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Sample records for hvof thermal spray

  1. A new HVOF thermal spray concept

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.A.; Matus, R.J.; Richter, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    HVOF plays an important role in the commercial production of thermal spray coatings from powder. Initially, both the chamber and duct modes were used. Today, the best coatings are produced by high-pressure chamber guns with some manufacturers having switched their designs from the duct to the chamber mode. There has been little or no spraying of wire with HVOF equipment. A new HVOF process -- the shock-stabilized mode -- compliments chamber powder spraying by offering the user a very simple device for wire use. Calculations show that the much higher jet velocities of the chamber mode make that design the better suited for use with powder. Conversely, the greatly increased jet temperatures offered by shock-stabilized combustion give extremely high wire melt-off rates.

  2. Nanocrystalline NiAl Coating Prepared by HVOF Thermal Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayati, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.; Tavoosi, M.; Movahedi, B.; Tahvilian, A.

    2011-03-01

    Nanocrystalline NiAl intermetallic powder was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) of Ni50Al50 powder mixture and then deposited on low carbon steel substrates by high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) thermal spray technique using two sets of spraying parameters. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transition electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and hardness test were used to characterize the prepared powders and coatings. The MA of Ni50Al50 powder mixture led to the formation of NiAl intermetallic compound. The resulting powder particles were three dimensional in nature with irregular morphology and a crystallite size of ~10 nm. This powder was thermally sprayed by HVOF technique to produce coating. The deposited coating had a nanocrystalline structure with low oxide and porosity contents. The hardness of coatings was in the range of 5.40-6.08 GPa, which is higher than that obtained for NiAl coating deposited using conventional powders.

  3. AE Monitoring and Analysis of HVOF Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, N. H.; Ahmed, R.; Reuben, R. L.; Allcock, B.

    2011-09-01

    This work presents an in situ monitoring of HVOF thermal spraying process through an acoustic emission (AE) technique in an industrial coating chamber. Single layer thermal spraying on substrate was carried out through slits. Continuous multilayer thermal spraying onto the sample without slit was also conducted. The AE was measured using a broadband piezoelectric AE sensor positioned on the back of the substrate. A mathematical model has been developed to determine the total kinetic energy of particles impacting the substrate through slits. Results of this work demonstrate that AE associated with particle impacts can be used for in situ monitoring of coating process. Results also show that the amplitude and AE energy is related to the spray gun transverse speed and the oxy-fuel pressure. The measured AE energy was found to vary with the number of particles impacting the substrate, determined using the mathematical model.

  4. HVOF thermal spraying: An alternative to hard chrome plating

    SciTech Connect

    Bolles, D.C.

    1995-10-01

    In recent years pressure to find alternatives to chromium electroplating has accelerated dramatically. While it is not likely that the process will be banned completely, the trend points to severe limitations. Industries must now look closely at their applications, and actively consider alternatives to hard chrome plaint. One of the most viable alternatives in thermal spraying. Recent advances in high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) technology offer an environmentally safer, cleaner and less-expensive alternative to chromium plating. It has been shown here that HVOF coatings can be used as chromium plating alternatives for many different applications. The HVOF process offers several advantages over chromium plaint including thicker coating capability, no part size restrictions and no hazardous waste products. A number of HVOF coatings have had excellent results in laboratory and field testing, and can be considered as effective replacements for hard chrome. The choice for a suitable replacement can only be made after careful assessment of the conditions associated with the application in question.

  5. Validation of HVOF Thermal Spray Coatings as a Replacement for Hard Chrome Plating on Hydraulic/Pneumatic Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Thermal Spray Coatings as a Replacement for Hard Chrome Plating on Hydraulic/Pneumatic Actuators December 2007 Report Documentation Page Form...00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Validation of HVOF Thermal Spray Coatings as a Replacement for Hard Chrome Plating on Hydraulic...Advantages and Limitations of HVOF Thermal Spraying as a Chrome Replacement

  6. Laser fusing of HVOF thermal sprayed alloy 625 on nickel-aluminum bronze

    SciTech Connect

    Brenna, R.T.; Pugh, J.L.; Denney, P.E.

    1994-12-31

    A preliminary study has been conducted to determine the feasibility of laser fusing alloy 625 onto nickel-aluminum-bronze base metal. Laser fusing was performed by melting a pre-coated surface of alloy 625 that had been applied by the high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The laser fusing was successful in producing a metallurigical bond between alloy 625 and the substrate. Minor modification to the heat-affected zone of the base metal was observed by microhardness measurements, and defect-free interfaces were produced between alloy 625 and nickel-aluminum-bronze by the process. The laser is a high energy density source that can be used for precise thermal processing of materials including surface modification. Laser fusing is the full or partial melting of a coating material that has been previously applied in some fashion to the substrate. Thermal spray coating of nickel-aluminum-bronze material with alloy 625 was conducted at the David Taylor Research Center. Nickel-aluminum-bronze specimens 2 x 3-in. by 1/2-in. thick were coated with alloy 25 utilizing the HVOF equipment. Coating thicknesses of approximately 0.014-in. (0.3 mm) were produced for subsequent laser fusing experiments. A preliminary study has been conducted to determine the feasibility of laser fusing a HVOF thermal sprayed alloy 625 coating onto nickel-aluminum-bronze base metal. Conclusions of this investigation were as follows: (1) Laser fusing was successful in producing a metallurgical bond between HVOF thermal sprayed alloy 625 and the nickel-aluminum-bronze. (2) Only minor microstructural modification to the heat-affected zone of the base metal ws observed by microhardness measurements. (3) Defect-free interfaces were produced between thermal sprayed alloy 625 and nickel-aluminum-bronze by laser fusing.

  7. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1995-09-01

    The gas dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder feed. The injection nozzle is assumed to be axisymmetric with premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. The aircap, a cronically converging nozzle, achieves choked flow conditions at the exit and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. Finite difference equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation are solved for the gas dynamics. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step and a 12-step quasi-global finite-rate chemistry model with dissociation of the gas and a total of nine species. Turbulent flow inside the aircap and in the free-jet decay is modeled using a two-equation k-{epsilon} model. An iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the gas dynamic equations inside and outside the torch . The CFD results are compared with recent experimental measurements of pressure inside the HVOF aircap. Comparisons are made for two flow rates of premixed fuel and oxygen and air cooling. This paper presents the first published comparisons of CFD predictions and experimental measurements for HVOF tbermal spraying.

  8. Quality optimization of thermally sprayed coatings produced by the JP-5000 (HVOF) gun using mathematical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawfik, Hazem

    1994-01-01

    Currently, thermal barrier coatings (TBC) of gas-turbine blades and similar applications have centered around the use of zirconia as a protective coating for high thermal applications. The advantages of zirconia include low thermal conductivity and good thermal shock resistance. Thermally sprayed tungsten carbide hardface coatings are used for a wide range of applications spanning both the aerospace and other industrial markets. Major aircraft engine manufacturers and repair facilities use hardface coatings for original engine manufacture (OEM), as well as in the overhaul of critical engine components. The principle function of these coatings is to resist severe wear environments for such wear mechanisms as abrasion, adhesion, fretting, and erosion. The (JP-5000) thermal spray gun is the most advanced in the High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) systems. Recently, it has received considerable attention because of its relative low cost and its production of quality coatings that challenge the very successful but yet very expensive Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) system. The quality of thermal spray coatings is enhanced as porosity, oxidation, residual stress, and surface roughness are reduced or minimized. Higher densification, interfacial bonding strength, hardness and wear resistance of coating are desirable features for quality improvement.

  9. Characterization and High-Temperature Erosion Behaviour of HVOF Thermal Spray Cermet Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Sidhu, Buta Singh

    2016-01-01

    High-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray, carbide-cermet-based coatings are usually employed in high-temperature erosive and erosive-corrosive environments. Extensive literature is available on high-temperature erosion performance of HVOF coatings under moderate to low particle flux and velocities for application in boiler tubes. This research work presents the characterization and high-temperature erosion behaviour of Cr3C2-25NiCr and WC-10Co-4Cr HVOF-sprayed coatings. Coatings were formulated on the substrate steel of type AISI 304, commonly used for the fabrication of pulverized coal burner nozzles (PCBN). Erosion testing was carried out in high-temperature air-jet erosion tester after simulating the conditions akin to that prevailing in PCBN in the boiler furnace. The coatings were tested for erosion behaviour at different angles and temperatures by freezing other test parameters. Brittle erosion behaviour was depicted in erosion testing, and the coatings couldn't restrain the erodent attacks to protect the substrate. High particle velocity and high particle flux were attributed to be the reasons of extensive erosive weight loss of the coatings. The surface morphology of the eroded specimens was analysed from back-scattered electron images to depict the probable mechanism of material removal. The coatings were characterized with optical microscopy, SEM-EDS analysis, XRD analysis, micro-hardness testing, porosity measurements, surface roughness testing and bond strength testing. The work was undertaken to investigate the performance of the selected coatings in highly erosive environment, so as to envisage their application in PCBNs for protection against material degradation. The coatings could only sustain in oblique impact erosion at room temperature and depleted fully under all other conditions.

  10. Thermal interaction between WC-Co coating and steel substrate in process of HVOF spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Guilemany, J.M.; Sobolev, V.V.; Nutting, J.; Dong, Z.; Calero, J.A. . Metalurgia Fisica-Ciencia de Materials)

    1994-10-01

    The WC-Co powders can be used to produce good adhesive and wear resistant HVOF thermal spray coatings on steel and light alloys substrates. In order to understand the properties of this kind of coating, the phases which are present in the coatings and structure changes during post heat treatments have been investigated. Although the coating properties depend very much on the structure developed in the substrate-coating interfacial region it has not been yet investigated in detail. The present study is devoted to the experimental and theoretical analysis of this interfacial region. The structure characterization has been performed mainly through the use of transmission electron microscopy. To provide a theoretical investigation a realistic prediction model of the process has been developed and on its base the mathematical simulation of the substrate-coating thermal interaction has been undertaken.

  11. Analysis of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch. Part 1, Numerical formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Talpallikar, M.

    1994-01-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder injection. The spray nozzle is axisymmetric with powder injection on the centerline, premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. Choked flow conditions occur at the exit of the aircap and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. The CFD simulation assumes three injection streams (solid metal particles with argon as a carrier gas, premixed oxygen/fuel, and air) inside the aircap and solves the combusting two-phase flow until the external spray stream decays to sonic conditions. The numerical formulation solves the mass, momentum, and energy transfer for both the gas and particle phase and strongly couples each phase. The combustion process is modeled using approximate equilibrium chemistry with dissociation of the gas with a total of nine species. Melting and re-solidification of the metal panicles is modeled as a lumped-mass system. Turbulent flow is modeled by a two equation k-{epsilon} turbulence model, including compressibility effects on turbulent dissipation. A time iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the partial differential equations. A companion paper [10] presents the results of the numerical simulation and gives a detailed discussion of the gas and panicle dynamics.

  12. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Helicopter Dynamic Components Using HVOF Thermal Spray Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    axis robot arm in a soundproof booth, programmed and operated remotely. Most depots already use this type of booth for their existing plasma spray...installation requires: • A soundproof booth. Booths are typically 15 ft square, with a separate operator control room, an observation window, and a high...equipment in place as well as the appropriate air permits to cover operation of the HVOF systems. The equipment is installed in soundproof booths, with

  13. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  14. Cracking and Spalling Behavior of HVOF Thermally Sprayed WC-Co-Cr Coating in Bend and Axial Fatigue Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, M.; Eybel, R.; Asselin, B.; Monerie-Moulin, F.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, WC-10Co-4Cr coating was sprayed by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) process on Almen strip and axial fatigue coupon. Three-point bend test was used to bend Almen strip coating specimens with tensile and compressive stress applied to the coating. Axial fatigue coating specimens were tested at a load stress of 1250 MPa and a stress ratio of R = -1. Process condition of Thermal spraying was found to have an effect on spalling performance of the coating in the fatigue test. The mechanism of cracking and spalling process in the coating was studied in bend and fatigue conditions. Based on deformation difference between the coating and the substrate, the factors, especially coating thickness, to impact the coating spalling behavior in axial fatigue test are discussed. HVOF-sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr coating matches the deformation of base substrate by cracking when tensile stress is applied in bend and fatigue tests because the coating has very limit deformation capability. In axial fatigue test of WC-10Co-4Cr coating specimen, the substrate works in a stress-to-strain manner; however the coating works in a strain-to-stress manner and is stressed due to the substrate deformation.

  15. Sliding Wear Properties of HVOF Thermally Sprayed Nylon-11 and Nylon-11/Ceramic Composites on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, L.; Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Cairncross, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Polymer and polymer/ceramic composite coatings were produced by ball-milling 60 μm Nylon-11 together with nominal 10 vol.% of nano and multiscale ceramic reinforcements and by HVOF spraying these composite feedstocks onto steel substrates to produce semicrystalline micron and nanoscale reinforced polymer matrix composites. Room temperature dry sliding wear performance of pure Nylon-11, Nylon-11 reinforced with 7 nm silica, and multiscale Nylon-11/silica composite coatings incorporating 7-40 nm and 10 μm ceramic particles were characterized using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Coefficient of friction and wear rate were determined as a function of applied load and coating composition. Surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize and analyze the coatings and wear scars. The pure Nylon-11 coating experienced less wear than the composites due to the occurrence of two additional wear mechanisms: abrasive and fatigue wear.

  16. Oxidation in HVOF-sprayed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.; Neiser, R.A.; Dykhuizen, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    It is widely held that most of the oxidation in thermally sprayed coatings occurs on the surface of the droplet after it has flattened. The evidence in this paper suggests that, for the conditions studied here, oxidation of the top surface of flattened droplets is not the dominant oxidation mechanism. In this study, a mild steel wire (AISI 1025) was sprayed using a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) torch onto copper and aluminum substrates. Ion milling and Auger spectroscopy were used to examine the distribution of oxides within individual splats. Conventional metallographic analysis was also used to study oxide distributions within coatings that were sprayed under the same conditions. An analytical model for oxidation of the exposed surface of a splat is presented. Based on literature data, the model assumes that diffusion of iron through a solid FeO layer is the rate limiting factor in forming the oxide on the top surface of a splat. An FeO layer only a few thousandths of a micron thick is predicted to form on the splat surface as it cools. However, the experimental evidence shows that the oxide layers are typically 100x thicker than the predicted value. These thick, oxide layers are not always observed on the top surface of a splat. Indeed, in some instances the oxide layer is on the bottom, and the metal is on the top. The observed oxide distributions are more consistently explained if most of the oxide formed before the droplets impact the substrate.

  17. HVOF-Sprayed Nylon-11 + Nanodiamond Composite Coatings: Production & Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stravato, A.; Knight, R.; Mochalin, V.; Picardi, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) combustion spraying has previously been shown to be a viable method for depositing polymer and polymer/ceramic composite coatings. The addition of hard particulate reinforcing phases to soft polymeric matrices should improve their durability and sliding wear performance. Nanosized diamond is an ideal reinforcing phase, owing to its high hardness, low coefficient of friction, and desirable thermal properties. Composite coatings comprising a Nylon-11 matrix reinforced with nanodiamonds have been successfully produced by HVOF. An important challenge is preserving the structure of the nanoparticles after thermal spray deposition and achieving their uniform dispersion within the polymeric matrix. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to confirm the presence and retention of nanodiamonds after HVOF deposition. Understanding of the role of process parameters, including the content of reinforcing phase in the matrix and powder preparation route is necessary. Nanoindentation studies demonstrated an improvement in creep behavior and recovery of the HVOF Nylon-11/nanodiamond composites subjected to deformation.

  18. Bond Strength of Multicomponent White Cast Iron Coatings Applied by HVOF Thermal Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranho, Ossimar; Rodrigues, Daniel; Boccalini, Mario; Sinatora, Amilton

    2009-12-01

    Multicomponent white cast iron is a new alloy that belongs to system Fe-C-Cr-W-Mo-V, and because of its excellent wear resistance it is used in the manufacture of hot rolling mills rolls. To date, this alloy has been processed by casting, powder metallurgy, and spray forming. The high-velocity oxyfuel process is now also considered for the manufacture of components with this alloy. The effects of substrate, preheating temperature, and coating thickness on bond strength of coatings have been determined. Substrates of AISI 1020 steel and of cast iron with preheating of 150 °C and at room temperature were used to apply coatings with 200 and 400 μm nominal thickness. The bond strength of coatings was measured with the pull-off test method and the failure mode by scanning electron microscopic analysis. Coatings with thickness of 200 μm and applied on substrates of AISI 1020 steel with preheating presented bond strength of 87 ± 4 MPa.

  19. Production of Babbitt Coatings by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, A. R. C.; Ettouil, F. B.; Moreau, C.; Savoie, S.; Schulz, R.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents HVOF as an alternative means to produce dense Babbitt coatings by thermal spray. A radial injection setup and low fuel flow rates were used to minimize heat transfer to the low melting point alloy. In-flight particle diagnostic systems were used to correlate spray parameters with the changes in particle velocity and thermal radiation intensity. The use of particles with larger diameters resulted in higher deposition efficiencies. It was shown that HVOF Babbitt coatings combine a dense structure and a fine distribution of intermetallic phases when compared to more traditional babbitting techniques.

  20. Production of Babbitt Coatings by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, A. R. C.; Ettouil, F. B.; Moreau, C.; Savoie, S.; Schulz, R.

    2017-08-01

    This work presents HVOF as an alternative means to produce dense Babbitt coatings by thermal spray. A radial injection setup and low fuel flow rates were used to minimize heat transfer to the low melting point alloy. In-flight particle diagnostic systems were used to correlate spray parameters with the changes in particle velocity and thermal radiation intensity. The use of particles with larger diameters resulted in higher deposition efficiencies. It was shown that HVOF Babbitt coatings combine a dense structure and a fine distribution of intermetallic phases when compared to more traditional babbitting techniques.

  1. Influence of cryomilling on the microstructural features in HVOF-sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats for thermal barrier coatings: Creation of a homogeneous distribution of nanoscale dispersoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kaka; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2010-10-01

    Previous research has revealed that thermal barrier coatings with cryomilled bond coats exhibit improved thermal cycling lifetime by growing a continuous and uniform oxide layer at a slower rate; yet the mechanism controlling the ultimate failure remains unclear. In an effort to provide a foundation for understanding the improved behavior, the influence of cryomilling on the microstructure of the NiCrAlY bond coat material is investigated in this article. Rather than focusing on the alumina scale formation, the microstructural features and their evolution within the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats themselves, prepared from conventional powder and cryomilled powder, were carefully compared through extensive scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy characterization. In addition, the as-cryomilled NiCrAlY powder is characterized to provide evidence of the direct influence of cryomilling and to exclude the impact from the HVOF spraying. It is found that the essential change in microstructural features resulting from the cryomilling is the creation of a homogeneous distribution of ultrafine (nanoscale) Al-rich oxide/nitride dispersoids, which remain thermally stable even after exposure at 1100°C for 100 h. The TEM study on the as-cryomilled powder, prior to the HVOF spraying, indicates that some Al and Y-rich oxides are already present within the material as a direct result of the cryomilling process.

  2. Mechanical Properties and Thermal Shock Resistance of HVOF Sprayed NiCrAlY Coatings Without and With Nano Ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Shufen; Wang, You; Pan, Zhaoyi; Wang, Liang

    2012-09-01

    NiCrAlY coatings without and with 0.2 wt.% nano ceria were prepared by high velocity oxygen fuel spraying. The microstructure, mechanical properties, and thermal shock resistance of as-sprayed coatings were investigated. The results showed that in the as-sprayed coatings, the number of un-melted particles was reduced drastically, the microstructure was refined and compact due to the refinement of sprayable powders. Both the hardness and adhesive strength of the NiCrAlY increased due to the refinement of microstructure and the decrease of the defects, such as pores and oxides, after adding nano ceria. The thermal cycle life of NiCrAlY coatings was improved by 15% after adding 0.2 wt.% nano ceria, which is attributed to the low content of spinel NiCr2O4 and high content of Cr2O3 in the thermal cycling, the refined and compact microstructure, and increased interfacial boundary.

  3. Computational analysis of a three-dimensional High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    An analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional CFD results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire torch, but wire feed is not simulated. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first published 3-D results of a thermal spray device. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Argon is injected through the center of the nozzle. Pre-mixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled assuming instantaneous chemistry. A standard, two-equation, K-{var_epsilon} turbulence model is employed for the turbulent flow field. An implicit, iterative, finite volume numerical technique is used to solve the coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the gas in a sequential manner. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and discussed.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  5. Duplex coating of electroless nickel and HVOF (high-velocity oxygen fuel) sprayed WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, P.; Korpiola, K.; Mahiout, A.

    2000-06-01

    The porosity of thermal sprayed coatings is usually a problem when coatings are used in wet corrosion application. The porosity allows media to penetrate to the surface of the base material. Corrosion spreads rapidly and the coating loses contact with the substrate and delaminates. This problem can be initiated by impregnating different polymers into the pores. An alternative approach has been tested in the present work to prevent corrosion of cemented carbide coated carbon steel in wet corrosion environments. Carbon steel substrates were coated with a thin film of electroless nickel (electroless nickel plating) and then HVOF (High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel) sprayed with cemented carbide. Reference specimens without electroless nickel were sprayed at the same time. The microhardness of the specimens was measured and the coating structure examined using optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The bond between the layers and the base material was examined by means of a bend test. A salt chamber test was also performed for the specimens. The structure of the electroless nickel layer was crystalline as a result of the HVOF spraying. There were no cracks in the nickel layer, if the layer was about 20 µm thick. According to the results of the bend test, the adhesion between coatings and substrate was good, and there was no difference between the duplex-coated specimen and the reference specimen. A sample with a thin nickel layer under an HVOF sprayed cemented carbide did not exhibit corrosion after 8 h in the salt chamber test.

  6. HVOF Thermal Spray TiC/TiB2 Coatings for AUSC Boiler/Turbine Components for Enhanced Corrosion Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Kanchan; Koc, Rasit; Fan, Chinbay

    2016-12-07

    The high temperatures of operations still pose significant risk of degradation and fatigue from oxidizing, corroding and eroding environment. In addition to unused O2, water from combustion and SOx from the coal sulfur oxidation that result in highly corrosive environment, acid gases such as HCl and other sulfur compounds may also be present. These adverse effects are further accelerated due to the elevated temperatures. In addition, ash particulates and unburnt carbon and pyritic sulfur can cause erosion of the surface and thus loss of material. Unburnt carbon and pyritic sulfur may also cause localized reduction sites. Thus, fireside corrosion protection and steam oxidation protection alternatives to currently used Ni-Cr overlays need to be identified and evaluated. Titanium carbide (TiC) is a suitable alternative on account of the material features such as the high hardness, the high melting point, the high strength and the low density for the substitution or to be used in conjunction with NiCr for enhancing the fireside corrosion and erosion of the materials. Another alternative is the use of titanium boride as a coating for chemical stability required for long-term service and high erosion resistance over the state-of-the-art, high fracture toughness (K1C ~12 MPam1/2) and excellent corrosion resistance (kp~1.9X10-11 g2/cm4/s at 800°C in air). The overarching aim of the research endeavor was to synthesize oxidation, corrosion and wear resistant TiC and TiB2 coating powders, apply thermal spray coating on existing boiler materials and characterize the coated substrates for corrosion resistance for applications at high temperatures (500 -750 °C) and high pressures (~350 bars) using the HVOF process and to demonstrate the feasibility of these coating to be used in AUSC boilers and turbines.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Suspension HVOF Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, M.; Moghtadernejad, S.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme is used to simulate suspension high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying process. The mass, momentum, energy, and species equations are solved together with the realizable k-ɛ turbulence model to simulate the gas phase. Suspension is assumed to be a mixture of solid particles [mullite powder (3Al2O3·2SiO2)], ethanol, and ethylene glycol. The process involves premixed combustion of oxygen-propylene, and non-premixed combustion of oxygen-ethanol and oxygen-ethylene glycol. One-step global reaction is used for each mentioned reaction together with eddy dissipation model to compute the reaction rate. To simulate the droplet breakup, Taylor Analogy Breakup model is applied. After the completion of droplet breakup, and solvent evaporation/combustion, the solid suspended particles are tracked through the domain to determine the characteristics of the coating particles. Numerical simulations are validated against the experimental results in the literature for the same operating conditions. Seven or possibly eight shock diamonds are captured outside the nozzle. In addition, a good agreement between the predicted particle temperature, velocity, and diameter, and the experiment is obtained. It is shown that as the standoff distance increases, the particle temperature and velocity reduce. Furthermore, a correlation is proposed to determine the spray cross-sectional diameter and estimate the particle trajectories as a function of standoff distance.

  8. Optimization of the laser remelting process for HVOF-sprayed Stellite 6 wear resistant coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciubotariu, Costel-Relu; Frunzăverde, Doina; Mărginean, Gabriela; Șerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bîrdeanu, Aurel-Valentin

    2016-03-01

    Cobalt base alloys are used in all industrial areas due to their excellent wear resistance. Several studies have shown that Stellite 6 coatings are suitable not only for protection against sliding wear, but also in case of exposure to impact loading. In this respect, a possible application is the protection of hydropower plant components affected by cavitation. The main problem in connection with Stellite 6 is the deposition procedure of the protective layers, both welding and thermal spraying techniques requesting special measures in order to prevent the brittleness of the coating. In this study, Stellite 6 layers were HVOF thermally sprayed on a martensitic 13-4 stainless steel substrate, as usually used for hydraulic machinery components. In order to improve the microstructure of the HVOF-sprayed coatings and their adhesion to the substrate, laser remelting was applied, using a TRUMPF Laser type HL 124P LCU and different working parameters. The microstructure of the coatings, obtained for various remelting conditions, was evaluated by light microscopy, showing the optimal value of the pulse power, which provided a homogenous Stellite 6 layer with good adhesion to the substrate.

  9. Development of HVOF Sprayed Erosion/Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Composite Structural Components in Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, R.; Ivosevic, M.; Twardowski, T. E.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Sutter, James K.; Kim, D. Y.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are being studied and developed as methods of enabling lightweight composites to be used more extensively as structural components in propulsion applications in order to reduce costs and improve efficiency through weight reductions. The primary goal of this work is the development of functionally graded material [FGM] polymer/metal matrix composite coatings to provide improved erosion/oxidation resistance to polyimide-based polymer matrix composite [PMC] substrates. The goal is to grade the coating composition from pure polyimide, similar to the PMC substrate matrix on one side, to 100 % WC-Co on the other. Both step-wise and continuous gradation of the loading of the WC-Co reinforcing phase are being investigated. Details of the coating parameter development will be presented, specifically the high velocity oxy-fuel [HVOF] combustion spraying of pure PMR-11 matrix material and layers of various composition PMR-II/WC-Co blends onto steel and PMR-15 composite substrates. Results of the HVOF process optimization, microstructural characterization, and analysis will be presented. The sprayed coatings were evaluated using standard metallographic techniques - optical and scanning electron microscopy [SEM]. An SEM + electron dispersive spectroscopy [EDS] technique has also been used to confirm retention of the PMR-II component. Results of peel/butt adhesion testing to determine adhesion will also be presented.

  10. Development of HVOF Sprayed Erosion/Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Composite Structural Components in Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Twardowski, T.; Kalidindi, S.; Knight, R.; Sutter, J.; Kim, D. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are being studied and developed as methods of enabling lightweight composites to be used more extensively as structural components in propulsion applications in order to reduce costs and improve efficiency through weight reductions. The primary goal of this work is the development of functionally graded material [FGM] polymer/metal matrix composite coatings to provide improved erosion/oxidation resistance to polyimide-based polymer matrix composite [PMC] substrates. The goal is to grade the coating composition from pure polyimide, similar to the PMC substrate matrix on one side, to 100% WC-Co on the other. Both step-wise and continuous gradation of the loading of the WC-Co reinforcing phase are being investigated, Details of the coating parameter development will be presented, specifically the high velocity oxy-fuel [HVOF] combustion spraying of pure PMR-I1 matrix material and layers of various composition PMR-II/WC-Co blends onto steel and PMR-15 composite substrates. Results of the HVOF process optimization, microstructural characterization, and analysis will be presented. The sprayed coatings were evaluated using standard metallographic techniques - optical and scanning electron microscopy [SEMI. An SEM + electron dispersive spectroscopy [EDS] technique has also been used to confirm retention of the PMR-I1 component. Results of peel/butt adhesion testing to determine adhesion will also be presented.

  11. Bactericidal Effects of HVOF-Sprayed Nanostructured TiO2 on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, B.; Peppler, M.; Lima, R. S.; McDonald, A.

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been shown to exhibit photocatalytic bactericidal activity. This preliminary study focused on examining the photocatalytic activity of high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed nanostructured TiO2 coatings to kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The surfaces of the nanostructured TiO2 coatings were lightly polished before addition of the bacterial solution. Plates of P. aeruginosa were grown, and then suspended in a phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution. The concentration of bacteria used was determined by a photo-spectrometer, which measured the amount of light absorbed by the bacteria-filled solution. This solution was diluted and pipetted onto the coating, which was exposed to white light in 30-min intervals, up to 120 min. It was found that on polished HVOF-sprayed coatings exposed to white light, 24% of the bacteria were killed after exposure for 120 min. On stainless steel controls, approximately 6% of the bacteria were not recovered. These preliminary results show that thermal-sprayed nanostructured TiO2 coatings exhibited photocatalytic bactericidal activity with P. aeruginosa.

  12. Thermal spray processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, H.; Berndt, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal spray processing has been used for a number of years to cost-effecticely apply TBC's for a wide range of heat engine applications. In particular, bond coats are applied by plasma spray and HVOF techniques and partially-stabilized zirconia top coats are applied by plasma spray methods. Thermal spray involves melting and rapid transport of the molten particles to the substrate, where high-rate solidification and coating build-up occur. It is the very nature of this melt processing that leads to the unique layered microstructure, as well as the apparent imperfections, so readily identified with thermal spray. Modeling the process, process-induced residual stresses, and thermal conductivity will be discussed in light of a new understanding of porosity and its anisotropy. Microcracking can be understood using new approaches, allowing a fuller view of the processing-performance connection. Detailed electron microscopic, novel neutron diffraction and fracture analysis of the deposits can lead to a better understanding of how overall microstructure can be controlled to influence critical properties of the deposited TBC system.

  13. Role of Oxides and Porosity on High-Temperature Oxidation of Liquid-Fueled HVOF Thermal-Sprayed Ni50Cr Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Bai, M.; Voisey, K. T.; Hussain, T.

    2017-02-01

    High chromium content in Ni50Cr thermally sprayed coatings can generate a dense and protective scale at the surface of coating. Thus, the Ni50Cr coating is widely used in high-temperature oxidation and corrosion applications. A commercially available gas atomized Ni50Cr powder was sprayed onto a power plant steel (ASME P92) using a liquid-fueled high velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray with three processing parameters in this study. Microstructure of as-sprayed coatings was examined using oxygen content analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Short-term air oxidation tests (4 h) of freestanding coatings (without boiler steel substrate) in a thermogravimetric analyzer at 700 °C were performed to obtain the kinetics of oxidation of the as-sprayed coating. Long-term air oxidation tests (100 h) of the coated substrates were performed at same temperature to obtain the oxidation products for further characterization in detail using SEM/EDX and XRD. In all samples, oxides of various morphologies developed on top of the Ni50Cr coatings. Cr2O3 was the main oxidation product on the surface of all three coatings. The coating with medium porosity and medium oxygen content has the best high-temperature oxidation performance in this study.

  14. Comparative High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Ni-20Cr Coatings on T22 Boiler Steel Produced by HVOF, D-Gun, and Cold Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Gagandeep; Bala, Niraj; Kaur, Narinder; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    To protect materials from surface degradations such as wear, corrosion, and thermal flux, a wide variety of materials can be deposited on the materials by several spraying processes. This paper examines and compares the microstructure and high-temperature corrosion of Ni-20Cr coatings deposited on T22 boiler steel by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF), detonation gun spray, and cold spraying techniques. The coatings' microstructural features were characterized by means of XRD and FE-SEM/EDS analyses. Based upon the results of mass gain, XRD, and FE-SEM/EDS analyses it may be concluded that the Ni-20Cr coating sprayed by all the three techniques was effective in reducing the corrosion rate of the steel. Among the three coatings, D-gun spray coating proved to be better than HVOF-spray and cold-spray coatings.

  15. The functional TiO2-biodegradable plastic composite material produced by HVOF spraying process.

    PubMed

    Bang, Hee-Seon; Bang, Han-Sur; Lee, Yoon-Ki

    2007-11-01

    Photocatalytic TiO2 coatings on bio-degradable plastic(polybutylene succinate: PBS) were prepared by HVOF spraying using three kinds of agglomerated powders (P200: 200 nm, P30: 30 nm, P7: 7 nm). The microstructures of the coatings were characterized with SEM and XRD analysis, and the photocatalytic efficiency of the coatings was evaluated by photo degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde. For both the HVOF sprayed P200 and P30 coatings, high anatase ratio of 100% was achieved, regardless of the fuel gas pressure. On the other hand, for the HVOF sprayed P7 coating, the anatase ratio decreased from 100% to 49.1% with increasing fuel gas pressure. This decrease may be attributed to the much higher susceptibility to heat of the 7 nm agglomerated powders than the 30 nm and 200 nm agglomerated powders. In terms of the photocatalytic efficiency, HVOF sprayed P200 and P30 coatings seemed to outperform the P7 coatings because of their higher anatase ratios. However, the HVOF sprayed P7 coatings did not show photocatalytic activity possibly because of the extremely small reaction surface area to the photo-catalytic activity and low anatase ratio. Therefore, the present study found that functional PBS plastic with photocatalytic performance could be produced by spraying of ceramics such as TiO2.

  16. Microstructure and Properties of HVOF-Sprayed Ni-50Cr Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Joel A. Simpson; Terry C. Totemeier; Richard N. Wright

    2006-06-01

    Thermal spray coatings represent a potential cost-effective means of protecting structural components in advanced fossil energy systems. Previous work at the INL has focused on relationships between thermal spray processing conditions, structure, and properties in alumina- and silica-forming coatings, namely Fe3Al, FeAl, and Mo-Si-B alloys. This paper describes the preparation and characterization of chromia-forming Ni-50%Cr coatings, an alloy similar to the INCOCLAD 671 cladding, which has shown excellent performance in the Niles Plant service tests. The structure and properties of Ni-50Cr coatings are similar to other HVOF-sprayed metallic coatings: a typical lamellar microstructure is observed with essentially no porosity and little oxide. The microhardness and compressive residual stress both increase with increased spray particle velocity. Corrosion tests were performed on a variety of free-standing coatings (removed from the substrate, wrought Fe3Al alloy, and Grade 91 steel in a simulated coal combustion gas (N2-10%CO-5%CO2-2%H2O-0.12%H2S) and gas-slag environments (same gas, with iron sulfide powder in contact with the coating surface). The coatings tested included Fe3Al, FeAl, and Ni-50Cr alloys sprayed at different velocities. In these tests the iron aluminides in wrought and coating form showed the best performance, with Ni-50Cr coatings slightly worse; the Grade 91 steel was severely attacked.

  17. Self-sharpening-effect of nickel-diamond coatings sprayed by HVOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Brinkhoff, A.; Schaak, C.; Zajaczkowski, J.

    2017-03-01

    The durability of stone working and drilling tools is an increasingly significant requirement in industrial applications. These tools are mainly produced by brazing diamond metal matrix composites inserts to the tool body. These inserts are produced by sintering diamonds and metal powder (e.g. nickel). If the wear is too high, the diamonds will break out of the metal matrix and other diamonds will be uncovered. This effect is called self-sharpening. But diamonds are difficult to handle because of their thermal sensitivity. Due to their high thermal influence, manufacturing costs, and complicate route of manufacturing (first sintering, then brazing), there is a great need for alternative production methods for such tools. One alternative to produce wear-resistant and self-sharpening coatings are thermal spray processes as examined in this paper. An advantage of thermal spray processes is their smaller thermal influence on the diamond, due to the short dwelling time in the flame. To reduce the thermal influence during spraying, nickel coated diamonds were used in the HVOF-process (high velocity oxygen fuel process). The wear resistance was subsequently investigated by means of a standardized ball-on-disc test. Furthermore, a SEM (scanning electron microscope) was used to gain information about the wear-mechanism and the self-sharpening effect of the coating.

  18. Effect of particle state on the adhesive strength of HVOF sprayed metallic coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Wang, Yu-Yue

    2002-12-01

    NiCrBSi and Ni-50Cr coatings were deposited using the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process under different spray parameters with two powders of different sizes to clarify the influence of the melting state of spray particles on the adhesive strength of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coating was estimated according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C633-79. The melting state of the spray droplet was examined from the coating microstructure. It was found that the melting state of spray particles had a significant effect on the adhesive strength of HVOF sprayed Ni-based coatings. The significant melting of the spray particle did not contribute to the increase in the adhesion of HVOF metallic coatings. On the other hand, the deposition of a partially melted large particle contributed to the substantial improvement of adhesive strength of the HVOF coating. The subsequent coating presented a dense microstructure and yielded an adhesive strength of more than 76 MPa, which was double that of the coating deposited with completely molten particles. It can be suggested that the good melting of the spray particle is mainly related to the mechanical interlocking effect, which reaches the limited and approximately defined adhesive strength up to 40 50 MPa.

  19. The Instrumented Indentation Study of HVOF-Sprayed Hardmetal Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdková, Šárka; Bláhová, Olga; Zahálka, František; Kašparová, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic properties, namely, hardness and Young's modulus, of four HVOF-sprayed hardmetal coatings were measured by instrumented indentation using Oliver-Pharr method Nanoindenter XP MTS with a continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) module. The results show that with sufficient number of CSM measurements, one can distinguish between indents made in the hard particles and indents made in the binder material. This can be accomplished by analyzing the plots of hardness and Young's modulus versus load (or versus indentation depth). Further development of the dependence curves enables the load (or indentation depth) to be set to correspond to the point of transition from a single structure component to the composite material and to determine the properties of both. Comparison of results of CSM measurement with the results of single indentation measurement at a defined load reveals a new perspective on the origin of the indentation size effect in hardmetal coatings. The measurements show that the increase in both the hardness and Young's modulus with decreasing load is caused mainly by the predominant influence of hard particles in the coatings.

  20. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOEpatents

    Byrnes, Larry Edward; Kramer, Martin Stephen; Neiser, Richard A.

    2003-08-26

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  1. Relationships between spray parameters, microstructures and ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of HVOF sprayed Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lei; Wu, Yuping; Hong, Sheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Yugui

    2017-11-01

    Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings were prepared on the AISI 321 steel substrate by the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying technology. The effect of selected parameters (oxygen flow, kerosene flow and spray distance) on the cavitation erosion resistance (denoted as Rc) of the coating were investigated by using the Taguchi method. Statistical tools such as design of experiments (DOE), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to meet the expected objective. It was concluded that the kerosene flow had greater influence on the Rc of the coating and followed by the spray distance and the oxygen flow, respectively. The optimum spray parameters (OSP) were 963L/min for the oxygen flow, 28L/h for the kerosene flow, and 330mm for the spray distance. The Rc of the coating increased with the increase of hardness or the decrease of porosity, and the hardness had a greater influence on Rc than the porosity. The Fe-based coating deposited under the OSP exhibited the best cavitation erosion resistance in distilled water. The cracks initiated at the edge of the pores and the interfaces between the un-melted or half-melted particles, and finally leaded to the delamination of the coating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fireside Corrosion Behavior of HVOF and Plasma-Sprayed Coatings in Advanced Coal/Biomass Co-Fired Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Dudziak, T.; Simms, N. J.; Nicholls, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a systematic evaluation of coatings for advanced fossil fuel plants and addresses fireside corrosion in coal/biomass-derived flue gases. A selection of four candidate coatings: alloy 625, NiCr, FeCrAl and NiCrAlY were deposited onto superheaters/reheaters alloy (T91) using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma spraying. A series of laboratory-based fireside corrosion exposures were carried out on these coated samples in furnaces under controlled atmosphere for 1000 h at 650 °C. The tests were carried out using the "deposit-recoat" test method to simulate the environment that was anticipated from air-firing 20 wt.% cereal co-product mixed with a UK coal. The exposures were carried out using a deposit containing Na2SO4, K2SO4, and Fe2O3 to produce alkali-iron tri-sulfates, which had been identified as the principal cause of fireside corrosion on superheaters/reheaters in pulverized coal-fired power plants. The exposed samples were examined in an ESEM with EDX analysis to characterize the damage. Pre- and post-exposure dimensional metrologies were used to quantify the metal damage in terms of metal loss distributions. The thermally sprayed coatings suffered significant corrosion attack from a combination of aggressive combustion gases and deposit mixtures. In this study, all the four plasma-sprayed coatings studied performed better than the HVOF-sprayed coatings because of a lower level of porosity. NiCr was found to be the best performing coating material with a median metal loss of ~87 μm (HVOF sprayed) and ~13 μm (plasma sprayed). In general, the median metal damage for coatings had the following ranking (in the descending order: most to the least damage): NiCrAlY > alloy 625 > FeCrAl > NiCr.

  3. Effect of Plasma Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing on HVOF-Sprayed Stainless Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gayoung; Bae, Gyuyeol; Moon, Kyungil; Lee, Changhee

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the effects of plasma nitriding (PN) and nitrocarburizing on HVOF-sprayed stainless steel nitride layers were investigated. 316 (austenitic), 17-4PH (precipitation hardening), and 410 (martensitic) stainless steels were plasma-nitrided and nitrocarburized using a N2 + H2 gas mixture and the gas mixture containing C2H2, respectively, at 550 °C. The results showed that the PN and nitrocarburizing produced a relatively thick nitrided layer consisting of a compound layer and an adjacent nitrogen diffusion layer depending on the crystal structures of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings. Also, the diffusion depth of nitrogen increased when a small amount of C2H2 (plasma nitrocarburizing process) was added. The PN and nitrocarburizing resulted in not only an increase of the surface hardness, but also improvement of the load bearing capacity of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings because of the formation of CrN, Fe3N, and Fe4N phases. Also, the plasma-nitrocarburized HVOF-sprayed 410 stainless steel had a superior surface microhardness and load bearing capacity due to the formation of Cr23C6 on the surface.

  4. Design Optimization of Liquid Fueled High Velocity Oxy- Fuel Thermal Spraying Technique for Durable Coating for Fossil Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Ahsan; Love, Norman

    2016-11-04

    High-velocity oxy–fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying was developed in 1930 and has been commercially available for twenty-five years. HVOF thermal spraying has several benefits over the more conventional plasma spray technique including a faster deposition rate which leads to quicker turn-around, with more durable coatings and higher bond strength, hardness and wear resistance due to a homogeneous distribution of the sprayed particles. HVOF thermal spraying is frequently used in engineering to deposit cermets, metallic alloys, composites and polymers, to enhance product life and performance. HVOF thermal spraying system is a highly promising technique for applying durable coatings on structural materials for corrosive and high temperature environments in advanced ultra-supercritical coal- fired (AUSC) boilers, steam turbines and gas turbines. HVOF thermal spraying is the preferred method for producing coatings with low porosity and high adhesion. HVOF thermal spray process has been shown to be one of the most efficient techniques to deposit high performance coatings at moderate cost. Variables affecting the deposit formation and coating properties include hardware characteristics such as nozzle geometry and spraying distance and process parameters such as equivalence ratio, gas flow density, and powder feedstock. In the spray process, the powder particles experience very high speeds combined with fast heating to the powder material melting point or above. This high temperature causes evaporation of the powder, dissolution, and phase transformations. Due to the complex nature of the HVOF technique, the control and optimization of the process is difficult. In general, good coating quality with suitable properties and required performance for specific applications is the goal in producing thermal spray coatings. In order to reach this goal, a deeper understanding of the spray process as a whole is needed. Although many researchers studied commercial HVOF thermal spray

  5. Influence of HVOF sprayed WC/Co coatings on the high-cycle fatigue strength of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, H.D.; Wilden, J.; Nassenstein, K.; Moebus, S.

    1995-12-31

    HVOF thermally sprayed WC/Co coatings are applied onto components which are exposed to wear caused by abrasion, erosion, fretting and sliding. Beside wear attacks and static stresses in lots of cases alternating mechanical stresses caused by dynamic loads occur additionally. Therefore, the fatigue resistance of WC/Co 88/12 and WC/Co 83/17 coated specimens was investigated by high-cycle fatigue tests (HCF). The results of the fatigue tests were documented in statistically ascertained Woehler-diagrams (S-N-curves). Furthermore, the mechanisms of failure are discussed.

  6. The characteristics of alumina scales formed on HVOF-sprayed MCrAlY coatings[High Velocity Oxygen Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, D.; Brandl, W.; Koester, U.

    2000-02-01

    HVOF MCrAlY (M = Ni, Co) coatings were isothermally oxidized in synthetic air between 850 and 1050 C for times up to 167 hr. During thermal spraying, aluminum and yttrium oxidized to form a fine oxide dispersion. The HVOF MCrAlY coatings exhibited a microstructure similar to ODS alloys. The fine dispersion consisted of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and aluminum-yttrium oxides. The oxidation experiments showed that the oxidation rate of HVOF coatings was two times slower than the oxidation rate of VPS MCrAlY coatings. The oxidation mechanism changed mainly in the transient-stage (no metastable modification of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed) and it was assumed that the oxide dispersion hindered diffusion of various elements from the bulk material during oxidation. The formation of the fine oxide dispersion also influenced the adherence of the oxide scale. The microstructures of the transient oxide scales were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  7. Combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of HVOF spray coated SS 410 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarendra, H. J.; Prathap, M. S.; Karthik, S.; Abhishek, A. M.; Madhu surya, K. C.; Gujjar gowda, S.; Anilkumar, T.

    2016-09-01

    The hydro turbine materials surface is degraded due to the slurry erosion and cavitation. The solid particles carried by water impacting the material results in slurry erosion. The damage occurred due to slurry erosion is the concern, when considered individually. The erosion damage is observed to be severe when slurry erosion and cavitation are combined. The hydro turbine material, martensitic stainless (SS 410) is surface modified with 80Ni-Cr by High Velocity Oxy Fuel spray process. The coated material subjected to post thermal treatment at a temperature of 950 ° C, soaked at 1 h, 2 h and 3 h are subjected to combined slurry and cavitation erosion test. The cavitation is created by using Cavitation Inducers. The tests are conducted by using silica sand as the erodent with three different sizes of 150, 200 and 300 μm. The results are compared with the as-received specimen. The results confirmed the effect of heat treatment on the end results, as the coated thermal treated specimens showed better erosion resistance against the as-received specimen. The eroded specimens are characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope. The thermal treated HVOF coated specimens shown the better erosion resistance.

  8. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of HVOF-sprayed Coatings for Use in Thixoextrusion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Picas, J. A.; Punset, M.; Menargues, S.; Campillo, M.; Baile, M. T.; Forn, A.

    2011-05-04

    The dies used for the thixoextrusion of steels have to be capable of withstanding complex thermal and mechanical loads, while giving a sufficient wear resistance against abrasion and adhesion at very high temperatures. In order to improve the wear resistance and reduce the heating of the extrusion die it can be protected with a hard cermet coating. The purpose of this work is to study the high-temperature performance of CrC-CoNiCrAlY coating and explore the potential application of this coating to improve dies used in thixoextrusion processes. A two-layer 75CrC-25CoNiCrAlY coating with a CoNiCrAlY bond-coating was fabricated by the HVOF thermal spray process on a steel substrate. Coatings were heat-treated at a range of temperatures between 900 deg. C and 1100 deg. C. The microstructural characterization of the coatings before and after heat treatment was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The mechanical properties of coatings were determined as a function of the temperature of heat treatment. The bond coat effect on the thermal shock resistance of CrC-CoNiCrAlY coating was analyzed.

  9. Influence of Bond Coat on HVOF-Sprayed Gradient Cermet Coating on Copper Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Peng; Cai, Fei; Chen, Wanglin; Wang, Shuoyu; Ni, Zhenhang; Hu, Xiaohong; Li, Mingxi; Zhu, Guanghong; Zhang, Shihong

    2017-06-01

    Coatings are required on mold copper plates to prolong their service life through enhanced hardness, wear resistance, and oxidation resistance. In the present study, NiCr-30 wt.%Cr3C2 ceramic-metallic (cermet) layers were deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying on different designed bond layers, including electroplated Ni, HVOF-sprayed NiCr, and double-decker Ni-NiCr. Annealing was also conducted on the gradient coating (GC) with NiCr bond layer to improve the wear resistance and adhesion strength. Coating microstructure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. Mechanical properties including microhardness, wear resistance, and adhesion strength of the different coatings were evaluated systematically. The results show that the types of metallic bond layer and annealing process had a significant impact on the mechanical properties of the GCs. The GCs with electroplated Ni bond layer exhibited the highest adhesion strength (about 70 MPa). However, the GC with HVOF-sprayed NiCr bond layer exhibited better wear resistance. The wear resistance and adhesion strength of the coating with NiCr metallic bond layer were enhanced after annealing.

  10. Physicochemical Characteristics of Dust Particles in HVOF Spraying and Occupational Hazards: Case Study in a Chinese Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haihong; Li, Haijun; Li, Xinyu

    2016-06-01

    Dust particles generated in thermal spray process can cause serious health problems to the workers. Dust particles generated in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying WC-Co coatings were characterized in terms of mass concentrations, particle size distribution, micro morphologies, and composition. Results show that the highest instantaneous exposure concentration of dust particles in the investigated thermal spray workshop is 140 mg/m3 and the time-weighted average concentration is 34.2 mg/m3, which are approximately 8 and 4 times higher than the occupational exposure limits in China, respectively. The large dust particles above 10 μm in size present a unique morphology of polygonal or irregular block of crushed powder, and smaller dust particles mainly exist in the form of irregular or flocculent agglomerates. Some heavy metals, such as chromium, cobalt, and nickel, are also found in the air of the workshop and their concentrations are higher than the limits. Potential occupational hazards of the dust particles in the thermal spray process are further analyzed based on their characteristics and the workers' exposure to the nanoparticles is assessed using a control banding tool.

  11. A Study on Wear Resistance of HVOF-Sprayed Ni-MoS2 Self-Lubricating Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. L.; Jeng, M. C.; Hwang, J. R.; Chang, C. H.

    2015-02-01

    Composite coating techniques are becoming increasingly popular owing to their peculiar performances. In this study, the wear resistance of thermally sprayed Ni-MoS2 composite coatings on an AISI 1020 steel substrate was investigated. Ni-MoS2 composite powder (size: 60-90 μm) containing 25 wt.% of dispersed MoS2 was prepared by electroless plating. Ni-MoS2 composite coatings were then prepared by HVOF thermal spraying. The coatings were characterized by structural, surface morphological, and compositional analyses by means of microhardness tests, SEM/EDS, XRD, and ICP-AES. For the evaluation of their anti-wear properties, the composites were subjected to ball-on-disk dry wear tests based on the ASTM G99 standard at room temperature. Experimental results showed that some of the MoS2 content dispersed in the Ni-based composite coating burnt away during the high-temperature spraying process, thereby reducing the MoS2 concentration in the coating. In the wear test, the weight loss in the Ni-MoS2 composite coating was minimal under a low load (<15 N) but increased rapidly with increasing load (>30 N). The average wear rate of the coatings was found to be ~1/40 times that of a Ni coating, showing that the wear resistance of the composite coatings was significantly improved by MoS2 addition.

  12. PComPtm: Nano-Composite Thermal Spray Alternative to Cd and Cr

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Acknowledgments EPA Phase I SBIR CONTRACT # EP-D-06-053 Metastructured Cermets for Hard Chrome Replacement...resistance, low friction Ductile binder provides ductility and toughness Working on HVOF, laser cladding , cold spray, and spray and fuse powder designs...nanocomposite core binder coating Thermal spray Microcomposite coating features Micro-Composite Coatings Chrome Plate WC-Co-Cr thermal spray

  13. Investigations on the Behavior of HVOF and Cold Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on T22 Boiler Steel in Actual Boiler Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Niraj; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya; Karthikeyan, J.

    2012-01-01

    High temperature corrosion accompanied by erosion is a severe problem, which may result in premature failure of the boiler tubes. One countermeasure to overcome this problem is the use of thermal spray protective coatings. In the current investigation high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and cold spray processes have been used to deposit commercial Ni-20Cr powder on T22 boiler steel. To evaluate the performance of the coatings in actual conditions the bare as well as the coated steels were subjected to cyclic exposures, in the superheater zone of a coal fired boiler for 15 cycles. The weight change and thickness loss data were used to establish kinetics of the erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction, surface and cross-sectional field emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS) and x-ray mapping techniques were used to analyse the as-sprayed and corroded specimens. The HVOF sprayed coating performed better than its cold sprayed counterpart in actual boiler environment.

  14. Assessment of Abrasive Wear of Nanostructured WC-Co and Fe-Based Coatings Applied by HP-HVOF, Flame, and Wire Arc Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, C. R. C.; Libardi, R.; Camargo, F.; Fals, H. C.; Ferraresi, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Thermal spray processes have been widely used to minimize losses caused by wear mechanisms. Sprayed deposits using conventional wire and powder materials have been long solving tribological problems in engineering equipment. More recently, the option for new different technologies and consumables like nanostructured powder materials and nanocomposite cored wires have expanded the possibilities for technical solutions. Cored wire technology allows the use of compositions that cannot be drawn into wire form like carbides in metallic matrix and high-temperature materials, thus, intensifying the use of spraying processes with low operating cost to demanding wear and corrosion applications. The objective of this work was to study the mechanical characteristics and wear performance of coatings obtained by Flame, Wire Arc, and HVOF spraying using selected nanostructured WC10Co4Cr, WC12Co, and Fe-based 140 MXC powder and wire materials. Abrasive wear performance of the coatings was determinate following the ASTM G-65 standard. Based on the results, a higher abrasive wear resistance was found for the HVOF-sprayed WC10Co4Cr nanostructured coating.

  15. Hot Corrosion Behavior of HVOF Sprayed Coatings on ASTM SA213-T11 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, H. S.; Sidhu, B. S.; Prakash, S.

    2007-09-01

    Cr3C2-NiCr, NiCr, WC-Co and Stellite-6 alloy coatings were sprayed on ASTM SA213-T11 steel using the HVOF process. Liquid petroleum gas was used as the fuel gas. Hot corrosion studies were conducted on the uncoated as well as HVOF sprayed specimens after exposure to molten salt at 900 °C under cyclic conditions. The thermo-gravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. XRD, SEM/EDAX and EPMA techniques were used to analyze the corrosion products. All these overlay coatings showed a better resistance to hot corrosion as compared to that of uncoated steel. NiCr Coating was found to be most protective followed by the Cr3C2-NiCr coating. WC-Co coating was least effective to protect the substrate steel. It is concluded that the formation of Cr2O3, NiO, NiCr2O4, and CoO in the coatings may contribute to the development of a better hot-corrosion resistance. The uncoated steel suffered corrosion in the form of intense spalling and peeling of the scale, which may be due to the formation of unprotective Fe2O3 oxide scale.

  16. MoB/CoCr Cermet Coatings by HVOF Spraying against Erosion by Molten Al-Zn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Hiroaki; Kitamura, Junya

    2007-09-01

    MoB/CoCr, a novel cermet material for thermal spraying, with high durability in molten alloys has been developed to utilize for aluminum die-casting parts, and for hot continuous dipping rolls in Zn and Al-Zn plating lines. The durability of the MoB/CoCr coatings prepared by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying has been investigated using a molten-metal immersion tester. The tests revealed that the MoB/CoCr coating has much higher durability without dissolution in the molten Al-45wt.%Zn alloy. Little change of crystal structure, mainly composed of double borides of CoMoB and CoMo2B2, is observed after the immersion test, suggesting that the double borides have much higher durability. Using undercoat is effective to reduce the influence of large difference in thermal expansion between the MoB/CoCr topcoat and substrate of stainless steel of AISI 316L, widely used for the hot continuous dipping rolls. Optimized thickness combinations of topcoat and undercoat are necessary to obtain intrinsic performance of low reactive MoB/CoCr against the molten Al-45wt.%Zn alloy.

  17. The effect of spraying parameters on micro-structural properties of WC-12%Co coating deposited on copper substrate by HVOF process

    SciTech Connect

    Sathwara, Nishit; Jariwala, C. Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.; Basa, D. K.

    2015-08-28

    High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal sprayed coatingmade from Tungsten Carbide (WC) isconsidered as one of the most durable materials as wear resistance for industrial applications at room temperature. WC coating offers high wear resistance due to its high hardness and tough matrix imparts. The coating properties strongly depend on thermal spray processing parameters, surface preparation and surface finish. In this investigation, the effect of variousHVOF process parameters was studied on WC coating properties. The WC-12%Co coating was produced on Copper substrate. Prior to coating, theCopper substrate surface was prepared by grit blasting. WC-12%Co coatings were deposited on Coppersubstrates with varying process parameters such as Oxygen gas pressure, Air pressure, and spraying distance. Microstructure of coating was examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and characterization of phasespresentin the coating was examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Microhardness of all coatingswas measured by VickerMicrohardness tester. At low Oxygen Pressure(10.00 bar), high Air pressure (7bar) and short nozzle to substrate distance of 170mm, best coating adhesion and porosity less structure isachieved on Coppersubstrate.

  18. A Study of Cr3C2-Based HVOF- and HVAF-Sprayed Coatings: Microstructure and Carbide Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikainen, V.; Bolelli, G.; Koivuluoto, H.; Honkanen, M.; Vippola, M.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vuoristo, P.

    2017-06-01

    The research on high-velocity air-fuel (HVAF)-sprayed Cr3C2-based materials has mostly focused on conventional Cr3C2-25NiCr composition. In this paper, two alternative compositions (Cr3C2-50NiCrMoNb and Cr3C2-37WC-18NiCoCrFe) were sprayed with high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and HVAF spray processes to evaluate the material behavior during spraying and to provide characterization of the microstructures and mechanical properties of the coatings. For comparison, coatings from the Cr3C2-25NiCr composition were sprayed with both processes. Spray diagnostics were carried out to obtain average particle velocity and temperature for each material and process combinations. The measured average in-flight particle data were 1800 °C and 700 m/s for HVOF process, and 1450 °C and 900 m/s for HVAF process. Characterization of the coating microstructures was carried out by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. In addition, the carbon content of the feedstock powders and sprayed coatings was measured with carbon analyzer. The results show that carbide rebounding or selective deposition of particles with higher metal matrix content is the dominating reason for carbide loss during HVAF spraying, while carbide dissolution is an additional source for the HVOF spraying. Higher particle velocities and controlled temperature measured for the HVAF process produced dense coatings with improved toughness and more homogenous coating structure.

  19. A Study of Cr3C2-Based HVOF- and HVAF-Sprayed Coatings: Microstructure and Carbide Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikainen, V.; Bolelli, G.; Koivuluoto, H.; Honkanen, M.; Vippola, M.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vuoristo, P.

    2017-08-01

    The research on high-velocity air-fuel (HVAF)-sprayed Cr3C2-based materials has mostly focused on conventional Cr3C2-25NiCr composition. In this paper, two alternative compositions (Cr3C2-50NiCrMoNb and Cr3C2-37WC-18NiCoCrFe) were sprayed with high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and HVAF spray processes to evaluate the material behavior during spraying and to provide characterization of the microstructures and mechanical properties of the coatings. For comparison, coatings from the Cr3C2-25NiCr composition were sprayed with both processes. Spray diagnostics were carried out to obtain average particle velocity and temperature for each material and process combinations. The measured average in-flight particle data were 1800 °C and 700 m/s for HVOF process, and 1450 °C and 900 m/s for HVAF process. Characterization of the coating microstructures was carried out by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. In addition, the carbon content of the feedstock powders and sprayed coatings was measured with carbon analyzer. The results show that carbide rebounding or selective deposition of particles with higher metal matrix content is the dominating reason for carbide loss during HVAF spraying, while carbide dissolution is an additional source for the HVOF spraying. Higher particle velocities and controlled temperature measured for the HVAF process produced dense coatings with improved toughness and more homogenous coating structure.

  20. Mechanical property changes in HVOF sprayed nano-structured WC-17wt.%Ni(80/20)Cr coating with varying substrate roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mahmud, Tarek A.; Saha, Gobinda C.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2014-06-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings developed by use of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process are known for their superior wear characteristics. In many industrial applications, new parts as well as repaired and refurbished parts coated with WC-Co microstructured coatings have shown enhanced erosion-corrosion and abrasive resistant properties when compared with other surface modification technologies such as chrome replacement, fusion welding, and cladding. This research has been further directed towards the development of HVOF technique to deposit dense nanostructured ceramic-metallic composites. The mechanism of plastic deformation, which determines the strength and ductility of materials, in nanostructured materials are different, thereby leading to novel mechanical properties. Various parameters can influence these properties, but the substrate surface preparation by grit blasting before thermal spraying is one critical parameter. The grit blasting process generates a surface roughness, which ensures mechanical anchoring between the coating and the substrate surface. In this work, the sliding wear behavior and microhardness of WC-17wt.%Ni(80/20)Cr cermet coatings deposited onto carbon steel substrates are examined as a function of three different surface roughness values under different loads. The results show that as-prepared surface with different blasting profiles have a direct influence on the surface roughness and wear performance of the coatings. The sliding wear resistance of the coatings increased as the substrate surface roughness increased. The wear depth decreased with increasing surface roughness.

  1. Oxidation behavior of nanostructured cobalt nickel chromium aluminum yttrium and nickel cobalt chromium aluminum yttrium sprayed by HVOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Dominic

    In recent years, much development has been made in the world of nanotechnologies. Hence, nanomaterials, which possess unique characteristics and excellent mechanical properties, are now being used in innovative and advanced applications. Despite the incredible potential of nanomaterials, their use is still at an embryonic stage as a result of the difficulty to mass-produce them. Among the potentially viable application remains the fabrication of nanostructured powders to produce high temperature oxidation resistance coatings. Nanostructured coatings were obtained by thermally spraying cryomilled CoNiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlY feedstock using the HVOF technique. It was found that the milling process used to prepare the powder significantly altered the microstructure of the alloy. In addition to achieving grain size refinement, significant aluminum segregation at grain boundaries was observed. Upon oxidation experiments up to 96 hours in static air at 1000°C an oxide scale composed of an adherent and dense alpha-Al2O3 inner layer with a top layer of fast growing oxides such as NiO, Cr2O3, CoAl2O4 and NiAl2O4 evolved from the coatings. It was found that the formation of a two-layer scale could be prevented through surface grinding prior to oxidation. Moreover, the comparison of the oxidation results of the powders and those of the coatings revealed that the spraying process has a considerable influence on the oxidation behavior of MCrAlYs attributable to the formation of oxide seeds during the spraying process.

  2. A Numerical Study on Gas Phase Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jae-Sang; Park, Sun-Kyu; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2008-08-01

    The high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray is used for a particulate deposition process in which micro-sized particles are propelled and heated in a supersonic combusting gas stream. It is characterized by high gas velocity and high density and is being used in an increasing variety of coating applications, such as ceramic and composite coatings, to improve wear and abrasion resistance. The particle temperature and velocity are two of the most important parameters in HVOF thermal spraying, which affect the quality of the coatings. To understand the particle dynamics, it is necessary to study, first, the thermal flow characteristics in the HVOF system. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed to predict the gas dynamic behaviors, and the effect of the geometrical parameter is studied to optimize the nozzle design.

  3. Manufacturing and Properties of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-Sprayed FeVCrC Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassatelli, Paolo; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Manfredini, Tiziano; Rigon, Rinaldo

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the microstructure, sliding wear behavior and corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-sprayed FeVCrC-based coatings. Various process parameters were tested to evaluate their effects on the coating properties, which were also compared to those of HVOF-sprayed NiCrBSi and Stellite-6 coatings. The Fe alloy coatings are composed of flattened splats, originating from molten droplets and consisting of a super-saturated solid solution, together with rounded particles, coming from partially unmolten material and containing V- and Fe-based carbide precipitates. All process parameters, apart from "extreme" settings with excess comburent in the flame, produce dense coatings, indicating that the feedstock powder is quite easily processable by HVOF. These coatings, with a microhardness of 650-750 HV0.3, exhibit wear rates of ≈2 × 10-6 mm3/(Nm) in ball-on-disk tests against sintered Al2O3 spheres. They perform far better than the reference coatings, and better than other Fe- and Ni-based alloy coatings tested in previous research. On the other hand, the corrosion resistance of the coating material (tested by electrochemical polarization in 0.1 M HCl solution) is quite low. Even in the absence of interconnected porosity, this results in extensive, selective damage to the Fe-based matrix. This coating material is therefore unadvisable for severely corrosive environments.

  4. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  5. Wear behaviors of HVOF sprayed WC-12Co coatings by laser remelting under lubricated condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejun, Kong; Tianyuan, Sheng

    2017-03-01

    A HVOF (high velocity oxygen fuel) sprayed WC-12Co coating was remelted with a CO2 laser. The surface-interface morphologies and phases were analyzed by means of SEM (scanning electron microscopy), and XRD (X-ray diffraction), respectively. The friction and wear behaviors of WC-12Co coating under the dry and lubricated conditions were investigated with a wear test. The morphologies and distributions of chemical elements on worn scar were analyzed with a SEM, and its configured EDS (energy diffusive spectrometer), respectively, and the effects of lubricated condition on COFs (coefficient of friction) and wear performance were also discussed. The results show that the adhesion between the coating and the substrate is stronger after laser remetling (LR), in which mechanical bonding, accompanying with metallurgical bonding, was found. At the load of 80 N, the average COF under the dry and lubricated friction conditions is 0.069, and 0.052, respectively, the latter lowers by 23.3% than the former, and the wear rate under the lubricated condition decreases by 302.3% than that under the dry condition. The wear mechanism under the dry and lubrication conditions is primarily composed of abrasive wear, cracking, and fatigue failure.

  6. Corrosion behavior of HVOF sprayed hard face coatings in alkaline-sulfide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenhou; Guo, Zhixing; Xiong, Ji; Lei, Yong; Li, Yuxi; Tang, Jun; Liu, Junbo; Ye, Junliu

    2017-09-01

    The paper focuses on the corrosion behavior of high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed WC-17Co, WC-10Co-4Cr, Cr3C2-25NiCr coatings in alkaline-sulfide solution (S2-, 0.2 ml/L, pH = 10). Eighteen days of immersion test is carried out and corrosion rate analysis shows that the Cr3C2-NiCr coating of low porosity exhibits the best corrosion resistance. In alkaline-sulfide solutions, porosity, passive film and microgalvanic between hard phase and binder phase have significant effect on the corrosion behavior of coatings. The corrosion mainly occurs in binder phase from SEM, though WO3, WS2, Cr2S3 are detected in XPS. In WC-17Co coating, the binder phase Co transforms to Co oxides and serious corrosion can be observed in binder phase. WC-10Co-4Cr coatings suffer localized corrosion since galvanic corrosion occurs between locations with different solubilities of W in Co binder. Cr3C2-25NiCr coating shows slight corrosion with the formation of NiS/Ni2O3/Cr2O3from the binder and Cr2S3 from the hard phase. The results are verified by the polarization curves, which show the longest passive region and lowest Icorrosion of Cr3C2-25NiCr coating.

  7. Corrosion Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed Fe-Based Alloy Coating in Various Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Lei; Wu, Yuping; Hong, Sheng; Qin, Yujiao; Shi, Wei; Li, Gaiye

    2017-08-01

    A Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline coating was prepared by the high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying process. The coating was characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistances of the Fe-based coating and a reference electroplated hard chromium (EHC) coating were evaluated in a 3.5% NaCl solution, a 1 mol/L HCl solution and a 1 mol/L NaOH solution using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). All of the results indicated that the corrosion resistance of the Fe-based coating was superior to the resistance of the EHC coating in both the 3.5% NaCl solution and the 1 mol/L HCl solution due to the dense structure and fewer defects of the Fe-based coating. However, the corrosion resistance of the Fe-based coating was inferior to corrosion resistance of the EHC coating in the 1 mol/L NaOH solution. This could be ascribed to the drastic passivation of the EHC coating in an alkaline environment.

  8. From Powders to Thermally Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, Pierre; Montavon, Ghislain; Bertrand, Ghislaine

    2010-01-01

    Since the early stages of thermal spray, it has been recognized that the powder composition, size distribution, shape, mass density, mechanical resistance, components distribution for composite particles play a key role in coating microstructure and thermo mechanical properties. The principal characteristics of particles are strongly linked to the manufacturing process. Coatings also depend on the process used to spray particles and spray parameters. Many papers have been devoted to the relationships existing between coating properties and structures at different scales and manufacturing processes. In many conventional spray conditions resulting in micrometric structures, among the different parameters, good powder flow ability, and dense particles are important features. Thermal plasma treatment, especially by RF plasma, of particles, prepared by different manufacturing processes, allows achieving such properties and it is now developed at an industrial scale. Advantages and drawbacks of this process will be discussed. Another point, which will be approached, is the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, depending very strongly upon the starting composite particle manufacturing. However, as everybody knows, "small is beautiful" and nano- or finely structured coatings are now extensively studied with spraying of: (i) very complex alloys containing multiple elements which exhibit a glass forming capability when cooled-down, their under-cooling temperature being below the glass transition temperature; (ii) conventional micrometer-sized particles (in the 30-90 μm range) made of agglomerated nanometer-sized particles; (iii) sub-micrometer- or nanometer-sized particles via a suspension in which also, instead of particles, stable sol of nanometer-sized particles can be introduced; and (iv) spray solutions of final material precursor. These different processes using plasma, HVOF or sometimes flame and also cold-gas spray will be discussed together with the

  9. Characterization of thermal sprayed nanostructured WC-Co coatings derived from nanocrystalline WC-18wt.%Co powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Z.-G.; Shaw, L. L.

    2003-03-01

    Nanostructured WC-Co coatings were synthesized using high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray. The nanocrystalline feedstock powder with a nominal composition of WC-18 wt.%Co was prepared using the novel integrated mechanical and thermal activation (IMTA) process. The effects of HVOF thermal spray conditions and powder characteristics on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-sprayed WC-Co coatings were studied. It was found that the ratio of oxygen-to-hydrogen flow rate (ROHFR) and the starting powder microstructures had strong effects on decarburization of the nano-coatings. Decarburization was significantly suppressed at low ROHFR and with the presence of free carbon in the powder. The level of porosity in the coatings was correlated with the powder microstructure and spray process conditions. The coating sprayed at ROHFR=0.5 exhibited the highest microhardness value (HV300g=1077), which is comparable to that of conventional coarse-grained coatings.

  10. Mechanical and Thermal Transport Properties of Suspension Thermal-Sprayed Alumina-Zirconia Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberste Berghaus, Jörg; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel; Moreau, Christian; Tarasi, Fariba; Chráska, Tomas

    2008-03-01

    Micro-laminates and nanocomposites of Al2O3 and ZrO2 can potentially exhibit higher hardness and fracture toughness and lower thermal conductivity than alumina or zirconia alone. The potential of these improvements for abrasion protection and thermal barrier coatings is generating considerable interest in developing techniques for producing these functional coatings with optimized microstructures. Al2O3-ZrO2 composite coatings were deposited by suspension thermal spraying (APS and HVOF) of submicron feedstock powders. The liquid carrier employed in this approach allows for controlled injection of much finer particles than in conventional thermal spraying, leading to unique and novel fine-scaled microstructures. The suspensions were injected internally using a Mettech Axial III plasma torch and a Sulzer-Metco DJ-2700 HVOF gun. The different spray processes induced a variety of structures ranging from finely segregated ceramic laminates to highly alloyed amorphous composites. Mechanisms leading to these structures are related to the feedstock size and in-flight particle states upon their impact. Mechanical and thermal transport properties of the coatings were compared. Compositionally segregated crystalline coatings, obtained by plasma spraying, showed the highest hardness of up to 1125 VHN3 N, as well as the highest abrasion wear resistance (following ASTM G65). The HVOF coating exhibited the highest erosion wear resistance (following ASTM G75), which was related to the toughening effect of small dispersed zirconia particles in the alumina-zirconia-alloyed matrix. This microstructure also exhibited the lowest thermal diffusivity, which is explained by the amorphous phase content and limited particle bonding, generating local thermal resistances within the structure.

  11. Effect of Operating Parameters on a Dual-Stage High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed N.; Shamim, Tariq

    2014-08-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray systems are being used to apply coatings to prevent surface degradation. The coatings of temperature sensitive materials such as titanium and copper, which have very low melting points, cannot be applied using a single-stage HVOF system. Therefore, a dual-stage HVOF system has been introduced and modeled computationally. The dual-spray system provides an easy control of particle oxidation by introducing a mixing chamber. In addition to the materials being sprayed, the thermal spray coating quality depends to a large extent on flow behavior of reacting gases and the particle dynamics. The present study investigates the influence of various operating parameters on the performance of a dual-stage thermal spray gun. The objective is to develop a predictive understanding of various parameters. The gas flow field and the free jet are modeled by considering the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy with the turbulence and the equilibrium combustion sub models. The particle phase is decoupled from the gas phase due to very low particle volume fractions. The results demonstrate the advantage of a dual-stage system over a single-stage system especially for the deposition of temperature sensitive materials.

  12. Progress in fabrication of large magnetic sheilds by using extended YBCO thick films sprayed on stainless steel with the HVOF technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pavese, F.; Bergadano, E.; Ferri, D.

    1997-06-01

    Fabricating a full box-type magnetic shield, by spraying a thick film of commercial YBCO powder on stainless steel with the oxygen-fuel high-velocity technique (HVOF, also referred to as {open_quotes}continuous detonation spray{close_quotes} (CDS)), requires the solution of several specific problems since the design stage of the project. The design problems of this type of shield are examined and the results obtained in the early stages of the realization are discussed.

  13. In-Service Evaluation of HVOF Coated Main Landing Gear on Navy P-3 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, jon L.; Forrest, Clint

    2008-01-01

    Due to the environmental and health concerns with Electroplated Hard Chrome (EHC), the Hard Chrome Alternatives Team (HCAT) has been working to provide an alternative wear coating for EHC. The US Navy selected Tungsten-Carbide Cobalt (WC- 17Co) High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating for this purpose and completed service evaluations on select aircraft components to support the HCAT charter in identifying an alternative wear coating for chrome plating. Other benefits of WC-Co thermal spray coatings over EHC are enhanced corrosion resistance, improved durability, and exceptional wear properties. As part of the HCAT charter and to evaluate HVOF coatings on operational Navy components, the P-3 aircraft was selected for a service evaluation to determine the coating durability as compared to chrome plating. In April 1999, a VP-30 P-3 aircraft was outfitted with a right-hand Main Landing Gear (MLG) shock strut coated with WCCo HYOF thermal spray applied to the piston barrel and four axle journals. The HVOF coating on the piston barrel and axle journals was applied by Southwest United Industries, Inc. This HVOF coated strut assembly has since completed 6,378 landings. Teardown analysis .for this WC-Co HVOF coated MLG asset is significant in assessing the durability of this wear coating in service relative to EHC and to substantiate Life Cycle Cost (LCC) data to support a retrograde transition from EHC to HVOF thermal spray coatings. Findings from this teardown analysis may also benefit future transitions to HVOF thermal spray coatings by identifying enhancements to finishing techniques, mating bearing and liner material improvements, improved seal materials, and improvements in HVOF coating selection.

  14. A comparison of two laser-based diagnostics for analysis of particles in thermal spray streams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.; O`Hern, T.J.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1995-07-01

    This paper discusses two commercially-available laser diagnostics that have been used in thermal spray research at Sandia National Laboratories: (1) a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) and (2) a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter. The PDPA provides simultaneous, correlated measurements of particle velocity and particle size distributions; but, particle sizing doesn`t work well with non-spherical particles or particles with rough surfaces. The L2F is used to collect particle velocity and number density distributions, and it can readily distinguish and separately measure particles with off-axis velocity vectors. PDPA and L2F principles of operation are presented along with potential advantages and limitations for thermal spray research. Four experiments were conducted to validate and compare measurement results with the PDPA and L2F instruments: (1) spinning wire, (2) powder in a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) jet, (3) powder in a cold jet, and (4) droplets in a wire-fed HVOF jet. TWO DIFFERENT TYPES of commercially-available laser velocimeter systems, a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and a Laser-Two-Focus velocimeter have been used in the Thermal Spray Research Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories. Each of these techniques has inherent advantages and limitations for thermal spray, and each involves assumptions that may not be valid for some experimental conditions. This paper describes operating principles and possible sources of measurement error for these two diagnostic systems. Some potential advantages and limitations are also presented. Four types of experiments were also conducted to validate and compare PDPA and L2F measurement results: (1) spinning wire, (2) powder in a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) jet, (3) powder in a cold jet, and (4) droplets in a wire-fed HVOF jet. We also offer a few observations related to practical issues such as ease-of-use, reliability, and effects of dust and vibration in a thermal spray lab.

  15. Thermal spray for commercial shipbuilding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, F. S.

    1997-09-01

    Thermal spraying of steel with aluminum to protect it from corrosion is a technology that has been proven to work in the marine environment. The thermal spray coating system includes a paint sealer that is applied over the thermally sprayed aluminum. This extends the service life of the coating and provides color to the end product. The thermal spray system protects steel both through the principle of isolation (as in painting) and galvanizing. With this dual protection mechanism, steel is protected from corrosion even when the coating is damaged. The thermal- sprayed aluminum coating system has proved the most cost- effective corrosion protection system for the marine environment. Until recently, however, the initial cost of application has limited its use for general application. Arc spray technology has reduced the application cost of thermal spraying of aluminum to below that of painting. Commercial shipbuilders could use this technology to enhance their market position in the marine industry.

  16. Characterization of High Temp Thermal Sprays for Engine Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-19

    Inconel 901) • Two Temperatures (300 °F, 750 °F) • One Thickness (0.010 inches) • Four Coatings – HVOF: WC-Co17; Tribaloy-400; Ni,Cr – PS : WC-Co17...Acoustic Emission Completed 7/03 – Adhesion Completed 9/03 3 Program Overview • Any relative performance differences between HVOF/ PS processes with...400 WC-Co17 – Plasma Spray • Tribaloy 400 WC-Co17 4 Fatigue • Directly compare EHC to HVOF and PS coatings • Specimen Details – Sprayed Shoulder to

  17. High Power Diode Laser-Treated HP-HVOF and Twin Wire Arc-Sprayed Coatings for Fossil Fuel Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2013-08-01

    This article deals with high power diode laser (HPDL) surface modification of twin wire arc-sprayed (TWAS) and high pressure high velocity oxy-fuel (HP-HVOF) coatings to combat solid particle erosion occurring in fossil fuel power plants. To overcome solid particle impact wear above 673 K, Cr3C2-NiCr-, Cr3C2-CoNiCrAlY-, and WC-CrC-Ni-based HVOF coatings are used. WC-CoCr-based HVOF coatings are generally used below 673 K. Twin wire arc (TWA) spraying of Tafa 140 MXC and SHS 7170 cored wires is used for a wide range of applications for a temperature up to 1073 K. Laser surface modification of high chromium stainless steels for steam valve components and LPST blades is carried out regularly. TWA spraying using SHS 7170 cored wire, HP-HVOF coating using WC-CoCr powder, Ti6Al4V alloy, and high chromium stainless steels (X20Cr13, AISI 410, X10CrNiMoV1222, 13Cr4Ni, 17Cr4Ni) were selected in the present study. Using robotically controlled parameters, HPDL surface treatments of TWAS-coated high strength X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and HP-HVOF-coated AISI 410 stainless steel samples were carried out and these were compared with HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and titanium alloy for high energy particle impact wear (HEPIW) resistance. The HPDL surface treatment of the coatings has improved the HEPIW resistance manifold. The improvement in HPDL-treated stainless steels and titanium alloys is marginal and it is not comparable with that of HPDL-treated coatings. These coatings were also compared with "as-sprayed" coatings for fracture toughness, microhardness, microstructure, and phase analyses. The HEPIW resistance has a strong relationship with the product of fracture toughness and microhardness of the HPDL-treated HP-HVOF and TWAS SHS 7170 coatings. This development opens up a possibility of using HPDL surface treatments in specialized areas where the problem of HEPIW is very severe. The HEPIW resistance of HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and

  18. Oxidation behavior of HVOF-sprayed nanostructured and CeO2-modified WC-12Co coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Naiyuan; Hang, Zongqiu; Liu, Yan; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Mingyue; Gao, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Two types of WC-12Co coatings with different modifications were deposited on steel substrates using high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. The coated samples were oxidized at 550∘C and 650∘C in ambient atmosphere. Oxidation mass gain was measured by electronic balance. Phase composition and microstructure evolution of both coatings after oxidation were conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Microhardness testing was performed before and after oxidation testing. The results showed that at 550∘C and 650∘C, the rare-earth modified WC-12Co coating has lower oxidation rates compared with the nanostructured WC-12Co coating. This might be due to the rare-earth modification coating reducing the porosity and oxygen diffusion in the coatings, therefore delaying the crack formation and propagation.

  19. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  20. Nano-Borides and Silicide Dispersed Composite Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Laser-Assisted HVOF Spray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2014-10-01

    The study concerned a detailed microstructural investigation of nano-borides (Cr2B and Ni3B) and nano-silicide (Ni2Si) dispersed γ-nickel composite coating on AISI 304 stainless steel by HVOF spray deposition of the NiCrBSi precursor powder and subsequent laser surface melting. A continuous wave diode laser with an applied power of 3 kW and scan speed of 20 mm/s in argon shroud was employed. The characterization of the surface in terms of microstructure, microtexture, phases, and composition were carried out and compared with the as-coated (high-velocity oxy-fuel sprayed) surface. Laser surface melting led to homogenization and refinement of microstructures with the formation of few nano-silicides of nickel along with nano-borides of nickel and chromium (Ni3B, Cr2B, and Cr2B3). A detailed microtexture analysis showed the presence of no specific texture in the as-sprayed and laser-melted surface of Cr2B and Ni3B phases. The average microhardness was improved to 750-900 VHN as compared to 250 VHN of the as-received substrate. Laser surface melting improved the microhardness further to as high as 1400 VHN due to refinement of microstructure and the presence of silicides.

  1. Characterization of Thermal Sprayed Aluminum and Stainless Steel Coatings for Clean Laser Enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Decker, T A; Gansert, R V; Gansert, D

    2000-04-06

    Surfaces of steel structures that enclose high-fluence, large-beam lasers have conventional and unconventional requirements. Aside from rust prevention, the surfaces must resist laser-induced degradation and the contamination of the optical components. The latter requires a surface that can be precision cleaned to low levels of particulate and organic residue. In addition, the surface treatment for the walls should be economical to apply because of the large surface areas involved, and accommodating with intricate joint geometries. Thermal sprayed coatings of aluminum (Al) and stainless steel are candidate surface materials. Coatings are produced and characterized for porosity, smoothness, and hardness. These properties have a bearing on the cleanliness of the coating. The laser resistance of Al and 3 16L coatings are given. The paper summarizes the characterization of twin-wire-arc deposited Al, high-velocity-oxygen-fueled (HVOF) deposited Al, flame-sprayed 316L, and HVOF deposited316L. The most promising candidate coating is that of HVOF Al. This Al coating has the lowest porosity (8%) compared the other three coatings and relatively low hardness (100 VHN). The as-deposited roughness (Ra) is 433 pinches, but after a quick sanding by hand, the roughness decreased to 166 pinches. Other post-coat treatments are discussed. HVOF aluminum coatings are demonstrated. Al coatings are corrosion barriers for steel, and this work shows promising resistance to laser damage and low particulation rates.

  2. HVOF- and HVAF-Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings Deposited from Feedstock Powders of Spherical Morphology: Microstructure Formation and High-Stress Abrasive Wear Resistance Up to 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, L.; Norpoth, J.; Trache, R.; Thiele, S.; Berger, L.-M.

    2017-10-01

    Chromium carbide-based coatings are commonly applied to protect surfaces against wear at high temperatures. This work discusses the influence of feedstock powder and spray torch selection on the microstructure and high-stress abrasion resistance of thermally sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr coatings. Four commercial feedstock powders with spherical morphology and different microstructures were deposited by different high-velocity spray processes, namely third-generation gas- and liquid-fueled HVOF torches and by the latest generation HVAF torch. The microstructures of the coatings were studied in the as-sprayed state and after various heat treatments. The high-stress abrasion resistance of as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings was tested at room temperature and at 800 °C. The study reveals that the selection of the spray torch mainly affects the room temperature abrasion resistance of the as-sprayed coatings, which is due to differences in the embrittlement of the binder phase generated by carbide dissolution. At elevated temperatures, precipitation and growth of secondary carbides yields a fast equalization of the various coatings microstructures and wear properties.

  3. HVOF- and HVAF-Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings Deposited from Feedstock Powders of Spherical Morphology: Microstructure Formation and High-Stress Abrasive Wear Resistance Up to 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, L.; Norpoth, J.; Trache, R.; Thiele, S.; Berger, L.-M.

    2017-08-01

    Chromium carbide-based coatings are commonly applied to protect surfaces against wear at high temperatures. This work discusses the influence of feedstock powder and spray torch selection on the microstructure and high-stress abrasion resistance of thermally sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr coatings. Four commercial feedstock powders with spherical morphology and different microstructures were deposited by different high-velocity spray processes, namely third-generation gas- and liquid-fueled HVOF torches and by the latest generation HVAF torch. The microstructures of the coatings were studied in the as-sprayed state and after various heat treatments. The high-stress abrasion resistance of as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings was tested at room temperature and at 800 °C. The study reveals that the selection of the spray torch mainly affects the room temperature abrasion resistance of the as-sprayed coatings, which is due to differences in the embrittlement of the binder phase generated by carbide dissolution. At elevated temperatures, precipitation and growth of secondary carbides yields a fast equalization of the various coatings microstructures and wear properties.

  4. Application of thermal spray coatings to aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, H.L.

    1994-12-31

    Reusable launch vehicles located by the ocean are subject to harsh seacoast environments before launch and immersion after splashdown at sea and tow back to the refurbishment facility. The use of various thermal spray processes for depositing corrosion and erosion protective materials to the alloy substrates has potential for enhancing the corrosion/erosion resistance and useful life of those expensive large reusable aerospace structures. Thermal spray processes such as high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), plasma, arc spray and conventional oxygen fuel spray and the IVD process (pure aluminum only) have been used to coat test panels and scrap flight hardware with various applied materials. Pure aluminum, aluminum/aluminum oxide matrix (DURALCAN), and pure zinc have been applied over 2219-T87 aluminum alloy, 4340 steel alloy substrates. Salt spray testing has been conducted in accordance with ASTM B-117 as well as beach exposure tests at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Adhesion tests have been performed for all materials applied to the various substrates as well as monitoring of substrate temperatures during the spray process. The pure aluminum, zinc, and aluminum/aluminum oxide matrix material afforded excellent corrosion protection in both beach exposure and salt spray environments. in conclusion, tests and actual applications have shown that the various thermal spray processes and coating materials have significant potential for enhancing corrosion/erosion resistance and extending the useful service life of expensive aerospace structures exposed to marine environments. The ability to effectively repair damaged IVD aluminum coated substrates using arc sprayed material adds flexibility to the maintenance process. Due to the excellent adhesion and corrosion protection of the substrate, tests are underway to determine if chromate conversion coating can be eliminated prior to primer/topcoat application.

  5. The Gas Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Charles Marcou

    An experimental study of the gas dynamics of the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process has been performed. With this process, a hot, combustion-driven, supersonic jet is used to propel particles onto a surface, thus forming metal coatings that provide wear, temperature, and corrosion resistance. The fundamental physics of the spray process were studied and several key areas of interest were identified for in-depth study. Optical diagnostic techniques, including microsecond -exposure schlieren and shadowgraph imaging, were used to visualize the hot supersonic jet produced during the spray process. Energetic turbulent mixing of the jet with the surrounding atmosphere was observed. Measurements of oxide levels in aluminum and mild steel coatings sprayed for a range of conditions indicated that the turbulent mixing influences coating oxidation. However, experiments conducted with a low-speed coaxial shroud of inert gas demonstrated that coating oxide formation can be effectively controlled during the spray process. A simple numerical model was developed to predict the behavior of a spray particle in the HVOF jet. The results of computations indicated that independent control of spray particle velocity and temperature was possible through systematic variations in combustion chamber pressure and particle injection location within the nozzle. This hypothesis was confirmed through a series of experiments in which stainless steel particle velocity and temperature were measured using trace velocimetry and two-color radiative pyrometry, respectively. Combustion chamber pressure had a strong effect on particle velocity. Injection location was used to control the residence time of a particle within the flow, thus allowing manipulation of particle temperature without a measurable effect on velocity. Thus, the results of these experiments revealed that the gas dynamics--the behavior of the compressible gas flow--of the HVOF spray process strongly influenced spray

  6. The Role of Oxide Tribofilms on Friction and Wear of Different Thermally Sprayed WC-CoCr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesmann, J. A. R.; Kuroda, S.; Espallargas, N.

    2017-01-01

    The tribolgical response of five different thermal sprayed WC-CoCr coatings sprayed with HVOF (JP-5000), HVAF (UniqueCoat M3) and Warm Spray (NIMS, Japan) has been evaluated during dry sliding in air and in nitrogen gas. Tests were conducted at room temperature and at 200 °C where both friction and wear were evaluated. Test results indicate that the HVAF and Warm Spray coatings were most dense, while HVOF coatings showed higher degree of porosity and discontinuities in the cross sections. Results show that the sliding atmosphere affects both friction and wear: Sliding in nitrogen reduced predominantly specific wear rate as well as friction coefficient. Higher friction was linked to the formation of tribofilms on the surfaces, aided by higher oxygen content in the sliding atmosphere and temperature.

  7. The Role of Oxide Tribofilms on Friction and Wear of Different Thermally Sprayed WC-CoCr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesmann, J. A. R.; Kuroda, S.; Espallargas, N.

    2017-02-01

    The tribolgical response of five different thermal sprayed WC-CoCr coatings sprayed with HVOF (JP-5000), HVAF (UniqueCoat M3) and Warm Spray (NIMS, Japan) has been evaluated during dry sliding in air and in nitrogen gas. Tests were conducted at room temperature and at 200 °C where both friction and wear were evaluated. Test results indicate that the HVAF and Warm Spray coatings were most dense, while HVOF coatings showed higher degree of porosity and discontinuities in the cross sections. Results show that the sliding atmosphere affects both friction and wear: Sliding in nitrogen reduced predominantly specific wear rate as well as friction coefficient. Higher friction was linked to the formation of tribofilms on the surfaces, aided by higher oxygen content in the sliding atmosphere and temperature.

  8. Electrochemical Corrosion of HVOF-Sprayed NiCoCrAlY Coatings in CO2-Saturated Brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Luna, H.; Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Alvarado-Orozco, J. M.; García-Herrera, J. E.; Martinez-Gomez, L.; Trápaga-Martínez, L. G.; Muñoz-Saldaña, J.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of pre-oxidation treatment and surface preparation of optimized NiCoCrAlY coatings deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying and exposed to a low-temperature corrosive environment is reported herein. Coatings with two surface finish conditions (as-sprayed and ground) were heat treated under two different oxygen partial pressures (air and argon). The electrochemical corrosion behavior was evaluated in CO2-saturated brine via potentiodynamic polarization, polarization resistance, and electrochemical impedance measurements. The results show that the grinding process and pre-oxidation treatment in argon enhanced growth and formation of α-Al2O3 scale. The potentiodynamic polarization results show that both pre-oxidation and surface treatment had a positive influence on the corrosion resistance of the coating. The reduction of the porosity and the formation of a dense, uniform, and adherent oxide scale through pre-oxidation treatment led to an increase of the corrosion resistance due to a decrease in active sites and blocking of diffusion of reactive species into the coating. However, according to the results, complete transformation from metastable alumina phases to α-Al2O3 in addition to formation and growth of dense α-Al2O3 is required to ensure full protection of the coating and base material over long periods.

  9. HVOF sprayed WC-CoCr coatings on aluminum: tensile and tribological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsomichalis, A.; Vardavoulias, M.; Vaxevanidis, N.

    2017-02-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive assessment of the tensile and sliding wear behaviour of WC-10Co4Cr agglomerated and sintered powder deposited on aluminum by Hyper Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) process. Microstructural analysis (SEM) identified grains of tungsten carbide (WC) in the metal matrix of the cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr). A transformation of the WC in the W2C phase was observed and decomposition of WC in the metal matrix. The HVOF WC-Co-Cr coating was found to decrease tensile strength of the aluminum substrate. Transverse cracks were observed to initiate on the coating surface, increasing rapidly with the increase in tensile strain and stopped on the coating-substrate interface causing decohesion. Tribological properties were examined using the pin-on-disk method under various loads. The friction coefficient rose abruptly at the start-up phase and stabilized at almost the same sliding distance independently of the applied load. Both the friction coefficient and the wear volume were found to increase with increasing applied load. Study of the wear mechanisms revealed surface micro-cracking and fragmentation of flattened coating layers with subsequent gradual pull out of the carbide particles.

  10. Effect of Spray Particle Velocity on Cavitation Erosion Resistance Characteristics of HVOF and HVAF Processed 86WC-10Co4Cr Hydro Turbine Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. K.; Kamaraj, M.; Seetharamu, S.; Pramod, T.; Sampathkumaran, P.

    2016-08-01

    The hydro plants utilizing silt-laden water for power generation suffer from severe metal wastage due to particle-induced erosion and cavitation. High-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF)-based coatings is widely applied to improve the erosion life. The process parameters such as particle velocity, size, powder feed rate, temperature, affect their mechanical properties. The high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) technology, with higher particle velocities and lower spray temperatures, gives dense and substantially nonoxidized coating. In the present study, the cavitation resistance of 86WC-10Co4Cr-type HVOF coating processed at 680 m/s spray particle velocity was compared with HVAF coatings made at 895, 960, and 1010 m/s. The properties such as porosity, hardness, indentation toughness, and cavitation resistance were investigated. The surface damage morphology has been analyzed in SEM. The cohesion between different layers has been examined qualitatively through scratch depth measurements across the cross section. The HVAF coatings have shown a lower porosity, higher hardness, and superior cavitation resistance. Delamination, extensive cracking of the matrix interface, and detachment of the WC grains were observed in HVOF coating. The rate of metal loss is low in HVAF coatings implying that process parameters play a vital role in achieving improved cavitation resistance.

  11. Industrial applications of thermal sprayed coatings in Venezuelan steelmaking industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liscano, S.; Nuñez, E.; Gil, L.; Zerpa, R.

    2013-11-01

    The metal components subjected to high temperature conditions, abrasive wear, corrosion, impact, etc.; tend to present degradation of manufacturing material, causing the failure imminent of the component. One of the alternatives to minimize or eliminate such effect is the application of ceramic coatings, which are thermal insulators and exhibit high mechanical strength. Its extreme hardness, coupled with the low friction properties and chemical stability, allowing its use in a wide variety of applications. Therefore, the following paper describes the application of thermal sprayed coatings obtained by HVOF and Plasma technologies like alternative to protect the metallic equipment in different venezuelan industrial sectors, such as to operate under aggressive conditions of service, such as the steelmaking nationals industries. This study presents applications cases of ceramic-based coatings, in order to minimize the sticking of metallic material in components of reduction reactor of FINMET® and MIDREXTM process.

  12. High temperature wear performance of HVOF-sprayed Cr3C2-WC-NiCoCrMo and Cr3C2-NiCr hardmetal coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wuxi; Zhou, Kesong; Li, Yuxi; Deng, Chunming; Zeng, Keli

    2017-09-01

    A novel Cr3C2-WC-NiCoCrMo and commercial Cr3C2-NiCr thermal spray-grade powders with particle size of -45 + 15 μm were prepared by an agglomeration and sintering process. Cr3C2-WC-NiCoCrMo and Cr3C2-NiCr coatings were deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. The fundamental properties of both coatings were evaluated and friction wear test against Al2O3 counterbodies of both coatings at high temperatures (450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C) were carried out ball-on-disk high temperature tribometer. All specimens were characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and 3D non-contact surface mapping profiler. The results have shown that the Cr3C2-WC-NiCoCrMo coating exhibited lower porosity, higher micro-hardness compared to the Cr3C2-NiCr coating. The Cr3C2-WC-NiCoCrMo coating also exhibited better wear resistance and higher friction coefficient compared to the Cr3C2-NiCr coating when sliding against the Al2O3 counterpart. Wear rates of both coatings increased with raising temperature. Both coatings experienced abrasive wear; hard phase particles (WC and Cr3C2) with different sizes, distributed in the matrix phase, will effectively improve the resistance against wear at high temperatures.

  13. Spallation Resistant HVOF Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    In Phase I, 14 different HVOF powder chemistries where sprayed and tested using the Praxair JP8000 spray system. Criteria for selection was that...Of these 14 chemistries, 4 where found to be top performers to be used in Phase II testing.  A Design Of Experiment (DOE) was performed on...following stress levels (or until spallation occurred)  190ksi  210ksi  230ksi  Initial testing with WC-Co top coat on all of the duplex

  14. Improved Protection Properties by Using Nanostructured Ceramic Powders for HVOF Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varis, T.; Knuuttila, J.; Turunen, E.; Leivo, J.; Silvonen, J.; Oksa, M.

    2007-12-01

    The potential of the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process for reduced porosity in coatings compared to those produced by other ambient thermal spray processes is well known. The ability to produce high-density ceramic coatings offers potential in high-performance applications in the field of wear, corrosion resistance, and dielectric coatings. However, due to operational limit of the HVOF process to effectively melt the ceramic particles, the process—structure relationship must be well optimized. It has been also demonstrated that benefits from HVOF ceramic coatings can be obtained only if particles are melted enough and good lamella adhesion is produced. One strategy to improve melting of ceramic particles in relative low-flame temperatures of HVOF process is to modify particle crystal structure and composition. In this paper the effect of the powder manufacturing method and the composition on deposition efficiency of spray process as well as on the mechanical properties of the HVOF sprayed are studied. Effect of fuel gas, hydrogen vs. propane, was also demonstrated. Studied materials were alumina-, chromia-, and titania-based agglomerated powders. Coating properties such as microstructure, hardness, abrasive wear resistance, and relative fracture toughness were compared to the coating manufactured by using conventional fused and crushed powders. It can be concluded that powder size distribution and microstructure should be optimized to fulfill process requirements very carefully to produce coatings with high deposition efficiency, dense structure, improved fracture toughness, and adhesion.

  15. Formation Mechanisms, Structure, and Properties of HVOF-Sprayed WC-CoCr Coatings: An Approach Toward Process Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Ghabchi, A.; Valarezo, A.; Sampath, S.; Liu, X.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2014-08-01

    Our study focuses on understanding the damage tolerance and performance reliability of WC-CoCr coatings. In this paper, the formation of HVOF-sprayed tungsten carbide-based cermet coatings is studied through an integrated strategy: First-order process maps are created by using online-diagnostics to assess particle states in relation to process conditions. Coating properties such as hardness, wear resistance, elastic modulus, residual stress, and fracture toughness are discussed with a goal to establish a linkage between properties and particle characteristics via second-order process maps. A strong influence of particle state on the mechanical properties, wear resistance, and residual stress stage of the coating was observed. Within the used processing window (particle temperature ranged from 1687 to 1831 °C and particle velocity from 577 to 621 m/s), the coating hardness varied from 1021 to 1507 HV and modulus from 257 to 322 GPa. The variation in coating mechanical state is suggested to relate to the microstructural changes arising from carbide dissolution, which affects the properties of the matrix and, on the other hand, cohesive properties of the lamella. The complete tracking of the coating particle state and its linking to mechanical properties and residual stresses enables coating design with desired properties.

  16. The Wear Behavior of HVOF Sprayed Near-Nanostructured WC-17%Ni(80/20)Cr Coatings in Dry and Slurry Wear Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mahmud, Tarek A.; Atieh, Anas M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2017-07-01

    The ability to deposit nanostructured feedstock by using high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spray offers potential improvements in coating hardness, wear resistance and toughness for applications in the oil sands industry. In this study, the wear behavior of a near-nanostructured coating was compared under dry and slurry abrasive wear test using an uncoated AISI-1018 low-carbon steel substrate as a reference. The coating microstructures were analyzed in the as-sprayed, dry and slurry test conditions using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and microhardness measurements. Wear behavior of the steel and coating surfaces were assessed using a pin-on-plate wear test under various loads. The results showed that a coating could be successfully deposited using the HVOF spraying technique and with retention of the near-nanosized WC dispersion within the coating structure. The wear rate under dry test conditions was greater for the steel and coating compared to tests performed under slurry conditions. Examination of the wear tracks revealed that the wear mechanism was different for the two test conditions. Wear in the dry test condition resulted from 2-body abrasion, while 3-body abrasion dominated wear in slurry conditions. The latter showed lower wear rates due to a lubricating effect of the oil.

  17. The 2016 Thermal Spray Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardelle, Armelle; Moreau, Christian; Akedo, Jun; Ashrafizadeh, Hossein; Berndt, Christopher C.; Berghaus, Jörg Oberste; Boulos, Maher; Brogan, Jeffrey; Bourtsalas, Athanasios C.; Dolatabadi, Ali; Dorfman, Mitchell; Eden, Timothy J.; Fauchais, Pierre; Fisher, Gary; Gaertner, Frank; Gindrat, Malko; Henne, Rudolf; Hyland, Margaret; Irissou, Eric; Jordan, Eric H.; Khor, Khiam Aik; Killinger, Andreas; Lau, Yuk-Chiu; Li, Chang-Jiu; Li, Li; Longtin, Jon; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Masset, Patrick J.; Matejicek, Jiri; Mauer, Georg; McDonald, André; Mostaghimi, Javad; Sampath, Sanjay; Schiller, Günter; Shinoda, Kentaro; Smith, Mark F.; Syed, Asif Ansar; Themelis, Nickolas J.; Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Trelles, Juan Pablo; Vassen, Robert; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-12-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the last decades in thermal spray technologies, practices and applications. However, like other technologies, they have to continuously evolve to meet new problems and market requirements. This article aims to identify the current challenges limiting the evolution of these technologies and to propose research directions and priorities to meet these challenges. It was prepared on the basis of a collection of short articles written by experts in thermal spray who were asked to present a snapshot of the current state of their specific field, give their views on current challenges faced by the field and provide some guidance as to the R&D required to meet these challenges. The article is divided in three sections that deal with the emerging thermal spray processes, coating properties and function, and biomedical, electronic, aerospace and energy generation applications.

  18. Thermal NDE method for thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.R.; Schmeller, M.D.; Sulit, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a feasibility demonstration of a thermal scanning NDE system for thermal spray coatings. Non-bonds were detected between several types of coatings and their substrates. Aluminum anti-skid coatings having very rough surfaces were included. A technique for producing known non-bond areas for calibrating and demonstrating NDE methods was developed.

  19. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum nanocomposite via plasma and high velocity oxy-fuel spray forming.

    PubMed

    Laha, T; Liu, Y; Agarwal, A

    2007-02-01

    Free standing structures of hypereutectic aluminum-23 wt% silicon nanocomposite with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforcement have been successfully fabricated by two different thermal spraying technique viz Plasma Spray Forming (PSF) and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Spray Forming. Comparative microstructural and mechanical property evaluation of the two thermally spray formed nanocomposites has been carried out. Presence of nanosized grains in the Al-Si alloy matrix and physically intact and undamaged carbon nanotubes were observed in both the nanocomposites. Excellent interfacial bonding between Al alloy matrix and MWCNT was observed. The elastic modulus and hardness of HVOF sprayed nanocomposite is found to be higher than PSF sprayed composites.

  20. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  1. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality By Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B. Mi; G. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-08-10

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with various surface preparation conditions or spray process parameters. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that different surface preparation conditions and varied process parameters can be successfully differentiated by the impedance value observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. This non-contact, nondestructive, easy-to-use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  2. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality by Eddy Current Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Bao; Zhao, Xiaoliang (George); Bayles, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with various surface preparation conditions or spray process parameters. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that different surface preparation conditions and varied process parameters can be successfully differentiated by the impedance value observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. This non-contact, nondestructive, easy-to-use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  3. Microstructure and properties of thermally sprayed Al-Sn-based alloys for plain bearing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, T.; Driver, L. C.; Harris, S. J.; McCartney, D. G.

    2006-12-01

    Al-Sn plain bearings for automotive applications traditionally comprise a multilayer structure. Conventionally, bearing manufacturing involves casting the Al-Sn alloy and roll-bonding to a steel backing strip. Recently, high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) thermal spraying has been used as a novel alternative manufacturing route. The present project extends previous work on ternary Al-Sn-Cu alloys to quaternary systems, which contain specific additions for potentially enhanced properties. Two alloys were studied in detail, namely, Al-20wt.%Sn-1wt.%Cu-2wt.%Ni and Al-20wt.%Sn-1wt.%Cu-7wt.%Si. This article will describe the microstructural evolution of these alloys following HVOF spraying onto steel substrates and subsequent heat treatment. The microstructures of powders and coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and the phases were identified by x-ray diffraction. Coating microhardnesses were determined under both as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions, and by the differences related to the microstructures that developed. Finally, the wear behavior of the sprayed and heat-treated coatings in hot engine oil was measured using an industry standard test and was compared with that of previous work on a ternary alloy.

  4. Desirability-Based Multi-Criteria Optimization of HVOF Spray Experiments to Manufacture Fine Structured Wear-Resistant 75Cr3C2-25(NiCr20) Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Vogli, E.; Baumann, I.; Kopp, G.; Weihs, C.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal spraying of fine feedstock powders allow the deposition of cermet coatings with significantly improved characteristics and is currently of great interest in science and industry. However, due to the high surface to volume ratio and the low specific weight, fine particles are not only difficult to spray but also show a poor flowability in the feeding process. In order to process fine powders reliably and to preserve the fine structure of the feedstock material in the final coating morphology, the use of novel thermal spray equipment as well as a thorough selection and optimization of the process parameters are fundamentally required. In this study, HVOF spray experiments have been conducted to manufacture fine structured, wear-resistant cermet coatings using fine 75Cr3C2-25(Ni20Cr) powders (-8 + 2 μm). Statistical design of experiments (DOE) has been utilized to identify the most relevant process parameters with their linear, quadratic and interaction effects using Plackett-Burman, Fractional-Factorial and Central Composite designs to model the deposition efficiency of the process and the majorly important coating properties: roughness, hardness and porosity. The concept of desirability functions and the desirability index have been applied to combine these response variables in order to find a process parameter combination that yields either optimum results for all responses, or at least the best possible compromise. Verification experiments in the so found optimum obtained very satisfying or even excellent results. The coatings featured an average microhardness of 1004 HV 0.1, a roughness Ra = 1.9 μm and a porosity of 1.7%. In addition, a high deposition efficiency of 71% could be obtained.

  5. Development and Application of HVOF Sprayed Spinel Protective Coating for SOFC Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, O.; Pihlatie, M.; Rautanen, M.; Himanen, O.; Lagerbom, J.; Mäkinen, M.; Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Kiviaho, J.

    2013-06-01

    Protective coatings are needed for metallic interconnects used in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks to prevent excessive high-temperature oxidation and evaporation of chromium species. These phenomena affect the lifetime of the stacks by increasing the area-specific resistance (ASR) and poisoning of the cathode. Protective MnCo2O4 and MnCo1.8Fe0.2O4 coatings were applied on ferritic steel interconnect material (Crofer 22 APU) by high velocity oxy fuel spraying. The substrate-coating systems were tested in long-term exposure tests to investigate their high-temperature oxidation behavior. Additionally, the ASRs were measured at 700 °C for 1000 h. Finally, a real coated interconnect was used in a SOFC single-cell stack for 6000 h. Post-mortem analysis was carried out with scanning electron microscopy. The deposited coatings reduced significantly the oxidation of the metal, exhibited low and stable ASR and reduced effectively the migration of chromium.

  6. Effect of Load on Friction-Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed WC-12Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yifu, Jin; Weicheng, Kong; Tianyuan, Sheng; Ruihong, Zhang; Dejun, Kong

    2017-07-01

    A WC-12Co coating was sprayed on AISI H13 hot work mold steel using a high-velocity oxygen fuel. The morphologies, phase compositions, and distributions of chemical elements of the obtained coatings were analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS), respectively. The friction-wear behaviors under different loads were investigated using a reciprocating wear tester; the morphologies and distributions of the chemical elements of worn tracks were analyzed using a SEM and its configured EDS, respectively. The results show the reunited grains of WC are held together by the Co binder; the primary phases of the coating are WC, Co, and a small amount of W2C and W, owing to the oxidation and decarburization of WC. Inter-diffusion of Fe and W between the coating and the substrate is shown, which indicates a good coating adhesion. The values of the average coefficient of friction under the loads of 40, 80, and 120 N are 0.29, 0.31, and 0.49, respectively. The WC grains are pulled out of the coating during the sliding wear test, but the coating maintains its integrity, suggesting that the coating is intact and continuously protects the substrate from wearing.

  7. Microstructure and properties of thermally sprayed silicon nitride-based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, S.; Berger, L.-M.; Herrmann, M.; Nebelung, M.; Heimann, R. B.; Schnick, T.; Wielage, B.; Vuoristo, P.; Schnick, T.

    2002-06-01

    The preparation of thermally sprayed, dense, Si3N4-based coatings can be accomplished using composite spray powders with Si3N4 embedded in a complex oxide binder matrix. Powders with excellent processability were developed and produced by agglomeration (spray drying) and sintering. Optimization of the heat transfer into the powder particles was found to be the most decisive factor necessary for the production of dense and well-adhering coatings. In the present work, different thermal spray processes such as detonation gun spraying (DGS), atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) with axial powder injection, and high-velocity oxyfuel spraying (HVOF) were used. The coatings were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and microhardness testing. The wear resistance was tested using a rubber wheel abrasion wear test (ASTM G65). In addition, thermoshock and corrosion resistances were determined. The microstructure and the performance of the best coatings were found to be sufficient, suggesting the technical applicability of this new type of coating.

  8. Yb2Si2O7 Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited by Various Thermal Spray Techniques: A Preliminary Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Emine; Marcano, Diana; Zhou, Dapeng; Sohn, Yoo Jung; Mauer, Georg; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Dense, crack-free, uniform, and well-adhered environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) are required to enhance the environmental durability of silicon (Si)-based ceramic matrix composites in high pressure, high gas velocity combustion atmospheres. This paper represents an assessment of different thermal spray techniques for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 EBCs. The Yb2Si2O7 coatings were deposited by means of atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF), suspension plasma spraying (SPS), and very low-pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) techniques. The initial feedstock, as well as the deposited coatings, were characterized and compared in terms of their phase composition. The as-sprayed amorphous content, microstructure, and porosity of the coatings were further analyzed. Based on this preliminary investigation, the HVOF process stood out from the other techniques as it enabled the production of vertical crack-free coatings with higher crystallinity in comparison with the APS and SPS techniques in atmospheric conditions. Nevertheless, VLPPS was found to be the preferred process for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 coatings with desired characteristics in a controlled-atmosphere chamber.

  9. Yb2Si2O7 Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited by Various Thermal Spray Techniques: A Preliminary Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Emine; Marcano, Diana; Zhou, Dapeng; Sohn, Yoo Jung; Mauer, Georg; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Dense, crack-free, uniform, and well-adhered environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) are required to enhance the environmental durability of silicon (Si)-based ceramic matrix composites in high pressure, high gas velocity combustion atmospheres. This paper represents an assessment of different thermal spray techniques for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 EBCs. The Yb2Si2O7 coatings were deposited by means of atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF), suspension plasma spraying (SPS), and very low-pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) techniques. The initial feedstock, as well as the deposited coatings, were characterized and compared in terms of their phase composition. The as-sprayed amorphous content, microstructure, and porosity of the coatings were further analyzed. Based on this preliminary investigation, the HVOF process stood out from the other techniques as it enabled the production of vertical crack-free coatings with higher crystallinity in comparison with the APS and SPS techniques in atmospheric conditions. Nevertheless, VLPPS was found to be the preferred process for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 coatings with desired characteristics in a controlled-atmosphere chamber.

  10. Numerical Investigation of Combustion and Flow Dynamics in a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Song, Qiuzhi; Yu, Zhiyi

    2016-02-01

    The combustion and flow behavior within a high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun is very complex and involves multiphase flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and supersonic/subsonic transitions. Additionally, this behavior has a significant effect on the formation of a coating. Non-premixed combustion models have been developed and are able to provide insight into the underlying physics of the process. Therefore, this investigation employs a non-premixed combustion model and the SST k - ω turbulence model to simulate the flow field of the JP5000 (Praxair-TAFA, US) HVOF thermal spray gun. The predicted temperature and velocity have a high level of agreement with experimental data when using the non-premixed combustion model. The results are focused on the fuel combustion, the subsequent gas dynamics within the HVOF gun, and the development of a supersonic free jet outside the gun. Furthermore, the oxygen/fuel inlet turbulence intensity, the fuel droplet size, and the oxygen/fuel ratio are investigated to determine their effect on the supersonic flow characteristics of the combustion gas.

  11. Effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Qin, Yujiao; Lin, Jinran

    2015-11-01

    The effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on electrochemical corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, was investigated using free corrosion potential, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in comparison with stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti. The results showed that cavitation erosion strongly enhanced the cathodic current density, shifted the free corrosion potential in the anodic direction, and reduced the magnitude of impedance of the coating. The impedance of the coating decreased more slowly under cavitation conditions than that of the stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti, suggesting that corrosion behavior of the coating was less affected by cavitation erosion than that of the stainless steel.

  12. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of HVOF-Sprayed (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) Composite Coating on Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Boron, Lukasz; Radecka, Marta; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the investigations was to compare the microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni and Cr3C2-NiCr coatings deposited by HVOF technique (the high-velocity oxygen fuel spray process) on ductile cast iron. The effect of nickel particles added to the chromium carbide coating on mechanical and wear behavior in the system of Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni/ductile cast iron was analyzed in order to improve the lifetime of coated materials. The structure with particular emphasis of characteristic of the interface in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron was studied using the optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopes, as well as the analysis of chemical and phase composition in microareas. Experimental results show that HVOF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni composite coating exhibits low porosity, high hardness, dense structure with large, partially molten Ni particles and very fine Cr3C2 and Cr7C3 particles embedded in NiCr alloy matrix, coming to the size of nanocrystalline. The results were discussed in reference to examination of bending strength considering cracking and delamination in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron as well as hardness and wear resistance of the coating. The composite structure of the coating provides the relatively good plasticity of the coating, which in turn has a positive effect on the adhesion of coating to the substrate and cohesion of the composite coating (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) in wear conditions.

  13. High-Temperature Exposure Studies of HVOF-Sprayed Cr3C2-25(NiCr)/(WC-Co) Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harpreet; Kaur, Manpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2016-08-01

    In this research, development of Cr3C2-25(NiCr) + 25%(WC-Co) composite coating was done and investigated. Cr3C2-25(NiCr) + 25%(WC-Co) composite powder [designated as HP2 powder] was prepared by mechanical mixing of [75Cr3C2-25(NiCr)] and [88WC-12Co] powders in the ratio of 75:25 by weight. The blended powders were used as feedstock to deposit composite coating on ASTM SA213-T22 substrate using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) spray process. High-temperature oxidation/corrosion behavior of the bare and coated boiler steels was investigated at 700 °C for 50 cycles in air, as well as, in Na2SO4-82%Fe2(SO4)3 molten salt environment in the laboratory. Erosion-corrosion behavior was investigated in the actual boiler environment at 700 ± 10 °C under cyclic conditions for 1500 h. The weight-change technique was used to establish the kinetics of oxidation/corrosion/erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction, field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and EDS elemental mapping techniques were used to analyze the exposed samples. The uncoated boiler steel suffered from a catastrophic degradation in the form of intense spalling of the scale in all the environments. The oxidation/corrosion/erosion-corrosion resistance of the HVOF-sprayed HP2 coating was found to be better in comparison with standalone Cr3C2-25(NiCr) coating. A simultaneous formation of protective phases might have contributed the best properties to the coating.

  14. Numerical simulation of gas and particle flow field characteristics in HVOF guns

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Eidelman, S.; Lottati, I.

    1995-12-31

    The particle flow field characteristics in an HVOF gun are examined using numerical simulation techniques. The authors consider the particle injection, acceleration, convection heat transfer, and particle barrel interaction processes in a TAFA JP-5000 HVOF gun. Details of particle trajectories and temperature history as a function of particle size and other parameters are simulated and analyzed. A parameter study is conducted for different particle size, particle injection direction, and particle velocity. The number of distinct particle injection regimes was predicted and analyzed. Particle velocity and temperature at the exit of the barrel are listed. Using numerical simulation, the injection condition can be designed as a function of the set of flow parameters as well as particle properties, including particle size and material properties, to optimize the thermal spray process. A companion paper by the same authors in this proceedings presents a comprehensive analysis of the gas flow conditions for the HVOF gun.

  15. Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M.

    2008-09-01

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

  16. Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M.

    2008-09-23

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

  17. Corrosion and Wear Studies of Cr3C2NiCr-HVOF Coatings Sprayed on AA7050 T7 Under Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, M.; Suegama, P. H.; Espallargas, N.; Fugivara, C. S.; Dosta, S.; Guilemany, J. M.; Benedetti, A. V.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, cermet coatings were prepared by high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) technique using a Diamalloy 3007 powder. The influence of the spray parameters on corrosion, friction, and abrasive wear resistance was studied. The samples were obtained using the standard conditions (253 L/min of oxygen and 375 L/min of compressed air), higher oxygen flux (341 L/min), and higher carrier gas flux (500 L/min). The coatings were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction and SEM studies showed well-bounded coating/substrate interface, pores, metallic matrix, chromium oxides, carbides, and carbides dissolution into the matrix. In comparison with the standard condition, the sample prepared using higher oxygen flux showed the highest carbide dissolution because of the high temperature achieved in the spray process. When the carrier gas flux was increased, the sample showed denser structure because of the higher particle velocity. The friction and abrasive wear resistance of the coatings were studied using rubber wheel and ball-on-disk tests. All samples showed similar sliding and abrasive behavior, and all of them showed better performance than the aluminum alloy. The electrochemical behavior was evaluated using open-circuit potential ( E OC) measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization curves. The coating prepared with higher carrier gas flux showed the highest corrosion resistance in 3.5% NaCl solution and probably no pitting attack to the substrate occurred even after around 26 h of test. Tests performed for longer immersion times showed that the total impedance values significantly decreased (6 and 4 times) for samples sprayed using standard and higher oxygen flux, and no great change for sample sprayed using higher carrier gas flux was observed. The last sample presents a corrosion resistance around 200 times higher than the others.

  18. Influence of Fine Powder Feedstock (-10 + 2 μm) on the HVOF Spraying Characteristics, Coating Morphology, and Properties of WC-CoCr 86-10-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Nebel, J.; Piotrowski, W.

    2013-03-01

    The use of fine feedstock powder can extend the feasibility and scope of HVOF coatings to new fields of applications. Especially for the purpose of near-net-shape coatings, these powders facilitate homogeneous layer morphologies, and smooth coating surfaces. However, the small particle sizes also lead to several challenges. One major issue is the in-flight behavior which is distinctly affected by the low mass and relatively large specific surface of the particles. In this paper, the in-flight and coating characteristics of WC-CoCr 86-10-4 (-10 + 2 μm) were investigated. It was determined that the fine powder feedstock shows a high sensitivity to the gas flow, velocity, and temperature of the spray jet. Because of their low mass inertia, their velocity, for example, is actually influenced by local pressure nodes (shock diamonds) in the supersonic flow. Additionally, the relatively large specific surface of the particles promotes partial overheating and degradation. Nevertheless, the morphological and mechanical properties of the sprayed layer are hardly affected. In fact, the coatings feature a superior surface roughness, porosity, hardness, and wear resistance.

  19. Microstructure and Properties of HVOF-Sprayed NiCrAlY Coatings Modified by Rare Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. F.; Liu, S. Y.; Wang, Y.; Sun, X. G.; Zou, Z. W.; Li, X. W.; Wang, C. H.

    2014-06-01

    Rare earth (RE)-modified NiCrAlY powders were prepared by ultrasonic gas atomization and deposited on stainless steel substrate by high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying. The effects of the RE on the microstructure, properties, and thermal shock resistance of the NiCrAlY coatings were investigated. The results showed that the NiCrAlY powders were refined and distributed uniformly after adding RE, while the number of unmelted particles in the coatings was reduced. Moreover, the RE-modified coatings showed improved microhardness and distribution uniformity. The microhardness of the coating reached a maximum after adding 0.9 wt.% RE, being 34.4 % higher than that of coatings without RE. The adhesive strength increased and reached a maximum after adding 0.6 wt.% RE, being 18.8 % higher than that of coatings without RE. Excessive RE decreased the adhesive strength. The thermal cycle life of NiCrAlY coatings increased drastically with RE addition. The coating with 0.9 wt.% RE showed optimum thermal shock resistance, being 21.2 % higher than that of coatings without RE.

  20. In-flight particle pyrometer for thermal spray processes. Final report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    The objective of the project was to produce an industrial hardened particle temperature sensor. In general the thermal spray community believes that the particle temperature and velocity prior to impact on the substrate are two of the predominant parameters which effect coating quality. Prior to the full scale prototyping of such an instrument it was necessary to firmly establish the relationship between operating parameters, particle temperature and coating characteristics. It was shown in the first year of this project that the characteristics and consistency of the coatings formed are directly determined by particle velocity and temperature at impact. For the HVOF spray process the authors have also shown that the particle velocity is determined primarily by chamber pressure, while stoichiometry (the ratio of oxygen to fuel) has a minor influence. Hence, particle velocity can be controlled by maintaining the chamber pressure at a set point. Particle temperature, on the other hand is primarily a function of stoichiometry. Therefore particle velocity and temperature can be independently controlled. In the second year (FY-94), an industrial hardened prototype particle temperature sensor (In-flight Particle Pyrometer) was produced. The IPP is a two-color radiation pyrometer incorporating improvements which make the device applicable to the measurement of in-flight temperature of particles over a wide range of operating conditions in thermal spray processes. The device is insensitive to particulate loading (particle feed rate), particle composition, particle size distribution, and provides an ensemble average particle temperature. The sensor head is compact and coupled to the electronics via a fiber optic cable. Fiber optic coupling allows maximum flexibility of deployment while providing isolation of the electronics from electromagnetic interference and the hot, particulate laden environment of a typical spray booth. The device is applicable to all thermal spray

  1. Laser modification of thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. A.; Fomin, A. D.; Naumkin, A. O.; Pekshev, P. Iu.; Smurov, I. Iu.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental results are reported on the modification of thermally sprayed coatings on steels and aluminum alloys using pulsed YAG and CW CO2 lasers. In particular, results obtained for self-fluxing Ni9CrBSi powders, ZRO2 ceramic, and titanium are examined. It is shown that the laser treatment of thermally sprayed coatings significantly improves their physicomechanical properties; it also makes it possible to obtain refractory coatings on low-melting substrates with good coating-substrate adhesion.

  2. High temperature intermetallic binders for HVOF carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, K.G.; Gruninger, M.F.; Jarosinski, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Gas turbines technology has a long history of employing the desirable high temperature physical attributes of ceramic-metallic (cermet) materials. The most commonly used coatings incorporate combinations of WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr, which have also been successfully utilized in other non-turbine coating applications. Increased turbine operating temperatures and other high temperature service conditions have made apparent the attractive notion of increasing the temperature capability and corrosion resistance of these coatings. In this study the intermetallic binder NiAl has been used to replace the cobalt and NiCr constituents of conventional WC and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} cermet powders. The composite carbide thermal spray powders were fabricated for use in the HVOF coating process. The structure of HVOF deposited NiAl-carbide coatings are compared directly to the more familiar WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron imaging (BEI) and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness variations with temperature are reported and compared between the NiAl and Co/NiCr binders.

  3. Study of the HVOF Ni-Based Coatings' Corrosion Resistance Applied on Municipal Solid-Waste Incinerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilemany, J. M.; Torrell, M.; Miguel, J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Oxidation of exchanger steel tubes causes important problems in Municipal Solid-Waste Incinerator (MSWI) plants. The present paper shows a possible solution for this problem through High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings. A comparative study was carried out between powder and wire Ni-based thermal spray coatings (with the same composition). These optimized coatings were compared based on their microstructure, wear properties (ASTM G99-90, ASTM G65-91), and erosion-corrosion (E-C) resistance. An E-C test designed in the Thermal Spray Centre was performed to reproduce the mechanisms that take place in a boiler. Studying the results of this test, the wire HVT Inconel coating sprayed by propylene appears to be the best alternative. A commercial bulk material with a composition similar to Ni-based coatings was tested to find the products of the oxidation reactions. The protective mechanisms of these materials were assessed after studying the results obtained for HVOF coatings and the bulk material where the presence of nickel and chromium oxides as a corrosion product can be seen. Kinetic evolution of the Ni-based coatings can be studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The protection that Inconel coatings give to the tube through the difference of the gain mass can be seen. Ni-based HVOF coatings by both spray conditions are a promising alternative to MSWI protection against chlorine environments, and their structures have a very important role.

  4. Synergistic effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion and corrosion of WC-CoCr and FeCrSiBMn coatings prepared by HVOF spraying.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Jinran

    2016-07-01

    The high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying process was used to fabricate conventional WC-10Co-4Cr coatings and FeCrSiBMn amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings. The synergistic effect of cavitation erosion and corrosion of both coatings was investigated. The results showed that the WC-10Co-4Cr coating had better cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance than the FeCrSiBMn coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. After eroded for 30 h, the volume loss rate of the WC-10Co-4Cr coating was about 2/5 that of the FeCrSiBMn coating. In the total cumulative volume loss rate under cavitation erosion-corrosion condition, the pure cavitation erosion played a key role for both coatings, and the total contribution of pure corrosion and erosion-induced corrosion of the WC-10Co-4Cr coating was larger than that of the FeCrSiBMn coating. Mechanical effect was the main factor for cavitation erosion-corrosion behavior of both coatings.

  5. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality by Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B.Mi; X. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-05-26

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with different surface preparation conditions before applying the coating, e.g., grit-blasted surface, wire-brush cleaned surface, and a dirty surface. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that the three surface preparation conditions can be successfully differentiated by looking into the impedance difference observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. More specimens are also prepared with variations of process parameters, such as spray angle, stand-off distance, and application of corrosion protective sealant, etc. They are blindly tested to evaluate the reliability of the eddy current system. Quantitative relations between the coating bond strength and the eddy current response are also established with the support of destructive testing. This non-contact, non-destructive, easy to use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  6. Thermal spray manual for machinery components

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, R.; Ginther, C.; Herbstritt, M.; Herbstritt, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Thermal Spray Manual For Machinery Components is a National Shipbuilding Research (SP-7) Project. This Manual is being developed by Puget Sound Naval Shipyard with the help of other government thermal spray facilities and SP-7 panel members. The purpose of the manual is to provide marine repair facilities with a ``how to do`` document that will be ``user friendly`` and known to be technically sound through production experience. The manual`s intent is to give marine repair facilities the ability to maximize the thermal spray process as a repair method for machinery components and to give these facilities guidelines on how to become qualified to receive certification that they meet the requirements of Military Standard 1687A.

  7. Thermal spray coatings: New materials, processes and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.N.

    1985-01-01

    The major areas of thermal spray, including materials, equipment, processes, coatings and applications, are covered. Emphasis of the papers is on practical recommendations and solutions to present applications. The author provides information on linear gas mass controllers, metal sprayed coating systems, plasma sprayed coatings, thermal sprayed coatings in marine applications and for repairing equipment parts, and advances in arc coating technology.

  8. Turning of thick thermal spray coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López de Lacalle, L. N.; Lamikiz, A.; Fernandes, M. H.; Gutiérrez, A.; Sánchez, J. A.

    2001-06-01

    This technical note looks at several attempts to machine parts coated with Ni5Al thermal spray. This coating is used in the overhaul and repair of gas turbine components. Machining the thermal sprays to achieve the dimensional tolerances and surface finish is needed. Turning tests were performed with small carbide inserts and with CBN. A study was made of tool performance and cutting process. In this way, tool life, wear mechanism, chip formation process, and actual roughness of turned parts were analyzed. In addition to the good performance of CBN inserts, some disadvantages of using coolant with CBN tools were detected and analyzed.

  9. Influence of the spray velocity on arc-sprayed coating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, H.-D.; Nassenstein, K.

    1999-09-01

    Thermal spray processes such as plasma spraying and HVOF have gained markets due to a steady process of development of materials and equipment. One disadvantage of thermal spray processes is that costs must be competitive compared to techniques such as PTA and electroplating. In order to reduce costs, the more economical spray processes like conventional wire flame spraying, as well as arc spraying, are becoming more popular. There are modern arc spray gun designs on the market that meet the requirements of modern coating properties, for example aviation overhaul applications as well as the processing of cored wires. Nevertheless, the physical basis of arc spraying is well known. The aim of the present investigation is to show how the influence of spray velocity (not particle velocity) affects coating structure with respect to arc spray parameters.

  10. Experimental and numerical evaluation of the performance of supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray (Warm Spray) gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, H.; Morita, H.; Komatsu, M.; Kuroda, S.

    2011-03-01

    The water-cooled supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun was developed to make a coating of temperature-sensitive material, such as titanium, on a substrate. The gun has a combustion chamber (CC) followed by a mixing chamber (MC), in which the combustion gas is mixed with the nitrogen gas at room temperature. The mixed gas is accelerated to supersonic speed through a converging-diverging (C-D) nozzle followed by a straight passage called the barrel. This paper proposes an experimental procedure to estimate the cooling rate of CC, MC and barrel separately. Then, the mathematical model is presented to predict the pressure and temperature in the MC for the specific mass flow rates of fuel, oxygen and nitrogen by assuming chemical equilibrium with water-cooling in the CC and MC, and frozen flow with constant specific heat from stagnant condition to the throat in the CC and MC. Finally, the present mathematical model was validated by comparing the calculated and measured stagnant pressures of the CC of the two-stage HVOF gun.

  11. High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray of Fe-Based Amorphous Alloy: a Numerical and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdelsztajn, L.; Dannenberg, J.; Lopez, J.; Yang, N.; Farmer, J.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2009-09-01

    The fabrication of dense coatings with appropriate properties using a high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process requires an in-depth understanding of the complete gas flow field and particle behavior during the process. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is implemented to investigate the gas flow behavior that occurs during the HVOF process and a simplified one-dimensional decoupled model of the in-flight thermal behavior of the amorphous Fe-based powder particles was developed and applied for three different spray conditions. The numerical results were used to rationalize the different coating microstructures described in the experimental results. Low porosity and amorphous coatings were produced using two different particle size distributions (16 to 25 μm and 25 to 53 μm). The amorphous characteristics of the powder were retained in the coating due to melting and rapid solidification in the case of very fine powder or ligaments (<16 μm) and to the fact that the crystallization temperature was not reached in the case of the large particles (16 to 53 μm).

  12. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  13. Feasibility of thermal NDE methods for Naval thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.R.; Wandling, C.R.; Schmeller, M.D.; Sulit, R.A.

    1983-10-24

    Thermal spray coatings are widely used to prevent corrosion in metal structures. They are also used to repair and reduce wear in machinery. A feasibility demonstration has shown that infrared-thermal scanning can be applied to nondestructively examine the coating-to-substrate bonds in a variety of thermal spray coatings. Emissivity independent and thermal wave methods must be applied in some cases to eliminate the effects of local differences in surface conditions and coating thickness. Rough-surfaced coatings such as those used in anti-skid applications can have thickness varying from about 0.1 inch (3 mm) at peaks to less than 0.04 inch (1 mm) at valleys. Data showing the feasibility of detecting non-bonds even under such rough coatings is described in this paper. The present work is the first phase of a program to develop a generally applicable emissivity independent thermal NDE scanning system for thermal spray coatings. This work was sponsored by the US Naval Sea Systems Command Materials Research and Development Program. It was directed by the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard which is the lead shipyard for introduction and implementation of industrial thermal spray processes and equipment for Naval applications. High speed, low application cost, high reliability and ease of test interpretation are the prime goals for the final thermal scanning NDE system. The most advanced state-of-the-art methods using thermal wave analysis to make maximum use of the scan information are being incorporated.

  14. Microstructure Evolution and Its Effect on the Wear Performance of HVOF-Sprayed Conventional WC-Co Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dingfa; Xiong, Haoqi; Wang, Qun

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a conventional tungsten carbide 12% cobalt (WC-12Co) coating was deposited by using a liquid fuel JP-8000 high velocity oxyfuel spray system. The properties of the coating namely phase content, microstructure, hardness, porosity, and fracture toughness were examined. The microstructure evolution and its influence on the abrasive wear behavior of the coatings were evaluated in detail by in-situ scanning electron microscopy and a comprehensive model for decarburization of WC has been established using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analyses.

  15. Thermal nondestructive examination method for thermal-spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.R.; Schmeller, M.D.; Sulit, R.A.

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes a feasibility demonstration of a thermal scanning NDE (nondestructive examination) system for thermal-spray coatings. Non-bonds were detected between several types of coatings and their substrates. Aluminum anti-skid coatings having very rough surfaces were included. A technique for producing known non-bond areas for calibrating and demonstrating NDE methods was developed.

  16. Computer experiment on studying the properties of thermally sprayed alumina coatings with lamellar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, V. I.; Solonenko, O. P.; Blednov, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    Results of stochastic modeling of lamellar structure formation and characteristics (microstructure, porosity, roughness) of ceramic coatings made of corundum powders (α-phase of Al2O3) are given in conditions typical for atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), and also detonation and supersonic flame spraying (HVOF). Comparison of characteristics of coatings for two model splats morphologies at their random laying on the base surface is presented.

  17. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the passive films formed on thermally sprayed and wrought Inconel 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakare, M. S.; Voisey, K. T.; Roe, M. J.; McCartney, D. G.

    2010-11-01

    There is a well known performance gap in corrosion resistance between thermally sprayed corrosion resistant coatings and the equivalent bulk materials. Interconnected porosity has an important and well known effect, however there are additional relevant microstructural effects. Previous work has shown that a compositional difference exists between the regions of resolidified and non-melted material that exist in the as-sprayed coatings. The resolidified regions are depleted in oxide forming elements due to formation of oxides during coating deposition. Formation of galvanic cells between these different regions is believed to decrease the corrosion resistance of the coating. In order to increase understanding of the details of this effect, this work uses X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study the passive films formed on thermally sprayed coatings (HVOF) and bulk Inconel 625, a commercially available corrosion resistant Ni-Cr-Mo-Nb alloy. Passive films produced by potentiodynamic scanning to 400 mV in 0.5 M sulphuric acid were compared with air-formed films. The poorer corrosion performance of the thermally sprayed coatings was attributed to Ni(OH) 2, which forms a loose, non-adherent and therefore non-protective film. The good corrosion resistance of wrought Inconel 625 is due to formation of Cr, Mo and Nb oxides.

  18. Mechanical Property of HVOF Inconel 718 Coating for Aeronautic Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyphout, Christophe; Fasth, Angelica; Nylen, Per

    2014-02-01

    The module of elasticity is one of the most important mechanical properties defining the strength of a material which is a prerequisite to design a component from its early stage of conception to its field of application. When a material is to be thermally sprayed, mechanical properties of the deposited layers differ from the bulk material, mainly due to the anisotropy of the highly textured coating microstructure. The mechanical response of the deposited layers significantly influences the overall performance of the coated component. It is, therefore, of importance to evaluate the effective module of elasticity of the coating. Conventional experimental methods such as microindentation, nanoindentation and four-point bending tests have been investigated and their results vary significantly, mainly due to inhomogeneous characteristics of the coating microstructure. Synchrotron radiation coupled with a tensile test rig has been proposed as an alternative method to determine the coating anisotropic elastic behavior dependence on crystallographic orientations. The investigation was performed on Inconel 718 (IN718) HVOF coatings sprayed on IN718 substrates. Combining these experimental techniques yield a deeper understanding of the nature of the HVOF coating Young's modulus and thus a tool for Design Practice for repair applications.

  19. Fracture evaluation of thermally sprayed coatings in dependence on cohesive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, J.; Česánek, Z.

    2017-05-01

    Measuring the cohesive strength of thermally sprayed coatings is relatively difficult matter, which can be accessed in many directions. This issue is nowadays solved by use of Scratch test method. This method is not completely sufficient for the cohesive strength testing because the coating is under load of combined stresses during the Scratch test. The reason to develop this method was need for exact measurement of tensile cohesion toughness of thermally sprayed coatings, which could provide results as close to a classic tensile test as possible. Another reason for development of this method was the impossibility of direct comparison with results obtained by other methods. Tested coatings were prepared using HP / HVOF (Stellite 6, NiCrBSi, CrC-NiCr and Hastelloy C-276). These coatings were selected as commonly used in commercial sector and also on because of rising customer demand for ability to provide such coating characteristics. The tested coatings were evaluated in terms of cohesive strength (method based on tensile strength test). Final fractures were evaluated by optical microscopy together with scanning electron microscopy and EDS analysis. As expected higher cohesive strength showed metallic coatings with top results of coating Stellite 6. Carbide coatings showed approximately third of the cohesion strength in comparison with metal based coating.

  20. Investigation of thermal spray coatings on austenitic stainless steel substrate to enhance corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel M.

    The research is aimed to evaluate thermal spray coatings to address material issues in supercritical and ultra-supercritical Rankine cycles. The primary purpose of the research is to test, evaluate, and eventually implement a coating to improve corrosion resistance and increase efficiency of coal fired power plants. The research is performed as part of a comprehensive project to evaluate the ability of titanium, titanium carbide, or titanium diboride powders to provide fireside corrosion resistance in supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam boilers, specifically, coal driven boilers in Illinois that must utilize high sulfur and high chlorine content coal. [1] The powder coatings that were tested are nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) and titanium di-boride (TiB2) powders that were synthesized by a patented process at Southern Illinois University. The powders were then sent to Gas Technology Institute in Chicago to coat steel coupons by HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) thermal spray technique. The powders were coated on an austenitic 304H stainless steel substrate which is commonly found in high temperature boilers, pipelines, and heat exchangers. The samples then went through various tests for various lengths of time under subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical conditions. The samples were examined using a scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction techniques to study microstructural changes and then determined which coating performed best.

  1. Structure Property Relationship of Suspension Thermally Sprayed WC-Co Nanocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, R.; Faisal, N. H.; Al-Anazi, Nayef M.; Al-Mutairi, S.; Toma, F.-L.; Berger, L.-M.; Potthoff, A.; Polychroniadis, E. K.; Sall, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Goosen, M. F. A.

    2015-02-01

    Tribomechanical properties of nanostructured coatings deposited by suspension high velocity oxy-fuel (S-HVOF) and conventional HVOF (Jet Kote) spraying were evaluated. Nanostructured S-HVOF coatings were obtained via ball milling of the agglomerated and sintered WC-12Co feedstock powder, which were deposited via an aqueous-based suspension using modified HVOF (TopGun) process. Microstructural evaluations of these hardmetal coatings included transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The nanohardness and modulus of the coated specimens were investigated using a diamond Berkovich nanoindenter. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a ball-on-flat test rig. Results indicated that low porosity coatings with nanostructured features were obtained. High carbon loss was observed, but coatings showed a high hardness up to 1000 HV2.9N. S-HVOF coatings also showed improved sliding wear and friction behavior, which were attributed to nanosized particles reducing ball wear in three-body abrasion and support of metal matrix due to uniform distribution of nanoparticles in the coating microstructure.

  2. Development of thermally-sprayed Al-Cu-Fe-Cr quasicrystal coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiamarga, Budi Hartono

    A class of quasicrystal alloys that has drawn a lot of attention is aluminum based quasicrystal alloys because they are hard, light weight, wear resistant, and have a non-stick property. Quasicrystalline materials in the form of coatings produced by thermal spray techniques have been developed to utilize their properties. The goal of this research has been to develop the knowledge necessary to produce good thermally sprayed Al-Cu-Fe-Cr quasicrystal coatings. Boron has been found to improve ductility, reduce porosity and increase hardness when added to other thermally sprayed powders, therefore, as part of this research, quasicrystal coatings containing boron will also be produced and evaluated. The first phase of this research utilized a fine QC-1 quasicrystal powder of Alsb{70.5}Cusb{10.1}Fesb{8.8}Crsb{10.6}. The addition of boron was done using mechanical mixing. The addition of boron in fused QC-1 powders shows that boron can reduce porosity and increase hardness. Due to difficulties with thermal spraying the fine QC-1 powder and evaporation of aluminum, a coarser QC-2 powder with similar composition to QC-1 powder was produced. QC-2 and boron modified QC-2 coatings have similar hardness and levels of porosity, around 11%, although boron modified QC-2 coatings proved to be more wear resistant than plain QC-2 coatings. Both coatings demonstrated a weak coating-substrate interface bonding. Laser heat treatment was used to reduce the porosity and strengthen the coating-substrate interface bonding. Laser treatment of QC-2 quasicrystal coatings resulted in harder and lower porosity coatings with better coating-substrate interface bonding. Unfortunately, hot-cracks in the coatings were also produced. Hot-cracks are undesireable because they decrease the coating's corrosion resistance. Thermal spraying using High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) technique was done. It was used on QC-2 powder and QC-3 powder of composition Alsb{68.6}Cusb{10.8}Fesb{8.9}Crsb{9.7}Bsb{2.0}. This

  3. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  4. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2014-09-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  5. Quality control of thermal sprayed coatings with an optoelectric sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, H.; Brandt, O.; Kasper, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on the development of a fully optoelectronic optical sensor that has been used for investigations concerning quality control of the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) flame spraying process. The authors focused on the following parameters: WoC with Co, CoCr, Ni at T < 500 C, and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} with Ni-Cr, Ni at T < 900 C. Until recently, there was no non-destructive testing (NDT) approach for flame spraying available, which is a major drawback for many critical applications, like in the aerospace industry. For instance, while cooling down after spraying, cracks in the coatings may occur caused by strain. Furthermore, edges may cause similar damage to the coating. The idea was to provide the flame spraying industry with a measurement technology that is applicable in the workshop, has a contactless principle of operation and is fast compared to the commonly used metallography or scanning electron microscopy. The approach is designed for use close to the process, i.e. coating morphology was not the focus of the investigations. On the contrary, they tried to extract quality related information from surface microtopography which can be obtained in a non-destructive and affordable manner. Main points covered in this paper are theoretical considerations, the operational principles and construction of the sensor head, and quantitative metrology of surface damage such as variations in rms-roughness and cracks.

  6. Thermal spray coatings replace hard chrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, M.; Unger, R.

    1997-08-01

    Hard chrome plating provides good wear and erosion resistance, as well as good corrosion protection and fine surface finishes. Until a few years ago, it could also be applied at a reasonable cost. However, because of the many environmental and financial sanctions that have been imposed on the process over the past several years, cost has been on a consistent upward trend, and is projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, it is very important to find a coating or a process that offers the same characteristics as hard chrome plating, but without the consequent risks. This article lists the benefits and limitations of hard chrome plating, and describes the performance of two thermal spray coatings (tungsten carbide and chromium carbide) that compared favorably with hard chrome plating in a series of tests. It also lists three criteria to determine whether plasma spray or hard chrome plating should be selected.

  7. Thermal Spray Formation of Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coquill, Scott; Galbraith, Stephen L.; Tuss. Darren L.; Ivosevic, Milan

    2008-01-01

    This innovation forms a sprayable polymer film using powdered precursor materials and an in-process heating method. This device directly applies a powdered polymer onto a substrate to form an adherent, mechanically-sound, and thickness-regulated film. The process can be used to lay down both fully dense and porous, e.g., foam, coatings. This system is field-deployable and includes power distribution, heater controls, polymer constituent material bins, flow controls, material transportation functions, and a thermal spray apparatus. The only thing required for operation in the field is a power source. Because this method does not require solvents, it does not release the toxic, volatile organic compounds of previous methods. Also, the sprayed polymer material is not degraded because this method does not use hot combustion gas or hot plasma gas. This keeps the polymer from becoming rough, porous, or poorly bonded.

  8. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Landing Gear Components Using HVOF Thermal Spray Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    Ogden Air Logistics Center • Mr. Robert Kestler, Naval Aviation Depot Cherry Point • Mr. James Candela, Naval Air Systems Command • Mr. Donald...WC/17Co or WC/10Co4Cr sliding against bushings fabricated from 4340 steel, Al-Ni bronze, anodized 2024 Al alloy, a Nitrile seal, or a Karon B seal...or a Karon B seal. The fretting test is illustrated in Figure 8, with the shoe fabricated from 4340 steel and coated with EHC, WC/17Co or WC

  9. Dilation Behavior of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano Lopez, Miryan Lorena

    Thermal Spray (TS) is a very versatile manufacturing process to deposit thick coatings on a variety of substrates. Coatings are used in protective (i.e. wear, chemical attack, high temperature, etc.) and functional (i.e. sensors) applications. TS coatings have a unique lamellar microstructure as a result of the overlapping of millions of molten and partially-molten particles. During processing, high deformation by impact, high temperature, and rapid solidification lead to a complex hierarchical material system that contains a high amount of microstructural defects. The presence of defects in the microstructure contribute to differences in property values in comparison to bulk materials. Thermal stresses and residual strains arise from processing, thermal gradients and thermal exposure. Evaluation of thermal properties, in this case, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is of vital importance to enhance coating performance. In this dissertation, expansion measurements of various metals, alloys, ceramics, and cermet coatings; were carried out using various techniques (push rod dilatometry, x-ray diffraction XRD, digital image correlation DIC, and curvature method) to determine the dilation behavior at the atomic, micro- and macro-scale levels. The main results were. 1) Mathematical models (Turner and Kerner) used for composite materials, successfully predicted the CTE property of a TS coating where the primary phase is the coating material and the secondary phases can be oxides, precipitates, etc. (formed as a byproduct of the spraying process). CTE was found not to be affected by porosity. 2) Despite the anisotropic behavior characteristic of TS coatings, the experimental results shown that CTE results to be reasonable isotropic within the scope of this study. 3) The curvature method was found to be an alternative technique to obtain the CTE, as well as the Young's modulus of coating in a bi-material strip, with good approximation. 4) An anomalous expansion

  10. Splat formation during thermal spraying of polymer particles: Mathematical modeling and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivosevic, Milan

    This thesis develops and presents a model for predicting the three-dimensional splat formation process for polymer particles under High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) combustion spray process conditions. During HVOF spray deposition, jets of high temperature, high velocity gases are used to heat, melt and accelerate particulate materials injected into the jet and propel them towards a surface to be coated. Upon impact at the surface, multiple hot particles impact and form splats that overlap, cool and consolidate to form a coating. These splats are the building blocks of an HVOF coating and coating characteristics such as porosity, roughness, adhesive and cohesive strengths depend on the morphology of these splats and how they bond to the substrate and to each other. Fully coupled transport models of particle acceleration and heating in an HVOF jet were simultaneously integrated within a FORTRAN code to predict particle velocity and particle temperature profiles at impact. Then, a volume-of-fluid computational fluid mechanics package, Flow-3DRTM, was used to predict particle deformation and splat shapes using results from the acceleration and heating models as the initial conditions. Fluid flow of spreading polymer droplets was modeled as a generalized Newtonian fluid with temperature and shear rate dependent viscosity. While shear thinning primarily affected the droplet spreading ratio, the internal temperature distribution had the largest effect on the final splat shape, particularly when particles were partially melted. The predicted shapes of deformed particles exhibited good qualitative agreement with experimentally observed splats. Most of the larger experimentally observed (> 70 mum) Nylon-11 splats sprayed onto room temperature flat or rough substrates exhibited a characteristic "fried-egg" shape with a large, nearly-hemispherical, core in the center of a thin disk. This shape was formed from polymer particles having a low temperature, high viscosity core and a

  11. Comparative Study of Microstructure and Properties of Thermal Sprayed MCrAlY Bond Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglima, Michael William

    A series of experiments were performed in order to observe certain process-property trends in thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coatings for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications in gas-turbine engines. Firstly, the basis of gas-turbine operation and design is discussed with a focus on the Brayton cycle and basic thermodynamic properties with respect to both the thermal and fuel efficiency of the turbine. The high-temperature environment inside the gas-turbine engine creates an extremely corrosive medium in which the engineering components must operate with sufficient operating life times. These engineering constraints, both thermal/fuel efficiency and operating life, pose a serious problem during long operation as well as thermal cycling of a civil aerospace engine. The concept of a thermal barrier coating is introduced along with how these coatings protect the internal engineering components, mostly in the hot-section of the turbine, and increase both the efficiency as well as the operating life of the components. The method used to create TBC's is then introduced being thermal spray processing along with standard operating procedures (SOP) used during coating deposition. The main focus of the experiments was to quantify the process-property trends seen during thermal spray processing of TBC's with respect to the adhesion and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer, as well as how sensitive these properties are to changing variables during coating deposition. The design of experiment (DOE) method was used in order to have sufficient statistical process control over the output as well as a standard method for quantifying the results. A total of three DOE's were performed using two main types of thermal spray processes being high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and atmospheric plasma spray (APS), with a total of five different types of torches which are categorized by liquid-fuel, gas-fuel, and single cathode plasma. The variables used in the proceeding experiments were

  12. Thermal Expansion of Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S V.; Palczer, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic Cu-8%Cr, Cu-26%Cr, Cu-8%Cr-1%Al, NiAl and NiCrAlY monolithic coatings were fabricated by vacuum plasma spray deposition processes for thermal expansion property measurements between 293 and 1223 K. The corrected thermal expansion, (DL/L(sub 0) varies with the absolute temperature, T, as (DL/L(sub 0) = A(T - 293)(sup 3) + BIT - 293)(sup 2) + C(T - 293) + D, where, A, B, C and D are thermal, regression constants. Excellent reproducibility was observed for all of the coatings except for data obtained on the Cu-8%Cr and Cu-26%Cr coatings in the first heat-up cycle, which deviated from those determined in the subsequent cycles. This deviation is attributed to the presence of residual stresses developed during the spraying of the coatings, which are relieved after the first heat-up cycle. In the cases of Cu-8%Cr and NiAl, the thermal expansion data were observed to be reproducible for three specimens. The linear expansion data for Cu-8% Cr and Cu-26%Cr agree extremely well with rule of mixture (ROM) predictions. Comparison of the data for the Cu-8%Cr coating with literature data for Cr and Cu revealed that the thermal expansion behavior of this alloy is determined by the Cu-rich matrix. The data for NiAl and NiCrAlY are in excellent agreement with published results irrespective of composition and the methods used for processing the materials. The implications of these results on coating GRCop-84 copper alloy combustor liners for reusable launch vehicles are discussed.

  13. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2017-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to shield the blades of gas turbines from heat and wear. There is a pressing need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of TBCs in the thermal design of advanced gas turbines with high energy efficiency. These TBCs consist of a ceramic-based top coat and a bond coat on a superalloy substrate. Usually, the focus is on the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction of the TBC because heat tends to diffuse from the surface of the top coat to the substrate. However, the in-plane thermal conductivity is also important in the thermal design of gas turbines because the temperature distribution within the turbine cannot be ignored. Accordingly, a method is developed in this study for measuring the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the top coat. Yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats are prepared by thermal spraying under different conditions. The in-plane and cross-plane thermal diffusivities of the top coats are measured by the flash method to investigate the anisotropy of thermal conduction in a TBC. It is found that the in-plane thermal diffusivity is higher than the cross-plane one for each top coat and that the top coats have significantly anisotropic thermal diffusivity. The cross-sectional and in-plane microstructures of the top coats are observed, from which their porosities are evaluated. The thermal diffusivity and its anisotropy are discussed in detail in relation to microstructure and porosity.

  14. Deposition and properties of high-velocity-oxygen-fuel and plasma-sprayed Mo-Mo2C composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prchlik, L.; Gutleber, J.; Sampath, S.

    2001-12-01

    Molybdenum thermal-spray coatings, dispersion strengthened by molybdenum oxides and molybdenum carbides, play an important role in industrial tribological applications. Traditionally, they have been prepared by plasma and wire flame spraying. High porosity and lower cohesion strength limit their application in situations where both galling and abrasion wear is involved. In this study, high-velocity-oxygen-fuel (HVOF) deposition of molybdenum and molybdenum carbide coatings was attempted. Deposition was achieved for all powders used. Composition, microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of the HVOF synthesized coatings were evaluated and compared with plasma-sprayed counterparts. The HVOF coatings possessed a very good abrasion resistance, whereas plasma deposits performed better in dry sliding tests. Measurements showed a close relationship between the coating surface hardness and its abrasion resistance. Results also suggested correlation between molybdenum carbide distribution in the molybdenum matrix and the sliding friction response of Mo-Mo2C coatings.

  15. A Comparative Study on Ni-Based Coatings Prepared by HVAF, HVOF, and APS Methods for Corrosion Protection Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghimeresht, E.; Markocsan, N.; Nylén, P.

    2016-12-01

    Selection of the thermal spray process is the most important step toward a proper coating solution for a given application as important coating characteristics such as adhesion and microstructure are highly dependent on it. In the present work, a process-microstructure-properties-performance correlation study was performed in order to figure out the main characteristics and corrosion performance of the coatings produced by different thermal spray techniques such as high-velocity air fuel (HVAF), high-velocity oxy fuel (HVOF), and atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). Previously optimized HVOF and APS process parameters were used to deposit Ni, NiCr, and NiAl coatings and compare with HVAF-sprayed coatings with randomly selected process parameters. As the HVAF process presented the best coating characteristics and corrosion behavior, few process parameters such as feed rate and standoff distance (SoD) were investigated to systematically optimize the HVAF coatings in terms of low porosity and high corrosion resistance. The Ni and NiAl coatings with lower porosity and better corrosion behavior were obtained at an average SoD of 300 mm and feed rate of 150 g/min. The NiCr coating sprayed at a SoD of 250 mm and feed rate of 75 g/min showed the highest corrosion resistance among all investigated samples.

  16. Characterization of WC-10Ni HVOF Coating for Carbon Steel Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, N. A.; Kamdi, Z.; Mohamad, Z.; Omar, A. S.; Latif, N. Abdul; Tobi, A. L. Mohd

    2017-01-01

    High Velocity Oxy-Fuel, HVOF is a depositing methods of a material layer over a base metal or substrate with characteristics of high flame velocity and moderate temperature. Where, tungsten carbide, WC cermet HVOF coatings is widely used to protect machine components from wear and corrosion. The main purpose of this present paper is to characterize the WC-10Ni coating deposited by HVOF thermal spray onto a carbon steel blade. The morphology and chemical composition of the coating were characterized by Scanning Electron Microstructure (SEM), electron dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The hardness test was carried out by using Vickers micro-hardness tester with loads of 490.3 mN (HV0.05). From XRD results, no sharp nickel peak was identified and has been replaced by a hump which indicate the amorphous Ni. The major crystalline phases were compounds WC, W2C and metallic phase of W. The WC-10Ni coating shows high hardness with low porosity distribution.

  17. Cold Sprayed Intermetallic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshchinsky, Evgeny

    Conventional thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of a duplex structure with a metallic bond coat and a ceramic heat-isolative topcoat. Several recent research activities are concentrated on the development of improved multilayer bond coat and TBC materials. This study represents an investigation performed for the aluminum based bond coats, especially those with reduced thermal conductivities. Using alternative TBC materials, such as metal alloys and intermetallics, their processing methods can be further optimized to achieve the best thermal physical parameters. One example is the ten-layer system in which cold sprayed aluminum based intermetallics are synthesized. These systems demonstrated improved heat insulation and thermal fatigue capabilities compared to conventional TBC. The microstructures and properties of the laminar coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD; micromechanical and durability tests were performed to define the structure and coating formation mechanisms. Application prospects for HCCI engines are discussed. Fuel energy can be utilized more efficiently with the concept of low heat rejection engines with applied TBC.

  18. Laser surface modification (LSM) of thermally-sprayed Diamalloy 2002 coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisario, A.; Barletta, M.; Veniali, F.

    2012-09-01

    Thermally-sprayed Diamalloy 2002 is widely used as overlay coating in several applications for their good wear and corrosion protection. Although, in the past, any effort has been produced to deposit Diamalloy 2002 with a low degree of defectiveness, some residual porosity and cracks can often affect the final property of the resulting coatings. Different techniques are commonly used to improve the performance of Diamalloy 2002. Recently, laser post-treatment seems to be one of the most promising, being an effective, non-contact, mini-invasive technology. In this respect, the present investigation deals with the application of a continuous wave high power diode laser to post-treat Diamalloy 2002 deposited by HVOF on AA 6082 T6 aluminum alloy. Different laser power and scan speed were investigated in order to identify the process window most favorable to improve the overall mechanical property of Diamalloy 2002 coatings. The changes in morphology, micro-structure and chemical composition of the coatings after laser post-treatments were investigated by inductive gage profilometry and combined SEM-EDXS. Further, the changes in the mechanical properties of the coatings were investigated in terms of hardness, elastic modulus, scratch and wear resistance. Consistent improvements in mechanical property can be achieved by Diamalloy 2002 when laser processing is performed at higher power and reduced scan speed. Yet, too much increase in power density should be always avoided as it can be detrimental to the final property of the coatings and cause high defectiveness and their failure.

  19. A simulation technique for predicting thickness of thermal sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goedjen, John G.; Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Leissler, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The complexity of many of the components being coated today using the thermal spray process makes the trial and error approach traditionally followed in depositing a uniform coating inadequate, thereby necessitating a more analytical approach to developing robotic trajectories. A two dimensional finite difference simulation model has been developed to predict the thickness of coatings deposited using the thermal spray process. The model couples robotic and component trajectories and thermal spraying parameters to predict coating thickness. Simulations and experimental verification were performed on a rotating disk to evaluate the predictive capabilities of the approach.

  20. Anomalous Epitaxial Growth in Thermally Sprayed YSZ and LZ Splats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2017-08-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are essentially layered materials, and lamellar interfaces are of great importance to coatings' performances. In the present study, to investigate the microstructures and defect features at thermally sprayed coating interfaces, homoepitaxial 8 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and heteroepitaxial lanthanum zirconia (LZ) films were fabricated. The epitaxial interfaces were examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) in detail. As a result, we report, for the first time, an anomalous incommensurate homoepitaxial growth with mismatch-induced dislocations in thermally sprayed YSZ splats to create a homointerface. We also find the anomalous heteroepitaxial growth in thermally sprayed LZ splats. The mechanism of the anomalous incommensurate growth was analyzed in detail. Essentially, it is a pseudo-heteroepitaxy because of the lattice mismatch between the film and the locally heated substrate, as the locally heated substrate is significantly strained by its cold surroundings. Moreover, the super-high-density dislocations were found in the interfacial region, which resulted from sufficient thermal fluctuations and extremely rapid cooling rates. Both the anomalous lattice mismatch and super-high-density dislocations lead to weak interfaces and violent cracking in thermally sprayed coatings. These were also the essential differences between the conventional and the present epitaxy by thermal spray technique.

  1. Anomalous Epitaxial Growth in Thermally Sprayed YSZ and LZ Splats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2017-06-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are essentially layered materials, and lamellar interfaces are of great importance to coatings' performances. In the present study, to investigate the microstructures and defect features at thermally sprayed coating interfaces, homoepitaxial 8 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and heteroepitaxial lanthanum zirconia (LZ) films were fabricated. The epitaxial interfaces were examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) in detail. As a result, we report, for the first time, an anomalous incommensurate homoepitaxial growth with mismatch-induced dislocations in thermally sprayed YSZ splats to create a homointerface. We also find the anomalous heteroepitaxial growth in thermally sprayed LZ splats. The mechanism of the anomalous incommensurate growth was analyzed in detail. Essentially, it is a pseudo-heteroepitaxy because of the lattice mismatch between the film and the locally heated substrate, as the locally heated substrate is significantly strained by its cold surroundings. Moreover, the super-high-density dislocations were found in the interfacial region, which resulted from sufficient thermal fluctuations and extremely rapid cooling rates. Both the anomalous lattice mismatch and super-high-density dislocations lead to weak interfaces and violent cracking in thermally sprayed coatings. These were also the essential differences between the conventional and the present epitaxy by thermal spray technique.

  2. Thermal spray deposition and evaluation of low-Z coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, R.D.; Swindeman, C.J.; White, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Thermally sprayed low-Z coatings of B{sub 4}C on Al substrates were investigated as candidate materials for first-wall reactor protective surfaces. Comparisons were made to thermally sprayed coatings of B, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and composites. Graded bond layers were applied to mitigate coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch. Microstructures, thermal diffusivity before and after thermal shock loading, steel ball impact resistance, CO{sub 2} pellet cleaning and erosion tolerance, phase content, stoichiometry by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and relative tensile strengths were measured.

  3. Elastic response of thermal spray deposits under indentation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, S.H.; Lin, C.K.; Berndt, C.C.

    1997-08-01

    The elastic response behavior of thermal spray deposits at Knoop indentations has been investigated using indentation techniques. The ration of hardness to elastic modulus, which is an important prerequisite for the evaluation of indentation fracture toughness, is determined by measuring the elastic recovery of the in-surface dimensions of Knoop indentations. The elastic moduli of thermal spray deposits are in the range of 12%--78% of the comparable bulk materials and reveal the anisotropic behavior of thermal spray deposits. A variety of thermal spray deposits has been examined, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ), and NiAl. Statistical tools have been used to evaluate the error estimates of the data.

  4. Cavitation-erosion of thermal sprayed hardfacing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out on the cavitation-erosion behavior of thermal sprayed WC-Co and Tribaloy (T-400) coatings. The thermal spray processes used were air and vacuum plasma spraying and hypersonic flame or Jet Kote spraying. The principal goals of this work were to investigate the influence of the three types of spray processes on the coating microstructure and cavitation-erosion behavior. It was found that spray atmosphere is a critical parameter in thermal spraying of WC-Co coatings. For the case of WC-Co materials, decomposition and dissolution of the carbide occur during air plasma and Jet Kote spraying processes, while no apparent decomposition and dissolution of the carbide were observed for vacuum plasma spraying. Tribaloy coatings produced by these three spray processes showed metastable mixtures of amorphous and microcrystalline phases, as well as supersaturated solid solution due to rapid solidification. Upon the heat treatment (at 1175 C for 5 minutes), these metastable phases were transformed to more stable phases. Laser treatment gave a dense coating surface structure, pore-free and crack-free surfaces, and resulted in significantly improved cavitation-erosion resistance. The main factors leading to enhanced cavitation-erosion resistance of the Tribaloy coatings are: (i) high coating density; (ii) high proportion of Laves phase; (iii) stress-induced phase transformation; and (iv) a low level of microstructural defects. The corrosive aspects of cavitation-erosion and electrochemical measurements showed that porosity was the predominant factor influencing cavitation-corrosion and corrosion behaviors.

  5. Photocatalytic Iron Oxide Coatings Produced by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Salehi, M.; Amirnasr, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.; Kalantari, Y.; Mohammadnezhad, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, hematite coatings with semiconductor properties have received attention for photocatalytic applications. In this study, plasma and flame spraying techniques were used for hematite deposition on 316 stainless steel plates. X-ray diffraction was used for phase composition analysis, and methylene blue was used as an organic pollutant to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of thermally sprayed coatings. The results showed that all these coatings could act under visible-light irradiation but the one deposited by flame spraying at 20 cm stand-off distance showed the highest photocatalytic activity. The results showed that wavelength of the light source and pH of the solution affected the photocatalytic activity significantly. It was also shown that thermally sprayed iron oxide coatings could have a high photo-absorption ability, which could positively affect the photocatalytic activity.

  6. Plasma Spray-PVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Deposit Out of the Vapor Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, Konstantin; Gindrat, Malko

    2011-06-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland). Even though it is a thermal spray process, it can deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. The basis of PS-PVD is the low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology that has been well established in industry for several years. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) or low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS), the new proposed process uses a high energy plasma gun operated at a reduced work pressure of 0.1 kPa (1 mbar). Owing to the high energy plasma and further reduced work pressure, PS-PVD is able to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional physical vapor deposition (PVD) technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) coatings. In contrast to EB-PVD, PS-PVD incorporates the vaporized coating material into a supersonic plasma plume. Owing to the forced gas stream of the plasma jet, complex shaped parts such as multi-airfoil turbine vanes can be coated with columnar thermal barrier coatings using PS-PVD. Even shadowed areas and areas which are not in the line of sight of the coating source can be coated homogeneously. This article reports on the progress made by Sulzer Metco in developing a thermal spray process to produce coatings out of the vapor phase. Columnar thermal barrier coatings made of Yttria-stabilized Zircona (YSZ) are optimized to serve in a turbine engine. This process includes not only preferable coating properties such as strain tolerance and erosion

  7. Thermal Spray Coatings for Blast Furnace Tuyere Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A.; Sivakumar, G.; Prusty, D.; Shalini, J.; Dutta, M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The components in an integrated steel plant are invariably exposed to harsh working environments involving exposure to high temperatures, corrosive gases, and erosion/wear conditions. One such critical component in the blast furnace is the tuyere, which is prone to thermal damage by splashing of molten metal/slag, erosive damage by falling burden material, and corrosion from the ensuing gases. All the above, collectively or independently, accelerate tuyere failure, which presents a potential explosion hazard in a blast furnace. Recently, thermal spray coatings have emerged as an effective solution to mitigate such severe operational challenges. In the present work, five different coatings deposited using detonation spray and air plasma spray techniques were comprehensively characterized. Performance evaluation involving thermal cycling, hot corrosion, and erosion tests was also carried out. Based on the studies, a coating system was suggested for possible tuyere applications and found to yield substantial improvement in service life during actual field trials.

  8. Mechanofused metal-carbide-oxide cermet powders for thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.; Yokota, O.; Grimaud, A.; Fauchais, P.; Usmani, S.; Chen, Z.J.; Berndt, C.C.; Herman, H.

    1994-12-31

    By generating a mechano-chemical reaction between two or more materials, the mechanofusion process enables the production of novel powdered materials having different mechanical properties. In this study, different varieties of starting materials have been combined with the aim of manufacturing powders for thermal spraying, the objective being to produce a coating having good wear resistance in severe environments (e.g., high temperatures). Sets of NiCrAlY-TiC-ZrO{sub 2} and NiAl-TiC-ZrO{sub 2} powders with different levels of ceramic have been sprayed and the resultant coatings evaluated for microstructure, microhardness, wear and thermal shock resistance. The principal objective of the present study was to evaluate mechanofusion for the production of thermal spray cermet powders.

  9. Wear mechanisms in thermally-sprayed Mo-based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, S. F.; Sampath, S.; Anand, V.

    1994-07-01

    The successful development of advanced diesel engines relies heavily on piston ring coating materials which can withstand elevated temperatures and reduce friction. Traditional hard chrome plating and flame-sprayed Mo-wire materials have reached their potential in the diesel engine environment, and alternatives are needed. Thermally-sprayed Mo-based alloys and composites are being evaluated for applications as next-generation ring-face coatings. The alloy development task of producing complex Mo-based alloy powders for use as thermally-sprayed coating materials requires an understanding of their wear resistance under contact stress conditions. In this paper, the wear behavior of Mo and Mo + NiCrBSi thermally sprayed coatings is exmined by pin-on-disc and single-point scratch-test methods. Microstructural analysis beneath worn regions have revealed that fracture of splats and their decohesion constitute the mode of failure. Improved wear resistance and stability of low friction coefficient was obtained by prealloying Mo with NiCrBSi prior to thermal spraying.

  10. Influence of Fracture Toughness and Microhardness on the Erosive Wear of Cermet Coatings Deposited by Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojena, Miguel Reyes; Orozco, Mario Sánchez; Fals, Hipólito Carvajal; Ferraresi, Valtair Antonio; Lima, Carlos Roberto Camello

    2017-02-01

    An evaluation of the relationship between the microhardness and fracture toughness with resistance to erosive wear of WC10Co4Cr, WC-12Co, and Cr3C2-25NiCr coatings was conducted. Powder and flexible cored wire feedstock materials were applied by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and flame spray (FS), respectively. The erosive wear mechanism prevailing in the coatings was found to be brittle, which also explains the higher erosion rate for the experimental condition using the particle impact angle of 90 deg and impact velocity of 9.33 m/s. The best wear performance was for the coatings applied by HVOF that attains 1.83 mm3/kg for the 90 deg/3.61 m/s test condition. The coating obtained with the WC-10Co4Cr material using the FSFC method showed tungsten carbide decarburization, justifying its poor mechanical properties and poor performance in the erosive wear test. Flame-sprayed flexicords proved to be a promising alternative to HVOF in obtaining coatings with low porosity and acceptable mechanical properties, especially in applications where the use of the HVOF technique is inadequate because of inaccessibility or excessively high cost. Values of K c for the coatings obtained by HVOF (7.35 to 10.83 MPa.m1/2) were between two and three times greater than the values obtained for the coatings resulting from FSFC (2.39 to 3.59 MPa.m1/2), in a similar manner as with the microhardness.

  11. Influence of Fracture Toughness and Microhardness on the Erosive Wear of Cermet Coatings Deposited by Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojena, Miguel Reyes; Orozco, Mario Sánchez; Fals, Hipólito Carvajal; Ferraresi, Valtair Antonio; Lima, Carlos Roberto Camello

    2017-05-01

    An evaluation of the relationship between the microhardness and fracture toughness with resistance to erosive wear of WC10Co4Cr, WC-12Co, and Cr3C2-25NiCr coatings was conducted. Powder and flexible cored wire feedstock materials were applied by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and flame spray (FS), respectively. The erosive wear mechanism prevailing in the coatings was found to be brittle, which also explains the higher erosion rate for the experimental condition using the particle impact angle of 90 deg and impact velocity of 9.33 m/s. The best wear performance was for the coatings applied by HVOF that attains 1.83 mm3/kg for the 90 deg/3.61 m/s test condition. The coating obtained with the WC-10Co4Cr material using the FSFC method showed tungsten carbide decarburization, justifying its poor mechanical properties and poor performance in the erosive wear test. Flame-sprayed flexicords proved to be a promising alternative to HVOF in obtaining coatings with low porosity and acceptable mechanical properties, especially in applications where the use of the HVOF technique is inadequate because of inaccessibility or excessively high cost. Values of K c for the coatings obtained by HVOF (7.35 to 10.83 MPa.m1/2) were between two and three times greater than the values obtained for the coatings resulting from FSFC (2.39 to 3.59 MPa.m1/2), in a similar manner as with the microhardness.

  12. Development of process data capturing, analysis and controlling for thermal spray techniques - SprayTracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelber, C.; Marke, S.; Trommler, U.; Rupprecht, C.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal spraying processes are becoming increasingly important in high-technology areas, such as automotive engineering and medical technology. The method offers the advantage of a local layer application with different materials and high deposition rates. Challenges in the application of thermal spraying result from the complex interaction of different influencing variables, which can be attributed to the properties of different materials, operating equipment supply, electrical parameters, flow mechanics, plasma physics and automation. In addition, spraying systems are subject to constant wear. Due to the process specification and the high demands on the produced coatings, innovative quality assurance tools are necessary. A central aspect, which has not yet been considered, is the data management in relation to the present measured variables, in particular the spraying system, the handling system, working safety devices and additional measuring sensors. Both the recording of all process-characterizing variables, their linking and evaluation as well as the use of the data for the active process control presuppose a novel, innovative control system (hardware and software) that was to be developed within the scope of the research project. In addition, new measurement methods and sensors are to be developed and qualified in order to improve the process reliability of thermal spraying.

  13. Quality Considerations for the Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigren, Jan; Täng, Kristina

    2007-12-01

    Revealing the true structural and mechanical properties is of utmost importance for the optimized use of thermal sprayed coatings. Only the true properties can be expected to correlate to the spray parameters. During the recent decade, the gas turbine industry has experienced a focus on the laboratory procedures being the weakest link in a frozen and robust process. This article will show several results indicating that the laboratory procedures are more essential to the evaluation results than the spray parameters themselves. With new and robust laboratory techniques, the true properties of thermal spray coatings are revealed, causing a major problem with respect to the quality standards developed 30-40 years ago. In many cases, these old specifications need updates, which is a difficult task from a cost, time, and quality perspective for OEM’s. Coatings that have been successfully used for almost half a century no longer conform to the specification they were optimized to, because of these new appropriate laboratory techniques and procedures. What is actually meant when stating the following? (1) The coating has 5% porosity; (2) No cracks are allowed; (3) Tensile bond is 50 Mpa; (4) Hardness is 1000 HV; and (5) Coating thickness is 100 μm. This article also initiates a discussion on the measurement inaccuracies, for testing of thermally sprayed coatings, with respect to the commonly used general international standards (such as QS9000, ISO17025, AS9003, and ISO10012), as well as with respect to recommendations from the Six Sigma methodology.

  14. Sealing of thermal spray coatings by impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuuttila, J.; Sorsa, P.; Mäntylä, T.; Knuuttila, J.; Sorsa, P.

    1999-06-01

    Results from the sealing of porosity by impregnation show that below a certain wetting angle of the sealant, high penetration depths are achieved. However, only sealants with very low curing shrinkages can prevent the transport of electrolyte through the coating. Various sealant types and impregnation methods are discussed, and factors influencing impregnation and sealing ability of sealants are reviewed. Experimental results from the sealing of plasma-sprayed aluminum-oxide coatings are presented.

  15. Structure characterization and wear performance of NiTi thermal sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinca, N.; Isalgué, A.; Fernández, J.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2010-08-01

    NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) has been studied for many years for its shape memory and pseudoelastic properties, as well as its biocompatibility, which make it suitable for many biomedical applications. However, SMA NiTi is also interesting for relevant wear resistance near the transition temperature which, along with its high oxidation and corrosion resistance, suggests its use as a coating to increase the lifetime of some components. Also, whereas bulk material properties have been characterized in respect of the nominal composition, manufacturing methods and thermo-mechanical treatments, NiTi overlays have been investigated much less. Most existent works in this field specifically deal with magnetron sputtering technology for thin films and its use in micro-devices (micro-electro-mechanical systems, MEMS), just some works refer to vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) for thicker coatings. The present paper explores and compares the microstructure and wear-related properties of coatings obtained from atomized NiTi powders, by VPS as well as by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) techniques. In the present case, the wear behaviour of the NiTi deposits has been studied by rubber-wheel equipment and ball-on-disk tests. The results obtained at room temperature show that the APS-quenched coatings exhibit a preferential dry sliding wear mechanism, while the VPS and HVOF coatings show an abrasive mechanism.

  16. Performance Analysis and Modeling of Thermally Sprayed Resistive Heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarre, Jean-Michel; Marcoux, Pierre; Perrault, Michel; Abbott, Richard C.; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    2013-08-01

    Many processes and systems require hot surfaces. These are usually heated using electrical elements located in their vicinity. However, this solution is subject to intrinsic limitations associated with heating element geometry and physical location. Thermally spraying electrical elements directly on surfaces can overcome these limitations by tailoring the geometry of the heating element to the application. Moreover, the element heat transfer is maximized by minimizing the distance between the heater and the surface to be heated. This article is aimed at modeling and characterizing resistive heaters sprayed on metallic substrates. Heaters were fabricated by using a plasma-sprayed alumina dielectric insulator and a wire flame-sprayed iron-based alloy resistive element. Samples were energized and kept at a constant temperature of 425 °C for up to 4 months. SEM cross-sectional observations revealed the formation of cracks at very specific locations in the alumina layer after thermal use. Finite-element modeling shows that these cracks originate from high local thermal stresses and can be predicted according to the considered geometry. The simulation model was refined using experimental parameters obtained by several techniques such as emissivity and time-dependent temperature profile (infra-red camera), resistivity (four-probe technique), thermal diffusivity (laser flash method), and mechanical properties (micro and nanoindentation). The influence of the alumina thickness and the substrate material on crack formation was evaluated.

  17. Milestones in Functional Titanium Dioxide Thermal Spray Coatings: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardon, M.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Titanium dioxide has been the most investigated metal oxide due to its outstanding performance in a wide range of applications, chemical stability and low cost. Coating processes that can produce surfaces based on this material have been deeply studied. Nevertheless, the necessity of coating large areas by means of rapid manufacturing processes renders laboratory-scale techniques unsuitable, leading to a noteworthy interest from the thermal spray (TS) community in the development of significant intellectual property and a large number of scientific publications. This review unravels the relationship between titanium dioxide and TS technologies with the aim of providing detailed information related to the most significant achievements, lack of knowhow, and performance of TS TiO2 functional coatings in photocatalytic, biomedical, and other applications. The influence of thermally activated techniques such as atmospheric plasma spray and high-velocity oxygen fuel spray on TiO2 feedstock based on powders and suspensions is revised; the influence of spraying parameters on the microstructural and compositional changes and the final active behavior of the coating have been analyzed. Recent findings on titanium dioxide coatings deposited by cold gas spray and the capacity of this technology to prevent loss of the nanostructured anatase metastable phase are also reviewed.

  18. Monoclinic zirconia distributions in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, M. J.; Haynes, J. A.; Ferber, M. K.; Cannon, W. R.

    2000-03-01

    Phase composition in an air plasma-sprayed Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) top coating of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system was characterized. Both the bulk phase content and localized pockets of monoclinic zirconia were measured with Raman spectroscopy. The starting powder consisted of ˜15 vol.% monoclinic zirconia, which decreased to ˜2 vol.% in the as-sprayed coating. Monoclinic zirconia was concentrated in porous pockets that were evenly distributed throughout the TBC. The pockets resulted from the presence of unmelted granules in the starting powder. The potential effect of the distributed monoclinic pockets on TBC performance is discussed.

  19. Quantitative analysis of thermal spray deposits using stereology

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, S.H.; Sampath, S.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Montavon, G.; Coddet, C.

    1995-12-31

    Stereology deals with protocols for describing a 3-D space, when only 2-D sections through solid bodies are available. This paper describes a stereological characterization of the microstructure of a thermal spray deposit. The aim of this work is to present results on the stereological characterization of a thermal spray deposit, using two approaches known as DeHoff`s and Cruz-Orive`s protocols. The individual splats are assumed to have an oblate spheroidal shape. The splat size distribution and elongation ratio distribution of splats are calculated using quantitative information from 2-D plane sections. The stereological methods are implemented to investigate the microstructure of a water stabilized plasma spray-formed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-13wt.%TiO{sub 2}. Results are obtained with both protocols. The splat sizes range from 0 to 60 {micro}m and shape factors from 0.4 to 1.0. The splats within the deposit seem to be much smaller and thicker (i.e., lower spreading) than those of the first layer deposited onto the substrate. The approach described in this work provides helpful quantitative information on the 3-D microstructure of thermal spray deposit.

  20. Effects of plasma spray parameters on two layer thermal barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1981-01-01

    The power level and the type of arc gas used during plasma spraying of a two layer thermal barrier system (TBS) were found to affect the life of the system. Life at 1095 C in a cyclic furnace test was improved by about 140 percent by increasing the power during plasma spray applications of the bond and thermal barrier coatings. This improvement is due to increases in the densities of the bond and thermal barrier coatings by 3 and 5 percent, respectively. These increases in densities are equivalent to about 45 and 30 percent reduction in mean porosities, respectively. The addition of hydrogen to the argon arc gas had the same effect as the reduction in power level and caused a reduction in TBS life.

  1. The Use of Thermal Spraying to Enhance the Bonding Characteristics of a Urethane Coated Propeller

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    A TRIDENT SCHOLAR PROJECT REPORT NO. 265 The Use of Thermal Spraying to Enhance the Bonding Characteristics of a Urethane Coated Propeller UNITED...Use of Thermal Spraying to Enhance the Bonding Characteristics of a Urethane Coated Propeller 6. AUTHOR(S) Poorman, Corey A. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...chosen was thermal spraying , specifically arc wire spraying , which created a rough, porous surface. This type of surface promoted mechanical bonding, as

  2. Vision-aided Monitoring and Control of Thermal Spray, Spray Forming, and Welding Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agapakis, John E.; Bolstad, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Vision is one of the most powerful forms of non-contact sensing for monitoring and control of manufacturing processes. However, processes involving an arc plasma or flame such as welding or thermal spraying pose particularly challenging problems to conventional vision sensing and processing techniques. The arc or plasma is not typically limited to a single spectral region and thus cannot be easily filtered out optically. This paper presents an innovative vision sensing system that uses intense stroboscopic illumination to overpower the arc light and produce a video image that is free of arc light or glare and dedicated image processing and analysis schemes that can enhance the video images or extract features of interest and produce quantitative process measures which can be used for process monitoring and control. Results of two SBIR programs sponsored by NASA and DOE and focusing on the application of this innovative vision sensing and processing technology to thermal spraying and welding process monitoring and control are discussed.

  3. Vision-aided monitoring and control of thermal spray, spray forming, and welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapakis, John E.; Bolstad, Jon

    1993-02-01

    Vision is one of the most powerful forms of non-contact sensing for monitoring and control of manufacturing processes. However, processes involving an arc plasma or flame such as welding or thermal spraying pose particularly challenging problems to conventional vision sensing and processing techniques. The arc or plasma is not typically limited to a single spectral region and thus cannot be easily filtered out optically. This paper presents an innovative vision sensing system that uses intense stroboscopic illumination to overpower the arc light and produce a video image that is free of arc light or glare and dedicated image processing and analysis schemes that can enhance the video images or extract features of interest and produce quantitative process measures which can be used for process monitoring and control. Results of two SBIR programs sponsored by NASA and DOE and focusing on the application of this innovative vision sensing and processing technology to thermal spraying and welding process monitoring and control are discussed.

  4. High-Power Diode Laser Surface Treated HVOF Coating to Combat High Energy Particle Impact Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.; Arya, Vivek; Pant, B. K.

    2013-07-01

    High-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed coatings have performed exceptionally well in low-energy particle impact wear and are accepted worldwide. However, their application for high-energy particle impact wear (HEPIW) requires a different approach and more efforts. HVOF-coating systems typically use WC-Co, WC-Co-Cr, WC-Ni-Cr, and FeCrAlY-Cr3C2 powders. WC-Co-Cr powders are preferred when there is a high demand for corrosion resistance. WC-10Co-4Cr coating powder has been selected in the current study. To improve coating properties such as microhardness, fracture toughness, and HEPIW resistance, a new approach of surface treatment with robotically controlled high-power diode laser (HPDL) is attempted. The robotically controlled HVOF-coating deposition and laser surface treatment were monitored using real-time diagnostic control. The HPDL-treated coating has been compared with "as-sprayed" HVOF coating for HEPIW resistance, fracture toughness, microhardness and microstructure. The coating characteristics and properties after laser surface treatment have improved many times compared with "as-sprayed" HVOF coating. This is due to the elimination of pores in the coating and formation of a metallurgical bond between coating and substrate. This new development opens up a possibility of using such laser treatments in specialized areas where HEPIW damages are acute. The fracture toughness and HEPIW resistance along with optical micrographs of HPDL-treated and untreated HVOF coatings are discussed and reported in this article. HEPIW resistance is observed to be proportional to the product of fracture toughness and microhardness of the HVOF coating.

  5. Influence of Feedstock Materials and Spray Parameters on Thermal Conductivity of Wire-Arc-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. H.; Zhou, Z.; Wang, G. H.; He, D. Y.; Bobzin, K.; Zhao, L.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-02-01

    To manufacture a protective coating with high thermal conductivity on drying cylinders in paper production machines, a FeCrB-cored wire was developed, and the spraying parameters for wire-arc spraying were optimized in this study. The conventional engineering materials FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings were produced as the reference coatings under the same experimental condition. It has been shown that the oxide content in coating influences the thermal conductivity of coating significantly. The FeCrB coating exhibits a relative higher thermal conductivity due to the lower oxide content in comparison with conventional FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings. Moreover, the oxidation of in-flight particles can be reduced by decreasing the standoff distance contributing to the increase in the thermal conductivity of coating. Total energy consumption of a papermaking machine can be significantly reduced if the coatings applied to dryer section exhibit high thermal conductivity. Therefore, the FeCrB coating developed in this study is a highly promising coating system for drying cylinders regarding the improved thermal conductivity and low operation costs in paper production industry.

  6. Influence of Feedstock Materials and Spray Parameters on Thermal Conductivity of Wire-Arc-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. H.; Zhou, Z.; Wang, G. H.; He, D. Y.; Bobzin, K.; Zhao, L.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-03-01

    To manufacture a protective coating with high thermal conductivity on drying cylinders in paper production machines, a FeCrB-cored wire was developed, and the spraying parameters for wire-arc spraying were optimized in this study. The conventional engineering materials FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings were produced as the reference coatings under the same experimental condition. It has been shown that the oxide content in coating influences the thermal conductivity of coating significantly. The FeCrB coating exhibits a relative higher thermal conductivity due to the lower oxide content in comparison with conventional FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings. Moreover, the oxidation of in-flight particles can be reduced by decreasing the standoff distance contributing to the increase in the thermal conductivity of coating. Total energy consumption of a papermaking machine can be significantly reduced if the coatings applied to dryer section exhibit high thermal conductivity. Therefore, the FeCrB coating developed in this study is a highly promising coating system for drying cylinders regarding the improved thermal conductivity and low operation costs in paper production industry.

  7. Wear and impact resistance of HVOF sprayedceramic matrix composites coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prawara, B.; Martides, E.; Priyono, B.; Ardy, H.; Rikardo, N.

    2016-02-01

    Ceramic coating has the mechanical properties of high hardness and it is well known for application on wear resistance, but on the other hand the resistance to impact load is low. Therefore its use is limited to applications that have no impact loading. The aim of this research was to obtain ceramic-metallic composite coating which has improved impact resistance compared to conventional ceramic coating. The high impact resistance of ceramic-metallic composite coating is obtained from dispersed metallic alloy phase in ceramic matrix. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) powder with chrome carbide (Cr3C2) base and ceramic-metal NiAl-Al2O3 with various particle sizes as reinforced particle was deposited on mild steel substrate with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating. Repeated impact test showed that reinforced metallic phase size influenced impact resistance of CMC coating. The ability of CMC coating to absorb impact energy has improved eight times and ten times compared with original Cr3C2 and hard chrome plating respectively. On the other hand the high temperature corrosion resistance of CMC coating showed up to 31 cycles of heating at 800°C and water quenching cooling.

  8. Processing of titanium and titanium alloys by thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Jokiel, P.

    1994-12-31

    Marine environments are generally known as aggressive corrosion atmospheres. Stainless steel applied as corrosion resistant material is very effective, but it is also an expensive solution since very often only localized areas may need protection. So, protective coatings such as aluminum, zinc, titanium or Cu/Ni alloys, organic paints and epoxies have been used to provide sufficient protection. Especially titanium and titanium alloys offer a high chemical resistance against various corrosive media due to a dense self healing oxide layer. Besides corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength combined with low specific weight are further advantages of titanium alloys. Economical restrictions still hinder titanium to be used as construction material outside of special applications in aircraft and medical technology. Generally most applications only deserve a thin protective coating. Thermal spray processes allow to combine cheap structural materials with a thin layer of high value material. The high affinity of titanium to oxygen has to be taken into account spraying this material. Therefore plasma spraying can be performed in vacuum or in inert atmosphere as well as using gas shrouds in order to shield the molten particles from reacting with the surrounding environment. This paper gives an overview on thermal spraying of titanium and titanium alloys. Coating formation as well as its characterization with regard to corrosion resistance and mechanical strength is examined.

  9. Designing energy dissipation properties via thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, Matthew R. W.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Madison, Jonathan D.

    2016-12-14

    The coefficient of restitution is a measure of energy dissipation in a system across impact events. Often, the dissipative qualities of a pair of impacting components are neglected during the design phase. This research looks at the effect of applying a thin layer of metallic coating, using thermal spray technologies, to significantly alter the dissipative properties of a system. We studied the dissipative properties across multiple impacts in order to assess the effects of work hardening, the change in microstructure, and the change in surface topography. The results of the experiments indicate that any work hardening-like effects are likely attributable to the crushing of asperities, and the permanent changes in the dissipative properties of the system, as measured by the coefficient of restitution, are attributable to the microstructure formed by the thermal spray coating. Furthermore, the microstructure appears to be robust across impact events of moderate energy levels, exhibiting negligible changes across multiple impact events.

  10. Hierarchical Formation of Intrasplat Cracks in Thermal Spray Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-06-01

    Intrasplat cracks, an essential feature of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings, play important roles in determining coating properties. However, final intrasplat crack patterns are always considered to be disordered and irregular, resulting from random cracking during splat cooling, since the detailed formation process of intrasplat cracks has scarcely been considered. In the present study, the primary formation mechanism for intrasplat cracking was explored based on both experimental observations and mechanical analysis. The results show that the intrasplat crack pattern in thermally sprayed ceramic splats presents a hierarchical structure with four sides and six neighbors, indicating that intrasplat crack patterns arise from successive domain divisions due to sequential cracking during splat cooling. The driving forces for intrasplat cracking are discussed, and the experimental data quantitatively agree well with theoretical results. This will provide insight for further coating structure designs and tailoring by tuning of intrasplat cracks.

  11. Tensile adhesion testing methodology for thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Christopher C.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of thermally sprayed coatings consists of lamellae which are oriented parallel to the substrate surface. The lamellae separate and fracture by distinctive mechanisms which are reflected in the failure morphology, and these may be described as adhesive (between the coating and substrate), cohesive (within the coating), or mixed mode. There is a large variability in the failure stress for any nominally identical group of coatings. A lower bound for the fracture toughness of alumina coatings can be calculated as 0.2 MNm exp -3/2. The coating strength values may also be treated as belonging to the statistical distribution of the Weibull function. The Weibull modulus of the coating strength varied from 1.4 to 3.8. This analysis infers that the flaw size within coatings is highly variable and that the flaws are nonuniformly dispersed. The present work focuses on the question of whether tensile adhesion tests are an appropriate testing method for thermally sprayed materials.

  12. Procedure Handbook for Shipboard Thermal Sprayed Coating Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    feedstock.. gas stream,.. . substrate . . . a coating . 4.2 History of TSA Coatings for Corrosion Protection Most U.S. shipyards are currently, or soon...throughout all types of industries for corrosion protection . Thermal sprayed coatings are used for protection of iron and steel in a range of corrosive...an excellent base for sealers or paint top coats . Zinc and aluminum coatings provide the broadest atmospheric protection , and the choice in their use

  13. Colour Matching in Decorative Thermally Sprayed Glass Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Thierry; Bertrand, Pierre; Coddet, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Coloured coatings were obtained on steel by plasma spraying without severe in-flight alteration of pigments, taking profit of the low thermal conductivity of the glassy matrix of glaze particles. Colour matching was studied by mixing 3 different glazes, comparing Grassmann and Kubelka-Munk based algorithms. Results suggest that the latter method should be preferred upon Grassmann method, particularly when the light absorption/dispersion ratios of coloured feedstocks are very different.

  14. Failure analysis of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermally induced failure processes of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings are examined. Cracking processes give rise to noise which was monitored by acoustic emission (AE) techniques. The sequential failure of coatings was examined from samples which were thermally cycled. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia with and without a NiCrAlZr bond coat were plasma-sprayed onto U700 alloy rod. In some cases the substrate was intentionally overheated during deposition of the thermal protection system to check how this process variable influenced the AE response of the specimen. In this way a qualitative appraisal of how process variables affect coating integrity could be discerned in terms of cracking behavior. Results from up to seven consecutive thermal cycles are reported here. Coating failure was observed in all cases. Failure of the thermal protection system is progressive, since cracking and crack growth were observed prior to ultimate failure. Thus castastrophic failure occurs at some stage when there is a transformation from the microcrack to a macrocrack network.

  15. Thermoelectric Device Fabrication Using Thermal Spray and Laser Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder; Fu, Gaosheng; Hwang, David J.; Zuo, Lei; Sampath, Sanjay; Longtin, Jon P.

    2016-02-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are used in many engineering applications such as vehicle and industrial waste-heat recovery systems to provide electrical power, improve operating efficiency and reduce costs. State-of-art TEG manufacturing is based on prefabricated materials and a labor-intensive process involving soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping for assembly. This reduces their durability and raises costs. Additive manufacturing technologies, such as thermal spray, present opportunities to overcome these challenges. In this work, TEGs have been fabricated for the first time using thermal spray technology and laser micromachining. The TEGs are fabricated directly onto engineering component surfaces. First, current fabrication techniques of TEGs are presented. Next, the steps required to fabricate a thermal spray-based TEG module, including the formation of the metallic interconnect layers and the thermoelectric legs are presented. A technique for bridging the air gap between two adjacent thermoelectric elements for the top layer using a sacrificial filler material is also demonstrated. A flat 50.8 mm × 50.8 mm TEG module is fabricated using this method and its performance is experimentally characterized and found to be in agreement with expected values of open-circuit voltage based on the materials used.

  16. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COATINGS by John A Luhn June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Sarath...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CORROSION AND THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC...produced by the cold gas dynamic spray process on 316L stainless steel substrates. Previous work on the use of the low-pressure cold spray process to

  17. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  18. An investigation of occupational metal exposure in thermal spraying processes.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, J K; Wilson, H K; White, M A

    1997-06-20

    A cross-sectional study of 34 workers engaged in thermal spraying at six worksites was undertaken in order to determine levels of exposure to and uptake of metals during different metal spraying activities. Levels of exposure to cobalt, chromium and nickel were highest in plasma sprayers and, on occasions exceeded UK Occupational Exposure Limits. Exposure to metals during detonation gun and electric arc spraying was better controlled and levels remained below the relevant Occupational Exposure Limits throughout the study period. Urinary levels of cobalt and nickel mirrored the airborne concentrations and the highest urine concentrations were again found in plasma sprayers. Urinary chromium levels were highest in electric arc sprayers, which may also reflect an increased body burden in this group due to a longer history of exposure. The findings clearly indicate that exposure to and uptake of metals may exceed UK Occupational Limits or Standards when spraying is performed manually or semi-automatically and where control relies on local exhaust ventilation (LEV) and personal respiratory protective equipment (RPE).

  19. Thermal sprayed composite melt containment tubular component and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Besser, Matthew F.; Terpstra, Robert L.; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Anderson, Iver E.

    2002-03-19

    A tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component for transient containment of molten metal or alloy wherein the tubular member includes a thermal sprayed inner melt-contacting layer for contacting molten metal or alloy to be processed, a thermal sprayed heat-generating layer deposited on the inner layer, and an optional thermal sprayed outer thermal insulating layer. The thermal sprayed heat-generating layer is inductively heated as a susceptor of an induction field or electrical resistively heated by passing electrical current therethrough. The tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component can comprise an elongated melt pour tube of a gas atomization apparatus where the melt pour tube supplies molten material from a crucible to an underlying melt atomization nozzle.

  20. Microstructural influence on erosion behaviour of thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, S.J.; James, B.J. . E-mail: b.james@auckland.ac.nz; Hyland, M.M.

    2007-01-15

    The influence of structure on erosion performance of thermally sprayed Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings under industrial turbine conditions has been investigated. Thermal spraying of these materials results in substantial variation in composition and microstructure due to exposure of the coating powders to the high temperature accelerating gas. Coatings were characterised using Back Scatter Electron imaging in conjunction with X-ray diffraction which showed carbide dissolution into the matrix of varying extent depending on deposition technique. Heat treatment at 900 deg. C caused carbide precipitation and matrix refinement. Erosion testing of as-sprayed and heat treated coatings was conducted at ambient and elevated temperature. Single impacts were characterised using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine the erosion mechanism. At ambient temperature the single impacts caused a brittle response with both carbide grains and matrix being cleaved by the erodent particle. Brittle cracks surrounded each impact and intersected with splat boundaries leading to a significant contribution to erosion rate from splat structure. Following heat treatment the erosion response of the coatings was more ductile with mounds of plastically deformed material surrounding each impact, this significantly reduced erosion rate.

  1. Wear Behavior of Thermal Spray Coatings on Rotavator Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Amardeep Singh; Grewal, Jasmaninder Singh; Jain, Deepak; Kang, Shivani

    2012-03-01

    A rotavator is a motorized cultivator, popularly used to decrease the total time and human efforts in soil preparation. However, under dynamic loading, rotavator blades are subjected to extreme abrasive wear. The objective of this study was to enhance the working life of the rotavator blade in order to decrease the idle time required to reinstate the blade periodically during cultivation. The objective was carried out by means of thermal spray coatings, where the effect of the coatings on the extent of wear and the wear characteristics of the rotavator blades were examined. Three different detonation gun sprayed coatings, namely WC-Co-Cr, Cr3C2NiCr and Stellite-21 were compared in this study on high tensile steel rotavator blades. The wear rates of Cr3C2NiCr and Stellite-21 coated blades showed significant superiority over the uncoated blade, but not as much as shown by WC-Co-Cr coated blade.

  2. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  3. Hill AFB HVOF Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-23

    program • Review part function • Review stress level Design and manufacture tools/fixtures Prototype Spraying •Adjustments made as needed Final Spray...measurement •Conduct grind operation •Surface finish measurement •Conduct temper etch •Conduct Barkhausen Noise Inspection (BNI) Teamwork - Integrity

  4. A Coupled Model Between Robot Trajectories and Thermal History of the Workpiece During Thermal Spray Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolot, Rodolphe; Deng, Sihao; Cai, Zhenhua; Liao, Hanlin; Montavon, Ghislain

    2014-02-01

    Offline robot trajectory generation is now often used for thermal spray applications, especially for complex design parts, requiring enhanced trajectories. This technique allows decreasing the downtime of the thermal spray cell and insures the generation of optimized trajectories. Heat transfers caused by thermal spray increase the workpiece temperature during the coating application. This temperature acts directly on the resulting thermal stresses after cooling of the part down to the ambient temperature. In this study, a coupling was developed between the robot trajectory and computation of the thermal history of the workpiece during the spray operation. The method is based on the storage of the real robot trajectory (i.e., accurate in time) in a text file, and reading of this file with a C programming performed with ANSYS/FLUENT commercial code which allows computing the displacement of the thermal sources according to the trajectory and solving the transient heat conservation equation during the torch displacement. The contributions of the impinging plasma jet and the molten particle jet are taken into account in the model.

  5. Investigation of defects in thermal sprayed coatings using impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzban, Ali

    Thermal spray (TS) coatings and materials including thermal barrier, tribological and anti-corrosive coatings have established application across a number of engineering fields. TS is attractive for these systems due to its low cost, ability to coat large areas and flexibility in material feedstock. These attributes, along with improvements in process diagnostics have spurred the exploration of TS for more functional applications including fuel cells, conformal electronic sensors and biomedical implants. Successful implementation of TS coatings in these systems will require more robust characterization of their mechanical behavior; to date this has been limited and in practice most measurements are carried out in a pass/fail manner. Little is known about the intrinsic or progressive behavior of the coatings under repeated loading. This is important as the microstructure of TS coatings comprises layers of micron-thick flattened particles ('splats') separated by interfaces, the bonding between which is not well understood. These interfaces represent potential short crack growth sites throughout the material. A lot of works has demonstrated that microstructurally short cracks propagate at substantially higher growth rates than long cracks at equivalent driving forces under both quasi-static and cycling loading conditions in ceramics and their composites and metals. Short cracks in a naturally broken material like TS will have a different mechanism. Mechanical properties and fracture behavior have been examined in TS, but via conventional methods. That is to say, a large notch is introduced and allowed to propagate. This method completely neglects the existing microstructure of a TS material, which is lamellar and contains a number of near-horizontal cracks. In this study, a new approach to damage monitoring in TS coatings, using through thickness impedance spectroscopy to detect changes in dielectric properties is introduced. The goal of this research is to understand

  6. Investigation of water spray to reduce collateral thermal damage during laser resection of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen-Kunde, D.; Wolken, H.; Ellebrecht, D.; Danicke, V.; Wurster, L.; Kleemann, M.; Birngruber, R.

    2013-06-01

    To reduce unwanted collateral thermal damage to surrounding tissue and organs during laparoscopic laser dissection (cw, wavelength: 1.9μm) of porcine liver water spray was used. Size and amount of the produced water droplets of the water spray were photographed by short time imaging and analyzed by imaging software. At in vivo measurements on fresh porcine liver the depth of thermal damage was reduced by 85 % with water spray and the lateral size of thermal damage at the tissue surface could be reduced by 67%. This results show that especially for laparoscopic laser surgery water spray application might be a useful tool to avoid unwanted collateral thermal damage.

  7. Anti-icing Behavior of Thermally Sprayed Polymer Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivuluoto, Heli; Stenroos, Christian; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Apostol, Marian; Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Vuoristo, Petri

    2017-01-01

    Surface engineering shows an increasing potential to provide a sustainable approach to icing problems. Currently, several passive anti-ice properties adoptable to coatings are known, but further research is required to proceed for practical applications. This is due to the fact that icing reduces safety, operational tempo, productivity and reliability of logistics, industry and infrastructure. An icing wind tunnel and a centrifugal ice adhesion test equipment can be used to evaluate and develop anti-icing and icephobic coatings for a potential use in various arctic environments, e.g., in wind power generation, oil drilling, mining and logistic industries. The present study deals with evaluation of icing properties of flame-sprayed polyethylene (PE)-based polymer coatings. In the laboratory-scale icing tests, thermally sprayed polymer coatings showed low ice adhesion compared with metals such as aluminum and stainless steel. The ice adhesion strength of the flame-sprayed PE coating was found to have approximately seven times lower ice adhesion values compared with metallic aluminum, indicating a very promising anti-icing behavior.

  8. Robust hydrophobic Fe-based amorphous coating by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Wu, Y.; Liu, L.

    2012-09-01

    Metallic surface is intrinsically hydrophilic due to its high surface energy. In this work, we present a different picture that highly hydrophobic metallic coatings could be directly fabricated by thermal spraying of Fe-based amorphous powders through the surface roughness control. These hydrophobic coatings are amorphous, exhibiting super-high hardness and excellent corrosion resistance. With low surface energy modification, the coatings become superhydrophobic and exhibit clearly self-cleaning effect. The present work opens a window for the applications of the amorphous coatings.

  9. Quantitative Topographical Characterization of Thermally Sprayed Coatings by Optical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, P.; Züst, R.; Michler, J.

    2009-03-01

    Topography measurements and roughness calculations for different rough surfaces (Rugotest surface comparator and thermally sprayed coatings) are presented. The surfaces are measured with a novel quantitative topography measurement technique based on optical stereomicroscopy and a comparison is made with established scanning stylus and optical profilometers. The results show that for most cases the different methods yield similar results. Stereomicroscopy is therefore a valuable method for topographical investigations in both quality control and research. On the other hand, the method based on optical microscopy demands a careful optimization of the experimental settings like the magnification and the illumination to achieve satisfactory results.

  10. Thermal transport properties of thermally sprayed coatings: An integrated study of materials, processing and microstructural effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Weiguang

    The complex microstructures of thermally sprayed coatings are very sensitive to processing conditions and have a significant influence on the properties. The thermal transport property is a very important design parameter for thermally sprayed coatings. Despite considerable progress in this area, there is continued need to clarify the interrelationships among processing, microstructure and thermal transport properties. This has been enabled through continued advancements in processing science and control, enhancements in microstructural characterization and new methods of property characterization. The purpose of this research is to seek a successive pathway to prior efforts in understanding the effect of microstructural defects on the thermal transport property of thermally sprayed coatings. Relationship between microstructure and thermal conductivity is investigated for three sets of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating systems made using different morphology powders, different particle size distribution and controlled modification of particle states via plasma torch parameters. By integrating the results, maps of the thermal conductivity-porosity relationship have been established. Such maps highlight the role of splat thickness and interfaces in thermal conductivity. Furthermore, a new microstructural parameter termed "effective porosity" is proposed which considers the dominating role of interlamellar pores on through thickness thermal transport in thermally sprayed coatings. This effective porosity is rationalized based on the heat transport mechanism and enables better understanding of microstructure-thermal transport property correlation. An inverse linear model and a percolation model are established which can serve as predictive tools for understanding microstructure-thermal conductivity relationships. In addition, a systematic assessment of thermal conductivity anisotropy has been carried out for YSZ, Al2O 3 and several metallic

  11. Effect of the increase in the entrance convergent section length of the gun nozzle on the high-velocity oxygen fuel and cold spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    2001-09-01

    Nozzle geometry, which influences combustion gas dynamics and, therefore, sprayed particle behavior, is one of the most important parameters in the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The nozzle geometry is also important in the cold spray method. The gas flows in the entrance convergent section of the nozzle exhibit a relatively higher temperature and are subsonic; thus, this region is most suitable for heating spray particles. In this study, numerical simulation and experiments investigated the effect of the entrance geometry of the gun nozzle on the HVOF process. The process changes inside the nozzle, as obtained by numerical simulation studies, were related to the coating properties. An Al2O3-40 mass% TiO2 powder was used for the experimental studies. The change in entrance convergent section length (rather than barrel part length or total length) of the gun nozzle had a significant effect on the deposition efficiency, microstructure, and hardness. The deposition efficiency and hardness increased as this geometry increased. On the other hand, the calculated and measured particle velocity showed a slight decrease. This effect on the HVOF process will also be applied to the nozzle design for the cold spray method.

  12. Comparative characteristic and erosion behavior of NiCr coatings deposited by various high-velocity oxyfuel spray processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Hazoor Singh; Sidhu, Buta Singh; Prakash, S.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the mechanical properties and microstructure details at the interface of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF)-sprayed NiCr-coated boiler tube steels, namely ASTM-SA-210 grade A1, ASTM-SA213-T-11, and ASTM-SA213-T-22. Coatings were developed by two different techniques, and in these techniques liquefied petroleum gas was used as the fuel gas. First, the coatings were characterized by metallographic, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, surface roughness, and microhardness, and then were subjected to erosion testing. An attempt has been made to describe the transformations taking place during thermal spraying. It is concluded that the HVOF wire spraying process offers a technically viable and cost-effective alternative to HVOF powder spraying process for applications in an energy generation power plant with a point view of life enhancement and to minimize the tube failures because it gives a coating having better resistance to erosion.

  13. Relationship Between the Microstructure and Thermal Conductivity of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongzhe; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Xuebin; Zeng, Yi; Ding, Minju; Zhang, Chenggong

    2011-12-01

    Plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings have a complex microstructure consisting of a variety of pores and cracks. These microstructure features which are determined by the spray process are known to influence the thermal conductivity of coatings. In this article, the microstructure features such as total porosity, large pores, and small pores were quantified by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis, and for each spray process, the particle velocity and particle temperature were measured prior to impact onto the substrate using the online monitoring system (Spray Watch 2i). Multiple linear regression was used to find the relationship between the particle state and the spray gun parameters. The linear regression models were also investigated between the particle state and the microstructure features, in addition, between the microstructure features and the thermal conductivity. The comprehensive correlation of spray process-microstructure-thermal conductivity was established for plasma-sprayed ZrO2 coatings.

  14. HVOF and HVAF Coatings of Agglomerated Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Powders for Water Droplet Erosion Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasi, F.; Mahdipoor, M. S.; Dolatabadi, A.; Medraj, M.; Moreau, C.

    2016-12-01

    Water droplet erosion (WDE) is a phenomenon caused by impingement of water droplets of several hundred microns to a few millimeters diameter at velocities of hundreds of meters per second on the edges and surfaces of the parts used in such services. The solution to this problem is sought especially for the moving compressor blades in gas turbines and those operating at the low-pressure end of steam turbines. Thermal-sprayed tungsten carbide-based coatings have been the focus of many studies and are industrially accepted for a multitude of wear and erosion resistance applications. In the present work, the microstructure, phase analysis and mechanical properties (micro-hardness and fracture toughness) of WC-Co coatings are studied in relation with their influence on the WDE resistance of such coatings. The coatings are deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes. The agglomerated tungsten carbide-cobalt powders were in either sintered or non-sintered conditions. The WDE tests were performed using 0.4 mm water droplets at 300 m/s impact velocity. The study shows promising results for this cermet as WDE-resistant coating when the coating can reach its optimum quality using the right thermal spray process and parameters.

  15. Structurally Integrated, Damage-Tolerant, Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackel, Andrew; Dwivedi, Gopal; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Thermal spray coatings are used extensively for the protection and life extension of engineering components exposed to harsh wear and/or corrosion during service in aerospace, energy, and heavy machinery sectors. Cermet coatings applied via high-velocity thermal spray are used in aggressive wear situations almost always coupled with corrosive environments. In several instances (e.g., landing gear), coatings are considered as part of the structure requiring system-level considerations. Despite their widespread use, the technology has lacked generalized scientific principles for robust coating design, manufacturing, and performance analysis. Advances in process and in situ diagnostics have provided significant insights into the process-structure-property-performance correlations providing a framework-enhanced design. In this overview, critical aspects of materials, process, parametrics, and performance are discussed through exemplary studies on relevant compositions. The underlying connective theme is understanding and controlling residual stresses generation, which not only addresses process dynamics but also provides linkage for process-property relationship for both the system (e.g., fatigue) and the surface (wear and corrosion). The anisotropic microstructure also invokes the need for damage-tolerant material design to meet future goals.

  16. Designing energy dissipation properties via thermal spray coatings

    DOE PAGES

    Brake, Matthew R. W.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Madison, Jonathan D.

    2016-12-14

    The coefficient of restitution is a measure of energy dissipation in a system across impact events. Often, the dissipative qualities of a pair of impacting components are neglected during the design phase. This research looks at the effect of applying a thin layer of metallic coating, using thermal spray technologies, to significantly alter the dissipative properties of a system. We studied the dissipative properties across multiple impacts in order to assess the effects of work hardening, the change in microstructure, and the change in surface topography. The results of the experiments indicate that any work hardening-like effects are likely attributablemore » to the crushing of asperities, and the permanent changes in the dissipative properties of the system, as measured by the coefficient of restitution, are attributable to the microstructure formed by the thermal spray coating. Furthermore, the microstructure appears to be robust across impact events of moderate energy levels, exhibiting negligible changes across multiple impact events.« less

  17. Thermal spraying and adhesion of oxides onto graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesrati, N.; Ajhrourh, H.; Du, Nguyen; Treheux, D.

    2000-03-01

    Surface treatment of graphite (Cg), which is based on thermal spraying of oxides (Al2O3, ZrO2), is proposed to reduce graphite reactivity and permeability toward oxygen. The study of coating adhesion allows recognition of the parameters that favor mechanical and chemical bonds. It also indicates the pretreatment of graphite, which leads to Cr3C2 or SiC bond coats. Different graphite-oxide systems were examined and showed that adhesion particularly depends on the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Cg, oxide, and the bond coat. Therefore, a post-treatment based on an impregnation with enamel of the porous oxide is essential to obtain effective protection of the graphite against the external environment.

  18. Computational homogenisation for thermoviscoplasticity: application to thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelsen, Rolf; Denzer, Ralf; Oppermann, Philip; Menzel, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Metal forming processes require wear-resistant tool surfaces in order to ensure a long life cycle of the expensive tools together with a constant high quality of the produced components. Thermal spraying is a relatively widely applied coating technique for the deposit of wear protection coatings. During these coating processes, heterogeneous coatings are deployed at high temperatures followed by quenching where residual stresses occur which strongly influence the performance of the coated tools. The objective of this article is to discuss and apply a thermo-mechanically coupled simulation framework which captures the heterogeneity of the deposited coating material. Therefore, a two-scale finite element framework for the solution of nonlinear thermo-mechanically coupled problems is elaborated and applied to the simulation of thermoviscoplastic material behaviour including nonlinear thermal softening in a geometrically linearised setting. The finite element framework and material model is demonstrated by means of numerical examples.

  19. Messier-Dowty/HVOF Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-27

    prefer to have ‘ one - stop shop’ taking care of all operations: - Nital etch, MPI, shot peen, HVOF, grind, inspection,cad plating, paint, etc… • Bare...rate Dedicate full-time resources to the assignment Preference for the one - stop shop concept 13 Direction / Reference / Date MESSIER-DOWTY

  20. Modeling Residual Stress Development in Thermal Spray Coatings: Current Status and Way Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Abba A.; Arif, Abul Fazal M.; Al-Athel, Khaled S.; Akhtar, S. Sohail; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-07-01

    An overview of analytical and numerical methods for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings is presented. The various sources and mechanisms underlying residual stress development in thermal spray coatings are discussed, then the various difficulties associated with experimental residual stress measurement in thermal spray coatings are highlighted. The various analytical and numerical models used for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are thoroughly discussed. While analytical models for prediction of postdeposition thermal mismatch stresses are fully developed, analytical quenching and peening stress models still require extensive development. Various schemes for prediction of residual stresses using the finite element method are identified. The results of the various numerical and analytical models are critically analyzed, and their accuracy and validity, when compared with experiments, are discussed. Issues regarding the accuracy and applicability of the models for predicting residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are highlighted, and several suggestions for future development of the models are given.

  1. Modeling Residual Stress Development in Thermal Spray Coatings: Current Status and Way Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Abba A.; Arif, Abul Fazal M.; Al-Athel, Khaled S.; Akhtar, S. Sohail; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-08-01

    An overview of analytical and numerical methods for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings is presented. The various sources and mechanisms underlying residual stress development in thermal spray coatings are discussed, then the various difficulties associated with experimental residual stress measurement in thermal spray coatings are highlighted. The various analytical and numerical models used for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are thoroughly discussed. While analytical models for prediction of postdeposition thermal mismatch stresses are fully developed, analytical quenching and peening stress models still require extensive development. Various schemes for prediction of residual stresses using the finite element method are identified. The results of the various numerical and analytical models are critically analyzed, and their accuracy and validity, when compared with experiments, are discussed. Issues regarding the accuracy and applicability of the models for predicting residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are highlighted, and several suggestions for future development of the models are given.

  2. The structure of Fe-Cr-B coatings obtained using selected methods of thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, K.; Szpak, M.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents issues connected with the production of protective coatings via thermal spraying. Information about wire coating materials which contain phases from the Fe-Cr-B system is presented. Arc thermal spraying is characterised and its possible applications are determined. The results of the examinations of the structure of coatings obtained by means of various arc spraying systems are discussed. Coatings of this type are used in the machine building and power engineering industries.

  3. Failure modes of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Kevin Walter

    Conventional plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are known to fail by spallation of the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) topcoat exposing the underlying metal to high temperatures. Failure takes place by crack propagation in the YSZ just above the YSZ/thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface. Compressive stress in the TGO due to thermal expansion coefficient mismatch and oxidation is believed to play a key role in the failure. However, non-destructive measurement of the compressive stress in the TGO has been challenging due to the overlying ceramic top layer. In this study, TBC samples coated to current industrial specifications were thermally cycled to various fractions of their life to determine the failure mechanisms. The technique of Cr3+ piezospectroscopy was successfully applied to the plasma-sprayed samples for the first time in an effort to measure compressive stress in the TGO through the ceramic top layer. In addition, a new nano-grained plasma-sprayed TBC was studied in order to develop a next generation TBC with enhanced properties. Results from observations on cross-sections and spalled surfaces have identified two competing failure mechanisms for TBCs: (1) cracking along asperity tips at the TGO/bond coat interface, and (2) cracking in the ceramic between the asperity tips. TGO residual compressive stress was found to increase in the first 1 to 10 cycles and then decrease with increasing number of cycles. The standard deviation of the stress measurement, which is a measure of damage accumulation in the TGO layer, was found to increase at higher numbers of cycles. Measurement of compressive stress in the TGO using Cr3+ piezo-spectroscopy was limited to YSZ thicknesses of <50 mum due to an impurity present in the YSZ layer. When no impurity was present the limiting thickness was <170 mum due to scattering by microstructural defects such as solute, porosity, and most importantly splat boundaries. A new nano-grained TBC was fabricated with a

  4. Evaluation of High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Al/SiCp Coatings as Corrosion Control Coatings for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taltavull, C.; Lopez, A. J.; Torres, B.; Rams, J.

    2014-06-01

    High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray technique has been used to fabricate Al and MMC (Al/SiCp) coatings on the AZ91 Mg alloy as a corrosion-control coatings. Corrosion behaviour of the coated specimens had been evaluated by electrochemical tests which revealed that some coated specimens presented an improvement on the corrosion behaviour of the AZ91 substrate. Taguchi DOE method has been used to analyse the relationship between the spraying conditions, i.e. spraying distance, % SiCp in feedstock, number of layers deposited and gun speed, and the corrosion behaviour of the coated specimens. In addition, a relationship between the coating characteristic, i.e. thickness, porosity, adhesion and roughness, and the corrosion behaviour of the coated specimens had also been studied. Optimum spraying conditions were fabricated and corrosion tested to validate the Taguchi DOE method analysis. Among the different coatings features, thickness and compactness seems to be the most relevant ones in terms of corrosion.

  5. Laser Surface Treatment of Stellite 6 Coating Deposited by HVOF on 316L Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoja-Razavi, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research aimed to study the effects of laser glazing treatment on microstructure, hardness, and oxidation behavior of Stellite 6 coating deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. The as-sprayed Stellite 6 coating (ST-HVOF) was subjected to single-pass and multiple-pass laser treatments to achieve the optimum glazing parameters. Microstructural characterizations were performed by x-ray diffractometry and field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Two-step optimization showed that laser treatment at the power of 200 W with a scan rate of 4 mm/s causes a surface layer with a thickness of 208 ± 32 µm to be remelted, while the underlying layers retain the original ST-HVOF coating structure. The obtained sample (ST-Glazing) exhibited a highly dense and uniform structure with an extremely low porosity of ~0.3%, much lower than that of ST-HVOF coating (2.3%). The average microhardness of ST-Glazing was measured to be 519 Hv0.3 indicating a 17% decrease compared to ST-HVOF (625 Hv0.3) due to the residual stress relief and dendrite coarsening from submicron size to ~3.4 µm after laser treatment. The lowest oxidation mass gain was obtained for ST-Glazing by 2 mg/cm2 after 8 cycles at 900 °C indicating 52 and 84% improvement in oxidation resistance in comparison to ST-HVOF and bare 316L steel substrates, respectively.

  6. Heat Flux Estimation of a Flame Thermal Spray Process Using a Thermally Thin Composite Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Duo; Serio, Bruno; Lecler, Sylvain; Pfeiffer, Pierre; Costil, Sophie

    2016-12-01

    Temperature measurements take on prime importance in the field of the thermal spray coating since the temperature variation greatly affects the formation of splat morphology and also the coating properties and qualities. The evaluation of the heat flux is therefore essential since temperature variation comes from the energy transfer and conduction of the thermal system. The aim of this study is to estimate the heat flux of a flame thermal spray by solving an inverse heat conduction problem. Firstly, the substrate material and geometry are well designed so that the Biot number is small enough to conform to the lumped capacitance conditions. A lumped capacitance model of a substrate with its coating subjected to a uniform echelon heat flux is evaluated by solving a heat balance equation in the Laplace domain. Then, a thermally thin calorimeter is designed and the experimental thermogram is obtained by embedding a thin-wire micro-thermocouple onto the front and rear faces of the substrate. The forced convective heat transfer coefficient as well as the net incident heat flux density brought to the substrate during the thermal spray process are estimated. The theoretical composite surface temperature is compared to the experimental recording, the result showing a good agreement.

  7. Thermal spraying of coatings using the hydrogen-oxygen flame

    SciTech Connect

    Korzh, V.N.; Popil`, Y.S.; Alexandrovskii, N.V.

    1995-12-31

    Use of hydrogen instead of acetylene in thermal spraying has not become popular up to now because of the limited amount of information on the technological capabilities of the oxy-hydrogen flame. The data given in technical publications on the lower calorific power and temperature of the flame as compared to the oxy-acetylene flame, explosion hazard and the operational and transportation costs which have to be incurred when using the cylinders held back the use of hydrogen. The advent of mobile water electrolysis generators (WEG) which permit generation of the combustible mixture directly in site, thus eliminating the cost of using the cylinder facilities and significantly reducing the transportation costs, improved the cost-effectiveness of applying hydrogen as the gas to replace acetylene in flame spraying and other processes of flame treatment of materials. The work performed in the Kiev Polytechnic Institute showed that the use of WEG in the production of the oxy-hydrogen mixture permits a 1.5 time reduction of the power consumption, as compared to the power consumed for the production of the oxy-acetylene mixture volume equivalent as to its technological potential, if the power consumed for fabrication of the calcium carbide is taken into account.

  8. Advances in Thermal Spray Coatings for Gas Turbines and Energy Generation: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwicke, Canan U.; Lau, Yuk-Chiu

    2013-06-01

    Functional coatings are widely used in energy generation equipment in industries such as renewables, oil and gas, propulsion engines, and gas turbines. Intelligent thermal spray processing is vital in many of these areas for efficient manufacturing. Advanced thermal spray coating applications include thermal management, wear, oxidation, corrosion resistance, sealing systems, vibration and sound absorbance, and component repair. This paper reviews the current status of materials, equipment, processing, and properties' aspects for key coatings in the energy industry, especially the developments in large-scale gas turbines. In addition to the most recent industrial advances in thermal spray technologies, future technical needs are also highlighted.

  9. Edge Effect on Crack Patterns in Thermally Sprayed Ceramic Splats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-02-01

    To explore the edge effect on intrasplat cracking of thermally sprayed ceramic splats, crack patterns of splats were experimentally observed and investigated through mechanical analysis. Both the polycrystalline splats and single-crystal splats showed obvious edge effects, i.e., preferential cracking orientation and differences in domain size between center fragments and edge fragments. In addition, substrate/interface delamination on the periphery was clearly observed for single-crystal splats. Mechanical analysis of edge effect was also carried out, and it was found that both singular normal stress in the substrate and huge peeling stress and shear stress at the interface were induced. Moreover, effective relief of tensile stress in splats is discussed. The good correspondence between experimental observations and mechanical analysis is elaborated. The edge effect can be used to tailor the pattern morphology and shed further light on coating structure design and optimization.

  10. Electrochemical Aging of Thermal-Sprayed Zinc Anodes on Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Cryer, C.B.; McGill, G.E.

    1996-10-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used in impressed current cathodic protection systems for some of Oregon's coastal reinforced concrete bridges. Electrochemical aging of zinc anodes results in physical and chemical changes at the zinc-concrete interface. Concrete surfaces heated prior to thermal-spraying had initial adhesion strengths 80 pct higher than unheated surfaces. For electrochemical aging greater than 200 kC/m{sup 2} (5.2 A h/ft{sup 2}), there was no difference in adhesion strengths for zinc on preheated and unheated concrete. Adhesion strengths decreased monotonically after about 400 to 600 kC/m{sup 2} (10.4 to 15.6 A-h/ft{sup 2}) as a result of the reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. A zone adjacent to the metallic zinc (and originally part of the zinc coating) was primarily zincite (ZnO), with minor constituents of wulfingite (Zn(OH){sub 2}), simonkolleite (Zn{sub 5}(OH) {sub 8}C{sub l2}{sup .}H{sub 2}O), and hydrated zinc hydroxide sulfates (Zn{sub 4}SO{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}{sup .}xH{sub 2}O). This zone is the locus for cohesive fracture when the zinc coating separates from the concrete during adhesion tests. Zinc ions substitute for calcium in the cement paste adjacent to the coating as the result of secondary mineralization. The initial estimate of the coating service life based on adhesion strength measurements in accelerated impressed current cathodic protection tests is about 27 years.

  11. Simulation of surface roughness during the formation of thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, M.P.

    1996-07-01

    The formation of a thermal spray coating was analyzed to identify methods to reduce the surface roughness of the coating. A new methodology was developed which uses a string of equally spaced node points to define the shape of the coating surface and to track the shape change as the thermal spray mass is deposited. This allows the calculation of arbitrary shapes for the coating surface which may be very complex. The model simulates the stochastic deposition of a large number of thermal spray droplets, where experimental data is used for the mass flux distribution on the target surface. This data shows that when the thermal spray mass impinges on the target surface, a large fraction of it (over-spray) splashes off the target and is re-deposited with a small spray angle, resulting in a large coating roughness. This analysis was used in a parameter study to identify methods for reducing the coating roughness. Effect of the shape of the profile for the pre-roughened substrate was found to be small. Decreasing the droplet size by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 13%. Increasing the spray angle for the over-spray by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 50%, and decreasing the amount of over- spray by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 51%.

  12. Plasma Spray-CVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Produce Thin Films from Liquid or Gaseous Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindrat, M.; Höhle, H.-M.; von Niessen, K.; Guittienne, Ph.; Grange, D.; Hollenstein, Ch.

    2011-06-01

    New dedicated coating processes which are based on the well-known LPPS™ technology but operating at lower work pressure (100 Pa) are being actively developed. These hybrid technologies contribute to improve the efficiencies in the turbine industry such as aero-engines and land-based gas turbines. They also have a great potential in the domain of new energy concepts in applications like Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, membranes, and photovoltaic with the adoption of new ways of producing coatings by thermal spray. Such processes include Plasma Spray-Thin Film (PS-TF) which gives the possibility to coat thin and dense layers from splats through a classical thermal spray approach but at high velocities (400-800 m/s) and enthalpy (8000-15000 kJ/kg). Plasma Spray-PVD (PS-PVD) which allows producing thick columnar-structured Thermal Barrier Coatings (100-300 μm) from the vapor phase with the employment of the high enthalpy gun and specific powder feedstock material. On the other hand, the Plasma Spray-CVD (PS-CVD) process uses modified conventional thermal spray components operated below 100 Pa which allows producing CVD-like coatings (<1-10 μm) at higher deposition rates using liquid or gaseous precursors as feedstock material. The advantages of such thermal spray-enhanced CVD processes are the high ionization degree and high throughput for the deposition of thin layers. In this article, we present an overview of the possibilities and limitations encountered while producing thin film coatings using liquid and gaseous precursors with this new type of low pressure plasma spray equipment and point out the challenges faced to obtain efficient injection and mixing of the precursors in the plasma jet. In particular, SiO x thin films from Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO or C6H18OSi2) can be deposited on wafers at deposition rates of up to 35 nm/s at an efficiency of about 50%. The process was also used for producing metal oxide coatings (Al2O3, ZnO, and SnO2) by evaporating different

  13. Synthesis and characterization of Cu3(BTC)2 membranes by thermal spray seeding and secondary growth.

    PubMed

    Noh, Seung-Jun; Kwon, Hyuk Taek; Kim, Jinsoo

    2013-08-01

    Crack-free Cu3(BTC)2 membranes were successfully prepared by thermal spray seeding and secondary growth method. Thermal spray seeding method, combining thermal seeding and pressurized spraying, uniformly distributed seed solution on the support, anchoring seed crystals tightly on the support. After secondary growth of the seeded support in the autoclave, continuous crack-free membrane was obtained by controlling cooling and drying steps. The gas permeation test was conducted at various temperatures using H2, CO2, CH4 and N2 gases.

  14. Thermal plasma spraying for SOFCs: Applications, potential advantages, and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Rob; Wang, Zhenwei; Kesler, Olivera; Rose, Lars; Jankovic, Jasna; Yick, Sing; Maric, Radenka; Ghosh, Dave

    In this article, the applications, potential advantages, and challenges of thermal plasma spray (PS) processing for nanopowder production and cell fabrication of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are reviewed. PS processing creates sufficiently high temperatures to melt all materials fed into the plasma. The heated material can either be quenched into oxide powders or deposited as coatings. This technique has been applied to directly deposit functional layers as well as nanopowder for SOFCs application. In particularly, low melting point and highly active electrodes can be directly fabricated on zirconia-based electrolytes. This is a simple processing technique that does not require the use of organic solvents, offering the opportunity for flexible adjustment of process parameters, and significant time saving in production of the cell and cost reduction compared with tape casting, screen printing and sintering processing steps. Most importantly, PS processing shows strong potential to enable the deposition of metal-supported SOFCs through the integrated fabrication of membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA) on porous metallic substrates with consecutive deposition steps. On the other hand, the application of PS processing to produce SOFCs faces some challenges, such as insufficient porosity of the electrodes, the difficulty of obtaining a thin (<10 μm) and dense electrolyte layer. Fed with H 2 as the fuel gas and oxygen as the oxidant gas, the plasma sprayed cell reached high power densities of 770 mW cm -2 at 900 °C and 430 mW cm -2 at 800 °C at a cell voltage of 0.7 V.

  15. Identifying Indicators of Progress in Thermal Spray Research Using Bibliometrics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.-T.; Khor, K. A.; Yu, L.-G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the research publications on thermal spray in the period of 1985-2015 using the data from Web of Science, Scopus and SciVal®. Bibliometrics analysis was employed to elucidate the country and institution distribution in various thermal spray research areas and to characterize the trends of topic change and technology progress. Results show that China, USA, Japan, Germany, India and France were the top countries in thermal spray research, and Xi'an Jiaotong University, Universite de Technologie Belfort-Montbeliard, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, ETH Zurich, National Research Council of Canada, University of Limoges were among the top institutions that had high scholarly research output during 2005-2015. The terms of the titles, keywords and abstracts of the publications were analyzed by the Latent Dirichlet Allocation model and visually mapped using the VOSviewer software to reveal the progress of thermal spray technology. It is found that thermal barrier coating was consistently the main research area in thermal spray, and high-velocity oxy-fuel spray and cold spray developed rapidly in the last 10 years.

  16. Thermal Conductivity in Suspension Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Kumara, Chamara; Gupta, Mohit; Nylen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Axial suspension plasma spraying (ASPS) can generate microstructures with higher porosity and pores in the size range from submicron to nanometer. ASPS thermal barrier coatings (TBC) have already shown a great potential to produce low thermal conductivity coatings for gas turbine applications. It is important to understand the fundamental relationships between microstructural defects in ASPS coatings such as crystallite boundaries, porosity etc. and thermal conductivity. Object-oriented finite element (OOF) analysis has been shown as an effective tool for evaluating thermal conductivity of conventional TBCs as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent microstructure in the model. The objective of this work was to analyze the thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs using experimental techniques and also to evaluate a procedure where OOF can be used to predict and analyze the thermal conductivity for these coatings. Verification of the model was done by comparing modeling results with the experimental thermal conductivity. The results showed that the varied scaled porosity has a significant influence on the thermal conductivity. Smaller crystallites and higher overall porosity content resulted in lower thermal conductivity. It was shown that OOF could be a powerful tool to predict and rank thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs.

  17. Structure Analysis Of Corrosion Resistant Thermal Sprayed Coatings On Low Alloy Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-23

    Metallic coatings have been proved to reduce the rate of corrosion of steel in various atmospheres. In this work the structure of Al, Cu-Al and Zn thermal sprayed coatings is examined. The as formed coatings are extremely rough, and they are composed of several phases which increase corrosion resistance as it was determined Salt Spray Chamber tests.

  18. Highly Segmented Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray: Effects of Spray Process on Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Honda, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Araki, Hiroshi; Murakami, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Sakka, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Effects of the ceramic powder size used for suspension as well as several processing parameters in suspension plasma spraying of YSZ were investigated experimentally, aiming to fabricate highly segmented microstructures for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to observe the atomization process and the velocity distribution of atomized droplets and ceramic particles travelling toward the substrates. The tested parameters included the secondary plasma gas (He versus H2), suspension injection flow rate, and substrate surface roughness. Results indicated that a plasma jet with a relatively higher content of He or H2 as the secondary plasma gas was critical to produce highly segmented YSZ TBCs with a crack density up to 12 cracks/mm. The optimized suspension flow rate played an important role to realize coatings with a reduced porosity level and improved adhesion. An increased powder size and higher operation power level were beneficial for the formation of highly segmented coatings onto substrates with a wider range of surface roughness.

  19. Systems and methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  20. Methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2007-10-02

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  1. Microstructural Evolution and Residual Stresses of Air-Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae-Young; Kim, Jae-Hyoun; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Cho, Hyun; Yi, Dong-Kee; Paik, Ungyu

    Microstructural evolution and fracture behavior of zirconia (ZrO2)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated under thermal exposure. New ZrO2 granule with 8 wt.% yttria (Y2O3) with a deformed hollow morphology was developed through a spray drying process and employed to prepare TBCs. The thermal exposure tests were conducted at 1210°C with a dwell time of 100 h till 800 h. The residual stress at the interface between top coat and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer was measured using a nanoindentation technique before and after thermal exposure. Vertical cracks on the top coat were newly formed and interlamellar cracks at the interface were enhanced after the thermal exposure of 800 h. Especially, partial delamination was observed at the interface after the thermal exposure of 800 h in TBC samples tested. The microstructural evolution in the top coat could be defined through load-displacement curves, showing a higher load or a less displacement after the thermal exposure of 800 h. The stress state was strongly dependent on the TGO geometry, resulting in the compressive stresses at the "valleys" or the "troughs," and the tensile stresses at the "crests" or peak areas, in the ranges of -500 to -75 MPa and of +168 to + 24 MPa, respectively. These stress terms incorporated with resintering during thermal exposure affected the mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus of the top coat.

  2. A Review of Thermal Spray Metallization of Polymer-Based Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, R.; Ashrafizadeh, H.; Lopera, A.; Mertiny, P.; McDonald, A.

    2016-06-01

    A literature review on the thermal spray deposition of metals onto polymer-based structures is presented. The deposition of metals onto polymer-based structures has been developed to enhance the thermal and electrical properties of the resulting metal-polymer material system. First, the description of the thermal spray metallization processes and technologies for polymer-based materials are outlined. Then, polymer surface preparation methods and the deposition of metal bond-coats are explored. Moreover, the thermal spray process parameters that affect the properties of metal deposits on polymers are described, followed by studies on the temperature distribution within the polymer substrate during the thermal spray process. The objective of this review is devoted to testing and potential applications of thermal-sprayed metal coatings deposited onto polymer-based substrates. This review aims to summarize the state-of-the-art contributions to research on the thermal spray metallization of polymer-based materials, which has gained recent attention for potential and novel applications.

  3. Computer-Aided Robot Trajectory Auto-generation Strategy in Thermal Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Liang, Hong; Quan, Shuhai; Deng, Sihao; Zeng, Chunnian; Zhang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    This paper is concerned with a new methodology which is designed to auto-generate the robotic trajectory for thermal spraying process. Based on it, a software package named Thermal Spray Toolkit is developed and integrated in the main frame of off-line programming software RobotStudio™ (Product of ABB Company, Sweden). This toolkit implements the robotic trajectory planning in an interactive manner between RobotStudio™ and the finite element analysis software (FES). It allows rearranging the imported node index created on the surface of workpiece by FES and in turn generating the thermal spraying needed robot trajectories. Several parameters in thermal spraying, such as scanning step and torch-substrate relative velocity which have major influence on the coating deposition, are considered in the trajectory generation process. Experiment is carried out to check the reliability of the generated robot trajectory.

  4. Performance of thermal-sprayed zinc anodes treated with humectants in cathodic protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Bennett, John E.; Milius, John K.; Cryer, Curtis B.; Soltesz, Steven M.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed Zn anodes are used for impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems in Oregon's reinforced concrete coastal bridges to minimize corrosion damage. Thermal-sprayed Zn performs well as an ICCP anode but the voltage requirement can increase with increasing electrochemical age. It also performs well as a galvanic (GCP) anode but current output can decrease with increasing electrochemical age. Past research has shown that increasing moisture at the Zn anode-concrete interface improves the operation of the thermal-sprayed Zn anode. Humectants, hygroscopic materials that are applied to the surface of the Zn-anode, can increase the moisture at the zinc-concrete interface, thereby improving the performance and extending the anode service life. Results are given for humectant-treated (LiBr and LiNO3) thermal-sprayed Zn anodes used in the laboratory electrochemical aging studies and in field studies on the Yaquina Bay Bridge, Oregon, USA.

  5. Spray-on technique simplifies fabrication of complex thermal insulation blanket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, W. E. G.; Raymond, R.

    1966-01-01

    Spray-on process constructs molds used in forming sections of thermal insulation blankets. The process simplifies the fabrication of blankets by eliminating much of the equipment formerly required and decreasing the time involved.

  6. Microstructure and Properties of Thermally Sprayed Functionally Graded Coatings for Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The use of polymer matrix composites (PMCs) in the gas flow path of advanced turbine engines offers significant benefits for aircraft engine performance but their useful lifetime is limited by their poor erosion resistance. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed polymer/cermet functionally graded (FGM) coatings are being investigated as a method to address this technology gap by providing erosion and oxidation protection to polymer matrix composites. The FGM coating structures are based on a polyimide matrix filled with varying volume fractions of WC-Co. The graded coating architecture was produced using a combination of internal and external feedstock injection, via two computer-controlled powder feeders and controlled substrate preheating. Porosity, coating thickness and volume fraction of the WC-Co filler retained in the coatings were determined using standard metallographic techniques and computer image analysis. The pull-off strength (often referred to as the adhesive strength) of the coatings was evaluated according to the ASTM D 4541 standard test method, which measured the greatest normal tensile force that the coating could withstand. Adhesive/cohesive strengths were determined for three different types of coating structures and compared based on the maximum indicated load and the surface area loaded. The nature and locus of the fractures were characterized according to the percent of adhesive and/or cohesive failure, and the tested interfaces and layers involved were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  7. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Gas Turbine Engine Components using Thermal Spray Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Chromium Electroplating on Gas Turbine Engine Components Using Thermal Spray Coatings May 2006 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Gas Turbine Engine Components Using Thermal Spray Coatings 5a. CONTRACT...Security Review, Rm. 2C157, Pentagon 1. DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION a. TYPE b. TITLE Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Gas TUibine Engine Components

  8. Plasma sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coating for NiAl-based intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Doychak, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system consists of two layers of a zirconia-yttria ceramic. The first layer is applied by low pressure plasma spraying. The second layer is applied by conventional atmospheric pressure plasma spraying. This facilitates the attachment of a durable thermally insulating ceramic coating directly to the surface of a highly oxidation resistant NiAl-based intermetallic alloy after the alloy has been preoxidized to promote the formation of a desirable Al2O3 scale.

  9. Wear Analysis of Thermal Spray Coatings on 3D Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Luo, W.; Selvadurai, U.

    2014-01-01

    Even though the application of thermal spray coatings on complex geometries gained a greater interest in the last decade, the effect of different geometrical features on the wear behavior is still ill-defined. In this study, the wear resistance of FTC-FeCSiMn coated 3D surfaces was investigated. The wear test was carried out by means of two innovative testing procedures. The first test is a Pin-on-Tubes test where the rotating motion is realized by a lathe chuck. The specimens in the second test were fixed on the table and a robot arm operated the pin. This wear test was applied on specimens with concave or convex surfaces. The residual stresses, which were determined by means of an incremental hole-drilling method, show a dependency on the substrate geometry. The obtained stresses were put in relation to the different radii. After the wear test, a 3D-profilometer determined the wear volume and the sections of the coatings were characterized by a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the wear resistance is strongly influenced by the geometry of the substrate.

  10. Lead-free piezoelectric ceramic coatings fabricated by thermal spray process.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kui; Chen, Shuting; Guo, Kun; Tan, Chee Kiang Ivan; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2017-09-04

    The paper starts from a review on the progress in fabrication of piezoelectric ceramic coatings by thermal spray method. For our experimental work, two types of lead-free piezoelectric ceramic coatings, including potassium sodium niobate (KNN)-based and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT)-based, are fabricated by thermal spray process, and their structure, morphology and piezoelectric properties are characterized. Our obtained lead-free ceramic coatings exhibit single phase of perovskite structure, relatively dense morphology, and competitive piezoelectric coefficients. The mechanism of forming the piezoelectric perovskite crystalline phase by thermal spray involving melting-recrystallization process is analyzed in comparison to that of ceramic synthesis through solid state reaction. Suppression of volatile loss and decomposition at high temperature due to the extremely high melting and cooling rate in the thermal spray process, and the impact on the resulting structure are discussed. Significant advantages of the thermal spray method over alternative processing methods for forming piezoelectric ceramic coatings are summarized. The combination of environmentally friendly lead-free compositions and the scalable thermal spray processing method will promote more applications of piezoelectric ceramic coatings for producing distributive sensors and transducers, and forming advanced smart structures and systems.

  11. Thermal Spraying of Bioactive Polymer Coatings for Orthopaedic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebbi, A.; Stokes, J.

    2012-06-01

    Flame sprayed biocompatible polymer coatings, made of biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymers, were investigated as single coatings on titanium and as top coatings on plasma sprayed Hydroxyapatite. Biocompatible polymers can act as drug carriers for localized drug release following implantation. The polymer matrix consisted of a biodegradable polymer, polyhydroxybutyrate 98%/ polyhydroxyvalerate 2% (PHBV) and a non-biodegradable polymer, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Screening tests were performed to determine the suitable range of spraying parameters, followed by a Design of Experiments study to determine the effects of spraying parameters on coating characteristics (thickness, roughness, adhesion, wettability), and to optimize the coating properties accordingly. Coatings characterization showed that optimized flame sprayed biocompatible polymers underwent little chemical degradation, did not produce acidic by-products in vitro, and that cells proliferated well on their surface.

  12. Fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier ceramics: Influence of processing, microstructure, and thermal aging

    DOE PAGES

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay; ...

    2014-06-09

    Fracture toughness has become one of the dominant design parameters that dictates the selection of materials and their microstructure to obtain durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Much progress has been made in characterizing the fracture toughness of relevant TBC compositions in bulk form, and it has become apparent that this property is significantly affected by process-induced microstructural defects. In this investigation, a systematic study of the influence of coating microstructure on the fracture toughness of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs has been carried out. Yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were fabricated under different spray process conditions inducing different levelsmore » of porosity and interfacial defects. Fracture toughness was measured on free standing coatings in as-processed and thermally aged conditions using the double torsion technique. Results indicate significant variance in fracture toughness among coatings with different microstructures including changes induced by thermal aging. Comparative studies were also conducted on an alternative TBC composition, Gd2Zr2O7 (GDZ), which as anticipated shows significantly lower fracture toughness compared to YSZ. Furthermore, the results from these studies not only point towards a need for process and microstructure optimization for enhanced TBC performance but also a framework for establishing performance metrics for promising new TBC compositions.« less

  13. Fracture toughness of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier ceramics: Influence of processing, microstructure, and thermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-06-09

    Fracture toughness has become one of the dominant design parameters that dictates the selection of materials and their microstructure to obtain durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Much progress has been made in characterizing the fracture toughness of relevant TBC compositions in bulk form, and it has become apparent that this property is significantly affected by process-induced microstructural defects. In this investigation, a systematic study of the influence of coating microstructure on the fracture toughness of atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) TBCs has been carried out. Yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were fabricated under different spray process conditions inducing different levels of porosity and interfacial defects. Fracture toughness was measured on free standing coatings in as-processed and thermally aged conditions using the double torsion technique. Results indicate significant variance in fracture toughness among coatings with different microstructures including changes induced by thermal aging. Comparative studies were also conducted on an alternative TBC composition, Gd2Zr2O7 (GDZ), which as anticipated shows significantly lower fracture toughness compared to YSZ. Furthermore, the results from these studies not only point towards a need for process and microstructure optimization for enhanced TBC performance but also a framework for establishing performance metrics for promising new TBC compositions.

  14. On the optimal motion planning for solid freeform fabrication by thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Rastegar, J.; Qin, Y.; Berndt, C.C.; Herman, H.; Sampath, S.; Tu, Q.

    1994-12-31

    A novel approach to optimal robot manipulator motion planning for Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) by thermal spraying is presented. In this approach, given the desired spatial geometry of the object, the motion of the spray gun relative to the forming platform is synthesized for minimal masking requirements considering the probabilistic nature of the thermal spraying process. The work being presented is part of an effort to develop a comprehensive geometric design methodology and the associated CAD/CAM software for SFF by thermal spraying. The software package, once fully developed, will interactively guide the designer to design parts such that they are manufacturable with minimal masking. The material build-up rate can be planned to achieve the desired distribution of the physical/material properties within the object volume. Examples of optimal motion planning for the generation of basic solid objects and computer simulation of the effectiveness of the developed methodology are presented and a number of related issues are discussed.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of alumina tube by thermal spray forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, M. A.; Zaidan, Sh. A.; Smich, H. E.

    2017-02-01

    In the present study spray forming of alumina tube with a wall thickness of 0.4-0.6 mm and the diameter of 38-62 mm on graphite substrate with two different sizes of alumina feedstock powders was used for flame spraying to form matrix of Al2O3 structures which have been fabricated. A detailed characterization of the spray-formed Al2O3 structure has been performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), (AFM) and Micro Hardness measurements. This study proves that a variety of structured materials and their combinations can be fabricated to near net shapes.

  16. Bilayer Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Thermal Cyclic Lifetime: Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mohit; Kumara, Chamara; Nylén, Per

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown as a promising process to produce porous columnar strain tolerant coatings for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines. However, the highly porous structure is vulnerable to crack propagation, especially near the topcoat-bondcoat interface where high stresses are generated due to thermal cycling. A topcoat layer with high toughness near the topcoat-bondcoat interface could be beneficial to enhance thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs. In this work, a bilayer coating system consisting of first a dense layer near the topcoat-bondcoat interface followed by a porous columnar layer was fabricated by SPS using Yttria-stabilised zirconia suspension. The objective of this work was to investigate if the bilayer topcoat architecture could enhance the thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs through experiments and to understand the effect of the column gaps/vertical cracks and the dense layer on the generated stresses in the TBC during thermal cyclic loading through finite element modeling. The experimental results show that the bilayer TBC had significantly higher lifetime than the single-layer TBC. The modeling results show that the dense layer and vertical cracks are beneficial as they reduce the thermally induced stresses which thus increase the lifetime.

  17. Bilayer Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Thermal Cyclic Lifetime: Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mohit; Kumara, Chamara; Nylén, Per

    2017-07-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown as a promising process to produce porous columnar strain tolerant coatings for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines. However, the highly porous structure is vulnerable to crack propagation, especially near the topcoat-bondcoat interface where high stresses are generated due to thermal cycling. A topcoat layer with high toughness near the topcoat-bondcoat interface could be beneficial to enhance thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs. In this work, a bilayer coating system consisting of first a dense layer near the topcoat-bondcoat interface followed by a porous columnar layer was fabricated by SPS using Yttria-stabilised zirconia suspension. The objective of this work was to investigate if the bilayer topcoat architecture could enhance the thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs through experiments and to understand the effect of the column gaps/vertical cracks and the dense layer on the generated stresses in the TBC during thermal cyclic loading through finite element modeling. The experimental results show that the bilayer TBC had significantly higher lifetime than the single-layer TBC. The modeling results show that the dense layer and vertical cracks are beneficial as they reduce the thermally induced stresses which thus increase the lifetime.

  18. Shock tube studies of thermal radiation of diesel-spray combustion under a range of spray conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, T.; Kurihara, Y.; Takasaki, M.; Katoh, R.; Ishii, K.

    2007-05-01

    A tailored interface shock tube and an over-tailored interface shock tube were used to measure the thermal energy radiated during diesel-spray combustion of light oil, α-methylnaphthalene and cetane by changing the injection pressure. The ignition delay of methanol and the thermal radiation were also measured. Experiments were performed in a steel shock tube with a 7 m low-pressure section filled with air and a 6 m high-pressure section. Pre-compressed fuel was injected through a throttle nozzle into air behind a reflected shock wave. Monochromatic emissive power and the power emitted across all infrared wavelengths were measured with IR-detectors set along the central axis of the tube. Time-dependent radii where soot particles radiated were also determined, and the results were as follows. For diesel spray combustion with high injection pressures (from 10 to 80 MPa), the thermal radiation energy of light oil per injection increased with injection pressure from 10 to 30 MPa. The energy was about 2% of the heat of combustion of light oil at P inj = about 30 MPa. At injection pressure above 30 MPa the thermal radiation decreased with increasing injection pressure. This profile agreed well with the combustion duration, the flame length, the maximum amount of soot in the flame, the time-integrated soot volume and the time-integrated flame volume. The ignition delay of light oil was observed to decrease monotonically with increasing fuel injection pressure. For diesel spray combustion of methanol, the thermal radiation including that due to the gas phase was 1% of the combustion heat at maximum, and usually lower than 1%. The thermal radiation due to soot was lower than 0.05% of the combustion heat. The ignition delays were larger (about 50%) than those of light oil. However, these differences were within experimental error.

  19. Reactive Plasma Nitriding of AL2O3 Powder in Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    Among advanced ceramics, aluminum nitride (AlN) had attracted much attention in the field of electrical and structural applications due to its outstanding properties. However, it is difficult to fabricate AlN coating by conventional thermal spray processes directly. Due to the thermal decomposition of feedstock AlN powder during spraying without a stable melting phase (which is required for deposition in thermal spray). Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) has been considered as a promising technology for in-situ formation of AlN thermally sprayed coatings. In this study the possibility of fabrication of AlN coating by reactive plasma nitriding of alumina (Al2O3) powder using N2/H2 plasma was investigated. It was possible to fabricate a cubic-AlN (c-AlN) based coating and the fabricated coating consists of c-AlN, α-Al2O3, Al5O6N and γ-Al2O3. It was difficult to understand the nitriding process from the fabricated coatings. Therefore, the Al2O3 powders were sprayed and collected in water. The microstructure observation of the collected powder and its cross section indicate that the reaction started from the surface. Thus, the sprayed particles were melted and reacted in high temperature reactive plasma and formed aluminum oxynitride which has cubic structure and easily nitride to c-AlN. During the coatings process the particles collide, flatten, and rapidly solidified on a substrate surface. The rapid solidification on the substrate surface due to the high quenching rate of the plasma flame prevents AlN crystal growth to form the hexagonal phase. Therefore, it was possible to fabricate c-AlN/Al2O3 based coatings through reactive plasma nitriding reaction of Al2O3 powder in thermal spray.

  20. Thermal and flow measurements of continuous cryogenic spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Tsai, Huang-Hsiu

    2006-07-01

    The performance of single sprays for high heat flux cooling using R-134a was studied. The heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the surface of a sprayed jet based on measurements of steady-state temperature gradients on a thin copper plate during continuous spraying. Meanwhile, the spray droplets flow characteristics was also quantified through laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements to obtain the local velocity distributions. The effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity, and spray exit-to-target distance on the surface heat flux including the corresponding critical heat flux (CHF) were explored through three different nozzle diameters of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mm. Finally, the effective use of the fluid being delivered based on the cooling efficiency and cooling effectiveness was also examined. The relationship between CHF and nozzle performance in terms of cooling efficiency and cooling effectiveness was found. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 140 W/cm(2) for the present nozzle size of d (j)=0.2 and 0.3 mm, which may enhance the current cryogen spray cooling (CSC) technique that assists laser therapy of dermatoses.

  1. Modeling thermal conductivity of thermal spray coatings: comparing predictions to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y.; Longtin, J. P.; Sampath, S.

    2006-12-01

    Thermal conductivity plays a critical role in the thermal transport of thermal-sprayed coatings. In this article, a combined image analysis and finite-element method approach is developed to assess thermal conductivity from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy images of the coating microstructure. Images are analyzed with a collection of image-processing algorithms to reveal the microscopic coating morphology. The processed digital image is used to generate a two-dimensional finite-element mesh in which pores, cracks, and the bulk coating material are identified. The effective thermal conductivity is then simulated using a commercial finite-element code. Results are presented for three coating material systems [yttriastabilized zirconia (YSZ), molybdenum, and NiAl], and the results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental values obtained using the laser flash method. The YSZ coatings are also annealed, and the analysis procedure was repeated to determine whether the technique can accurately assess changes in coating morphology.

  2. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  3. Life modeling of atmospheric and low pressure plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Argarwal, P.; Duderstadt, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The cycles-to-failure vs cycle duration data for three different thermal barrier coating systems, which consist of atmospheric pressure plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 over similarly deposited or low pressure plasma sprayed Ni-base alloys, are presently analyzed by means of the Miller (1980) oxidation-based life model. Specimens were tested at 1100 C for heating cycle lengths of 1, 6, and 20 h, yielding results supporting the model's value.

  4. Marine Applications of Thermal Spray Technology Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Meeting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-25

    Cable Laying Ship AFTER REPAIR – 26” Diameter Ring GATE VALVE – 12” BEFORE REPAIR AFTER REPAIR Seat Surface Repaired With HVOF Applied Tungsten Carbide...Tungsten Carbide BEFORE AFTER BUTTERFLY VALVE STEM New Shaft Coated With HVOF Applied Tungsten Carbide To Prevent Wear OLD VALVE STEM NEW VALVE STEM WITH...Shafts • Rudder Posts • Valve Stems • Main Propulsion Shafts • Plungers • Mandrels • Packing Glands INNOVATION ! EXPERIENCE ! QUALITY

  5. Effect of layer thickness on the properties of nickel thermal sprayed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Nurisna, Zuhri Triyono, Muhayat, Nurul Wijayanta, Agung Tri

    2016-03-29

    Thermal arc spray nickel coating is widely used for decorative and functional applications, by improving corrosion resistance, wear resistance, heat resistence or by modifying other properties of the coated materials. There are several properties have been studied. Layer thickness of nickel thermal sprayed steel may be make harder the substrate surface. In this study, the effect of layer thickness of nickel thermal sprayed steel has been investigated. The rectangular substrate specimens were coated by Ni–5 wt.% Al using wire arc spray method. The thickness of coating layers were in range from 0.4 to 1.0 mm. Different thickness of coating layers were conducted to investigate their effect on hardness and morphology. The coating layer was examined by using microvickers and scanning electron microscope with EDX attachment. Generally, the hardness at the interface increased with increasing thickness of coating layers for all specimens due to higher heat input during spraying process. Morphology analysis result that during spraying process aluminum would react with surrounding oxygen and form aluminum oxide at outer surface of splat. Moreover, porosity was formed in coating layers. However, presence porosity is not related to thickness of coating material. The thicker coating layer resulted highesr of hardness and bond strength.

  6. Preparation of SrZrO3 Thermal Barrier Coating by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinhui; Ma, Wen; Wen, Jing; Bai, Yu; Sun, Li; Chen, Baodong; Dong, Hongying; Shuang, Yingchai

    2017-02-01

    The solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process is capable of depositing highly durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In this study, an aqueous chemical precursor feedstock was injected into the plasma jet to deposit SrZrO3 thermal barrier coating on metal substrate. Taguchi design of experiments was employed to optimize the SPPS process. The thermal characteristics and phase evolution of the SrZrO3 precursor, as well as the influence of various spray parameters on the coating deposition rate, microhardness, microstructure, and phase stability, were investigated. The experimental results showed that, at given spray distance, feedstock flow rate, and atomization pressure, the optimized spray parameters were arc current of 600 A, argon flow rate of 40 L/min, and hydrogen flow rate of 10 L/min. The SrZrO3 coating prepared using the optimized spray parameters had single-pass thickness of 6.0 μm, porosity of 18%, and microhardness of 6.8 ± 0.1 GPa. Phase stability studies indicated that the as-sprayed SrZrO3 coating had good phase stability in the temperature range from room temperature to 1400 °C, gradually exhibiting a phase transition from t'-ZrO2 to m-ZrO2 in the SrZrO3 coating at 1450 °C with increasing time, while the SrZrO3 phase did not change.

  7. Microstructure and wear behavior of quasicrystalline thermal sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, D.J.; Krotz, P.D.; Daniel, R.L. Jr.; Smith, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    An Al-Cu-Fe alloy coating which forms a quasicrystalline phase is a potential candidate for replacing electro-deposited chromium on various components in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Coatings were deposited by air and vacuum plasma spraying and by high-velocity oxygen-fuel spraying. Finer starting powders tended to lose Al during spraying, which affected the phase equilibrium of the coatings. Coatings which retained the starting powder composition were richer in the desired quasicrystalline phase. Ball-on-disk wear tests between 440 C stainless steel ball and the Al-Cu-Fe coatings were performed. Coefficients of friction ranged from 0.60 to 1.2 for the different coatings.

  8. Microstructure and wear behavior of quasicrystalline thermal sprayed

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, D.J.; Krotz, P.D.; Daniel, R.L.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    An Al-Cu-Fe alloy coating which forms a quasicrystalline phase is a potential candidate for replacing electro-deposited chromium on various components in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Coatings were deposited by air and vacuum plasma spraying and by high-velocity oxygen-fuel spraying. Finer starting powders tended to lose Al during spraying, which affected the phase equilibrium of the coatings. Coatings which retained the starting powder composition were richer in the desired quasicrystalline phase. Ball-on-disk wear tests between 440 C stainless steel ball and the Al-Cu-Fe coatings were performed. Coefficients of friction ranged from 0.60 to 1.2 for the different coatings.

  9. Nanocomposite Lanthanum Zirconate Thermal Barrier Coating Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaohui; Wang, You; Wang, Liang; Hao, Guangzhao; Sun, Xiaoguang; Shan, Fan; Zou, Zhiwei

    2014-10-01

    This work seeks to develop an innovative nanocomposite thermal barrier coating (TBC) exhibiting low thermal conductivity and high durability compared with that of current TBCs. To achieve this objective, nanosized lanthanum zirconate particles were selected for the topcoat of the TBC system, and a new process—suspension plasma spray—was employed to produce desirable microstructural features: the nanocomposite lanthanum zirconate TBC contains ultrafine splats and high volume porosity, for lower thermal conductivity, and better durability. The parameters of plasma spray experiment included two main variables: (i) spray distance varying from 40 to 80 mm and (ii) the concentration of suspension 20, 25, and 30 wt.%, respectively. The microstructure of obtained coatings was characterized with scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction. The porosity of coatings is in the range of 6-10%, and the single phase in the as-sprayed coatings was pyrochlore lanthanum zirconate.

  10. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-07

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  11. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure.

  12. Suspension thermal spraying of hydroxyapatite: microstructure and in vitro behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bolelli, Giovanni; Bellucci, Devis; Cannillo, Valeria; Lusvarghi, Luca; Sola, Antonella; Stiegler, Nico; Müller, Philipp; Killinger, Andreas; Gadow, Rainer; Altomare, Lina; De Nardo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    In cementless fixation of metallic prostheses, bony ingrowth onto the implant surface is often promoted by osteoconductive plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. The present work explores the use of the innovative High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying (HVSFS) process to coat Ti substrates with thin homogeneous hydroxyapatite coatings. The HVSFS hydroxyapatite coatings studied were dense, 27-37μm thick, with some transverse microcracks. Lamellae were sintered together and nearly unidentifiable, unlike conventional plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite. Crystallinities of 10%-70% were obtained, depending on the deposition parameters and the use of a TiO2 bond coat. The average hardness of layers with low (<24%) and high (70%) crystallinity was ≈3.5GPa and ≈4.5GPa respectively. The distributions of hardness values, all characterised by Weibull modulus in the 5-7 range, were narrower than that of conventional plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite, with a Weibull modulus of ≈3.3. During soaking in simulated body fluid, glassy coatings were progressively resorbed and replaced by a new, precipitated hydroxyapatite layer, whereas coatings with 70% crystallinity were stable up to 14days of immersion. The interpretation of the precipitation behaviour was also assisted by surface charge assessments, performed through Z-potential measurements. During in vitro tests, HA coatings showed no cytotoxicity towards the SAOS-2 osteoblast cell line, and surface cell proliferation was comparable with proliferation on reference polystyrene culture plates.

  13. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  14. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-09-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  15. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  16. A sputtered zirconia primer for improved thermal shock resistance of plasma-sprayed ceramic turbine seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Sovey, J.; Allen, G. P.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the application of sputtered Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) primer in plasma-sprayed YSZ ceramic-coated turbine blades results in an improvement, by a factor of 5-6, in the thermal shock life of specimens with a sprayed, porous, Ni-Cr-Al-Y intermediate layer. Species with and without the primer were found to be able to survive 1000 cycles when the intermediate layer was used, but reduced laminar cracking was observed in the specimen with the primer. It is suggested that the sputtered YZS primer-induced properties are due to (1) more effective wetting and adherence of the plasma-sprayed YZS particles to the primer, and (2) the primer's retardation of impinging, molten plasma sprayed particles solidification rates, which result in a less detrimental residual stress distribution.

  17. Thermal spray forming of refractory sample ampoule cartridges for single crystal growth space furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank; Poorman, Richard; Holmes, Richard; Mckechnie, Timothy; Krotz, Phil; Liaw, Yoon

    1993-01-01

    A thermal spray process is being used to build up refractory metals and ceramics into a containment cartridge for high temperature, single crystal semiconductor growth experiments. This process uses high energy plasma inside a low pressure (100-200 torr) inert environment to apply layers of material onto a removable mandrel. A variety of materials are being characterized and evaluated against a demanding set of requirements, including high service temperature (1700 C), oxidation resistance, and resistance to liquid metal attack. Techniques to spray form refractory metals (tungsten, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum) and ceramics (alumina, boron nitride) are being developed in the Plasma Spray Cell at Marshall Space Flight Center. These plasma spray formed materials have been evaluated for mechanical properties, density, microstructure, and resistance to liquid metal attack. Forming techniques and the resultant mechanical and metallurgical properties will be presented.

  18. Thermal spray forming of refractory sample ampoule cartridges for single crystal growth space furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank; Poorman, Richard; Holmes, Richard; Mckechnie, Timothy; Krotz, Phil; Liaw, Yoon

    1993-01-01

    A thermal spray process is being used to build up refractory metals and ceramics into a containment cartridge for high temperature, single crystal semiconductor growth experiments. This process uses high energy plasma inside a low pressure (100-200 torr) inert environment to apply layers of material onto a removable mandrel. A variety of materials are being characterized and evaluated against a demanding set of requirements, including high service temperature (1700 C), oxidation resistance, and resistance to liquid metal attack. Techniques to spray form refractory metals (tungsten, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum) and ceramics (alumina, boron nitride) are being developed in the Plasma Spray Cell at Marshall Space Flight Center. These plasma spray formed materials have been evaluated for mechanical properties, density, microstructure, and resistance to liquid metal attack. Forming techniques and the resultant mechanical and metallurgical properties are presented.

  19. A Numerical Study of Sea-Spray Aerosol Motion in a Coastal Thermal Internal Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tinghao; Yu, Xiping

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional large-eddy simulation model is applied to the study of sea-spray aerosol transport, dispersion and settling in the coastal thermal internal boundary layer (IBL) formed by cool airflow from the open sea to the warm land. An idealized situation with constant inflow from the ocean and constant heat flux over the coastal land is considered. The numerical results confirm that the thickness of the coastal thermal IBL increases with the distance from the coastline until the outer edge of the IBL penetrates into the capping inversion layer. The thickness increases also with time until a fully-developed thermal boundary layer is formed. In addition, the thickness of the coastal thermal IBL increases more rapidly when the heat flux over the land is greater. Existence of large-scale eddies within the thermal IBL is identified and the turbulence intensity within the thermal IBL is also found to be significantly higher than that above. It is also indicated that the vertical position of the maximum concentration does not occur at the surface but increases as sea-spray aerosols are transported inland. The vertical position of the maximum flux of sea-spray aerosols within the coastal thermal IBL is shown to coincide with that of the maximum vertical velocity fluctuations when the coastal thermal IBL is fully developed with increased distance in the airflow direction.

  20. Method and closing pores in a thermally sprayed doped lanthanum chromite interconnection layer

    DOEpatents

    Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.

    1995-02-14

    A dense, substantially gas-tight electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an air electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles doped with an element or elements selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by thermal spraying doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles, either by plasma arc spraying or flame spraying; (C) depositing a mixture of CaO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the surface of the thermally sprayed layer; and (D) heating the doped LaCrO{sub 3} layer coated with CaO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface deposit at from about 1,000 C to 1,200 C to substantially close the pores, at least at a surface, of the thermally sprayed doped LaCrO{sub 3} layer. The result is a dense, substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the nonselected portion of the air electrode. A fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell, for example for generation of electrical power. 5 figs.

  1. Method and closing pores in a thermally sprayed doped lanthanum chromite interconnection layer

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an air electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element or elements selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by thermal spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles, either by plasma arc spraying or flame spraying; (C) depositing a mixture of CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 on the surface of the thermally sprayed layer; and (D) heating the doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer coated with CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 surface deposit at from about 1000.degree. C. to 1200.degree. C. to substantially close the pores, at least at a surface, of the thermally sprayed doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer. The result is a dense, substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the nonselected portion of the air electrode. A fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell, for example for generation of electrical power.

  2. Thermal Failure of Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings with Cold-Sprayed Nanostructured NiCrAlY Bond Coat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Chang-Jiu; Li, Yong; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Wang, Xiu-Ru; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2008-12-01

    Nanostructured thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were deposited by plasma spraying using agglomerated nanostructured YSZ powder on Inconel 738 substrate with cold-sprayed nanostructured NiCrAlY powder as bond coat. The isothermal oxidation and thermal cycling tests were applied to examine failure modes of plasma-sprayed nanostructured TBCs. For comparison, the TBC consisting of conventional microstructure YSZ and conventional NiCrAlY bond coat was also deposited and subjected to the thermal shock test. The results showed that nanostructured YSZ coating contained two kinds of microstructures; nanosized zirconia particles embedded in the matrix and microcolumnar grain structures of zirconia similar to those of conventional YSZ. Although, after thermal cyclic test, a continuous, uniform thermally grown oxide (TGO) was formed, cracks were observed at the interface between TGO/BC or TGO/YSZ after thermal cyclic test. However, the failure of nanostructured and conventional TBCs mainly occurred through spalling of YSZ. Compared with conventional TBCs, nanostructured TBCs exhibited better thermal shock resistance.

  3. Ultrafine particles emitted by flame and electric arc guns for thermal spraying of metals.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Denis; Régnier, Roland; Subra, Isabelle; Sutter, Benjamin; Lecler, Marie T; Morele, Yves

    2010-08-01

    The ultrafine aerosol emitted by thermal spraying of metals using flame and electric arc processes has been characterized in terms of particle size distribution and emission rates based on both particle number and mass. Thermal spraying of Zn, Zn/Al, and Al was studied. Measurements taken using an electrical low pressure impactor and a condensation nucleus counter reveal an aerosol made up of very fine particles (80-95% of number distribution <100 nm). Ultrafine particle emission rates produced by the electric arc process are very high, the largest values being recorded during spraying of pure aluminium. This process generates high particle emissions and therefore requires careful consideration and possible rethinking of currently implemented protection measures: ventilated cabins, dust collectors, and personal protective equipment.

  4. Characterization of Microstructure and Thermal Properties of YSZ Coatings Obtained by Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying (ASPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per

    2015-10-01

    The paper aims at demonstrating various microstructures which can be obtained using the suspension spraying technique and their respective significance in enhancing the thermal insulation property of a thermal barrier coating. Three different types of coating microstructures are discussed which were produced by the Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying. Detailed characterization of coatings was then performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were utilized for microstructure evaluations; x-ray diffraction for phase analysis; water impregnation, image analysis, and mercury intrusion porosimetry for porosity analysis, and laser flash analysis for thermal diffusivity measurements were used. The results showed that Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying can generate vertically cracked, porous, and feathery columnar-type microstructures. Pore size distribution was found in micron, submicron, and nanometer range. Higher overall porosity, the lower density of vertical cracks or inter-column spacing, and higher inter-pass porosity favored thermal insulation property of the coating. Significant increase in thermal diffusivity and conductivity was found at higher temperature, which is believed to be due to the pore rearrangement (sintering and pore coarsening). Thermal conductivity values for these coatings were also compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) thermal barrier coatings from the literature and found to be much lower.

  5. Development and evaluation of suspension plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings as thermal barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Every, Kent J.

    The insulating effects from thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines allow for increased operational efficiencies and longer service lifetimes. Consequently, improving TBCs can lead to enhanced gas turbine engine performance. This study was conducted to investigate if yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, the standard industrial choice for TBCs, produced from nano-sized powder could provide better thermal insulation than current commericial YSZ coatings generated using micron-sized powders. The coatings for this research were made via the recently developed suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process. With SPS, powders are suspended in a solvent containing dispersing agents; the suspension is then injected directly into a plasma flow that evaporates the solvent and melts the powder while transporting it to the substrate. Although related to the industrial TBC production method of air plasma spraying (APS), SPS has two important differences---the ability to spray sub-micron diameter ceramic particles, and the ability to alloy the particles with chemicals dissolved in the solvent. These aspects of SPS were employed to generate a series of coatings from suspensions containing ˜100 nm diameter YSZ powder particles, some of which were alloyed with neodymium and ytterbium ions from the solvent. The SPS coatings contained columnar structures not observed in APS TBCs; thus, a theory was developed to explain the formation of these features. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was tested to evaluate the effects of these unique microstructures and the effects of the alloying process. The results for samples in the as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions were compared to conventional YSZ TBCs. This comparison showed that, relative to APS YSZ coatings, the unalloyed SPS samples typically exhibited higher as-sprayed and lower heat-treated thermal conductivities. All thermal conductivity values for the alloyed samples were lower than conventional YSZ TBCs

  6. Relationship Between Lamellar Structure and Elastic Modulus of Thermally Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Intra-splat Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Rong; Lv, Bo-Wen; Yang, Guan-Jun; Zhang, Wei-Xu; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-12-01

    The elastic modulus of plasma-sprayed top coating plays an important role in thermal cyclic lifetime of thermally sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), since the thermal stress is determined by the substrate/coating thermal mismatch and the elastic modulus of top coating. Consequently, much attention had been paid to understanding the relationship between elastic modulus and lamellar structure of top coating. However, neglecting the intra-splat cracks connected with inter-splat pores often leads to poor prediction in in-plane modulus. In this study, a modified model taking account of intra-splat cracks and other main structural characteristics of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating was proposed. Based on establishing the relationship between elastic modulus and structural parameters of basic unit, effects of structural parameters on the elastic modulus of coatings were discussed. The predicted results are well consistent with experimental data on coating elastic modulus in both out-plane direction and in-plane direction. This study would benefit the further comprehensive understanding of failure mechanism of TBCs in thermal cyclic condition.

  7. A sputtered zirconia primer for improved thermal shock resistance of plasma sprayed ceramic turbine seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Sovey, J.; Allen, G. P.

    1981-01-01

    The development of plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic turbine blade tip seal components is discussed. The YSZ layers are quite thick (0.040 to 0.090 in.). The service potential of seal components with such thick ceramic layers is cyclic thermal shock limited. The most usual failure mode is ceramic layer delamination at or very near the interface between the plasma sprayed YSZ layer and the NiCrAlY bondcoat. Deposition of a thin RF sputtered YSZ primer to the bondcoat prior to deposition of the thick plasma sprayed YSZ layer was found to reduce laminar cracking in cyclic thermal shock testing. The cyclic thermal shock life of one ceramic seal design was increased by a factor of 5 to 6 when the sputtered YSZ primer was incorporated. A model based on thermal response of plasma sprayed YSZ particles impinging on the bondcoat surface with and without the sputtered YSZ primer provides a basis for understanding the function of the primer.

  8. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, M. A.; Yanar, N. M.; Pettit, F. S.; Taylor, T. A.; Meier, G. H.

    2012-10-01

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  9. Method for thermally spraying crack-free mullite coatings on ceramic-based substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Heidorn, Raymond W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for depositing a mullite coating on a silicon-based material, such as those used to form articles exposed to high temperatures and including the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The process is generally to thermally spray a mullite powder to form a mullite layer on a substrate, in which the thermal spraying process is performed so that the mullite powder absorbs a sufficient low level of energy from the thermal source to prevent evaporation of silica from the mullite powder. Processing includes deposition parameter adjustments or annealing to maintain or reestablish phase equilibrium in the mullite layer, so that through-thickness cracks in the mullite layer are avoided.

  10. Method for thermally spraying crack-free mullite coatings on ceramic-based substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Heidorn, Raymond W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for depositing a mullite coating on a silicon-based material, such as those used to form articles exposed to high temperatures and including the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The process is generally to thermally spray a mullite powder to form a mullite layer on a substrate, in which the thermal spraying process is performed so that the mullite powder absorbs a sufficient low level of energy from the thermal source to prevent evaporation of silica from the mullite powder. Processing includes deposition parameter adjustments or annealing to maintain or reestablish phase equilibrium in the mullite layer, so that through-thickness cracks in the mullite layer are avoided.

  11. Assessment of thermal spray coatings for wear and abrasion resistance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karode, Ishaan Nitin

    Thermal spray cermet and metallic coatings are extensively used for wear, abrasion and corrosion control in a variety of industries. The first part of the thesis focuses mainly on testing of sand erosion resistance of thermal spray coatings on carbon composites used in the manufacture of helicopter rotor blades. The test set-up employed is a sand blasting machine and is an effort to duplicate the in-flight conditions especially those encountered in hot arid conditions. The technique adopted follows the Department of Defence test method standard. Carbon Composites have excellent stiffness, strength and low weight/density. The strength to weight ratio is high. Hence, these are used in aerospace applications to a large extent. However, the biggest problem encountered with carbon composites is its low abrasion resistance as its surface is very weak. Hence, thermal spray coatings are used to improve the surface properties of CFRP. Zinc bond coats and WC-Co coatings were tested. However, high amount of thermal stresses were developed between the substrate and the coating due to large differences in the CTE's of the both, leading to high mass losses within two minutes and just 130 grams of sand sprayed on to the coatings with the sand blasting machine built; and hence the coatings with CC as a substrate could not qualify for the application. The second part of the thesis focuses on the assessment of different thermal spray coatings used for manufacture of mechanical seals in pumps and analyze the best coating material for the wear resistance application through detail quantification of material loss by block-on-ring test set-up. A machine based on Block-on-ring test set-up following ASTM G77 (Measurement of Adhesive wear resistance of thermal spray coatings) standards was built to duplicate the pump conditions. Thermally sprayed coated materials were tested in different conditions (Load, time, abrasive). WC-Co had the highest wear resistance (lower volume losses) and

  12. Characterization of thermal sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on some biomedical implant materials.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tejinder Pal; Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Hazoor

    2014-06-12

    To characterize two thermal sprayed coatings of different particle-sized hydroxyapatite on some biomedical implant materials. Characterization of the as-sprayed coatings was performed using x-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), and x-ray mapping techniques. Bond strength of the sprayed coatings measured as per ASTM-C633 standard and cell culture studies were performed to access the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results indicated that, HA coatings of 10 μm particle sized powder were completely amorphous, while that of 30 μm sized powder consisted of crystalline HA with minor tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) phases. This flame spray HA-A and HA-B coatings exhibited higher bond strength (67.8 and 49.3 MPa respectively) in comparison with other thermal spray HA coating techniques reported in literature. In-vitro biocompatibility studies revealed that HA-B coated specimens had good biocompatibility with a human osteosarcoma cell line KHOSNP (R-970-5). These observations show that particle size of HA powders have a significant effect on the phase composition, microstructure, roughness and biocompatibility of deposited coatings. HA-B coatings were found to be metallurgically better than the HA-A coating from the point of view of biomedical applications.

  13. Microstructure and thermal behaviour of plasma sprayed zirconia/alumina composite coating.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Ando, Y; Kurokawa, K; Hejwowski, T

    2011-10-01

    In thermal barrier coatings (TBC), failure occurs near or at the interface between the metallic bondcoat and topcoat. On high temperature conditions, an oxide scale which is named thermally grown oxide (TGO) occurs along the bond/topcoat interface. For diminishing the creation of TGO, a dense coating with low residual stress and thermal stress buffer layer was preferable. High hardness ceramic coatings could be obtained by gas tunnel type plasma spraying, and the deposited coating had superior property in comparison with those deposited by conventional type plasma spray method. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying system was utilized to produce a zirconia/alumina functionally graded thermal barrier coating and discussed its physical and mechanical properties, thermal behavior and high temperature oxidation resistance of the coating are discussed. Consequently, the proposed system exhibited superior mechanical properties and oxidation resistance at the expenses of a slightly lower thermal insulating effect. This interlayer is preferred in order to minimize the detrimental effect of the phase transformation of gamma-Al2O3 to alpha-Al2O3.

  14. Process, properties, and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  15. Process, properties and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  16. Oxidation and degradation of a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) specimens consisting of single-crystal superalloy substrates, vacuum plasma-sprayed Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and air plasma-sprayed 7.5 wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia top coatings was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis at 1150{degrees}C for up to 200 hours. Coating durability was assessed by furnace cycling at 1150{degrees}C. Coatings and reaction products were identified by x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  17. Friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal insulations: field evaluation of prototype test devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiter, W.J.; Roberts, W.E.; Mathey, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    The report describes results of the third and final phase of a study conducted for the General Services Administration (GSA) to develop a field-test method to measure the friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal-insulation materials. Field tests were conducted on 17 fibrous and 2 cementitious spray-applied materials to assess surface and bulk compression/shear, indentation, abrasion, and impact properties. The tests were performed using prototype devices developed in an earlier phase of the study. As expected, the field specimens displayed varying response to dislodgment or indentation in the tests. The field tests confirmed that the goal of the study had been achieved.

  18. Process, properties, and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  19. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation of an air plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1996-08-01

    Thermogravimetric methods for evaluating bond coat oxidation in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were assessed by high-temperature testing of TBC systems with air plasma-sprayed (APS) Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and yttria-stabilized zirconia top coatings. High-mass thermogravimetric analysis (at 1150{sup degrees}C) was used to measure bond coat oxidation kinetics. Furnace cycling was used to evaluate APS TBC durability. This paper describes the experimental methods and relative oxidation kinetics of the various specimen types. Characterization of the APS TBCs and their reaction products is discussed.

  20. A comparative study of high velocity oxygen fuel, vacuum plasma spray, and axial plasma spray for the deposition of CoNiCrAlY bond coat alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivani, A.; Bardi, U.; Carrafiello, L.; Lavacchi, A.; Niccolai, F.; Rizzi, G.

    2003-12-01

    In the aerospace field as well as in the stationary gas turbine field, thermally sprayed coatings are used to improve the surface properties of nickel-super-alloys materials. Coatings are commonly used as bond coat and antioxidation materials (mainly MCrAlY alloys) and as thermal barrier coatings (mainly yttria partially stabilized zirconia). The purpose of the current study was to assess the properties of thermally sprayed bond coat CoNiCrAlY alloys comparing the performance of three different techniques: vacuum plasma spray (VPS), high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), and axial plasma spray (AxPS). The quality of the deposited films has been assessed and compared from the point of view of microstructural (porosity, oxide concentration, unmelted particles presence) and mechanical (hardness) characteristics. The surface composition and morphology of the coatings were also determined. Specific efficiency tests were performed for the three examined technologies. The highest quality coatings are obtained by VPS, but also high velocity oxygen fuel and AxPS sprayed films have interesting properties, which can make their use interesting for some applications.

  1. Influence of the Process Parameters on the Properties of Diamax Deposits Obtained by Flame Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciu, M. A.; Nanu, C.; Sandu, G. I.; Toma, B. F.; Bejinariu, C.; Cazac, A.; Toma, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    The paper aims to determine the influence of the process parameters, namely: C2H2 gas flow rate and inclination angle of the spraying gun on physico and mechanical properties of the hardalloyed layers of Diamax 10999 Eutalloy, on steel support - obtained by flame thermal spray process. For this purpose, the two technological parameters varied on three levels and in each case were evaluated the deposits properties. Investigations conducted by electronical microscopy SEM, X-ray, micro-hardness and by adherence evaluation and of the deposits porosity allowed the establishment of the performant deposit. Thus it was found that at the decreasing of the spraying distance,the deposit porosity decreases; in layer appear the phenomena of overheating, issue that determine the adherence reducing in average of 22%, and also the modification of chemical composition. The results recorded have afforded the obtaining of an optimum domain of variation of the process parameters.

  2. Reactive Plasma-Sprayed Aluminum Nitride-Based Coating Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Egota, Kazumi; Okamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Recently, thick aluminum nitride/alumina (AlN/Al2O3) composite coatings were successfully fabricated through the reactive plasma spraying of fine Al2O3/AlN mixture in the N2/H2 atmospheric plasma. The coatings consist of AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and α-Al2O3 phases. This study will evaluate the thermal conductivity of these complicated plasma-sprayed coatings and optimize the controlling aspects. Furthermore, the influence of the process parameters on the coatings thermal conductivity will be investigated. The fabricated coatings showed very low thermal conductivity (2.43 W/m K) compared to the AlN sintered compacts. It is attributed to the phase composition of the fabricated coatings, oxide content, and porosity. The presence of Al2O3, Al5O6N and the high coating porosity decreased its thermal conductivity. The presence of oxygen in the AlN lattice creates Al vacancies which lead to phonon scattering and therefore suppressed the thermal conductivity. The formation of γ-Al2O3 phase in the coating leads to further decrease in its conductivity, due to its lower density compared to the α-phase. Moreover, the high porosity of the coating strongly suppressed the conductivity. This is due to the complicated microstructure of plasma spray coatings (splats, porosity, and interfaces, particularly in case of reactive spray process), which obviously lowered the conductivity. Furthermore, the measured coating density was lower than the AlN value and suppressed the coating conductivity. In addition, the spraying parameter showed a varied effect on the coating phase composition, porosity, density, and therefore on its conductivity. Although the N2 gas flow improved the nitride content, it suppressed the thermal conductivity gradually. It is attributed to the further increase in the porosity and further decrease in the density of the coatings with the N2 gas. Furthermore, increasing the arc did not show a significant change on the coating thermal conductivity. On the other hand

  3. Fluid and Thermal Dynamics of Cryogen Sprays Impinging on a Human Tissue Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Walfre; Vu, Henry; Jia, Wangcun; Nelson, J. Stuart; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) protects the epidermis from unintended heating during cutaneous laser surgery. The present work investigated the time-dependent flow characteristics of cryogen sprays and correspondent thermal dynamics at the surface of a human tissue phantom. First, a numerical analysis was carried out to evaluate an epoxy block substrate as a human tissue phantom. Next, the velocity and diameter of cryogen droplets were measured simultaneously and correlated with surface temperature of the human tissue phantom during CSC. Finally, velocity and diameter measurements were used to compute the spray number, mass, and kinetic energy fluxes, and temperature measurements were used to compute the surface heat flux. Numerical modeling showed that the thermal response of our phantom was qualitatively similar to that of human stratum corneum and epidermis; quantitatively, thermal responses differed. A simple transformation to map the temperature response of the phantom to that of tissue was derived. Despite the relatively short spurt durations (10 ms, 30 ms, and 50 ms), cryogen delivery is mostly a steady state process with initial and final fluid transients mainly due to the valve dynamics. Thermal transients (16 ms) are longer than fluid transients (4 ms) due to the low thermal diffusivity of human tissues; steady states are comparable in duration (≈10 ms, 30 ms, and 50 ms) although there is an inherent thermal delay (≈12 ms). Steady state temperatures are the lowest surface temperatures experienced by the substrate, independent of spurt duration; hence, longer spurt durations result in larger exposures of the tissue surface to the same lower, steady state temperature as in shorter spurts. Temperatures in human tissue during CSC for the spray system and parameters used herein are estimated to be ≈−19°C at the stratum corneum surface and >0°C across the epidermis. PMID:19045512

  4. Effect of Heat Treatment on Wear Resistance of Nickel Aluminide Coatings Deposited by HVOF and PTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benegra, M.; Santana, A. L. B.; Maranho, O.; Pintaude, G.

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to compare the wear resistance of nickel aluminide coatings deposited using plasma transferred arc (PTA) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) processes. Wear resistance was measured in rubber wheel abrasion tests. In both deposition processes, the same raw material (nickel aluminide powder) was atomized and deposited on a 316L steel plate substrate. After deposition, specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, aiming solubilization and precipitation. Coatings deposited using PTA developed different microstructures as a result of the incorporation of substrate elements. However, despite the presence of these microstructures, they performed better than coatings processed using HVOF before the heat treatment. After thermal cycling, the superficial hardness after the wear tests for both processes was similar, resulting in similar mass losses.

  5. HVOF-Deposited WCCoCr as Replacement for Hard Cr in Landing Gear Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüero, A.; Camón, F.; García de Blas, J.; Del Hoyo, J. C.; Muelas, R.; Santaballa, A.; Ulargui, S.; Vallés, P.

    2011-12-01

    WCCoCr coatings deposited by HVOF can replace hard Cr on landing gear components. Powders with two different WC particle sizes (micro and nano-) and geometries have been employed to study the effects on the coating's properties. Moreover, coatings produced employing two sets of parameters resulting in high and low flame temperatures have been evaluated. Minor differences in microstructure and morphology were observed for the two powders employing the same spraying parameters, but the nano-sized powder exhibited a higher spraying efficiency. However, more significant microstructural changes result when the low- and high-energy spray parameters are used. Moreover, results of various tests which include adhesion, wear, salt fog corrosion resistance, liquid immersion, and axial fatigue strength, indicate that the coatings produced with high-energy flame are similar in behavior. On the other hand, the nanostructured low-energy flame coating exhibited a significantly lower salt fog corrosion resistance.

  6. Development of Particle Interface Bonding in Thermal Spray Coatings: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2013-03-01

    Thermal spray ceramic coatings deposited following the conventional routine exhibit a typical lamellar structure with a limited interface bonding ratio. The bonding between particles in the coating dominates coating properties and performance. In this review paper, the bonding formation at the interface between thin lamellae in the coating is examined. The effect of spray parameters on the bonding ratio is presented to reveal the main droplet parameters controlling bonding formation, which reveals that the temperature of the spray particle rather than its velocity dominates the bonding formation. The limitation to increase significantly the ceramic particle temperature inherent to the thermal spray process leads to the observation of a maximum bonding ratio of about 32%, while through controlling the surface temperature of the coating prior to molten droplet impact, the bonding at the lamellar interface can be significantly increased. Consequently, it is shown that with the proper selection of deposition conditions and control of the deposition temperature, the bonding ratio of ceramic deposits can be altered from a maximum of 32% for a conventional deposit to a maximum of 100%. Such wide adjustability of the lamellar bonding opens new possibilities for using thermal spray coatings in various applications requiring different microstructures and properties. The examination of recent studies shows that the bonding control makes it possible to fabricate porous deposits through surface-molten particles. Such an approach could be applied for the fabrication of porous materials, the deposition of high temperature abradable ceramic coatings, and for forming functional structured surfaces, such as a surface with super-hydrophobicity or a solid oxide fuel cell cathode interface with high specific surface area and high catalytic performance. Furthermore, complete interface bonding leads to crystalline structure control of individual splats through epitaxial grain growth.

  7. Stress Analysis and Failure Mechanisms of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiasheng; Wang, Liang; Li, Dachuan; Zhong, Xinghua; Zhao, Huayu; Tao, Shunyan

    2017-06-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by plasma spraying and heat-treated at 1100 °C for 50, 100, 150, and 200 h in air, respectively. Mechanical properties including microhardness and Young's modulus were evaluated using the nanoindentation test. Residual stresses in the ceramic topcoat and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer were measured using Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence piezo-spectroscopy (PLPS) techniques, respectively. The results showed that both the modulus and hardness increased with the thermal exposure time up to 100 h and then gradually decreased. The accumulated tensile stress in the as-sprayed topcoat changed to compressive stress after thermal exposure, and the compressive stress in the topcoat increased with an increase of thermal exposure time up to 150 h. The average compressive stresses in the TGO layer were higher than that of the cross-sectional topcoat, and the measured in-plane compressive stress increased firstly and then gradually decreased with increasing exposure time. The local interface geometry strongly affect the nature and evolution of hydrostatic stresses in the TGO. Finally, the crack initiation and propagation at the topcoat/TGO/bondcoat interface has been discussed with respect to the residual stresses in the plasma-sprayed TBC system.

  8. Columnar-Structured Mg-Al-Spinel Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, N.; Ebert, S.; Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2015-01-01

    The suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process has been developed to permit the feeding of sub-micrometer-sized powder into the plasma plume. In contrast to electron beam-physical vapor deposition and plasma spray-physical vapor deposition, SPS enables the cost-efficient deposition of columnar-structured coatings. Due to their strain tolerance, these coatings play an important role in the field of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In addition to the cost-efficient process, attention was turned to the TBC material. Nowadays, yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is used as standard TBC material. However, its long-term application at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is problematic. At these high temperatures, phase transitions and sintering effects lead to the degradation of the TBC system. To overcome those deficits of YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel was chosen as TBC material. Even though it has a lower melting point (~2135 °C) and a higher thermal conductivity (~2.5 W/m/K) than YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel provides phase stability at high temperatures in contrast to YSZ. The Mg-Al-spinel deposition by SPS resulted in columnar-structured coatings, which have been tested for their thermal cycling lifetime. Furthermore, the influence of substrate cooling during the spraying process on thermal cycling behavior, phase composition, and stoichiometry of the Mg-Al-spinel has been investigated.

  9. Remaining Fatigue Life Assessment of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Philippe; Gitzhofer, François; Fauchais, Pierre; Boulos, Maher

    2010-09-01

    Ceramic functional coatings are frequently applied to structural materials, covering a wide range of thermomechanical and electrochemical applications. The main limiting feature is their reliability when subjected to cyclic transient thermal stresses. The study described in this article is a continuation of earlier research study focused on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the thermomechanical aging effects in ceramic coatings. Here, emphasis is placed on the usefulness of combining AE short-term monitoring with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict the performance of such coatings when subjected to cyclic thermal loads. The FEM study presented in this article is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent approach, of the stress fields that developed within the coatings during the post-deposition cooling step and the thermal cycling. Experiments were conducted using yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Alumina (Al2O3) ceramic coatings combined with a NiCr-based intermetallic bond coat.

  10. Ceramic Top Coats of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Materials, Processes, and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Emine; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The ceramic top coat has a major influence on the performance of the thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs). Yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the top coat material frequently used, and the major deposition processes of the YSZ top coat are atmospheric plasma spraying and electron beam physical vapor deposition. Recently, also new thermal spray processes such as suspension plasma spraying or plasma spray-physical vapor deposition have been intensively investigated for TBC top coat deposition. These new processes and particularly the different coating microstructures that can be deposited with them will be reviewed in this article. Furthermore, the properties and the intrinsic-extrinsic degradation mechanisms of the YSZ will be discussed. Following the TBC deposition processes and standard YSZ material, alternative ceramic materials such as perovskites and hexaaluminates will be summarized, while properties of pyrochlores with regard to their crystal structure will be discussed more in detail. The merits of the pyrochlores such as good CMAS resistance as well as their weaknesses, e.g., low fracture toughness, processability issues, will be outlined.

  11. APS TBC performance on directionally-solidified superalloy substrates with HVOF NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings

    DOE PAGES

    Lance, Michael J.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Haynes, James A.; ...

    2015-09-04

    Directionally-solidified (DS) superalloy components with advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) to lower the metal operating temperature have the potential to replace more expensive single crystal superalloys for large land-based turbines. In order to assess relative TBC performance, furnace cyclic testing was used with superalloys 1483, X4 and Hf-rich DS 247 substrates and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings at 1100 °C with 1-h cycles in air with 10% H2O. With these coating and test conditions, there was no statistically-significant effect of substrate alloy on the average lifetime of the air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coatings onmore » small coupons. Using photo-stimulated luminescence piezospectroscopy maps at regular cycling intervals, the residual compressive stress in the α-Al2O3 scale underneath the YSZ top coating and on a bare bond coating was similar for all three substrates and delaminations occurred at roughly the same rate and frequency. As a result, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements collected from the bare bond coating surface revealed higher Ti interdiffusion occurring with the 1483 substrate, which contained the highest Ti content.« less

  12. APS TBC performance on directionally-solidified superalloy substrates with HVOF NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Michael J.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Haynes, James A.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2015-09-04

    Directionally-solidified (DS) superalloy components with advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) to lower the metal operating temperature have the potential to replace more expensive single crystal superalloys for large land-based turbines. In order to assess relative TBC performance, furnace cyclic testing was used with superalloys 1483, X4 and Hf-rich DS 247 substrates and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings at 1100 °C with 1-h cycles in air with 10% H2O. With these coating and test conditions, there was no statistically-significant effect of substrate alloy on the average lifetime of the air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coatings on small coupons. Using photo-stimulated luminescence piezospectroscopy maps at regular cycling intervals, the residual compressive stress in the α-Al2O3 scale underneath the YSZ top coating and on a bare bond coating was similar for all three substrates and delaminations occurred at roughly the same rate and frequency. As a result, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements collected from the bare bond coating surface revealed higher Ti interdiffusion occurring with the 1483 substrate, which contained the highest Ti content.

  13. Thermal Shock Resistance of Stabilized Zirconia/Metal Coat on Polymer Matrix Composites by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; Huang, Wenzhi; Cheng, Haifeng; Cao, Xueqiang

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized zirconia/metal coating systems were deposited on the polymer matrix composites by a combined thermal spray process. Effects of the thicknesses of metal layers and ceramic layer on thermal shock resistance of the coating systems were investigated. According to the results of thermal shock lifetime, the coating system consisting of 20 μm Zn and 125 μm 8YSZ exhibited the best thermal shock resistance. Based on microstructure evolution, failure modes and failure mechanism of the coating systems were proposed. The main failure modes were the formation of vertical cracks and delamination in the outlayer of substrate, and the appearance of coating spallation. The residual stress, thermal stress and oxidation of substrate near the substrate/metal layer interface were responsible for coating failure, while the oxidation of substrate near the substrate/coating interface was the dominant one.

  14. Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Forming of Solar Thermal Propulsion Components Using Refractory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank; Gerish, Harold; Davis, William; Hissam, D. Andy

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal Spray Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a fabrication technique using Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) to form structural components from a tungsten/rhenium alloy. The components were assembled into an absorption cavity for a fully-functioning, ground test unit of a solar thermal propulsion engine. The VPS process deposits refractory metal onto a graphite mandrel of the desired shape. The mandrel acts as a male mold, forming the required contour and dimensions of the inside surface of the deposit. Tungsten and tungsten/25% rhenium were used in the development and production of several absorber cavity components. These materials were selected for their high temperature (less than 2500 C) strength. Each absorber cavity comprises 3 coaxial shells with two, double-helical flow passages through which the propellant gas flows. This paper describes the processing techniques, design considerations, and process development associated with forming these engine components.

  15. Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Forming of Solar Thermal Propulsion Components Using Refractory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank; Gerish, Harold; Davis, William; Hissam, D. Andy

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal Spray Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a fabrication technique using Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) to form structural components from a tungsten/rhenium alloy. The components were assembled into an absorption cavity for a fully-functioning, ground test unit of a solar thermal propulsion engine. The VPS process deposits refractory metal onto a graphite mandrel of the desired shape. The mandrel acts as a male mold, forming the required contour and dimensions of the inside surface of the deposit. Tungsten and tungsten/25% rhenium were used in the development and production of several absorber cavity components. These materials were selected for their high temperature (less than 2500 C) strength. Each absorber cavity comprises 3 coaxial shells with two, double-helical flow passages through which the propellant gas flows. This paper describes the processing techniques, design considerations, and process development associated with forming these engine components.

  16. Evaluation of thermal sprayed metallic coatings for use on the structures at Launch Complex 39

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of the evaluation program is presented. The objective was to evaluate the applicability of Thermal Sprayed Coatings (TSC) to protect the structures in the high temperature acid environment produced by exhaust of the Solid Rocket Boosters during the launches of the Shuttle Transportation System. Only the relatively low cost aluminum TSC which provides some cathodic protection for steel appears to be a practical candidate for further investigation.

  17. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-10-01

    In the 11th quarter, further testing was performed on thermal spray coatings. A component coated and fused in the 9th quarter underwent high-stress abrasive wear testing. The test successfully showed this coating could survive in a high stress, sliding wear environment as the base layer in an FGM design coating. Work on the ferrous metal-matrix composites was completed in previous quarter and therefore no update is provided.

  18. Sintering and Interface Strain Tolerance of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Leissler, George W.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot section SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. A coating system consisting of a zirconia-based oxide topcoat (thermal barrier) and a mullite/BSAS silicate inner coat (environmental barrier) is often considered a model system for the CMC applications. However, the coating sintering, and thermal expansion mismatch between the zirconia oxide layer and the silicate environmental barrier/CMC substrate will be of major concern at high temperature and under thermal cycling conditions. In this study, the sintering behavior of plasma-sprayed freestanding zirconia-yttria-based thermal barrier coatings and mullite (and/or barium-strontium-aluminosilicate, i.e., BSAS) environmental barrier coatings was determined using a dilatometer in the temperature range of 1200-1500 C. The effects of test temperature on the coating sintering kinetics were systematically investigated. The plasma-sprayed zirconia-8wt.%yttria and mullite (BSAS) two-layer composite coating systems were also prepared to quantitatively evaluate the interface strain tolerance of the coating system under thermal cycling conditions based on the dilatomentry. The cyclic response of the coating strain tolerance behavior and interface degradation as a function of cycle number will also be discussed.

  19. Microstructure and Thermal Properties of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Yb2Si2O7 Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Niu, Yaran; Huang, Liping; Li, Hong; Zheng, Xuebin; Ding, Chuanxian; Sun, Jinliang

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, Yb2Si2O7 powder was synthesized by solid-state reaction using Yb2O3 and SiO2 powders as starting materials. Atmospheric plasma spray technique was applied to fabricate Yb2Si2O7 coating. The phase composition and microstructure of the coating were characterized. The density, open porosity and Vickers hardness of the coating were investigated. Its thermal stability was evaluated by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the coating were measured. The results showed that the as-sprayed coating was mainly composed of crystalline Yb2Si2O7 with amorphous phase. The coating had a dense structure containing defects, such as pores, interfaces and microcracks. The TG-DTA results showed that there was almost no mass change from room temperature to 1200 °C, while a sharp exothermic peak appeared at around 1038 °C in DTA curve, which indicated that the amorphous phase crystallized. The thermal conductivity of the coating decreased with rise in temperature up to 600 °C and then followed by an increase at higher temperatures. The minimum value of the thermal conductivity of the Yb2Si2O7 coating was about 0.68 W/(m K).

  20. Spray freeze-dried nanofibrillated cellulose aerogels with thermal superinsulating properties.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Saelices, Clara; Seantier, Bastien; Cathala, Bernard; Grohens, Yves

    2017-02-10

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) aerogels were prepared by spray freeze-drying (SFD). Their structural, mechanical and thermal insulation properties were compared to those of NFC aerogels prepared by conventional freeze-drying (CFD). The purpose of this investigation is to develop superinsulating bioaerogels by reducing their pore size. Severe reduction of the aerogel pore size and skeleton architecture were observed by SEM, aerogels prepared by SFD method show a fibril skeleton morphology, which defines a mesoporous structure. BET analyses confirm the appearance of a new organization structure with pores of nanometric sizes. As a consequence, the thermal insulation properties were significantly improved for SFD materials compared to CFD aerogel, reaching values of thermal conductivity as low as 0.018W/(mK). Moreover, NFC aerogels have a thermal conductivity below that of air in ambient conditions, making them one of the best cellulose based thermal superinsulating material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microencapsulation of menadione sodium bisulphite with polydimethylsiloxane by the spray-drying process: characterization by thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Gronchi, P; Del Rosso, R; Centola, P; Cosentino, R F

    1992-01-01

    Menadione sodium bisulphite was microencapsulated with a polydimethylsiloxane membrane using spray-drying technology. Tests were performed using laboratory equipment and a Niro Atomizer pilot plant to scale up the process. The products were characterized with differential thermal analysis (DTA) and chemical and physical methods. Many differences between raw material and microencapsulated powder result from DTA data. The thermal characterization confirms that the spray-drying microcoating could be used to protect powder from the oxidative actions of the atmosphere.

  2. Surface modification of austenitic thermal-spray coatings by low-temperature nitrocarburizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, T.; Mehner, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal-spray coatings of austenitic materials are mainly used under corrosive conditions. The relatively poor wear resistance strongly limits their use. In comparative studies between nitrocarburized and untreated thermal-spray coatings, the influence of the nitrogen and carbon enrichment on the properties of the coatings and the microstructure was investigated. The cross-section micrograph of the nitrocarburized coating shows the S-phase formation in the surface layer region. The depth profile of the nitrogen and carbon concentration was determined by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOS) analysis. A selective enrichment of the surface layer region with nitrogen and carbon by means of thermochemical heat treatment increases the wear resistance. The interstitially dissolved nitrogen and carbon causes the formation of strong compressive residual stresses and high surface hardness. Increases in the service life of existing applications or new material combinations with face-centred cubic friction partners are possible. In the absence of dimensional change, uniform as well as partial nitrogen enrichment of the thermal spray coating is possible. Nitrocarburized coatings demonstrate a significant improvement in adhesive wear resistance and extremely high surface hardness.

  3. Elastoplastic analysis of process induced residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yongxiong; Liang Xiubing; Liu Yan; Xu Binshi

    2010-07-15

    The residual stresses induced from thermal spraying process have been extensively investigated in previous studies. However, most of such works were focused on the elastic deformation range. In this paper, an elastoplastic model for predicting the residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings was developed, in which two main contributions were considered, namely the deposition induced stress and that due to differential thermal contraction between the substrate and coating during cooling. The deposition induced stress was analyzed based on the assumption that the coating is formed layer-by-layer, and then a misfit strain is accommodated within the multilayer structure after the addition of each layer (plastic deformation is induced consequently). From a knowledge of specimen dimensions, processing temperatures, and material properties, residual stress distributions within the structure can be determined by implementing the model with a simple computer program. A case study for the plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY on Inconel 718 system was performed finally. Besides some similar phenomena observed from the present study as compared with previous elastic model reported in literature, the elastoplastic model also provides some interesting features for prediction of the residual stresses.

  4. Effects of service condition on rolling contact fatigue failure mechanism and lifetime of thermal spray coatings—A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huawei; Cui, Xiufang; Wang, Haidou; Xing, Zhiguo; Jin, Guo

    2015-01-01

    The service condition determines the Rolling Contact Fatigue(RCF) failure mechanism and lifetime under ascertain material structure integrity parameter of thermal spray coating. The available literature on the RCF testing of thermal spray coatings under various condition services is considerable; it is generally difficult to synthesize all of the result to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the parameters which has a great effect on a thermal spray coating's resistance of RCF. The effects of service conditions(lubrication states, contact stresses, revolve speed, and slip ratio) on the changing of thermal spray coatings' contact fatigue lifetime is introduced systematically. The effects of different service condition on RCF failure mechanism of thermal spray coating from the change of material structure integrity are also summarized. Moreover, In order to enhance the RCF performance, the parameter optimal design formula of service condition and material structure integrity is proposed based on the effect of service condition on thermal spray coatings' contact fatigue lifetime and RCF failure mechanism. The shortage of available literature and the forecast focus in future researches are discussed based on available research. The explicit result of RCF lifetime law and parameter optimal design formula in term of lubrication states, contact stresses, revolve speed, and slip ratio, is significant to improve the RCF performance on the engineering application.

  5. Harmful risks for workers in thermal spraying: A review completed by a survey in a French company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hériaud-Kraemer, Hélène; Montavon, Ghislain; Coddet, Christian; Hertert, Sylvaine; Robin, Hervé

    2003-12-01

    Thermal spray technologies are implemented in spray booths either manually or automatically. In both cases, workers can be exposed to several potential and real risks. The major risks are to workers’ respiratory systems and result from harmful feedstock materials. To the authors’ knowledge, very few specific studies have been conducted to assess the significance of these risks. This study describes the major risks encountered and reviews the results of a survey conducted in a French company that uses thermal spray technology on a large scale.

  6. High Temperature Thermal Properties of Columnar Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coating Performed by Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, B.; Schick, V.; Remy, B.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.

    2016-09-01

    Performance enhancement of gas turbines is a main issue for the aircraft industry. Over many years, a large part of the effort has been focused on the development of more insulating Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs). In this study, Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) columnar structures are processed by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS). These structures have already demonstrated abilities to get improved thermal lifetime, similarly to standard YSZ TBCs performed by EB-PVD. Thermal diffusivity measurements coupled with differential scanning calorimetry analysis are performed from room temperature up to 1100 °C, first, on HastelloyX substrates and then, on bilayers including a SPS YSZ coating. Results show an effective thermal conductivity for YSZ performed by SPS lower than 1 W.m-1K-1 whereas EB- PVD YSZ coatings exhibit a value of 1.5 W.m-1K-1.

  7. Analytical methods to characterize heterogeneous raw material for thermal spray process: cored wire Inconel 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, T.; Bonebeau, S.; Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Pawlowski, L.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    In wire arc spraying, the raw material needs to exhibit sufficient formability and ductility in order to be processed. By using an electrically conductive, metallic sheath, it is also possible to handle non-conductive and/or brittle materials such as ceramics. In comparison to massive wire, a cored wire has a heterogeneous material distribution. Due to this fact and the complex thermodynamic processes during wire arc spraying, it is very difficult to predict the resulting chemical composition in the coating with sufficient accuracy. An Inconel 625 cored wire was used to investigate this issue. In a comparative study, the analytical results of the raw material were compared to arc sprayed coatings and droplets, which were remelted in an arc furnace under argon atmosphere. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis were used to determine the chemical composition. The phase determination was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results were related to the manufacturer specifications and evaluated in respect to differences in the chemical composition. The comparison between the feedstock powder, the remelted droplets and the thermally sprayed coatings allows to evaluate the influence of the processing methods on the resulting chemical and phase composition.

  8. Thermally Sprayed Coatings as Effective Tool Surfaces in Sheet Metal Forming Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, V.; Witulski, J.; Brosius, A.; Trompeter, M.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2011-06-01

    Two approaches to produce wear-resistant effective surfaces for deep drawing tools by thermal arc wire spraying of hard materials are presented. Arc wire spraying is a very economic coating technique due to a high deposition rate. The coated surface is very rough compared to that of conventional sheet metal forming tools. In the first approach, the coated surface is smoothed in a subsequent CNC-based incremental roller burnishing process. In this process, the surface asperities on the surface are flattened, and the roughness is significantly reduced. In the second approach, the hard material coatings are not sprayed directly on the tool but on a negative mould. Afterward, the rough "as-sprayed" side of the coating is backfilled with a polymer. The bonded hard metal shell is removed from the negative mould and acts as the surface of the hybrid sheet metal forming tool. Sheet metal forming experiments using tools based on these two approaches demonstrate that they are suitable to form high-strength steels. Owing to a conventional body of steel or cast iron, the first approach is suitable for large batch sizes. The application of the second approach lies within the range of small up to medium batch size productions.

  9. Erosion Performance of Gadolinium Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Processed by Suspension Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahade, Satyapal; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    7-8 wt.% Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the standard thermal barrier coating (TBC) material used by the gas turbines industry due to its excellent thermal and thermo-mechanical properties up to 1200 °C. The need for improvement in gas turbine efficiency has led to an increase in the turbine inlet gas temperature. However, above 1200 °C, YSZ has issues such as poor sintering resistance, poor phase stability and susceptibility to calcium magnesium alumino silicates (CMAS) degradation. Gadolinium zirconate (GZ) is considered as one of the promising top coat candidates for TBC applications at high temperatures (>1200 °C) due to its low thermal conductivity, good sintering resistance and CMAS attack resistance. Single-layer 8YSZ, double-layer GZ/YSZ and triple-layer GZdense/GZ/YSZ TBCs were deposited by suspension plasma spray (SPS) process. Microstructural analysis was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A columnar microstructure was observed in the single-, double- and triple-layer TBCs. Phase analysis of the as-sprayed TBCs was carried out using XRD (x-ray diffraction) where a tetragonal prime phase of zirconia in the single-layer YSZ TBC and a cubic defect fluorite phase of GZ in the double and triple-layer TBCs was observed. Porosity measurements of the as-sprayed TBCs were made by water intrusion method and image analysis method. The as-sprayed GZ-based multi-layered TBCs were subjected to erosion test at room temperature, and their erosion resistance was compared with single-layer 8YSZ. It was shown that the erosion resistance of 8YSZ single-layer TBC was higher than GZ-based multi-layered TBCs. Among the multi-layered TBCs, triple-layer TBC was slightly better than double layer in terms of erosion resistance. The eroded TBCs were cold-mounted and analyzed by SEM.

  10. Thermal behavior and stability of biodegradable spray-dried microparticles containing triamcinolone.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Arnóbio Antônio; de Matos, Jivaldo Rosário; Formariz, Thalita Pedroni; Rossanezi, Gustavo; Scarpa, Maria Virginia; do Egito, Eryvaldo Sócrates Tabosa; de Oliveira, Anselmo Gomes

    2009-02-23

    Thermal analysis has been widely used for obtaining information about drug-polymer interactions and for pre-formulation studies of pharmaceutical dosage forms. In this work, biodegradable microparticles of poly (d,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) containing triamcinolone (TR) in various drug:polymer ratios were produced by spray drying. The main purpose of this study was to study the effect of the spray-drying process not only on the drug-polymer interactions but also on the stability of microparticles using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry (TG) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG), X-ray analysis (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The evaluation of drug-polymer interactions and the pre-formulation studies were assessed using the DSC, TG and DTG, and IR. The quantitative analysis of drugs entrapped in PLGA microparticles was performed by the HPLC method. The results showed high levels of drug-loading efficiency for all used drug:polymer ratio, and the polymorph used for preparing the microparticles was the form B. The DSC and TG/DTG profiles for drug-loaded microparticles were very similar to those for the physical mixtures of the components. Therefore, a correlation between drug content and the structural and thermal properties of drug-loaded PLGA microparticles was established. These data indicate that the spray-drying technique does not affect the physico-chemical stability of the microparticle components. These results are in agreement with the IR analysis demonstrating that no significant chemical interaction occurs between TR and PLGA in both physical mixtures and microparticles. The results of the X-ray analysis are in agreement with the thermal analysis data showing that the amorphous form of TR prevails over a small fraction of crystalline phase of the drug also present in the TR-loaded microparticles. From the pre-formulation studies, we have found that the spray-drying methodology is an efficient process for obtaining TR

  11. System for NDE of thermal spray coating bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.R.; Wandling, C.R.; Gatto, F.B.; Rogers, F.S.

    1984-09-01

    A nondestructive testing system that is especially well suited to NDE of bonds between coatings and substrates has been developed. It injects heat into the test specimen surface from a hot gas pulse and detects and other coating problems by means of an emissivity independent infrared scanning method. This method is very practical and has been proven in numerous demonstrations. It is the only method known by the authors to be applicable to such a wide variety of coatings. Qualitative correlation between bond strength and scan results from the system was demonstrated on one small group of test specimens. Due to its emissivity independence, the method yields results that are, in many cases, far superior to other infrared-thermal NDE methods. It can be applied to coatings having tough surfaces, and no physical contact with the test specimen is required.

  12. Validation of the thermal effect of roof with the Spraying and green plants in an insulated building

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru; Ojima, Toshio

    2004-08-08

    In recent years, roof-spraying and rooftop lawns have proven effective on roofs with poor thermal insulation. However, the roofs of most buildings have insulating material to provide thermal insulation during the winter. The effects of insulation has not previously been quantified. In this study, the authors collected measurements of an insulated building to quantify the thermal effects of roof-spraying and rooftop lawns. Roof-spraying did not significantly reduce cooling loads and required significant amounts of water. The conclusion is that roof spraying is not suitable for buildings with well-insulated roofs. Rooftop lawns, however, significantly stabilized the indoor temperature while additionally helping to mitigate the heat island phenomenon.

  13. Validation on the thermal effect of roof with the spraying and green plants in an insulated building

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru; Ojima, Toshio

    2004-03-20

    In recent years, roof-spraying and rooftop lawns has proved effective on roofs with poor thermal insulation. However, roofs of most buildings have insulating material to provide thermal insulation during the winter. The effects of such a practice have not previously been quantified. In this study, the authors conducted measurements of an insulated building to quantify the thermal effects of roof-spraying and rooftop lawns. Roof-spraying did not significantly reduce cooling loads, and required significant amounts of water. The conclusion is that roof spraying is not suitable for buildings with well-insulated roofs. Rooftop lawns, however, significantly stabilized the indoor temperature while additionally helping to mitigate the heat island phenomenon.

  14. Coating Layer and Corrosion Protection Characteristics in Sea Water with Various Thermal Spray Coating Materials for STS304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Jong; Woo, Yong-Bin

    We investigated the optimal method of application and the anticorrosive abilities of Zn, Al, and Zn + 15%Al spray coatings in protecting stainless steel 304 (STS304) in sea water. If a defect such as porosity or an oxide layer, causes STS304 to be exposed to sea water, and the thermal spray coating material will act as the cathode and anode, respectively. The Tafel experiments revealed that Al-coated specimens among applied coating methods had the lowest corrosion current densities. As the corrosion potential decreases with increasing corrosion current density, we estimated the characteristics and lifetime of the protective thermal spray coating layer in the galvanic cell formed by the thermal spray coating layer and STS304.

  15. Thermal conductivity of spray-on foam insulations for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, Matt; Vanderlaan, Mark; Van Sciver, Steven

    2012-06-01

    A guarded-hot-plate apparatus [1] has been developed to measure the thermal conductivity of spray-on foam insulations (SOFI) at temperatures ranging from 30 K to 300 K. The foam tested in the present study is NCFI 24-124, a polyisocyanurate foam used on the External Tanks of the Space Shuttle. The foam was tested first in ambient pressure air, then evacuated and tested once more. These thermal conductivities were compared to the thermal conductivity taken from a sample immediately after being subjected to conditions similar to those experienced by the foam while on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center. To mimic the conditions experienced on the launch pad, an apparatus was built to enclose one side of the foam sample in a warm, humid environment while the other side of the sample contacts a stainless steel surface held at 77 K. The thermal conductivity data obtained is also compared to data found in the literature.

  16. Liquid Feedstock Plasma Spraying: An Emerging Process for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markocsan, Nicolaie; Gupta, Mohit; Joshi, Shrikant; Nylén, Per; Li, Xin-Hai; Wigren, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Liquid feedstock plasma spraying (LFPS) involves deposition of ultrafine droplets of suspensions or solution precursors (typically ranging from nano- to submicron size) and permits production of coatings with unique microstructures that are promising for advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. This paper reviews the recent progress arising from efforts devoted to development of high-performance TBCs using the LFPS approach. Advancements in both suspension plasma spraying and solution precursor plasma spraying, which constitute the two main variants of LFPS, are presented. Results illustrating the different types of the microstructures that can be realized in LFPS through appropriate process parameter control, model-assisted assessment of influence of coating defects on thermo-mechanical properties and the complex interplay between pore coarsening, sintering and crystallite growth in governing thermal conductivity are summarized. The enhancement in functional performances/lifetime possible in LFPS TBCs with multilayered architectures and by incorporating new pyrochlore chemistries such as gadolinium zirconate, besides the conventional single 8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia insulating ceramic layer, is specifically highlighted.

  17. High stress abrasive wear behavior of some hardfaced surfaces produced by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, A. K.; Gachake, Arati; Prasad, B. K.; Dasgupta, Rupa; Singh, M.; Yegneswaran, A. H.

    2002-02-01

    Steel surfaces were thermally sprayed with nickel chromium boron (NCB) powder (with and without tungsten carbide) using an oxy-acetylene torch. The sprayed (hard) surfaces and substrate were characterized for abrasive wear properties. Test parameters such as load and sliding distance were varied. A significant improvement in the abrasive wear resistance (inverse of wear rate) was noted for the thermally sprayed surfaces as compared to that of the substrate. Wear surfaces, subsurface regions, and debris were examined in order to ascertain the operating wear mechanisms. Substrate (mild steel), because of its low hardness, suffered severe wear through the cutting, ploughing, and wedging action of the hard abrasive (silicon carbide). Deep cuts on the worn surface, a bulky transfer layer, subsurface cracks, and large-size debris were observed. However, wear was reduced due to high hardness of the layer of NCB powder on the substrate, which resisted the penetration of abrasive into the surface. Presence of tungsten carbide in the layer of NCB powder further reduced the wear of the corresponding specimen because of very high hardness of the tungsten carbide. Shallow wear grooves and finer debris were observed for the NCB coating with and without tungsten carbide. Cutting was the predominating wear mechanism in the case of coatings.

  18. Thermal spray vitrification process for the removal of lead oxide contained in organic paints

    SciTech Connect

    Karthikeyan, J.; Chen, J.; Bancke, G.A.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Breslin, V.T.

    1995-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) regulations have necessitated the removal and containment of toxic lead from lead oxide containing paints. The Thermal Spray Vitrification Process (TSVP) is a novel technique in which a glass powder of appropriate composition is flame sprayed onto the painted surface to achieve removal and vitrification of the lead. Two different glass systems, i.e., alkali silicate and ferrous silicate, were chosen for detailed study. Appropriate amounts of raw materials were mixed, fused, quenched, ground and sieved to obtain the spray quality powders. Grit blasted mild steel coupons were used as test substrates for the spray parameter optimization studies; while those coupons with lead oxide containing organic paint were used for the lead removal experiments. The powders and deposits were investigated using Microtrac particle size analysis (for powders), optical microscopy, XRD and SEM. The remnant lead in the panel was measured using a specially prepared X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) system. The lead leach rate was recorded as per US-EPA approved Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The results of this study have shown that lead oxide can be successfully removed form the paint by flame spraying a maximum of three layers of glass onto the painted surface. It is possible to obtain much higher lead removal rate with ferrous silicate glass as compared to alkali silicate glass is much higher than the ferrous silicate glass. The in situ vitrification has not been completely optimized; however, the lead containing glass coating can be remelted in situ or on site to enhance the vitrification of the lead which had been absorbed in the glass coating.

  19. Relieving thermal discomfort: Effects of sprayed L-menthol on perception, performance, and time trial cycling in the heat.

    PubMed

    Barwood, M J; Corbett, J; Thomas, K; Twentyman, P

    2015-06-01

    L-menthol stimulates cutaneous thermoreceptors and induces cool sensations improving thermal comfort, but has been linked to heat storage responses; this could increase risk of heat illness during self-paced exercise in the heat. Therefore, L-menthol application could lead to a discrepancy between behavioral and autonomic thermoregulatory drivers. Eight male participants volunteered. They were familiarized and then completed two trials in hot conditions (33.5 °C, 33% relative humidity) where their t-shirt was sprayed with CONTROL-SPRAY or MENTHOL-SPRAY after 10 km (i.e., when they were hot and uncomfortable) of a 16.1-km cycling time trial (TT). Thermal perception [thermal sensation (TS) and comfort (TC)], thermal responses [rectal temperature (Trec ), skin temperature (Tskin )], perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate, pacing (power output), and TT completion time were measured. MENTHOL-SPRAY made participants feel cooler and more comfortable and resulted in lower RPE (i.e., less exertion) yet performance was unchanged [TT completion: CONTROL-SPRAY 32.4 (2.9) and MENTHOL-SPRAY 32.7 (3.0) min]. Trec rate of increase was 1.40 (0.60) and 1.45 (0.40) °C/h after CONTROL-SPRAY and MENTHOL-SPRAY application, which were not different. Spraying L-menthol toward the end of self-paced exercise in the heat improved perception, but did not alter performance and did not increase heat illness risk. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The first result of an optical monitoring system for optimization of thermal spray droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Yamagata, Y.; Muraoka, K.

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the first experimental result of a simple but reliable optical monitoring system for optimization of thermal spray droplets. The system, which was used in the present experiment and the authors call as ``a pre-proto instrument'', consisted of a light collecting lens followed by a part for separating the light into two wavelengths, with the light of each wavelength guided into an avalanche photo-diode (APD) to be electronically detected. First, it was calibrated using a special purpose-built calibration system. Then, it was taken to a plasma spray gun for a field test, yielding a satisfactory first result. Based on this positive result, future plans of the project are discussed.

  1. Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Forming of Solar Thermal Propulsion Components Using Refractory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Frank R.; Hissam, David A.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Davis, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Spray Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a fabrication technique using Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) to form structural components from a tungsten/rhenium alloy. The components were assembled into an absorber cavity for a fully-functioning, ground test unit of a solar then-nal propulsion engine. The VPS process deposits refractory metal onto a graphite mandrel of the desired shape. The mandrel acts as a male mold, forming the required contour and dimensions of the inside surface of the deposit. Tungsten and tungsten/25% rhenium were used in the development and production of several absorber cavity components. These materials were selected for their high temperature (greater than 25000 C [greater than 4530 F]) strength. Each absorber cavity comprises 3 coaxial shells with two, double-helical flow passages through which the propellant gas flows. This paper describes the processing techniques, design considerations, and process development associated with forming these engine components.

  2. Friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal insulations: laboratory evaluation of prototype test devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiter, W.J.; Roberts, W.E.; Mathey, R.G.

    1988-11-01

    This report describes the results of the second phase of a study to develop a field test method for assessing the friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal-insulating materials. Phase 2 is the laboratory evaluation of the prototype devices for conducting surface and bulk compression/shear, indentation, abrasion, and impact tests. The results indicated that the surface and bulk compression/shear, indentation, and impact devices provided some measure of discrimination between samples subjectively judged as having high and moderate friability. In contrast, the abrasion device was non-discriminating in that, for all tests, a residue was produced. It was concluded that all devices be included in the field phase of the study using in-place spray-applied fireproofings having different levels of friability.

  3. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  4. Finite Element Simulation of Residual Stress Development in Thermally Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhoriny, Mohamed; Wenzelburger, Martin; Killinger, Andreas; Gadow, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    The coating buildup process of Al2O3/TiO2 ceramic powder deposited on stainless-steel substrate by atmospheric plasma spraying has been simulated by creating thermomechanical finite element models that utilize element death and birth techniques in ANSYS commercial software and self-developed codes. The simulation process starts with side-by-side deposition of coarse subparts of the ceramic layer until the entire coating is created. Simultaneously, the heat flow into the material, thermal deformation, and initial quenching stress are computed. The aim is to be able to predict—for the considered spray powder and substrate material—the development of residual stresses and to assess the risk of coating failure. The model allows the prediction of the heat flow, temperature profile, and residual stress development over time and position in the coating and substrate. The proposed models were successfully run and the results compared with actual residual stresses measured by the hole drilling method.

  5. Finite Element Simulation of Residual Stress Development in Thermally Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhoriny, Mohamed; Wenzelburger, Martin; Killinger, Andreas; Gadow, Rainer

    2017-03-01

    The coating buildup process of Al2O3/TiO2 ceramic powder deposited on stainless-steel substrate by atmospheric plasma spraying has been simulated by creating thermomechanical finite element models that utilize element death and birth techniques in ANSYS commercial software and self-developed codes. The simulation process starts with side-by-side deposition of coarse subparts of the ceramic layer until the entire coating is created. Simultaneously, the heat flow into the material, thermal deformation, and initial quenching stress are computed. The aim is to be able to predict—for the considered spray powder and substrate material—the development of residual stresses and to assess the risk of coating failure. The model allows the prediction of the heat flow, temperature profile, and residual stress development over time and position in the coating and substrate. The proposed models were successfully run and the results compared with actual residual stresses measured by the hole drilling method.

  6. The behavior of high-purity, low-density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, Yanar NM

    2009-12-01

    Research on the behavior of high-purity, low-density (85%) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The microstructure of the APS topcoats is one variable in this study intended to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation and to minimize the thermal conduction through the YSZ layer. The specimens were evaluated using cyclic oxidation tests and important properties of the TBCs, such as resistance to sintering and phase transformation, were determined. The high purity resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in significant durability during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, CTE of the superalloy substrate and the nature of the thermal exposure.

  7. Thermal stability studies of plasma sprayed yttrium oxide coatings deposited on pure tantalum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, A.; Anupama, P.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Sreekumar, K. P.; Satpute, R. U.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2010-02-01

    Plasma sprayed Yttrium oxide is used for coating of crucibles and moulds that are used at high temperature to handle highly reactive molten metals like uranium, titanium, chromium, and beryllium. The alloy bond layer is severely attacked by the molten metal. This commonly used layer contributes to the impurity addition to the pure liquid metal. Yttrium oxide was deposited on tantalum substrates (25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk and 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk) by atmospheric plasma spray technique with out any bond coat using optimized coating parameters. Resistance to thermal shock was evaluated by subjecting the coated specimens, to controlled heating and cooling cycles between 300K to 1600K in an induction furnace in argon atmosphere having <= 0.1ppm of oxygen. The experiments were designed to examine the sample tokens by both destructive and non-destructive techniques, after a predetermined number of thermal cycles. The results upto 24 thermal cycles of 25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk coupons and upto 6 cycles of 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk coupons are discussed. The coatings produced with the optimized parameters were found to exhibit excellent thermal shock resistance.

  8. Oxy-Acetylene Flame Thermal Spray of Al/SiCp Composites with High Fraction of Reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, B.; Rodrigo, P.; Campo, M.; Ureña, A.; Rams, J.

    2009-12-01

    Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with more that 50 vol.% of SiC particles were fabricated using oxyacetylene thermal spraying. The sprayed material consisted of mixtures of aluminum powder with 60-85 vol.% of SiC particles. To favor the processing of the composite, in some cases, the SiC particles were coated with silica following a sol-gel route. This allowed obtaining as-sprayed samples with thickness above 2 mm and with porosity values below 2%. Post-processing of the samples by hot pressing allowed to reduce further the porosity of the composites and to enhance their microstructural homogeneity. The whole process of spraying and hot pressing has been optimized and the role played by the different spraying parameters and by time length and temperature of hot pressing has been also studied.

  9. Life Prediction of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Temperature-Dependent Model Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Chen, Kuiying; Baddour, N.; Patnaik, P. C.

    2017-06-01

    The failure analysis and life prediction of atmospheric plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (APS-TBCs) were carried out for a thermal cyclic process. A residual stress model for the top coat of APS-TBC was proposed and then applied to life prediction. This residual stress model shows an inversion characteristic versus thickness of thermally grown oxide. The capability of the life model was demonstrated using temperature-dependent model parameters. Using existing life data, a comparison of fitting approaches of life model parameters was performed. A larger discrepancy was found for the life predicted using linearized fitting parameters versus temperature compared to those using non-linear fitting parameters. A method for integrating the residual stress was proposed by using the critical time of stress inversion. The role of the residual stresses distributed at each individual coating layer was explored and their interplay on the coating's delamination was analyzed.

  10. Ultra-low thermal conductivity of nanogranular indium tin oxide films deposited by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinzari, Vladimir I.; Cocemasov, Alexandr I.; Nika, Denis L.; Korotcenkov, Ghenadii S.

    2017-02-01

    The authors have shown that nanogranular indium tin oxide (ITO) films, deposited by spray pyrolysis on a silicon substrate, demonstrate ultralow thermal conductivity κ ˜ 0.84 ± 0.12 Wm-1 K-1 at room temperature. This value is approximately by one order of magnitude lower than that in bulk ITO. The strong drop of thermal conductivity is explained by the nanogranular structure and porosity of ITO films, resulting in enhanced phonon scattering on grain boundaries. The experimental results were interpreted theoretically, employing the Boltzmann transport equation approach for phonon transport and filtering model for electronic transport. The calculated values of thermal conductivity are in reasonable agreement with the experimental findings. The presented results show that ITO films with an optimal nanogranular structure may be prospective for thermoelectric applications.

  11. Thermal Shock Properties of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Deposited Using Low-Energy Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings have been frequently used as a thermal protective layer on the metal or alloy component surfaces. In the present study, ZrO2-7%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were successfully deposited by DC (direct current) plasma spray process under very low pressure conditions (less than 1 mbar) using low-energy plasma guns F4-VB and F100. The experiments were performed to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of different TBC specimens which were heated to 1373 K at a high-temperature cycling furnace and held for 0.5 h, followed by air cooling at room temperature for 0.2 h. For comparison, a corresponding atmospheric plasma spray (APS) counterpart was also elaborated to carry out the similar experiments. The results indicated that the very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS) coatings displayed better thermal shock resistance. Moreover, the failure mechanism of the coatings was elucidated.

  12. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes for cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; McGill, Galen E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are being used in Oregon in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for reinforced concrete bridges. The U.S. Department of Energy, Albany Research Center, is collaborating with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to evaluate the long-term performance and service life of these anodes. Laboratory studies were conducted on concrete slabs coated with 0.5 mm (20 mil) thick, thermal-sprayed zinc anodes. The slabs were electrochemically aged at an accelerated rate using an anode current density of 0.032 A/m2 (3mA/ft2). Half the slabs were preheated before thermal-spraying with zinc; the other half were unheated. Electrochemical aging resulted in the formation at the zinc-concrete interface of a thin, low pH zone (relative to cement paste) consisting primarily of ZnO and Zn(OH)2, and in a second zone of calcium and zinc aluminates and silicates formed by secondary mineralization. Both zones contained elevated concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. The original bond strength of the zinc coating decreased due to the loss of mechanical bond to the concrete with the initial passage of electrical charge (aging). Additional charge led to an increase in bond strength to a maximum as the result of secondary mineralization of zinc dissolution products with the cement paste. Further charge led to a decrease in bond strength and ultimately coating disbondment as the interfacial reaction zones continued to thicken. This occurred at an effective service life of 27 years at the 0.0022 A/m2 (0.2 mA/ft2) current density typically used by ODOT in ICCP systems for coastal bridges. Zinc coating failure under tensile stress was primarily cohesive within the thickening reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. There was no difference between the bond strength of zinc coatings on preheated and unheated concrete surfaces after long service times.

  13. Spray-Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composite Electrodes for Thermal Energy Scavenging Electrochemical Cells.

    PubMed

    Holubowitch, Nicolas E; Landon, James; Lippert, Cameron A; Craddock, John D; Weisenberger, Matthew C; Liu, Kunlei

    2016-08-31

    Spray-coated multiwalled carbon nanotube/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (MWCNT/PVDF) composite electrodes, scCNTs, with varying CNT compositions (2 to 70 wt %) are presented for use in a simple thermal energy-scavenging cell (thermocell) based on the ferro/ferricyanide redox couple. Their utility for direct thermal-to-electrical energy conversion is explored at various temperature differentials and cell orientations. Performance is compared to that of buckypaper, a 100% CNT sheet material used as a benchmark electrode in thermocell research. The 30 to 70 wt % scCNT composites give the highest power output by electrode area-seven times greater than buckypaper at ΔT = 50 °C. CNT utilization is drastically enhanced in our electrodes, reaching 1 W gCNT(-1) compared to 0.036 W gCNT(-1) for buckypaper. Superior performance of our spray-coated electrodes is attributed to both wettability with better use of a large portion of electrochemically active CNTs and minimization of ohmic and thermal contact resistances. Even composites with as low as 2 wt % CNTs are still competitive with prior art. The MWCNT/PVDF composites developed herein are inexpensive, scalable, and serve a general need for CNT electrode optimization in next-generation devices.

  14. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser; Frank W. Zok; Carlos G. Levi; Jeffrey Hawk

    2004-02-01

    In an effort to realize minimum of a 2x increase in wear life of ground engaging components used on mining machines, two potentially cost effective processes were explored for the production of tailored, highly abrasion resistant materials: (1) hybrid pressure casting of steel composites, and (2) arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings. Steel composites comprised of cermet or oxide hard particles were successfully produced using pressure casting processes, although a cost effective process has not yet been identified for oxide particles. Both composites achieved project wear targets in high stress gouging wear, but the cermet composites did not meet the targets in impact wear, due to poor matrix toughness resulting from particle dissolution. Oxide composites had superior toughness and are expected to meet impact wear goals. Arc lamp processing of thermal spray coatings was successfully demonstrated to produce a metallurgical bond at the coating interface. Functionally graded materials were developed and successfully fused to allow for the accommodation of thermal process stresses in an intermediate layer. Ultimately, three functionally graded materials were identified as having high stress, three-body abrasion resistance sufficient to exceed project goals.

  15. Thermally Sprayed Large Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Stack: Geometry Optimization, Preparation, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; He, Peng-Jiang; Yun, Liang-Liang; Song, Bo; Xie, Ying-Xin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we develop a large tubular solid oxide fuel cells design with several cells in series on a porous cermet support, which has many characteristics such as self-sealing, low Ohmic loss, high strength, and good thermal expansion coefficient matching. Here, we investigate aspects of the cell design, manufacture, performance, and application. Firstly, the cell length and number of cells in series are optimized by theoretical analysis. Then, thermal spraying is applied as a cost-effective method to prepare all the cell components. Finally, the performance of different types of cells and two types of stacks is characterized. The maximum output power of one tube, which had 20 cells in series, reaches 31 and 40.5 W at 800 and 900 °C, respectively. Moreover, the output power of a stack assembled with 56 tubes, each with ten cells in series, reaches 800 W at 830 °C. The excellent single tube and cell stack performance suggest that thermally sprayed tubular SOFCs have significant potential for commercialized application.

  16. Effect of Sintering on Mechanical and Physical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of sintering on mechanical and physical properties of free-standing plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined by annealing them at 1316 C in air. Mechanical and physical properties of the TBCs, including strength, modes I and II fracture toughness, elastic modulus, Poisson s response, density, microhardness, fractography, and phase stability, were determined at ambient temperature as a function of annealing time ranging from 0 to 500 h. All mechanical and physical properties, except for the amount of monoclinic phase, increased significantly in 5 to 100 h and then reached a plateau above 100 h. Annealing resulted in healing of microcracks and pores and in grain growth, accompanying densification of the TBC s body due to the sintering effect. However, an inevitable adverse effect also occurred such that the desired lower thermal conductivity and good expansivity, which makes the TBCs unique in thermal barrier applications, were degraded upon annealing. A model was proposed to assess and quantify all the property variables in response to annealing in a normalized scheme. Directionality of as-sprayed TBCs appeared to have an insignificant effect on their properties, as determined via fracture toughness, microhardness, and elastic modulus measurements.

  17. Ultimate Heat Sink Thermal Performance and Water Utilization: Measurements on Cooling and Spray Ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Athey, G. F.; Hadlock, R. K.; Abbey, O. B.

    1982-02-01

    A data acquisition research program, entitled "Ultimate Heat Sink Performance Field Experiments," has been brought to completion. The primary objective is to obtain the requisite data to characterize thermal performance and water utilization for cooling ponds and spray ponds at elevated temperature. Such data are useful for modeling purposes, but the work reported here does not contain modeling efforts within its scope. The water bodies which have been studied are indicative of nuclear reactor ultimate heat sinks, components of emergency core cooling systems. The data reflect thermal performance and water utilization for meteorological and solar influences which are representative of worst-case combinations of conditions. Constructed water retention ponds, provided with absolute seals against seepage, have been chosen as facilities for the measurement programs; the first pond was located at Raft River, Idaho, and the second at East Mesa, California. The data illustrate and describe, for both cooling ponds and spray ponds, thermal performance and water utilization as the ponds cool from an initially elevated temperature. To obtain the initial elevated temperature, it has been convenient to conduct the measurements at geothermal sites having large supplies and delivery rates of hot geothermal fluid. The data are described and discussed in the text, and presented in the form of data volumes as appendices.

  18. Thermally Sprayed Large Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Stack: Geometry Optimization, Preparation, and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; He, Peng-Jiang; Yun, Liang-Liang; Song, Bo; Xie, Ying-Xin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we develop a large tubular solid oxide fuel cells design with several cells in series on a porous cermet support, which has many characteristics such as self-sealing, low Ohmic loss, high strength, and good thermal expansion coefficient matching. Here, we investigate aspects of the cell design, manufacture, performance, and application. Firstly, the cell length and number of cells in series are optimized by theoretical analysis. Then, thermal spraying is applied as a cost-effective method to prepare all the cell components. Finally, the performance of different types of cells and two types of stacks is characterized. The maximum output power of one tube, which had 20 cells in series, reaches 31 and 40.5 W at 800 and 900 °C, respectively. Moreover, the output power of a stack assembled with 56 tubes, each with ten cells in series, reaches 800 W at 830 °C. The excellent single tube and cell stack performance suggest that thermally sprayed tubular SOFCs have significant potential for commercialized application.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of free standing, plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings, including strength, fracture toughness, fatigue, constitutive relation, elastic modulus, and directionality, has been determined under various loading-specimen configurations. This report presents and describes a summary of mechanical properties of the plasma-sprayed coating material to provide them as a design database.

  20. Thermal spraying of reactive materials to form wear-resistant composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallaire, S.

    1992-03-01

    The dispersion of more than 20 vol.% submicrometer ceramic particles within a metallic matrix and the deposition of such a cermet to form a thick and tough coating presents problems. Most of the coating techniques have failed in attempting to homogeneously disperse very fine and hard particles in large amounts while avoiding their decomposition or reaction with the metal matrix during the deposition process. A simple and efficient method has been developed for producing ceramic-containing composite coatings. It consists in synthesizing cermet-based materials and in depositing them by a rapid solidification process such as thermal spraying. Boride- and carbide-based materials have been successfully obtained by plasma spraying reactive powders comprising the basic reagents. These materials, with a microstructure of submicrometer ceramic particles dispersed in a metallic matrix, exhibit good wear-resistant properties (abrasion and sliding wear). Finally, reactive core wire arc spraying is suggested as a flexible way to produce coatings containing up to 25 vol.% TiB2.

  1. Column formation in suspension plasma-sprayed coatings and resultant thermal properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, K.; Krane, M. J. M.; Trice, R. W.; Wang, H.; Porter, W.; Besser, M.; Sordelet, D.; Ilavsky, J.; Almer, J.

    2011-06-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  2. Column Formation in Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Coatings and Resultant Thermal Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, Kent; Krane, Matthew; Trice, Rodney; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Besser, Matthew; Sordelet, Daniel; Ilavsky, Dr. Jan; Almer, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  3. Neutron and X-ray diffraction of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Herman, H.; Singhal, S. P.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    ZrO2-7.8mol. pct. YO1.5, a fused powder, and ZrO2-8.7mol. pct. YO1.5, a prereacted powder, were plasma-sprayed onto steel substrates. Neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction of the as-received powder, the powder plasma sprayed into water, as-sprayed coatings, and coatings heat-treated for 10 and 100 h were carried out to study phase transformations and ordering of the oxygen ions on the oxygen sublattice. The as-received fused powder has a much lower monoclinic percentage than does the pre-reacted powder, this resulting in a much lower monoclinic percentage in the coating. Heat treatment increases the percentages of the cubic and monoclinic phases, while decreasing the tetragonal content. An ordered tetragonal phase is detected by the presence of extra neutron diffraction peaks. These phase transformations and ordering will result in volume changes. The implications of these transformations on the performance of partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings is discussed.

  4. Thermal Shock Behavior of Air Plasma Sprayed CoNiCrAlY/YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi Wei; Wu, Wei; Hua, Jia Jie; Lin, Chu Cheng; Zheng, Xue Bin; Zeng, Yi

    2014-07-01

    The structural changes and failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during thermal shock cycling were investigated. TBCs consisting of CoNiCrAlY bond coat and partially yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) on a nickel-based alloy substrate and its thermal shock resistance performance was evaluated. TBCs were heated at 1100°C for 15 min followed by cold water quenching to ambient temperature. Microstructural evaluation and elemental analysis of TBCs were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The crack features of YSZ coatings in TBCs during thermal shock cycling, including those of horizontal (parallel to the substrate) and vertical cracks (perpendicular to the substrate), were particularly investigated by means of SEM and image analysis. Results show that horizontal and vertical cracks have different influences on the thermal shock resistance of the coatings. Horizontal cracks that occur at the interface of YSZ and thermally growth oxidation (TGO) cause partial or large-area spalling of coatings. When vertical and horizontal cracks encounter, network segments are formed which lead to partial spalling of the coatings.

  5. Corrosion Characterization of Iron-Based High-Performance Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Aprigliano, L F; Yang, N; Perepezko, J H; Beardsley, M B

    2005-03-21

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. One of these compositions, SAM1651, is discussed in detail to illustrate the promise of this general class of materials.

  6. Effect of thermal annealing on ZnO:Al thin films grown by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Manouni, A.; Manjón, F. J.; Perales, M.; Mollar, M.; Marí, B.; Lopez, M. C.; Ramos Barrado, J. R.

    2007-07-01

    We report the effect of thermal annealing in air on the structural and optical properties of undoped and aluminium-doped (1%-4%) zinc oxide (AZO) thin films, grown by the spray pyrolysis technique on quartz substrates. Films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature photoluminescence, electrical resistivity, and Raman spectroscopy after annealing at temperatures between 500 and 900 ∘C. Annealing in air improves the long-range order crystalline quality of the bulk crystals, but promotes a number of point defects in the surface affecting both the resistivity and the photoluminescence.

  7. Position Paper External Tank Thermal Protection System (TPS) Manually Sprayed fly-as-is Foam Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, John H.

    2009-01-01

    During manufacture of the existing External Tanks (ETs), the Thermal Protection System (TPS) foam manual spray application processes lacked the enhanced controls/procedures to ensure that defects produced were less than the critical size. Therefore the only remaining option to certify the "fly-as-is" foam is to verify ET120 tank hardware meets the new foam debris requirements. The ET project has undertaken a significant effort studying the existing "fly-as-is" TPS foam. This paper contains the findings of the study.

  8. Wear Resistant Carbide-based Thermal Sprayed Coatings: Process, Properties, Mechanical Degradation and Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabchi, Arash

    Thermally sprayed ceramic-metallic composite (CerMet) materials consist of ceramic particles mainly in form of carbides reinforced by metallic binder exhibit unique microstructural and mechanical characteristics. Such structure brings in a novel combination of hardness and toughness enabling application of this class of material in wear resistant surfaces. Final deposit microstructure that defines the mechanical properties and wear performance of material depends on process parameters and starting material characteristics. Complex interaction of in-flight particles with supersonic flame, formation of complex defective deposit structure comprising of pores, cracks and splat boundaries make comprehending of interrelation of process, microstructure, properties and performance a difficult task. Additional challenge is development of systematic understanding on mechanical degradation, damage and wear mechanisms of cermet coatings due to their complex structure. This dissertation attempts to address these issues first by taking a systematic step by step approach, process map, to establish a correlation between process, particle state, microstructure and properties. Different strategies were proposed and examined to control the high velocity thermal spray process. This strategy assessment enabled a better control over in-flight particles state in high velocity thermal spray process and provided better understanding on interaction of in-flight particles with the flame. Further, possible advantages of reducing the carbide particle size from micron to nano in terms of mechanical properties and different wear performance were explored. It was suggested that poor wear performance of nano-structured coating is due to presence of brittle phases and less available binder promotes the excessive stress detrimental to load carrying capability of material. Material damage and wear mechanisms of coating under different tribological conditions were examined. The results suggest a

  9. Measuring Systems for Temperature Monitoring of Thermal Spraying and Combustion Processes in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchenko, V. N.; Dozhdikov, V. S.

    2003-09-01

    Conventional optical pyrometry methods do not always yield satisfactory results in cases of temperature monitoring in complicated industrial processes. For example, measuring the temperature of heated particles in thermal plasma spraying jets requires recognizing the object being measured by solving a mathematical problem. In addition to diagnosis of the temperature of a heated gas flow based on its self-radiation, it is necessary to utilize an irradiation physical model of IR active molecules. The paper briefly describes two diagnostic systems and methods for the above-mentioned industrial application. The main details of the system design, calibration and performance are presented.

  10. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such as Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air, and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of metal into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tailpipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  11. Investigation of Bio-Inspired Hybrid Materials through Polymer Infiltration of Thermal Spray Formed Ceramic Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Katherine Claire

    certain degree of porosity (up to approximately 20%). Often, porosity is interconnected and is controlled by varying processing parameters. Through the introduction of an appropriate polymer at the porosity interface, it may be possible to achieve synergistic benefits in terms of both strength and toughness of the sprayed material. This dissertation will focus on the fabrication and evaluation of property enhancements of bio-inspired materials based on ceramic thermally sprayed scaffolds through post deposition polymer impregnation.

  12. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  13. Monitoring Delamination of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings by Reflectance-Enhanced Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Highly scattering plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) present a challenge for optical diagnostic methods to monitor TBC delamination because scattering attenuates light transmitted through the TBC and usually degrades contrast between attached and delaminated regions of the TBC. This paper presents a new approach where reflectance-enhanced luminescence from a luminescent sublayer incorporated along the bottom of the TBC is used to identify regions of TBC delamination. Because of the higher survival rate of luminescence reflecting off the back surface of a delaminated TBC, the strong scattering exhibited by plasma-sprayed TBCs actually accentuates contrast between attached and delaminated regions by making it more likely that multiple reflections of luminescence off the back surface occur before exiting the top surface of the TBC. A freestanding coating containing sections designed to model an attached or delaminated TBC was prepared by depositing a luminescent Eu-doped or Er-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent layer below a plasma-sprayed undoped YSZ layer and utilizing a NiCr backing layer to represent an attached substrate. For specimens with a Eu-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer, luminescence intensity maps showed excellent contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections even at a plasma-sprayed overlayer thickness of 300 m. Discernable contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections was not observed for specimens with a Er-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer because luminescence from Er impurities in the undoped YSZ layer overwhelmed luminescence originating form the Er-doped YSZ sublayer.

  14. Mathematical analysis of thermoelastic characteristics in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings.

    PubMed

    Go, Jaegwi; Jungo, Yeon-Gil; Kim, Seokchan; Ali, Md Afsar; Paik, Ungyu

    2012-02-01

    The thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been analyzed using mathematical modeling. Two types of TBC model, cylinder and circular disk which are commercial plasma-sprayed TBCs, subjecting to symmetric temperature distribution to the radial and longitudinal directions, respectively, were taken into consideration. Based on the thermoelastic theories, a second order ordinary differential equation was derived for the cylinder model and a pair of partial differential equations were set up for the circular disk model. The analytic solution was obtained from the ordinary differential equation, while a finite volume method was developed for numerical solutions to the pair of partial differential equations due to the complexity of governing equations. The thermoelastic characteristics of TBC models, such as temperature distributions, displacements, and stresses, were displayed according to the obtained solutions. The rate of heat conduction in the section of the top coat is relatively slow in comparison with the substrate, and no profound difference appears in the temperature distribution between two TBC models. The highest longitudinal tensile stress is expressed at the bond coat of both models, and the substrate is under the compressive stresses to the circumferential direction. While the cylinder expands to the positive longitudinal direction only, the expansion in the circular disk occurs to both the positive and negative longitudinal directions. Relatively large displacement and stresses exhibit in the cylinder as compared with the circular disk. In the circular disk, the stresses to the radial direction undulate at each section, and the displacement profile displays that the width of the circular disk is slightly narrowed. The results demonstrate that the mechanical and thermal properties of the top and bond coats are the crucial factors to be considered in controlling the thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed

  15. Protection of carbon steel against hot corrosion using thermal spray Si- and Cr-base coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Martinez, L.

    1998-02-01

    A Fe75Si thermal spray coating was applied on the surface of a plain carbon steel baffle plate. Beneath this coating, a Ni20Cr coating was applied to give better adherence to the silicon coating. The baffle was installed in the high-temperature, fireside, corrosion zone of a steam generator. At the same time, an uncoated 304 stainless steel baffle was installed nearby for comparison. For 13 months the boiler burned heavy fuel oil with high contents of vanadium. The samples were studied employing scanning electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, and x-ray diffraction techniques. After that, it was possible to inspect the structural state of the components, and it was found that the stainless steel baffle plates were destroyed almost completely by corrosion, whereas the carbon steel coated baffle plate did not suffer a significant attack, showing that the performance of the thermal spray coating was outstanding and that the coating was not attacked by vanadium salts of the molten slag.

  16. Thermally sprayed prepregs for thixoforging of UD fiber reinforced light metal MMCs

    SciTech Connect

    Silber, Martin; Wenzelburger, Martin; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-07

    Low density and good mechanical properties are the basic requirements for lightweight structures in automotive and aerospace applications. With their high specific strength and strain to failure values, aluminum alloys could be used for such applications. Only the insufficient stiffness and thermal and fatigue strength prevented their usage in high-end applications. One possibility to solve this problem is to reinforce the light metal with unidirectional fibers. The UD fiber allows tailoring of the reinforcement to meet the direction of the component's load. In this study, the production of thermally sprayed prepregs for the manufacturing of continuous fiber reinforced MMC by thixoforging is analysed. The main aim is to optimize the winding procedure, which determines the fiber strand position and tension during the coating process. A method to wind and to coat the continuous fibers with an easy-to-use handling technique for the whole manufacturing process is presented. The prepregs were manufactured by producing arc wire sprayed AlSi6 coatings on fibers bundles. First results of bending experiments showed appropriate mechanical properties.

  17. Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of Supersonic Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yu; Ding, Chunhua; Li, Hongqiang; Han, Zhihai; Ding, Bingjun; Wang, Tiejun; Yu, Lie

    2013-10-01

    In this work, Y2O3 stabilized zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were deposited by conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and high efficiency supersonic atmospheric plasma spraying (SAPS), respectively. The effect of Al2O3 layer stability on the isothermal growth behavior of thermally grown oxides (TGOs) was studied. The results revealed that the Al2O3 layer experienced a three-stage change process, i.e., (1) instantaneous growth stage, (2) steady-state growth stage, and (3) depletion stage. The thickness of Al2O3 scale was proved to be an important factor for the growth rate of TGOs. The SAPS-TBCs exhibited a higher Al2O3 stability and better oxidation resistance as compared with the APS-TBCs. Additionally, it was found that inner oxides, especially nucleated on the top of the crest, continually grew and swallowed the previously formed Al2O3 layer, leading to the granulation and disappearance of continuous Al2O3 scale, which was finally replaced by the mixed oxides and spinel.

  18. Investigation of Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Iron-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-02-01

    Because of their favorable thermophysical properties, good machinability and low material costs, iron-based coatings which exhibit a highly amorphous/nanocrystalline microstructure are currently in the focus of research. Considering the crystallization temperature of the material, iron-based coatings might be the next generation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for low-temperature systems, reducing thermal losses. The objective of this research project is the development of highly amorphous, iron-based coatings. For this purpose, amorphous feedstock materials with different chromium contents have been developed and characterized regarding their microstructures, phase compositions, crystallization temperatures and amorphous content. The results show that the amorphous content is reduced with increasing particle size and chromium content. The coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying (APS) and high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF). It is shown that all coatings exhibit amorphous structures. HVOF coatings show a smaller amount of amorphous content compared to the feedstock materials, indicating crystallization occurring in not fully melted particles or insufficient rapid cooling. The APS process can increase the amount of amorphous content compared to the feedstock material, as shown for x Cr = 15%. All coatings proof good thermal shock behavior. Lowest thermal diffusivity values were determined for APS coatings, which confirms the potential of iron-based TBCs.

  19. Calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) dielectrics prepared by plasma spray and post-deposition thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ctibor, Pavel; Kotlan, Jiri; Pala, Zdenek; Sedlacek, Josef; Hajkova, Zuzana; Grygar, Tomas Matys

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Calcium titanate was sprayed by two different plasma spray systems. • Significant improvement of dielectric properties after annealing was observed. • Calcium titanate self-supporting parts can be fabricated by plasma spraying. - Abstract: This paper studies calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) dielectrics prepared by plasma spray technology. A water stabilized plasma gun (WSP) as well as a widely used gas stabilized plasma gun (GSP) were employed in this study to deposit three sample sets at different spray conditions. Prepared specimens were annealed in air at atmospheric pressure for 2 h at various temperatures from 530 to 1170 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and porosity measurements were used for sample characterization. Dielectric spectroscopy was applied to obtain relative permittivity, conductivity and loss factor frequency dependence. Band gap energy was estimated from reflectance measurements. The work is focused on the explanation of changes in microstructure and properties of a plasma sprayed deposit after thermal annealing. Obtained results show significant improvement of dielectric properties after thermal annealing.

  20. Mechanical and tribological properties of thermally sprayed tungsten carbide-cobalt coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yunfei

    Since previous work in our laboratory has shown that very fine microstructures increase the hardness and the resistance to sliding and abrasive wear of bulk, sintered, WC/Co composites, it was decided to explore whether similar benefits can be obtained in coatings of this material deposited by the Thermal Spray Method. The research was a collaborative effort in which a number of companies and universities prepared feedstock powders by a number of methods and deposited coatings by Plasma Spray and High Velocity Oxy Fuel spray techniques. Our role was to study the resistance of these coatings to abrasion and to wear in unlubricated sliding, to relate our findings to the microstructure of the coatings and to the properties of the powder and the parameters of deposition. The results were then used by our partners in the program to modify their processes in order to obtain the best possible performance. The thesis consists of four parts. In the first, we review the literature on WC/Co coatings and present the results of our survey of 45 coatings. This shows that the details of the thermal spray technique determine the tribological performance of the coatings much more than the size of the WC grains in the starting powder. It also shows that abrasive and sliding wear respond differently to the material properties. The remainder of the thesis describes a systematic variation of powders and deposition techniques, based on our earlier findings. In the second part, we describe the microstructures, hardness and toughness of nine coatings deposited by A. Dent at SUNY Stony Brook, with three different powders and three different flame chemistries. We find that the hardness is determined mainly by the flame temperature; hardness is decreased by porosity on the 50-nm size range, and this porosity is produced by insufficient melting of the Co binder. High temperatures and certain powder morphologies cause extensive decarburization, and the latter reduces the adhesion between the

  1. Analysis of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings With Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Bond Coats Under Spatially Uniform Cyclic Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a numerical investigation into the spallation mechanism in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings observed under spatially-uniform cyclic thermal loading. The analysis focuses on the evolution of local stress and inelastic strain fields in the vicinity of the rough top/bond coat interface during thermal cycling, and how these fields are influenced by the presence of an oxide film and spatially uniform and graded distributions of alumina particles in the metallic bond coat aimed at reducing the top/bond coat thermal expansion mismatch. The impact of these factors on the potential growth of a local horizontal delamination at the rough interface's crest is included. The analysis is conducted using the Higher-Order Theory for Functionally Graded Materials with creep/relaxation constituent modeling capabilities. For two-phase bond coat microstructures, both the actual and homogenized properties are employed in the analysis. The results reveal the important contributions of both the normal and shear stress components to the delamination growth potential in the presence of an oxide film, and suggest mixed-mode crack propagation. The use of bond coats with uniform or graded microstructures is shown to increase the potential for delamination growth by increasing the magnitude of the crack-tip shear stress component.

  2. Osteoclast resorption of thermal spray hydoxyapatite coatings is influenced by surface topography.

    PubMed

    Gross, Karlis A; Muller, Dirk; Lucas, Helen; Haynes, David R

    2012-05-01

    Coating characteristics such as composition, crystallite features and topography collectively impact the cell response. The influence from splats has not yet been assessed for hydroxyapatite (HAp) thermal spray coatings. The objective of this work is to (a) survey the topography on commercial implants, (b) ascertain topography formation from single splats, and (c) determine the osteoclast resorption pattern on a topographically refined coating compared to dentine. Coatings on dental implants, an orthopedic screw, a femoral stem and a knee implant were studied for reference. The effects of substrate pre-heat, roughness, spray distance and particle size on the coating roughness and topography were studied. Human-derived osteoclasts were placed on a coating with refined topography and compared to dentine, a polished coating and polished sintered HAp. A pre-heat of at least 200°C on titanium was required to form rounded splats. The greatest influence on coating roughness and topography arose from particle size. A 2-fold increase in the mean particle size from 30 to 72 μm produced a significant difference (P<0.001) in roughness from 4.8 and 9.7 μm. A model is shown to illustrate topography formation, nanostructure evolution on single splats, and the topography as seen in commercial implants. Osteoclasts showed a clear preference for activity on coatings with refined topography. A one-way ANOVA test revealed a significantly greater pit depth (P=0.022) for dentine (14 μm) compared to the as-sprayed and polished coating (5 μm). Coatings with topography display a similar number of resorption pits with dentine, but a 10-fold greater number than polished coatings, emphasizing the importance of flattened droplet topography on implant surfaces. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal Insulation and Thermal Shock Behavior of Conventional and Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed TBCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddon Masoule, S.; Valefi, Z.; Ehsani, N.; Qazi Lavasani, H.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the thermal insulation and thermal shock resistance behavior of nanostructured versus conventional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings. To evaluate their coating performance in service conditions, samples were furnace sintered at 1150 °C for 100 h in ambient atmosphere. The results show that the nanostructured coatings exhibited better heat transfer resistance and thermal shock resistance compared with the conventional coating. In addition, the larger size of the initial agglomerates in the nanostructured coatings increased the percentage area of nanozones and decreased the heat transfer resistance. The thermal insulation behavior of the conventional coating was improved after heat treatment because of horizontal cracking. Disappearance of cracks, bridging between grains, and their growth by connecting with each other were observed in the conventional coating. However, in the nanostructured coatings, the nanoareas and their related properties disappeared. Microstructural and phase investigations were carried out by optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The thermal behavior was investigated by thermal insulation capability testing.

  4. Thermally Sprayed SiC Coatings for Offshore Wind Turbine Bearing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarok, F.; Armada, S.; Fagoaga, I.; Espallargas, N.

    2013-12-01

    Tribological tests were conducted on thermally sprayed silicon carbide (SiC) coatings to investigate its potential on reducing wear in offshore wind turbine bearings. The tests were carried out under dry conditions, 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, and polyalfaolefin (PAO)-lubricated conditions. In order to obtain good quality SiC coatings, it is compulsory to modify the feedstock to limit SiC decomposition during atmospheric spraying process. The SiC feedstock used in this research has been modified with yttrium aluminum garnet (Y3Al5O12) oxide additives that originated from its metal salt precursors. High-frequency pulse detonation (HFPD) technique has been utilized to produce coatings of around 100 μm in thickness. The sliding tests have recorded the lowest coefficient of friction (COF) of 0.15 in PAO condition and the highest COF of 0.50 in dry sliding. The wear tracks morphology show that during dry sliding test, the coatings experience abrasive wear accompanied by tribo-oxidation reaction that initiates crack formation along the splat boundaries. On the other two sliding test conditions (NaCl and PAO), polishing of asperities and some grain plowing from the splats were observed in the wear tracks. Tribochemical wear was found to be the main mechanism producing smooth surfaces. Nevertheless, in all cases, the wear losses were negligible.

  5. Study of thermal and electrical parameters of workpieces during spray coating by electrolytic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khafizov, A. A.; Shakirov, Yu I.; Valiev, R. A.; Valiev, R. I.; Khafizova, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of thermal and electrical parameters of products in the system bottom layer - intermediate layer when applying protective coatings of ferromagnetic powder by plasma spray produced in an electric discharge with a liquid cathode, on steel samples. Temperature distribution and gradients in coating and intermediate coating were examined. Detailed descriptions of spray coating with ferromagnetic powder by plasma jet obtained in electrical discharge with liquid cathode and the apparatus for obtaining thereof is provided. Problem has been solved by using of Fourier analysis. Initial data for calculations is provided. Results of numerical analysis are provided as temporal functions of temperature in contiguity between coating and intermediate coating as well as temporal function of the value Q=q-φ where q is density of heat current directed to the free surface of intermediate coating, φ is density of heat current in contiguity between coating and intermediate coating. The analysis of data given shows that in the systems of contact heat exchange bottom layer-intermediate layer with close values of the thermophysical characteristics of constituting materials is observed a slow increase of the temperature of the contact as a function of time.

  6. Development of Thermal Spraying and Coating Techniques by Using Thixotropic Slurries Including Metals and Ceramics Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirihara, S.; Itakura, Y.; Tasaki, S.

    2013-03-01

    Thermal nanoparticles coating and microlines patterning were newly developed as novel technologies to fabricate fine ceramics layers and geometrical intermetallics patterns for mechanical properties modulations of practical alloys substrates. Nanometer sized alumina particles were dispersed into acrylic liquid resins, and the obtained slurries were sputtered by using compressed air jet. The slurry mists could blow into the arc plasma with argon gas spraying. On stainless steels substrates, the fine surface layers with high wear resistance were formed. In cross sectional microstructures of the coated layers, micromater sized cracks or pores were not observed. Subsequently, pure aluminum particles were dispersed into photo solidified acrylic resins, and the slurry was spread on the stainless steel substrates by using a mechanical knife blade. On the substrates, microline patterns with self similar fractal structures were drawn and fixed by using scanning of an ultra violet laser beam. The patterned pure metal particles were heated by the argon arc plasma spray assisting, and the intermetallics or alloys phases with high hardness were created through reaction diffusions. Microstructures in the coated layers and the patterned lines were observed by using a scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Surface Pre-treatment for Thermally Sprayed ZnAl15 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Pre-treatment of substrates is an important step in thermal spraying. It is widely accepted that mechanical interlocking is the dominant adhesion mechanism for most substrate-coating combinations. To prevent premature failure, minimum coating adhesion strength, surface preparation grades, and roughness parameters are often specified. For corrosion-protection coatings for offshore wind turbines, an adhesion strength ≥ 5 MPa is commonly assumed to ensure adhesion over service lifetime. In order to fulfill this requirement, Rz > 80 µm and a preparation grade of Sa3 are common specifications. In this study, the necessity of these requirements is investigated using the widely used combination of twin-wire arc-sprayed ZnAl15 on S355J2 + N as a test case. By using different blasting media and parameters, the correlation between coating adhesion and roughness parameters is analyzed. The adhesion strength of these systems is measured using a test method allowing measurements on real parts. The results are compared to DIN EN 582:1993, the European equivalent of ASTM-C633. In another series of experiments, the influence of surface pre-treatment grades Sa2.5 and Sa3 is considered. By combining the results of these three sets of experiments, a guideline for surface pre-treatment and adhesion testing on real parts is proposed for the considered system.

  8. Surface Pre-treatment for Thermally Sprayed ZnAl15 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Pre-treatment of substrates is an important step in thermal spraying. It is widely accepted that mechanical interlocking is the dominant adhesion mechanism for most substrate-coating combinations. To prevent premature failure, minimum coating adhesion strength, surface preparation grades, and roughness parameters are often specified. For corrosion-protection coatings for offshore wind turbines, an adhesion strength ≥ 5 MPa is commonly assumed to ensure adhesion over service lifetime. In order to fulfill this requirement, Rz > 80 µm and a preparation grade of Sa3 are common specifications. In this study, the necessity of these requirements is investigated using the widely used combination of twin-wire arc-sprayed ZnAl15 on S355J2 + N as a test case. By using different blasting media and parameters, the correlation between coating adhesion and roughness parameters is analyzed. The adhesion strength of these systems is measured using a test method allowing measurements on real parts. The results are compared to DIN EN 582:1993, the European equivalent of ASTM-C633. In another series of experiments, the influence of surface pre-treatment grades Sa2.5 and Sa3 is considered. By combining the results of these three sets of experiments, a guideline for surface pre-treatment and adhesion testing on real parts is proposed for the considered system.

  9. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  10. Thermal Characteristics of Foams and Discharge from Fire-Extinguishment Foam Spray Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youn-Jea; Pyo, Jin-Soo

    To evaluate the performance of discharged foam agents used to protect structures from heat and fire damages, the thermal characteristics of fire-extinguishment foams were experimentally investigated. Especially, two different parameters of a spray nozzle, that is, the number of air holes and the orifice diameter, were considered. A simple repeatable test for fire-extinguishment foams subjected to fire radiation was performed. Experimental results showed that the expansion ratio of the discharged foam with the small orifice throat (d0= 9.5 mm) and opened air hole (Nh=9) was large. Results also showed that although the temperature gradient in the foam increased as the foam expansion ratio is increased, it remained constant as the intensity of heat flux increased.

  11. Dissolution and mineralization of sintered and thermally sprayed hydroxy-fluoroapatites.

    PubMed

    Pullen, L J; Gross, K A

    2005-05-01

    Hydroxyapatites are commonly used as bone cement, coatings on implants for dental and orthopaedic applications, but also as middle ear implants. These applications all require a different tissue healing response that can be attained by different manufacturing processes or by chemically modifying the composition. During implantation apatites undergo a process of dissolution and mineralization. The degree of dissolution is dependent upon the manufacturing process & is higher for thermally sprayed implant materials. This allows them to integrate to the natural bone. This study tests the dissolution and mineralization of fluoride containing hydroxyapatites through immersion in simulated body fluid. It shows that mineralization occurs more readily in hydroxyapatites than fluorapatites because of their higher dissolution rate. Mineralization was detected most readily by image analysis using scanning electron microscopy than by weight changes using a microbalance. Microscopy allowed small heterogeneous precipitates to be observed during the initial stages of mineralization.

  12. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus and method [or thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such a Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air. and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of meta1 into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter. controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tail pipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  13. Thermal Spraying of CuAlFe Powder on Cu5Sn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roata, I. C.; Pascu, A.; Croitoru, C.; Stanciu, E. M.; Pop, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    To improve the corrosion and wear resistance of copper and its alloys, flame spraying has been employed to obtain a relatively homogenous Cu/Al/Fe-based coating. To minimize the defects that usually occur by using this method, a post-coating annealing step has been employed, by using concentrated solar energy as means of thermal surface treatment. Scanning electron micrographs have indicated a reduction in the cracks/pores density and accelerated corrosion testing have indicated a higher performance of the solar-annealed sample, in comparison with the initial reference material. The coating approach mentioned in this paper could be successfully applied to restore several worn tools and instruments, and could also be of use in the renewable energy field (IR-absorbent coatings) or in advanced oxidation processes, such as photocatalysis.

  14. A particle temperature sensor for monitoring and control of the thermal spray process

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Haggard, D.C.

    1995-12-01

    The temperature and velocity of thermally sprayed particles prior to their impact on the substrate are two of the predominant determinants of coating quality and characteristics. This paper describes an instrument developed for real time monitoring of in-flight particle temperature in an industrial environment. The instrument is designed to operate as a stand alone device for verifying that a desired particle temperature is attained or for developing process settings to yield a particular temperature. The device is also suitable for incorporation into a closed loop process controller. Data showing the relationship between torch parameters and average particle temperature are presented. There is good agreement between previous measurements using laboratory instrumentation and the simpler, industrially hardened technique described here. The assumption of gray body behavior is evaluated and for known emissivities corrections are developed.

  15. Creep of plasma-sprayed-ZrO2 thermal-barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Logan, W. R.; Adams, J. W.; Bill, R. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of plasma-sprayed-zirconia thermal-barrier coatings with three different porosities and different initial particle sizes were deformed in compression at initial loads of 6900, 13,800, and 24,100 kPa (1000, 2000, and 3500 psi) and temperatures of 1100, 1250, and 1400 C. The coatings were stabilized with lime, MgO, and two different concentrations of Y2O3. Creep began as soon as the load was applied and continued at a constantly decreasing rate until the load was removed. Temperature and stabilization had a pronounced effect on creep rate while the stress, particle size, and porosity had a lesser effect. Creep deformation was due to cracking and particle sliding.

  16. Construction of mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces by thermal spray deposition and further surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiuyong; Gong, Yongfeng; Suo, Xinkun; Huang, Jing; Liu, Yi; Li, Hua

    2015-11-01

    Here we report a simple and cost-effective technical route for constructing superhydrophobic surfaces with excellent abrasion resistance on various substrates. Rough surface structures were fabricated by thermal spray deposition of a variety of inorganic materials, and further surface modification was made by applying a thin layer of polytetrafluoroethylene. Results show that the Al, Cu, or NiCrBSi coatings with the surface roughness of up to 13.8 μm offer rough surface profile to complement the topographical morphology in micro-/nano-scaled sizes, and the hydrophobic molecules facilitate the hydrophobicity. The contact angles of water droplets of ∼155° with a sliding angle of up to 3.5° on the samples have been achieved. The newly constructed superhydrophobic coatings tolerate strong abrasion, giving clear insight into their long-term functional applications.

  17. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-07-01

    In the 10th quarter no further work was conducted on the steel matrix composite element of this project. For this element work is effectively complete and all that remains is the composition of the final report. For the thermal spray coating effort, components coated and fused in the previous quarter were subject to high stress abrasive wear testing. Some complications were encountered with the wear testing, but the tests which were completed successfully showed that the coatings provided wear resistance 5x that of the baseline material. Further wear testing is planned for the 11th and final quarter. An overview of the progress during the 10th quarter of this project is given below. Additional research details are provided in the limited rights appendix to this report.

  18. Anisotropic Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at High Temperature Determined by Ultrasonic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qin; Zhu, Jianguo; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are of great scientific and technological significance for the design and fabrication of TBC systems. The ultrasonic method combined with a sing-around method for mechanical properties measurement of TBC is deduced and the elastic modulus can be determined in the spray, or longitudinal, direction, and the transverse direction. Tested specimens of plasma-sprayed TBC are detached from the substrate and treated with thermal exposure at 1400 °C. The elastic moduli along the longitudinal and transverse directions of the TBCs are measured by different types of ultrasonic waves combined with a sing-around method, while the Poisson's ratio is also obtained simultaneously. The experimental results indicate that the magnitude of longitudinal elastic modulus is larger than that of the transverse one, and thus the plasma-sprayed TBC has an anisotropic mechanical property. Moreover, the elastic moduli along both longitudinal and transverse directions change with high-temperature exposure time, which consists of a rapid increasing stage followed by a slow decreasing stage. In addition, the magnitude of Poisson's ratio increases slightly from 0.05 to 0.2 with the high-temperature exposure time. Generally, the microstructures in the plasma-sprayed coatings and their evolution in a high-temperature environment are the main causes of the varying anisotropic mechanical properties.

  19. Microstructures and Thermal Properties of Cold-Sprayed Cu-Cr Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, S.; Yoshino, S.; Yamada, M.; Fukumoto, M.; Okamoto, K.

    2013-08-01

    Copper-based composites for thermal conductive components were prepared via the cold spray process, and the deposition efficiency and adhesion morphology of feedstock powders on Cu substrate were evaluated. Cu-based composites were fabricated using Cu-Cr mixed powders with their mixture ratio of 20, 35, 50, and 65 mass% Cr onto oxygen-free copper substrate with N2 carrier gas. Cu-Cr composite coatings were investigated for their Cr content ratio, microstructures, and thermal conductivity. The Cr content ratio in the coating was approximately 50-60% of feedstock mixture ratio due to the low formability of the hard particles. Transmission electron microscopy characterizations revealed that an oxygen-rich layer exists at the Cr particle/Cu substrate interface, which contributes to the deposition of the Cr particles. After the heat treatment at 1093 K, the coatings showed denser cross-sectional structures than those before the heat treatment, and the thermal conductivity was improved as a result of the recrystallization of Cu matrix.

  20. Effect of Particle Size on the Micro-cracking of Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Coatings During Thermal Cycle Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jibo; Wang, Weize; Yu, Jingye; Wu, Liangmin; Feng, Zhengqu

    2017-04-01

    The failure of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during service or thermal cycle testing usually results from internal cracking in the top coat, erosion and CMAS (calcium-magnesium-alumina-silicate)-induced damage, etc. The microstructure of ceramic coatings affects their durability and other properties of TBCs. In the present study, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) using feedstocks with different particle sizes. In addition, the effect of particle size on damage evolution in the top coat was investigated. It is found that the coatings deposited using coarse particles show the higher thermal cycle life. Crack length grew with increasing numbers of thermal cycles. The faster crack growth rate can be found for the coatings deposited from fine particles. The porosity of the coating made from the coarse powder is larger than the porosity of the coating made from fine powder both in the as-sprayed condition and after thermal cycling. The changes in crack growth rate and the porosity are related to the effect of sintering and stress evolution in coatings during the thermal cyclic tests.

  1. Effect of Particle Size on the Micro-cracking of Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Coatings During Thermal Cycle Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jibo; Wang, Weize; Yu, Jingye; Wu, Liangmin; Feng, Zhengqu

    2017-03-01

    The failure of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during service or thermal cycle testing usually results from internal cracking in the top coat, erosion and CMAS (calcium-magnesium-alumina-silicate)-induced damage, etc. The microstructure of ceramic coatings affects their durability and other properties of TBCs. In the present study, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) using feedstocks with different particle sizes. In addition, the effect of particle size on damage evolution in the top coat was investigated. It is found that the coatings deposited using coarse particles show the higher thermal cycle life. Crack length grew with increasing numbers of thermal cycles. The faster crack growth rate can be found for the coatings deposited from fine particles. The porosity of the coating made from the coarse powder is larger than the porosity of the coating made from fine powder both in the as-sprayed condition and after thermal cycling. The changes in crack growth rate and the porosity are related to the effect of sintering and stress evolution in coatings during the thermal cyclic tests.

  2. Corrosion potential behavior in high temperature water of noble metal-doped alloys coatings deposited by underwater thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Andresen, P.L.; Gray, D.M.; Lau, Y.C.; Offer, H.P.

    1995-12-31

    The electrochemical corrosion potential of 304 stainless steel coated under water by hyper-velocity oxy-fuel and plasma spray techniques using noble metal doped powders was measured to evaluate the catalytic behavior in high temperature water under various water chemistry conditions. Thermal spray coatings of noble metal doped powders exhibited catalytic behavior for the recombination of oxygen and hydrogen in high temperature water which causes the corrosion potential to decrease well below a critical value of {minus}230 mV{sub she} for the intergranular stress corrosion cracking protection in water. This was observed in water containing various amounts of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide when stoichiometric excess hydrogen was present.

  3. High Temperature Mechanical Properties of Free-Standing HVOF CoNiCrAlY Coatings by Lateral Compression of Circular Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waki, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Kyousuke; Yamaguchi, Itsuki; Kobayashi, Akira

    MCrAlY, M means Co and/or Ni, sprayed coating is used to protect a super alloy substrate from corrosion or oxidation in a gas turbine blade. However, the mechanical properties are not well-known, because there are few proper measurement methods for a thin coating at high temperature. Authors have developed the new easy method to measure the mechanical properties using the lateral compression of a circular tube. The method is useful to apply to a thin coating because it does not need chucking and manufacturing a test piece is very easy. The method is also easily applicable to high temperature measurement. In this study, high temperature mechanical properties, Young's modulus, bending strength and fracture strain, of CoNiCrAlY coatings by HVOF were systematically measured. The results obtained were as follows: Young's modulus and bending strength suddenly decreased beyond 400˜450°C. The Young's modulus and bending strength thermally treated at higher than 1050°C was significantly higher than that of virgin CoNiCrAlY coating. It was found that higher thermal treatment in atmosphere was the most effective in increasing the Young's modulus and bending strength. It was also found that the improvement of Young's modulus was primarily caused by not the effect of TGO but the sintering and diffusion of unfused particles. On the contrary, the fracture strain increased beyond 400°C differently from the bending strength. The fracture strains of CoNiCrAlY thermally treated in vacuum were higher than those of CoNiCrAlY treated in atmosphere. It was found that higher thermal treatment in vacuum was the most effective in increasing the fracture strain.

  4. Experimental Study on the Electrochemical Anti-Corrosion Properties of Steel Structures Applying the Arc Thermal Metal Spraying Method

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hong-Bok; Lee, Han-Seung; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The arc thermal metal spraying method (ATMSM) provides proven long-term protective coating systems using zinc, aluminum and their alloys for steel work in a marine environment. This paper focuses on studying experimentally the anti-corrosion criteria of ATMSM on steel specimens. The effects of the types of spraying metal and the presence or absence of sealing treatment from the thermal spraying of film on the anti-corrosion performance of TMSM were quantitatively evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The results showed that ATMSM represented a sufficient corrosion resistance with the driving force based on the potential difference of more than approximately 0.60 V between the thermal spraying layer and the base substrate steel. Furthermore, it was found that the sealing treatment of specimens had suppressed the dissolution of metals, increased the corrosion potential, decreased the corrosion current density and increased the polarization resistance. Metal alloy Al–Mg (95%:5%) by mass with epoxy sealing coating led to the most successful anti-corrosion performance in these electrochemical experiments. PMID:28788271

  5. Preliminary study of cyclic thermal shock resistance of plasma-sprayed zirconium oxide turbine outer air seal shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Several experimental concepts representing potential high pressure turbine seal material systems were subjected to cyclic thermal shock exposures similar to those that might be encountered under severe engine start-up and shut-down sequences. All of the experimental concepts consisted of plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized ZrO2 on the high temperature side of the blade tip seal shroud. Between the ZrO2 and a cooled, dense metal backing, various intermediate layer concepts intended to mitigate thermal stresses were incorporated. Performance was judged on the basis of the number of thermal shock cycles required to cause loss of seal material through spallation. The most effective approach was to include a low modulus, sintered metal pad between the ZrO2 and the metallic backing. It was also found that reducing the density of the ZrO2 layer significantly improved the performance of specimens with plasma-sprayed metal/ceramic composite intermediate layers.

  6. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. 1993 Ship Production Symposium. Paper No. 24: Thermal Spray for Corrosion Control: A Competitive Edge for Commercial Shipbuilding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    precautions ultra clean practices are required to maintain surface cleanliness until it is coated. Arc spray is much more forgiving to surface ...the cost of thermal spray to below that of painting, while providing the highest quality coating. The process is forgiving to surface cleanliness requirements... cleanliness requirements, and requires blasting standards similar to painting, with the exception that arc spraying requires blasting with an angular grit to

  7. Sintering and Fracture Behavior of Plasma-sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. There is a need to characterize the fundamental sintering and fracture behavior of the current ZrO2-(7 to 8)wt%Y2O3 coating, in order to fully take advantage of the coating capability. In addition, a thorough evaluation of the coating behavior and temperature limits will be useful for more accurately assessing the benefit gained from future advanced coating systems. In this study, the sintering behavior of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 coatings was systematically investigated as a function of temperature and time using a dilatometer in the temperature range of 1200-1500 C. The coating sintering kinetics obtained by dilatometry were compared with the coating thermal conductivity increase kinetics, determined by a steady-state laser heat-flux testing approach, under high temperature and thermal gradient sintering conditions. The mode I, mode II, and mixed mode I-mode II fracture behavior of as-processed and sintering-annealed coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at ambient and elevated temperatures in order to evaluate the coating sintering effects on the fracture envelope of K(sub I) versus K(sub II). The coating thermal conductivity cyclic response associated with the interface delamination of the coating systems under simulated engine heat-flux conditions will be discussed in conjunction with the sintering and fracture testing results.

  8. Failure of thick, low density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminiak, Michael Aaron

    This research was directed at developing fundamental understandings of the variables that influence the performance of air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Focus was placed on understanding how and why each variable influenced the performance of the TBC system along with how the individual variables interacted with one another. It includes research on the effect of surface roughness of NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying, the interdiffusion behavior of bond coats coupled to commercial superalloys, and the microstructural and compositional control of APS topcoats to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation. The specimens used for this research were prepared by Praxair Surface Technologies and have been evaluated using cyclic oxidation and thermal shock tests. TBC performance was sensitive to bond coat roughness with the rougher bond coats having improved cyclic performance than the smoother bond coats. The explanation being the rough bond coat surface hindered the propagation of the delamination cracks. The failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on a combination of the topcoat thickness, topcoat microstructure and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the superalloy and topcoat. Thinner topcoats tended to fail at the topcoat/TGO interface due to bond coat oxidation whereas thicker topcoats failed within the topcoat due to the strain energy release rate of the thicker coating exceeding the fracture strength of the topcoat. Properties of free-standing high and conventional purity YSZ topcoats of both a lowdensity (LD) and dense-vertically fissure (DVF) microstructures were evaluated. The densification rate and phase evolution were sensitive to the YSZ purity and the starting microstructure. Increasing the impurity content resulted in enhanced sintering and phase decomposition rates, with the exception of the

  9. Sintering and Creep Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia and Hafnia Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The sintering and creep of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings under high temperature conditions are complex phenomena. Changes in thermomechanical and thermophysical properties and in the stress response of these coating systems as a result of the sintering and creep processes are detrimental to coating thermal fatigue resistance and performance. In this paper, the sintering characteristics of ZrO2-8wt%y2O3, ZrO2-25wt%CeO2-2.5wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6w%NiO- 9wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6wt%Sc2O3-2wt%y2O3 and HfO2-27wt%y2O3 coating materials were investigated using dilatometry. It was found that the HfO2-Y2O3 and baseline ZrO2-Y2O3 exhibited the best sintering resistance, while the NiO-doped ZrO2-Y2O3 showed the highest shrinkage strain rates during the tests. Higher shrinkage strain rates of the coating materials were also observed when the specimens were tested in Ar+5%H2 as compared to in air. This phenomenon was attributed to an enhanced metal cation interstitial diffusion mechanism under the reducing conditions. It is proposed that increased chemical stability of coating materials will improve the material sintering resistance.

  10. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings for high-temperature wear-protection applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.C.

    1980-03-01

    Under normal high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating conditions, faying surfaces of metallic components under high contact pressure are prone to friction, wear, and self-welding damage. Component design calls for coatings for the protection of the mating surfaces. Anticipated operating temperatures up to 850 to 950/sup 0/C (1562 to 1742/sup 0/F) and a 40-y design life require coatings with excellent thermal stability and adequate wear and spallation resistance, and they must be compatible with the HTGR coolant helium environment. Plasma and detonation-gun (D-gun) deposited chromium carbide-base and stabilized zirconia coatings are under consideration for wear protection of reactor components such as the thermal barrier, heat exchangers, control rods, and turbomachinery. Programs are under way to address the structural integrity, helium compatibility, and tribological behavior of relevant sprayed coatings. In this paper, the need for protection of critical metallic components and the criteria for selection of coatings are discussed. The technical background to coating development and the experience with the steam cycle HTGR (HTGR-SC) are commented upon. Coating characterization techniques employed at General Atomic Company (GA) are presented, and the progress of the experimental programs is briefly reviewed. In characterizing the coatings for HTGR applications, it is concluded that a systems approach to establish correlation between coating process parameters and coating microstructural and tribological properties for design consideration is required.

  11. A New Type of Self-lubricated Thermal Spray Coatings: Liquid Lubricants Embedded in a Metal Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Armada, S.

    2015-01-01

    Oils and greases are commonly used for lubricating, rotating and sliding systems such as bearings, gears, connectors, etc. The maintenance of such lubricated systems in some applications where access is difficult (e.g., offshore wind farms and subsea equipment) increases the operational costs. In some cases, it can be thought that the use of solid lubricants (MoS2, PTFE, graphite, etc.) embedded in coatings could be a solution for such applications; however, the mechanical and dynamic conditions of most of the systems are not appropriate for solid lubricants. Despite this, solid lubricants such as PTFE and MoS2 have been largely employed in different industries, especially in those applications where liquid lubricants cannot be used and when the dynamic conditions allow for it. Self-lubricated coatings have been a major topic of interest in thermal spray in the last decades. Although the use of liquid lubricants is desirable whenever it is possible, limited research has been addressed toward the development of self-lubricated coatings containing liquid lubricants. One of the main reasons for this is due to the complexity of embedding liquid lubricant reservoirs inside the coating matrix. In the present work, a new type of liquid-solid self-lubricated coatings is presented, being the matrix a metal alloy. Three thermal spray techniques used were as follows: arc-spray, plasma spray, and HVOAF. The metal matrices were two stainless steel types and liquid lubricant-filled capsules with different liquid contents were used. No degradation of the capsules during spraying was observed and the coatings containing capsules were able to keep a low coefficient of friction. The optimal performance is found for the coatings obtained at the lowest spraying temperature and velocity.

  12. A New Type of Self-lubricated Thermal Spray Coatings: Liquid Lubricants Embedded in a Metal Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Armada, S.

    2014-09-01

    Oils and greases are commonly used for lubricating, rotating and sliding systems such as bearings, gears, connectors, etc. The maintenance of such lubricated systems in some applications where access is difficult (e.g., offshore wind farms and subsea equipment) increases the operational costs. In some cases, it can be thought that the use of solid lubricants (MoS2, PTFE, graphite, etc.) embedded in coatings could be a solution for such applications; however, the mechanical and dynamic conditions of most of the systems are not appropriate for solid lubricants. Despite this, solid lubricants such as PTFE and MoS2 have been largely employed in different industries, especially in those applications where liquid lubricants cannot be used and when the dynamic conditions allow for it. Self-lubricated coatings have been a major topic of interest in thermal spray in the last decades. Although the use of liquid lubricants is desirable whenever it is possible, limited research has been addressed toward the development of self-lubricated coatings containing liquid lubricants. One of the main reasons for this is due to the complexity of embedding liquid lubricant reservoirs inside the coating matrix. In the present work, a new type of liquid-solid self-lubricated coatings is presented, being the matrix a metal alloy. Three thermal spray techniques used were as follows: arc-spray, plasma spray, and HVOAF. The metal matrices were two stainless steel types and liquid lubricant-filled capsules with different liquid contents were used. No degradation of the capsules during spraying was observed and the coatings containing capsules were able to keep a low coefficient of friction. The optimal performance is found for the coatings obtained at the lowest spraying temperature and velocity.

  13. Comparison between alkali heat treatment and sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on thermally-sprayed rough Ti surface in rabbit model: Effects on bone-bonding ability and osteoconductivity.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Toshiyuki; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Masashi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of different surface treatments (hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, alkali heat treatment, and no treatment) on the ability of bone to bond to a rough arc-sprayed Ti metal surface, using rabbit models. The bone-to-implant contacts for untreated, HA-coated, and alkali heat-treated implants were 21.2%, 72.1%, and 33.8% at 4 weeks, 21.8%, 70.9%, and 30.0% at 8 weeks, and 16.3%, 70.2%, and 29.9% at 16 weeks, respectively (n = 8). HA -coated implants showed significantly higher bone-to-implant contacts than the untreated and alkali heat-treated implants at all the time point, whereas alkali heat-treated implants showed significantly higher bone-to-implant contacts than untreated implants at 4 and 16 weeks. The failure loads in a mechanical test for untreated, HA coated, alkali heat-treated plates were 65.4 N, 70.7 N, and 90.8 N at 4 weeks, 76.1 N, 64.7 N, and 104.8 N at 8 weeks and 88.7 N, 92.6 N, and 118.5 N at 16 weeks, respectively (n = 8). The alkali heat-treated plates showed significantly higher failure loads than HA-coated plates at 8 and 16 weeks. The difference between HA-coated plates and untreated plates were not statistically significant at any time point. Thus HA coating, although it enables high bone-to-implant contact, may not enhance the bone-bonding properties of thermally-sprayed rough Ti metal surfaces. In contrast, alkali heat treatment can be successfully applied to thermally-sprayed Ti metal to enhance both bone-to-implant contact and bone-bonding strength. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Residual Strain and Fracture Response of Al2O3 Coatings Deposited via APS and HVOF Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, R.; Faisal, N. H.; Paradowska, A. M.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to nondestructively evaluate the residual stress profile in two commercially available alumina/substrate coating systems and relate residual stress changes with the fracture response. Neutron diffraction, due to its high penetration depth, was used to measure residual strain in conventional air plasma-sprayed (APS) and finer powder high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF (θ-gun))-sprayed Al2O3 coating/substrate systems. The purpose of this comparison was to ascertain if finer powder Al2O3 coatings deposited via θ-gun can provide improved residual stress and fracture response in comparison to conventional APS coatings. To obtain a through thickness residual strain profile with high resolution, a partially submerged beam was used for measurements near the coating surface, and a beam submerged in the coating and substrate materials near the coating-substrate interface. By using the fast vertical scanning method, with careful leveling of the specimen using theodolites, the coating surface and the coating/substrate interface were located with an accuracy of about 50 μm. The results show that the through thickness residual strain in the APS coating was mainly tensile, whereas the HVOF coating had both compressive and tensile residual strains. Further analysis interlinking Vickers indentation fracture behavior using acoustic emission (AE) was conducted. The microstructural differences along with the nature and magnitude of the residual strain fields had a direct effect on the fracture response of the two coatings during the indentation process.

  15. Development of a Thermal Transport Database for Air Plasma Sprayed ZrO2 ? Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Porter, Wallace D

    2010-01-01

    Thermal Diffusivities of Air Plasma Sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are measured by the laser flash method. The data are used to calculate thermal conductivity of TBCs when provided with density and specific heat data. Due to the complicated microstructure and other processing related parameters, thermal diffusivity of TBCs can vary as much as three to four fold. Data collected from over 200 free-standing ZrO2 7-8 wt%Y2O3 TBCs are presented. The large database gives a clear picture of the expected band of thermal diffusivity values. When this band is used as reference for thermal diffusivity of a specific TBC, the thermal transport property of TBC can be more precisely described. The database is intended to serve researchers and manufacturers of TBCs as a valuable source for evaluating their coatings.

  16. Thermal Spray Using a High-Frequency Pulse Detonation Combustor Operated in the Liquid-Purge Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, T.; Obayashi, R.; Tajiri, T.; Kimura, K.; Morohashi, Y.; Johzaki, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Hanafusa, T.; Mizunari, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on thermal spray by pulsed detonations at 150 Hz were conducted. Two types of pulse detonation combustors were used, one operated in the inert gas purge (GAP) mode and the other in the liquid-purge (LIP) mode. In both modes, all gases were supplied in the valveless mode. The GAP mode is free of moving components, although the explosive mixture is unavoidably diluted with the inert gas used for the purge of the hot burned gas. In the LIP mode, pure fuel-oxygen combustion can be realized, although a liquid-droplet injector must be actuated cyclically. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a higher spraying temperature in the LIP mode. First, the temperature of CoNiCrAlY particles heated by pulsed detonations was measured. As a result, the spraying temperature in the LIP mode was higher than that in the GAP mode by about 1000 K. Second, the temperature of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) particles, whose melting point was almost 2800 °C, heated by pulsed detonations in the LIP mode was measured. As a result, the YSZ particles were heated up to about 2500 °C. Finally, a thermal spray experiment using YSZ particles was conducted, and a coating with low porosity was successfully deposited.

  17. Fabrication of Water Jet Resistant and Thermally Stable Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Spray Coating of Candle Soot Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Qahtan, Talal F; Gondal, Mohammed A; Alade, Ibrahim O; Dastageer, Mohammed A

    2017-08-08

    A facile synthesis method for highly stable carbon nanoparticle (CNP) dispersion in acetone by incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame is presented. The synthesized CNP dispersion is the mixture of graphitic and amorphous carbon nanoparticles of the size range of 20-50 nm and manifested the mesoporosity with an average pore size of 7 nm and a BET surface area of 366 m(2)g(-1). As an application of this material, the carbon nanoparticle dispersion was spray coated (spray-based coating) on a glass surface to fabricate superhydrophobic (water contact angle > 150° and sliding angle < 10 °) surfaces. The spray coated surfaces were found to exhibit much improved water jet resistance and thermal stability up to 400 °C compared to the surfaces fabricated from direct candle flame soot deposition (candle-based coating). This study proved that water jet resistant and thermally stable superhydrophobic surfaces can be easily fabricated by simple spray coating of CNP dispersion gathered from incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame and this technique can be used for different applications with the potential for the large scale fabrication.

  18. Analysis and optimization of gas-thermal spray process in terms of condensed phase velocity and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmatov, A. V.; Gulyaev, I. P.; Kuzmin, V. I.; Lyskov, E. A.; Ermakov, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the experimental results for velocity and tempertaure disibutions of the condensed phase in a plasma jet from the plasmatorch PNK-50 (design from ITAM SB RAS, Novosibirsk). The plasma jet is used at different operational modes for thermal spraying of nickel alloy powder PR-NKh16SR3. The measurements for average velocity (230-280 m/s) and temperature (2290-2410 K) of sprayed particles were matched to data on microhardness (630-710 HV) and porosity (1.7-13.5 %) of samples. Results were transferred into coating properties maps plotted in coordinates "arc current vs. torch offset" and "particle velocity vs. particle temperature". Experiments demonstrated the change in parameters of condensed phase in the jet after performimg of maintenance job for the plasmatorch. We propose the method for adjusting the operational parameters of thermal spraying equipment using optical methods of control for particle velocity and particle temperature. The exemplary apparatus function of the plasmatorch was plotted; an approach is proposed for optimization and transfer of spraying technology of coatings with specified properties between equipment from different manufacturers, different class and power.

  19. Minimizing superficial thermal injury using bilateral cryogen spray cooling during laser reshaping of composite cartilage grafts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Jen; Cheng, Sally M H; Chiu, Lynn L; Wong, Brian J F; Ting, Keen

    2008-09-01

    Composite cartilage grafts were excised from New Zealand rabbit ears. Flat composite grafts (of cartilage and overlying skin graft on both surfaces) were obtained from each ear and cut into a rectangle measuring 50 mm by 25 mm (x by y) with an average thickness of approximately 1.3 mm (z), skin included. Specimens were manually deformed with a jig and maintained in this new position during laser illumination. The composite cartilage grafts were illuminated on the concave surface with an Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm, 3 mm spot) at 10 W, 20 W, 30 W, 40 W, 50 W. Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) was applied to both exterior (convex) and interior (concave) surfaces of the tissue to reduce thermal injury to the grafts. CSC was delivered: (1) in controlled applications (cryogen released when surface reached 40 degrees C, and (2) receiving only laser at above wattage, no CSC [representing the control group]. The specimens were maintained in a deformation for 15 minutes after illumination and serially examined for 14 days. The control group with no CSC caused injury to all specimens, ranging from minor to full thickness epidermal thermal injury. Although most levels of laser and CSC yielded a high degree of reshaping over an acute time period, after 14 days specimens exposed to 30 W, 40 W, 50 W retained shape better than those treated at 10 W and 20 W. The specimens exposed to 50 W with controlled CSC retained its new shape to the highest degree over all others, and thermal injury was minimal. In conclusion, combinations of laser and CSC parameters were effective and practical for the reshaping of composite cartilage grafts.

  20. Minimizing Superficial Thermal Injury Using Bilateral Cryogen Spray Cooling During Laser Reshaping of Composite Cartilage Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Jen; Cheng, Sally M.H.; Chiu, Lynn L.; Wong, Brian J.F.; Ting, Keen

    2014-01-01

    Composite cartilage grafts were excised from New Zealand rabbit ears. Flat composite grafts (of cartilage and overlying skin graft on both surfaces) were obtained from each ear and cut into a rectangle measuring 50 mm by 25 mm (x by y) with an average thickness of approximately 1.3 mm (z), skin included. Specimens were manually deformed with a jig and maintained in this new position during laser illumination. The composite cartilage grafts were illuminated on the concave surface with an Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm, 3 mm spot) at 10 W, 20 W, 30 W, 40 W, 50 W. Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) was applied to both exterior (convex) and interior (concave) surfaces of the tissue to reduce thermal injury to the grafts. CSC was delivered: (1) in controlled applications (cryogen released when surface reached 40°C, and (2) receiving only laser at above wattage, no CSC [representing the control group]. The specimens were maintained in a deformation for 15 minutes after illumination and serially examined for 14 days. The control group with no CSC caused injury to all specimens, ranging from minor to full thickness epidermal thermal injury. Although most levels of laser and CSC yielded a high degree of reshaping over an acute time period, after 14 days specimens exposed to 30 W, 40 W, 50 W retained shape better than those treated at 10 W and 20 W. The specimens exposed to 50 W with controlled CSC retained its new shape to the highest degree over all others, and thermal injury was minimal. In conclusion, combinations of laser and CSC parameters were effective and practical for the reshaping of composite cartilage grafts. Lasers Surg. PMID:18727025

  1. Arc spraying in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianjun

    2001-03-01

    Although are spraying is not a new technique, recent development of arc spraying device systems, spray wires, research on the coating mechanism, and the dynamic behavior of spraying make it a most active thermal spray process. In China, the arc spraying technique is the most efficient way for long life corrosion protection of steel structures. In addition, the arc spraying process is widely used for renovation and surface modification of machine components, mold making for plastic products, high-temperature corrosion resistance for waterwalls of boilers, antisliding coatings, self-lubricating coatings, etc.

  2. Thermal spray removal of lead-based paint from the viaduct bridge at Rock Island Arsenal, IL. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boy, J.H.; Weber, R.A.; Kumar, A.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents a field demonstration at the Rock Island Arsenal, IL, that validated the thermal spray vitrification (TSV) process as a safe and effective technique for removing lead-based paint from a steel bridge. Specially formulated glass was applied in a molten state to painted steel using a conventional thermal spray application system. The molten glass reacts with the paint, and encapsulates the lead. The cooled glass readily cracks and falls off, removing the paint. After onsite remelting of the glass waste to complete the encapsulation process, the final waste product is chemically inert and may be disposed of in a regular landfill. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, Division of Air Pollution Control determined that the glass remelt process could be considered a paint-removal operation for which no air quality permit was required.

  3. Preparation of the Wire of ZChSnSb11-6 Used for Remanufacturing Thermal Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Yang, Z. Y.; Fu, D. X.; Li, X. F.; Chen, W.

    Tin base Babbitt alloy widely used in bearing bush production and repair, the performance of ZChSnSb11-6 is better than ZChSnSb8-4.But as a result of as-cast structure of ZChSnSb11-6 is rich in big hard phase, its processing performance is bad, in this paper, through the optimization of smelting, casting, extrusion, drawing and other processes we have been successfully prepared ZChSnSb11-6 wire suitable for thermal spraying. Through metallographic examination, micro hardness, bond strength and porosity testing, it was proved that the wire meet the requirements of bearing manufacturing thermal spraying.

  4. Manual for the thermal and hdyraulic design of direct contract spray columns for use in extracting heat from geothermal brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, H. R.

    1985-06-01

    This report outlines the current methods being used in the thermal and hydraulic design of spray column type, direct contact heat exchangers. It provides appropriate referenced equations for both preliminary design and detailed performance. The design methods are primarily empirical and are applicable for use in the design of such units for geothermal application and for application with solar ponds. Methods for design, for both preheater and boiler sections of the primary heat exchangers, for direct contact binary powers plants are included.

  5. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  6. Development of novel thermal sprayed antibacterial coating and evaluation of release properties of silver ions.

    PubMed

    Noda, Iwao; Miyaji, Fumiaki; Ando, Yoshiki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Shimazaki, Takafumi; Yonekura, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Masaki; Mawatari, Masaaki; Hotokebuchi, Takao

    2009-05-01

    Several studies have addressed the use of antibacterial coating to reduce implant-associated infections. In this study, novel silver (Ag)-containing calcium-phosphate (CP) coating technology based on the thermal spraying method was developed. The coating's physical and chemical properties, in vitro antibacterial activity, hydroxyapatite (HA)-forming ability, and release of Ag ions were evaluated. An amorphous structure of the coating was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, and Ag residue in the coating was determined by elementary analysis. The coating showed strong antibacterial activity to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in fetal bovine serum (FBS) along with HA-forming ability in simulated body fluid. Therefore, it is expected that the coating would confer antibacterial and bone bonding abilities to the implant surface. Time course release testing of Ag ions from the coating on immersion in FBS showed pronounced Ag release for up to 24 h after immersion, with consistent strong antibacterial activity at the early postoperative stage. In repeated testing, the amount of released Ag ions was about 6500 parts per billion (ppb, microg/L) for the first release test, after which it gradually decreased. However, retention of significant release of Ag ions after a sixth repeat implies that Ag release from the coating is slow in FBS.

  7. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Corrosion-Resistant Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J

    2007-07-18

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Fe-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  8. Criticality-Control Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J

    2007-07-18

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. The high boron content of Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5) makes it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. Average measured values of the neutron absorption cross section in transmission ({Sigma}{sub t}) for Type 316L stainless steel, Alloy C-22, borated stainless steel, a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy, and SAM2X5 have been determined to be approximately 1.1, 1.3, 2.3, 3.8 and 7.1 cm{sup -1}, respectively.

  9. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, J; Choi, J; Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  10. Quasistatic vs. Dynamic Modulus Measurements Of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Morscher, G. N.; Choi, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been demonstrated to exhibit nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior by quasistatic cyclic compression and cylindrical punch indentation measurements. In particular, the instantaneous (tangential) elastic modulus increases with applied stress and exhibits significant hysteresis during cycling. Sound velocity (dynamic) measurements also show an increase in TBC modulus with applied compressive stress, but in contrast show no significant hysteresis for the modulus during cycling. The nonlinear elastic behavior of the TBCs evidenced by these tests is attributed to coating compaction and internal sliding. The differences between the quasistatic and dynamic measurements are explained by the relative absence of the effect of internal sliding in the dynamic modulus measurements. By incorporating short load reversals into the larger loading cycle and measuring the instantaneous modulus at the start of each load reversal, the effects of internal sliding can be substantially reduced in the quasistatic measurements, and the resulting modulus values show good agreement with the modulus values determined by dynamic sound velocity measurements.

  11. Bell-contoured, parallel flow nozzles for reducing overspray in thermal spray processes

    SciTech Connect

    Beason, G.P. Jr.; McKechnie, T.N.; Zimmerman, F.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal spray guns which exhaust supersonic plasmas currently employ anodes incorporating conical nozzles. These nozzles do not ideally expand the plasma flow and, therefore, produce disruptive shock waves and expansion fans in the plume. Shock waves and expansion fans turn the flow, allowing injected particles to escape and resolidify. Also, the divergent, linear walls produce tangential flow velocity components that are not parallel to the nozzle center axis. The divergent flow components, in turn, impart divergent trajectories to many injected powder particles which facilitates their escape from the plasma flow. To solve this problem, bell-contoured nozzles were designed and fabricated to ideally expand the plasma and, thus, eliminate disruptive flow phenomena while exhausting a collimated flow. As a result, injected powder particles remained in the plasma, and overspray was reduced substantially. Additionally, the flow exiting the bell nozzles did not impart divergent components to injected particles; therefore, the impact velocities of the particles were maximized. Consequently, test results show that bell-contoured nozzles have reduced overspray by 50 percent.

  12. Velocity and Thermal Distributions of an Actively Controlled Swirl-Stabilized Spray Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allgood, Daniel; Acharya, Sumanta; Gutmark, Ephraim

    1999-11-01

    An experimental study of a swirl-stabilized spray flame was performed on a 100 kW model gas turbine combustor. The objective of the research is to investigate the dynamics of the turbulent flowfield and combustion processes for an actively controlled flame with the purpose of enhancing combustion efficiency. The airstream entering the combustor is acoustically excited generating periodic coherent vortical structures in the flowfield. The fuel feed is then modulated at the optimum relative phase instance to provide enhanced fuel and air mixing. The turbulent velocities were measured using a 3 component Aerometrics PDPA system driven by a 6W-argon ion laser. To visualize the thermal characteristics of the flame, a new non-intrusive measurement technique was implemented using an infrared imaging system (Raytheon Radiance HS camera) with a spatial and temporal resolution of 256x256 pixels and 1.2 kHz, respectively. A hypersectral lens (Pacific Advanced Technology) with the capability of selective wavelength viewing from 3-5 microns was used to image the CO2 IR emission wavelength of approximately 4.3 microns. The results from this study will provide insight into the mechanisms involved in the droplet-vortex interactions, the atomization processes, and how active control techniques can be used to enhance the performance of combustors.

  13. Role of Powder Granulometry and Substrate Topography in Adhesion Strength of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromer, R.; Cormier, J.; Costil, S.

    2016-06-01

    APS coating is deposited with different treated surfaces to understand the effects of surface topography and particle sizes on adhesion bond strength. Grit blasting and laser surface texturing have been used to create a controlled roughness and controlled surface topography, respectively. Coating adhesion is mainly controlled by a mechanical interlocking mechanism. Fully melted Ni-Al powder fills the respected target surface with high-speed radial flow. Pores around central flattening splat are usually seen due to splash effects. Laser surface texturing has been used to study near interface coating depending on the target shape and in-contact area. Pull-off test results have revealed predominant correlation with powder, surface topography, and adhesion bond strength. Adhesion bond strength is linked to the in-contact area. So, coating adhesion might be optimized with powder granulometry. Pores near the interface would be localized zones for crack initiations and propagations. A mixed-mode failure has been reported for sharp interface (interface and inter-splats cracks) due to crack kicking out phenomena. Coating toughness near the interface is a key issue to maximize adhesion bond strength. Volume particles and topography parameters have been proposed to enhance adhesion bond strength for thermal spray process for small and large in-contact area.

  14. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  15. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

    2009-06-01

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed with excellent corrosion resistance and neutron absorption. These coatings, with further development, could be cost-effective options to enhance the corrosion resistance of drip shields and waste packages, and limit nuclear criticality in canisters for the transportation, aging, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials and their stability at high neutron doses enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for waste package and drip shield applications, although the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas-atomized powders and applied as near full density, nonporous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This article summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers and as neutron absorbers. This article also presents a simple cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  16. Preparing Al-Mg Substrate for Thermal Spraying: Evaluation of Surface State After Different Pretreatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukauskaitė, R.; Valiulis, A. V.; Černašėjus, O.; Škamat, J.; Rębiś, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the pretreatment technique for preparing the surface of aluminum alloy EN AW 5754 before thermal spray. The surface after different pretreatments, including degreasing with acetone, chemical etching with acidic and alkali solutions, grit-blasting, cathodic cleaning, and some combinations of these techniques, has been studied. The investigation of pre-treated surfaces covered the topographical study (using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and 3D profilometry), the chemical analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the evaluation of surface wettability (sessile drop method), and the assessment of surface free energy. Compared with all the techniques used in present work, the cathodic cleaning and its combination with grit-blasting provide the most preferable chemistry of the surface. Due to the absence of hydroxides at the surface and, possible, due to the diffusion of magnesium to the surface of substrate, the surface wettability and the surface free energy have been significantly improved. No direct correlation between the surface topography and the surface wettability has been established.

  17. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Frank W. Zok; Carlos G. Levi; Matthew T. Kiser

    2003-04-01

    In the ninth quarter, investigations in steel matrix composites focused on characterization of abrasive wear and fracture test coupons in order to gain a better understanding of the material attributes contributing to the observed behavior in each test. Both the wear and fracture work found that the performance of the carbide cermet based composites was significantly affected by the dissolution of the hard particles and the elements added in hopes of discouraging dissolution. both thrusts focused on abrasive wear characterization. In abrasive wear this led to increase matrix hardness which increased wear resistance, however the fracture toughness of the composites were significantly reduced. In contrast, the oxide based composites demonstrated good fracture characteristics and the oxide particles provided superior protection to the high stress gouging wear imparted by pin-abrasion testing. For the thermal spray coating effort, modified coatings and fusing parameters were explored on simulated components. Significant improvements appear to have been achieved, and are demonstrated in the lack of observable cracking in the coatings. The abrasive wear characteristics of these components will be explored in the 10th quarter. An overview of the progress during the 9th quarter of this project is given below. Additional research details are provided in the limited rights appendix to this report.

  18. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser; Jeffrey Hawk

    2003-01-01

    In the eighth quarter, investigations in both thrusts focused on abrasive wear characterization. For the steel matrix composites, various systems were tested at DOE Albany Research Center using wear tests which produced low stress scratching, high stress gouging, and gouging and impact wear. Based on the wear results, it is uncertain as to whether the composites created have sufficient wear resistance to provide a 2x life increase in a selectively reinforced component in all applications. High stress component abrasive wear tests were conducted at Caterpillar on arc lamp processed, thermal sprayed components. Testing showed that in many cases, arc lamp processing parameters and resulting fusion were insufficient to prevent coating spallation. Of those coatings which experienced only limited spallation, wear life improvements approached 2x and it is expected that project goals can be met with additional process modifications. An overview of the progress during the 8th quarter of this project is given below. Additional research details are provided in the limited rights appendix to this report.

  19. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liu; Trent Weaver; F.W. Zok; C.G. Levi; Matthew T. Kiser

    2002-04-01

    In the fifth quarter, tooling for the steel MMC effort was redesigned based on the findings from the pressure casting trials of the previous quarter. While awaiting the arrival of that tooling, gravity casting trials were performed to assess modified performing technology and new hard particle systems. Steel-boride composite systems demonstrated good wetting and infiltration behavior, and fully infiltrated steel-boride composites were obtained under certain conditions. However, preform floating and particle dissolution are challenges which must be overcome. Ceramic oxide composites successfully pressure cast in a hot isostatic press at UC Santa Barbara were characterized and subject to fracture toughness testing. Resulting differences in fracture toughness are believed to be due to differences in matrix hardness, potentially imparted through reaction of the molten steel with the particles. Some evidence of bonding between the steel and oxide particles was noted on fracture surfaces. Arc lamp processing trials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory demonstrated that thermal spray coatings were successfully designed to facilitate fusion. All coatings investigated developed some degree of metallurgical bond after lamp fusion and for most coatings lamp fusion also further increased coating hardness. An overview of the progress during the 1st quarter of this project is given below. Research details are provided in the limited rights appendix to this report.

  20. Method for Thermal Spraying of Coatings Using Resonant-Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    A method has been devised for high-volume, high-velocity surface deposition of protective metallic coatings on otherwise vulnerable surfaces. Thermal spraying is used whereby the material to be deposited is heated to the melting point by passing through a flame. Rather than the usual method of deposition from the jet formed from the combustion products, this innovation uses non-steady combustion (i.e. high-frequency, periodic, confined bursts), which generates not only higher temperatures and heat transfer rates, but exceedingly high impingement velocities an order of magnitude higher than conventional thermal systems. Higher impingement rates make for better adhesion. The high heat transfer rates developed here allow the deposition material to be introduced, not as an expensive powder with high surface-area-to-volume, but in convenient rod form, which is also easier and simpler to feed into the system. The nonsteady, resonant combustion process is self-aspirating and requires no external actuation or control and no high-pressure supply of fuel or air. The innovation has been demonstrated using a commercially available resonant combustor shown in the figure. Fuel is naturally aspirated from the tank through the lower Tygon tube and into the pulsejet. Air for starting is ported through the upper Tygon tube line. Once operation commences, this air is no longer needed as additional air is naturally aspirated through the inlet. A spark plug on the device is needed for starting, but the process carries on automatically as the operational device is resonant and reignites itself with each 220-Hz pulse.

  1. Improving Tribological Properties of Cast Al-Si Alloys through Application of Wear-Resistant Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culliton, David; Betts, Anthony; Carvalho, Sandra; Kennedy, David

    2013-04-01

    Flame Spray Thermal Spray coatings are low-cost, high-wear surface-treatment technologies. However, little has been reported on their potential effects on cast automotive aluminum alloys. The aim of this research was to investigate the tribological properties of as-sprayed NiCrBSi and WC/12Co Flame Spray coatings applied to two cast aluminum alloys: high-copper LM24 (AlSi8Cu3Fe), and low-copper LM25 (AlSi7Mg). Potential interactions between the mechanical properties of the substrate and the deposited coatings were deemed to be significant. Microstructural, microhardness, friction, and wear (pin-on-disk, microabrasion, Taber abrasion, etc.) results are reported, and the performance differences between coatings on the different substrates were noted. The coefficient of friction was reduced from 0.69-0.72 to 0.12-0.35. Wear (pin-on-disk) was reduced by a factor of 103-104, which was related to the high surface roughness of the coatings. Microabrasion wear was dependent on coating hardness and applied load. Taber abrasion results showed a strong dependency on the substrate, coating morphology, and homogeneity.

  2. Processing, structure, property and performance relationships for the thermal spray of the internal surface of aluminum cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David James

    The increased need for automotive weight reduction has necessitated the use of aluminum for engine blocks. Conventional aluminum alloys cannot survive the constant wear from a piston ring reciprocating on the surface. However, a wear resistant thermal spray coating can be applied on the internal surface of the cylinder bore, which has significant advantages over other available options. Thermal spray is a well-established process for depositing molten, semi-molten, or solid particles onto a substrate to form a protective coating. For this application, the two main challenges were obtaining good wear resistance, and achieving good adhesion. To design a system capable of producing a well-adhered, wear resistant coating for this high volume application it is necessary to identify the overall processing, structure, properties, and performance relationships. The results will demonstrate that very important relationships exist among particle characteristics, substrate conditions, and the properties of the final coating. However, it is the scientific studies to understand some of the process physics in these relationships that allow recognition of the critical processing conditions that need to be controlled to ensure a consistent, reliable thermal spray coating. In this investigation, it will be shown that the critical microstructural aspect of the coating that produced the required tribological properties was the presence of wuestite (FeO). It was found that by using a low carbon steel material with compressed air atomizing gas, it was possible to create an Fe/FeO structure that exhibited excellent tribological properties. This study will also show that traditional thermal spray surface preparation techniques were not ideal for this application, therefore a novel alternative approach was developed. The application of a flux to the aluminum surface prior to thermal spray promotes excellent bond strengths to non-roughened aluminum. Analysis will show that this flux strips

  3. Parameters Influencing the Photocatalytic Activity of Suspension-Sprayed TiO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Berger, Lutz-Michael; Shakhverdova, Irina; Leupolt, Beate; Potthoff, Annegret; Oelschlägel, Kathrin; Meissner, Tobias; Gomez, José Antonio Ibáñez; de Miguel, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Photocatalytic properties of titania have been studied very intensively for a variety of applications, including air and water purification. In order to clarify the influence of the phase composition and other parameters, thermal spraying with suspensions was applied to produce photocatalytically active titania coatings starting from two commercially available anatase and rutile submicron powders. Aqueous suspensions containing 40% solids by weight were sprayed with an HVOF process using ethylene as the fuel gas. The spray parameters were chosen in order to produce mechanically stable coatings and to preserve a high content of the initial crystalline phases of the powders. The coating microstructures, phase compositions, and surface properties were characterized. The photocatalytic performance was evaluated by degradation of the pink dye Rhodamine B (RB) using two techniques: degradation of an aqueous solution of RB and discoloration of impregnated RB. All the coatings exhibited photocatalytic activity to varying degrees, depending on the phase composition as well as other factors, namely, the coating microstructure, surface morphology, surface hydroxylation, light absorption, and interaction with the pollutant.

  4. Sensors in Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents what is our actual knowledge about sensors, used in the harsh environment of spray booths, to improve the reproducibility and reliability of coatings sprayed with hot or cold gases. First are described, with their limitations and precisions, the different sensors following the in-flight hot particle parameters (trajectories, temperatures, velocities, sizes, and shapes). A few comments are also made about techniques, still under developments in laboratories, to improve our understanding of coating formation such as plasma jet temperature measurements in non-symmetrical conditions, hot gases heat flux, particles flattening and splats formation, particles evaporation. Then are described the illumination techniques by laser flash of either cold particles (those injected in hot gases, or in cold spray gun) or liquid injected into hot gases (suspensions or solutions). The possibilities they open to determine the flux and velocities of cold particles or visualize liquid penetration in the core of hot gases are discussed. Afterwards are presented sensors to follow, when spraying hot particles, substrate and coating temperature evolution, and the stress development within coatings during the spray process as well as the coating thickness. The different uses of these sensors are then described with successively: (i) Measurements limited to particle trajectories, velocities, temperatures, and sizes in different spray conditions: plasma (including transient conditions due to arc root fluctuations in d.c. plasma jets), HVOF, wire arc, cold spray. Afterwards are discussed how such sensor data can be used to achieve a better understanding of the different spray processes, compare experiments to calculations and improve the reproducibility and reliability of the spray conditions. (ii) Coatings monitoring through in-flight measurements coupled with those devoted to coatings formation. This is achieved by either maintaining at their set point both in-flight and

  5. Exploring thermal spray gray alumina coating pore network architecture by combining stereological protocols and impedance electrochemical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antou, G.; Montavon, G.; Hlawka, F.; Cornet, A.; Coddet, C.

    2006-12-01

    Complex multiscale pore network architecture characterized by multimodal pore size distribution and connectivity develops during the manufacture of ceramic thermal spray coatings from intra- and interlamellar cracks generated when each lamella spreads and solidifies to globular pores resulting from lamella stacking defects. This network significantly affects the coating properties and their in-service behaviors. De Hoff stereological analysis permits quantification of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of spheroids (i.e., pores) from the determination of their two-dimensional (2D) distribution estimated by image analysis when analyzing the coating structure from a polished plane. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy electrochemically examines a material surface by frequency variable current and potential and analyzes the complex impedance. When a coating covers the material surface, the electrolyte percolates through the more or less connected pore network to locally passivate the substrate. The resistive and capacitive characteristics of the equivalent electrical circuit will depend upon the connected pore network architecture. Both protocols were implemented to quantify thermal spray coating structures. Al2O3-13TiO2 coatings were atmospherically plasma sprayed using several sets of power parameters, are current intensity, plasma gas total flow rate, and plasma gas composition in order to determine their effects on pore network architecture. Particle characteristics upon impact, especially their related dimensionless numbers, such as Reynolds, Weber, and Sommerfeld criteria, were also determined. Analyses permitted identification of (a) the major effects of power parameters upon pore architecture and (b) the related formation mechanisms.

  6. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  7. Structurally Integrated, Damage Tolerant Thermal Spray Coatings: Processing Effects on Surface and System Functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackel, Andrew

    Thermal Spray (TS) coatings have seen extensive application as protective surfaces to enhance the service life of substrates prone to damage in their operating environment (wear, corrosion, heat etc.). With the advent of high velocity TS processes, the ability to deposit highly dense (>99%) metallic and cermet coatings has further enhanced the protective ability of these coatings. In addition to surface functionality, the influence of the coating application on the mechanical performance of a coated component is of great concern when such a component will experience either static or cyclic loading during service. Using a process mapping methodology, the processing-property interplay between coating materials meant to provide damage tolerant surface or for structural restoration are explored in terms of relevant mechanical properties. Most importantly, the residual stresses inherent in TS deposited coatings are shown to play a significant role in the integrated mechanical performance of these coatings. Unique to high velocity TS processes is the ability to produce compressive stresses within the deposit from the cold working induced by the high kinetic energy particles upon impact. The extent of these formation stresses are explored with different coating materials, as well as processing influence. The ability of dense TS coatings to carry significant structural load and synergistically strengthen coated tensile specimens is demonstrated as a function of coating material, processing, and thickness. The sharing of load between the substrate and otherwise brittle coating enables higher loads before yield for the bi-material specimens, offering a methodology to improve the tensile performance of coated components for structural repair or multi-functionality (surface and structure). The concern of cyclic fatigue damage in coated components is explored, since the majority of service application are designed for loading to be well below the yield point. The role of

  8. Microstructure and properties of in-flight rare-earth doped thermal barrier coatings prepared by suspension plasma spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Stephanie

    Thermal barrier coatings with lower thermal conductivity improve the efficiency of gas turbine engines by allowing higher operating temperatures. Recent studies were shown that coatings containing a pair of rare-earth oxides with equal molar ratio have lower thermal conductivity and improved sintering resistance compared to the undoped 4-4.5 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In the present work, rare-earth doped coatings were fabricated via suspension plasma spray by spraying YSZ powder-ethanol suspensions that contained dissolved rare-earth nitrates. The compositions of the coatings determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy verified that 68 +/- 8% of the rare-earth nitrates added into the suspension was incorporated into the coatings. Two coatings containing different concentrations of the same dopant pair (Nd2O3/Yb2O3), and three coatings having similar concentrations of different dopant pairs (Nd 2O3/Yb2O3, Nd2O3/Gd 2O3, and Gd2O3/Yb2O 3) were produced and compared. The effect of dopant concentration and dopant pair type on the microstructure and properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed and heat treated conditions were investigated using XRD, SEM, TEM, STEM-EDX, and the laser flash method. The cross-sectional morphology of all coatings displayed columnar structure. The porosity content of the coating was found to increase with increasing dopant concentration, but did not significantly change with dopant pairs. Similarly, increasing the Nd2O3/Yb2O 3 concentration lowered the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed coatings. Although the effect of changing dopant pair type is not as significant as increasing the dopant concentration, the coating that contained Gd2O 3/Yb2O3 exhibited the lowest conductivity compared to coatings that had other dopant pairs. Thermal conductivity measurement performed on the heat treated coatings indicated a larger conductivity increase for the rare-earth doped coatings. A detailed study on the

  9. An investigation of the electrical behavior of thermally-sprayed aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, C.J.; Seals, R.D.; White, R.L.; Murray, W.P.; Cooper, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    Electrical properties of plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide coatings were measured at temperatures up to 600 C. High purity (> 99.5 wt% pure Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) alumina powders were plasma-sprayed on stainless steel substrates over a range of power levels, using two gun configurations designed to attain different spray velocities. Key electrical properties were measured to evaluate the resultant coatings as potential insulating materials for electrostatic chucks (ESCs) being developed for semiconductor manufacturing. Electrical resistivity of all coatings was measured under vacuum upon heating and cooling over a temperature range of 20 to 600 C. Dielectric constants were also measured under the same test conditions. X-ray diffraction was performed to examine phase formation in the coatings. Results show the important of powder composition and careful selection and control of spray conditions for optimizing electrical behavior in plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide, and point to the need for further studies to characterize the relationship between high temperature electrical properties, measured plasma-spray variables, and specific microstructural and compositional coating features.

  10. Structural and electrical properties of oxide thick films prepared by thermal spray for direct-write applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kipyung

    Thermal spray has been examined as a direct write technique for hybrid electronic devices, since it has potential advantages that include both high deposition rate and low temperature deposition. The mid-k and high-k dielectric thick films were deposited using plasma spray or high velocity oxy fuel spray at a deposition rate of 15 mum/second. Their dielectric properties were assessed. Thermal sprayed BaTiO3 and Ba0.68Sr0.32TiO 3 films with a thickness in the range of 40˜150 mum had dielectric constants of ˜240 at 100 kHz. The dielectric constants were comparable to films prepared by other techniques, although they were more than an order of magnitude lower than those of corresponding bulk ceramics. The reduced dielectric constants were attributed to the presence of the fine grains less than 100 nm in size, an amorphous phase, pores, and a low dielectric constant interfacial layer between the film and substrate. The dielectric constants of BaTiO3 and Ba0.68Sr0.32TiO films increased up to 450 after annealing at 500°C for 20 hours in air. In BaTiO3 and BST(68/32) films, the presence of a low dielectric constant layer at the film/substrate interface was determined from the dependence of dielectric constant on film thickness. The capacitance density of the interfacial layer, Ci/A, was in the range of 2.3˜2.7 nF/cm 2 for as-deposited films. Ci/A increased to 12 nF/cm 2 after annealing at 500°C for 20 hours in air. The increase of dielectric constants in the annealed films was mainly attributed to the increase of interfacial capacitance by crystallization of the interfacial layer material. The dielectric constants of thermal spray deposited mid-k films, such as Al2O3, ZrO2, and MgAl2O 4, were comparable to those of corresponding bulk ceramics. Multilayer capacitors consisting of MgAl2O4 dielectric layers and Ni-Al electrodes were successfully fabricated by thermal spray. The capacitors with three dielectric layers showed the capacitance density of 0.6 nF/cm 2, which

  11. Effect of HVOF Processing Parameters on the Properties of NiCoCrAlY Coatings by Design of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Luna, H.; Lozano-Mandujano, D.; Alvarado-Orozco, J. M.; Valarezo, A.; Poblano-Salas, C. A.; Trápaga-Martínez, L. G.; Espinoza-Beltrán, F. J.; Muñoz-Saldaña, J.

    2014-08-01

    The effect of three principal, independent, high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-processing parameters on the properties of NiCoCrAlY coatings deposited using commercial powders is reported here. The design of experiments (DoE) technique at a two-level factorial and a central composite rotatable design was used to analyze and optimize the HVOF spraying process. The deposition parameters investigated were (1) fuel flow, (2) oxygen flow, and (3) stand-off distance. The effect of these processing variables was evaluated using selected responses, including porosity and oxide content, residual stresses, and deposition efficiency. Coatings with low porosity as well as with low residual stress were obtained using high fuel-rich conditions at a stand-off distance between 250 and 300 mm. At shorter and longer stand-off distances, respectively, either excessive flattening of splats or un-molten condition occurred, resulting in high levels of porosity and residual stress. The response surface, the empirical relationships among the variables, and the response parameters allowed the selection of optimum deposition parameters and the improvement of coating properties.

  12. Microstructural and Tribological Properties of Al2O3-13pctTiO2 Thermal Spray Coatings Deposited by Flame Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, Rassim; Bradai, Mohand Amokrane; Sadeddine, Abdelhamid; Mouadji, Youcef; Bilek, Ali; Benabbas, Abderrahim

    2015-10-01

    T He present investigation has been conducted to study the tribological properties of Al2O3-13pctTiO2 (AT-13) ceramic coatings deposited on a low carbon steel type E335 by using a thermal flame spray technique. The microstructure and phase composition of wire and coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Measurements of micro hardness were also performed on the surface of the coatings. The tribological tests were carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer at different loads. All tests were performed using two disks as counter body, namely Al2O3-ZrO2 (AZ-25) and Al2O3-TiO2 (AT-3) which formed couple 1 and couple 2, respectively, in order to work out the wear rate and friction coefficient. Roughness profiles were also evaluated before and after each test. The SEM showed that the dense microstructure of Al2O3-TiO2 (AT-13) coatings have a homogenous lamellar morphology and complex of several phases with the presence of porosities and unmelted particles. The XRD analysis of the wire before the spray showed a majority phase of α-Al2O3 rhombohedral structure and a secondary phase of Al2TiO5 orthorhombic structure with little traces of TiO2 (rutile) tetragonal structure, whereas the XRD of the coating revealed the disappearance of TiO2 replaced by the formation of a new metastable phase γ-Al2O3 cubic structure. The tribological results showed that the applied contact pressure affects the variation of the friction coefficient with time and that it decreases with the rise of the normal force of contact. It was found also that the couple 2 with nearly chemical compositions of spray-coated (AT-13) and disk (AT-3) exhibited much higher wear resistance than the couple 1 although they have sliding coefficient of friction nearly.

  13. Anisotropic thermal expansion effects in plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.; Herman, H.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal expansion properties of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8-wt pct Y2O3 coatings, detached from the substrate, have been examined. Coatings were heat-treated in air or in argon. Anisotropic effects in the longitudinal (planar to the substrate surface) and transverse (perpendicular to the substrate surface) directions were measured and related to the coating structure. The thermal expansion coefficient of the coating is discussed in terms of the material's properties, such as the crack network and interlamellar boundary distribution. A precise model for the expansion behavior of coatings still needs attention, since no description of all of the contributing variables exists. A quantitative analysis of thermal properties of coatings will aid in future design and modeling of coating systems.

  14. Characterization of Copper Coatings Deposited by High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spray for Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimijazi, H. R.; Aghaee, M.; Salehi, M.; Garcia, E.

    2017-08-01

    Copper coatings were deposited on steel substrates by high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying. The microstructure of the feedstock copper powders and free-standing coatings were evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The x-ray diffraction pattern was utilized to determine phase compositions of powders and coatings. Oxygen content was determined by a LECO-T300 oxygen determiner. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured in two directions, through-thickness and in-plane by laser flash apparatus. The electrical resistivity of the coatings was measured by the four-point probe method. Oxygen content of the coatings was two times higher than that of the initial powders (0.35-0.37%). The thermal and electrical conductivities of the coatings were different depending on the direction of the measurement. The thermal and electrical conductivity of the coatings improved after annealing for 6 h at a temperature of 600°C.

  15. Comparison of the Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of WC-25Co Coatings Obtained by High Velocity Oxy-Fuel and Cold Gas Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, M.; Dosta, S.; Fernández, J.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Cold gas spray (CGS) coatings were previously produced by spraying WC-25Co cermet powders onto Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates. Unlike conventional flame spray techniques (e.g., high-velocity oxy-fuel; HVOF), no melting of the powder occurs; the particles are deformed and bond together after being sprayed by a supersonic jet of compressed gas, thereby building up several layers and forming a coating. WC-Co cermets are used in wear-resistant parts, because of their combination of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. XRD tests were previously run on the initial powder and the coatings to determine possible phase changes during spraying. The bonding strength of the coatings was measured by adhesion tests. Here, WC-25Co coatings were also deposited on the same substrates by HVOF spraying. The wear resistance and fracture toughness of the coatings obtained previously by CGS and the HVOF coatings obtained here were studied. Their corrosion resistance was determined by electrochemical measurements. It was possible to achieve thick, dense, and hard CGS coatings on Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates, with better or the same mechanical and electrochemical properties as those of the HVOF coatings; making the former a highly competitive method for producing WC-25Co coatings.

  16. Comparison of Thermal Properties of Thermal Barrier Coating Deposited on IN738 Using Standard Air Plasma Spray with 100HE Plasma Spray System

    SciTech Connect

    Uppu, Nalini; Mensah, Patrick F.; Ofori, Daniel

    2006-07-31

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have low thermal conductivity values and have a primary benefit of providing an insulating layer that reduces the coated substrate temperature and mitigates the effects of hot streaking or uneven temperature distributions. Thermal conductivity, k, is a thermo-physical property that can be derived from the thermal diffusivity, α, of the specimen. It can be obtained from the formula k = α cp ρ, where cp is specific heat and ρ is the density of the material. Thermal conductivity, k, describes the quantity of heat that passes through a unit area of sample in unit time with a temperature gradient present. This thermal property of TBCs can be measured by flash method in which a nearly instantaneous pulse of energy (usually laser or other discharge source) is input to the frontal surface of a material sample and the temperature changes are measured on back side of sample with and INSb infrared detector as shown in Fig.1. A laser flash test has the advantage of being fast while providing values with excellent accuracy and reproducibility. In this study, an instantaneous triangular heat pulse from a laser heat flash system (FL5000) made by Anter corporation, Pittsburgh, PA was used. The technique satisfies the ASTM E 1461. The test method can measure thermal diffusivity values ranging from 10-7 to 10-3 m2/s from temperatures 75 to 2800 K.

  17. Robot based deposition of WC-Co HVOF coatings on HSS cutting tools as a substitution for solid cemented carbide cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Schaak, C.; Biermann, D.; Aßmuth, R.; Goeke, S.

    2017-03-01

    Cemented carbide (hard metal) cutting tools are the first choice to machine hard materials or to conduct high performance cutting processes. Main advantages of cemented carbide cutting tools are their high wear resistance (hardness) and good high temperature strength. In contrast, cemented carbide cutting tools are characterized by a low toughness and generate higher production costs, especially due to limited resources. Usually, cemented carbide cutting tools are produced by means of powder metallurgical processes. Compared to conventional manufacturing routes, these processes are more expensive and only a limited number of geometries can be realized. Furthermore, post-processing and preparing the cutting edges in order to achieve high performance tools is often required. In the present paper, an alternative method to substitute solid cemented carbide cutting tools is presented. Cutting tools made of conventional high speed steels (HSS) were coated with thick WC-Co (88/12) layers by means of thermal spraying (HVOF). The challenge is to obtain a dense, homogenous, and near-net-shape coating on the flanks and the cutting edge. For this purpose, different coating strategies were realized using an industrial robot. The coating properties were subsequently investigated. After this initial step, the surfaces of the cutting tools were ground and selected cutting edges were prepared by means of wet abrasive jet machining to achieve a smooth and round micro shape. Machining tests were conducted with these coated, ground and prepared cutting tools. The occurring wear phenomena were analyzed and compared to conventional HSS cutting tools. Overall, the results of the experiments proved that the coating withstands mechanical stresses during machining. In the conducted experiments, the coated cutting tools showed less wear than conventional HSS cutting tools. With respect to the initial wear resistance, additional benefits can be obtained by preparing the cutting edge by means

  18. Spray characterization of thermal fogging equipment typically used in vector control.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W C; Walker, T W; Fritz, B K; Gwinn, T; Smith, V L; Szumlas, D; Quinn, B; Lan, Y; Huang, Y; Sykes, D

    2008-12-01

    Droplet size spectra from different sprayers used to generate insecticide-laden fogs for controlling flying insects were measured by a laser diffraction instrument and Teflon-coated slides. The objectives of this work were to present not only information on spray-system droplet size generated by different sprayers, but to compare methodologies by which other similar systems can be evaluated and give applicators sprayer-system performance data. Data from 45 replicated spray tests, comprising 11 sprayers and 5 pesticides, showed a wide range in the droplet size spectra produced. The volume median diameter measurements ranged from 2.6 to 75.5 microm for diesel-diluted sprays and from 27.9 to 59.9 microm for water-diluted sprays. Similarly, the percent volume <20 microm ranged between 12.0-100% and 8.5-30.7%, for diesel- and water-diluted sprays, respectively. The droplet sizes measured by the swinging slide and laser diffraction methods were not consistent. The information presented aids users in sprayer selection and operation to produce the specific droplet size spectra required for a particular application.

  19. Oxidation Behavior of In-Flight Molten Aluminum Droplets in the Twin-Wire Electric Arc Thermal Spray Process

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Brian G. Williams

    2005-05-01

    This paper examines the in-flight oxidation of molten aluminum sprayed in air using the twin-wire electric arc (TWEA) thermal spray process. The oxidation reaction of aluminum in air is highly exothermic and is represented by a heat generation term in the energy balance. Aerodynamic shear at the droplet surface enhances the amount of in-flight oxidation by: (1) promoting entrainment and mixing of the surface oxides within the droplet, and (2) causing a continuous heat generation effect that increases droplet temperature over that of a droplet without internal circulation. This continual source of heat input keeps the droplets in a liquid state during flight. A linear rate law based on the Mott-Cabrera theory was used to estimate the growth of the surface oxide layer formed during droplet flight. The calculated oxide volume fraction of an average droplet at impact agrees well with the experimentally determined oxide content for a typical TWEA-sprayed aluminum coating, which ranges from 3.3 to 12.7%. An explanation is provided for the elevated, nearly constant surface temperature (~ 2000 oC) of the droplets during flight to the substrate and shows that the majority of oxide content in the coating is produced during flight, rather than after deposition.

  20. Tribological and Oxidative Behavior of Thermally Sprayed NiCrBSi Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, M. A.; Rico, A.; Gómez, M. T.; Cadenas, M.; Fernández-Rico, J. E.; Rodríguez, J.

    2017-01-01

    The behavior of NiCrBSi coatings deposited by three different spraying techniques was studied: flame spray with a subsequent flame treatment (FS + Flame), flame spray with post-laser treatment (FS + Laser) and laser cladding (LC). The coating responses under wear and oxidation conditions were analyzed. Although the microstructure of the coatings deposited by the three different techniques showed similar phases and precipitates, some changes in the size and distribution of these constituents were observed. The pin on disk configuration was used to determine the friction coefficients and wear rates. LC coatings showed the highest wear resistance, with plastic deformation being the main wear mechanism identified for all of the coatings analyzed. Tests under aggressive environments were also performed to determine the oxidation kinetics.

  1. Tribological and Oxidative Behavior of Thermally Sprayed NiCrBSi Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, M. A.; Rico, A.; Gómez, M. T.; Cadenas, M.; Fernández-Rico, J. E.; Rodríguez, J.

    2017-02-01

    The behavior of NiCrBSi coatings deposited by three different spraying techniques was studied: flame spray with a subsequent flame treatment (FS + Flame), flame spray with post-laser treatment (FS + Laser) and laser cladding (LC). The coating responses under wear and oxidation conditions were analyzed. Although the microstructure of the coatings deposited by the three different techniques showed similar phases and precipitates, some changes in the size and distribution of these constituents were observed. The pin on disk configuration was used to determine the friction coefficients and wear rates. LC coatings showed the highest wear resistance, with plastic deformation being the main wear mechanism identified for all of the coatings analyzed. Tests under aggressive environments were also performed to determine the oxidation kinetics.

  2. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew T. Kiser

    2001-07-01

    First quarter activities were limited to initial project discussions, laboratory preparation, and some initial coupon preparation. Technical discussion were held with the subcontractors to clearly define their roll in the project. Detailed preparation of the pressure casting lab were started. Initial test coupons were sprayed and provided to Oak Ridge National Lab for infrared lamp fusion trials.

  3. Coating Bores of Light Metal Engine Blocks with a Nanocomposite Material using the Plasma Transferred Wire Arc Thermal Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Ernst, F.; Zwick, J.; Schlaefer, T.; Cook, D.; Nassenstein, K.; Schwenk, A.; Schreiber, F.; Wenz, T.; Flores, G.; Hahn, M.

    2008-09-01

    Engine blocks of modern passenger car engines are generally made of light metal alloys, mostly hypoeutectic AlSi-alloys. Due to their low hardness, these alloys do not meet the tribological requirements of the system cylinder running surface—piston rings—lubricating oil. In order to provide a suitable cylinder running surface, nowadays cylinder liners made of gray cast iron are pressed in or cast into the engine block. A newer approach is to apply thermal spray coatings onto the cylinder bore walls. Due to the geometric conditions, the coatings are applied with specifically designed internal diameter thermal spray systems. With these processes a broad variety of feedstock can be applied, whereas mostly low-alloyed carbon steel feedstock is being used for this application. In the context of this work, an iron-based wire feedstock has been developed, which leads to a nanocrystalline coating. The application of this material was carried out with the Plasma Transferred Wire Arc system. AlMgSi0.5 liners were used as substrates. The coating microstructure and the properties of the coatings were analyzed.

  4. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2- 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of K(sub I)/K(sub II) were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  5. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2 - 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma- sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  6. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2- 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of K(sub I)/K(sub II) were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  7. Combined Mode I and Mode II Fracture of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of ZrO2 - 8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Precracks were introduced in test specimens using the single-edge-v-notched beam (SEVNB) method incorporated with final diamond polishing to achieve sharp crack tips. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behaviors of the coating material were compared with those of monolithic advanced ceramics determined previously. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the plasma- sprayed thermal barrier coating material was predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  8. Thermal-Cycling Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Partially Stabilized Zirconia Coatings on High-Density Graphite Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sure, Jagadeesh; Thyagarajan, K.; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-08-01

    The thermal cycling behavior of partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ)-coated by plasma-spray process on NiCrAlY bond-coated high-density (HD) graphite substrate was investigated. Thermal cycling was carried out at 600 and 750 °C under vacuum, up to 200 cycles. Each cycle comprised a 10-min heating followed by forced air cooling for 10 min down to room temperature. Characterization of the microstructure and the phase analysis of thermal-cycled PSZ coatings by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy revealed the correlation between the microstructural/crystallographic phases and the mechanical integrity of the coating up to 200 cycles. Segmented and vertical cracks generated on the coating during thermal cycling were observed to propagate with increase in the number of cycles. Macrocracks and variations in elemental compositions were not observed until 200 cycles at 600 and 750 °C. XRD and Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed the presence of nontransformable tetragonal phase only in all the thermal-cycled PSZ coatings, irrespective of temperature up to 200 cycles.

  9. International Thermal Spraying Conference (10th) Held at Essen, Germany on 2-6 May 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-16

    Poland Ch. Martin, P. Fauchais Laboratoire de Thermodynamique U.E.R. Sciences Universite de Limoges Limoges, France H. Bhat, R.A. Zatorski, H. Herman...Fauchais Deposition by Low Pressure Nitrogen Laboratoire de Thermodynamique Arc Plasma Spraying. U.E.R. Sciences Universite de Limoges Limoges, France...Minsk, USSR Plasmatron. M. Vardelle, A. Vardelle, P. Fauchais Study of the Trajectories and Laboratoire de Thermodynamique Temperature of Powders in a

  10. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  11. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  12. Preliminary Tuft Testing of Metallic Bristles Versus PS212, PS300, and HVOF300

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Turbine engine brush seals are designed with sacrificial brushes and hard shaft coatings to minimize shaft wear and reduce the cost of engine overhauls. Replacing a worm seal is more cost and time effective than refinishing an engine shaft. However, this tribological design causes excessive brush wear and reduces long term seal efficiency. An alternative approach is to coat the shaft with a solid lubricant and allow the bristles to wear into the shaft coating similar to traditional abradable labyrinth seals. This approach can result in reduced seal leakage by forcing the leakage to flow through the seal bristle pack or through a more tortuous shaft wear track. Key to this approach is limiting the shaft wear to an acceptable level were surface refinishing would not be required during every engine overhaul. Included in this paper are brush seal tuft test results for four metallic bristles (nickel-chrome or cobalt-chrome based superalloys) tested against three solid lubricant coatings (NASA's PS212, PS300, and HVOF300). These test results are also compared to previous baseline tests conducted with plasma sprayed chrome carbide. Compared to the baseline results, no tribological benefit was achieved with the metallic bristle/solid lubricant tribopairs tested. To improve the performance of the solid lubricant coatings, issues regarding lubricant phase sizes (homogeneity), and composition need to be addressed.

  13. Characterization and durability testing of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria and hafnia-yttria thermal barrier coatings. Part 1: Effect of spray parameters on the performance of several lots of partially stabilized zirconia-yttria powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Leissler, George W.; Jobe, J. Marcus

    1993-01-01

    Initial experiments conducted on thermal barrier coatings prepared in the newly upgraded research plasma spray facility and the burner rig test facilities are discussed. Part 1 discusses experiments which establish the spray parameters for three baseline zirconia-yttria coatings. The quality of five similar coating lots was judged primarily by their response to burner rig exposure supplemented by data from other sources such as specimen characterizations and thermal diffusivity measurements. After allowing for burner rig variability, although there appears to be an optimum density (i.e., optimum microstructure) for maximum burner rig life, the distribution tends to be rather broad about the maximum. In Part 2, new hafnia-yttria-based coatings were evaluated against both baseline and alternate zirconia-yttria coatings. The hafnia-yttria coatings and the zirconia-yttria coatings that were prepared by an alternate powder vendor were very sensitive to plasma spray parameters, in that high-quality coatings were only obtained when certain parameters were employed. The reasons for this important observation are not understood. Also not understood is that the first of two replicate specimens sprayed for Part 1 consistently performed better than the second specimen. Subsequent experiments did not display this spray order affect, possibly because a chiller was installed in the torch cooling water circuit. Also, large changes in coating density were observed after switching to a new lot of electrodes. Analyses of these findings were made possible, in part, because of the development of a sensitive density measurement technique described herein in detail. The measured thermal diffusivities did not display the expected strong relationship with porosity. This surprising result was believed to have been caused by increased microcracking of the denser coatings on the stainless steel substrates.

  14. Can Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Mitigate Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Syrek-Gerstenkorn, B.

    2017-01-01

    Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage (CCS) uses low-cost carbon steel pipelines owing to their negligible corrosion rates in dry CO2. However, in the presence of liquid water, CO2 forms corrosive carbonic acid. In order to mitigate wet CO2 corrosion, use of expensive corrosion-resistant alloys is recommended; however, the increased cost makes such selection economically unfeasible; hence, new corrosion mitigation methods are sought. One such method is the use of thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA), which has been used to mitigate corrosion of carbon steel in seawater, but there are concerns regarding its suitability in CO2-containing solutions. A 30-day test was carried out during which carbon steel specimens arc-sprayed with aluminum were immersed in deionized water at ambient temperature bubbled with 0.1 MPa CO2. The acidity (pH) and potential were continuously monitored, and the amount of dissolved Al3+ ions was measured after completion of the test. Some dissolution of TSA occurred in the test solution leading to nominal loss in coating thickness. Potential measurements revealed that polarity reversal occurs during the initial stages of exposure which could lead to preferential dissolution of carbon steel in the case of coating damage. Thus, one needs to be careful while using TSA in CCS environments.

  15. In vivo antibacterial and silver-releasing properties of novel thermal sprayed silver-containing hydroxyapatite coating.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Takafumi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Ando, Yoshiki; Noda, Iwao; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kawano, Shunsuke; Miyazaki, Masaki; Mawatari, Masaaki; Hotokebuchi, Takao

    2010-02-01

    One of the serious postoperative complications associated with joint replacement is bacterial infection. In addressing this problem, we have previously described the development of a novel thermal spraying technology combining silver (Ag) showing antibacterial activity with hydroxyapatite (HA) displaying good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and reported the in vitro properties. This study evaluated serum Ag ion concentrations and antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using a subcutaneous rat model. HA loaded with 3 wt % of silver oxide (Ag-HA) and plain HA were sprayed on the surface of titanium disks. Ag-HA- or HA-coated samples were implanted into the back subcutaneous pockets of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Mean serum Ag ion concentration in the Ag-HA group increased to more than 50 ppb by 48 h after implantation, then decreased gradually to baseline levels. Mean (+/- standard error of the mean) number of viable MRSA on HA coating was (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10(5), which is significantly more than the (1.1 +/- 0.4) x 10(4) on Ag-HA coating (p < 0.001). Ag-HA coating offers good abilities to release Ag ions and kill MRSA in vivo.

  16. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying: TBC microstructural stability and durability

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, M. A.; Yanar, N. M.; Pettit, F. S.; Taylor, T. A.; Meier, G. H.

    2012-07-23

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  17. Effect of Liquid Feed-Stock Composition on the Morphology of Titanium Dioxide Films Deposited by Thermal Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Adán, C; Marugán, J; van Grieken, R; Chien, K; Pershin, L; Coyle, T; Mostaghimi, J

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited on the surface of titanium foils by Thermal Plasma Spray (TPS) process. Three different TiO2 coatings were prepared using the commercial TiO2-P25 nanopowder and titanium isopropoxide precursor solution as feed-stocks. Structure and morphology of the TiO2-P25 powder and the plasma sprayed coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, UV-visible spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRD and Raman results indicate that the TiO2 coatings were composed of an anatase/rutile mixture that is conditioned by the suspension composition used to be sprayed. Coatings prepared from TiO2-P25 nanoparticles in water suspension (NW-P25) and titanium isopropoxide solution suspension (NSP-P25) are incorporated into the coatings without phase transformation and their anatase/rutile ratio percentage remains very similar to the starting TiO2-P25 powder. On the contrary, when titanium isopropoxide solution is used for spraying (SP), the amount of rutile increases in the final TiO2 coating. SEM analysis also reveals different microstructure morphology, coating thickness, density and porosity of the three TiO2 films that depend significantly on the type of feed-stock employed. Interestingly, we have observed the role of titanium isopropoxide in the formation of more porous and cohesive layers of TiO2. The NSP-P25 coating, prepared with a mix of titanium isopropoxide solution based on TiO2 nanoparticles, presents higher deposition efficiencies and higher coating thickness than the film prepared with nanoparticles suspended in water (NW-P25) or with titanium isopropoxide solutions (SP). This is due to the precursor solution is acting as the cement between TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the cohesive strength of the coating. In sum, NSP-P25 and NW-P25 coatings display a good photocatalytic potential, based on their light absorption properties and mechanical stability. Band gap of

  18. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D.; Blue, Craig A.; Rivard, John D. K.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Kohler, Leslie K.; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J.; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2013-07-09

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  19. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

    2013-09-03

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  20. Fatigue behavior of thermal sprayed WC-CoCr- steel systems: Role of process and deposition parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Vackel, Andrew; Sampath, Sanjay

    2017-02-27

    Thermal spray deposited WC-CoCr coatings are extensively used for surface protection of wear prone components in a variety of applications. Although the primary purpose of the coating is wear and corrosion protection, many of the coated components are structural systems (aero landing gear, hydraulic cylinders, drive shafts etc.) and as such experience cyclic loading during service and are potentially prone to fatigue failure. It is of interest to ensure that the coating and the application process does not deleteriously affect the fatigue strength of the parent structural metal. It has long been appreciated that the relative fatigue life of amore » thermal sprayed component can be affected by the residual stresses arising from coating deposition. The magnitude of these stresses can be managed by torch processing parameters and can also be influenced by deposition effects, particularly the deposition temperature. In this study, the effect of both torch operating parameters (particle states) and deposition conditions (notably substrate temperature) were investigated through rotating bending fatigue studies. The results indicate a strong influence of process parameters on relative fatigue life, including credit or debit to the substrate's fatigue life measured via rotating bend beam studies. Damage progression within the substrate was further explored by stripping the coating off part way through fatigue testing, revealing a delay in the onset of substrate damage with more fatigue resistant coatings but no benefit with coatings with inadequate properties. Finally, the results indicate that compressive residual stress and adequate load bearing capability of the coating (both controlled by torch and deposition parameters) delay onset of substrate damage, enabling fatigue credit of the coated component.« less

  1. In Situ Wear Test on Thermal Spray Coatings in a Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weifeng; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Selvadurai, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the determination of the mass loss is usually used for a quantitative evaluation of wear tests, while the analysis of wear tracks is utilized for a qualitative evaluation of wear. Both evaluation methods can only be used after the wear testing process and their results only present the final outcome of the wear test. However, the changes during the wear test and the time-dependent wear mechanisms are of great interest as well. A running wear test in a large chamber scanning electron microscope (SEM) offers the first opportunity to observe the wear process in situ. Different wear mechanisms, such as the adhesive, abrasive wear, surface fatigue and tribochemical reaction, can be recorded with high magnification. Within this research, a special pin-on-disk testing device is designed for a vacuum environment. Using this device, arc-sprayed NiCrBSi coatings and high-velocity-oxygen-fuel-sprayed WC-12Co coatings were tested in a large chamber SEM with Al2O3 ceramic balls as wear counterparts. During the wear testing, different wear mechanisms were determined and the processes were recorded in short video streams.

  2. Spray Characterization of Thermal Fogging Equipment Typically Used in Vector Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    KEY WORDS Atomization, droplet size, sprayer, thermal fogger, vector control INTRODUCTION One of the most common methods for control- ling...ment and insecticides, applicators depend on recommended equipment operating parameters , as supplied by the manufacturer, along with recommended...2001). In vector control, Seleena et al. (2001) studied thermal application of Bacillus thwingiensis var. israelensis for dengue vector control using

  3. Deposition of Workability-Enhancing Disposable Thick Fe Deposits on Fe-Si Alloy Sheets Using Thermal and Kinetic Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeick; Lee, Changhee; Kim, Sanghoon

    2015-02-01

    Fe-Si alloys are widely applied materials in industrial fields due to their magnetic properties. However, these alloys are difficult to manufacture due to the high oxidation affinity of Fe-Si alloys at high temperature; further, the permanence of the formed oxides (i.e., Fe2SiO4) degrade their workability. In order to solve this problem, disposable workability-improving `thick' coating layers were deposited on Fe-Si alloy substrates in this study using plain carbon steel wire and pure Fe powder via thermal and kinetic spraying processes. The resulting deposits were compared in terms of microstructure and mechanical properties. In thermal sprayed deposit, the oxides degraded mechanical properties, but were helpful for the deposition of a thick layer by restraining bending by thermally induced tensile residual stress. On the other hand, kinetic sprayed deposit showed better adhesive bond strength owing to the compressive residual stress. After a post heating, it was observed that the type of oxides was not affected by diffusion of Si elements from the substrate due to the limited diffusion length of Si elements. Imperfect chemical/metallurgical bonding between the deposit and substrate was also observed. Further, mechanical properties of post heat-treated specimens were enhanced relative to the as-sprayed state.

  4. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  5. Processing Parameter Effects and Thermal Properties of Y2Si2O7 Nanostructured Environmental Barrier Coatings Synthesized by Solution Precursor Induction Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darthout, Émilien; Laduye, Guillaume; Gitzhofer, François

    2016-10-01

    The solution precursor plasma spray process, in which a solution of metal salts is axially injected into an induction thermal plasma, is suitable for deposition of nanostructured environmental barrier coatings. The effects of main processing parameters, namely the solution precursor concentration, spraying distance, reactor pressure, and atomization gas flow rate, have been analyzed using D-optimal design of experiments regarding the deposition rate and coating porosity responses. Among these four parameters, the solution precursor concentration had the greatest influent on the coating structure, followed by the spraying distance and reactor pressure, and finally the atomization gas flow rate with a small contribution. It is pointed out that the species that impact on the substrate are agglomerates of nanoparticles. The equivalent thermal conductivity of selected coatings was computed from experimental temperature evolution curves obtained by laser flash thermal diffusivity analysis, using two methods: a multilayer finite-element model with optimization, and a multilayer thermal diffusion model. The results of the two models agree, with coatings exhibiting low thermal conductivity between 0.7 and 1 W/(m K) at 800 °C.

  6. Development of self-lubricating coatings via cold spray process: Feedstock formulation and deformation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Gaurav

    Because of their low density, high specific strength and high stiffness, titanium alloys are one of the prime candidates for structural application often requiring specific tribological properties. However, their relatively high friction coefficients and low wear resistance are limiting their application over a wider temperature range. Various coatings deposited with technologies like high velocity oxy flame (HVOF), detonation gun (DGun), electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD), etc., can improve wear performance and decrease corrosion damage. These technologies require high processing temperatures precluding the integration of thermally vulnerable lubricants. This research looks at a relatively new coating process called Cold Spray for self-lubricating coatings on Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Cold Spray can produce coatings without significant heating of the sprayed powder or substrate. The particles are in solid state as they hit the substrate, and the formation of coatings occurs mainly due to the kinetic energy of the particles. Therefore, the impact velocity plays an important role. Below a critical value, the particles can cause densification and abrasion of the substrate. The focus of this study is to design composite coatings for the cold spray process and determination of the critical velocity through finite element modeling. Different powders and feedstock formulation techniques are discussed in order to find an optimum formulation for self-lubricating coatings. A composite powder (Ni coated hBN) was found to be the best candidate for the feedstock. The deformation of composite particles upon impact on the substrate was modeled and compared to the experiments. A number of approaches involving different modeling platforms, particle-substrate geometries, and material models have been tried. This work presents the results of ANSYS (version 10.0) analysis using an axisymmetric model of the particle impact. Stress and strain distributions in the particle

  7. Influence of dopant on the behavior under thermal cycling of two plasma- sprayed zirconia coatings Part 2: residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacha, R.; Fauchais, P.; Nardou, F.

    1997-06-01

    The evolution of coating morphology and surface residual stresses was followed for three different pow-ders: zirconia stabilized with 8 wt% yttria (YSZ), 9.9 wt% dysprosia (DSZ), and 9.8 wt% ytterbia (YbSZ). The YSZ reference powder was fused and crushed (-45 +22 μm), and the other two were agglom-erated and sintered (-90 +10 μm). According to the size distributions and manufacturing process, the plasma-sprayed YSZ particles were fully molten, resulting in dense coatings with good contact between the splats; the DSZ and, especially, the YbSZ particles were partially molten. In general, the surface residual stresses were slightly compressive before thermal cycling. The YSZ and DSZ coatings were insensitive to aging (600 h in air at room temperature), as shown by the surface stress evolution, which was not the case for YbSZ coatings. Six hundred furnace thermal cycles from 1100 °C to room temperature indicated excellent behavior of YSZ and DSZ coatings, with almost no variation of sur-face residual stresses, compared to a high dispersion for YbSZ coatings with the development of macrocracks parallel and perpendicular to the substrate within the coating.

  8. Characterization and durability testing of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria and hafnia-yttria thermal barrier coatings. Part 2: Effect of spray parameters on the performance of several hafnia-yttria and zirconia-yttria coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Leissler, George W.

    1993-01-01

    This is the second of two reports which discuss initial experiments on thermal barrier coatings prepared and tested in newly upgraded plasma spray and burner rig test facilities at LeRC. The first report, part 1, describes experiments designed to establish the spray parameters for the baseline zirconia-yttria coating. Coating quality was judged primarily by the response to burner rig exposure, together with a variety of other characterization approaches including thermal diffusivity measurements. That portion of the study showed that the performance of the baseline NASA coating was not strongly sensitive to processing parameters. In this second part of the study, new hafnia-yttria coatings were evaluated with respect to both baseline and alternate zirconia-yttria coatings. The hafnia-yttria and the alternate zirconia-yttria coatings were very sensitive to plasma-spray parameters in that high-quality coatings were obtained only when specific parameters were used. The reasons for this important observation are not understood.

  9. Effects of arc current on the life in burner rig thermal cycling of plasma sprayed ZrOsub2-Ysub2Osub3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; McDonald, G.

    1982-02-01

    An analysis of thermal cycle life data for four sets of eight thermal barrier coated specimens representing arc currents (plasma gun power) of 525, 600, 800, or 950 amps is presented. The ZrO2-8Y2O3/NiCrAlY plasma spray coated Rene 41 rods were thermal cycled to 1040 C in a Mach 0.3-Jet A/air burner flame. The experimental results indicate the existance of a minimum or threshold power level which coating life expectancy is less than 500 cycles. Above the threshold power level, coating life expectancy more than doubles and increases with arc current.

  10. Effect of Layer-Graded Bond Coats on Edge Stress Concentration and Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability is closely related to design, processing and microstructure of the coating Z, tn systems. Two important issues that must be considered during the design of a thermal barrier coating are thermal expansion and modulus mismatch between the substrate and the ceramic layer, and substrate oxidation. In many cases, both of these issues may be best addressed through the selection of an appropriate bond coat system. In this study, a low thermal expansion and layer-graded bond coat system, that consists of plasma-sprayed FeCoNiCrAl and FeCrAlY coatings, and a high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed FeCrAlY coating, is developed to minimize the thermal stresses and provide oxidation resistance. The thermal expansion and oxidation behavior of the coating system are also characterized, and the strain isolation effect of the bond coat system is analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). Experiments and finite element results show that the layer-graded bond coat system possesses lower interfacial stresses. better strain isolation and excellent oxidation resistance. thus significantly improving the coating performance and durability.

  11. Thermal spraying of functionally graded calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Khor, K. A.; Cheang, P.

    1998-03-01

    Biomedical requirements in a prosthesis are often complex and diverse in nature. Biomaterials for implants have to display a wide range of adaptability to suit the various stages of the bio-integration process of any foreign material into the human body. Often, a combination of materials is needed. The preparation of a functionally graded bioceramic coating composed of essentially calcium phosphate compounds is explored. The coating is graded in accordance to adhesive strength, bioactivity, and bioresorbability. The bond coat on the Ti-6Al-4V stub is deposited with a particle range of the hydroxyapatite (HA) that will provide a high adhesive strength and bioactivity but have poor bioresorption properties. The top coat, however, is composed of predominantly α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) that is highly bioresorbable. This arrangement has the propensity of allowing accelerated bio-integration of the coating by the body tissues as the top layer is rapidly resorbed, leaving the more bioactive intermediate layer to facilitate the much needed bioactive properties for proper osteoconduction. The processing steps and problems are highlighted, as well as the results of post-spray heat treatment.

  12. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  13. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  14. Spray characterization of thermal fogging equipment typically used in vector control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The generation of insecticide laden fogs provides an effective method for controlling flying insects. One of the critical factors affecting the effectiveness of a thermal fogging application is the generation of droplets that will remain aloft in the fogging cloud and moves into the area where the ...

  15. Investigation of mechanical properties of thermal coatings obtained during plasma spraying of powder zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, A. R.; Ilinkova, T. A.; Shafigullin, L. N.; Saifutdinov, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal coatings of zirconia partially stabilized with yttrium, deposited by low-temperature plasma, are the basis for the thermal protection of aircraft engine. At the same time there is an actual problem of selection of coating systems “ceramic layer - underlayer” of great thickness, providing better thermal protection, but having low strength characteristics due to the accumulation of internal stresses. To determine the optimal thickness of the test method used in the 4-point bending to allow the surface coating to explore in the elastic-plastic behavior of the field of coatings and strength. Based on the experimental results established the role of underlayer in the formation of the complex mechanical properties of thermal barrier coatings. With a well formed underlayer (PVNH16U6) system becomes sensitive to a change in thickness of the coating, to optimize the response on the strength and deformation criteria. According to the results the optimum ratio of the thickness of the ceramic layer and the underlayer should be regarded as the ratio of 3-5 for which the highest strength values were obtained for all the test coating systems.

  16. Effect of Coating Process Condition on High-Temperature Oxidation and Mechanical Failure Behavior for Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Yoshiba, Masayuki; Harada, Yoshio

    In order to clarify the thermal and/or mechanical failure behavior of the plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) system in connection with their coating characteristics depending on the coating process condition, two kinds of the failure analytical tests were conducted for TBC systems processed under different conditions. One was the high-temperature oxidation test, which was conducted at 1100°C under both the isothermal and thermal cycle conditions. The other was the in-situ observation of mechanical failure behavior, which was conducted under the static loadings at ambient temperature; as the most fundamental aspect, by means of an optical microscopy. It was found that the thermal and mechanical failure behavior of TBC system depends strongly on the top-coat (TC)/bond-coat (BC) interfacial condition, the reheat-treatment (RHT) after spraying and so on. For the TBC system with vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS) BC as well as for that with atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) BC, in particular, the RHT at an appropriate temperature in Ar atmosphere was found to be effective for improving the oxidation property. For the TBC system with APS-BC, however, it was impossible to prevent the crack growth into the BC interior under the tensile loading in spite of conducting the RHT, since the microdefects such as oxides within the APS-BC tend to provide an easy crack propagation path. Furthermore, it was clarified that the smoothening process on the BC surface is able to prevent perfectly the occurrence of the wart-like oxide during oxidation, but at the same time increases also the risk of the TC spalling under the mechanical loading.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Thermal Interfaces Enhanced with Sprayed on Nanoscale Polymer Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-20

    substrate interface—was measured using a photoacoustic method [14, 16, 17]. Two polymer systems were studied: the first, polystyrene (PS) was chosen...for photoacoustic measurements. Before bonding, 80 nm of Ti was evaporated onto the top of the Ag foil for absorbing the laser energy (λ = 1100 nm). To...the maximum potential of the structure. 2.2. Photoacoustic characterization The thermal resistance of the polymer bonded structures was measured using a

  18. Evaluation of the degradation of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings using nano-indentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Jin; Cho, Sung-Keun; Choi, Jung-Hun; Koo, Jae-Mean; Seok, Chang-Sung; Kim, Moon-Young

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the disk type of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system for a gas turbine blade was isothermally aged at 1100 degrees C for various times up to 400 hours. For each aging condition, the thickness of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) was measured by optical microscope and mechanical properties such as the elastic modulus and hardness were measured by micro-indentation and nano-indentation on the cross-section of a coating specimen. In the case of micro-indentation, the mechanical properties of a Ni-base superalloy substrate and MCrAlY bond coat material did not significantly change with an increase in exposure time. In the case of nano-indentation, the gamma-Ni phase and beta-NiAl phase in the bond coat and top coat material show no significant change in their properties. However, the elastic modulus and the hardness of TGO show a remarkable decrease from 100 h to 200 h then remain nearly constant after 200 h due to the internal delamination of TBC. It has been confirmed that the nano-indentation technique is a very effective way to evaluate the degradation of a thermal barrier coating system.

  19. On the Fracture Toughness and Crack Growth Resistance of Bio-Inspired Thermal Spray Hybrid Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Michael Murray

    Surface exploration of the Moon and Asteroids can provide important information to scientists regarding the origins of the solar-system and life . Small robots and sensor modules can enable low-cost surface exploration. In the near future, they are the main machines providing these answers. Advanced in electronics, sensors and actuators enable ev