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Sample records for hydrated sodium calcium

  1. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  2. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  3. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium...

  4. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  5. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  7. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  8. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  10. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  11. Influence of sodium borate on the early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    SciTech Connect

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste; Dhoury, Mélanie; Cau Dit Coumes, Céline; Mercier, Cyrille; Revel, Bertrand; Le Bescop, Patrick; Damidot, Denis

    2015-04-15

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are potential candidates for the conditioning of radioactive wastes with high sodium borate concentrations. This work thus investigates early age hydration of two CSA cements with different gypsum contents (0 to 20%) as a function of the mixing solution composition (borate and NaOH concentrations). Gypsum plays a key role in controlling the reactivity of cement. When the mixing solution is pure water, increasing the gypsum concentration accelerates cement hydration. However, the reverse is observed when the mixing solution contains sodium borate. Until gypsum exhaustion, the pore solution pH remains constant at ~ 10.8, and a poorly crystallized borate compound (ulexite) precipitates. A correlation is established between this transient precipitation and the hydration delay. Decreasing the gypsum content in the binder, or increasing the sodium content in the mixing solution, are two ways of reducing the stability of ulexite, thus decreasing the hydration delay.

  12. Effect of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicates on aflatoxicosis in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Kubena, L F; Harvey, R B; Phillips, T D; Clement, B A

    1993-04-01

    In three experiments, three different hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicates (HSCAS) were incorporated into chick diets (.5%) containing either 0 or 5.0 (Experiments 1 and 2) or 0 or 2.5 (Experiment 3) mg/kg aflatoxin (AF). Male broiler chicks consumed their respective diets and water ad libitum from 1 to 21 days of age. When compared with controls, body weights in chicks receiving 5.0 mg AF/kg were reduced by 214 g in Experiment 1 and 220 g in Experiment 2. The addition of .5% of the HSCAS compounds significantly diminished the growth inhibitory effects caused by AF by 39 to 68% in Experiment 1, by 46 to 88% in Experiment 2, and by 38 to 90% in Experiment 3. The increases in relative organ weights and the decreases in serum biochemical values caused by AF were significantly diminished to differing degrees by all three of the HSCAS compounds. These data demonstrate that these specific HSCAS compounds can be protective against the effects of AF in young growing broilers and further emphasizes the fact that all silicate-type sorbents are not equal in their ability to protect against aflatoxicosis. It also seems possible to specially process compounds to increase their efficacy for protection against the toxicity of AF.

  13. Effects of a hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (T-Bind) on mycotoxicosis in young broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Kubena, L F; Harvey, R B; Bailey, R H; Buckley, S A; Rottinghaus, G E

    1998-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the ability of a hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (T-Bind) sorbent to reduce the toxicity of aflatoxins (AF) or T-2 toxin in male broiler chickens from day of hatch to 21 d of age. In Experiment 1, the sorbent was added at 0.250 or 0.375% to diets containing AF at 5 or T-2 toxin at 8 mg/kg of diet. When compared with controls, AF reduced BW gain by 27% and T-2 toxin reduced BW gain by 17%. The addition of the sorbent at 0.250 or 0.375%, in the absence of added mycotoxins, did not alter the performance of the chicks. The sorbent reduced the toxic effects of 5 mg AF/kg of diet on BW gain by 43% but did not significantly diminish the toxic effects of 8 mg T-2 toxin/kg of diet. The decreased efficiency of feed utilization and the increased relative organ weights caused by AF were significantly diminished to differing degrees by the sorbent. Oral lesions caused by T-2 toxin were not affected by the sorbent. In Experiment 2, the sorbent was added at 0.80% to a diet containing 8 mg T-2 toxin/kg of diet. The sorbent did not diminish the toxic effects of T-2 toxin when added at 0.80% of the diet. These data demonstrate that this specific sorbent can provide protection against the toxicity of AF, but not T-2 toxin, in young broiler chicks.

  14. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Oscar; Giraldo, Carolina; Camargo, Sergio S.

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  15. The effect of sodium chloride on the dissolution of calcium silicate hydrate gels.

    PubMed

    Hill, J; Harris, A W; Manning, M; Chambers, A; Swanton, S W

    2006-01-01

    The use of cement based materials will be widespread in the long-term management of radioactive materials in the United Kingdom. One of the applications could be the Nirex reference vault backfill (NRVB) as an engineered barrier within a deep geological repository. NRVB confers alkaline conditions, which would provide a robust chemical barrier through the control of the solubility of some key radionuclides, enhanced sorption and minimised corrosion of steel containers. An understanding of the dissolution of C-S-H gels in cement under the appropriate conditions (e.g., saline groundwaters) is necessary to demonstrate the expected evolution of the chemistry over time and to provide sufficient cement to buffer the porewater conditions for the required time. A programme of experimental work has been undertaken to investigate C-S-H gel dissolution behaviour in sodium chloride solutions and the effect of calcium/silicon ratio (C/S), temperature and cation type on this behaviour. Reductions in calcium concentration and pH values were observed with samples equilibrated at 45 degrees C compared to those prepared at 25 degrees C. The effect of salt cation type on salt-concentration dependence of the dissolution of C-S-H gels was investigated by the addition of lithium or potassium chloride in place of sodium chloride for gels with a C/S of 1.0 and 1.8. With a C/S of 1.0, similar increases in dissolved calcium concentration with increasing ionic strength were recorded for the different salts. However, at a C/S of 1.8, anomalously high calcium concentrations were observed in the presence of lithium.

  16. The effect of sodium chloride on the dissolution of calcium silicate hydrate gels

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J. . E-mail: joanne.hill@nirex.co.uk; Harris, A.W.; Manning, M.; Chambers, A.; Swanton, S.W.

    2006-07-01

    The use of cement based materials will be widespread in the long-term management of radioactive materials in the United Kingdom. One of the applications could be the Nirex reference vault backfill (NRVB) as an engineered barrier within a deep geological repository. NRVB confers alkaline conditions, which would provide a robust chemical barrier through the control of the solubility of some key radionuclides, enhanced sorption and minimised corrosion of steel containers. An understanding of the dissolution of C-S-H gels in cement under the appropriate conditions (e.g., saline groundwaters) is necessary to demonstrate the expected evolution of the chemistry over time and to provide sufficient cement to buffer the porewater conditions for the required time. A programme of experimental work has been undertaken to investigate C-S-H gel dissolution behaviour in sodium chloride solutions and the effect of calcium/silicon ratio (C/S), temperature and cation type on this behaviour. Reductions in calcium concentration and pH values were observed with samples equilibrated at 45 deg. C compared to those prepared at 25 deg. C. The effect of salt cation type on salt-concentration dependence of the dissolution of C-S-H gels was investigated by the addition of lithium or potassium chloride in place of sodium chloride for gels with a C/S of 1.0 and 1.8. With a C/S of 1.0, similar increases in dissolved calcium concentration with increasing ionic strength were recorded for the different salts. However, at a C/S of 1.8, anomalously high calcium concentrations were observed in the presence of lithium.

  17. Comparison of the sequestering properties of yeast cell wall extract and hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate in three in vitro models accounting for the animal physiological bioavailability of zearalenone.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, A; Kettunen, H; Apajalahti, J; Pennala, E; Moran, C A

    2013-01-01

    The sequestration/inactivation of the oestrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) by two adsorbents--yeast cell wall extract (YCW) and hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS)--was studied in three laboratory models: (1) an in vitro model was adapted from referenced methods to test for the sequestrant sorption capabilities under buffer conditions at two pH values using liquid chromatography coupled to a fluorescence detector for toxin quantification; (2) a second in vitro model was used to evaluate the sequestrant sorption stability according to pH variations and using ³H-labelled ZEA at low toxin concentration; and (3) an original, ex vivo Ussing chamber model was developed to further understand the transfer of ZEA through intestinal tissue and the impact of each sequestrant on the mycotoxin bioavailability of ³H-labelled ZEA. YCW was a more efficient ZEA adsorbent than HSCAS in all three models, except under very acidic conditions (pH 2.5 or 3.0). The Ussing chamber model offered a novel, ex vivo, alternative method for understanding the effect of sequestrant on the bioavailability of ZEA. The results showed that compared with HSCAS, YCW was more efficient in sequestering ZEA and that it reduced the accumulation of ZEA in the intestinal tissue by 40% (p < 0.001).

  18. Ab Initio Studies of Calcium Carbonate Hydration.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Berganza, Josue A; Diao, Yijue; Pamidighantam, Sudhakar; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2015-11-25

    Ab initio simulations of large hydrated calcium carbonate clusters are challenging due to the existence of multiple local energy minima. Extensive conformational searches around hydrated calcium carbonate clusters (CaCO3·nH2O for n = 1-18) were performed to find low-energy hydration structures using an efficient combination of Monte Carlo searches, density-functional tight binding (DFTB+) method, and density-functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP level, or Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2 level. This multilevel optimization yields several low-energy structures for hydrated calcium carbonate. Structural and energetics analysis of the hydration of these clusters revealed a first hydration shell composed of 12 water molecules. Bond-length and charge densities were also determined for different cluster sizes. The solvation of calcium carbonate in bulk water was investigated by placing the explicitly solvated CaCO3·nH2O clusters in a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The findings of this study provide new insights into the energetics and structure of hydrated calcium carbonate and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms where calcium carbonate formation or dissolution is of relevance.

  19. Efficiency of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate to ameliorate the adverse effects of graded levels of aflatoxin B1 in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Horn, N; Applegate, T J

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS) adsorbent to ameliorate the adverse effects of 0.5 to 2 mg of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)/kg in broiler chicks. The study consisted of 8 dietary treatments, including 4 concentrations of AFB1 (0, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/kg) with or without HSCAS (0.5%) fed to 8 replicate cages per diet (6 males chicks per cage) from 0 to 21 d of age. Cumulative feed intake, BW gain (P < 0.0001), and G:F (P = 0.004) of birds fed the 2 mg of AFB1/kg of diet were significantly lower in comparison with birds fed 0 to 1 mg of AFB1/kg. Relative liver weight was increased in the 2 mg of AFB1/kg group (P < 0.0001). Dietary HSCAS improved cumulative BW gain (main effect P = 0.06), particularly from 14 to 21 d of age (P = 0.037). Dietary HSCAS also reversed the increase in relative liver weight for birds fed AFB1 (P = 0.019). Dietary AFB1 negatively affected major serum parameters (albumin, total protein, globulin, phosphorus, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, and creatine phosphokinase), whereas supplementation with HSCAS partially alleviated the affected serum biochemistry. In addition, serum complement activity and liver gene expression were negatively affected by 2 mg of AFB1/kg. The HSCAS supplement increased the liver expression of catalase and superoxide dismutase (P < 0.05). Results from this study indicate that dietary supplementation with HSCAS can effectively improve BW gain and partially ameliorate aflatoxicosis for broiler chicks fed AFB1-contaminated feeds.

  20. Hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cements - Experimental findings and thermodynamic modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Winnefeld, Frank; Lothenbach, Barbara

    2010-08-15

    Calcium sulfoaluminate cements (CSA) are a promising low-CO{sub 2} alternative to ordinary Portland cements and are as well of interest concerning their use as binder for waste encapsulation. In this study, the hydration of two CSA cements has been investigated experimentally and by thermodynamic modelling between 1 h and 28 days at w/c ratios of 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. The main hydration product of CSA is ettringite, which precipitates together with amorphous Al(OH){sub 3} until the calcium sulfate is consumed after around 1-2 days of hydration. Afterwards, monosulfate is formed. In the presence of belite, straetlingite occurs as an additional hydration product. The pore solution analysis reveals that straetlingite can bind a part of the potassium ions, which are released by the clinker minerals. The microstructure of both cements is quite dense even after 16 h of hydration, with not much pore space available at a sample age of 28 days. The pore solution of both cements is dominated during the first hours of hydration by potassium, sodium, calcium, aluminium and sulfate; the pH is around 10-11. When the calcium sulfate is depleted, the sulfate concentration drops by a factor of 10. This increases pH to around 12.5-12.8. Based on the experimental data, a thermodynamic hydration model for CSA cements based on cement composition, hydration kinetics of clinker phases and calculations of thermodynamic equilibria by geochemical speciation has been established. The modelled phase development with ongoing hydration agrees well with the experimental findings.

  1. Calcium silicate hydrates: Solid and liquid phase composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Nonat, André

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents a review on the relationship between the composition, the structure and the solution in which calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) is equilibrated. The silica chain length in C–S–H increases with the silicon concentration and the calcium content in the interlayer space with the calcium concentrations. Sodium and potassium are taken up in the interlayer space, preferentially at low calcium concentrations and thus by low Ca/Si C–S–H. Aluminium uptake in C–S–H increases strongly at higher aluminium concentrations in the solution. At low Ca/Si, aluminium substitutes silica in the bridging position, at Ca/Si > 1 aluminium is bound in TAH. Recently developed thermodynamic models are closely related to the structure of C–S–H and tobermorite, and able to model not only the solubility and the chemical composition of the C–S–H, but also to predict the mean silica chain length and the uptake of aluminium.

  2. The interaction of calcium nitrate and a Class C fly ash during hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.; Daugherty, K.

    1996-07-01

    Different analytical techniques were used to study the hydration of a Class C fly ash in the presence of various concentrations of calcium nitrate. Calcium nitrate was found to accelerate the hydration of calcium aluminate phases in relationship to dosage. Hydration mechanisms were modified resulting in altered products. The new products consisted of calcium aluminate hydrate and nitrate. Evidence suggested that the modified nitrate-hydrates competed with or inhibited the formation of calcium aluminate sulfates hydrates.

  3. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  4. Formation and Transformation Behavior of Sodium Dehydroacetate Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Xie, Chuang; Huang, Yaohui; Hou, Baohong; Bao, Ying; Gong, Junbo; Yin, Qiuxiang; Rohani, Sohrab

    2016-01-01

    The effect of various controlling factors on the polymorphic outcome of sodium dehydroacetate crystallization was investigated in this study. Cooling crystallization experiments of sodium dehydroacetate in water were conducted at different concentrations. The results revealed that the rate of supersaturation generation played a key role in the formation of the hydrates. At a high supersaturation generation rate, a new sodium dehydroacetate dihydrate needle form was obtained; on the contrary, a sodium dehydroacetate plate monohydrate was formed at a low supersaturation generation rate. Furthermore, the characterization and transformation behavior of these two hydrated forms were investigated with the combined use of microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS). It was found that the new needle crystals were dihydrated and hollow, and they eventually transformed into sodium dehydroacetate monohydrate. In addition, the mechanism of formation of sodium dehydroacetate hydrates was discussed, and a process growth model of hollow crystals in cooling crystallization was proposed. PMID:27058518

  5. Incorporation of calcium salts into xanthan gum matrices: hydration, erosion and drug release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Groves, Emma; Chaw, Cheng Shu

    2015-01-01

    Xanthan gum (XG), a hydrophilic biopolymer with modified release properties, was used to produce directly compressed matrix tablets containing a model drug, sodium p-aminosalicylate. Three formulations were prepared, each containing a different calcium dihydrate salt: calcium chloride, calcium sulfate or dibasic calcium phosphate. The aim of the investigation was to relate the calcium ion content and solubility of the calcium salt to the in vitro drug release profile of the xanthan matrices. Tablet hydration, erosion and drug release were determined in distilled water using the British Pharmacopoeia (BP) paddle method. The data showed that the overall drug release was the greatest with addition of calcium sulfate, followed by calcium chloride and dibasic calcium phosphate. The chloride salt formulation displayed the greatest percentage erosion due to rapid mass loss during the initial phase, followed by those with sulfate or phosphate salts. As xanthan gel viscosity increased and drug release was also found to be lower, it can be concluded that drug release is influenced by the solubility of the salt present in the formulation, since these parameters determine the viscosity and structure of the gel layer. PMID:25371230

  6. FT-IR Study On The Hydration Of Calcium Bilirubinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hai; Soloway, Roger D.; Yang, Zhanlan; Ding, Xiao-Chun; Xu, Duan-Fu; Wu, Jin-Guang

    1989-12-01

    Comparison of the dessicated and hydrated forms of the neutral salt of calcium bilirubinate indicated that water alters both the C-E1 skeleton and the polar groups of the molecule, suggesting that water may considerably alters the conformation and, therefore, the properties of calcium bilirubinate. The small degree of swelling indicates that some cross-linking is present in this ionic polymer but that it is much less than in whole pigment gallstones, suggesting that other molecules, possibly glycoproteins, provide much of the cross-linking.

  7. The role of calcium ions and lignosulphonate plasticiser in the hydration of cement

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, L.H.; Knight, J.C.; Maharaj, R

    2005-04-01

    Experiments involving equilibrium dialysis, conductivity, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) have been carried out to investigate the role of calcium ions and polymeric plasticisers in cement/admixture hydration. Results from a study of lignosulphonic acid, sodium salt, acetate as a plasticiser shows that a plasticiser has dual role; one mainly as a kinetic inhibitor (poison) in cement hydration mechanism and the other as a dispersant. Evidence of a weak Ca{sup 2+} binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic moieties was found at low ionic strengths of 0.1 M using ITC. No evidence of formal Ca{sup 2+} binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic acid moieties was found using equilibrium dialysis at higher ionic strength of 1 M (ionic strengths of 0.4 M are typically found in Portland cement pore solution), as is often suggested in cement/admixture literature.

  8. Calcium and sodium bentonite for hydraulic containment applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, M.H.; Daniel, D.E.; Eykholt, G.R.

    1997-05-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of calcium and sodium bentonites was investigated for sand-bentonite mixtures, a thin bentonite layer simulating a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), and bentonite-cement mixtures simulating backfill for a vertical cutoff wall. The permeant liquids were tap water and distilled water containing 0.25 M calcium chloride. In general, the hydraulic performance of calcium bentonite was not significantly better than the performance of sodium bentonite for either the clay-amended sand or the GCL application, and was substantially worse than the performance of sodium bentonite in the bentonite-cement mixture. A drained angle of internal friction of 21{degree} was measured for calcium bentonite, compared to 10{degree} for sodium bentonite. Except for a larger drained shear strength, no advantage of calcium bentonite over sodium bentonite could be identified from the results of this study.

  9. Uptake of chloride and carbonate ions by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, Adel; Cau-dit-Coumes, Celine; Frizon, Fabien

    2012-08-15

    Decommissioning of old nuclear reactors may produce waste streams containing chlorides and carbonates, including radioactive {sup 36}Cl{sup -} and {sup 14}CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. Their insolubilization by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate was investigated. Carbonates were readily depleted from the solution, giving at thermodynamic equilibrium monocarboaluminate, monocarboaluminate + calcite, or calcite only, depending on the initial ratio between the anion and calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate. Chloride ions reacted more slowly and were precipitated as Kuzel's salt, Kuzel's and Friedel's salts, or Friedel's salt only. Rietveld refinement of X-Ray powder diffraction patterns was successfully used to quantify the phase distributions, which were compared to thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, analysing the lattice parameters of Kuzel's salt as a function of its chloride content showed the occurrence of a restricted solid solution towards the sulfate side with general formula 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}xCaCl{sub 2}{center_dot}(1 - x)CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}(12 - 2x){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (0.36 {<=} x {<=} 0.50).

  10. Modulating the hydration behaviour of calcium chloride by lactam complexation.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Andrea; Musa, Osama M; Steed, Jonathan W

    2016-07-26

    Complexation of calcium chloride with bis(lactam) ligand L1 allows the formation of both an unstable anhydrous complex, an aqua complex {[Ca2(μ-L1)2(H2O)9]Cl4]}n (1) and a related hydrate incorporating additional lattice water of crystallization {[Ca(μ-L1)(H2O)5]Cl2·H2O}n (2). Related mono(lactam) L2 does not form aqua complexes but the anhydrous complex {[CaCl2(μ-L2)2]}n (3), is highly deliquescent. An unusual ethanol solvate is also reported {[CaCl2(L2)(EtOH)]}n (4).

  11. Modulating the hydration behaviour of calcium chloride by lactam complexation.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Andrea; Musa, Osama M; Steed, Jonathan W

    2016-07-26

    Complexation of calcium chloride with bis(lactam) ligand L1 allows the formation of both an unstable anhydrous complex, an aqua complex {[Ca2(μ-L1)2(H2O)9]Cl4]}n (1) and a related hydrate incorporating additional lattice water of crystallization {[Ca(μ-L1)(H2O)5]Cl2·H2O}n (2). Related mono(lactam) L2 does not form aqua complexes but the anhydrous complex {[CaCl2(μ-L2)2]}n (3), is highly deliquescent. An unusual ethanol solvate is also reported {[CaCl2(L2)(EtOH)]}n (4). PMID:27411017

  12. Interactions in Calcium Oxalate Hydrate/Surfactant Systems.

    PubMed

    Sikiric; Filipovic-Vincekovic; Babic-Ivancić Vdović Füredi-Milhofer

    1999-04-15

    Phase transformation of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) into the thermodynamically stable monohydrate (COM) in anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) and cationic (dodecylammonium chloride) surfactant solutions has been studied. Both surfactants inhibit, but do not stop transformation from COD to COM due to their preferential adsorption at different crystal faces. SDS acts as a stronger transformation inhibitor. The general shape of adsorption isotherms of both surfactants at the solid/liquid interface is of two-plateau-type, but differences in the adsorption behavior exist. They originate from different ionic and molecular structures of crystal surfaces and interactions between surfactant headgroups and solid surface. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs... maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive is a...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs... maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive is a...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs... maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive is a...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs... maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive is a...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3490 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. 872.3490 Section 872.3490 Food and Drugs... maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and/or polyvinylmethylether maleic acid calcium-sodium double salt denture adhesive is a...

  18. Hydration patterns and salting effects in sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Mu, Yuguang

    2011-10-01

    The salting effects of 2M sodium chloride electrolyte are studied based on a series of model solutes with properties ranging from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Generally, hydrophobic solutes will be salted out and hydrophilic solutes will be salted in by NaCl solution. The solvation free energy changes are highly correlated with Kirkwood-Buff integrals. The underlying mechanism resorts to the preferential binding of ions and water to solutes. Our results demonstrate that the salting effect not only depends on the salt's position in Hofmeister series, but also on the solutes' specifics. Taking the hydration free energies of solutes and ions as independent variables, a schematic diagram of salting effects is suggested. The resolved multifaceted salting effects rely on the sensitive balance of the tripartite interaction among solutes, ions, and water.

  19. Mechanical behavior of a composite interface: Calcium-silicate-hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palkovic, Steven D.; Moeini, Sina; Yip, Sidney; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2015-07-01

    The generalized stacking fault (GSF) is a conceptual procedure historically used to assess shear behavior of defect-free crystalline structures through molecular dynamics or density functional theory simulations. We apply the GSF technique to the spatially and chemically complex quasi-layered structure of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the fundamental nanoscale binder within cementitious materials. A failure plane is enforced to calculate the shear traction-displacement response along a composite interface containing highly confined water molecules, hydroxyl groups, and calcium ions. GSF simulations are compared with affine (homogeneous) shear simulations, which allow strain to localize naturally in response to the local atomic environment. Comparison of strength and deformation behavior for the two loading methods shows the composite interface controls bulk shear deformation. Both models indicate the maximum shear strength of C-S-H exhibits a normal-stress dependency typical of cohesive-frictional materials. These findings suggest the applicability of GSF techniques to inhomogeneous structures and bonding environments, including other layered systems such as biological materials containing organic and inorganic interfaces.

  20. Mechanical behavior of a composite interface: Calcium-silicate-hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Palkovic, Steven D.; Moeini, Sina; Büyüköztürk, Oral; Yip, Sidney

    2015-07-21

    The generalized stacking fault (GSF) is a conceptual procedure historically used to assess shear behavior of defect-free crystalline structures through molecular dynamics or density functional theory simulations. We apply the GSF technique to the spatially and chemically complex quasi-layered structure of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the fundamental nanoscale binder within cementitious materials. A failure plane is enforced to calculate the shear traction-displacement response along a composite interface containing highly confined water molecules, hydroxyl groups, and calcium ions. GSF simulations are compared with affine (homogeneous) shear simulations, which allow strain to localize naturally in response to the local atomic environment. Comparison of strength and deformation behavior for the two loading methods shows the composite interface controls bulk shear deformation. Both models indicate the maximum shear strength of C-S-H exhibits a normal-stress dependency typical of cohesive-frictional materials. These findings suggest the applicability of GSF techniques to inhomogeneous structures and bonding environments, including other layered systems such as biological materials containing organic and inorganic interfaces.

  1. Urinary calcium, sodium, and bone mass of young females.

    PubMed

    Matkovic, V; Ilich, J Z; Andon, M B; Hsieh, L C; Tzagournis, M A; Lagger, B J; Goel, P K

    1995-08-01

    Calcium is an important determinant of peak bone mass in young adults because of its influence on skeletal development during growth. Attainment of maximum peak bone mass requires optimal positive balance between calcium intake and obligatory losses of calcium, primarily in urine and feces. Urinary excretion is an important determinant of calcium retention in the body. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of various nutrients on urinary calcium excretion, and to assess their impact on bone mass of young females, aged 8-13 y, during early puberty. The study was conducted in 381 healthy white females in pubertal stage 2. From each participant we collected basic anthropometric measurements, a 3-d food record, blood, a 24-h urine sample, and bone mass measurements of the total body and forearm by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Urinary sodium was found to be one of the most important determinants of urinary calcium excretion: [urinary calcium (mmol/d) = 0.01154 x urinary sodium (mmol/d) + 0.823], whereas calcium intake had relatively little impact: [urinary calcium (mmol/d) = 0.02252 x calcium intake (mmol/d) + 1.5261]. Urinary calcium was much higher at a calcium intake of approximately 37.5 mmol/d (1500 mg/d), supporting the notion that calcium is a threshold nutrient. Calcium intake had a significant positive influence on the bone mineral content and density of the whole body and radius shaft whereas urinary calcium had a negative influence, presumably by reducing calcium accretion into the skeleton.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Process for making a calcium/sodium ferrate adduct by the electrochemical formation of sodium ferrate

    SciTech Connect

    Deininger, J.P.; Dotson, R.L.

    1984-05-29

    Described is a process for making a calcium/sodium ferrate adduct with sodium ferrate in a divided-type electrolysis cell. The anolyte chamber of the cell is charged with an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide and a sodium ferrate-stabilizing proportion of at least one sodium halide salt. The anolyte chamber additionally contains ferric ions (Fe(III)). The catholyte chamber contains an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution during operation. The source of ferric ion in the anolyte may be either an iron-containing anode or at least one iron-containing compound present in the anolyte solution or both. The preferred material separating the anolyte chamber from the catholyte chamber is comprised of a gas- and hydraulic-impermeable, ionically-conductive, chemically-stable ionomeric film (e.g., a cation-exchange membrane with carboxylic, sulfonic or other inorganic exchange sites). Sodium ferrate is prepared in the anolyte chamber by passing an electric current and impressing a voltage between the anode and cathode of the cell. During electrolysis, sodium ferrate forms in the aqueous sodium hydroxide anolyte. This anolyte is reacted with a calcium compound to produce a calcium/sodium ferrate adduct. Alternatively the sodium ferrate may be first recovered in a solid form and then reacted with a calcium compound to produce said adduct.

  3. Aqueous solutions of calcium ions: hydration numbers and the effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Zavitsas, Andreas A

    2005-11-01

    Hydration numbers of calcium ions are determined from extensive measurements of colligative properties of water solutions of calcium salts. The hydration numbers reported refer to the average number of water molecules that are bound sufficiently strongly to calcium ions so as to be removed from the solvent and become part of the solute. Contrary to common descriptions of deviations from ideal behavior for concentrated solutions, ideal behavior is demonstrated when mole fractions are calculated by taking account of such bound water. Measurements over wide concentration and temperature ranges are used to obtain the effect of temperature on the average hydration number of Ca(2+). Freezing point depression measurements yield a hydration number of 12.0 +/- 0.8. Boiling point elevations yield 6.7 +/- 0.6. Consistent with this, vapor pressure measurements from 0 to 200 degrees C show a gradual decrease in hydration number with increasing temperature, with a value of 5.0 at 200 degrees C.

  4. Energetics of sodium-calcium exchanged zeolite A.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Wu, D; Guo, X; Shen, B; Navrotsky, A

    2015-05-01

    A series of calcium-exchanged zeolite A samples with different degrees of exchange were prepared. They were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). High temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry measured the formation enthalpies of hydrated zeolites CaNa-A from constituent oxides. The water content is a linear function of the degree of exchange, ranging from 20.54% for Na-A to 23.77% for 97.9% CaNa-A. The enthalpies of formation (from oxides) at 25 °C are -74.50 ± 1.21 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite Na-A and -30.79 ± 1.64 kJ mol(-1) TO2 for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Dehydration enthalpies obtained from differential scanning calorimetry are 32.0 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite Na-A and 20.5 kJ mol(-1) H2O for hydrated zeolite 97.9% CaNa-A. Enthalpies of formation of Ca-exchanged zeolites A are less exothermic than for zeolite Na-A. A linear relationship between the formation enthalpy and the extent of calcium substitution was observed. The energetic effect of Ca-exchange on zeolite A is discussed with an emphasis on the complex interactions between the zeolite framework, cations, and water.

  5. Pressure induced reactions amongst calcium aluminate hydrate phases

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Ju-hyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2011-06-15

    The compressibilities of two AFm phases (straetlingite and calcium hemicarboaluminate hydrate) and hydrogarnet were obtained up to 5 GPa by using synchrotron high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction with a diamond anvil cell. The AFm phases show abrupt volume contraction regardless of the molecular size of the pressure-transmitting media. This volume discontinuity could be associated to a structural transition or to the movement of the weakly bound interlayer water molecules in the AFm structure. The experimental results seem to indicate that the pressure-induced dehydration is the dominant mechanism especially with hygroscopic pressure medium. The Birch-Murnaghan equation of state was used to compute the bulk modulus of the minerals. Due to the discontinuity in the pressure-volume diagram, a two stage bulk modulus of each AFm phase was calculated. The abnormal volume compressibility for the AFm phases caused a significant change to their bulk modulus. The reliability of this experiment is verified by comparing the bulk modulus of hydrogarnet with previous studies.

  6. Distribution of Water in Synthetic Calcium Silicate Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Roosz, C; Gaboreau, S; Grangeon, S; Prêt, D; Montouillout, V; Maubec, N; Ory, S; Blanc, P; Vieillard, P; Henocq, P

    2016-07-12

    Understanding calcium silicate hydrates (CSHs) is of paramount importance for understanding the behavior of cement materials because they control most of the properties of these man-made materials. The atomic scale water content and structure have a major influence on their properties, as is analogous with clay minerals, and we should assess these. Here, we used a multiple analytical approach to quantify water distribution in CSH samples and to determine the relative proportions of water sorbed on external and internal (interlayer) surfaces. Water vapor isotherms were used to explain the water distribution in the CSH microstructure. As with many layered compounds, CSHs have external and internal (interlayer) surfaces displaying multilayer adsorption of water molecules on external surfaces owing to the hydrophilic surfaces. Interlayer water was also quantified from water vapor isotherm, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravimetric analyses (TGA) data, displaying nonreversible swelling/shrinkage behavior in response to drying/rewetting cycles. From this quantification and balance of water distribution, we were able to explain most of the widely dispersed data already published according to the various relative humidity (RH) conditions and measurement techniques. Stoichiometric formulas were proposed for the different CSH samples analyzed (0.6 < Ca/Si < 1.6), considering the interlayer water contribution. PMID:27281114

  7. [Sodium and calcium cation transport of erythrocytes in essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Z M; Song, K Q; Liu, G Y

    1989-08-01

    The sodium and calcium transport of erythrocyte and the influencing factors were studied in essential hypertensive (EH) subjects. The result showed that plasma endogenous digitalis-like compound (EDLC) increased and sodium pump depressed in some EH patients, but there were no parallel correlation between EDLC and sodium pump. The patients with normal sodium pump mainly showed their maximal Ca2+ pump activity and decreased calmodulin (CaM) content of erythrocyte. Thus there may be different types of ion transport defect in EH, and the abnormalities of these cation transports have an important role in the pathogenesis of EH. PMID:2560705

  8. Identification of the hydrate gel phases present in phosphate-modified calcium aluminate binders

    SciTech Connect

    Chavda, Mehul A.; Bernal, Susan A.; Apperley, David C.; Kinoshita, Hajime; Provis, John L.

    2015-04-15

    The conversion of hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates to cubic phases in hydrated calcium aluminate cements (CAC) can involve undesirable porosity changes and loss of strength. Modification of CAC by phosphate addition avoids conversion, by altering the nature of the reaction products, yielding a stable amorphous gel instead of the usual crystalline hydrate products. Here, details of the environments of aluminium and phosphorus in this gel were elucidated using solid-state NMR and complementary techniques. Aluminium is identified in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination states, and phosphorus is present in hydrous environments with varying, but mostly low, degrees of crosslinking. A {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) experiment showed the existence of aluminium–phosphorus interactions, confirming the formation of a hydrated calcium aluminophosphate gel as a key component of the binding phase. This resolves previous disagreements in the literature regarding the nature of the disordered products forming in this system.

  9. Intrinsic differences in atomic ordering of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrates in conventional and alkali-activated cements

    SciTech Connect

    White, Claire E.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika; Page, Katharine

    2015-01-15

    The atomic structures of calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) and calcium (–sodium) aluminosilicate hydrate (C–(N)–A–S–H) gels, and their presence in conventional and blended cement systems, have been the topic of significant debate over recent decades. Previous investigations have revealed that synthetic C–S–H gel is nanocrystalline and due to the chemical similarities between ordinary Portland cement (OPC)-based systems and low-CO{sub 2} alkali-activated slags, researchers have inferred that the atomic ordering in alkali-activated slag is the same as in OPC–slag cements. Here, X-ray total scattering is used to determine the local bonding environment and nanostructure of C(–A)–S–H gels present in hydrated tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S), blended C{sub 3}S–slag and alkali-activated slag, revealing the large intrinsic differences in the extent of nanoscale ordering between C–S–H derived from C{sub 3}S and alkali-activated slag systems, which may have a significant influence on thermodynamic stability, and material properties at higher length scales, including long term durability of alkali-activated cements.

  10. Simultaneous Sodium and Calcium Imaging from Dendrites and Axons

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dynamic calcium imaging is a major technique of neuroscientists. It can reveal information about the location of various calcium channels and calcium permeable receptors, the time course, magnitude, and location of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) changes, and indirectly, the occurrence of action potentials. Dynamic sodium imaging, a less exploited technique, can reveal analogous information related to sodium signaling. In some cases, like the examination of AMPA and NMDA receptor signaling, measurements of both [Ca2+]i and [Na+]i changes in the same preparation may provide more information than separate measurements. To this end, we developed a technique to simultaneously measure both signals at high speed and sufficient sensitivity to detect localized physiologic events. This approach has advantages over sequential imaging because the preparation may not respond identically in different trials. We designed custom dichroic and emission filters to allow the separate detection of the fluorescence of sodium and calcium indicators loaded together into a single neuron in a brain slice from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats. We then used high-intensity light emitting diodes (LEDs) to alternately excite the two indicators at the appropriate wavelengths. These pulses were synchronized with the frames of a CCD camera running at 500 Hz. Software then separated the data streams to provide independent sodium and calcium signals. With this system we could detect [Ca2+]i and [Na+]i changes from single action potentials in axons and synaptically evoked signals in dendrites, both with submicron resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). PMID:26730401

  11. Simultaneous Sodium and Calcium Imaging from Dendrites and Axons.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kenichi; Ross, William N

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic calcium imaging is a major technique of neuroscientists. It can reveal information about the location of various calcium channels and calcium permeable receptors, the time course, magnitude, and location of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) changes, and indirectly, the occurrence of action potentials. Dynamic sodium imaging, a less exploited technique, can reveal analogous information related to sodium signaling. In some cases, like the examination of AMPA and NMDA receptor signaling, measurements of both [Ca(2+)]i and [Na(+)]i changes in the same preparation may provide more information than separate measurements. To this end, we developed a technique to simultaneously measure both signals at high speed and sufficient sensitivity to detect localized physiologic events. This approach has advantages over sequential imaging because the preparation may not respond identically in different trials. We designed custom dichroic and emission filters to allow the separate detection of the fluorescence of sodium and calcium indicators loaded together into a single neuron in a brain slice from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats. We then used high-intensity light emitting diodes (LEDs) to alternately excite the two indicators at the appropriate wavelengths. These pulses were synchronized with the frames of a CCD camera running at 500 Hz. Software then separated the data streams to provide independent sodium and calcium signals. With this system we could detect [Ca(2+)]i and [Na(+)]i changes from single action potentials in axons and synaptically evoked signals in dendrites, both with submicron resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio (S/N).

  12. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Zhao, Yazhao; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-04-01

    Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al2O3 from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C-A-S-H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH)2 with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl2Si2O8·4H2O and Na2Al2Si2O8·H2O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C-A-S-H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities.

  13. Synthesis and single crystal structure refinement of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kalo, Hussein; Milius, Wolfgang; Braeu, Michael; Breu, Josef

    2013-02-15

    A sodium brittle mica with the ideal composition [Na{sub 4}]{sup inter}[Mg{sub 6}]{sup oct}[Si{sub 4}Al{sub 4}]{sup tet}O{sub 20}F{sub 4} was synthesized via melt synthesis in a gas tight crucible. This mica is unusual inasmuch as the known mica structure holds only room for two interlayer cations per unit cell and inasmuch as it readily hydrates despite the high layer charge while ordinary micas and brittle micas are non-swelling. The crystal structure of one-layer hydrate sodium brittle mica was determined and refined from single crystal X-ray data. Interlayer cations reside at the center of the distorted hexagonal cavities and are coordinated by the three inner basal oxygen atoms. The coordination of the interlayer cation is completed by three interlayer water molecules residing at the center of the interlayer region. The relative position of adjacent 2:1-layers thus is fixed by these octahedrally coordinated interlayer cations. Pseudo-symmetry leads to extensive twinning. In total five twin operations generate the same environment for the interlayer species and are energetically degenerate. - Graphical abstract: The sodium brittle mica has been successfully synthesized by melt synthesis and the crystal structure of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melt synthesis yielded coarse grained sodium brittle mica which showed little disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium brittle mica hydrated completely to the state of one-layer hydrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica could therefore be determined and refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrangement of upper and lower tetrahedral sheet encompassing interlayer cation were clarified.

  14. Mass density and water content of saturated never-dried calcium silicate hydrates.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Julio C; Trtik, Pavel; Diaz, Ana; Holler, Mirko; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Raabe, Jörg; Bunk, Oliver; Menzel, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) are the most abundant hydration products in ordinary Portland cement paste. Yet, despite the critical role they play in determining mechanical and transport properties, there is still a debate about their density and exact composition. Here, the site-specific mass density and composition of C-S-H in hydrated cement paste are determined with nanoscale resolution in a nondestructive approach. We used ptychographic X-ray computed tomography in order to determine spatially resolved mass density and water content of the C-S-H within the microstructure of the cement paste. Our findings indicate that the C-S-H at the border of hydrated alite particles possibly have a higher density than the apparent inner-product C-S-H, which is contrary to the common expectations from previous works on hydrated cement paste.

  15. Accelerated growth of calcium silicate hydrates: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoleau, Luc

    2011-12-15

    Despite the usefulness of isothermal calorimetry in cement analytics, without any further computations this brings only little information on the nucleation and growth of hydrates. A model originally developed by Garrault et al. is used in this study in order to simulate hydration curves of cement obtained by calorimetry with different known hardening accelerators. The limited basis set of parameters used in this model, having a physical or chemical significance, is valuable for a better understanding of mechanisms underlying in the acceleration of C-S-H precipitation. Alite hydration in presence of four different types of hardening accelerators was investigated. It is evidenced that each accelerator type plays a specific role on one or several growth parameters and that the model may support the development of new accelerators. Those simulations supported by experimental observations enable us to follow the formation of the C-S-H layer around grains and to extract interesting information on its apparent permeability.

  16. Stimulation of calcium-sodium exchange in dog red blood cells by hemolysis and resealing.

    PubMed

    Parker, J C

    1988-09-01

    Osmotic hemolysis and resealing greatly increase calcium influx in dog red blood cells. The resealed ghosts show a saturable calcium entry pathway with complex kinetics. As expected for a calcium-sodium exchanger, calcium uptake is stimulated by internal sodium and inhibited by external sodium. Compared to fresh, intact red cells the resealed ghost calcium-sodium exchanger is less responsive to quinidine and to alterations in medium tonicity. The differences in calcium uptake rate among cells from different donors are minimized in the ghost preparation. There are several ways to stimulate sodium-dependent calcium movements in these cells, of which hemolysis-resealing is the most potent. The results of these and previous studies suggest that dog red blood cells have a latent capacity for calcium-sodium exchange. PMID:3415988

  17. Aqueous solutions of calcium ions: hydration numbers and the effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Zavitsas, Andreas A

    2005-11-01

    Hydration numbers of calcium ions are determined from extensive measurements of colligative properties of water solutions of calcium salts. The hydration numbers reported refer to the average number of water molecules that are bound sufficiently strongly to calcium ions so as to be removed from the solvent and become part of the solute. Contrary to common descriptions of deviations from ideal behavior for concentrated solutions, ideal behavior is demonstrated when mole fractions are calculated by taking account of such bound water. Measurements over wide concentration and temperature ranges are used to obtain the effect of temperature on the average hydration number of Ca(2+). Freezing point depression measurements yield a hydration number of 12.0 +/- 0.8. Boiling point elevations yield 6.7 +/- 0.6. Consistent with this, vapor pressure measurements from 0 to 200 degrees C show a gradual decrease in hydration number with increasing temperature, with a value of 5.0 at 200 degrees C. PMID:16853671

  18. Crystal chemistry and structure refinement of five hydrated calcium borates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.; Appleman, D.E.; Christ, C.L.

    1964-01-01

    The crystal structures of the five known members of the series Ca2B6O11??xH2O (x = 1, 5, 5, 7, 9, and 13) have been refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques, yielding bond distances and angles with standard errors of less than 0??01 A?? and 0??5??, respectively. The results illustrate the crystal chemical principles that govern the structures of hydrated borate compounds. The importance of hydrogen bonding in the ferroelectric transition of colemanite is confirmed by more accurate proton assignments. ?? 1964.

  19. Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Freidin, C.

    1998-06-01

    The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

  20. How Sodium Chloride Salt Inhibits the Formation of CO2 Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Holzammer, Christine; Finckenstein, Agnes; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas S

    2016-03-10

    We present an experimental Raman study on how the addition of sodium chloride to CO2-hydrate-forming systems inhibits the hydrate formation thermodynamically. For this purpose, the molar enthalpy of reaction and the molar entropy of reaction for the reaction of weakly hydrogen-bonded water molecules to strongly hydrogen bonded water molecules are determined for different salinities from the Raman spectrum of the water-stretching vibration. Simultaneously, the influence of the salinity on the solubility of CO2 in the liquid water-rich phase right before the start of hydrate formation is analyzed. The results demonstrate that various mechanisms contribute to the inhibition of gas hydrate formation. For the highest salt concentration of 20 wt % investigated, the temperature of gas hydrate formation is lowered by 12 K. For this concentration the molar enthalpy and entropy of reaction become smaller by 50 and 20%, respectively. Concurrently, the solubility of carbon dioxide is reduced by 70%. These results are compared with data in literature for systems of sodium chloride in water (without carbon dioxide). PMID:26867107

  1. How Sodium Chloride Salt Inhibits the Formation of CO2 Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Holzammer, Christine; Finckenstein, Agnes; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas S

    2016-03-10

    We present an experimental Raman study on how the addition of sodium chloride to CO2-hydrate-forming systems inhibits the hydrate formation thermodynamically. For this purpose, the molar enthalpy of reaction and the molar entropy of reaction for the reaction of weakly hydrogen-bonded water molecules to strongly hydrogen bonded water molecules are determined for different salinities from the Raman spectrum of the water-stretching vibration. Simultaneously, the influence of the salinity on the solubility of CO2 in the liquid water-rich phase right before the start of hydrate formation is analyzed. The results demonstrate that various mechanisms contribute to the inhibition of gas hydrate formation. For the highest salt concentration of 20 wt % investigated, the temperature of gas hydrate formation is lowered by 12 K. For this concentration the molar enthalpy and entropy of reaction become smaller by 50 and 20%, respectively. Concurrently, the solubility of carbon dioxide is reduced by 70%. These results are compared with data in literature for systems of sodium chloride in water (without carbon dioxide).

  2. Santaclaraite, a new calcium-manganese silicate hydrate from California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erd, Richard C.; Ohashi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Santaclaraite, ideally CaMn4(Si5O14(OH))(OH).H2O, occurs as pink and tan veins and masses in Franciscan chert in the Diablo Range, Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties, California. It is associated with four unidentified Mn silicates, Mn-howieite, quartz, braunite, calcite, rhodochrosite, kutnahorite, baryte, harmotome, chalcopyrite and native copper. Santaclaraite is triclinic, space group B1, a 15.633(1), b 7.603(1) , c 12.003(1) A, alpha 109.71(1)o, beta 88.61(1)o, gamma 99.95(1) o, V 1322.0(3) A3; Z = 4. The strongest lines of the X-ray pattern are 7.04(100), 3.003(84), 3.152(80), 7.69(63), 3.847(57) A. Crystals are lamellar to prismatic (flattened on (100)), with good cleavage on (100) and (010); H. 61/2 Dcalc. 3.398 g/cm3, Dmeas. 3.31 (+ or -0.01); optically biaxial negative, alpha 1.681, beta 1.696, gamma 1.708 (all + or - 0.002), 2Valpha 83 (+ or -1)o. Although chemically a hydrated rhodonite, santaclaraite dehydrates to Mn-bustamite at approx 550oC (in air) . Santaclaraite is a five-tetrahedral-repeat single-chain silicate and has structural affinities with rhodonite, nambulite, marsturite, babingtonite and inesite.-J.A.Z.

  3. Crystal phase of fibrous calcium phosphates prepared with sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, J; Ban, S; Arimoto, N; Kato, N; Kimura, Y; Hasegawa, J

    1995-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of preparation conditions on the crystal phase of the fired fiber prepared with sodium alginate. Hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, hereafter referred to as HA, was only formed in fiber fired at 900 degrees C under proper conditions. There was no significant difference in the crystal phase of the fired fibers prepared using different sodium alginate concentrations and syringe nozzle diameter, although fiber diameters were enlarged with increasing in either. No effects of phosphate type on the crystal phase of the fired fiber were found, but the aging time and the rinsing time had great effects. Sodium calcium phosphate, NaCaPO4, and HA were formed when the aging time was shorter than 5 min. Chlorapatite, Ca5Cl(PO4)3, and HA were formed when the rinsing time was shorter than 3 sec, and HA was formed when the rinsing time was 5 min to 1 hour, beta-TCP, beta-Ca3 (PO4)2, and HA were formed when the rinsing time exceeded 2 weeks.

  4. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium...

  5. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium...

  6. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium...

  7. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium...

  8. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium...

  9. Efficacy of calcium sodium phosphosilicate in managing dentinal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Surve, Sai M; Acharya, Anirudh B; Shetty, Ananya; Thakur, Srinath L

    2012-01-01

    A large number of home use products have been tested and used for managing dentinal hypersensitivity. This eight-week clinical trial compared the temporal efficacy of a commercially available toothpaste containing calcium sodium phosphosilicate to that of a toothpaste containing potassium nitrate. For this study, 20 subjects (age 18 - 65) were screened using a visual analog scale (VAS) for sensitivity to a cold stimulus. Baseline VAS sensitivity scores to tactile stimulus were recorded for a minimum of two teeth per patient. Dentifrices were prescribed for all patients and sensitivity scores were re-evaluated at two, four, and eight weeks. Though both groups showed significant reductions in sensitivity scores, only at eight weeks was there a marginally significant difference (p = 0.0551) in sensitivity scores between the test group and the positive control group. PMID:23032238

  10. Dynamical behaviors of structural, constrained and free water in calcium- and magnesium-silicate-hydrate gels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Le, Peisi; Fratini, Emiliano; Ito, Kanae; Wang, Zhe; Mamontov, Eugene; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2016-01-28

    We present the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of cement pastes depend strongly on their porosities. In a saturated paste, the porosity links to the free water volume after hydration. Structural water, constrained water, and free water have different dynamical behavior. Hence, it should be possible to extract information on pore system by exploiting the water dynamics. With our experiments we investigated the slow dynamics of hydration water confined in calcium- and magnesium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H and M-S-H) gels using high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. C-S-H and M-S-H are the chemical binders present in calcium rich and magnesium rich cements. Wemore » measured three M-S-H samples: pure M-S-H, M-S-H with aluminum-silicate nanotubes (ASN), and M-S-H with carboxyl group functionalized ASN (ASN-COOH). A C-S-H sample with the same water content (i.e. 0.3) is also studied for comparison. We found that structural water in the gels contributes to the elastic component of the QENS spectrum, while constrained water and free water contribute the quasi-elastic component. The quantitative analysis suggests that the three components vary for different samples and indicate the variance in the system porosity, which controls the mechanical properties of cement pastes.« less

  11. Effects of metabolic acidosis and alkalosis on sodium and calcium transport in the dog kidney.

    PubMed

    Sutton, R A; Wong, N L; Dirks, J H

    1979-05-01

    Clearance and micropuncture studies have been performed in dogs to examine the effects of acute and chronic metabolic acidosis and acute alkalosis on tubular sodium and calcium transport. Acute metabolic acidosis, induced by the infusion of hydrochloric acid, decreased proximal fluid reabsorption and increased the fractional delivery of sodium and calcium to the distal tubule, but not to the final urine. In comparison with normal dogs, dogs with chronic metabolic acidosis (induced by feeding ammonium chloride) showed an increase in proximal fluid reabsorption and a dissociation of calcium from sodium reabsorption more distally, leading to an increased delivery of calcium relative to sodium at the distal tubule and in the final urine. The infusion of sodium bicarbonate to correct chronic metabolic acidosis, both in intact and thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) dogs, reduced proximal fluid reabsorption and caused a selective enhancement of calcium reabsorption relative to sodium in the more distal nephron, resulting in a reversal of the dissociation observed in acidosis, both at the distal tubule and in the final urine. By contrastin fusion of sodium chloride in parathyroid-intact acidotic dogs did not reduce proximal fluid reabsorption or enhance tubular calcium reabsorption. In nonacidotic dogs, both intact and TPTX, infusion of sodium bicarconate to induce acute alkalosis resulted in selhese data demonstrate the presence of a component of tubular calcium reabsorption situated beyond the proximal tubule, which is inhibited by chronic (but not acute) metabolic acidosis and enhanced by metabolic alkalosis (or bicarbonate infusion) independently of parathyroid hormone. PMID:480784

  12. The coexistence of geopolymeric gel and calcium silicate hydrate at the early stage of alkaline activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, C.K.; Lukey, G.C.; Deventer, J.S.J. van . E-mail: jannie@unimelb.edu.au

    2005-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the effects of the addition of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of metakaolin (MK) based geopolymers. It was found that it is possible to have geopolymeric gel and calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel forming simultaneously within a single binder. The coexistence of these two phases is dependent on the alkalinity of the alkali activator and the MK / GGBFS mass ratio. It has been found that the formation of CSH gel together with the geopolymeric gel occurs only in a system at low alkalinity. In the presence of high concentrations of NaOH (> 7.5 M), the geopolymeric gel is the predominant phase formed with small calcium precipitates scattered within the binder. The coexistence of the two phases is not observed unless a substantial amount of a reactive calcium source is present initially. It is thought that voids and pores within the geopolymeric binder become filled with the CSH gel. This helps to bridge the gaps between the different hydrated phases and unreacted particles; thereby resulting in the observed increase in mechanical strength for these binders.

  13. Physicochemical characterization of nedocromil bivalent metal salt hydrates. 3. Nedocromil calcium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Halfen, J A; Young, V G; Padden, B E; Munson, E J; Menon, V; Grant, D J

    1997-12-01

    A crystalline pentahydrate and a crystalline 8/3 hydrate of nedocromil calcium (NC) were prepared. The relationships between these solid phases and the nature of the water interactions in their structures were studied through characterization by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Karl Fischer titrimetry (KFT), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), ambient- or variable-temperature powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy, water uptake at various relative humidities (RH), intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) and solubility measurements. The solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate of the pentahydrate in water at 25 degrees C are approximately 17% greater than the corresponding values for the 8/3 hydrate, corresponding to a greater Gibbs free energy of only 380 J.mol-1 (91 cal.mol-1) for the pentahydrate. The results of DSC, TGA, and FTIR and SSNMR spectroscopy indicate that the water of hydration is more loosely bound in the pentahydrate than in the 8/3 hydrate. On increasing the temperature in open-pan DSC and TGA, the water in the pentahydrate is released in four steps (three steps in crimped pans), whereas the water in the 8/3 hydrate is released in three steps (three steps also in crimped pans). These three stepwise dehydrations are fundamentally explained by their different water environments in the crystal structure of the 8/3 hydrate, which was determined by single-crystal XRD [crystal data: triclinic, space group P1, a = 13.2381(3) A, b = 13.3650(2) A, c = 17.8224(2) A, alpha = 68.202(1) degrees, beta = 86.894(1) degrees, gamma = 82.969(1) degrees, Z = 6]. The asymmetric unit contains three nedocromil anions and three calcium cations associated with eight water molecules. The nedocromil anions act as polyfunctional ligands to the Ca2+ ions, coordinating through both the carbonyl oxygen and the carboxylate oxygen atoms. The molecular

  14. Changes in the solid state of anhydrous and hydrated forms of sodium naproxen under different grinding and environmental conditions: Evidence of the formation of new hydrated forms.

    PubMed

    Censi, Roberta; Rascioni, Riccardo; Di Martino, Piera

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the solid state change of the anhydrous and hydrate solid forms of sodium naproxen under different grinding and environmental conditions. Grinding was carried out manually in a mortar under the following conditions: at room temperature under air atmosphere (Method A), in the presence of liquid nitrogen under air atmosphere (Method B), at room temperature under nitrogen atmosphere (Method C), and in the presence of liquid nitrogen under nitrogen atmosphere (Method D). Among the hydrates, the following forms were used: a dihydrate form (DSN) obtained by exposing the anhydrous form at 55% RH; a dihydrate form (CSN) obtained by crystallizing sodium naproxen from water; the tetrahydrate form (TSN) obtained by exposing the anhydrous form at 75% RH. The metastable monohydrate form (MSN), previously described in the literature, was not used because of its high physical instability. The chemical stability during grinding was firstly assessed and proven by HPLC. Modification of the particle size and shape, and changes in the solid state under different grinding methods were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray powder diffractometry and thermogravimetry, respectively. The study demonstrated the strong influence of starting form, grinding and environmental conditions on particle size, shape and solid state of recovered sodium naproxen forms. In particular, it was demonstrated that in the absence of liquid nitrogen (Methods A and C), either at air or at nitrogen atmosphere, the monohydrate form (MSN) was obtained from any hydrates, meaning that these grinding conditions favored the dehydration of superior hydrates. The grinding process carried out in the presence of liquid nitrogen (Method B) led to further hydration of the starting materials: new hydrate forms were identified as one pentahydrate form and one hexahydrate form. The hydration was caused by the condensation of the atmospheric water on sodium naproxen

  15. On the nature of structural disorder in calcium silicate hydrates with a calcium/silicon ratio similar to tobermorite

    SciTech Connect

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Claret, Francis; Lerouge, Catherine; Warmont, Fabienne; Sato, Tsutomu; Anraku, Sohtaro; Linard, Yannick

    2013-10-15

    Four calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) with structural calcium/silicon (Ca/Si) ratios ranging from 0.82 ± 0.02 to 0.87 ± 0.02 were synthesized at room temperature, 50, 80, and 110 °C. Their structure was elucidated by collating information from electron probe micro-analysis, transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). A modeling approach specific to defective minerals was used because sample turbostratism prevented analysis using usual XRD refinement techniques (e.g. Rietveld analysis). It is shown that C-S-H with Ca/Si ratio of ∼ 0.8 are structurally similar to nano-crystalline turbostratic tobermorite, a naturally occurring mineral. Their structure thus consists of sheets of calcium atoms in 7-fold coordination, covered by ribbons of silicon tetrahedra with a dreierketten (wollastonite-like) organization. In these silicate ribbons, 0.42 Si per bridging tetrahedron are missing. Random stacking faults occur systematically between successive layers (turbostratic stacking). Layer-to-layer distance is equal to 11.34 Å. Crystallites have a mean size of 10 nm in the a–b plane, and a mean number of 2.6–2.9 layers stacked coherently along the c* axis.

  16. Structural Basis for Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Sodium and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Teresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate action potentials in nerve, muscle, and other electrically excitable cells. Voltage-gated calcium channels are activated by depolarization during action potentials, and calcium influx through them is the key second messenger of electrical signaling, initiating secretion, contraction, neurotransmission, gene transcription, and many other intracellular processes. Drugs that block sodium channels are used in local anesthesia and the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorder, chronic pain, and cardiac arrhythmia. Drugs that block calcium channels are used in the treatment of epilepsy, chronic pain, and cardiovascular disorders, including hypertension, angina pectoris, and cardiac arrhythmia. The principal pore-forming subunits of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are structurally related and likely to have evolved from ancestral voltage-gated sodium channels that are widely expressed in prokaryotes. Determination of the structure of a bacterial ancestor of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels at high resolution now provides a three-dimensional view of the binding sites for drugs acting on sodium and calcium channels. In this minireview, we outline the different classes of sodium and calcium channel drugs, review studies that have identified amino acid residues that are required for their binding and therapeutic actions, and illustrate how the analogs of those key amino acid residues may form drug-binding sites in three-dimensional models derived from bacterial channels. PMID:25848093

  17. Hydration Status and Sodium Balance of Endurance Runners Consuming Postexercise Supplements of Varying Nutrient Content.

    PubMed

    Pryor, J Luke; Johnson, Evan C; Del Favero, Jeffery; Monteleone, Andrew; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Rodriguez, Nancy R

    2015-10-01

    Postexercise protein and sodium supplementation may aid recovery and rehydration. Preserved beef provides protein and contains high quantities of sodium that may alter performance related variables in runners. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of consuming a commercial beef product postexercise on sodium and water balance. A secondary objective was to characterize effects of the supplementation protocols on hydration, blood pressure, body mass, and running economy. Eight trained males (age = 22 ± 3 y, VO2max = 66.4 ± 4.2 ml·kg-1·min-1) completed three identical weeks of run training (6 run·wk-1, 45 ± 6 min·run-1, 74 ± 5% HRR). After exercise, subjects consumed either, a beef nutritional supplement (beef jerky; [B]), a standard recovery drink (SRD), or SRD+B in a randomized counterbalanced design. Hydration status was assessed via urinary biomarkers and body mass. No main effects of treatment were observed for 24 hr urine volume (SRD, 1.7 ± 0.5; B, 1.8 ± 0.6; SRD+B, 1.4 ± 0.4 L·d-1), urine specific gravity (1.016 ± 0.005, 1.018 ± 0.006, 1.017 ± 0.006) or body mass (68.4 ± 8.2, 68.3 ± 7.7, 68.2 ± 8.1 kg). No main effect of treatment existed for sodium intake-loss (-713 ± 1486; -973 ± 1123; -980 ± 1220 mg·d-1). Mean arterial pressure (81.0 ± 4.6, 81.1 ± 7.3, 83.8 ± 5.4 mm Hg) and average exercise running economy (VO2: SRD, 47.9 ± 3.2; B, 47.2 ± 2.6; SRD+B, 46.2 ± 3.4 ml·kg-1·min-1) was not affected. Urinary sodium excretion accounted for the daily sodium intake due to the beef nutritional supplement. Findings suggest the commercial beef snack is a viable recovery supplement following endurance exercise without concern for hydration status, performance decrements, or cardiovascular consequences.

  18. Hydration Status and Sodium Balance of Endurance Runners Consuming Postexercise Supplements of Varying Nutrient Content.

    PubMed

    Pryor, J Luke; Johnson, Evan C; Del Favero, Jeffery; Monteleone, Andrew; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Rodriguez, Nancy R

    2015-10-01

    Postexercise protein and sodium supplementation may aid recovery and rehydration. Preserved beef provides protein and contains high quantities of sodium that may alter performance related variables in runners. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of consuming a commercial beef product postexercise on sodium and water balance. A secondary objective was to characterize effects of the supplementation protocols on hydration, blood pressure, body mass, and running economy. Eight trained males (age = 22 ± 3 y, VO2max = 66.4 ± 4.2 ml·kg-1·min-1) completed three identical weeks of run training (6 run·wk-1, 45 ± 6 min·run-1, 74 ± 5% HRR). After exercise, subjects consumed either, a beef nutritional supplement (beef jerky; [B]), a standard recovery drink (SRD), or SRD+B in a randomized counterbalanced design. Hydration status was assessed via urinary biomarkers and body mass. No main effects of treatment were observed for 24 hr urine volume (SRD, 1.7 ± 0.5; B, 1.8 ± 0.6; SRD+B, 1.4 ± 0.4 L·d-1), urine specific gravity (1.016 ± 0.005, 1.018 ± 0.006, 1.017 ± 0.006) or body mass (68.4 ± 8.2, 68.3 ± 7.7, 68.2 ± 8.1 kg). No main effect of treatment existed for sodium intake-loss (-713 ± 1486; -973 ± 1123; -980 ± 1220 mg·d-1). Mean arterial pressure (81.0 ± 4.6, 81.1 ± 7.3, 83.8 ± 5.4 mm Hg) and average exercise running economy (VO2: SRD, 47.9 ± 3.2; B, 47.2 ± 2.6; SRD+B, 46.2 ± 3.4 ml·kg-1·min-1) was not affected. Urinary sodium excretion accounted for the daily sodium intake due to the beef nutritional supplement. Findings suggest the commercial beef snack is a viable recovery supplement following endurance exercise without concern for hydration status, performance decrements, or cardiovascular consequences. PMID:25811075

  19. Obsidian hydration profiles measured by sputter-induced optical emission.

    PubMed

    Tsong, I S; Houser, C A; Yusef, N A; Messier, R F; White, W B; Michels, J W

    1978-07-28

    The variation of concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, and aluminum as a function of depth in the hydration layer of obsidian artifacts has been determined by sputter-induced optical emission. The surface hydration is accompanied by dealkalization, and there is a buildup of alkaline earths, calcium and magnesium in the outermost layers. These results have clarified the phenomena underlying the obsidian hydration dating technique. PMID:17793728

  20. Obsidian hydration profiles measured by sputter-induced optical emission.

    PubMed

    Tsong, I S; Houser, C A; Yusef, N A; Messier, R F; White, W B; Michels, J W

    1978-07-28

    The variation of concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, and aluminum as a function of depth in the hydration layer of obsidian artifacts has been determined by sputter-induced optical emission. The surface hydration is accompanied by dealkalization, and there is a buildup of alkaline earths, calcium and magnesium in the outermost layers. These results have clarified the phenomena underlying the obsidian hydration dating technique.

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic investigation of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates synthesised by reactive milling

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Leon . E-mail: l.black@shu.ac.uk; Garbev, Krassimir; Beuchle, Guenter; Stemmermann, Peter; Schild, Dieter

    2006-06-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to analyse a series of mechanochemically synthesised, nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The samples, with Ca/Si ratios of 0.2 to 1.5, showed structural features of C-S-H(I). XPS analysis revealed changes in the extent of silicate polymerisation. Si 2p, Ca 2p and O 1s spectra showed that, unlike for the crystalline calcium silicate hydrate phases studied previously, there was no evidence of silicate sheets (Q{sup 3}) at low Ca/Si ratios. Si 2p and O 1s spectra indicated silicate depolymerisation, expressed by decreasing silicate chain length, with increasing C/S. In all spectra, peak narrowing was observed with increasing Ca/Si, indicating increased structural ordering. The rapid changes of the slope of FWHM of Si 2p, {delta} {sub Ca-Si} and {delta} {sub NBO-BO} as function of C/S ratio indicated a possible miscibility gap in the C-S-H-solid solution series between C/S 5/6 and 1. The modified Auger parameter ({alpha}') of nanocrystalline C-S-H decreased with increasing silicate polymerisation, a trend already observed studying crystalline C-S-H. Absolute values of {alpha}' were shifted about - 0.7 eV with respect to crystalline phases of equal C/S ratio, due to reduced crystallinity.

  2. Effect of temperature and aluminium on calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate chemistry under equilibrium conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Rupert J.; L'Hôpital, Emilie; Provis, John L.; Lothenbach, Barbara

    2015-02-15

    There exists limited information regarding the effect of temperature on the structure and solubility of calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H). Here, calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C–(A–)S–H) is synthesised at Ca/Si = 1, Al/Si ≤ 0.15 and equilibrated at 7–80 °C. These systems increase in phase-purity, long-range order, and degree of polymerisation of C–(A–)S–H chains at higher temperatures; the most highly polymerised, crystalline and cross-linked C–(A–)S–H product is formed at Al/Si = 0.1 and 80 °C. Solubility products for C–(A–)S–H were calculated via determination of the solid-phase compositions and measurements of the concentrations of dissolved species in contact with the solid products, and show that the solubilities of C–(A–)S–H change slightly, within the experimental uncertainty, as a function of Al/Si ratio and temperature between 7 °C and 80 °C. These results are important in the development of thermodynamic models for C–(A–)S–H to enable accurate thermodynamic modelling of cement-based materials.

  3. Formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) cement pastes using sodium hexametaphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tingting; Vandeperre, Luc J.; Cheeseman, Christopher R.

    2014-11-15

    Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel is formed by the reaction of brucite with amorphous silica during sulphate attack in concrete and M-S-H is therefore regarded as having limited cementing properties. The aim of this work was to form M-S-H pastes, characterise the hydration reactions and assess the resulting properties. It is shown that M-S-H pastes can be prepared by reacting magnesium oxide (MgO) and silica fume (SF) at low water to solid ratio using sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP) as a dispersant. Characterisation of the hydration reactions by x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis shows that brucite and M-S-H gel are formed and that for samples containing 60 wt.% SF and 40 wt.% MgO all of the brucites react with SF to form M-S-H gel. These M-S-H cement pastes were found to have compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa.

  4. Interaction of hydration and subfornical organ lesions in sodium-depletion induced salt appetite.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, E M; Lane, J R; Fitts, D A

    1997-02-01

    The authors tested whether the level of hydration after furosemide diuresis and 22 hr of sodium depletion affects the amount of water or 0.3 M NaCl solution consumed by rats with intact brains or with lesions of the subfornical organ (SFO). Rats received 2 (underhydrated) or 10 (euhydrated) ml/kg water by gavage as the only fluid input 2, 4, and 20 hr after 10 mg/kg furosemide. These hydration treatments had little or no effect on the amount of saline consumed in 2 hr by intact rats. SFO lesions reduced water intake regardless of hydration condition. Euhydrated, SFO-lesioned rats drank a normal amount of saline, but underhydrated, lesioned rats drank less saline than any other group. Thus, euhydration may facilitate salt appetite in SFO-lesioned rats, and the deficits in salt appetite noted in SFO-lesioned rats may result from deficits in water ingestion rather than from a destruction of angiotensin II receptor sites that directly provoke salt appetite. PMID:9109639

  5. Performance and plasma metabolites of dairy calves fed starter containing sodium butyrate, calcium propionate or sodium monensin.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, L S; Bittar, C M M

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine the influence of supplementation of sodium butyrate, sodium monensin or calcium propionate in a starter diet on the performance and selected plasma metabolites (plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate) of Holstein calves during pre- and post-weaning periods. Twenty-four newborn Holstein calves were housed in individual hutches until 10 weeks of life, receiving water free choice, and fed four liters of milk daily. Calves were blocked according to weight and date of birth, and allocated to one of the following treatments, according to the additive in the starter: (i) sodium butyrate (150 g/kg); (ii) sodium monensin (30 mg/kg); and (iii) calcium propionate (150 g/kg). During 10 weeks, calves received starter ad libitum, while coast cross hay (Cynodon dactylon (L.) pers.) was offered after weaning, which occurred at the 8th week of age. Weekly, calves were weighted and evaluated for body measurements. Blood samples were taken weekly after the fourth week of age, 2 hours after the morning feeding, for determination of plasma metabolites. No differences were observed among treatments for starter or hay intake, BW and daily gain of the animals. Mean concentrations of selected plasma metabolites were similar in calves fed a starter supplemented with sodium butyrate, sodium monensin and calcium propionate. There was significant reduction in the concentrations of plasma glucose as calves aged. The inclusion of sodium butyrate, calcium propionate or sodium monensin as additives in starter feeds resulted in equal animal performance, before and after weaning, suggesting that sodium monensin may be replaced by organic acid salts.

  6. Effects of anesthetics pentobarbital sodium and chloral hydrate on urine proteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mindi; Li, Xundou; Li, Menglin

    2015-01-01

    Urine can be a better source than blood for biomarker discovery since it accumulates many changes. The urine proteome is susceptible to many factors, including anesthesia. Pentobarbital sodium and chloral hydrate are commonly used anesthetics in animal experiments. This study demonstrated the effects of these two anesthetics on the rat urine proteome using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). With anesthesia, the urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio of all rats increased twofold. The relative abundance of 22 and 23 urinary proteins were changed with pentobarbital sodium or chloral hydrate anesthesia, respectively, as determined by label-free quantification. Among these changed proteins, fifteen had been considered as candidate biomarkers such as uromodulin, and sixteen had been considered stable in healthy human urine, which are more likely to be considered as potential biomarkers when changed, such as transferrin. The pattern of changed urinary proteins provides clues to the discovery of urinary proteins regulatory mechanisms. When determining a candidate biomarker, anesthetic-related effects can be excluded from future biomarker discovery studies. Since anesthetics take effects via nervous system, this study is the first to provide clues that the protein handling function of the kidney may possibly be regulated by the nervous system. PMID:25789206

  7. Neocortical GABA release at high intracellular sodium and low extracellular calcium: an anti-seizure mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rassner, Michael P; Moser, Andreas; Follo, Marie; Joseph, Kevin; van Velthoven-Wurster, Vera; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    In epilepsy, the GABA and glutamate balance may be disrupted and a transient decrease in extracellular calcium occurs before and during a seizure. Flow Cytometry based fluorescence activated particle sorting experiments quantified synaptosomes from human neocortical tissue, from both epileptic and non-epileptic patients (27.7% vs. 36.9% GABAergic synaptosomes, respectively). Transporter-mediated release of GABA in human and rat neocortical synaptosomes was measured using the superfusion technique for the measurement of endogenous GABA. GABA release was evoked by either a sodium channel activator or a sodium/potassium-ATPase inhibitor when exocytosis was possible or prevented, and when the sodium/calcium exchanger was active or inhibited. The transporter-mediated release of GABA is because of elevated intracellular sodium. A reduction in the extracellular calcium increased this release (in both non-epileptic and epileptic, except Rasmussen encephalitis, synaptosomes). The inverse was seen during calcium doubling. In humans, GABA release was not affected by exocytosis inhibition, that is, it was solely transporter-mediated. However, in rat synaptosomes, an increase in GABA release at zero calcium was only exhibited when the exocytosis was prevented. The absence of calcium amplified the sodium/calcium exchanger activity, leading to elevated intracellular sodium, which, together with the stimulation-evoked intracellular sodium increment, enhanced GABA transporter reversal. Sodium/calcium exchange inhibitors diminished GABA release. Thus, an important seizure-induced extracellular calcium reduction might trigger a transporter- and sodium/calcium exchanger-related anti-seizure mechanism by augmenting transporter-mediated GABA release, a mechanism absent in rats. Uniquely, the additional increase in GABA release because of calcium-withdrawal dwindled during the course of illness in Rasmussen encephalitis. Seizures cause high Na(+) influx through action potentials. A

  8. Effects of dietary calcium on erythrocyte sodium ion transport systems in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Fujito, K; Yokomatsu, M; Ishiguro, N; Numahata, H; Tomino, Y; Koide, H

    1991-01-01

    The alteration of sodium ion transport in red blood cells was observed in SHR and patients with essential hypertension. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of dietary calcium intake on blood pressure and sodium ion transport of red blood cells in SHR. The SHR were fed a diet with three different levels of calcium contents as follows: 0.1% (low), 0.6% (normal) and 4.0% (high) of calcium between 6 and 20 weeks of age. At 20 weeks of age, the levels of erythrocyte sodium efflux, sodium or potassium contents in the red blood cells were measured. On the high Ca diet, SHR showed an attenuation of the increase in blood pressure. On the low Ca diet, SHR showed an enhancement of hypertension. In proportion of increasing of dietary calcium contents, SHR had a lower level of sodium content in the RBC and a higher activity of the sodium pump. However, the passive sodium permeability and sodium-potassium cotransport in SHR were similar among the three different Ca diets. It is concluded that the amounts of dietary Ca might be related to the regulation of blood pressure by changing the sodium pump of the cell membrane in SHR.

  9. Novel technique for phosphorus recovery from aqueous solutions using amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (A-CSHs).

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Uemoto, Masahide; Kagami, Jumpei; Miura, Keiichi; Aketo, Tsuyoshi; Toda, Masaya; Honda, Kohsuke; Ohtake, Hisao

    2013-05-01

    A novel technique for phosphorus (P) recovery from aqueous solutions was developed using amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (A-CSHs). A-CSHs, which have a high Ca/Si molar ratio of 2.0 or greater, could be synthesized using unlimitedly available, inexpensive materials such as siliceous shale and calcium hydroxide. A-CSHs showed high performance for P recovery from an anaerobic sludge digestion liquor (ASDL) and the synthetic model liquor (s-ASDL) containing 89 mg PO4-P/L. After 20 min mixing, 1.5 g/L A-CSHs could remove approximately 69 and 73% PO4-P from ASDL and s-ASDL, respectively. By contrast, autoclaved lightweight concrete particles, which contained crystalline calcium silicate hydrates as a principal component, removed only 10 and 6% PO4-P from ASDL and s-ASDL, respectively, under the same experimental conditions. When A-CSHs were washed with deionized water to remove free Ca(OH)2, P removability was significantly improved (up to 82%) despite the reduction in the amount of Ca(2+) released. Unlike in the case of Ca(OH)2, no significant carbonate inhibition was observed with P removal by A-CSHs. Moreover, P removed by A-CSHs showed better settleability, filterability, and dewaterability than P precipitated with conventional CaCl2 and Ca(OH)2. The present study demonstrated that A-CSHs have great potential as a novel, beneficial material for P recovery and recycling. PMID:23497975

  10. [Role of sodium ions in gastric absorption of calcium in ruminants (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Timet, D; Emanović, D; Herak, M; Kraljević, P; Mitin, V

    1981-01-01

    The influence of sodium ions on gastric absorption of calcium in ruminants was studied with regard to the accompanying anions. Bags made of the surviving mucous membrane of different compartments of bovine stomach were used for this purpose. The epithelial side of the mucous membrane always faced towards the inside of the bags. The bags were filled with a combined solution of a calcium salt (chloride, carbonate or phosphate) and sodium chloride. The concentration of calcium was always the same (10 mg/100 ml) while the concentration of sodium varied, amounting to 102.5, 205 and 1025 mg/100 ml. The external face of the bags was placed in Tyrode's solution. In general, calcium absorption became more and more intensive when the concentration of sodium in the contents increased, regardless of the solubility and dissociability of the calcium salt used. When chloride was the accompanying anion, this effect appeared in the rumen and omasum at a physiological concentration of sodium (205 mg/100 ml), and in the abomasum it appeared only at a concentration which widely exceeded the limits of the normal (1025 mg/100 ml). When either carbonate or phosphate were used for this purpose, this effect generally appeared at the highest concentration of sodium, and only in the abomasum, with phosphate as the accompanying anion, at a concentration of 205 mg/100 ml. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the presence of sodium ions in the contents stimulates gastric absorption of calcium, but the concentration of sodium at which this stimulative effect appears depends, at least to a certain degree, on the accompanying anion of calcium. The possibility of improving the absorption of calcium in the digestive tract of ruminants is discussed in view of the results obtained.

  11. Effect of calcium, magnesium and sodium ions on in vitro nucleation of human gall bladder bile.

    PubMed Central

    Neithercut, W D

    1989-01-01

    The effect of increasing the calcium, magnesium and sodium concentration in gall bladder bile samples from 21 patients with gall stones and nine controls on the in vitro rate of formation of cholesterol microcrystals and numbers of cholesterol microcrystals formed was examined. Addition of these cations to raise the mean maximum concentration of calcium ions to 19.8 mmol/l, of magnesium ions to 20 mmol/l and sodium ions to 998 mmol/l did not trigger nucleation in control bile samples or samples from patients with gall stones. Increasing the mean concentration of calcium ions to 8.6 mmol/l and of sodium to 320 mmol/l increased the numbers of cholesterol monohydrate crystals/0.1 mm3 counted by light polarisation phase contrast microscopy at the time of nucleation in samples from patients with gall stones from a median of 2 (range 1-10) in control portions to 18 (range 2-128) for calcium ions and 10 (range 2-141) for sodium ions (p less than 0.001). Calcium and magnesium ions were more effective than sodium ions, and calcium ions could increase crystal numbers at concentrations found in samples from patients with gall stones, median 4.6 mmol/l (range 2.7-16.9 mmol/l). The concentrations of calcium and magnesium present in bile may therefore influence the rate of development of gall stones. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2731760

  12. Anticaries effect of dentifrices with calcium citrate and sodium trimetaphosphate

    PubMed Central

    DELBEM, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; BERGAMASCHI, Maurício; RODRIGUES, Eliana; SASSAKI, Kikue Takebayashi; VIEIRA, Ana Elisa de Mello; MISSEL, Emilene Macario Coimbra

    2012-01-01

    Because of the growing concerns regarding fluoride ingestion by young children and dental fluorosis, it is necessary to develop new dentifrices. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentifrices with calcium citrate (Cacit) and sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP) on enamel demineralization. Material and Methods Enamel blocks (n=70), previously selected through surface hardness analysis, were submitted to daily treatment with dentifrices diluted in artificial saliva and to a pH-cycling model. The fluoride concentration in dentifrices was 0, 250, 450, 550, 1,000 and 1,100 µg F/g. CrestTM was used as a positive control (1,100 mg F/g). Cacit (0.25%) and TMP (0.25%) were added to dentifrices with 450 and 1,000 µg F/g. Surface hardness was measured again and integrated loss of subsurface hardness and fluoride concentration in enamel were calculated. Parametric and correlation tests were used to determine difference (p<0.05) and dose-response relationship between treatments. Results The addition of Cacit and TMP did not provide a higher fluoride concentration in enamel, however it reduced (p<0.05) mineral loss when compared to other dentifrices; the dentifrice with Cacit and TMP and a low fluoride concentration presented similar results when compared to a dentifrice with 1,100 mg F/g (p>0.05). Conclusions Dentifrices with 450 and 1,000 µg F/g, Cacit and TMP were as effective as a gold standard one. PMID:22437685

  13. Transporting of sodium and calcium cation in erythrocyte in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Z M; Song, K Q; Liu, G Y; Li, Y R

    1990-02-01

    The sodium and calcium cation transport in erythrocyte and their influencing factors were studied in essential hypertensive (EH) patients. The result showed that plasma sodium pump inhibitor, endogenous digitalis-like compound (EDLC), rose in some patients and sodium pump was depressed in the others, but there were no parallel links between EDLC and sodium pump. The patients with normal sodium pump have mainly shown a decrease of their maximal CA++ pump activity and calmodulin (CaM) content in erythrocyte. It indicated that there might be different types of ion transporting defect in EH, and the abnormalities of these cation transports might be an important pathogenesis in EH. PMID:2167817

  14. Spontaneous and CRH-Induced Excitability and Calcium Signaling in Mice Corticotrophs Involves Sodium, Calcium, and Cation-Conducting Channels.

    PubMed

    Zemkova, Hana; Tomić, Melanija; Kucka, Marek; Aguilera, Greti; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the tdimer2(12) form of Discosoma red fluorescent protein under control of the proopiomelanocortin gene's regulatory elements are a useful model for studying corticotrophs. Using these mice, we studied the ion channels and mechanisms controlling corticotroph excitability. Corticotrophs were either quiescent or electrically active, with a 22-mV difference in the resting membrane potential (RMP) between the 2 groups. In quiescent cells, CRH depolarized the membrane, leading to initial single spiking and sustained bursting; in active cells, CRH further facilitated or inhibited electrical activity and calcium spiking, depending on the initial activity pattern and CRH concentration. The stimulatory but not inhibitory action of CRH on electrical activity was mimicked by cAMP independently of the presence or absence of arachidonic acid. Removal of bath sodium silenced spiking and hyperpolarized the majority of cells; in contrast, the removal of bath calcium did not affect RMP but reduced CRH-induced depolarization, which abolished bursting electrical activity and decreased the spiking frequency but not the amplitude of single spikes. Corticotrophs with inhibited voltage-gated sodium channels fired calcium-dependent action potentials, whereas cells with inhibited L-type calcium channels fired sodium-dependent spikes; blockade of both channels abolished spiking without affecting the RMP. These results indicate that the background voltage-insensitive sodium conductance influences RMP, the CRH-depolarization current is driven by a cationic conductance, and the interplay between voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels plays a critical role in determining the status and pattern of electrical activity and calcium signaling.

  15. Predictive Mechanical Characterization of Macro-Molecular Material Chemistry Structures of Cement Paste at Nano Scale - Two-phase Macro-Molecular Structures of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Tri-Calcium Silicate, Di-Calcium Silicate and Calcium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla Espinosa, Ingrid Marcela

    Concrete is a hierarchical composite material with a random structure over a wide range of length scales. At submicron length scale the main component of concrete is cement paste, formed by the reaction of Portland cement clinkers and water. Cement paste acts as a binding matrix for the other components and is responsible for the strength of concrete. Cement paste microstructure contains voids, hydrated and unhydrated cement phases. The main crystalline phases of unhydrated cement are tri-calcium silicate (C3S) and di-calcium silicate (C2S), and of hydrated cement are calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide (CH). Although efforts have been made to comprehend the chemical and physical nature of cement paste, studies at molecular level have primarily been focused on individual components. Present research focuses on the development of a method to model, at molecular level, and analysis of the two-phase combination of hydrated and unhydrated phases of cement paste as macromolecular systems. Computational molecular modeling could help in understanding the influence of the phase interactions on the material properties, and mechanical performance of cement paste. Present work also strives to create a framework for molecular level models suitable for potential better comparisons with low length scale experimental methods, in which the sizes of the samples involve the mixture of different hydrated and unhydrated crystalline phases of cement paste. Two approaches based on two-phase cement paste macromolecular structures, one involving admixed molecular phases, and the second involving cluster of two molecular phases are investigated. The mechanical properties of two-phase macromolecular systems of cement paste consisting of key hydrated phase CSH and unhydrated phases C3S or C2S, as well as CSH with the second hydrated phase CH were calculated. It was found that these cement paste two-phase macromolecular systems predicted an isotropic material behavior. Also

  16. Hydration state of calcium sulfates in Gale crater, Mars: Identification of bassanite veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapin, W.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Maurice, S.; Vaniman, D.; Nachon, M.; Mangold, N.; Schröder, S.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Wiens, R. C.; Martínez, G. M.; Cousin, A.; Sautter, V.; Lasue, J.; Rampe, E. B.; Archer, D.

    2016-10-01

    In-situ analyses reveal the presence of hydrogen within calcium sulfate veins crosscutting the sediments found in Gale crater. Laboratory experiments were performed to calibrate the hydrogen signal measured by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in a range applicable to martian data. The analyses indicate that all veins targeted so far at Gale consist predominantly of bassanite which most likely formed by dehydration of gypsum. This scenario suggests that the percolating water produced gypsum, possibly by hydration of anhydrite in aqueous solution, and remained at temperatures below ∼60 °C at that time. Desiccating conditions followed, consistent with a hyperarid climate and favored by burial or impacts. Additionally, anhydrite with lesser bassanite has been found by XRD in samples of sediments hosting the veins. Our result suggests bassanite is likely found in the veins and anhydrite may be more common as a fine-grained component within the sediments.

  17. Crystal growth of calcium carbonate in silk fibroin/sodium alginate hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Jinfa; Zuo, Baoqi

    2014-01-01

    As known, silk fibroin-like protein plays a pivotal role during the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals in the nacre sheets. Here, we have prepared silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels to serve as templates for calcium carbonate mineralization. In this experiment, we report an interesting finding of calcium carbonate crystal growth in the silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels by the vapor diffusion method. The experimental results indicate calcium carbonate crystals obtained from nanofiber hydrogels with different proportions of silk fibroin/sodium alginate are mixture of calcite and vaterite with unusual morphologies. Time-dependent growth study was carried out to investigate the crystallization process. It is believed that nanofiber hydrogels play an important role in the process of crystallization. This study would help in understanding the function of organic polymers in natural mineralization, and provide a novel pathway in the design and synthesis of new materials related unique morphology and structure.

  18. Capture and sequestration of CO2 in the interlayer space of hydrated calcium Montmorillonite clay under various geological burial depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Zaoui, A.

    2016-05-01

    We perform, at nanoscale level, the structure and dynamics of carbon dioxide molecules in hydrated Ca-montmorillonite clays. The swelling behaviour of hydrated Wyoming-type Montmorillonite including CO2 molecules and counterions is presented and analysed. In addition, the atom density profile, diffusion behaviours and radial distribution functions of CO2, interlayer water molecules and Calcium ions have been investigated at different geological burial depth of 0 km, 3 km and 6 km, which correspond to various temperature and pressure of simulation conditions. Furthermore, the influence of different hydration state on the dynamical behaviours of carbon dioxide is also explained. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient shows that the carbon dioxide species diffuse more freely with the increase of depth and water content. We also found that the presence of interlayer CO2 inhibits the diffusion of all the mobile species. These results mainly show that the hydrated clay system is an appropriate space capable of absorbing CO2 molecules.

  19. Fractionation and solubility of cadmium in paddy soils amended with porous hydrated calcium silicate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Masaihiko, Saigusa

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that porous hydrated calcium silicate (PS) is very effective in decreasing cadmium (Cd) content in brown rice. However, it is unclear whether the PS influences cadmium transformation in soil. The present study examined the effect of PS on pH, cadmium transformation and cadmium solubility in Andosol and Alluvial soil, and also compared its effects with CaCO3, acidic porous hydrated calcium silicate (APS) and silica gel. Soil cadmium was operationally fractionationed into exchangeable (Exch), bound to carbonates (Carb), bound to iron and manganese oxides (FeMnO(x)), bound to organic matters (OM) and residual (Res) fraction. Application of PS and CaCO3 at hig rates enhanced soil pH, while APS and silica gel did not obviously change soil pH. PS and CaCO3 also increased the FeMnO(x)-Cd in Andosol and Carb-Cd in Alluvial soil, thus reducing the Exch-Cd in the tested soils. However, PS was less effective than CaCO3 at the same application rate. Cadmium fractions in the two soils were not changed by the treatments of APS and silica gel. There were no obvious differences in the solubility of cadmium in soils treated with PS, APS, silica gel and CaCO3 except Andosol treated 2.0% CaCO3 at the same pH of soil-CaCl2 suspensions. These findings suggested that the decrease of cadmium availability in soil was mainly attributed to the increase of soil pH caused by PS. PMID:17918598

  20. Intake of protein, calcium and sodium in public child day care centers

    PubMed Central

    Longo-Silva, Giovana; Toloni, Maysa Helena de A.; de Menezes, Risia Cristina E.; Temteo, Tatiane Leocádio; Oliveira, Maria Alice A.; Asakura, Leiko; Costa, Emília Chagas; Taddei, José Augusto de A. C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess calcium, protein and sodium intake, of children that attend public day-care centers and to compare it with the recommended one. METHODS: Cross-sectional descriptive study in seven public day care centers of São Paulo city, Southeast Brazil, which enrolled 366 children between 12 and 36 months of age. The data collection occurred between September and December 2010. Each day care center was evaluated for three non-consecutive days, totaling 42 days and 210 meals. Dietary intake was assessed by a direct food weighing method. For the nutritional calculation, DietWin(r) Profissional 2.0 was used, and the adequacy was calculated according to the recommendations of the National School Feeding Program for energy, protein, calcium and sodium. The calcium/protein relation was also calculated, as well as calcium density (mg/1,000kcal). RESULTS: The energy (406.4kcal), protein (18.2g) and calcium (207.6mg) consumption did not reach the recommended values ​​in all the evaluated day care centers. Sodium intake exceeded up to three times the recommendation. The calcium/protein ratio of 11.7mg/g was less than the adequate one (20mg/g). CONCLUSIONS: There was inadequacy of calcium, protein and sodium dietary intake, in children attending public day-care centers. PMID:25119750

  1. [Monitoring of formation of diclofenac sodium salt hydrates and their influence on the drug dissolution from prepared tablets].

    PubMed

    Doležel, Petr; Muselík, Jan; Králová, Michaela; Vetchý, David

    2013-12-01

    NIR spectroscopy together with multivariate data analysis were used to analyze the hydrates of diclofenac sodium prepared from the non-aqueous solvents tetrahydrofuran and methanol under standard laboratory conditions at 20 °C and relative humidity less than 60%. It was confirmed that the developed PLS regression model can monitor the process of formation of hydrates. It was also found that the hydrated form of diclofenac sodium arises during the preparation of the dosage form the using technology of impregnating the solid carrier by non-aqueous solvents, which resulted in reducing of the drug release rate from prepared tablets up to twice. NIR spectroscopy was confirmed as one of the effective PAT (Process Analytical Technology) methods. PMID:24393114

  2. Effect of sodium chloride on hydration structures of PMEA and P(MPC-r-BMA).

    PubMed

    Morita, Shigeaki; Tanaka, Masaru

    2014-09-01

    The hydration structures of two different types of biomaterials, i.e., poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) and a random copolymer of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine and n-butyl methacrylate (P(MPC-r-BMA)), were investigated by means of attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The effects of the addition of sodium chloride to liquid water in contact with the surfaces of the polymer films were examined. The neutral polymer of PMEA was easily dehydrated by NaCl addition, whereas the zwitterionic polymer of P(MPC-r-BMA) was hardly dehydrated. More specifically, nonfreezing water having a strong interaction with the PMEA chain and freezing bound water having an intermediate interaction were hardly dehydrated by contacting with normal saline solution, whereas freezing water having a weak interaction with the PMEA chain was readily dehydrated. In contrast, freezing water in P(MPC-r-BMA) is exchanged for the saline solution contacting with the material surface without dehydration.

  3. Interaction of Nanostructured Calcium Silicate Hydrate with Ibuprofen Drug Molecules: X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) Study at the Ca, Si and O K-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X. X.; Sham, T. K.; Zhu, Y. J.; Hu, Y. F.

    2013-04-01

    Mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) nanostructure has been proven to be bioactive and biocompatible, and has a bright future in the application of bone treatment among other applications. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) is a powerful tool for the study of the interactions of calcium silicate hydrates with drug molecules because it is element specific and it probes the unoccupied electronic states. Herein, we report the use of the calcium, silicon and oxygen K-edge XANES spectroscopy to identify how drug molecules interact with different groups in calcium silicate hydrate mesoporous nano-carriers with different morphologies. Significant changes are observed in XANES spectra after drug loading into the calcium silicate hydrate system, especially at the Si and O K-edge. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. The selective activation of the cardiac sarcolemmal sodium-calcium exchanger by plasmalogenic phosphatidic acid produced by phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Hale, C C; Ebeling, E G; Hsu, F F; Ford, D A

    1998-01-30

    Since plasmalogens are the predominant phospholipid of cardiac sarcolemma, the activation of the sodium-calcium exchanger by either plasmenylethanolamine or plasmalogenic phosphatidic acid generated by phospholipase D was explored. Sodium-calcium exchange activity was 7-fold greater in proteoliposomes comprised of plasmenylethanolamine compared to proteoliposomes comprised of only plasmenylcholine. Phospholipase D treatment of proteoliposomes resulted in 1 mol % conversion of plasmenylcholine or phosphatidylcholine to their respective phosphatidic acid molecular species with a concomitant 8-fold or 2-fold activation of sodium-calcium exchange activity, respectfully. Thus, phospholipase D-mediated hydrolysis of plasmalogens to phosphatidic acid may be an important mechanism for the regulation of the sodium-calcium exchanger.

  5. Interdependence between sodium transport, external chloride, and sodium/calcium exchanger in the isolated skin of the Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Soto, C; Aguilar, G; Jiménez, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, cytosolic calcium, and chloride to the transepithelial transport of sodium in isolated frog skin. Sodium transport was measured as amiloride-inhibitable short circuit current (SCC). We studied the effect of variations in the concentrations of external chloride and of the manipulation of calcium on sensitive amiloride SCC. Modifications in the movement of Ca2+ were induced by an ionophore, A23187, and a Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine. Calcium ionophore A23187 (5 and 20 microM), in a normal Ringer's solution, increased SCC and transepithelial potential difference (PD). In contrast, nifedipine (20 microM) reduced SCC and PD. The role of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger was studied using dichlorobenzamil (DCB, 50 microM) and quinacrine (1 mM), inhibitors of this exchanger. They selectively increased SCC and PD on the mucosal side of the skin, with no effect on the serosal side. This response occurred only in the presence of extracellular calcium. Replacement of NaCl by sodium methanesulfonate or the addition of furosemide (1 mM) at the serosal compartment, decreased basal SCC and PD and blocked the response to A23187 and the mucosal effect of DCB and quinacrine. These results suggest the presence of an Na+/Ca2+ exchanger located on the mucosal side of the frog skin, which participates in the transepithelial sodium transport. The action of this exchanger may be modulated by external chloride and calcium. J. Exp. Zool. 289:23-32, 2001.

  6. Molecular dynamics study on the growth of structure I methane hydrate in aqueous solution of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yen-Tien; Chen, Li-Jen; Chen, Yan-Ping; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2012-12-01

    The structure, thermodynamic, and kinetic properties of methane hydrates formed from the aqueous solution of sodium chloride are investigated based on molecular dynamics simulations. A three-phase molecular model consisting of a slab of methane hydrate phase, a slab of liquid water containing sodium chloride, and a gas phase of methane molecules is used. The decrease in the three-phase coexisting temperatures (by 2-3 K) at different pressures (10-100 MPa) for aqueous NaCl solutions (about 2 mol %) confirms the thermodynamic inhibition of NaCl. The growth rate of methane hydrates in NaCl solution is found to be half to one-third of that in pure water. The kinetic inhibition of NaCl is found to be a result of the reduced water repelling at the growing interface due to the strong hydration of ions. Individual ions or NaCl ion pairs can replace water molecules to participate in the formation of the cage structures. The distortion of water cages due to the presence of ions may result in a reduced fraction of occupation of methane in the cage cavities. Our results provide useful insights into the mechanism of growth of methane hydrates in seawater and the desalination.

  7. Effect of sodium and calcium ingestion on thermoregulation during exercise in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Brock, P. J.; Morse, J. T.; Van Beaumont, W.; Montgomery, L. D.; Convertino, V. A.; Mangseth, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of hypertonic sodium and calcium ingestion on body temperature during exercise in cool and hot environments are investigated. Rectal and mean skin temperatures, sweat rates and arm and leg total blood flows were measured in men during periods of rest, submaximal exercise and recovery at temperatures of 26.5 C and 39.4 C after ingestion of NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. In both environments, higher rectal temperatures are observed after hypertonic sodium ingestion, which is also associated with attenuated blood flow in the extremities, lower sweat rates and slightly higher skin temperature in the heat, indicating significant thermoregulatory responses. Hypertonic calcium and isotonic sodium cause no temperature change, although calcium caused a reduction of blood flow in the extremities.

  8. Interaction grand potential between calcium-silicate-hydrate nanoparticles at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnaud, Patrick A.; Labbez, Christophe; Miura, Ryuji; Suzuki, Ai; Miyamoto, Naoto; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Miyamoto, Akira; van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2016-02-01

    Calcium-silicate-hydrate (or C-S-H), an inosilicate, is the major binding phase in cement pastes and concretes and a porous hydrated material made up of a percolated and dense network of crystalline nanoparticles of a mean apparent spherical diameter of ~5 nm that are each stacks of multiple C-S-H layers. Interaction forces between these nanoparticles are at the origin of C-S-H chemical, physical, and mechanical properties at the meso- and macroscales. These particle interactions and the resulting properties may be affected significantly by nanoparticle density and environmental conditions such as the temperature, relative humidity, or concentration of chemical species in the bulk solution. In this study, we combined grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations and an extension of the mean force integration method to derive the pair potentials. This approach enables realistic simulation of the physical environment surrounding the C-S-H particles. We thus constructed the pair potentials for C-S-H nanoparticles of defined chemical stoichiometry at 10% relative humidity (RH), varying the relative crystallographic orientations at a constant particle density of ρpart ~ 2.21 mmol L-1. We found that cohesion between nanoparticles is affected strongly by both the aspect ratio and the crystallographic misorientation of interacting particles. This method and the findings underscore the importance of accounting for relative dimensions and orientation among C-S-H nanoparticles in descriptions of physical and simulated multiparticle aggregates or mesoscale systems.Calcium-silicate-hydrate (or C-S-H), an inosilicate, is the major binding phase in cement pastes and concretes and a porous hydrated material made up of a percolated and dense network of crystalline nanoparticles of a mean apparent spherical diameter of ~5 nm that are each stacks of multiple C-S-H layers. Interaction forces between these nanoparticles are at the origin of C-S-H chemical, physical, and mechanical

  9. Exploration of a calcium-organic framework as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Niu, Yubin; Wang, Min-Qiang; Yang, Jingang; Lu, Shiyu; Han, Jin; Bao, Shu-Juan; Xu, Maowen

    2016-08-01

    In this communication, we designed and synthesized a novel calcium-organic framework and presented it as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries. The results show that it delivers a reversible capacity of higher than 140 mA h g(-1) even after 300 cycles. The remarkable performance is attributed to the high structural stability and extremely low solubility of the calcium-organic framework in electrolytes. PMID:27440582

  10. Thermodynamic behaviour of sodium and calcium based sorbents in the emission control of waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Verdone, Nicola; De Filippis, Paolo

    2004-02-01

    The dry treatment of flue gas produced by incineration processes is discussed thermodynamically. The study investigates the theoretical limits achieved by sodium and calcium based sorbents in the removal of the pollutant species HCl, NOx and SO2. Calculations were performed varying the temperature and the molar ratio between the amount of the injected alkaline sorbent and the content of the pollutant gaseous species in the flue gas. Results show that sodium cation based sorbents are more efficient than calcium based ones in the whole investigated temperature range (100-600 degrees C). The higher effectiveness of sodium based sorbents is particularly remarkable towards hydrogen chloride, whose concentration can always be reduced below the values set by the environmental regulations. Possible improvements in the treatment efficiency of combustion fumes obtainable with sodium based sorbents can be mainly summarised in a lower concentration of HCl in the treated gas and in a partial reduction of NOx concentration.

  11. Immobilization of Pseudomonas sp. DG17 onto sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Qi; Hua, Fei; Zhao, Yi Cun; Li, Yi; Wang, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas sp. DG17, capable of degrading crude oil, was immobilized in sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate for biodegradation of crude oil contaminated soil. In this work, proportion of independent variables, the laboratory immobilization parameters, the micromorphology and internal structure of the immobilized granule, as well as the crude oil biodegradation by sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate immobilized cells and sodium alginate–attapulgite immobilized cells were studied to build the optimal immobilization carrier and granule-forming method. The results showed that the optimal concentrations of sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate and calcium chloride were 2.5%–3.5%, 0.5%–1%, 3%–7% and 2%–4%, respectively. Meanwhile, the optimal bath temperature, embedding cell amount, reaction time and multiplication time were 50–60 °C, 2%, 18 h and 48 h, respectively. Moreover, biodegradation was enhanced by immobilized cells with a total petroleum hydrocarbon removal ranging from 33.56% ± 3.84% to 56.82% ± 3.26% after 20 days. The SEM results indicated that adding calcium carbonate was helpful to form internal honeycomb-like pores in the immobilized granules. PMID:26019567

  12. Repassivation Potential of Alloy 22 in Sodium and Calcium Chloride Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Ilevbare, G O; Carranza, R M

    2007-08-11

    A comprehensive matrix of 60 tests was designed to explore the effect of calcium chloride vs. sodium chloride and the ratio R of nitrate concentration over chloride concentration on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22. Tests were conducted using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique at 75 C and at 90 C. Results show that at a ratio R of 0.18 and higher nitrate was able to inhibit the crevice corrosion in Alloy 22 induced by chloride. Current results fail to show in a consistent way a different effect on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22 for calcium chloride solutions than for sodium chloride solutions.

  13. Formation of hydroxyapatite in soils using calcium citrate and sodium phosphate for control of strontium migration.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Sanchez, Charles Anthony; Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Hasan, Mahmoud A.; Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2003-08-01

    {sup 90}Sr contamination is a major problem at several U.S. sites. At some sites, {sup 90}Sr has migrated deep underground making site remediation difficult. In this paper, we describe a novel method for precipitation of hydroxyapatite, a strong sorbent for {sup 90}Sr, in soil. The method is based on mixing a solution of calcium citrate and sodium phosphate in soil. As the indigenous soil microorganisms mineralize the citrate, the calcium is released and forms hydroxyapatite. Soil, taken from the Albuquerque desert, was treated with a sodium phosphate solution or a sodium phosphate/calcium citrate solution. TEM and EDS were used to identify hydroxyapatite with CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} substitutions, with a formula of (Ca{sub 4.8}Na{sub 0.2})[(PO{sub 4}){sub 2.8}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.2}](OH), in the soil treated with the sodium phosphate/calcium citrate solution. Untreated and treated soils were used in batch sorption experiments for Sr uptake. Average Sr uptake was 19.5, 77.0 and 94.7% for the untreated soil, soil treated with sodium phosphate, and soil with apatite, respectively. In desorption experiments, the untreated soil, phosphate treated soil and apatite treated soil released an average of 34.2, 28.8 and 4.8% respectively. The results indicate the potential of forming apatite in soil using soluble reagents for retardation of radionuclide migration.

  14. Calcium reduces the sodium permeability of luminal membrane vesicles from toad bladder. Studies using a fast-reaction apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, H.S. Jr.; Al-Awqati, Q.

    1983-05-01

    Regulation of the sodium permeability of the luminal membrane is the major mechanism by which the net rate of sodium transport across tight epithelia is varied. Previous evidence has suggested that the permeability of the luminal membrane might be regulated by changes in intracellular sodium or calcium activities. To test this directly, we isolated a fraction of the plasma membrane from the toad urinary bladder, which contains a fast, amiloride-sensitive sodium flux with characteristics similar to those of the native luminal membrane. Using a flow-quench apparatus to measure the initial rate of sodium efflux from these vesicles in the millisecond time range, we have demonstrated that the isotope exchange permeability of these vesicles is very sensitive to calcium. Calcium reduces the sodium permeability, and the half-maximal inhibitory concentration is 0.5 microM, well within the range of calcium activity found in cells. Also, the permeability of the luminal membrane vesicles is little affected by the ambient sodium concentration. These results, when taken together with studies on whole tissue, suggest that cell calcium may be an important regulator of transepithelial sodium transport by its effect on luminal sodium permeability. The effect of cell sodium on permeability may be mediated by calcium rather than by sodium itself.

  15. Dietary Sodium Effects on Bone Loss and Calcium Metabolism During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Arnaud, Sara B.; Abrams, Steven A.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The acceleration of age-related bone loss is one of the most detrimental effects of space flight. The ability to understand and counteract this loss will be critical for crew health and safety during and after long-duration missions. Studies in healthy ambulatory individuals have linked high salt (sodium) diets, hypercalciuria, and increased renal stone risk. Dietary salt may modulate bone loss through changes in calcium metabolism and the calcium endocrine system. The research proposed here will determine the role of dietary salt in the loss of bone during simulated space flight. Calcium metabolism will be determined through calcium kinetics studies, endocrine and biochemical measurements; and estimates of the mass, distribution and mechanical properties of bone, in subjects fed low (100 mmol sodium/day) or high (250 mmol sodium/day) levels of dietary salt during 28 days of headdown tilt bedrest. This research addresses the role of dietary salt in the loss of bone and calcium in space flight, and integrates the changes in calcium metabolism with those occurring in other physiologic systems. These data will be critical for both countermeasure development, and in determination of nutritional requirements for extended-duration space flight. The potential countermeasures resulting from this research will reduce health risks due to acceleration of age-related osteoporosis and increased risk of renal stone formation..

  16. Calcium aluminates hydration in presence of amorphous SiO{sub 2} at temperatures below 90 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas Mercury, J.M.

    2006-10-15

    The hydration behaviour of Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}, Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 33} and CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} with added amorphous silica at 40, 65 and 90 deg. C has been studied for periods ranging from 1 to 31 days. In hydrated samples crystalline phases like katoite (Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3-} {sub x} (OH){sub 4} {sub x} ) and gibbsite, Al(OH){sub 3}, were identified, likewise amorphous phases like Al(OH) {sub x} , calcium silicate hydrates, C-S-H, and calcium aluminosilicate hydrates, C-S-A-H, were identified. The stoichiometry of Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3-} {sub x} (OH){sub 4} {sub x} (0{<=}3-x{<=}0.334), which was the main crystalline product, was established by Rietveld refinement of X-ray and neutron diffraction data and by transmission electron microscopy. - Graphical abstract: Katoite, Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3-} {sub x} (OH){sub 4} {sub x} (0{<=}3-x{<=}0.334), was identified besides gibbsite, Al(OH){sub 3}, as a crystalline stable hydration products in Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}, Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 33} and CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} hydrated with added amorphous silica between 40 and 90 deg. C.

  17. Calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate "cement" phases and rare Ca-zeolite association at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, F.; Scordari, F.; Mesto, E.; Sharygin, V. V.; Bortolozzi, G.

    2010-06-01

    Very high temperature, Ca-rich alkaline magma intruded an argillite formation at Colle Fabbri, Central Italy, producing cordierite-tridymite metamorphism in the country rocks. An intense Ba-rich sulphate-carbonate-alkaline hydrothermal plume produced a zone of mineralization several meters thick around the igneous body. Reaction of hydrothermal fluids with country rocks formed calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), i.e., tobermorite-afwillite-jennite; calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (CASH) — "cement" phases - i.e., thaumasite, strätlingite and an ettringite-like phase and several different species of zeolites: chabazite-Ca, willhendersonite, gismon-dine, three phases bearing Ca with the same or perhaps lower symmetry of phillipsite-Ca, levyne-Ca and the Ca-rich analogue of merlinoite. In addition, apophyllite-(KF) and/or apophyllite-(KOH), Ca-Ba-carbonates, portlandite and sulphates were present. A new polymorph from the pyrrhotite group, containing three layers of sphalerite-type structure in the unit cell, is reported for the first time. Such a complex association is unique. Most of these minerals are specifically related to hydration processes of: (1) pyrometamorphic metacarbonate/metapelitic rocks (natural analogues of cement clinkers); (2) mineralization between intrusive stocks and slates; and (3) high-calcium, alkaline igneous rocks such as melilitites and foidites as well as carbonatites. The Colle Fabbri outcrop offers an opportunity to study in situ complex crystalline overgrowth and specific crystal chemistry in mineral phases formed in igneous to hydrothermal conditions.

  18. Structure of the calcium pyrophosphate monohydrate phase (Ca2P2O7·H2O): towards understanding the dehydration process in calcium pyrophosphate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Gras, Pierre; Ratel-Ramond, Nicolas; Teychéné, Sébastien; Rey, Christian; Elkaim, Erik; Biscans, Béatrice; Sarda, Stéphanie; Combes, Christèle

    2014-09-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate hydrate (CPP, Ca(2)P(2)O(7) · nH2O) and calcium orthophosphate compounds (including apatite, octacalcium phosphate etc.) are among the most prevalent pathological calcifications in joints. Even though only two dihydrated forms of CPP (CPPD) have been detected in vivo (monoclinic and triclinic CPPD), investigations of other hydrated forms such as tetrahydrated or amorphous CPP are relevant to a further understanding of the physicochemistry of those phases of biological interest. The synthesis of single crystals of calcium pyrophosphate monohydrate (CPPM; Ca(2)P(2)O(7) · H2O) by diffusion in silica gel at ambient temperature and the structural analysis of this phase are reported in this paper. Complementarily, data from synchrotron X-ray diffraction on a CPPM powder sample have been fitted to the crystal parameters. Finally, the relationship between the resolved structure for the CPPM phase and the structure of the tetrahydrated calcium pyrophosphate β phase (CPPT-β) is discussed.

  19. Dissolution-precipitation behaviour of ettringite, monosulfate, and calcium silicate hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, Isabel; Keller, Peter; Mavrocordatos, Denis; Wehrli, Bernhard; Johnson, C. Annette

    2004-02-01

    The stability of the cement minerals ettringite, monosulfate, and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) was investigated to better understand the uptake of contaminants in waste-cement mixes. Suspensions were spiked with radioisotopes of components ({sup 45}Ca and {sup 35}SO{sub 4} for ettringite and monosulfate and {sup 45}Ca and {sup 32}Si for C-S-H) to observe their uptake behaviour within 0-70 days. A physical model was applied to determine dissolution-precipitation rates. An initial fast uptake was observed to occur in most systems, so the data obtained between 7 and 70 days were chosen for analysis. Dissolution-precipitation rates were in the range of 10{sup -11.5} to 10{sup -12.2} mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} for all minerals. The whole solids would be dissolved and reprecipitated within 1-4 years. The measured dissolution-precipitation rates of pure cement minerals give the maximum rate for ion substitution processes with contaminants and are distinguishable from faster processes such as surface complexation and ion exchange processes.

  20. Nanostructured calcium silicate hydrate seeds accelerate concrete hardening: a combined assessment of benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Bräu, Michael; Ma-Hock, Lan; Hesse, Christoph; Nicoleau, Luc; Strauss, Volker; Treumann, Silke; Wiench, Karin; Landsiedel, Robert; Wohlleben, Wendel

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology creates new possibilities to control and improve material properties for civil infrastructure. Special focus in this area is put on Portland cement and gypsum. Together their annual production is by far larger than for any other material worldwide. Nanomodification of these materials can be done during the few hours between dissolution and hardening, especially by nucleation of the re-crystallization with suitable colloids. Here we report first results in homogeneous seeding of the precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates within a real Portland cement composition. The occupational safety during the production phase and during mixing of concrete paste is addressed in detail by in vivo testing. We perform 5-day inhalation with 21-day recovery in rats and analyze organ-specific toxicity and 71 endpoints from bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF) and blood. In BALF parameters, no test-related changes were observed, indicating the generally low toxicity of the test material. Some mild lesions were observed in larynx level. In the lungs, all animals of the 50 mg/m³ concentration group revealed a minimal to mild increase in alveolar macrophages, which recovered back to control level.

  1. A novel titania/calcium silicate hydrate hierarchical coating on titanium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qianli; Liu, Xujie; Elkhooly, Tarek A; Zhang, Ranran; Shen, Zhijian; Feng, Qingling

    2015-10-01

    Recently, surface micron/nano-topographical modifications have attracted a great deal of attention because it is capable of mimicking the hierarchical characteristics of bone. In the current work, a novel titania/calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) bi-layer coating with hierarchical surface topography was successfully prepared on titanium substrate through micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and subsequent hydrothermal treatment (HT). MAO treatment could lead to a micron-scale topographical surface with numerous crater-like protuberances. The subsequent HT process enables the in situ nucleation and growth of CSH nanoplates on MAO-fabricated titania surface. The nucleation of CSH nanoplates is considered to follow a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Compared to MAO-fabricated coating with single-scale surface topography, MAO-HT-fabricated coating with hierarchical surface topography exhibits enhanced hydrophilicity, fibronectin adsorption and initial MG-63 cell attachment. The process of cell-material interactions is considered to be triggered by surface properties of the coated layer and indirectly mediated by protein adsorption on coating surface. These results suggest that MAO-HT treatment is an efficient way to prepare coatings with hierarchical surface topography on titanium surface, which is essential for altering protein adsorption and initial cell attachment.

  2. Stabilization of ZnCl2-containing wastes using calcium sulfoaluminate cement: cement hydration, strength development and volume stability.

    PubMed

    Berger, Stéphane; Cau Dit Coumes, Céline; Le Bescop, Patrick; Damidot, Denis

    2011-10-30

    The potential of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement was investigated to solidify and stabilize wastes containing large amounts of soluble zinc chloride (a strong inhibitor of Portland cement hydration). Hydration of pastes and mortars prepared with a 0.5 mol/L ZnCl(2) mixing solution was characterized over one year as a function of the gypsum content of the binder and the thermal history of the material. Blending the CSA clinker with 20% gypsum enabled its rapid hydration, with only very small delay compared with a reference prepared with pure water. It also improved the compressive strength of the hardened material and significantly reduced its expansion under wet curing. Moreover, the hydrates assemblage was less affected by a thermal treatment at early age simulating the temperature rise and fall occurring in a large-volume drum of cemented waste. Fully hydrated materials contained ettringite, amorphous aluminum hydroxide, strätlingite, together with AFm phases (Kuzel's salt associated with monosulfoaluminate or Friedel's salt depending on the gypsum content of the binder), and possibly C-(A)-S-H. Zinc was readily insolubilized and could not be detected in the pore solution extracted from cement pastes.

  3. Calcium phosphate-containing precipitate and the carcinogenicity of sodium salts in rats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S M; Arnold, L L; Cano, M; Ito, M; Garland, E M; Shaw, R A

    2000-04-01

    Sodium saccharin, ascorbate and other sodium salts fed at high doses to rats produce urinary bladder urothelial cytotoxicity with consequent regenerative hyperplasia. For sodium salts that have been tested, tumor activity is enhanced when administered either alone or after a brief exposure to a known genotoxic bladder carcinogen. These sodium salts alter urinary composition of rats resulting in formation of an amorphous precipitate. We examined the precipitate to ascertain its composition and further delineate the basis for its formation in rat urine. Using scanning electron microscopy with attached X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, the principal elements present were calcium, phosphorus, minor amounts of silicon and sulfur. Smaller elements are not detectable by this method. Infrared analyses demonstrated that calcium phosphate was in the tribasic form and silicon was most likely in the form of silica. Small amounts of saccharin were present in the precipitate from rats fed sodium saccharin (<5%), but ascorbate was not detectable in the precipitate from rats fed similar doses of sodium ascorbate. Large amounts of urea and mucopolysaccharide, apparently chondroitin sulfate, were detected in the precipitate by infrared analysis. Chemical analyses confirmed the presence of large amounts of calcium phosphate with variably small amounts of magnesium, possibly present as magnesium ammonium phosphate crystals, present in urine even in controls. Small amounts of protein, including albumin and alpha(2u)-globulin, were also detected (<5% of the precipitate). Calcium phosphate is an essential ingredient of the medium for tissue culture of epithelial cells, but when present at high concentrations (>5 mM) it precipitates and becomes cytotoxic. The nature of the precipitate reflects the unique composition of rat urine and helps to explain the basis for the species specificity of the cytotoxic and proliferative effects of high doses of these sodium salts. PMID:10753216

  4. Development of montelukast sodium loaded niosomal carriers by film hydration technique.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Awasthi, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and characterize montelukast sodium loaded niosomal drug carrier systems. The vesicles were prepared by film hydration technique using different surfactants. The optimized formulation was selected on the basis of results obtained from drug entrapment, morphology and in vitro drug release studies, and further evaluated for possible drug-excipient interaction, thermal behavior and drug physical state, before and after formulation using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis methods, respectively. The morphological characterization of vesicles was done using Transmission electron microscopy. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy system was used for elemental and dimensional analysis of developed vesicles. The vesicle surface charge was determined using zeta potential measurements. The results suggested that the optimized formulation had small size (103±6.01 nm) and high drug entrapment (72.20±2.10%). No chemical interaction was observed between the drug and excipients. The study revealed that Span 60 is a good nonionic surfactant for vesicle formulation. After 3 months storage at 2-8°C, the optimized formulation preserved stability in terms of formulation colour, drug amount and percent drug release. After 3 months, flocculation occured and hard cake was not formed on the settlement of vesicles. The preliminary results of this study suggest that the designed vesicles could enhance drug entrapment, reduce the initial burst release of drug and modulate the drug release. PMID:25910042

  5. Fermentation of cucumbers brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Generation of waste water containing sodium chloride from cucumber fermentation tank yards could be eliminated if cucumbers were fermented in brines that did not contain this salt. To determine if this is feasible, cucumbers were fermented in brines that contained only calcium chloride to maintain f...

  6. Evidence that sodium deprivation influences vitamin D dependent rat renal calcium binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Pansini, A.R.; Christakos, S.

    1983-10-01

    In order to provide some insight concerning the role of renal calcium binding protein (CaBP) in the functioning of the mammalian kidney, the response of renal CaBP to dietary alterations was examined. Three week old rats were fed diets deficient in calcium, phosphorus or sodium supplemented with vitamin D for a four week period. The specific activity of renal CaBP in the 28,000 M/sub r/ region was found to increase four fold in rats fed the low phosphorus diet and two fold in rats fed the low calcium diet when compared to rats fed the control diet. Renal CaBP/mg protein from rats fed the low sodium diet decreased 50% from the control values. Changes in renal CaBP were confirmed by polyacrylamide gel analysis of the 28,000 M/sub r/ fraction by densitometric tracing using a purified CaBP marker. The greater response to dietary phosphorus restriction suggests that renal CaBP may be regulated by a mechanism different from that of intestinal CaBP. The decrease in renal CaBP in rats fed the low sodium diet suggests for the first time that sodium is required for vitamin D dependent distal tubular calcium transport processes.

  7. Commercial scale cucumber fermentations brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of low salt cucumber fermentation processes present opportunities to reduce the amount of sodium chloride (NaCl) that reaches fresh water streams from industrial activities. The objective of this research was to translate cucumber fermentation brined with calcium chloride instead of NaCl...

  8. Imaging of drug loading distributions in individual microspheres of calcium silicate hydrate - an X-ray spectromicroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2015-04-01

    Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere.Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07471h

  9. Hydration status and fluid and sodium balance in elite Canadian junior women's soccer players in a cool environment.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Jennifer C; Stuart-Hill, Lynneth A; Pethick, Wendy; Gaul, Catherine A

    2012-10-01

    Dehydration can impair mental and on-field performance in soccer athletes; however, there is little data available from the female adolescent player. There is a lack of research investigating fluid and electrolyte losses in cool temperatures. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the pretraining hydration status, fluid balance, and sweat sodium loss in 34 female Canadian junior elite soccer athletes (mean age ± SD, 15.7 ± 0.7 years) in a cool environment. Data were collected during two 90 min on-field training sessions (9.8 ± 3.3 °C, 63% ± 12% relative humidity). Prepractice urine specific gravity (USG), sweat loss (pre- and post-training body mass), and sweat sodium concentration (regional sweat patch method) were measured at each session. Paired t tests were used to identify significant differences between training sessions and Pearson's product moment correlation analysis was used to assess any relationships between selected variables (p ≤ 0.05). We found that 45% of players presented to practice in a hypohydrated state (USG > 1.020). Mean percent body mass loss was 0.84% ± 0.07% and sweat loss was 0.69 ± 0.54 L. Although available during each training session, fluid intake was low (63.6% of players consumed <250 mL). Mean sweat sodium concentration was 48 ± 12 mmol·L⁻¹. Despite low sweat and moderate sodium losses, players did not drink enough to avoid mild fluid and sodium deficits during training. The findings from this study highlights the individual variations that occur in hydration management in athletes and thus the need for personalized hydration guidelines.

  10. Effects of Hypotonic Saline Loading in Hydrated Dog: Evidence for a Saline-induced Limit on Distal Tubular Sodium Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Richard M.; Abramson, Ruth G.; Kahn, Thomas; Levitt, Marvin F.

    1967-01-01

    We performed studies on dogs under hydrated conditions, utilizing the rate of free water formation (CH2O) as an index of the rate of distal tubular sodium transport. Since CH2O could be progressively increased with no evidence of a maximal rate during loading with hypotonic (2.5%) mannitol, it was concluded that there is no limit on distal tubular sodium transport during mannitol loading. In contrast, during hypotonic (0.45%) saline loading CH2O rose initially, but as urine flow (V) exceeded 25% of the filtered load CH2O attained maximal levels (up to 20% of the filtered load) and remained stable as V increased to 50% of the filtered load. It was concluded that saline loading progressively inhibits proximal sodium reabsorption. Initially, the distal tubule absorbes a large fraction of the proximal rejectate and sodium excretion rises slightly. Eventually, an alteration in distal sodium transport appears which culminates in a maximal rate or transport limit. This distal transport limit provoked by saline loading could not be characterized by a classical Tm as seen with glucose and does not seem to be consequent to high rates of flow through the distal tubule. Regardless of the precise nature of this limit, the major increment in sodium excretion develops during saline loading only after saline alters the capacity of the distal tubule to transport sodium. PMID:6027084

  11. Improved model of hydrated calcium ion for molecular dynamics simulations using classical biomolecular force fields.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jejoong; Wilson, James; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-10-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+) ) play key roles in various fundamental biological processes such as cell signaling and brain function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study such interactions, however, the accuracy of the Ca(2+) models provided by the standard MD force fields has not been rigorously tested. Here, we assess the performance of the Ca(2+) models from the most popular classical force fields AMBER and CHARMM by computing the osmotic pressure of model compounds and the free energy of DNA-DNA interactions. In the simulations performed using the two standard models, Ca(2+) ions are seen to form artificial clusters with chloride, acetate, and phosphate species; the osmotic pressure of CaAc2 and CaCl2 solutions is a small fraction of the experimental values for both force fields. Using the standard parameterization of Ca(2+) ions in the simulations of Ca(2+) -mediated DNA-DNA interactions leads to qualitatively wrong outcomes: both AMBER and CHARMM simulations suggest strong inter-DNA attraction whereas, in experiment, DNA molecules repel one another. The artificial attraction of Ca(2+) to DNA phosphate is strong enough to affect the direction of the electric field-driven translocation of DNA through a solid-state nanopore. To address these shortcomings of the standard Ca(2+) model, we introduce a custom model of a hydrated Ca(2+) ion and show that using our model brings the results of the above MD simulations in quantitative agreement with experiment. Our improved model of Ca(2+) can be readily applied to MD simulations of various biomolecular systems, including nucleic acids, proteins and lipid bilayer membranes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 752-763, 2016.

  12. Is calcium more important than sodium in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension?

    PubMed

    McCarron, D A

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis that abnormalities of calcium homeostasis at both an organ and cellular level are a primary factor in the pathogenesis of human and experimental hypertension forms the basis of this review. The rapidly expanding data base relating disordered calcium metabolism to altered vascular smooth muscle function and increased peripheral vascular resistance is summarized and integrated with the observations that reduced dietary calcium intake is the most consistent nutritional correlate of hypertension in the United States. The role of sodium and sodium chloride in pathogenesis of hypertension is reassessed in the light of new data from epidemiological clinical research, experimental models, and cell physiology investigations. The data supporting the thesis that the effects of sodium or chloride or both on blood pressure may represent, in selected situations, secondary influences mediated through induced changes in calcium homeostasis are presented. The interface between these nutritional factors and the normal regulation of vascular smooth muscle is discussed, providing a theoretical framework in which to assess the current information and to formulate the necessary future research.

  13. Effect of calcium/sodium ion exchange on the osmotic properties and structure of polyelectrolyte gels.

    PubMed

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2015-12-01

    We discuss the main findings of a long-term research program exploring the consequences of sodium/calcium ion exchange on the macroscopic osmotic and elastic properties, and the microscopic structure of representative synthetic polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylate, (polyacrylic acid)) and biopolymer gels (DNA). A common feature of these gels is that above a threshold calcium ion concentration, they exhibit a reversible volume phase transition. At the macroscopic level, the concentration dependence of the osmotic pressure shows that calcium ions influence primarily the third-order interaction term in the Flory-Huggins model of polymer solutions. Mechanical tests reveal that the elastic modulus is practically unaffected by the presence of calcium ions, indicating that ion bridging does not create permanent cross-links. At the microscopic level, small-angle neutron scattering shows that polyacrylic acid and DNA gels exhibit qualitatively similar structural features in spite of important differences (e.g. chain flexibility and chemical composition) between the two polymers. The main effect of calcium ions is that the neutron scattering intensity increases due to the decrease in the osmotic modulus. At the level of the counterion cloud around dissolved macroions, anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering measurements made on DNA indicate that divalent ions form a cylindrical sheath enveloping the chain, but they are not localized. Small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering provide complementary information on the structure and interactions in polymer solutions and gels.

  14. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During previous studies, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon product. As much as a 130% increase in the humic acid sorption capacity of a PAC produced from a high-sodium-content lignite was observed. During this study, activated carbons were prepared from three coals representing high-sodium, low-sodium--low-calcium, and high-calcium compositions in two steps, an initial char formation followed by mild activation with steam to avoid excessive burnout. This set of carbons was characterized with respect to physical and chemical properties. The BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) nitrogen adsorption isotherms gave relatively low surface areas (ranging from 245 to 370 m{sup 2}/g). The lowest-BET area was obtained for the high-sodium carbon, which can be attributed to enlargement of micropores as a result of sodium-catalyzed gasification reaction of the carbon structure. This hypothesis is consistent with the scanning electron microscopy microprobe analyses, which show that in both the coal and the activated carbon from this coal, the sodium is distributed over both the carbon structure and the mineral particles. Thus it is initially associated with carboxylate groups on the coal and then as sodium oxide or

  15. Effect of Protein-Lipid-Salt Interactions on Sodium Availability in the Mouth and Consequent Perception of Saltiness: As Affected by Hydration in Powders.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Umut; Peterson, Devin G

    2015-09-01

    There is a broad need to reformulate lower sodium food products without affecting their original taste. The present study focuses on characterizing the role of protein-salt interactions on the salt release in low-moisture systems and saltiness perception during hydration. Sodium release from freeze-dried protein powders and emulsion powders formulated at different protein/lipid ratios (5:0 to 1:4) were characterized using a chromatography column modified with a porcine tongue. Emulsion systems with protein structured at the interface were found to have faster initial sodium release rates and faster hydration and were perceived to have a higher initial salt intensity with a lower salty aftertaste. In summary, exposure of the hydrophilic segments of the interface-structured proteins in emulsions was suggested to facilitate hydration and release of sodium during dissolution of low-moisture powder samples. PMID:26255668

  16. Effect of Protein-Lipid-Salt Interactions on Sodium Availability in the Mouth and Consequent Perception of Saltiness: As Affected by Hydration in Powders.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Umut; Peterson, Devin G

    2015-09-01

    There is a broad need to reformulate lower sodium food products without affecting their original taste. The present study focuses on characterizing the role of protein-salt interactions on the salt release in low-moisture systems and saltiness perception during hydration. Sodium release from freeze-dried protein powders and emulsion powders formulated at different protein/lipid ratios (5:0 to 1:4) were characterized using a chromatography column modified with a porcine tongue. Emulsion systems with protein structured at the interface were found to have faster initial sodium release rates and faster hydration and were perceived to have a higher initial salt intensity with a lower salty aftertaste. In summary, exposure of the hydrophilic segments of the interface-structured proteins in emulsions was suggested to facilitate hydration and release of sodium during dissolution of low-moisture powder samples.

  17. Ternary phase behaviour and vesicle formation of a sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate/1-decanol/water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akter, Nasima; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Reza, Mohammad Imam Hasan

    2011-08-01

    The phase behaviour of a system composed of amino acid-based surfactant (sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate), 1-decanol and deionised water was investigated for vesicle formation. Changing the molar ratio of the amphiphiles, two important aggregate structures were observed in the aqueous corner of the phase diagram. Two different sizes of microemulsions were found at two amphiphile-water boundaries. A stable single vesicle lobe was found for 1∶2 molar ratios in 92 wt% water with vesicles approximately 100 nm in size and with high zeta potential value. Structural variation arises due to the reduction of electrostatic repulsions among the ionic headgroups of the surfactants and the hydration forces due to adsorbed water onto monolayer's. The balance of these two forces determines the aggregate structures. Analysis was followed by the molecular geometrical structure. These findings may have implications for the development of drug delivery systems for cancer treatments, as well as cosmetic and food formulations.

  18. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of accelerated carbonation of a synthetic calcium-silicate-hydrate gel

    SciTech Connect

    Morandeau, Antoine E.; White, Claire E.

    2015-04-21

    Calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H) gel is the main binder component in hydrated ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste, and is known to play a crucial role in the carbonation of cementitious materials, especially for more sustainable alternatives containing supplementary cementitious materials. However, the exact atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of C–S–H gel remain unknown. Here, we investigate the local atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of a synthetic calcium–silicate–hydrate gel exposed to pure CO₂ vapour, using in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and subsequent pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. By analysing both the reciprocal and real-space scattering data as the C–S–H carbonation reaction progresses, all phases present during the reaction (crystalline and non-crystalline) have been identified and quantified, with the results revealing the emergence of several polymorphs of crystalline calcium carbonate (vaterite and calcite) in addition to the decalcified C–S–H gel. Furthermore, the results point toward residual calcium being present in the amorphous decalcified gel, potentially in the form of an amorphous calcium carbonate phase. As a result of the quantification process, the reaction kinetics for the evolution of the individual phases have been obtained, revealing new information on the rate of growth/dissolution for each phase associated with C–S–H gel carbonation. Moreover, the investigation reveals that the use of real space diffraction data in the form of PDFs enables more accurate determination of the phases that develop during complex reaction processes such as C–S–H gel carbonation in comparison to the conventional reciprocal space Rietveld analysis approach.

  19. Hydration sequence of swelling clays: evolutions of specific surface area and hydration energy.

    PubMed

    Salles, Fabrice; Douillard, Jean-Marc; Denoyel, Renaud; Bildstein, Olivier; Jullien, Michel; Beurroies, Isabelle; Van Damme, Henri

    2009-05-15

    In order to identify the key steps and the driving force for the hydration process of swelling clays, the water adsorption isotherms and enthalpies were measured on monoionic montmorillonite samples saturated with alkali or calcium ions, and on bi-ionic samples saturated with a sodium-calcium mixture. The specific surface area evolution along the hydration process was determined using a recent interpretation of the experimental adsorption isotherms of swelling solids. Results are interpreted in structural terms. Compared with additional data from sample-controlled thermal analysis (SCTA), the results confirm experimentally that the hydration of Li- and Na-montmorillonite is mainly a cation-controlled process, in contrast with the hydration of Cs samples in which the cation contribution to hydration is negligible, as we have already demonstrated using electrostatic calculations or conductivity measurements. PMID:19303602

  20. Early-age hydration and volume change of calcium sulfoaluminate cement-based binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaunsali, Piyush

    Shrinkage cracking is a predominant deterioration mechanism in structures with high surface-to-volume ratio. One way to allay shrinkage-induced stresses is to use calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement whose early-age expansion in restrained condition induces compressive stress that can be utilized to counter the tensile stresses due to shrinkage. In addition to enhancing the resistance against shrinkage cracking, CSA cement also has lower carbon footprint than that of Portland cement. This dissertation aims at improving the understanding of early-age volume change of CSA cement-based binders. For the first time, interaction between mineral admixtures (Class F fly ash, Class C fly ash, and silica fume) and OPC-CSA binder was studied. Various physico-chemical factors such as the hydration of ye'elimite (main component in CSA cement), amount of ettringite (the main phase responsible for expansion in CSA cement), supersaturation with respect to ettringite in cement pore solution, total pore volume, and material stiffness were monitored to examine early-age expansion characteristics. This research validated the crystallization stress theory by showing the presence of higher supersaturation level of ettringite, and therefore, higher crystallization stress in CSA cement-based binders. Supersaturation with respect to ettringite was found to increase with CSA dosage and external supply of gypsum. Mineral admixtures (MA) altered the expansion characteristics in OPC-CSA-MA binders with fixed CSA cement. This study reports that fly ash (FA) behaves differently depending on its phase composition. The Class C FA-based binder (OPC-CSA-CFA) ceased expanding beyond two days unlike other OPC-CSA-MA binders. Three factors were found to govern expansion of CSA cement-based binders: 1) volume fraction of ettringite in given pore volume, 2) saturation level of ettringite, and 3) dynamic modulus. Various models were utilized to estimate the macroscopic tensile stress in CSA cement

  1. Imaging of drug loading distributions in individual microspheres of calcium silicate hydrate--an X-ray spectromicroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wu, Jin; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2015-04-21

    Imaging is one of the most direct and ideal ways to track drug loading distributions in drug carriers on the molecular level, which will facilitate the optimization of drug carriers and drug loading capacities. Herein, we report the mapping of an individual mesoporous calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) microsphere before and after the loading of ibuprofen (IBU) and the interactions between drug carriers and drug molecules simultaneously by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nanoscaled X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy clearly indicates that IBU is bonded to calcium and silicate sites via carboxylic acid groups. More importantly, STXM has been successfully used to determine the absolute thickness of IBU, revealing its distribution in the CSH microsphere.

  2. Effect of hydrophilic walls on the hydration of sodium cations in planar nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    A computer simulation of the structure of Na+ ion hydration shells with sizes in the range of 1 to 100 molecules in a planar model nanopore 0.7 nm wide with structureless hydrophilic walls is performed using the Monte Carlo method at a temperature of 298 K. A detailed model of many-body intermolecular interactions, calibrated with reference to experimental data on the free energy and enthalpy of reactions after gaseous water molecules are added to a hydration shell, is used. It is found that perturbations produced by hydrophilic walls cause the hydration shell to decay into two components that differ in their spatial arrangement and molecular orientational order.

  3. Atomic mobility in calcium and sodium aluminosilicate melts at 1200 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claireaux, Corinne; Chopinet, Marie-Hélène; Burov, Ekaterina; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Roskosz, Mathieu; Toplis, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    Multicomponent chemical diffusion in liquids of the quaternary system CaO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2 has been studied. Diffusion-couple experiments were performed at 1200 °C and for different durations around a central composition of 64.5 wt%SiO2, 13.3 wt%Na2O, 10.8 wt%CaO, 11.4 wt%Al2O3, leading to an overconstrained system of equations that was used to determine the diffusion matrix of the system. The dominant eigenvector of the diffusion matrix was found to correspond to the exchange between sodium and calcium, consistent with the results of the ternary soda-lime silica system. On the other hand, neither of the other two eigenvectors of the diffusion matrix of the quaternary system involve sodium. Given a factor of 50 between the dominant and second eigenvalue, diffusion couples involving the exchange of sodium oxide and a network-forming oxide result in strong uphill diffusion of calcium. The second eigenvector, corresponding to the exchange of calcium with silicon and aluminum, is close to the dominant eigenvector found in previous studies of ternary alkaline-earth aluminosilicate systems. Our results therefore suggest that simple systems may be used to understand diffusive mechanisms in more complex systems.

  4. Effect of intravenous calcium borogluconate and sodium phosphate in cows with parturient paresis.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Zulliger, P; Liesegang, A; Bleul, U; Hässig, M

    2009-03-01

    Thirty cows with parturient paresis were divided into three groups of 10. All the cows were given 500 ml of a 40 per cent calcium borogluconate solution intravenously over a period of 10 minutes, and 20 were also given 500 ml of a 10 per cent solution of sodium phosphate intravenously; in 10 of the cows this solution was administered over a period of 10 minutes immediately after the calcium borogluconate solution, and in the other 10 cows 200 ml of the solution was administered rapidly and the remaining 300 ml was added to 10 litres of sodium chloride and glucose solution and infused slowly over six hours. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to the outcome of the treatments; six or seven of the cows in each group stood within eight hours of the treatment. There were no significant differences between the changes in serum calcium concentrations among the groups. The mean concentrations of inorganic phosphorus in the groups given sodium phosphate were increased above the normal range initially, but after eight hours there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of the numbers of cows that were hypophosphataemic. There were no significant differences between the three groups with respect to changes after treatment in the serum concentrations of magnesium or parathyroid hormone.

  5. Involvement of the Sodium-Calcium exchanger 3 (NCX3) in ziram-induced calcium dysregulation and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, J.; Lao, A.J.; Katsura, M.; Caputo, A.; Schweizer, F. E.; Sokolow, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ziram is a dimethyldithiocarbamate fungicide which can cause intraneuronal calcium (Ca2+) dysregulation and subsequently neuronal death. The signaling mechanisms underlying ziram-induced Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and neurotoxicity are not fully understood. NCX3 is the third isoform of the sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) family and plays an important role in regulating Ca2+ homeostasis in excitable cells. We previously generated a mouse model deficient for the sodium-calcium exchanger 3 and showed that NCX3 is protective against ischemic damage. In the present study, we aim to examine whether NCX3 exerts a similar role against toxicological injury caused by the pesticide ziram. Our data show baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells stably transfected with NCX3 (BHK-NCX3) are more susceptible to ziram toxicity than cells transfected with the empty vector (BHK-WT). Increased toxicity in BHK-NCX3 was associated with a rapid rise in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+i] induced by ziram. Profound mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP depletion were also observed in BHK-NCX3 cells following treatment with ziram. Lastly, primary dopaminergic neurons lacking NCX3 (NCX3−/−) were less sensitive to ziram neurotoxicity than wildtype control dopaminergic neurons. These results demonstrate that NCX3 genetic deletion protects against ziram-induced neurotoxicity and suggest NCX3 and its downstream molecular pathways as key factors involved in ziram toxicity. Our study identifies new molecular events through which pesticides (e.g. ziram) can lead to pathological features of degenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and indicates new targets to slow down neuronal degeneration. PMID:25284465

  6. Effect of calcium chloride on the hydration and leaching of lead-retarded cement

    SciTech Connect

    Cheeseman, C.R.; Asavapisit, S. )

    1999-06-01

    The effect of adding CaCl[sub 2] to ordinary portland cement containing 10% (by weight) of a synthetic lead hydroxide waste has been investigated using differential thermal analysis, conduction calorimetry, and by analyzing solutions extracted from mixes during the early stages of hydration. Lead wastes are known to retard initial cement hydration reactions, and for the waste loading used in these experiments the peak in the heat of hydration curve was delayed from 8.7 to 172 h. The addition of CaCl[sub 2] reduced this retarding effect but was associated with a decrease in the overall extent of cement hydration, particularly at high CaCl[sub 2] concentrations. The acceleration induced is associated with lower concentrations of hydroxyl ions in solution. This reduces dissolution and subsequent adsorption of Pb(OH)[sub 3][sup [minus

  7. Asymmetric hydration structure around calcium ion restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Kusudo, Tomoko; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2016-11-23

    The adsorbed phase and hydration structure of an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2 restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons (ACs) having different average pore widths (0.63 and 1.1 nm) were investigated with the analysis of adsorption isotherms and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra on Ca K-edge. The adsorbed density of Ca(2+) per unit micropore volume in the narrower pore was higher than in the wider pore, while the adsorbed amount per unit mass of carbon with the narrower pore was half of the amount of ACs with the larger pore. On the other hand, variations in the bands assigned to double-electron (KM I) and 1s  →  3d excitations in XAFS spectra demonstrate the formation of a distorted hydration cluster around Ca(2+) in the micropore, although the structural parameters of hydrated Ca(2+) in the micropores were almost consistent with the bulk aqueous solution, as revealed by the analysis of extended XAFS (EXAFS) spectra. In contrast to the hydration structure of monovalent ions such as Rb(+), which generally presents a dehydrated structure in smaller than 1 nm micropores in ACs, the present study clearly explains that the non-spherically-symmetric structure of hydrated Ca(2+) restricted in carbon micropores whose sizes are around 1 nm is experimentally revealed where any dehydration phenomena from the first hydration shell around Ca(2+) could not be observed. PMID:27624154

  8. Effect of excess dietary sodium, potassium, calcium and phosphorus on excreta moisture of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Rose, S P; Wells, R G; Pirgozliev, V

    2000-12-01

    1. Four experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of dietary concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium or phosphate on the water intake and excreta moisture of laying hens. A fifth experiment examined the effect on these variables of increasing amounts of 2 different sodium salts (chloride or bicarbonate) and the interactions with 2 levels of dietary phosphorus. 2. All experiments involved individually caged laying hens fed on diets varying in 1 or 2 minerals in replacement for washed sand. The experimental diets contained mineral concentrations that either met or exceeded the expected requirement of the hens. The diets were given for a 7 or 8 d feeding period and food and water intakes were measured and excreta were collected for the last 48 h of each feeding period. These data were corrected for evaporative water loss to the environment during the collection period. 3. Increasing dietary concentrations of sodium, potassium or phosphorus gave linear increases (P<0.001) in the water intake of the laying hens and linear increases (P<0.01) in the moisture content of their excreta. Each 1 g/kg increase in dietary mineral increased the moisture content of the excreta by 9.04 (+/- 1.57), 11.95 (+/- 2.02) and 5.59 (+/- 0.31) g/kg (+/- standard error) for sodium, potassium and phosphorus, respectively. Increasing concentrations of dietary calcium did not significantly affect the water intakes or excreta moisture levels of the laying hens. 4. The fifth experiment showed that, although there was a sodium x phosphorus interaction (P<0.05), the effects of the 2 mineral additions were approximately additive. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in water intakes or excreta moisture contents due to the 2 different sodium salts (chloride or bicarbonate).

  9. Corrosion resistance of inconel 690 to sodium carbonate, calcium carbonate, and sodium meta silicate at 900 and 1100{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    1997-01-29

    Corrosive attack of Inconel 690 coupons was not observed following 3 day exposure tests to calcium carbonate, sodium carbonate, and sodium meta silicate at 900 {degrees}C. However, melt line attack was evident on coupons exposed to sodium meta silicate and sodium carbonate tested for 3 days at 1100 {degrees}C. In addition, intergranular attack (IGA), approximately 0.67 mils/day, was observed on the Inconel 690 coupon exposed to calcium carbonate at 1100 {degrees}C. Calcium carbonate did not completely remove the glass coating at 950 {degrees}C. In fact, it was comparable to the results obtained by exposing a glass coated coupon at 950 {degrees}C in air. Therefore, calcium carbonate is not recommended for cleaning the DWPF melter pour spout. Both sodium carbonate and sodium meta silicate appear to remove most of the glass. However, these cleaning agents will remain on the metal surface following exposure at 950 {degrees}C resulting in very rough surface and a potential for corrosive attack when heated to 1100 {degrees}C.

  10. A calcium prerinse required to form calcium fluoride in plaque from a sodium fluoride rinse.

    PubMed

    Vogel, G L; Tenuta, L M A; Schumacher, G E; Chow, L C

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a calcium (Ca) prerinse used before a 228 µg/g (ppm) fluoride (F) rinse would induce the formation of 'calcium fluoride-like' (CaF2-like) deposits in human dental plaque. Sixty minutes after the use of the Ca prerinse/F rinse, plaque samples were collected from 10 volunteers, homogenized, and split into 2 aliquots. The plaque mass from one aliquot was then extracted with a 'plaque-like' solution that extracted all the CaF2-like deposits. The total F in both aliquots was then determined and compared. The results demonstrated that, as in previous studies, the Ca prerinse induced large increases in plaque fluid and total plaque F. However, unlike previous results without the Ca prerinse, 30% of the plaque F deposits were CaF2 or CaF2-like. Given that maintaining an elevated F concentration in the vicinity of a developing lesion may play an important role in the cariostatic effect of this ion, and the potential advantages of CaF2-like deposits as an F source, these results suggest that a Ca prerinse may increase the cariostatic effect of topical agents.

  11. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, I.; Luchinsky, D. G.; Tindjong, R.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Qf at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Qf=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Qf for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Qf leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Qf(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca2+/Na+ valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls.

  12. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, I; Luchinsky, D G; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Q(f) at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Q(f)=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Q(f) for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q(f) leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Q(f)(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca(2+)/Na(+) valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls. PMID:24329301

  13. The Role of an Impurity in Ceftriaxone Sodium Preparation for Injection in Determining Compatibility with Calcium-Containing Solutions.

    PubMed

    Tange, Mio; Yoshida, Miyako; Nakai, Yuka; Uchida, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Ceftriaxone sodium preparation for injection is known to form insoluble microparticles with calcium. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of an impurity in the ceftriaxone sodium preparation on this incompatibility. Firstly, using HPLC, two impurities were identified in the ceftriaxone sodium solution. The major impurity (impurity 1) was identified as tetrahydro-2-methyl-3-thioxo-1,2,4-triazine-5,6-dione by LC/MS. Secondly, the role played by this impurity in the incompatibility with calcium was examined. Using seven different ceftriaxone preparations for injection, the effect of adding impurity 1 to mixed solutions of ceftriaxone sodium and calcium chloride on the appearance of insoluble microparticles, was examined using a light obscuration particle counter. Although incompatibility was not completely suppressed by the addition of impurity 1, the number of insoluble microparticles formed with calcium chloride solution was decreased in proportion to the concentration of impurity 1, and the concentration of calcium ion decreased as the concentration of added impurity 1 increased. These results show that impurity 1 plays a concentration-dependent role in incompatibility between ceftriaxone sodium preparation for injection and calcium-containing solutions. PMID:26936047

  14. The regulation of corneal hydration by a salt pump requiring the presence of sodium and bicarbonate ions

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, Stuart

    1974-01-01

    1. The use of polyacrylamide gel salt bridges enables trans-membrane potentials to be measured to an accuracy of 20 μV over long periods. 2. The technique is applied to measure electrical potentials across corneal endothelia of rabbits. 3. In de-epithelialized corneas which translocate water, a spontaneous potential of 550 μV is found across the endothelium (tissue resistance 20 Ω cm2). 4. This electrical potential (and water translocation) is reduced to zero when sodium is absent from the Ringer, and by about 80% when bicarbonate ions are absent. Removal of chloride has no such effect. 5. Under a variety of conditions, the potential correlates with the observed translocation of fluid across corneal endothelium. The translocated fluid is shown to be isotonic with sodium in the Ringer and therefore the potential correlates with `active' sodium transport. 6. The potential and water translocation are abolished in the presence of ouabain at concentrations greater than 10-5 M. 7. The potential (lens-side negative) is of the wrong polarity to explain the net sodium transport (into the lens-side) by a sodium ion `pump'. 8. The current does not equal the net sodium flux under short circuit conditions. They differ in magnitude and polarity. 9. A model is proposed where the endothelium `pumps' salt out of the corneal stroma into the aqueous humour. 10. Flux equations are derived for a condition where the membrane (corneal endothelium) separates an ion exchanger (corneal stroma) from free solution (aqueous humour), where the usual relationship for free-free solutions Δπ = csΔμs does not apply. 11. The model is of use only when the stroma is well stirred. It may be used in whole corneas retaining their epithelium but it may not be used in de-epithelialized corneas. 12. The model predicts that the presence of an `active' salt flux out across the endothelium would create passive water and salt fluxes. The passive water flux would also travel out of the stroma across the

  15. High Sodium-Induced Oxidative Stress and Poor Anticrystallization Defense Aggravate Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Rat Hyperoxaluric Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced sodium excretion is associated with intrarenal oxidative stress. The present study evaluated whether oxidative stress caused by high sodium (HS) may be involved in calcium oxalate crystal formation. Male rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet. Normal-sodium and HS diets were achieved by providing drinking water containing 0.3% and 3% NaCl, respectively. Rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet with 5% hydroxyl-L-proline (HP) for 7 and 42 days to induce hyperoxaluria and/or calcium oxalate deposition. Compared to normal sodium, HS slightly increased calcium excretion despite diuresis; however, the result did not reach statistical significance. HS did not affect the hyperoxaluria, hypocalciuria or supersaturation caused by HP; however, it increased calcium oxalate crystal deposition soon after 7 days of co-treatment. Massive calcium oxalate formation and calcium crystal excretion in HS+HP rats were seen after 42 days of treatment. HP-mediated hypocitraturia was further exacerbated by HS. Moreover, HS aggravated HP-induced renal injury and tubular damage via increased apoptosis and oxidative stress. Increased urinary malondialdehyde excretion, in situ superoxide production, NAD(P)H oxidase and xanthine oxidase expression and activity, and decreased antioxidant enzyme expression or activity in the HS+HP kidney indicated exaggerated oxidative stress. Interestingly, this redox imbalance was associated with reduced renal osteopontin and Tamm-Horsfall protein expression (via increased excretion) and sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter NaDC-1 upregulation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that a HS diet induces massive crystal formation in the hyperoxaluric kidney; this is not due to increased urinary calcium excretion but is related to oxidative injury and loss of anticrystallization defense. PMID:26241473

  16. High Sodium-Induced Oxidative Stress and Poor Anticrystallization Defense Aggravate Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Rat Hyperoxaluric Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced sodium excretion is associated with intrarenal oxidative stress. The present study evaluated whether oxidative stress caused by high sodium (HS) may be involved in calcium oxalate crystal formation. Male rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet. Normal-sodium and HS diets were achieved by providing drinking water containing 0.3% and 3% NaCl, respectively. Rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet with 5% hydroxyl-L-proline (HP) for 7 and 42 days to induce hyperoxaluria and/or calcium oxalate deposition. Compared to normal sodium, HS slightly increased calcium excretion despite diuresis; however, the result did not reach statistical significance. HS did not affect the hyperoxaluria, hypocalciuria or supersaturation caused by HP; however, it increased calcium oxalate crystal deposition soon after 7 days of co-treatment. Massive calcium oxalate formation and calcium crystal excretion in HS+HP rats were seen after 42 days of treatment. HP-mediated hypocitraturia was further exacerbated by HS. Moreover, HS aggravated HP-induced renal injury and tubular damage via increased apoptosis and oxidative stress. Increased urinary malondialdehyde excretion, in situ superoxide production, NAD(P)H oxidase and xanthine oxidase expression and activity, and decreased antioxidant enzyme expression or activity in the HS+HP kidney indicated exaggerated oxidative stress. Interestingly, this redox imbalance was associated with reduced renal osteopontin and Tamm-Horsfall protein expression (via increased excretion) and sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter NaDC-1 upregulation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that a HS diet induces massive crystal formation in the hyperoxaluric kidney; this is not due to increased urinary calcium excretion but is related to oxidative injury and loss of anticrystallization defense.

  17. X-ray microanalysis of calcium in fixed and in shock-frozen hydrated green algal cells: Mougeotia, Spirogyra and Zygnema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbacher, Roland; Wagner, Gottfried; Pallaghy, Charles K.

    1984-04-01

    X-ray microanalysis, widely used for ionic detection in cell tissues, was performed on 0.5 μm thick glutaraldehyde-osmiumtetroxide fixed cell sections. Calcium in a water-insoluble state was found in membrane bound vesicles of about 0.5 μm in diameter. No other cell compartment showed a comparable calcium accumulation. In vivo staining by the fluorescent calcium indicator dye chlorotetracycline revealed a vesicular calcium pattern in Mougeotia matching the results by X-ray microanalysis: a dense population of calcium vesicles is located close to the chloroplast edge where the actin filaments are attached. The data find further support from X-ray microanalysis of shock-frozen hydrated Mougeotia cells and of the closely related green algal cells Spirogyra and Zygnema (Zygnemaceae). X-ray microanalysis as performed in this study seems a reliable tool for the detection of water-insoluble calcium stored by membrane-covered cytoplasmic compartments.

  18. The mechanism of vapor phase hydration of calcium oxide: implications for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Kudłacz, Krzysztof; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos

    2014-10-21

    Lime-based sorbents are used for fuel- and flue-gas capture, thereby representing an economic and effective way to reduce CO2 emissions. Their use involves cyclic carbonation/calcination which results in a significant conversion reduction with increasing number of cycles. To reactivate spent CaO, vapor phase hydration is typically performed. However, little is known about the ultimate mechanism of such a hydration process. Here, we show that the vapor phase hydration of CaO formed after calcination of calcite (CaCO3) single crystals is a pseudomorphic, topotactic process, which progresses via an intermediate disordered phase prior to the final formation of oriented Ca(OH)2 nanocrystals. The strong structural control during this solid-state phase transition implies that the microstructural features of the CaO parent phase predetermine the final structural and physicochemical (reactivity and attrition) features of the product hydroxide. The higher molar volume of the product can create an impervious shell around unreacted CaO, thereby limiting the efficiency of the reactivation process. However, in the case of compact, sintered CaO structures, volume expansion cannot be accommodated in the reduced pore volume, and stress generation leads to pervasive cracking. This favors complete hydration but also detrimental attrition. Implications of these results in carbon capture and storage (CCS) are discussed.

  19. The Effect of Calcium Sodium Phosphosilicate on Dentin Hypersensitivity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Mei, Li; Yao, Liang; Tian, Jinhui; Li, Huang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of calcium sodium phosphosilicate (CSPS) in treating dentin hypersensitivity (DH) and to compare this effect to that of a negative (placebo) control. Materials and Methods Several databases, including Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, were searched to identify relevant articles published through January 2015; grey literature (i.e., academic literature that is not formally published) was also searched. Two authors performed data extraction independently and jointly using data collection forms. The primary outcome was the DH pain response to routine activities or to thermal, tactile, evaporative, or electrical stimuli, and the secondary outcome was the side effects of CSPS use. Each study was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk bias. Meta-analysis of studies with the same participant demographics, interventions, controls, assessment methods and follow-up periods was performed. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation System was used to assess the quality of the evidence and the risk of bias across studies. Results Meta-analysis demonstrated that toothpaste containing 5% CSPS was more effective than the negative control at relieving dentin sensitivity, with the level of evidence classified as “moderate”. In addition, prophylaxis paste containing 15% calcium sodium phosphosilicate was favored over the negative control at reducing post-periodontal therapy hypersensitivity, with the level of evidence categorized as “low”. Only two studies reported side effects of CSPS use. Conclusions The majority of studies found that calcium sodium phosphosilicate was more effective than the negative control at alleviating DH. Because strong evidence is scarce, high-quality, well-designed clinical trials are required in the future before definitive recommendations can be made. PMID:26544035

  20. Calcium-43 chemical shift and electric field gradient tensor interplay: a sensitive probe of structure, polymorphism, and hydration.

    PubMed

    Widdifield, Cory M; Moudrakovski, Igor; Bryce, David L

    2014-07-14

    Calcium is the 5th most abundant element on earth, and is found in numerous biological tissues, proteins, materials, and increasingly in catalysts. However, due to a number of unfavourable nuclear properties, such as a low magnetogyric ratio, very low natural abundance, and its nuclear electric quadrupole moment, development of solid-state (43)Ca NMR has been constrained relative to similar nuclides. In this study, 12 commonly-available calcium compounds are analyzed via(43)Ca solid-state NMR and the information which may be obtained by the measurement of both the (43)Ca electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift tensors (the latter of which are extremely rare with only a handful of literature examples) is discussed. Combined with density functional theory (DFT) computations, this 'tensor interplay' is, for the first time for (43)Ca, illustrated to be diagnostic in distinguishing polymorphs (e.g., calcium formate), and the degree of hydration (e.g., CaCl2·2H2O and calcium tartrate tetrahydrate). For Ca(OH)2, we outline the first example of (1)H to (43)Ca cross-polarization on a sample at natural abundance in (43)Ca. Using prior knowledge of the relationship between the isotropic calcium chemical shift and the calcium quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) with coordination number, we postulate the coordination number in a sample of calcium levulinate dihydrate, which does not have a known crystal structure. Natural samples of CaCO3 (aragonite polymorph) are used to show that the synthetic structure is present in nature. Gauge-including projector augmented-wave (GIPAW) DFT computations using accepted crystal structures for many of these systems generally result in calculated NMR tensor parameters which are in very good agreement with the experimental observations. This combination of (43)Ca NMR measurements with GIPAW DFT ultimately allows us to establish clear correlations between various solid-state (43)Ca NMR observables and selected structural parameters

  1. Human water, sodium, and calcium regulation during space flight and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, S. E.; Seagrave, R. C.

    2000-05-01

    When one is exposed to microgravity, fluid which is normally pooled in the lower extremities is redistributed headward and weight bearing bones begin to demineralize due to reduced mechanical stresses. The kidney, which is the primary regulator of body fluid volume and composition, responds to the fluid shift and bone demineralization by increasing the urinary output of water, sodium, and calcium. This research involves developing a mathematical description of how water and electrolytes are internally redistributed and exchanged with the environment during space flight. This model consequently involves kidney function and the associated endocrine system. The model agrees well with actual data, including that a low sodium diet can prevent bone demineralization. Therefore, assumptions made to develop the model are most likely valid. Additionally, various levels of activity are also considered in the model since exercise may help to eliminate some of the undesired effects of space flight such as muscle atrophy and bone demineralization.

  2. Human water, sodium, and calcium regulation during space flight and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, S. E.; Seagrave, R. C.

    When one is exposed to microgravity, fluid which is normally pooled in the lower extremities is redistributed headward and weight bearing bones begin to demineralize due to reduced mechanical stresses. The kidney, which is the primary regulator of body fluid volume and composition, responds to the fluid shift and bone demineralization by increasing the urinary output of water, sodium, and calcium. This research involves developing a mathematical description of how water and electrolytes are internally redistributed and exchanged with the environment during space flight. This model consequently involves kidney function and the associated endocrine system. The model agrees well with actual data, including that a low sodium diet can prevent bone demineralization. Therefore, assumptions made to develop the model are most likely valid. Additionally, various levels of activity are also considered in the model since exercise may help to eliminate some of the undesired effects of space flight such as muscle atrophy and bone demineralization.

  3. Variable Temperature Infrared Spectroscopy Investigations of Benzoic Acid Desorption from Sodium and Calcium Montmorillonite Clays.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Tara M; Ingram, Audrey L; Maraoulaite, Dalia K; White, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    Processes involved in thermal desorption of benzoic acid from sodium and calcium montmorillonite clays are investigated by using variable temperature diffuse reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). By monitoring the temperature dependence of infrared absorbance bands while heating samples, subtle changes in molecular vibrations are detected and employed to characterize specific benzoic acid adsorption sites. Abrupt changes in benzoic acid adsorption site properties occur for both clay samples at about 125 °C. Difference spectra absorbance band frequency variations indicate that adsorbed benzoic acid interacts with interlayer cations through water bridges and that these interactions can be disrupted by the presence of organic anions, in particular, benzoate. PMID:26647147

  4. Effect of intravenous calcium and oral sodium phosphate in cows with parturient paresis.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Dumelin, J; Siegwart, N; Bleul, U; Hässig, M

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether oral administration of sodium phosphate in conjunction with intravenous calcium is more efficaceous than intravenous calcium alone for the treatment of parturient paresis. Thirty cows with parturient paresis were examined and treated by the same veterinarian. The cows were divided randomly into two groups of 15 cows each. Cows in group A received 500 ml of a 40 per cent calcium borogluconate solution containing 15.65 g calcium gluconate and borogluconate, with a supplement of 6 per cent magnesium hypophosphite (9.85 g magnesium hypophosphite) intravenously over a period of approximately 15 min. Cows in group B received the same treatment as well as 350 g of monobasic sodium phosphate (70 g inorganic phosphate, NaH2PO4 2 H2O, Streuli) dissolved in 0.5 litres of distilled water orally via a stomach tube. After treatment, the heart rate, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, superficial body temperature, rumen motility, appetite and defecation of the cows were monitored every hour for eight h. The cows' attempts to rise and their ability to stand were also noted. Initially, the results of clinical examination and serum electrolyte analyses did not differ between the two groups of cows. Within one hour of treatment, stupor was not observed in any of the cows. The general demeanour after treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups. In both groups, the average rectal temperature increased within two hours of the initiation of treatment, from 38.0 +/- 0.95 degrees C to 38.5 +/- 0.40 degrees C. There was no significant difference in the recovery rate between the groups. Of the 30 cows, 22 (73.3 per cent) stood within eight hours of treatment (10 cows from group A and 12 cows from group B). The type of treatment did not affect the time required to stand: cows in group A stood within 47.3 +/- 44 minutes and cows in group B stood within 24.2 +/- 32 minutes after the start of treatment. Our findings do not

  5. Interaction between alpha-calcium sulfate hemihydrate and superplasticizer from the point of adsorption characteristics, hydration and hardening process

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Baohong; Ye Qingqing; Zhang Jiali; Lou Wenbin; Wu Zhongbiao

    2010-02-15

    Superplasticizers (SPs), namely sulfonated melamine formaldehyde (SMF) and polycarboxylate (PC), were independently admixed with alpha-calcium sulfate hemihydrate based plaster to improve the material's performance. SMF and PC gave, respectively, 38% and 25% increases in the 2 h bending strength at the optimum dosages of 0.5 wt.% and 0.3 wt.%, which are determined essentially by the maximum water-reducing efficiency. The peak shift of binding energy of Ca2p{sub 3/2} detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests that SPs are chemically adsorbed on gypsum surface. A careful examination of the strength development of set plaster allowed the hydration and hardening process to be divided roughly into five stages. SMF accelerates early hydration, while PC decelerates it. Both SPs allowed similar maximum water reductions, giving a more compact structure and a decrease in total pore volume and average pore diameter, and thus leading to higher strengths in the hardened plasters with SPs.

  6. A study of the effects of nickel chloride and calcium chloride on hydration of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, H.; Cartledge, F.K.; Roy, A.; Tittlebaum, M.E. . Department of Chemistry and Institute for Recyclable Materials)

    1993-07-01

    Portland cement samples containing amounts of CaCl[sub 2] and NiCl[sub 2] ranging from approximately 1% to 20% by weight have been examined by [sup 29]Si and [sup 27]Al solid-state MAS NMR as a function of time, and some of the mature pastes have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. Changes in physical properties that had been previously observed as a function of amounts of salt added are clearly traceable to differences in the silicate matrices. Low concentrations of both salts promote Q[sup 1] formation, but high concentrations result in formation of much more Q[sup 2] at the expense of Q[sup 1]. Both salts accelerate both aluminate and silicate hydration, and the effects appear to be almost entirely due to chloride. Minor variations in hydration rates at high Ni concentrations may be the result of nickel salt precipitation.

  7. Ternary phase behaviour and vesicle formation of a sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate/1-decanol/water system

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Nasima; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Reza, Mohammad Imam Hasan

    2011-01-01

    The phase behaviour of a system composed of amino acid-based surfactant (sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate hydrate), 1-decanol and deionised water was investigated for vesicle formation. Changing the molar ratio of the amphiphiles, two important aggregate structures were observed in the aqueous corner of the phase diagram. Two different sizes of microemulsions were found at two amphiphile-water boundaries. A stable single vesicle lobe was found for 1∶2 molar ratios in 92 wt% water with vesicles approximately 100 nm in size and with high zeta potential value. Structural variation arises due to the reduction of electrostatic repulsions among the ionic headgroups of the surfactants and the hydration forces due to adsorbed water onto monolayer's. The balance of these two forces determines the aggregate structures. Analysis was followed by the molecular geometrical structure. These findings may have implications for the development of drug delivery systems for cancer treatments, as well as cosmetic and food formulations. PMID:22355590

  8. Establishment of drug delivery system nanocapsulated with an antioxidant (+)-catechin hydrate and sodium meta borate chelator against sodium fluoride induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Arpita; Chanda, Soumen; Bandyopadhyay, Bidyut; Das, Nirmalendu

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress a major cause of fluoride induced toxicity and mitochondrial impairment in common in experimental rats during chronic exposure of fluoride. Attempts have been made in the present experiment to diminish oxidative damage, combined therapy with (+)-catechin hydrate (an antioxidant) and sodium meta borate (chelator) were used. Fluoride intoxication in rats was performed by using 13mg/kg NaF and both antioxidant CH and chelator SMB were used at a concentration of 8.98μM/kg body weight. Mixture of CH and SMB in free or in PLGA nanocapsule encapsulated form were prepared. The efficacies of those formulations were tested in combating free radical mediated oxidative insult produced by sodium fluoride (NaF). The amalgamated therapy used in this experiment was shown to reduce fluoride levels in liver, brain and kidney from 9.5, 5.5, 6.3μg/g to 4.6, 2, 2.6μg/g, respectively. Our result indicated that the combined chelator and antioxidant therapy in nanocapsulated drug delivery system could provide a projection in combating fluoride induced mitochondrial impairment in rat model.

  9. Alendronate sodium hydrate (oral jelly) for the treatment of osteoporosis: review of a novel, easy to swallow formulation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by loss of bone mass, decreased bone strength, and an increased risk of bone fracture. The disease progresses with age, especially in postmenopausal women. Japan is one of the most rapidly aging societies worldwide. Japanese individuals over 65 years of age constituted 23.0% of the population in 2010 and 25.1% to 25.2% as of 2013. The estimated number of people with osteoporosis in Japan is currently 13 million. Bisphosphonates increase bone mineral density by inhibiting osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, thereby reducing the risk of fractures. Alendronate sodium hydrate (alendronate) is a bisphosphonate that potently inhibits bone resorption and is used to treat osteoporosis. Sufficient water is required to take an alendronate oral tablet; insufficient water could result in digestive system diseases, such as esophageal ulceration. Elderly patients with swallowing difficulty may choke on the tablet. Taking a tablet with oral jelly is a method to prevent digestive system disease and reduce the choking hazard. Once-weekly alendronate oral jelly was approved in 2012 by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan as the world's first drug for osteoporosis in a jelly formulation. It consists of a jelly portion and an air portion. The jelly formulation is smoothly discharged by pushing the air portion. Therefore, elderly patients with physical disabilities are able to easily take all of the jelly formulation from the package. In this review, this new formulation of alendronate sodium hydrate (oral jelly) is introduced and discussed in terms of osteoporosis treatment. This new formulation provides an alternative so that patients may select a method of dosing tailored to their preferences. Management of osteoporosis involves assessing fracture risk and preventing fractures. Higher adherence to the treatment of patients with osteoporosis and prevention of osteoporotic fractures are issues to be resolved. PMID

  10. Optical planar waveguide in sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals by carbon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Gang; Wang, Hui-Lin; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2013-07-01

    There is great interest in niobate crystals which belong to the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) families owing to their intriguing properties. As one representative of such crystals, CBN (calcium barium niobate) has attracted rapidly growing attention. Because it has a higher Curie temperature than SBN (strontium barium niobate), possesses outstanding ferroelectric and it possesses optical properties. In addition, doped with sodium, CBN will show a higher Curie temperature than pure CBN. We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical planar waveguide in x-cut sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystal by using C ion implantation. The guided-mode properties at the wavelength of 633 and 1539 nm are investigated through prism-coupling measurements, respectively. By applying direct end-face coupling arrangement, the near-field optical intensity distribution of waveguide modes is measured at 633 nm. For comparison, the modal profile of the same guided mode is also numerically calculated by the finite difference beam-propagation method via computer software BeamPROP. The transmission spectra of the waveguide before and after ion implantation treatments were investigated also. Our experiment results reveal that the waveguide could propagate light with transverse magnetic polarized direction only and it is assumed that the polarization selectivity of CBN crystal may responsible for this phenomenon.

  11. Modulation of the sodium-calcium exchanger in the rat kidney by different sequential stressors.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, S; Sedlakova, B; Kvetnansky, R; Ondrias, K; Krizanova, O

    2010-01-01

    Stress, if exaggerated, modulates a variety of metabolic pathways and results in development of serious health consequences. The cell membrane sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) is a major calcium extrusion system and is also modulated by stress. It has been shown previously that mRNA, protein levels and activity of the type 1 NCX (NCX1) in the left ventricle of the rat heart are increased by stressors, such as immobilization or hypoxia. In this study we investigated whether exposure to a subsequent different stressor can affect gene expression, protein level and activity of the NCX1 in rat kidney compared to exposure to only one type of stressor. In these experiments, we used immobilization and cold as the model stressors.We found that cold exposure at 4 degrees C for 24 h, when applied after immobilization repeated seven times, completely abolished the immobilization-induced increase in NCX mRNA level and after 7 days cold exposure the increases in NCX1 protein and activity in rat kidney were also abolished. Permanently increased NCX1 expression can result in imbalance of cellular calcium homeostasis and thus contribute to kidney dysfunction. Based on our results, we conclude that exposure to a cold stressor can have a protective effect on the kidney in rats exposed previously to repeated immobilization stress. This might be explained by differential stimulation of sympathetic neural and adrenal medullary responses by these different stressors.

  12. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  13. Distinct roles for sodium, chloride, and calcium in excitotoxic dendritic injury and recovery.

    PubMed

    Hasbani, M J; Hyrc, K L; Faddis, B T; Romano, C; Goldberg, M P

    1998-11-01

    The postsynaptic neuronal dendrite is selectively vulnerable to hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and glutamate receptor overactivation. We explored the glutamate receptor pharmacology and ionic basis of rapid, reversible alterations in dendritic shape which occur in cultured neurons exposed to glutamate. Dendrite morphology was assessed with the fluorescent membrane tracer, DiI, or immunofluorescence labeling of the somatodendritic protein, MAP2. Cortical cultures derived from 15-day-old mouse embryos underwent segmental dendritic beading when exposed to NMDA, AMPA, or kainate, but not to metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists. Varicosity formation in response to NMDA or kainate application was substantially attenuated in reduced sodium buffer (substituted with N-methyl-D-glucamine). Furthermore, veratridine-induced sodium entry mimicked excitotoxic alterations in dendrites and additionally caused varicosity formation in axons. Solutions deficient in chloride (substituted with Na methylsulfate) and antagonists of chloride-permeable GABA/glycine receptors reduced NMDA- or kainate-induced varicosity formation. An increase in dendrite volume was observed as varicosities formed, and varicosity formation was attenuated in sucrose-supplemented hypertonic media. Despite marked structural changes affecting virtually all neurons, dendrite shape returned to normal within 2 h of terminating glutamate receptor agonist application. Neurons exposed to kainate recovered more rapidly than those exposed to NMDA, and neurons exposed to NMDA in calcium-free buffer recovered more rapidly than cells treated with NMDA in normal buffer. While sodium, chloride, and water entry contribute to excitotoxic dendritic injury acutely, calcium entry through NMDA receptors results in lasting structural changes in damaged dendrites.

  14. Highly improved hydration level sensing properties of copper oxide films with sodium and potassium doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Bünyamin; Kaya, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    In this study, un-doped, Na-doped, and K-doped nanostructured CuO films were successfully synthesized by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and then characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Structural properties of the CuO films were affected from doping. The XRD pattern indicates the formation of polycrystalline CuO films with no secondary phases. Furthermore, doping affected the crystal structure of the samples. The optimum conductivity values for both Na and K were obtained at 4 M% doping concentrations. The comparative hydration level sensing properties of the un-doped, Na-doped, and K-doped CuO nanoparticles were also investigated. A significant enhancement in hydration level sensing properties was observed for both 4 M% Na and K-doped CuO films for all concentration levels. Detailed discussions were reported in the study regarding atomic radii, crystalline structure, and conductivity.

  15. Calcium sulfoaluminate (Ye'elimite) hydration in the presence of gypsum, calcite, and vaterite

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, Craig W.; Telesca, Antonio; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-11-15

    Six calcium sulfoaluminate-based cementitious systems composed of calcium sulfoaluminate, calcite, vaterite, and gypsum were cured as pastes and mortars for 1, 7, 28 and 84 days. Pastes were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. Mortars were tested for compressive strength, dimensional stability and setting time. Furthermore, pastes with a water/cementitious material mass ratio of 0.80 were tested for heat evolution during the first 48 h by means of isothermal conduction calorimetry. It has been found that: (1) both calcite and vaterite reacted with monosulfoaluminate to give monocarboaluminate and ettringite, with vaterite being more reactive; (2) gypsum lowered the reactivity of both carbonates; (3) expansion was reduced by calcite and vaterite, irrespective of the presence of gypsum; and (4) both carbonates increased compressive strength in the absence of gypsum and decreased compressive strength less in the presence of gypsum, with vaterite's action more effective than that of calcite.

  16. Crystallization kinetics of calcium oxalate hydrates studied by scanning confocal interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohe, Bernd; Rogers, Kem A.; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Hunter, Graeme K.

    2006-10-01

    Scanning confocal interference microscopy (SCIM) is an optical technique that allows the visualization of structures below the limits of classical optical microscopy (≪250 nm). This study represents the first use of SCIM to analyze the formation of calcium oxalate crystals, the major constituent of kidney stones. Crystals were nucleated and grown on the glass bottom of Petri dishes in the presence and absence of the polyelectrolyte inhibitor poly- L-aspartic acid (poly-asp). In the absence of poly-asp, monoclinic calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) nucleated from {1 0 0} or {0 1 0} faces. The first observed particles were 70-120 nm in diameter and grew by a step-like progression in the [0 0 1] and [0 1 0] directions. Addition of poly-asp had several effects on calcium oxalate formation. First, the number of particles was increased, but their sizes were decreased. Second, the rate of COM growth in the [0 0 1] direction was decreased to a greater extent than the rate along [0 1 0]. Third, the formation of tetragonal calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals was favored. Fourth, the rates of COD growth along <1 1 0> and allied directions were decreased, whereas that parallel to <0 0 1> is increased. Sequences of highly resolved growth fronts show step displacement for COM and moving crystal edges for COD. Analysis of image sequences suggested that growth is strongly affected by competing and alternating processes, in which diffusion processes are rate-limiting and induce nonlinear growth. This study shows that SCIM is a powerful technique for the quantitative analysis of crystallization processes and for determining the mode of action of inhibitors.

  17. Effect of potassium sodium tartrate and sodium citrate on the preparation of {alpha}-calcium sulfate hemihydrate from flue gas desulfurization gypsum in a concentrated electrolyte solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.X.; Guan, B.H.; Fu, H.L.; Yang, L.C.

    2009-12-15

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum mainly composed of calcium sulfate dihydrate (DH) was used as a raw material to obtain alpha-calcium sulfate hemihydrate ({alpha}-HH) through dehydration in a Ca-Mg-K-Cl-solution medium at 95{sup o}C under atmospheric pressure. The effects of potassium sodium tartrate and sodium citrate on the preparation of alpha-HH in the electrolyte solution were investigated. The results revealed that the addition of potassium sodium tartrate (1.0 x 10{sup -2} - 2.5 x 10{sup -2}M) decreased the dehydration rate of FGD gypsum and increased the length/width (l/w) ratio of {alpha}-HH crystals, which could yield unfavorable strength properties. Addition of sodium citrate (1.0 x 10{sup -5} - 2.0 x 10{sup -5}M) slightly increased the dehydration rate of FGD gypsum and decreased the l/w ratio of {alpha}-HH crystals, which could be beneficial to increase strength. However, it also led to a partial formation of anhydrite (AH) crystals. AH was also the only dehydration product when the concentration of sodium citrate increased to 1.0 x 10{sup -4}M. Therefore, sodium citrate rather than potassium sodium tartrate could be used as an additive in Ca-Mg-K-Cl electrolyte solutions if alpha-HH with a shorter l/w ratio is the desired product from FGD gypsum dehydration. The concentration of sodium citrate should be properly controlled to reduce the formation of AH.

  18. Ligand action on sodium, potassium, and calcium channels: role of permeant ions.

    PubMed

    Zhorov, Boris S; Tikhonov, Denis B

    2013-03-01

    Ion channels are targets for many naturally occurring toxins and small-molecule drugs. Despite great progress in the X-ray crystallography of ion channels, we still do not have a complete understanding of the atomistic mechanisms of channel modulation by ligands. In particular, the importance of the simultaneous interaction of permeant ions with the ligand and the channel protein has not been the focus of much attention. Considering these interactions often allows one to rationalize the highly diverse experimental data within the framework of relatively simple structural models. This has been illustrated in earlier studies on the action of local anesthetics, sodium channel activators, as well as blockers of potassium and calcium channels. Here, we discuss the available data with a view to understanding the use-, voltage-, and current carrying cation-dependence of the ligand action, paradoxes in structure--activity relationships, and effects of mutations in these ion channels.

  19. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Debanne, Dominique; Alcaraz, Gisele

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  20. Stable anode performance of vanadium oxide hydrate semi-microspheres and their graphene based composite microspheres in sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Fei, Hailong; Li, Zhiwei; Feng, Wenjing; Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    A simple and versatile method for preparation of new crystalline vanadium oxide hydrate semi-microspheres is developed via a simple hydrothermal route, which are tested as a novel high-energy anode materials for sodium-ion batteries. The enhancement of electrochemical performance for the vanadium oxide hydrate electrode is offered by addition of graphene. The graphene-based vanadium oxide hydrate microsphere composite shows a high discharge capacity of 336.1 mA h g(-1) for the second cycle between a 0.05-3.0 V voltage limit at a discharge current density of 10 mA g(-1). A reversible capacity of 303.1 mA h g(-1) is retained after 20 cycles.

  1. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will also affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. These new federal drinking water regulations may require public water suppliers to adjust treatment practices or incorporate additional treatment operations into their existing treatment trains. Many options have been identified, including membrane processes, granular activated carbon, powered activated carbon (PAC), enhanced coagulation and/or softening, and alternative disinfectants (e.g., chlorine dioxide, ozone, and chloramines). Of the processes being considered, PAC appears to offer an attractive benefit-to-cost advantage for many water treatment plants, particularly small systems (those serving fewer than 10,000 customers). PAC has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. Activated carbons can be produced from a variety of raw materials, including wood, peat, coconut husks, and numerous types of coal. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During that study, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon

  2. Preparation, crystal structures and rapid hydration of P2- and P3-type sodium chromium antimony oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Pospelov, A.A.; Nalbandyan, V.B.

    2011-05-15

    Two new Na{sub x}[Cr{sub (1+x)/2}Sb{sub (1-x)/2}]O{sub 2} compounds have been prepared by solid-state reactions in argon. Their structures have been determined by the X-ray Rietveld method. Both new phases together with NaCrO{sub 2}-based solid solution comprise brucite-like layers of edge-shared (Cr,Sb)O{sub 6} octahedra but differ by packing mode of the layers and coordination of the interlayer Na{sup +} ions. A P3 phase exists at x{approx}0.5-0.58. It is rhombohedral (R3-bar m), a=2.966, c=16.937 A at x{approx}0.58, with 29% Na{sup +} occupancy of trigonal prisms. A P2 phase exists at x{approx}0.6-0.7. It is hexagonal (P6{sub 3}/mmc), a=2.960, c=11.190 A at x{approx}0.7, with 37% and 33% Na{sup +} occupancy of two non-equivalent trigonal prisms. Both P2 and P3 phases rapidly absorb moisture in air; packing mode is preserved, the a parameter changes slightly but c increases by 24-25%. Very high sodium ion conductivity is predicted for both P2 and P3 anhydrous phases. -- Graphical Abstract: Polyhedral presentation of layered structures of Na{sub x}[Cr{sub (1+x)/2}Sb{sub (1-x)/2}]O{sub 2}. (Cr,Sb)O{sub 6} octahedra are green. Part of the sodium prisms are open to show short distances between sodium sites which cannot be occupied simultaneously. Display Omitted highlights: > Two new layered Na{sub x}[Cr{sub (1+x)/2}Sb{sub (1-x)/2}]O{sub 2} phases, P2 and P3, have been prepared in argon. > Interlayer O-O distances are larger than in Na{sub x}(M,Ti)O{sub 2} analogs (M=Cr,Ni,Li). > As a result, both rapidly hydrate in air with c-axis expansion of 24-25%. > Bottleneck radii are also larger, and this predicts very high Na{sup +}-ion conductivity.

  3. Intracellular calcium and its sodium-independent regulation in voltage-clamped snail neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, H J; Thomas, R C

    1995-01-01

    1. We have used both Ca(2+)-sensitive microelectrodes and fura-2 to measure the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i or its negative log, pCai) of snail neurones voltage clamped to -50 or -60 mV. Using Ca(2+)-sensitive microelectrodes, [Ca2+]i was found to be approximately 174 nM and pCai, 6.76 +/- 0.09 (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 11); using fura-2, [Ca2+]i was approximately 40 nM and pCai, 7.44 +/- 0.06 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 10). 2. Depolarizations (1-20 s) caused an increase in [Ca2+]i which was abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+, indicating that the rise in [Ca2+]i was due to Ca2+ influx through voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Caffeine (10-20 mM) caused an increase in [Ca2+]i in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. The effects of caffeine on [Ca2+]i could be prevented by ryanodine. 4. Thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, caused a small increase in resting [Ca2+]i and slowed the rate of recovery from Ca2+ loads following 20 s depolarizations. 5. Neither replacement of extracellular sodium with N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG), nor loading the cells with intracellular sodium, had any effect on resting [Ca2+]i or the rate of recovery of [Ca2+]i following depolarizations. 6. The mitochondrial uncoupling agent carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCmP) caused a small gradual rise in resting [Ca2+]i. Removal of extracellular sodium during exposure to CCmP had no further effect on [Ca2+]i. 7. Intracellular orthovanadate caused an increase in resting [Ca2+]i and prevented the full recovery of [Ca2+]i following small Ca2+ loads, but removal of extracellular sodium did not cause a rise in [Ca2+]i. We conclude that there is no Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger present in the cell body of these neurones and that [Ca2+]i is maintained by an ATP-dependent Ca2+ pump. Images Figure 1 PMID:7623274

  4. Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash. Part 2: Influence of curing conditions on long-term stability

    SciTech Connect

    Freidin, C.

    1999-11-01

    The distinguishing feature of high-calcium oil shale fly ash (HCOSFA) used in experiments is the high amount of free CaO and SO{sub 3} in form of lime and anhydrite. Strength development as well as the microstructure and composition of the new formations of fly ash binder (FAB) based on HCOSFA and low-calcium coal fly ash after curing in different conditions and long-term exposure in various environments were studied. It was determined that moist air and water are the most favorable conditions for aging processes of FAB. In atmospheric air three stages in strength change of cured FAB are observed: increase of compressive strength over 1 month; sharp drop after 1 month up to the 3 to months; stabilization or slowdown of loss in strength after 3 to 6 months of exposure. The duration of the second and third stages depends on HCOSFA content and does not depend on curing conditions. One of the hydration products of FAB is ettringite. Its instability in air could be a reason for the decrease in strength of FAB and some disintegration of the hardened system. In the presence of low-calcium coal fly ash, additional amounts of stable calcium silicate hydrates are formed during FAB curing especially during steam curing. This has a positive effect on compressive strength and stability of FAB in atmospheric air.

  5. Possible roles of exceptionally conserved residues around the selectivity filters of sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S

    2011-01-28

    In the absence of x-ray structures of sodium and calcium channels their homology models are used to rationalize experimental data and design new experiments. A challenge is to model the outer-pore region that folds differently from potassium channels. Here we report a new model of the outer-pore region of the NaV1.4 channel, which suggests roles of highly conserved residues around the selectivity filter. The model takes from our previous study (Tikhonov, D. B., and Zhorov, B. S. (2005) Biophys. J. 88, 184-197) the general disposition of the P-helices, selectivity filter residues, and the outer carboxylates, but proposes new intra- and inter-domain contacts that support structural stability of the outer pore. Glycine residues downstream from the selectivity filter are proposed to participate in knob-into-hole contacts with the P-helices and S6s. These contacts explain the adapted tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes that feed on toxic prey through valine substitution of isoleucine in the P-helix of repeat IV. Polar residues five positions upstream from the selectivity filter residues form H-bonds with the ascending-limb backbones. Exceptionally conserved tryptophans are engaged in inter-repeat H-bonds to form a ring whose π-electrons would facilitate passage of ions from the outer carboxylates to the selectivity filter. The outer-pore model of CaV1.2 derived from the NaV1.4 model is also stabilized by the ring of exceptionally conservative tryptophans and H-bonds between the P-helices and ascending limbs. In this model, the exceptionally conserved aspartate downstream from the selectivity-filter glutamate in repeat II facilitates passage of calcium ions to the selectivity-filter ring through the tryptophan ring. Available experimental data are discussed in view of the models.

  6. Erosion protection by calcium lactate/sodium fluoride rinses under different salivary flows in vitro.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra B; Scaramucci, Taís; Lippert, Frank; Zero, Domenick T; Hara, Anderson T

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a calcium lactate prerinse on sodium fluoride protection in an in vitro erosion-remineralization model simulating two different salivary flow rates. Enamel and dentin specimens were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n = 8), according to the combination between rinse treatments - deionized water (DIW), 12 mM NaF (NaF) or 150 mM calcium lactate followed by NaF (CaL + NaF) - and unstimulated salivary flow rates - 0.5 or 0.05 ml/min - simulating normal and low salivary flow rates, respectively. The specimens were placed into custom-made devices, creating a sealed chamber on the specimen surface connected to a peristaltic pump. Citric acid was injected into the chamber for 2 min, followed by artificial saliva (0.5 or 0.05 ml/min) for 60 min. This cycle was repeated 4×/day for 3 days. Rinse treatments were performed daily 30 min after the 1st and 4th erosive challenges, for 1 min each time. Surface loss was determined by optical profilometry. KOH-soluble fluoride and structurally bound fluoride were determined in specimens at the end of the experiment. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). NaF and CaL + NaF exhibited significantly lower enamel and dentin loss than DIW, with no difference between them for normal flow conditions. The low salivary flow rate increased enamel and dentin loss, except for CaL + NaF, which presented overall higher KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride levels. The results suggest that the NaF rinse was able to reduce erosion progression. Although the CaL prerinse considerably increased F availability, it enhanced NaF protection against dentin erosion only under hyposalivatory conditions.

  7. Physicochemical characterizations and desulfurization properties in coal combustion of three calcium and sodium industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Jun Cheng; Junhu Zhou; Jianzhong Liu; Xinyu Cao; Kefa Cen

    2009-05-15

    To recycle industrial wastes and reduce SO{sub 2} pollutant emission in coal combustion, the mineralogical compositions, porosity structures, surface morphologies, and desulfurization properties of three calcium and sodium industrial wastes were investigated via X-ray diffraction (XRD), porosimeter, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a fixed-bed reactor. (1) White lime mud (WLM) mainly composed of CaCO{sub 3} with Na{sub 2}O and K{sub 2}O impurities has smaller CaCO{sub 3} particles and a higher surface area than limestone. But calcined WLM has larger CaO particles and a lower surface area than limestone calcined at 1200{sup o}C for 300 s. (2) Calcium carbide residue (CCR) mainly composed of Ca(OH)2, has the highest surface area and smaller Ca(OH){sub 2} particles than the CaCO{sub 3} particles in WLM. Its surface area monotonously and dramatically decreases at 1200{sup o}C for 300 s, but the sintered CaO particles are still smaller than those in the limestone. (3) When brine sludge (BS), mainly composed of NaCl and CaCO{sub 3}, is heated at 1200{sup o}C for 300 s, the NaCl/CaO eutectic solvent facilitates the aggregation of some complex composites to form many larger particles. (4) WLM gives the highest desulfurization efficiency of 80.4% at 1000{sup o}C and 65.0% at 1100{sup o}C in coal combustion. Combined CCR and limestone give a synergistic desulfurization efficiency of 45.8% at 1200{sup o}C. BS with a molar ratio of Na/Ca at 1:15 effectively promotes the synergistic desulfurization efficiency of combined CCR and limestone to a peak of 54.9% at 1200{sup o}C. 23 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Addition of sodium hyaluronate and the effect on performance of the injectable calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Kai, Dan; Li, Dongxiao; Zhu, Xiangdong; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2009-08-01

    An injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) with porous structure and excellent anti-washout ability was developed in the study. Citric acid and sodium bicarbonate were added into the CPC powder consisting of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) to form macro-pores, then different concentrations of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solution, as liquid phase, was added into the cement to investigate its effect on CPC's performance. The prepared CPCs were tested on workability (injectable time and setting time), mechanical strength, as well as anti-washout ability. The experimental results showed that addition of NaHA not only enhanced the anti-washout ability of the CPC dramatically but also improve its other properties. When NaHA concentration was 0.6 wt%, the injectable time elongated to 15.7 +/- 0.6 min, the initial and final setting times were respectively shorten to 18.3 +/- 1.2 and 58.7 +/- 2.1 min, and the compressive strength were increased to 18.78 +/- 1.83 MPa. On the other hand, Addition of NaHA showed little effect on porous structure of the CPC and enhanced its bioactivity obviously, which was confirmed by the apatite formation on its surface after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In conclusion, as an in situ shaped injectable biomaterials, the CPC with appropriate addition of NaHA would notably improve its performance and might be used in minimal invasive surgery for bone repair or reconstruction. PMID:19291369

  9. Balancing strength and toughness of calcium-silicate-hydrate via random nanovoids and particle inclusions: Atomistic modeling and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2016-11-01

    As the most widely used manufactured material on Earth, concrete poses serious societal and environmental concerns which call for innovative strategies to develop greener concrete with improved strength and toughness, properties that are exclusive in man-made materials. Herein, we focus on calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), the major binding phase of all Portland cement concretes, and study how engineering its nanovoids and portlandite particle inclusions can impart a balance of strength, toughness and stiffness. By performing an extensive +600 molecular dynamics simulations coupled with statistical analysis tools, our results provide new evidence of ductile fracture mechanisms in C-S-H - reminiscent of crystalline alloys and ductile metals - decoding the interplay between the crack growth, nanovoid/particle inclusions, and stoichiometry, which dictates the crystalline versus amorphous nature of the underlying matrix. We found that introduction of voids and portlandite particles can significantly increase toughness and ductility, specially in C-S-H with more amorphous matrices, mainly owing to competing mechanisms of crack deflection, voids coalescence, internal necking, accommodation, and geometry alteration of individual voids/particles, which together regulate toughness versus strength. Furthermore, utilizing a comprehensive global sensitivity analysis on random configuration-property relations, we show that the mean diameter of voids/particles is the most critical statistical parameter influencing the mechanical properties of C-S-H, irrespective of stoichiometry or crystalline or amorphous nature of the matrix. This study provides new fundamental insights, design guidelines, and de novo strategies to turn the brittle C-S-H into a ductile material, impacting modern engineering of strong and tough concrete infrastructures and potentially other complex brittle materials.

  10. Transformation of meta-stable calcium silicate hydrates to tobermorite: reaction kinetics and molecular structure from XRD and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jacqueline R; Maxwell, Robert S; Carroll, Susan A

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the integrity of well-bore systems that are lined with Portland-based cements is critical to the successful storage of sequestered CO2 in gas and oil reservoirs. As a first step, we investigate reaction rates and mechanistic pathways for cement mineral growth in the absence of CO2 by coupling water chemistry with XRD and NMR spectroscopic data. We find that semi-crystalline calcium (alumino-)silicate hydrate (Al-CSH) forms as a precursor solid to the cement mineral tobermorite. Rate constants for tobermorite growth were found to be k = 0.6 (+/- 0.1) x 10(-5) s(-1) for a solution:solid of 10:1 and 1.6 (+/- 0.8) x 10(-4) s(-1) for a solution:solid of 5:1 (batch mode; T = 150 degrees C). This data indicates that reaction rates for tobermorite growth are faster when the solution volume is reduced by half, suggesting that rates are dependent on solution saturation and that the Gibbs free energy is the reaction driver. However, calculated solution saturation indexes for Al-CSH and tobermorite differ by less than one log unit, which is within the measured uncertainty. Based on this data, we consider both heterogeneous nucleation as the thermodynamic driver and internal restructuring as possible mechanistic pathways for growth. We also use NMR spectroscopy to characterize the site symmetry and bonding environment of Al and Si in a reacted tobermorite sample. We find two [4]Al coordination structures at delta iso = 59.9 ppm and 66.3 ppm with quadrupolar product parameters (PQ) of 0.21 MHz and 0.10 MHz (+/- 0.08) from 27Al 3Q-MAS NMR and speculate on the Al occupancy of framework sites by probing the protonation environment of Al metal centers using 27Al{1H}CP-MAS NMR. PMID:19144195

  11. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  12. Structural Insight into the Ion-Exchange Mechanism of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jun; Li, Hua; Zeng, Weizhong; Sauer, David B.; Belmares, Ricardo; Jiang, Youxing

    2012-06-19

    Sodium/calcium (Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}) exchangers (NCX) are membrane transporters that play an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} for cell signaling. We demonstrated the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}-exchange function of an NCX from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX{_}Mj) and report its 1.9 angstrom crystal structure in an outward-facing conformation. Containing 10 transmembrane helices, the two halves of NCX{_}Mj share a similar structure with opposite orientation. Four ion-binding sites cluster at the center of the protein: one specific for Ca{sup 2+} and three that likely bind Na{sup +}. Two passageways allow for Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} access to the central ion-binding sites from the extracellular side. Based on the symmetry of NCX{_}Mj and its ability to catalyze bidirectional ion-exchange reactions, we propose a structure model for the inward-facing NCX{_}Mj.

  13. Effects of Chlorhexidine and Sodium Hypochlorite on the Setting Time of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Frough Reyhani, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Negin; Shakouie, Sahar; Rahimi, Saeed; Salem Milani, Amin; Ranjbar, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether adding 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 2.6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) to calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement would affect its setting time (ST), or not. Methods and Materials: In this study, the setting time of CEM cement was evaluated in three groups (n=9) as follows: group 1; CEM cement, group 2; CEM cement+2% CHX and group 3; CEM cement+2.6% NaOCl. Then the mean values of ST were calculated and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to evaluate the normal distribution of data. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The mean ST for groups 1, 2 and 3 were 105, 120 and 220 min, respectively. There was a significant increase in the duration of ST in group 3 (NaOCl) in comparison with the two other groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: NaOCl significantly increased the ST of CEM cement, whereas chlorhexidine did not alter the ST. PMID:26213537

  14. Molecular Modeling of Ammonium, Calcium, Sulfur, and Sodium Lignosulphonates in Acid and Basic Aqueous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Valencia, P. J.; Bolívar Marinez, L. E.; Pérez Merchancano, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Lignosulphonates (LS), also known as lignin sulfonates or sulfite lignin, are lignins in sulfonated forms, obtained from the "sulfite liquors," a residue of the wood pulp extraction process. Their main utility lies in its wide range of properties, they can be used as additives, dispersants, binders, fluxing, binder agents, etc. in fields ranging from food to fertilizer manufacture and even as agents in the preparation of ion exchange membranes. Since they can be manufactured relatively easy and quickly, and that its molecular size can be manipulated to obtain fragments of very low molecular weight, they are used as transport agents in the food industry, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and drug development, and as molecular elements for the treatment of health problems. In this paper, we study the electronic structural and optical characteristics of LS incorporating ammonium, sulfur, calcium, and sodium ions in acidic and basic aqueous media in order to gain a better understanding of their behavior and the very interesting properties exhibit. The studies were performed using the molecular modeling program HyperChem 5 using the semiempirical method PM3 of the NDO Family (neglect of differential overlap), to calculate the structural properties. We calculated the electronic and optical properties using the semiempirical method ZINDO / CI.

  15. Transuranium removal from Hanford high level waste simulants using sodium permanganate and calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmarth, W. R.; Rosencrance, S. W.; Nash, C. A.; Fonduer, F. F.; DiPrete, D. P.; DiPrete, C. C.

    2000-07-01

    Plutonium and americium are present in the Hanford high level liquid waste complexant concentrate (CC) due to the presence of complexing agents including di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA), tributylphosphate (TBP), hydroxyethylene diamine triacetic acid (HEDTA), ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, glycolic acid, and sodium gluconate. The transuranic concentrations approach 600 nCi/g and require processing prior to encapsulation into low activity glass. BNFL's (British Nuclear Fuels Limited's) original process was a ferric co-precipitation method based on earlier investigations by Herting and Orth, et al. Furthermore, flocculation and precipitation are widely used for clarification in municipal water treatment. Co-precipitation of Np, Am, and Pu with ferric hydroxide is also used within an analytical method for the sum of those analytes. Tests to evaluate BNFL's original precipitation process indicated the measured decontamination factors (DFs) and filter fluxes were too low. Therefore, an evaluation of alternative precipitation agents to replace ferric ion was undertaken. Agents tested included various transition metals, lanthanide elements, uranium species, calcium, strontium, and permanganate.

  16. Poisson-Fermi Modeling of the Ion Exchange Mechanism of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinn-Liang; Hsieh, Hann-Jeng; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-03-17

    The ion exchange mechanism of the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) crystallized by Liao et al. in 2012 is studied using the Poisson-Fermi theory developed by Liu and Eisenberg in 2014. A cycle of binding and unbinding is proposed to account for the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange function of the NCX molecule. Outputs of the theory include electric and steric fields of ions with different sizes, correlations of ions of different charges, and polarization of water, along with number densities of ions, water molecules, and interstitial voids. We calculate the electrostatic and steric potentials of the four binding sites in NCX, i.e., three Na(+) binding sites and one Ca(2+) binding site, with protein charges provided by the software PDB2PQR. The energy profiles of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions along their respective Na(+) and Ca(2+) pathways in experimental conditions enable us to explain the fundamental mechanism of NCX that extrudes intracellular Ca(2+) across the cell membrane against its chemical gradient by using the downhill gradient of Na(+). Atomic and numerical details of the binding sites are given to illustrate the 3 Na(+):1 Ca(2+) stoichiometry of NCX. The protein NCX is a catalyst. It does not provide (free) energy for transport. All energy for transport in our model comes from the ions in surrounding baths. PMID:26906748

  17. Synthesis and hydration behavior of calcium zirconium aluminate (Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18}) cement

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Eun-Hee; Yoo, Jun-Sang; Kim, Bo-Hye; Choi, Sung-Woo; Hong, Seong-Hyeon

    2014-02-15

    Calcium zirconium aluminate (Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18}) cements were prepared by solid state reaction and polymeric precursor methods, and their phase evolution, morphology, and hydration behavior were investigated. In polymeric precursor method, a nearly single phase Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} was obtained at relatively lower temperature (1200 °C) whereas in solid state reaction, a small amount of CaZrO{sub 3} coexisted with Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} even at higher temperature (1400 °C). Unexpectedly, Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} synthesized by polymeric precursor process was the large-sized and rough-shaped powder. The planetary ball milling was employed to control the particle size and shape. The hydration behavior of Ca{sub 7}ZrAl{sub 6}O{sub 18} was similar to that of Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} (C3A), but the hydration products were Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}·6H{sub 2}O (C3AH6) and several intermediate products. Thus, Zr (or ZrO{sub 2}) stabilized the intermediate hydration products of C3A.

  18. Dual inhibition of sodium-mediated proton and calcium efflux triggers non-apoptotic cell death in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Harley, William; Floyd, Candace; Dunn, Tamara; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Hegde, Manu; Palandoken, Hasan; Nantz, Michael H.; Leon, Leonardo; Carraway, K L; Lyeth, Bruce; Gorin, Fredric A.

    2010-01-01

    Malignant glioma cells maintain an elevated intracellular pH (pHi) within hypoxic-ischemic tumor microenvironments through persistent activation of sodium-proton transport (McLean et al., 2000). Amiloride has been reported to selectively kill human malignant glioma cell lines but not primary astrocytes (Hegde et al., 2004). While amiloride reduces pHi of malignant gliomas by inhibiting isoform 1 of sodium-proton exchange (NHE1), direct acidification was shown to be cytostatic rather than cytotoxic. At cytotoxic concentrations, amiloride has multiple drug targets including inhibition of NHE1 and sodium calcium exchange. Amiloride's glioma cytotoxicity can be explained, at least in part, by dual inhibition of NHE1 and of Na+-dependent calcium efflux by isoform 1.1 of the sodium calcium exchanger (NCX1.1) , which increases [Ca2+]i and initiates glioma cell demise. As a result of persistent NHE1 activity, cytosolic free levels of sodium ([Na+]i) in U87 and C6 glioma cells are elevated 3-fold, as compared with normal astrocytes. Basal cytosolic free calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) also are increased 5-fold. 2′, 4′-dichlorobenzamil (DCB) inhibits the sodium-dependent calcium transporter (NCX1.1) much more potently than NHE1. DCB was employed in a concentration-dependent fashion in glioma cells to selectively inhibit the forward mode of NCX1.1 at ≤1uM, while dually inhibiting both NHE1 and NCX1.1 at ≥20uM. DCB (1uM) was not cytotoxic to glioma cells, while DCB (20μM) further increased basal elevated levels of [Ca2+]i in glioma cells that was followed by cell demise. Cariporide and SEA0400 are more specific inhibitors of NHE1 and NCX1.1 than amiloride or DCB, respectively. Individually, Cariporide and SEA0400 are not cytotoxic, but in combination induced glioma cell death. Like amiloride, the combination of Cariporide and SEA0400 produced glioma cell death in the absence of demonstrable caspase-activation. PMID:20869350

  19. Selectivity filters and cysteine-rich extracellular loops in voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and NALCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Robert F.; Guan, W.; Zhorov, Boris S.; Spafford, J. David

    2015-01-01

    How nature discriminates sodium from calcium ions in eukaryotic channels has been difficult to resolve because they contain four homologous, but markedly different repeat domains. We glean clues from analyzing the changing pore region in sodium, calcium and NALCN channels, from single-cell eukaryotes to mammals. Alternative splicing in invertebrate homologs provides insights into different structural features underlying calcium and sodium selectivity. NALCN generates alternative ion selectivity with splicing that changes the high field strength (HFS) site at the narrowest level of the hourglass shaped pore where the selectivity filter is located. Alternative splicing creates NALCN isoforms, in which the HFS site has a ring of glutamates contributed by all four repeat domains (EEEE), or three glutamates and a lysine residue in the third (EEKE) or second (EKEE) position. Alternative splicing provides sodium and/or calcium selectivity in T-type channels with extracellular loops between S5 and P-helices (S5P) of different lengths that contain three or five cysteines. All eukaryotic channels have a set of eight core cysteines in extracellular regions, but the T-type channels have an infusion of 4–12 extra cysteines in extracellular regions. The pattern of conservation suggests a possible pairing of long loops in Domains I and III, which are bridged with core cysteines in NALCN, Cav, and Nav channels, and pairing of shorter loops in Domains II and IV in T-type channel through disulfide bonds involving T-type specific cysteines. Extracellular turrets of increasing lengths in potassium channels (Kir2.2, hERG, and K2P1) contribute to a changing landscape above the pore selectivity filter that can limit drug access and serve as an ion pre-filter before ions reach the pore selectivity filter below. Pairing of extended loops likely contributes to the large extracellular appendage as seen in single particle electron cryo-microscopy images of the eel Nav1 channel. PMID

  20. Cytotoxicity of endodontic irrigants containing calcium hydroxide and sodium lauryl sulphate on fibroblasts derived from mouse L929 cell line.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Sérgio Valmor; Barroso, Cristiane Maria Sodré; Ruiz, Patrícia Alvarez

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of root canal irrigating solutions containing calcium hydroxide and sodium lauryl sulphate on fibroblasts derived from L929 cell line. Saturated calcium hydroxide aqueous solution (CH), sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and SLS associated with calcium hydroxide (HCT20) were diluted with sterile distilled water at 50%, 20%, 10% and 5% concentrations. Minimum essential medium (MEM) served as the control group. The cytotoxicity of the solutions was evaluated on L929 mouse fibroblast cell line, at 4 and 24 h of contact time by the 51Cr radiotracer method. Data were compared and statistical inferences were made with the chi-square test. In all analysis, significance level was set at 5%. CH and HCT20 showed toxicity at 50% concentration, while at concentrations lower than 50% these solutions showed cell tolerance. SLS was cytotoxic at all concentrations. In conclusion, the association of calcium hydroxide and SLS (HCT20) combines the beneficial properties of these solutions and was not harmful to the fibroblast cell line, seeming to be a suitable endodontic irrigating solution.

  1. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals different molecular mechanisms of Bacillus coagulans 2-6 response to sodium lactate and calcium lactate during lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiayang; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Landong; Zhu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yao, Qingshou; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lactate production is enhanced by adding calcium carbonate or sodium hydroxide during fermentation. However, Bacillus coagulans 2-6 can produce more than 180 g/L L-lactic acid when calcium lactate is accumulated, but less than 120 g/L L-lactic acid when sodium lactate is formed. The molecular mechanisms by which B. coagulans responds to calcium lactate and sodium lactate remain unclear. In this study, comparative transcriptomic methods based on high-throughput RNA sequencing were applied to study gene expression changes in B. coagulans 2-6 cultured in non-stress, sodium lactate stress and calcium lactate stress conditions. Gene expression profiling identified 712 and 1213 significantly regulated genes in response to calcium lactate stress and sodium lactate stress, respectively. Gene ontology assignments of the differentially expressed genes were performed. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that 'ATP-binding cassette transporters' were significantly affected by calcium lactate stress, and 'amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism' was significantly affected by sodium lactate stress. It was also found that lactate fermentation was less affected by calcium lactate stress than by sodium lactate stress. Sodium lactate stress had negative effect on the expression of 'glycolysis/gluconeogenesis' genes but positive effect on the expression of 'citrate cycle (TCA cycle)' genes. However, calcium lactate stress had positive influence on the expression of 'glycolysis/gluconeogenesis' genes and had minor influence on 'citrate cycle (TCA cycle)' genes. Thus, our findings offer new insights into the responses of B. coagulans to different lactate stresses. Notably, our RNA-seq dataset constitute a robust database for investigating the functions of genes induced by lactate stress in the future and identify potential targets for genetic engineering to further improve L-lactic acid production by B. coagulans.

  2. Ionic surfactant aggregates in saline solutions: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the presence of excess sodium chloride (NaCl) or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)).

    PubMed

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Karttunen, Mikko; Haataja, Mikko

    2009-04-30

    The properties of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) aggregates in saline solutions of excess sodium chloride (NaCl) or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) ions were studied through extensive molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. We find that the ionic strength of the solution affects not only the aggregate size of the resulting anionic micelles but also their structure. Specifically, the presence of CaCl(2) induces more compact and densely packed micelles with a significant reduction in gauche defects in the SDS hydrocarbon chains in comparison with NaCl. Furthermore, we observe significantly more stable salt bridges between the charged SDS head groups mediated by Ca(2+) than Na(+). The presence of these salt bridges helps stabilize the more densely packed micelles.

  3. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  4. Electron Solvation in Liquid Ammonia: Lithium, Sodium, Magnesium, and Calcium as Electron Sources.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-03-10

    A free electron in solution, known as a solvated electron, is the smallest possible anion. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms serve as electron donors in solvents that mediate outer-sphere electron transfer. We report herein ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of lithium, sodium, magnesium, and calcium in liquid ammonia at 250 K. By analyzing the electronic properties and the ionic and solvation structures and dynamics, we systematically characterize these metals as electron donors and ammonia molecules as electron acceptors. We show that the solvated metal strongly modifies the properties of its solvation shells and that the observed effect is metal-specific. Specifically, the radius and charge exhibit major impacts. The single solvated electron present in the alkali metal systems is distributed more uniformly among the solvent molecules of each metal's two solvation shells. In contrast, alkaline earth metals favor a less uniform distribution of the electron density. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms are coordinated by four and six NH3 molecules, respectively. The smaller atoms, Li and Mg, are stronger electron donors than Na and Ca. This result is surprising, as smaller atoms in a column of the periodic table have higher ionization potentials. However, it can be explained by stronger electron donor-acceptor interactions between the smaller atoms and the solvent molecules. The structure of the first solvation shell is sharpest for Mg, which has a large charge and a small radius. Solvation is weakest for Na, which has a small charge and a large radius. Weak solvation leads to rapid dynamics, as reflected in the diffusion coefficients of NH3 molecules of the first two solvation shells and the Na atom. The properties of the solvated electrons established in the present study are important for radiation chemistry, synthetic chemistry, condensed-matter charge transfer, and energy sources. PMID:26886153

  5. Commercial Scale Cucumber Fermentations Brined with Calcium Chloride Instead of Sodium Chloride.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; McFeeters, R F; Moeller, L; Johanningsmeier, S D; Hayes, J; Fornea, D S; Rosenberg, L; Gilbert, C; Custis, N; Beene, K; Bass, D

    2015-12-01

    Development of low salt cucumber fermentation processes present opportunities to reduce the amount of sodium chloride (NaCl) that reaches fresh water streams from industrial activities. The objective of this research was to translate cucumber fermentation brined with calcium chloride (CaCl2 ) instead of NaCl to commercial scale production. Although CaCl2 brined cucumber fermentations were stable in laboratory experiments, commercial scale trials using 6440 L open-top tanks rapidly underwent secondary cucumber fermentation. It was understood that a limited air purging routine, use of a starter culture and addition of preservatives to the cover brine aids in achieving the desired complete cucumber fermentation. The modified process was used for subsequent commercial trials using 12490 and 28400 L open-top tanks packed with variable size cucumbers and from multiple lots, and cover brines containing CaCl2 and potassium sorbate to equilibrated concentrations of 100 and 6 mM, respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum LA0045 was inoculated to 10(6) CFU/mL, and air purging was applied for two 2-3 h periods per day for the first 10 d of fermentation and one 2-3 h period per day between days 11 and 14. All fermentations were completed, as evidenced by the full conversion of sugars to lactic acid, decrease in pH to 3.0, and presented microbiological stability for a minimum of 21 d. This CaCl2 process may be used to produce fermented cucumbers intended to be stored short term in a manner that reduces pollution and waste removal costs. PMID:26512798

  6. Synthesis of sodium caseinate-calcium carbonate microspheres and their mineralization to bone-like apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhewu; Liang, Guobin; Jin, Lin; Wang, Zhenling; Xing, Chao; Jiange, Qing; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2014-06-01

    Phosphoproteins can induce and stabilize calcium carbonate (CaCO3) vaterite, which has desirable features for high reactivity. The purpose of this study was to synthesize bioactive CaCO3 microspheres for bone regeneration. Sodium caseinate (NaCas)-containing CaCO3 microspheres, with the crystal phase of vaterite, were synthesized by fast precipitation in an aqueous solution of CaCl2, Na2CO3, and 2 mg/mL of NaCas. The uniform microspheres exhibited rougher surfaces and lower negative charges than CaCO3 particles without NaCas addition. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) of the microspheres showed characteristic peaks or bands corresponding to phosphate and hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves exhibited approximately 5% weight loss below 600 °C due to the decomposition of NaCas. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed lath-like hydroxyapatite (HAp) on the surface after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) revealed that the agglomerates were composed of Ca, C, O, P, Na, and Mg elements, and the Ca/P ratios ranged from 1.53 to 1.56. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns exhibited peaks characteristic of hydroxyapatite. The results of this study demonstrated that the addition of NaCas induced the formation of vaterite microspheres which possesses an enhanced apatite formation after soaking in SBF at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. These NaCas-CaCO3 microspheres may be a potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

  7. In vitro enamel remineralization by low-fluoride toothpaste with calcium citrate and sodium trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Edo; Danelon, Marcelle; Freire, Isabelle Rodrigues; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of a low fluoride toothpaste (450 µgF/g, NaF) combined with calcium citrate (Cacit) and sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP) on enamel remineralization. Bovine enamel blocks had the enamel surface polished sequentially to determine the surface hardness. After production of artificial carious lesions, the blocks selected by their surface hardness were submitted to remineralization pH cycling and daily treatment with dentifrice suspensions (diluted in deionized water or artificial saliva): placebo, 275, 450, 550 and 1,100 µgF/g and commercial dentifrice (positive control, 1,100 µgF/g). Finally, the surface and cross-section hardness was determined for calculating the change of surface hardness (%SH) and mineral content (%∆Z). Fluoride in enamel was also determined. The data from %SH, %∆Z and fluoride were subjected to two-way analysis of variance followed by Student-Newman-Keuls's test (p<0.05). The mineral gain (%SH and %∆Z) was higher for toothpastes diluted in saliva (p<0.05), except for the 450 µgF/g dentifrice with Cacit/TMP (p>0.05). The 450 Cacit/TMP toothpaste and the positive control showed similar results (p>0.05) when diluted in water. A dose-response was observed between fluoride concentration in toothpastes and fluoride present in enamel, regardless of dilution. It was concluded that it is possible to enhance the remineralization capacity of low F concentration toothpaste by of organic (Cacit) and inorganic (TMP) compounds with affinity to hydroxyapatite.

  8. Commercial Scale Cucumber Fermentations Brined with Calcium Chloride Instead of Sodium Chloride.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; McFeeters, R F; Moeller, L; Johanningsmeier, S D; Hayes, J; Fornea, D S; Rosenberg, L; Gilbert, C; Custis, N; Beene, K; Bass, D

    2015-12-01

    Development of low salt cucumber fermentation processes present opportunities to reduce the amount of sodium chloride (NaCl) that reaches fresh water streams from industrial activities. The objective of this research was to translate cucumber fermentation brined with calcium chloride (CaCl2 ) instead of NaCl to commercial scale production. Although CaCl2 brined cucumber fermentations were stable in laboratory experiments, commercial scale trials using 6440 L open-top tanks rapidly underwent secondary cucumber fermentation. It was understood that a limited air purging routine, use of a starter culture and addition of preservatives to the cover brine aids in achieving the desired complete cucumber fermentation. The modified process was used for subsequent commercial trials using 12490 and 28400 L open-top tanks packed with variable size cucumbers and from multiple lots, and cover brines containing CaCl2 and potassium sorbate to equilibrated concentrations of 100 and 6 mM, respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum LA0045 was inoculated to 10(6) CFU/mL, and air purging was applied for two 2-3 h periods per day for the first 10 d of fermentation and one 2-3 h period per day between days 11 and 14. All fermentations were completed, as evidenced by the full conversion of sugars to lactic acid, decrease in pH to 3.0, and presented microbiological stability for a minimum of 21 d. This CaCl2 process may be used to produce fermented cucumbers intended to be stored short term in a manner that reduces pollution and waste removal costs.

  9. In vitro enamel remineralization by low-fluoride toothpaste with calcium citrate and sodium trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Edo; Danelon, Marcelle; Freire, Isabelle Rodrigues; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of a low fluoride toothpaste (450 µgF/g, NaF) combined with calcium citrate (Cacit) and sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP) on enamel remineralization. Bovine enamel blocks had the enamel surface polished sequentially to determine the surface hardness. After production of artificial carious lesions, the blocks selected by their surface hardness were submitted to remineralization pH cycling and daily treatment with dentifrice suspensions (diluted in deionized water or artificial saliva): placebo, 275, 450, 550 and 1,100 µgF/g and commercial dentifrice (positive control, 1,100 µgF/g). Finally, the surface and cross-section hardness was determined for calculating the change of surface hardness (%SH) and mineral content (%∆Z). Fluoride in enamel was also determined. The data from %SH, %∆Z and fluoride were subjected to two-way analysis of variance followed by Student-Newman-Keuls's test (p<0.05). The mineral gain (%SH and %∆Z) was higher for toothpastes diluted in saliva (p<0.05), except for the 450 µgF/g dentifrice with Cacit/TMP (p>0.05). The 450 Cacit/TMP toothpaste and the positive control showed similar results (p>0.05) when diluted in water. A dose-response was observed between fluoride concentration in toothpastes and fluoride present in enamel, regardless of dilution. It was concluded that it is possible to enhance the remineralization capacity of low F concentration toothpaste by of organic (Cacit) and inorganic (TMP) compounds with affinity to hydroxyapatite. PMID:23969915

  10. Calcium pentosan polysulfate and sodium pentosan polysulfate may be used to treat intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia-Guo; Wang, Jia; Xin, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Sheng-Fei; Qi, Feng; Mao, Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Cheng

    2011-04-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a major health problem world-wide, and several spinal disorders are closely associated with it. Although people have invested a great deal of time and effort, how to prevent and reverse the IDD for the researchers is still a difficult and hot issue. Intervertebral disc belongs to cartilage tissue, and IDD also is the cartilage degeneration disease. A large quantity of studies have shown that Calcium pentosan polysulfate (CaPPS) and sodium pentosan polysulfate (NaPPS) possess chondroprotective activities and play an important role in maintaining cartilage integrity. We reasonably hypothesize that NaPPS and CaPPS may be used to treat IDD. The possible mechanism may include that: (1) the significant effects of NaPPS and CaPPS in improving capillary blood flow could maintain nutritional supply to intervertebral disc, and preserve intervertebral disc tissue against degeneration; (2) CaPPS and NaPPS preserve cartilage integrity, proteoglycan synthesis, and improve cartilage biomechanical properties; (3) as the multifaceted exosite inhibitors of proteinases NaPPS and CaPPS strongly impede the activity and production of proteinases; (4) promotion of the balance between proteinases and TIMPs also may be involved in treating IDD; (5) NaPPS and CaPPS exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects, and then reduce inflammation-induced IDD. If the hypothesis were conformed, the symptoms caused by IDD and its related diseases would be a corresponding alleviation or even disappearance, which could greatly alleviate the suffering of patients from disc degeneration diseases. Certainly, many roles of CaPPS and NaPPS, such as effectiveness, safety and side effects, need to be tested, and further works such as animal model and clinical trial, need to be done to prove this hypothesis.

  11. Electron Solvation in Liquid Ammonia: Lithium, Sodium, Magnesium, and Calcium as Electron Sources.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-03-10

    A free electron in solution, known as a solvated electron, is the smallest possible anion. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms serve as electron donors in solvents that mediate outer-sphere electron transfer. We report herein ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of lithium, sodium, magnesium, and calcium in liquid ammonia at 250 K. By analyzing the electronic properties and the ionic and solvation structures and dynamics, we systematically characterize these metals as electron donors and ammonia molecules as electron acceptors. We show that the solvated metal strongly modifies the properties of its solvation shells and that the observed effect is metal-specific. Specifically, the radius and charge exhibit major impacts. The single solvated electron present in the alkali metal systems is distributed more uniformly among the solvent molecules of each metal's two solvation shells. In contrast, alkaline earth metals favor a less uniform distribution of the electron density. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms are coordinated by four and six NH3 molecules, respectively. The smaller atoms, Li and Mg, are stronger electron donors than Na and Ca. This result is surprising, as smaller atoms in a column of the periodic table have higher ionization potentials. However, it can be explained by stronger electron donor-acceptor interactions between the smaller atoms and the solvent molecules. The structure of the first solvation shell is sharpest for Mg, which has a large charge and a small radius. Solvation is weakest for Na, which has a small charge and a large radius. Weak solvation leads to rapid dynamics, as reflected in the diffusion coefficients of NH3 molecules of the first two solvation shells and the Na atom. The properties of the solvated electrons established in the present study are important for radiation chemistry, synthetic chemistry, condensed-matter charge transfer, and energy sources.

  12. Trichloroethylene decomposition and in-situ dry sorption of Cl-products by calcium oxides prepared from hydrated limes.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Yoshimi; Iwata, Goichi; Choh, Kyaw; Kubota, Mitsuhiro; Matsuda, Hitoki

    2011-10-01

    A comparison of CaOs produced by calcining two types of hydrated lime and calcium carbonate was made for decomposition of trichloroethylene and in-situ dry sorption of the decomposed Cl-products using a lab-scale gas flow type tubular packed bed reactor. About 20 mg of CaO sample was mixed with about 2 g of Al2O3 particles and packed in the reactor and allowed to react with a flowing standard gas containing 500 ppm of C2HCl3 (N2 balance) at 673 and 873 K, under the condition that the reaction of CaO with C2HCl3 might be completed within a few hours. It was found that no thermal decomposition of C2HCl3 at or below 673 K was observed in a reactor packed only with Al2O3 particles. However, a considerable amount of decomposition of C2HCl3 was obtained in a reactor packed with CaO and Al2O3, even at 673 K. For 1 mol of CaO prepared by calcining highly reactive Ca(OH)2 at 673 K, decomposition of 0.42 mol of C2HCl3 and in-situ absorption product of 0.53 mol of CaCl2 were obtained. At 873 K, about 46% of C2HCl3 was thermally decomposed. The total amount of C2HCl3 decomposed in CaO-Al2O3 particle bed at 873 K became nearly twice larger than that at 673 K. For 1 mol of CaO prepared by calcining highly reactive Ca(OH)2 at 873 K, decomposition of 0.59 mol of C2HCl3 and in-situ absorption product of 0.67 mol of CaCl2 were obtained. Small amounts of C2Cl2, C2Cl4, CCl4, etc. were detected during decomposition of C2HCl3 at 673 and 873 K. It was recognized that the data on decomposition of C2HCl3 as well as in-situ dry sorption of Cl-products in CaO particle bed were correlated with specific surface area of the CaO employed. PMID:21821273

  13. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes. PMID:23283222

  14. Crystal structures of hydrates of simple inorganic salts. II. Water-rich calcium bromide and iodide hydrates: CaBr2 · 9H2O, CaI2 · 8H2O, CaI2 · 7H2O and CaI2 · 6.5H2O.

    PubMed

    Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Single crystals of calcium bromide enneahydrate, CaBr(2) · 9H2O, calcium iodide octahydrate, CaI(2) · 8H2O, calcium iodide heptahydrate, CaI(2) · 7H2O, and calcium iodide 6.5-hydrate, CaI(2) · 6.5H2O, were grown from their aqueous solutions at and below room temperature according to the solid-liquid phase diagram. The crystal structure of CaI(2) · 6.5H2O was redetermined. All four structures are built up from distorted Ca(H2O)8 antiprisms. The antiprisms of the iodide hydrate structures are connected either via trigonal-plane-sharing or edge-sharing, forming dimeric units. The antiprisms in calcium bromide enneahydrate are monomeric. PMID:25186361

  15. Gd3+ and Calcium Sensitive, Sodium Leak Currents Are Features of Weak Membrane-Glass Seals in Patch Clamp Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Chemin, Jean; Monteil, Arnaud; Spafford, J. David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of leaky patch currents in whole cell recording of HEK-293T cells were examined as a means to separate these control currents from expressed sodium and calcium leak channel currents from snail NALCN leak channels possessing both sodium (EKEE) and calcium (EEEE) selectivity filters. Leak currents were generated by the weakening of gigaohm patch seals by artificial membrane rupture using the ZAP function on the patch clamp amplifier. Surprisingly, we found that leak currents generated from the weakened membrane/glass seal can be surprisingly stable and exhibit behavior that is consistent with a sodium leak current derived from an expressible channel. Leaky patch currents differing by 10 fold in size were similarly reduced in size when external sodium ions were replaced with the large monovalent ion NMDG+. Leaky patch currents increased when external Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was lowered to 0.1 mM and were inhibited (>40% to >90%) with 10 µM Gd3+, 100 µM La3+, 1 mM Co2+ or 1 mM Cd2+. Leaky patch currents were relatively insensitive (<30%) to 1 mM Ni2+ and exhibited a variable amount of block with 1 mM verapamil and were insensitive to 100 µM mibefradil or 100 µM nifedipine. We hypothesize that the rapid changes in leak current size in response to changing external cations or drugs relates to their influences on the membrane seal adherence and the electro-osmotic flow of mobile cations channeling in crevices of a particular pore size in the interface between the negatively charged patch electrode and the lipid membrane. Observed sodium leak conductance currents in weak patch seals are reproducible between the electrode glass interface with cell membranes, artificial lipid or Sylgard rubber. PMID:24945283

  16. Gd3+ and calcium sensitive, sodium leak currents are features of weak membrane-glass seals in patch clamp recordings.

    PubMed

    Boone, Adrienne N; Senatore, Adriano; Chemin, Jean; Monteil, Arnaud; Spafford, J David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of leaky patch currents in whole cell recording of HEK-293T cells were examined as a means to separate these control currents from expressed sodium and calcium leak channel currents from snail NALCN leak channels possessing both sodium (EKEE) and calcium (EEEE) selectivity filters. Leak currents were generated by the weakening of gigaohm patch seals by artificial membrane rupture using the ZAP function on the patch clamp amplifier. Surprisingly, we found that leak currents generated from the weakened membrane/glass seal can be surprisingly stable and exhibit behavior that is consistent with a sodium leak current derived from an expressible channel. Leaky patch currents differing by 10 fold in size were similarly reduced in size when external sodium ions were replaced with the large monovalent ion NMDG+. Leaky patch currents increased when external Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was lowered to 0.1 mM and were inhibited (>40% to >90%) with 10 µM Gd3+, 100 µM La3+, 1 mM Co2+ or 1 mM Cd2+. Leaky patch currents were relatively insensitive (<30%) to 1 mM Ni2+ and exhibited a variable amount of block with 1 mM verapamil and were insensitive to 100 µM mibefradil or 100 µM nifedipine. We hypothesize that the rapid changes in leak current size in response to changing external cations or drugs relates to their influences on the membrane seal adherence and the electro-osmotic flow of mobile cations channeling in crevices of a particular pore size in the interface between the negatively charged patch electrode and the lipid membrane. Observed sodium leak conductance currents in weak patch seals are reproducible between the electrode glass interface with cell membranes, artificial lipid or Sylgard rubber.

  17. Synthesis and nano-mechanical characterization of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) made with 1.5 CaO/SiO{sub 2} mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Emmy M.; Kim, Jung J.; Reda Taha, M.M.

    2012-09-15

    In this study, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is synthesized and characterized. C-S-H slurry was made with calcium oxide (CaO) to micro-silica (SiO{sub 2}) mixture ratio of 1.5 and enough deionized water. The slurry was continuously mixed for 7 days, then the excess water was removed. Two methods of drying were implemented: one method used the standard d-dry technique and the other was equilibrated to 11% relative humidity (RH). The dried powders were characterized using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRDA), and {sup 29}Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The stoichiometric formulas of synthetic C-S-H powders dried to d-dry and 11% RH in this study were approximated as C{sub 1.2}SH{sub 0.7} and C{sub 1.2}SH{sub 2.4} respectively. The powders were then compacted to create specimens with porosities similar to C-S-H in hydrated cement. The specimens underwent nanoindentation to mechanically characterize C-S-H. The experiments provide insight on the nanoscale mechanical characteristics of C-S-H.

  18. Combined effects of potassium lactate and calcium ascorbate as sodium chloride substitutes on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of low-sodium frankfurter sausage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y M; Jung, K C; Jo, H M; Nam, K W; Choe, J H; Rhee, M S; Kim, B C

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of sodium chloride (NaCl) substitutes, including potassium lactate (K-lactate) and calcium ascorbate (Ca-ascorbate), on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of low-sodium frankfurter sausage (1.2% content of NaCl). Sausages produced with 40% substitution of NaCl with combined K-lactate and Ca-ascorbate showed a higher value of lightness (P<0.001) than sausages containing 2.0% content of NaCl (control). However, the sensory panels were unable to distinguish a difference in color intensity between the control and treatment groups. Frankfurter sausages produced with 30% K-lactate and 10% Ca-ascorbate exhibited similar water-holding capacity, textural properties, and organoleptic characteristics (P>0.05) when compared to control sausages. Thus, the use of these salt mixtures is a good way to reduce the NaCl content in meat products while maintaining the quality of meat products. These results may be useful in developing low-sodium meat products. PMID:23896133

  19. Combined effects of potassium lactate and calcium ascorbate as sodium chloride substitutes on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of low-sodium frankfurter sausage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y M; Jung, K C; Jo, H M; Nam, K W; Choe, J H; Rhee, M S; Kim, B C

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of sodium chloride (NaCl) substitutes, including potassium lactate (K-lactate) and calcium ascorbate (Ca-ascorbate), on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of low-sodium frankfurter sausage (1.2% content of NaCl). Sausages produced with 40% substitution of NaCl with combined K-lactate and Ca-ascorbate showed a higher value of lightness (P<0.001) than sausages containing 2.0% content of NaCl (control). However, the sensory panels were unable to distinguish a difference in color intensity between the control and treatment groups. Frankfurter sausages produced with 30% K-lactate and 10% Ca-ascorbate exhibited similar water-holding capacity, textural properties, and organoleptic characteristics (P>0.05) when compared to control sausages. Thus, the use of these salt mixtures is a good way to reduce the NaCl content in meat products while maintaining the quality of meat products. These results may be useful in developing low-sodium meat products.

  20. Comparative evaluation of a dentifrice containing calcium sodium phosphosilicate to a dentifrice containing potassium nitrate for dentinal hypersensitivity: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Satyapal, Tanya; Mali, Rohini; Mali, Amita; Patil, Vishakha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Calcium sodium phosphosilicate is a recently introduced desensitizing agent which acts by occluding the dentinal tubules and also resists acid decalcification. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of a new toothpaste containing 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate for the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity and also compare it with 5% potassium nitrate. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with the chief complaint of dentinal hypersensitivity were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. The visual analog scale (VAS) scores were taken for water and air stimuli at baseline, 3 weeks after usage of the respective toothpaste, and 3 weeks after discontinuation of the respective toothpaste. Results: Both the groups showed reduction in hypersensitivity scores at 3 weeks and 6 weeks for air stimulus and cold water. The calcium sodium phosphosilicate group, however, showed significantly reduction in hypersensitivity compared to the potassium nitrate group at any time point for both measures of hypersensitivity. Conclusion: The 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate group showed immense reduction in dentinal hypersensitivity symptoms. The 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate showed prolonged effects even after discontinuation as compared to 5% potassium nitrate, due to its dentinal tubular occlusion property. PMID:25425819

  1. Sodium

    MedlinePlus

    ... sodium. Doctors recommend you eat less than 2.4 grams per day. That equals about 1 teaspoon of table salt a day. Reading food labels can help you see how much sodium is in prepared foods. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  2. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ

    PubMed Central

    Kuksis, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels. PMID:26180118

  3. Characterization of cytolytic neutrophil activation in vitro by amorphous hydrated calcium phosphate as a model of biomaterial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Felicity C; Taheri, Amir; Dann, Sophie C; Dye, Julian F

    2011-03-01

    Calcium ions are utilized in biomolecular biomaterial design for osteomimetic scaffolds and as divalent cross-linking agents, typically for gelation of alginates, stabilisation of protein structure (e.g., fibrinogen) and enzyme activation (e.g., thrombin). Biological interactions with defined calcium phosphates (e.g., hydroxyapatite) are exploited for osteogenesis, although crystalline calcium phosphates (e.g., calcium pyrophosphate) stimulate inflammation. We found that the calcium concentration used in the manufacture of prototype dermal scaffolds made from fibrin/alginate composite was related to the inflammatory infiltration during in vivo integration. In investigating a cause for this inflammatory response, we have identified and characterized a cytolytic inflammatory effect of amorphous calcium phosphate (CaP) formed in physiological solutions, relevant to biomaterial biocompatibility. Isolated human neutrophils (Nφ) were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline with CaCl(2) ranging 2.5-20 mM total calcium. Nφ activation was assessed by morphology and integrin-β2 (CD18a) expression. Mediator release (Nφ-elastase, IL-8, and TNFα) was measured from both Nφ and whole blood cultures plus CaCl(2). CaP exposure increased CD18a expression over 1 h (maximal at 10 mM calcium/ phosphate) with concurrent phagocytosis, cytolysis, and Nφ-elastase release. CaCl(2) induced expression of IL-8 and TNFα in whole blood cultures. These results suggest that CaP formed from the resorption of calcium-containing biomaterials could induce inflammation and accelerate biomaterial degradation, driving further CaP release. This demonstrates a novel mechanism for biomaterial-induced inflammation. The in vitro system described could aid preclinical evaluation of novel biomaterial inflammatory potential. PMID:21254387

  4. Phylogeny unites animal sodium leak channels with fungal calcium channels in an ancient, voltage-insensitive clade.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J; Hillis, David M; Zakon, Harold H

    2012-12-01

    Proteins in the superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels mediate behavior across the tree of life. These proteins regulate the movement of ions across cell membranes by opening and closing a central pore that controls ion flow. The best-known members of this superfamily are the voltage-gated potassium, calcium (Ca(v)), and sodium (Na(v)) channels, which underlie impulse conduction in nerve and muscle. Not all members of this family are opened by changes in voltage, however. NALCN (NA(+) leak channel nonselective) channels, which encode a voltage-insensitive "sodium leak" channel, have garnered a growing interest. This study examines the phylogenetic relationship among Na(v)/Ca(v) voltage-gated and voltage-insensitive channels in the eukaryotic group Opisthokonta, which includes animals, fungi, and their unicellular relatives. We show that NALCN channels diverged from voltage-gated channels before the divergence of fungi and animals and that the closest relatives of NALCN channels are fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble.

  5. Role of intracellular calcium and sodium in light adaptation in the retina of the honey bee drone (Apis mellifera, L).

    PubMed

    Bader, C; Baumann, F; Bertrand, D

    1976-04-01

    In the honey bee drone, the decrease in sensitivity to light of a retinula cell exposed to background illumination was found to be accurately reflected by the difference in amplitude between the initial transient depolarization and the lowest steady depolarization evoked by the background light. It is shown that both the decrease in sensitivity to light and the accompanying drop in potential from the transient to the plateau can be prevented by injecting EGTA intracellularly. A decrease in duration and amplitude of responses to short test flashes such as observed immediately after illumination was found to occur too when Ca or Na, but not K, Li, or Mg injected into dark-adapted retinula cells. Injection of EGTA into a retinula cell maintained a steady state of light adaptation, was found to cause an increase in amplitude and duration of the response to a short test flash, thus producing the effects of dark adaptation. It is suggested that, in the retina of the honey bee drone, an increase in intracellular calcium concentration plays a central role in light adaptation and that an increase in intracellular sodium concentration, resulting from the influx of sodium ions during the responses to light, could lead to this increase in intracellular free calcium.

  6. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  7. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements and fortified foods include gluconate, lactate, and phosphate. Calcium absorption is best when a person consumes ... also interfere with the body's ability to absorb iron and zinc, but this effect is not well ...

  8. Solid-state {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR characterization of hydrates formed in calcium aluminate-silica fume mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, P.; Rivas Mercury, J.M.

    2008-08-15

    Partially deuterated Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub y}(OH){sub 12-4y}-Al(OH){sub 3} mixtures, prepared by hydration of Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} (C{sub 3}A), Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 33} (C{sub 12}A{sub 7}) and CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CA) phases in the presence of silica fume, have been characterized by {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al magic-angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopies. NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize anhydrous and fully hydrated samples. In hydrated compounds, Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} and Al(OH){sub 3} phases were detected. From the quantitative analysis of {sup 27}Al NMR signals, the Al(OH){sub 3}/Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 12} ratio was deduced. The incorporation of Si into the katoite structure, Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3-x}(OH){sub 4x}, was followed by {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopies. Si/OH ratios were determined from the quantitative analysis of {sup 27}Al MAS-NMR components associated with Al(OH){sub 6} and Al(OSi)(OH){sub 5} environments. The {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy was also used to quantify the unreacted silica and amorphous calcium aluminosilicate hydrates formed, C-S-H and C-A-S-H for short. From {sup 29}Si NMR spectra, the amount of Si incorporated into different phases was estimated. Si and Al concentrations, deduced by NMR, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and Rietveld analysis of both X-ray and neutron data, indicate that only a part of available Si is incorporated in katoite structures. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron micrograph of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}-microsilica mixture hydrated at 90 deg. C for 31 days showing a cubic Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2.0{+-}}{sub 0.2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 0.9{+-}}{sub 0.2}(OH){sub 1.8} crystal surrounded by unreacted amorphous silica spheres.

  9. Exploring time of death from potassium, sodium, chloride, glucose & calcium analysis of postmortem synovial fluid in semi arid climate.

    PubMed

    Siddhamsetty, Arun K; Verma, Satish K; Kohli, Anil; Verma, Aditi; Puri, Dinesh; Singh, Archana

    2014-11-01

    Estimation of time of death (TOD) with fair accuracy from postmortem changes still remains an important but difficult task to be performed by every autopsy surgeon under different climatic conditions. The environment plays an important role in the process of decomposition and thereby affecting the levels of electrolytes and other biochemical parameters in the postmortem samples. Since, there is limited information available on the levels of these biochemical parameters from semi arid environment, the present study was aimed to explore time of death by analyzing electrolyte, glucose and calcium levels of postmortem synovial fluid collected from samples under such climatic conditions. The synovial fluid samples from two hundred and ten bodies brought to University College of Medical Sciences and associated Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital Delhi for medico-legal postmortem examination, during the period of November 2010 to April 2012, were analyzed for potassium, sodium, chloride, glucose and calcium. Univariate regression analysis of electrolyte concentrations of synovial fluid showed significant positive relationship between time of death and potassium (r = 0.840, p = 0.000). However, there was negative relationship between time of death and sodium (r = -0.175, p = 0.011) & glucose (r = -0.427, p = 0.000) and no significant relationship was found between time of death and calcium (r = 0.099, p = 0.152) & chloride (r = 0.082, p = 0.24) among the samples analyzed.

  10. Calcium oxalate crystal deposition in kidneys of hypercalciuric mice with disrupted type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saeed R; Glenton, Patricia A

    2008-05-01

    The most common theories about the pathogenesis of idiopathic kidney stones consider precipitation of calcium phosphate (CaP) within the kidneys critical for the development of the disease. We decided to test the hypothesis that a CaP substrate can promote the deposition of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the kidneys. Experimental hyperoxaluria was induced by feeding glyoxylate to male mice with knockout (KO) of NaP(i) IIa (Npt2a), a sodium-phosphate cotransporter. Npt2a KO mice are hypercalciuric and produce CaP deposits in their renal tubules. Experimental hyperoxaluria led to CaOx crystalluria in both the hypercalciuric KO mice and the normocalciuric control B6 mice. Only the KO mice produced CaOx crystal deposits in their kidneys, but the CaOx crystals deposited separately from the CaP deposits. Perhaps CaP deposits were not available for a CaOx overgrowth. These results also validate earlier animal model observations that showed that CaP substrate is not required for renal deposition of CaOx and that other factors, such as local supersaturation, may be involved. The absence of CaOx deposition in the B6 mice despite extreme hyperoxaluria also signifies the importance of both calcium and oxalate in the development of CaOx nephrolithiasis.

  11. Influence of Pyrethroid Insecticides on Sodium and Calcium Influx in Neocortical Neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Using murine neocortical neurons in primary culture, we have compared the ability of 11 structurally diverse pyrethroid insecticides to evoke Na+ ...

  12. Physicochemical changes in dry-cured hams salted with potassium, calcium and magnesium chloride as a partial replacement for sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Aliño, M; Grau, R; Toldrá, F; Barat, J M

    2010-10-01

    The reduction of added sodium chloride in dry-cured ham has been proposed to reduce dietary sodium intake in Mediterranean countries. The effect of substituting sodium chloride with potassium chloride, calcium chloride and magnesium chloride on some physicochemical characteristics of dry-cured ham during processing was evaluated. The results showed that hams salted with a mixture of sodium and potassium chloride registered higher salt concentrations and lower water contents and thus, needed less time to reach the required weight loss at the end of the process. The opposite effect was observed when calcium and magnesium chloride were added to the salt mixture. The observed differences in the texture and colour parameters were mainly due to differences in water and salt content.

  13. Effects of Sodium and Hydrogen Flourides on the Metabolism of Flourine, Calcium, and Phosphorus in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macuch, P.; Kortus, J.; Balazova, G.; Mayer, J.

    1968-01-01

    Rats given 4 mg. fluoride/kg./day for eight days excreted more calcium and phosphorus and retained less than the controls. In bone ash from rats given different fluoride doses for 40 days the calcium and phosphorus were maximal after a total dose of about 250 μg. fluoride/rat, but fell to subnormal levels after higher doses. The calcium and phosphorus levels in bone ash from rats given 750 μg. fluoride/day fell with the duration of treatment. Rats exposed to 9·4-11·7 μg. hydrogen fluoride/litre air absorbed fluoride rapidly, as shown by increased urinary excretion, by changes in the enamel of the teeth, and by rising fluoride levels in the teeth and bones. Radiological examination, however, showed no gross changes. Urinary excretion increased with exposure time. PMID:5647974

  14. Search for an exosphere in sodium and calcium in the transmission spectrum of exoplanet 55 Cancri e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridden-Harper, A. R.; Snellen, I. A. G.; Keller, C. U.; de Kok, R. J.; Di Gloria, E.; Hoeijmakers, H. J.; Brogi, M.; Fridlund, M.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.; van Westrenen, W.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The atmospheric and surface characterization of rocky planets is a key goal of exoplanet science. Unfortunately, the measurements required for this are generally out of reach of present-day instrumentation. However, the planet Mercury in our own solar system exhibits a large exosphere composed of atomic species that have been ejected from the planetary surface by the process of sputtering. Since the hottest rocky exoplanets known so far are more than an order of magnitude closer to their parent star than Mercury is to the Sun, the sputtering process and the resulting exospheres could be orders of magnitude larger and potentially detectable using transmission spectroscopy, indirectly probing their surface compositions. Aims: The aim of this work is to search for an absorption signal from exospheric sodium (Na) and singly ionized calcium (Ca+) in the optical transmission spectrum of the hot rocky super-Earth 55 Cancri e. Although the current best-fitting models to the planet mass and radius require a possible atmospheric component, uncertainties in the radius exist, making it possible that 55 Cancri e could be a hot rocky planet without an atmosphere. Methods: High resolution (R ~ 110 000) time-series spectra of five transits of 55 Cancri e, obtained with three different telescopes (UVES/VLT, HARPS/ESO 3.6 m and HARPS-N/TNG) were analysed. Targeting the sodium D lines and the calcium H and K lines, the potential planet exospheric signal was filtered out from the much stronger stellar and telluric signals, making use of the change of the radial component of the orbital velocity of the planet over the transit from -57 to +57 km s-1. Results: Combining all five transit data sets, we detect a signal potentially associated with sodium in the planet exosphere at a statistical significance level of 3σ. Combining the four HARPS transits that cover the calcium H and K lines, we also find a potential signal from ionized calcium (4.1σ). Interestingly, this latter

  15. Intraoral evaluation of mineralization of cosmetic defects by a toothpaste containing calcium, fluoride, and sodium bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Litkowski, Leonard J; Quinlan, Kathleen B; Ross, David R; Ghassemi, Annahita; Winston, Anthony; Charig, Andrew; Flickinger, Mark; Vorwerk, Linda

    2004-09-01

    New dual-phase fluoride toothpastes that contain soluble calcium, phosphate, and baking soda have recently been introduced into the market. These toothpastes are designed to fill in small surface defects in tooth enamel and thereby enhance tooth esthetics such as gloss. This two-part study was designed to assess these superficial mineralizing effects from using one of these products compared with an experimental calcium-containing, bicarbonate-free formulation and a conventional fluoride toothpaste using an intraoral model. Enamel specimens with 4 types of defects were mounted into an intraoral appliance and placed in the mouths of volunteers for 1 month. The four types of defects were whitening toothpaste abrasion, coarse abrasion, natural dimpling, and acid etching. Before and after intraoral exposure, scanning electron microscope photographs of the specimens were made. The surface microhardness of the acid-etched specimens also was determined. The volunteers brushed their specimens twice daily with one of three randomly assigned toothpastes. The toothpastes were a two-phase, calcium-containing, bicarbonate-based toothpaste; an experimental, two-phase, calcium-containing, bicarbonate-free toothpaste; and a conventional toothpaste. Only the calcium-containing toothpastes showed unequivocal signs of mineral deposition into surface defects, leading to smoothing of the enamel. All three products significantly increased the hardness of the etched enamel, presumably because of fluoride. However, only the two calcium-containing toothpastes gave significantly greater hardness increases than the conventional toothpaste; the specimens treated with a conventional toothpaste were indistinguishable from those treated with saliva. PMID:15645904

  16. Final report of the safety assessment of L-Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Sodium Ascorbate, and Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2005-01-01

    L-Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Sodium Ascorbate, and Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate function in cosmetic formulations primarily as antioxidants. Ascorbic Acid is commonly called Vitamin C. Ascorbic Acid is used as an antioxidant and pH adjuster in a large variety of cosmetic formulations, over 3/4 of which were hair dyes and colors at concentrations between 0.3% and 0.6%. For other uses, the reported concentrations were either very low (<0.01%) or in the 5% to 10% range. Calcium Ascorbate and Magnesium Ascorbate are described as antioxidants and skin conditioning agents--miscellaneous for use in cosmetics, but are not currently used. Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate functions as an antioxidant in cosmetic products and is used at concentrations ranging from 0.01% to 3%. Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate functions as an antioxidant in cosmetics and was reported being used at concentrations from 0.001% to 3%. Sodium Ascorbate also functions as an antioxidant in cosmetics at concentrations from 0.0003% to 0.3%. Related ingredients (Ascorbyl Palmitate, Ascorbyl Dipalmitate, Ascorbyl Stearate, Erythorbic Acid, and Sodium Erythorbate) have been previously reviewed by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel and found "to be safe for use as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of good use." Ascorbic Acid is a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) substance for use as a chemical preservative in foods and as a nutrient and/or dietary supplement. Calcium Ascorbate and Sodium Ascorbate are listed as GRAS substances for use as chemical preservatives. L-Ascorbic Acid is readily and reversibly oxidized to L-dehydroascorbic acid and both forms exist in equilibrium in the body. Permeation rates of Ascorbic Acid through whole and stripped mouse skin were 3.43 +/- 0.74 microg/cm(2)/h and 33.2 +/- 5.2 microg/cm(2)/h. Acute oral and parenteral studies in mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, and cats demonstrated little toxicity

  17. Final report of the safety assessment of L-Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Sodium Ascorbate, and Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2005-01-01

    L-Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbate, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Sodium Ascorbate, and Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate function in cosmetic formulations primarily as antioxidants. Ascorbic Acid is commonly called Vitamin C. Ascorbic Acid is used as an antioxidant and pH adjuster in a large variety of cosmetic formulations, over 3/4 of which were hair dyes and colors at concentrations between 0.3% and 0.6%. For other uses, the reported concentrations were either very low (<0.01%) or in the 5% to 10% range. Calcium Ascorbate and Magnesium Ascorbate are described as antioxidants and skin conditioning agents--miscellaneous for use in cosmetics, but are not currently used. Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate functions as an antioxidant in cosmetic products and is used at concentrations ranging from 0.01% to 3%. Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate functions as an antioxidant in cosmetics and was reported being used at concentrations from 0.001% to 3%. Sodium Ascorbate also functions as an antioxidant in cosmetics at concentrations from 0.0003% to 0.3%. Related ingredients (Ascorbyl Palmitate, Ascorbyl Dipalmitate, Ascorbyl Stearate, Erythorbic Acid, and Sodium Erythorbate) have been previously reviewed by the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel and found "to be safe for use as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of good use." Ascorbic Acid is a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) substance for use as a chemical preservative in foods and as a nutrient and/or dietary supplement. Calcium Ascorbate and Sodium Ascorbate are listed as GRAS substances for use as chemical preservatives. L-Ascorbic Acid is readily and reversibly oxidized to L-dehydroascorbic acid and both forms exist in equilibrium in the body. Permeation rates of Ascorbic Acid through whole and stripped mouse skin were 3.43 +/- 0.74 microg/cm(2)/h and 33.2 +/- 5.2 microg/cm(2)/h. Acute oral and parenteral studies in mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, and cats demonstrated little toxicity

  18. Calcium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert J P

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes the chemical and biological value of the calcium ion. In calcium chemistry, our main interest is in equilibria within static, nonflowing systems. Hence, we examined the way calcium formed precipitates and complex ions in solution. We observed thereafter its uses by humankind in a vast number of materials such as minerals, e.g., marble, concrete, mortars, which parallel the biological use in shells and bones. In complex formation, we noted that many combinations were of anion interaction with calcium for example in the uses of detergents and medicines. The rates of exchange of calcium from bound states were noted but they had little application. Calcium ions do not act as catalysts of organic reactions. In biological systems, interest is in the above chemistry, but extends to the fact that Ca2+ ions can carry information by flowing in one solution or from one solution to another through membranes. Hence, we became interested in the details of rates of calcium exchange. The fast exchange of this divalent ion from most organic binding sites has allowed it to develop as the dominant second messenger. Now the flow can be examined in vitro as calcium binds particular isolated proteins, which it activates as seen in physical mechanical changes or chemical changes and this piece-by-piece study of cells is common. Here, however, we have chosen to stress the whole circuit of Ca2+ action indicating that the cell is organized both at a basal and an activated state kinetic level by the steady state flow of the ion (see Fig. 11). Different time constants of exchange utilizing very similar binding constants lead to: 1) fast responses as in the muscle of an animal; or 2) slower change as in differentiation of an egg or seed. Many other changes of state may relate to Ca2+ steady-state levels of flow in the circuitry and here we point to two: 1) dormancy in reptiles and animals; and 2) sporulation in both bacteria and lower plants. In the other chapters of

  19. Incorporation of zinc into calcium silicate hydrates, Part I: formation of C-S-H(I) with C/S=2/3 and its isochemical counterpart gyrolite

    SciTech Connect

    Stumm, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.stumm@itc-wgt.fzk.de; Garbev, Krassimir; Beuchle, Guenter; Black, Leon; Stemmermann, Peter; Nueesch, Rolf

    2005-09-01

    We have investigated the incorporation of zinc into both nanocrystalline and crystalline calcium silicate hydrates with starting C/S ratios of 2/3 (0.66). Zinc was added replacing calcium in the starting mixtures [Zn/(Zn+Ca)=0-1/4; 0-10 wt.% Zn], and the resultant phases were characterised using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetry (DTA-TG) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). In both groups of samples, increasing zinc content led to gradual structural changes, until eventually a second phase was formed. Zinc was incorporated to similar limits in both sets of samples. The thermal stability of the structures increased to a certain zinc content, beyond which there was structural destabilisation. Zinc incorporation is possible up to {approx}6 wt.%. Our observations strongly indicate similar zinc incorporation mechanisms in both sample series, namely incorporation of zinc into the interlayer of C-S-H(I) and the X-sheet of gyrolite for nanocrystalline and crystalline samples, respectively.

  20. In situ cross-linking of sodium alginate with calcium and aluminum ions to sustain the release of theophylline from polymeric matrices.

    PubMed

    Nokhodchi, Ali; Tailor, Anish

    2004-12-01

    Small matrices of calcium alginate or aluminium alginate have been investigated as possible controlled release systems for drugs. The objective of the present study was to sustain the release of theophylline from alginate matrices using different concentrations of aluminium chloride and calcium chloride in presence and absence of HPMC. Tablets containing differing concentrations of aluminium and calcium chloride were produced and the release rate of theophylline was tested using the basket dissolution apparatus over 8 h. Increasing amounts of aluminium chloride from 0.0001 to 0.00068 moles decreased the release of theophylline from 95.1 +/- 0.27 to 29.5 +/- 1.5, indicating a significant effect of aluminium ions on a reduction in the release rate of theophylline from sodium alginate matrices. In the case of matrices containing different concentrations of calcium ions, as the concentration of calcium chloride increased, the release rate increased to an optimum then declined after this. This was due to insufficient calcium ions being available to cross-link with the sodium alginate to form an insoluble gel. The effect of aluminium ions, as this is a trivalent ion compared to calcium, which is a divalent ion, aluminium ions are able to decrease the release rate with a smaller concentration compared to calcium ions. The results also showed that the presence of HPMC caused a reduction in release rate of theophylline from alginate matrices containing calcium chloride. Whereas, in the case of alginate matrices containing aluminium chloride the release rate of theophylline increased in presence of HPMC. For comparing the dissolution data, dissolution efficiency (DE) was used. The values of DE are consistent with the dissolution data. The results show that within a formulation series, DE values generally decrease when the cation concentration increases and this criterion can be used to describe the effect of calcium and aluminium ions on the release behaviour of theophylline

  1. Sodium and calcium binding to Panulirus interruptus hemocyanin as studied by 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Norne, J E; Gustavsson, H; Forsén, S; Chiancone, E; Kuiper, H A; Antonini, E

    1979-08-01

    Addition of Panulirus hemocyanin to NaCl solutions produces marked changes in the 23Na relaxation parameters; they show that sodium ions interact with binding sites on the protein and exchange rapidly with the bulk. The observed non-lorentzian lineshapes and the non-exponential decay of the transverse magnetization indicate that non-extreme narrowing conditions apply and give information on the dynamics of the interaction. Panulirus hemocyanin has at least two classes of Na+ binding sites; the binding constant of the more strongly bound sodium ions is in the order of 1 X 10(2) M-1. Competition between Na+ and Ca2+ for protein binding sites is demonstrated by the effect of Ca2+ on the 23Na relaxation parameters. However, only the more strongly bound Na+ are displaced by Ca2+. The number of Ca2+ needed to displace these sodium ions is 3--5 per oxygen binding site. The 23Na relaxation parameters are influenced also by the state of oxygenation of the protein, indicating a linkage between Na+ and oxygen binding. The simplest interpretation of the data is that sodium ions bind more strongly to oxyhemocyanin in agreement with oxygen equilibrium experiments. PMID:488113

  2. Calcium Alginate-Neusilin US2 Nanocomposite Microbeads for Oral Sustained Drug Delivery of Poor Water Soluble Drug Aceclofenac Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Mallappa, Manjanna Kolammanahalli; Kesarla, Rajesh; Banakar, Shivakumar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and investigate the calcium alginate- (CA-) Neusilin US2 nanocomposite microbeads containing preconcentrate of aceclofenac sodium (ACF-Na) liquid microemulsion (L-ME) for enhancement of oral bioavailability. The preconcentrate L-ME is prepared by using Labrafac PG, Labrasol, and Span 80 as oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant, respectively. The solid CA nanocomposite microbeads of L-ME prepared by microemulsification internal gelation technique using sodium alginate (SA) gelling agent, Neusilin US2 as adsorbent, and calcium chloride as crosslinking agent. L-ME has good thermodynamic stability; globule size was found to be 32.4 nm with polydispersity index 0.219 and −6.32 mV zeta potential. No significant interactions of excipients, drug in the formulations observed by FT-IR, DSC and XPRD. The concentration of SA and Neusilin US2 influences the flow properties, mean particle size, mechanical strength, drug entrapment efficiency, and percentage of drug release. All the formulations show minimum drug release in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) pH 1.2 for initial 2 h, maximum drug release in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at 6 h, followed by sustaining in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) of pH 7.4 up to 12 h. The interaction of SA with Neusilin US2 creates a thick thixotropic gel network structure which acts as barrier to control the release of drug in the alkaline pH environment. Neusilin US2 is a novel filler used to convert L-ME into solid nanocomposite microbeads to enhance dissolution rate of poor water soluble drugs sustaining the drug release for prolonged period of time. PMID:25802761

  3. Long-term inactivation of bacteriophage PRD1 as a function of temperature, pH, sodium and calcium concentration.

    PubMed

    Schijven, Jack F; Sadeghi, Gholamreza; Hassanizadeh, S Majid

    2016-10-15

    The two most significant processes controlling virus mobility in the subsurface environment are virus attachment and inactivation. In particular, models that predict subsurface virus transport are highly sensitive to inactivation. Virus inactivation is known to depend on temperature as well as hydrochemical conditions. The aim of the current work was to study the effects of temperature and hydrochemical conditions on the inactivation of bacteriophage PRD1 as a model virus, and to develop a quantitative relation for these effects. Series of batch experiments under controlled temperature were conducted, for a range of conditions: 9.5 °C and 12 °C, pH4 - pH8, sodium concentrations of 1, 10 and 20 mM, and calcium concentrations of 0.5, 1.5, and 3 mM. By multivariate regression analysis, a joint log-square model was developed that describes the inactivation rate of PRD1 as a function of these hydrochemical conditions. This model approximates two rate and Weibull models and accounts for the observed non-linear inactivation at increased pH and salt concentrations. Model predictions are within ±0.4 log10 (0.4-2.5 times) virus concentration reduction. The nature of the log-square model does not allow extrapolation of virus inactivation beyond the experimental conditions. Inactivation rate of PRD1 was found to increase with increasing temperature and increasing sodium and calcium concentrations, and to be lowest between pH 6.5 and pH 7.5. Within the studied conditions, the developed log-square model may be applied at field scale for predicting inactivation during subsurface transport of viruses. PMID:27438901

  4. Changes in Sodium, Calcium, and Magnesium Ion Concentrations That Inhibit Geobacillus Biofilms Have No Effect on Anoxybacillus flavithermus Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Somerton, B; Lindsay, D; Palmer, J; Brooks, J; Flint, S

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of varied sodium, calcium, and magnesium concentrations in specialty milk formulations on biofilm formation by Geobacillus spp. and Anoxybacillus flavithermus. The numbers of attached viable cells (log CFU per square centimeter) after 6 to 18 h of biofilm formation by three dairy-derived strains of Geobacillus and three dairy-derived strains of A. flavithermus were compared in two commercial milk formulations. Milk formulation B had relatively high sodium and low calcium and magnesium concentrations compared with those of milk formulation A, but the two formulations had comparable fat, protein, and lactose concentrations. Biofilm formation by the three Geobacillus isolates was up to 4 log CFU cm(-2) lower in milk formulation B than in milk formulation A after 6 to 18 h, and the difference was often significant (P ≤ 0.05). However, no significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were found when biofilm formations by the three A. flavithermus isolates were compared in milk formulations A and B. Supplementation of milk formulation A with 100 mM NaCl significantly decreased (P ≤ 0.05) Geobacillus biofilm formation after 6 to 10 h. Furthermore, supplementation of milk formulation B with 2 mM CaCl2 or 2 mM MgCl2 significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05) Geobacillus biofilm formation after 10 to 18 h. It was concluded that relatively high free Na(+) and low free Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) concentrations in milk formulations are collectively required to inhibit biofilm formation by Geobacillus spp., whereas biofilm formation by A. flavithermus is not impacted by typical cation concentration differences of milk formulations.

  5. Changes in Sodium, Calcium, and Magnesium Ion Concentrations That Inhibit Geobacillus Biofilms Have No Effect on Anoxybacillus flavithermus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Somerton, B.; Lindsay, D.; Palmer, J.; Brooks, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of varied sodium, calcium, and magnesium concentrations in specialty milk formulations on biofilm formation by Geobacillus spp. and Anoxybacillus flavithermus. The numbers of attached viable cells (log CFU per square centimeter) after 6 to 18 h of biofilm formation by three dairy-derived strains of Geobacillus and three dairy-derived strains of A. flavithermus were compared in two commercial milk formulations. Milk formulation B had relatively high sodium and low calcium and magnesium concentrations compared with those of milk formulation A, but the two formulations had comparable fat, protein, and lactose concentrations. Biofilm formation by the three Geobacillus isolates was up to 4 log CFU cm−2 lower in milk formulation B than in milk formulation A after 6 to 18 h, and the difference was often significant (P ≤ 0.05). However, no significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were found when biofilm formations by the three A. flavithermus isolates were compared in milk formulations A and B. Supplementation of milk formulation A with 100 mM NaCl significantly decreased (P ≤ 0.05) Geobacillus biofilm formation after 6 to 10 h. Furthermore, supplementation of milk formulation B with 2 mM CaCl2 or 2 mM MgCl2 significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05) Geobacillus biofilm formation after 10 to 18 h. It was concluded that relatively high free Na+ and low free Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations in milk formulations are collectively required to inhibit biofilm formation by Geobacillus spp., whereas biofilm formation by A. flavithermus is not impacted by typical cation concentration differences of milk formulations. PMID:26002898

  6. Combination of sodium chlorite and calcium propionate reduces enzymatic browning and microbial population of fresh-cut ‘Granny Smith’ apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tissue browning and microbial growth are the main concerns associated with fresh-cut apples. In this study, effects of sodium chlorite (SC) and calcium propionate (CP), individually and combined, on quality and microbial population of apple slices were investigated. ‘Granny Smith’ apple slices, dipp...

  7. Effects of estradiol and IGF-1 on the sodium calcium exchanger in rat cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F; Francis, Liliana; De Los Reyes, Lina

    2011-05-01

    The Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) is an important bidirectional transporter of calcium in neurons and has been shown to be involved in neuroprotection. Calcium can activate a number of cascades that can result in apoptosis and cell death, and NCX is a key factor in regulating the cytoplasmic concentration of this ion. 17-β-estradiol and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are known neuroprotective hormones with interacting mechanisms and effects on intracellular calcium; however, their relationship with the NCX has not been explored. In this article, the effects of these two hormones on neuronal NCX were tested using the whole-cell patch clamp technique on rat primary culture neurons. Both 17-β-estradiol and IGF-1 produced an increase in the NCX-mediated inward current and a decrease in the NCX-mediated outward current. However, the IGF-1 effect was lower than that of 17-β-estradiol, and the effect of both agents together was greater than the sum of each agent alone. Neither of the agents affected the pattern of regulation by extracellular or intrapipette calcium. Inhibitors of the IGF-1 and 17-β-estradiol receptors and inhibitors of the main signaling pathways failed to change the observed effects, indicating that these actions were not mediated by the classical receptors of these hormones. These effects on the NCX could be a mechanism explaining the neuroprotective actions of 17-β-estradiol and IGF-1, and these findings could help researchers to understand the role of the NCX in neuroprotection.

  8. The effect of Portuguese Man-of-war (Physalia physalis) venom on calcium, sodium and potassium fluxes of cultured embryonic chick heart cells.

    PubMed

    Edwards, L; Luo, E; Hall, R; Gonzalez, R R; Hessinger, D A

    2000-03-01

    Portuguese Man-of-war venom markedly increases calcium (45Ca2+) influx into primary, cultured, embryonic chick heart cells. This action is dose-dependent, but is unaffected by organic calcium blockers (diltiazem, verapamil, nifedipine, nimodipine and mibefradil). On the other hand, certain trivalent (La3+, Gd3+) and divalent (Zn2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Mn2+) metals inhibit venom-induced calcium influx. Sodium (22Na+) influx into chick heart cells is also significantly increased by Man-of-war venom. Flecainide does not block venom-induced sodium influx. The efflux of the potassium analogue, 86Rb+, from heart cells is also significantly increased by the venom. The venom, however, has little or no effect on rubidium (86Rb+) or 2-deoxy-D-[2-3H] glucose influx. PMID:10669022

  9. Sodium pump activity and calcium relaxation in vascular smooth muscle of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt rats

    SciTech Connect

    Soltis, E.E.; Field, F.P.

    1986-11-01

    The Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump activity was determined in femoral arterial smooth muscle from deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats using potassium relaxation and ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake as indices. The membrane-stabilizing effect of calcium and its relation to Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump activity also were examined. Femoral arteries from DOCA-salt rats exhibited a greater relaxation in response to potassium addition after contraction with norepinephrine in a low potassium (0.6 mM) Krebs solution. The concentration of potassium required to produce a 50% relaxation was significantly less in DOCA-salt rats. Ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake was significantly greater at 3, 10, and 20 minutes of /sup 86/Rb incubation in femoral arteries from DOCA-salt rats. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between the uptake of /sup 86/Rb and time of incubation in both control and DOCA-salt rats. A significant difference in the slopes of the regression lines showed that the rate of uptake was greater in DOCA-salt rats. No difference was observed in ouabain-insensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake. A dose-dependent relaxation in response to increasing concentrations of calcium following contraction to norepinephrine was observed in femoral arteries from control and DOCA-salt rats. The relaxation was directly dependent on the level of extracellular potassium and was blocked by ouabain. Femoral arteries from DOCA-salt rats relaxed to a significantly greater extent in response to calcium at each level of potassium when compared with controls. These results provide further evidence for an increase in Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump activity in vascular smooth muscle from DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

  10. Net charge transport during sodium-dependent calcium extrusion in isolated salamander rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The light-sensitive current and the current associated with the extrusion of internal Ca2+ in exchange for external Na+ have been recorded from detached rod outer segments from the salamander retina by the use of the whole-cell voltage clamp technique. No significant current-carrying mechanisms are present in the outer segment membrane apart from the light-sensitive conductance and the Na:Ca,K exchange, and exchange currents can therefore be recorded directly without the use of subtraction procedures or pharmacological blockers. The charge moved by the exchange was studied by loading outer segments with a known amount of calcium and then recording the exchange current on return to a Na(+)-containing solution. Calcium is not sequestered to any significant extent in a slowly exchanging internal store, as the charge recovered is unaffected if admission of the Na(+)-containing solution is delayed for 40 s. The number of charges flowing into the cell in exchange for each Ca2+ ion extruded was found not to deviate significantly from one over a wide range of ionic conditions and membrane potentials. These results show that the stoichiometry of the exchange is fixed over a wide range of conditions, and that the size of the inward exchange current is therefore directly proportional to the rate of Ca2+ efflux through the carrier. PMID:1722238

  11. High-Power Arctic Lidar for observations of Sodium layer and Calcium Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuerker, R. F.; Foley, J.; Kidd, P.; Wong, A. Y.

    1998-11-01

    The UCLA HIPAS Observatory is located at 64o 54' 22"N, 146o 50' 33" W. It passes under the auroral oval, has a 2.7 m diameter liquid mirror collector (LMT), and two bistatic laser illuminators; a Doubled YAG pumped dye laser and a Doubled (tunable) Alexandrite laser. The first emits 0.1 J - 10 ns pulses at 590nm (Na) at 20 Hz. The second laser emits 0.15 J -10 ns pulses at 393 nm (Ca+) and 391.4 nm (N2) at 10 Hz. New sporadic sodium layers have been observed during the passage of the electrojet and auroras in periods of 20-30 seconds, indicating that sodium is liberated from micrometeors during auroral precipitations. The Laser Induced Fluorescence techniques will be used to observe the acceleration of the Ca+ ions when they are driven by the 80 MW (ERP) 2.85MHz RF array, modulated at the Ca+ ion Cyclotron Frequency. 1. Ionospheric Modifaction and Enviromental Research in the Auroral Region in Plasma Science and the Environment. Publisher: AIP Press, Woodbury, NY. Editors: W. Manheimer, L. Sugiyama, T. Stix; Chapter 3, pgs. 41-75, 1997. Research supported by ONR N00014-96-C-0040

  12. The effect of calcium and sodium lactates on growth from spores of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens in a 'sous-vide' beef goulash under temperature abuse.

    PubMed

    Aran, N

    2001-01-22

    The effect of calcium and sodium lactates on growth from spores of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens at three different concentrations (0, 1.5 and 3% w/w) and at different temperatures (10, 15 and 20 degrees C for B. cereus and 15, 20 and 25 degrees C for C. perfringens) was investigated, using beef goulash as a model system for pasteurised vacuum-packaged convenience foods. Calcium lactate at a level of 3% reduced the pH values of the samples from 6.0 to 5.5. No B. cereus growth was observed at 10 degrees C, but after 7 days at an incubation temperature of 15 degrees C, cell number increased by 1 log cfu/g in the control samples. At this temperature, lactates were seen to be effective at inhibiting growth. Calcium lactate was more inhibitory than sodium lactate as the growth of B. cereus was inhibited at 1.5 and 3% concentrations at 20 degrees C, respectively. Growth of C. perfringens was arrested in the presence of 1.5% calcium lactate at all storage temperatures, whereas growth was inhibited by 3% sodium lactate only at 15 degrees C. PMID:11205943

  13. Sodium Nitrate Particles: Physical and Chemical Properties During Hydration and Dehydration, and Implications for Aged Sea Salt Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Rachel C.; Laskin, Alexander; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2004-07-01

    Experiments probing the phase and behavior of NaNO3 particles at different relative humidities, important for elucidating the role these play in the chemistry and radiative properties of marine regions, are presented. Changes in NaNO3 particles during hydration were studied using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and conventional SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). Mixtures of NaNO3 and NaCl, which are typical of partially processed sea salt particles, were also studied. Complementary studies using long path FTIR were carried out to determine the extent of water association with NaNO3 aerosols, and for comparison, NaCl, MgCl2, and NH4NO3, as a function of relative humidity. The combination of these techniques shows that NaNO3 particles exist as unusual metastable, amorphous solids at low relative humidity that undergo continuous hygroscopic growth with increasing relative humidity. While other evidence for this phenomenon has been reported, this is the first direct observation using ESEM.

  14. The hydrothermal decomposition of calcium monosulfoaluminate 14-hydrate to katoite hydrogarnet and β-anhydrite: An in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Nicola; Kyritsis, Konstantinos; Hall, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    We apply in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the transformation of calcium monosulfoaluminate 14-hydrate Ca 4Al 2O 6(SO 4)·14H 2O [monosulfate-14] to hydrogarnet Ca 3Al 2(OH) 12 on the saturated water vapor pressure curve up to 250 °C. We use an aqueous slurry of synthetic ettringite Ca 6Al 2(SO 4) 3(OH) 12·26H 2O as the starting material; on heating, this decomposes at about 115 °C to form monosulfate-14 and bassanite CaSO 4·0.5H 2O. Above 170 °C monosulfate-14 diffraction peaks slowly diminish in intensity, perhaps as a result of loss of crystallinity and the formation of an X-ray amorphous meta-monosulfate. Hydrogarnet nucleates only at temperatures above 210 °C. Bassanite transforms to β-anhydrite (insoluble anhydrite) at about 230 °C and this transformation is accompanied by a second burst of hydrogarnet growth. The transformation pathway is more complex than previously thought. The mapping of the transformation pathway shows the value of rapid in-situ time-resolved synchrotron diffraction.

  15. Combination of sodium chlorite and calcium propionate reduces enzymatic browning and microbial population of fresh-cut "Granny Smith" apples.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenqiang; Fan, Xuetong

    2010-03-01

    Tissue browning and microbial growth are the main concerns associated with fresh-cut apples. In this study, effects of sodium chlorite (SC) and calcium propionate (CP), individually and combined, on quality and microbial population of apple slices were investigated. "Granny Smith" apple slices, dipped for 5 min in CP solutions at 0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (w/v) either alone or in combination with 0.05% (w/v) SC, were stored at 3 and 10 degrees C for up to 14 d. Color, firmness, and microflora population were measured at 1, 7, and 14 d of storage. Results showed that CP alone had no significant effect on the browning of cut apples. Even though SC significantly inhibited tissue browning initially, the apple slices turned brown during storage at 10 degrees C. The combination of CP and SC was able to inhibit apple browning during storage. Samples treated with the combination of SC with CP did not show any detectable yeast and mold growth during the entire storage period at 3 degrees C. At 10 degrees C, yeast and mold count increased on apple slices during storage while CP reduced the increase. However, high concentrations of CP reduced the efficacy of SC in inactivating E. coli inoculated on apples. Overall, our results suggested that combination of SC with 0.5% and 1% CP could be used to inhibit tissue browning and maintain firmness while reducing microbial population. Practical Application: Apple slices, which contain antioxidants and other nutrient components, have emerged as popular snacks in food service establishments, school lunch programs, and for family consumption. However, the further growth of the industry is limited by product quality deterioration caused by tissue browning, short shelf-life due to microbial growth, and possible contamination with human pathogens during processing. Therefore, this study was conducted to develop treatments to reduce microbial population and tissue browning of "Granny Smith" apple slices. Results showed that an antimicrobial

  16. Combination of sodium chlorite and calcium propionate reduces enzymatic browning and microbial population of fresh-cut "Granny Smith" apples.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenqiang; Fan, Xuetong

    2010-03-01

    Tissue browning and microbial growth are the main concerns associated with fresh-cut apples. In this study, effects of sodium chlorite (SC) and calcium propionate (CP), individually and combined, on quality and microbial population of apple slices were investigated. "Granny Smith" apple slices, dipped for 5 min in CP solutions at 0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (w/v) either alone or in combination with 0.05% (w/v) SC, were stored at 3 and 10 degrees C for up to 14 d. Color, firmness, and microflora population were measured at 1, 7, and 14 d of storage. Results showed that CP alone had no significant effect on the browning of cut apples. Even though SC significantly inhibited tissue browning initially, the apple slices turned brown during storage at 10 degrees C. The combination of CP and SC was able to inhibit apple browning during storage. Samples treated with the combination of SC with CP did not show any detectable yeast and mold growth during the entire storage period at 3 degrees C. At 10 degrees C, yeast and mold count increased on apple slices during storage while CP reduced the increase. However, high concentrations of CP reduced the efficacy of SC in inactivating E. coli inoculated on apples. Overall, our results suggested that combination of SC with 0.5% and 1% CP could be used to inhibit tissue browning and maintain firmness while reducing microbial population. Practical Application: Apple slices, which contain antioxidants and other nutrient components, have emerged as popular snacks in food service establishments, school lunch programs, and for family consumption. However, the further growth of the industry is limited by product quality deterioration caused by tissue browning, short shelf-life due to microbial growth, and possible contamination with human pathogens during processing. Therefore, this study was conducted to develop treatments to reduce microbial population and tissue browning of "Granny Smith" apple slices. Results showed that an antimicrobial

  17. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tommasso J.R., Wright; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  18. Calcium H&K and sodium D absorption induced by the interstellar and circumgalactic media of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murga, Maria; Zhu, Guangtun; Ménard, Brice; Lan, Ting-Wen

    2015-09-01

    We map out calcium II and sodium I absorption (Fraunhofer H, K & D lines) induced by both the interstellar medium and the circumgalactic medium of the Milky Way. Our measurements cover more than 9000 deg2 and make use of about 300 000 extragalactic spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present absorption maps for these two species and then compare their distributions to those of neutral hydrogen and dust. We show that the abundance of Na I with respect to neutral hydrogen stays roughly constant in different environments, while that of Ca II decreases with hydrogen column density. Studying how these tracers vary as a function of velocity, we show that, on average, the NNaI/NCaII ratio decreases at higher velocity with respect to the local standard of rest, similar to the local Routly-Spitzer effect but seen on Galactic scale. We show that it is likely caused by higher gas/dust density at lower velocity. Finally, we show that Galactic Ca II and Na I absorption needs to be taken into account for precision photometry and, more importantly, for photometric redshift estimation with star-forming galaxies. Our maps of Ca II and Na I absorption are publicly available.

  19. A thermochemical study of glasses and crystals along the joins silica-calcium aluminate and silica-sodium aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrotsky, Alexandra; Peraudeau, Gilles; McMillan, Paul; Coutures, Jean-Pierre

    1982-11-01

    Enthalpies of solution in molten 2PbO · B 2O 3 at 985 K are reported for series of glasses xCa0.5AlO2-(1- x) SiO2 ( O ≤ x ≤ 0.99) and xNaAlO2-(1- x) SiO2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.56). The data are compared to values for the corresponding crystalline aluminosilicates and to preliminary data for systems containing KAlO 2 and Mg 0.5AlO 2. The enthalpies of mixing of glasses become more exothermic with increasing basicity of the mono- or divalent oxide. The tendency toward immiscibility on the silica-rich side, indicated by the shape of the heat of mixing curve between x = 0 and x = 0.4, is pronounced in the calcium aluminate system, but not in the sodium aluminate system. The shape of the heat of mixing curve, which is roughly symmetrical about x = 0.5, can be rationalized in terms of glass structure by considering essentially random substitution of Si and Al on a continuous three dimensional tetrahedral framework, with stabilization arising from electrostatic interactions between aluminum and the nonframework cation balancing the destabilizing effects arising from perturbation of the aluminosilicate framework by the nonframework cation. These trends are consistent with the variation of physical properties of aluminosilicate melts.

  20. THE ROLE OF INTRACELLULAR SODIUM (Na+) IN THE REGULATION OF CALCIUM (Ca2+)-MEDIATED SIGNALING AND TOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xian-Min; Groveman, Bradley R; Fang, Xiao-Qian; Lin, Shuang-Xiu

    2010-01-01

    It is known that activated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are a major route of excessive calcium ion (Ca2+) entry in central neurons, which may activate degradative processes and thereby cause cell death. Therefore, NMDARs are now recognized to play a key role in the development of many diseases associated with injuries to the central nervous system (CNS). However, it remains a mystery how NMDAR activity is recruited in the cellular processes leading to excitotoxicity and how NMDAR activity can be controlled at a physiological level. The sodium ion (Na+) is the major cation in extracellular space. With its entry into the cell, Na+ can act as a critical intracellular second messenger that regulates many cellular functions. Recent data have shown that intracellular Na+ can be an important signaling factor underlying the up-regulation of NMDARs. While Ca2+ influx during the activation of NMDARs down-regulates NMDAR activity, Na+ influx provides an essential positive feedback mechanism to overcome Ca2+-induced inhibition and thereby potentiate both NMDAR activity and inward Ca2+ flow. Extensive investigations have been conducted to clarify mechanisms underlying Ca2+-mediated signaling. This review focuses on the roles of Na+ in the regulation of Ca2+-mediated NMDAR signaling and toxicity. PMID:21243124

  1. Individual effects of sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium chloride salts on Lactobacillus pentosus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Durán-Quintana, M C; Garrido-Fernandez, A

    2008-07-01

    A quantitative investigation on the individual effects of sodium (NaCl), potassium (KCl), calcium (CaCl2), and magnesium (MgCl2) chloride salts against Lactobacillus pentosus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two representative microorganisms of table olives and other fermented vegetables, was carried out. In order to assess their potential activities, both the kinetic growth parameters and dose-response profiles in synthetic media (deMan Rogosa Sharpe broth medium and yeast-malt-peptone-glucose broth medium, respectively) were obtained and analyzed. Microbial growth was monitored via optical density measurements as a function of contact time in the presence of progressive chloride salt concentrations. Relative maximum specific growth rate and lag-phase period were modeled as a function of the chloride salt concentrations. Moreover, for each salt and microorganism tested, the noninhibitory concentrations and the MICs were estimated and compared. All chloride salts exerted a significant antimicrobial effect on the growth cycle; particularly, CaCl2 showed a similar effect to NaCl, while KCl and MgCl2 were progressively less inhibitory. Microbial susceptibility and resistance were found to be nonlinearly dose related.

  2. Stabilization/solidification of mercury-contaminated waste ash using calcium sodium phosphate (CNP) and magnesium potassium phosphate (MKP) processes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Han; Eom, Yujin; Lee, Tai Gyu

    2014-08-15

    This study examined the stabilization and solidification (S/S) of mercury (Hg)-contaminated waste ash generated from an industrial waste incinerator using chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) technology. A magnesium potassium phosphate (MKP; MgKPO4 · 6H2O) ceramic, fabricated from MgO and KH2PO4, and a calcium sodium phosphate (CNP; CaNaPO4) ceramic, fabricated from CaO and Na2HPO4, were used as solidification binders in the CBPC process, and Na2S or FeS was added to each solidification binder to stabilize the Hg-contaminated waste ash. The S/S processes were conducted under various operating conditions (based on the solidification binder and stabilization reagent, stabilization reagent dosage, and waste loading ratio), and the performance characteristics of the S/S sample under each operating condition were compared, including the Hg leaching value and compressive strength. The Hg leaching value of untreated Hg-contaminated waste ash was 231.3 μg/L, whereas the S/S samples treated using the MKP and CNP processes exhibited Hg leaching values below the universal treatment standard (UTS) limit (25 μg/L). Although the compressive strengths of the S/S samples decreased as the sulfide dosage and waste loading ratio were increased, most of the S/S samples fabricated by the MKP and CNP processes exhibited good mechanical properties.

  3. Microstructural, textural, and sensory characteristics of probiotic yogurts fortified with sodium calcium caseinate or whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Akalın, A S; Unal, G; Dinkci, N; Hayaloglu, A A

    2012-07-01

    The influence of milk protein-based ingredients on the textural characteristics, sensory properties, and microstructure of probiotic yogurt during a refrigerated storage period of 28 d was studied. Milk was fortified with 2% (wt/vol) skim milk powder as control, 2% (wt/vol) sodium calcium caseinate (SCaCN), 2% (wt/vol) whey protein concentrate (WPC) or a blend of 1% (wt/vol) SCaCN and 1% (wt/vol) WPC. A commercial yogurt starter culture and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 as probiotic bacteria were used for the production. The fortification with SCaCN improved the firmness and adhesiveness. Higher values of viscosity were also obtained in probiotic yogurts with SCaCN during storage. However, WPC enhanced water-holding capacity more than the caseinate. Addition of SCaCN resulted in a coarse, smooth, and more compact protein network; however, WPC gave finer and bunched structures in the scanning electron microscopy micrographs. The use of SCaCN decreased texture scores in probiotic yogurt; probably due to the lower water-holding capacity and higher syneresis values in the caseinate-added yogurt sample. Therefore, the textural characteristics of probiotic yogurts improved depending on the ingredient variety. PMID:22720919

  4. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  5. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  6. Early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate (synthetic ye'elimite, C{sub 4}A{sub 3}S{sup ¯}) in the presence of gypsum and varying amounts of calcium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, Craig W.; Kirchheim, Ana Paula; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Gartner, Ellis M.

    2013-06-15

    Suspensions of synthetic ye'elimite (C{sub 4}A{sub 3}S{sup ¯}) in a saturated gypsum (CS{sup ¯}H{sub 2}) and calcium hydroxide (CH) solution were examined in-situ in a wet cell by soft X-ray transmission microscopy and ex-situ by scanning electron microscopy. The most voluminous hydration product observed was ettringite. Ettringite commonly displayed acicular, filiform, reticulated, and stellate crystal habits. Additionally, pastes with C{sub 4}A{sub 3}S{sup ¯}, 15% CS{sup ¯}H{sub 2}, and varying amounts of CH were prepared and examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and isothermal calorimetry. The XRD experiments showed that increasing CH content caused more solid solution (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/OH{sup −}) AFm phases to form at early ages (< 1 d) and more monosulfate to form at later ages (> 1 d). Calorimetry indicated that the increased production of solid solution AFm was accompanied with an increase in the initial (< 30 min) rate of heat evolution, and increasing CH generally reduced the time till the second maximum rate of heat evolution due to the formation of ettringite and monosulfate.

  7. Effect of estrogen on calcium and sodium transport by the nephron luminal membranes.

    PubMed

    Brunette, M G; Leclerc, M

    2001-08-01

    Estrogens are widely used for contraception and osteoporosis prevention. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of 17 beta-estradiol on calcium (Ca(2+)) transport by the nephron luminal membranes, independently of any other Ca(2+)-regulating hormones. Proximal and distal tubules of rabbit kidneys were incubated with 17 beta-estradiol or the carrier for various periods of time, and the luminal membranes of these tubules were purified and vesiculated. Ca(2+) uptake by membrane vesicles was measured using the Millipore filtration technique. Incubation of proximal tubules with the hormone did not influence Ca(2+) uptake by the luminal membranes. In contrast, incubation of distal tubules with 10(-8) M 17 beta-estradiol for 30 min decreased the initial uptake of 0.5 mM Ca(2+) from 0.34+/-0.04 (s.e.m. ) to 0.17+/-0.04 pmol/microg per 5 s (P<0.05). In the presence of 100 mM Na(+), 0.5 mM Ca(2+) uptake was strongly diminished and the effect of 17 beta-estradiol disappeared (0.17+/-0.01 and 0.21+/-0.07 pmol/microg per 5 s in vesicles from the control and treated tubules). Direct incubation of the membranes with 17 beta-estradiol, however, failed to show any influence of the hormone on Ca(2+) transport. The action of 17 beta-estradiol was dose-dependent, with a half-maximal effect at approximately 10(-9) M. Ca(2+) uptake by the distal tubule membranes presents dual kinetics. 17 beta-Estradiol decreased the V(max) value of the high-affinity component from 0.42+/-0.02 to 0.31+/-0.03 pmol/microg per 10 s (P<0.02). In contrast with the effect of the hormone on Ca(2+) transport, estradiol increased Na(+) uptake by both the proximal and distal tubule luminal membranes. In conclusion, incubation of proximal and distal tubules with estrogen decreases Ca(2+) reabsorption by the high-affinity Ca(2+) channels of the distal luminal membranes, and enhances Na(+) transport by the membranes from proximal and distal nephrons. PMID:11479140

  8. Postnatal growth of infants of less than 1.3 kg birth weight: effects of metabolic acidosis, of caloric intake, and of calcium, sodium, and phosphate supplementation.

    PubMed

    Chance, G W; Radde, I C; Willis, D M; Roy, R N; Park, E; Ackerman, I

    1977-11-01

    Weekly increments of length, weight, head circumference, and skinfold thickness in response to a series of dietary changes were measured in 108 healthy infants who weighed less than 1.3 kg at birth. The serial manipulations included prevention of late metabolic acidosis, increased caloric intake, and calcium, sodium, and phosphorus supplementation. The study comprised four phases; the infants were divided into ten groups according to dietary regimen. AGA and SGA infants were studied separately. Growth in length was primarily influenced by a change to a formula providing a higher caloric intake and a 60:40 whey protein/casein ratio. Correction of late metabolic acidosis, sodium, and phosphorus supplementation had minor additive effects on growth in length. Increased caloric intake also influenced growth of head circumference, but only in AGA infants. Only the sodium intake was shown to influence body weight increments significantly with the range of caloric intake used in the study (132 to 160 calories/kg/day).

  9. Dynamic behaviors of water contained in calcium-silicate-hydrate gel at different temperatures studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhou; Deng, Pei-Na; Zhang, Li-Li; Li, Hua

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic behaviors of water contained in calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel with different water content values from 10% to 30% (by weight), are studied by using an empirical diffusion model (EDM) to analyze the experimental data of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra at measured temperatures ranging from 230 K to 280 K. In the study, the experimental QENS spectra with the whole Q-range are considered. Several important parameters including the bound/immobile water elastic coefficient A, the bound water index BWI, the Lorentzian with a half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) Γ 1(Q) and Γ 2(Q), the self-diffusion coefficients D t1 and D t2 of water molecules, the average residence times τ 01 and τ 02, and the proton mean squared displacement (MSD) are obtained. The results show that the QENS spectra can be fitted very well not only for small Q (≤ 1 Å-1) but also for large Q. The bound/immobile water fraction in a C-S-H gel sample can be shown by the fitted BWI. The distinction between bound/immobile and mobile water, which includes confined water and ultra-confined water, can be seen by the fitted MSD. All the MSD tend to be the smallest value below 0.25 Å2 (the MSD of bound/immobile water) as the Q increases to 1.9 Å-1, no matter what the temperature and water content are. Furthermore, by the abrupt changes of the fitted values of D t1, τ 01, and Γ 1(Q), a crossover temperature at 250 K, namely the liquid-to-crystal-like transition temperature, can be identified for confined water in large gel pores (LGPs) and/or small gel pores (SGPs) contained in the C-S-H gel sample with 30% water content.

  10. Efficacy of estramustine phosphate sodium hydrate (EMP) monotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients: report of 102 cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Hayakawa, Nozomi; Ezaki, Taisuke; Suzuki, Kenjiro; Maeda, Takahiro; Ninomiya, Akiharu; Nakamura, So

    2013-12-01

    This retrospective chart review study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of estramustine phosphate sodium hydrate (EMP) monotherapy in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and to determine who would benefit from EMP therapy. EMP was administered at a daily dose of 560 mg to 102 patients as a third-line therapy, who had already received combined androgen blockade (CAB) and subsequent alternative antiandrogen therapy. The responses to EMP after its induction and its toxicity were evaluated. We also analyzed the association between the clinicopathological factors of the patients and their responses to EMP therapy. A reduction in the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 4 weeks after induction was observed in 70 patients (68.6%), while 30 cases (29.4%) achieved more than 50% reduction of PSA. Long-term reduction of PSA from baseline for more than 6 months was observed in 31 patients (30.4%). EMP treatment was discontinued in 11 patients (10.8%) because of side effects (nausea in six patients, gynecomastia in three patients, eruption in one patient, and liver dysfunction in one patient). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that long duration of prior hormonal therapy was an independent favorable factor for reduced PSA levels, long responses, and overall survival. The data suggest that oral EMP administration as a third-line monotherapy is well tolerated and effective to some degree in patients with CRPC who have already received CAB and subsequent alternative antiandrogen therapy. Thus, EMP can be regarded as one treatment option, especially for patients whose prior duration of hormonal therapy was long.

  11. Assessment of Pain Intensity in Patients with Dentin Hypersensitivity After Application of Prophylaxis Paste Based on Calcium Sodium Phosphosilicate Formula

    PubMed Central

    Chałas, Renata; Wójcik-Chęcińska, Ilona; Zamościńska, Jolanta; Bachanek, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background One of many functions of the pulp-dentin complex is sensory function. Acute, situated, receding pain after the cessation of the stimulus action is called dentin pain. Dentin hypersensitivity has been described as one of the most painful and least successfully treated chronic ailments of teeth. The aim of this research was the clinical evaluation of the effectiveness of professional polishing paste containing calcium sodium phosphosilicate formula (NovaMin) in eliminating dentin hypersensitivity after a single application. Material/Methods The study comprised 92 teeth with dentin hypersensitivity diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. The pain reaction of exposed dentine was induced by tactile and dehydrating stimuli, asking patients to assess the severity of pain on the VAS scale. Clinical trial and survey were carried out twice: before and 1 week after the application of the polishing paste. Results After the application of the examined paste, the percentage of teeth reacting with a severe pain to the touch of the probe decreased from 16.3% to 4.3%, and with a moderate pain from 42.4% to 12%. Examination after applying dehydrating stimulus a week after carrying out the application showed a decrease in the proportion of teeth with strong pain from 28.3% to 0% and moderate pain from 38% to 15.2%. The lack of pain increased from 12% to about 50%. Conclusions The use of prophylactic professional paste with NovaMin formula in in-office procedure provides the reduction of dentin hypersensitivity noticeable by 1 week after application. PMID:26429677

  12. Genetic control and transgressive segregation of zinc, iron, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and sodium accumulation in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds.

    PubMed

    Fernandes Santos, C A; Boiteux, L S

    2015-01-16

    Cowpea crop, through combining a range of essential minerals with high quality proteins, plays an important role in providing nutritional security to human population living in semi-arid regions. Studies on genetics of biofortification with essential minerals are still quite scarce, and the major objective of the present study was to provide genetic information on development of cowpea cultivars with high seed mineral contents. Genetic parameters heritability and minimum number of genes were estimated for seed accumulation of zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and sodium (Na). Generation mean and variance analyses were conducted using contrasting parental lines, F₁, F₂, and backcross populations derived from IT97K-1042-3 x BRS Tapaihum and IT97K-1042-3 x Canapu crosses. High narrow-sense heritability (h²) values were found for accumulation of Fe (65-86%), P (74-77%), and K (77-88%), whereas moderate h(2) values were observed for accumulation of Ca (41-56%), Zn (51-83%), and Na (50-55%) in seeds. Significant additive genetic effects as well as parental mean effects were detected in both crosses for all minerals, whereas epistasis was important genetic component in Zn content. The minimum number of genes controlling the accumulation of minerals ranged from two (K) to 11 (P). Transgressive segregation was observed in F2 populations of both crosses for all minerals analyzed. The results suggest that, although under either oligogenic or polygenic control, the seed content of these six minerals in cowpea can be improved via standard breeding methods largely used for self-pollinated crops.

  13. Molecular Basis of Calpain Cleavage and Inactivation of the Sodium-Calcium Exchanger 1 in Heart Failure*

    PubMed Central

    Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Hafver, Tandekile Lubelwana; Hodne, Kjetil; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Lunde, Ida Gjervold; Dalhus, Bjørn; Lunde, Marianne; Kvaløy, Heidi; Louch, William Edward; Tønnessen, Theis; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sejersted, Ole Mathias; Carlson, Cathrine Rein

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac sodium (Na+)-calcium (Ca2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) is central to the maintenance of normal Ca2+ homeostasis and contraction. Studies indicate that the Ca2+-activated protease calpain cleaves NCX1. We hypothesized that calpain is an important regulator of NCX1 in response to pressure overload and aimed to identify molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of calpain binding and cleavage of NCX1 in the heart. NCX1 full-length protein and a 75-kDa NCX1 fragment along with calpain were up-regulated in aortic stenosis patients and rats with heart failure. Patients with coronary artery disease and sham-operated rats were used as controls. Calpain co-localized, co-fractionated, and co-immunoprecipitated with NCX1 in rat cardiomyocytes and left ventricle lysate. Immunoprecipitations, pull-down experiments, and extensive use of peptide arrays indicated that calpain domain III anchored to the first Ca2+ binding domain in NCX1, whereas the calpain catalytic region bound to the catenin-like domain in NCX1. The use of bioinformatics, mutational analyses, a substrate competitor peptide, and a specific NCX1-Met369 antibody identified a novel calpain cleavage site at Met369. Engineering NCX1-Met369 into a tobacco etch virus protease cleavage site revealed that specific cleavage at Met369 inhibited NCX1 activity (both forward and reverse mode). Finally, a short peptide fragment containing the NCX1-Met369 cleavage site was modeled into the narrow active cleft of human calpain. Inhibition of NCX1 activity, such as we have observed here following calpain-induced NCX1 cleavage, might be beneficial in pathophysiological conditions where increased NCX1 activity contributes to cardiac dysfunction. PMID:25336645

  14. Genetic control and transgressive segregation of zinc, iron, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and sodium accumulation in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds.

    PubMed

    Fernandes Santos, C A; Boiteux, L S

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea crop, through combining a range of essential minerals with high quality proteins, plays an important role in providing nutritional security to human population living in semi-arid regions. Studies on genetics of biofortification with essential minerals are still quite scarce, and the major objective of the present study was to provide genetic information on development of cowpea cultivars with high seed mineral contents. Genetic parameters heritability and minimum number of genes were estimated for seed accumulation of zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and sodium (Na). Generation mean and variance analyses were conducted using contrasting parental lines, F₁, F₂, and backcross populations derived from IT97K-1042-3 x BRS Tapaihum and IT97K-1042-3 x Canapu crosses. High narrow-sense heritability (h²) values were found for accumulation of Fe (65-86%), P (74-77%), and K (77-88%), whereas moderate h(2) values were observed for accumulation of Ca (41-56%), Zn (51-83%), and Na (50-55%) in seeds. Significant additive genetic effects as well as parental mean effects were detected in both crosses for all minerals, whereas epistasis was important genetic component in Zn content. The minimum number of genes controlling the accumulation of minerals ranged from two (K) to 11 (P). Transgressive segregation was observed in F2 populations of both crosses for all minerals analyzed. The results suggest that, although under either oligogenic or polygenic control, the seed content of these six minerals in cowpea can be improved via standard breeding methods largely used for self-pollinated crops. PMID:25729958

  15. Dietary supplementation with sodium bicarbonate improves calcium absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during peak production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M J; Zhao, J P; Jiao, H C; Wang, X J; Zhang, Q; Lin, H

    2015-01-01

    The advantage of supplemental sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on eggshell quality in laying hens changes with age. Besides increasing calcium (Ca) secretion in the eggshell gland, it may improve Ca absorption in the intestine or kidney. Hy-Line Brown layers (n = 384), 25 weeks of age, were allocated to two treatment groups in two experiments, each of which included 4 replicates of 24 hens. Hens were fed a basal diet (control) or the basal diet containing 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg for 50 or 20 weeks in Experiment 1 or 2, respectively. A 24-h continuous lighting regimen was used to allow hens to consume the dietary supplements during the period of active eggshell formation. In Experiment 1, particularly from 25 to 50 weeks of age, and in Experiment 2, NaHCO3 supplementation favoured hen-d egg production at the expense of lower egg weight. The increased eggshell thickness should have nothing to do with the additional eggshell formation, because of the unchanged egg mass and daily eggshell calcification. At 35 weeks of age in both experiments, NaHCO3 supplementation increased duodenal expression of calbindin-d28k (CaBP-D28k) protein, contributing to higher Ca retention and balance. From 50 to 75 weeks of age in Experiment 1, the hens had little response to NaHCO3 supplementation and showed a negative trend on eggshell thickness and strength. It is concluded that dietary supplementation with 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg improves Ca absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during the peak but not late production period, with the introduction of continuous lighting.

  16. Mucoadhesion on pig vesical mucosa: influence of polycarbophil/calcium interactions.

    PubMed

    Kerec, M; Bogataj, M; Mugerle, B; Gasperlin, M; Mrhar, A

    2002-07-01

    The influence of polycarbophil/calcium interactions on the mucoadhesive properties of polycarbophil has been examined. Polycarbophil dispersions and films with different concentrations of calcium or sodium ions were prepared and the following parameters were measured: detachment force on pig vesical mucosa, zeta potential, pH and viscosity. Polycarbophil detachment force decreased significantly in the presence of calcium but not sodium. Both ions decrease the pH of polycarbophil dispersions. On the other hand, altering the pH of hydrated polycarbophil films in the absence of added ions had an insignificant effect on detachment force. Both ions reduce the absolute values of polycarbophil zeta potential, calcium more efficiently than sodium. We could conclude that decreased mucoadhesion strength of polycarbophil in the presence of calcium is due to the chelation of polycarbophil carboxylic groups by calcium and crosslinking of polymer. The crosslinked polymer chains would be expected to be less flexible, and therefore, interpenetrate to a lesser extent with the glycosaminoglycans of mucus. Additionally, the interactions between functional groups of polycarbophil and mucus glycosaminoglycans are lowered due to the calcium, blocking the carboxylic groups. The mechanism of calcium influence on viscosity of polycarbophil dispersions appears to be different: repulsion between ionised carboxylic groups of polycarbophil prevails over the crosslinking of polycarbophil by calcium.

  17. Structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates: insights from X-ray diffraction, synchrotron X-ray absorption and nuclear magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Claret, Francis; Roosz, Cédric; Sato, Tsutomu; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Linard, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) having Ca/Si ratios ranging between 0.57 ± 0.05 and 1.47 ± 0.04 was studied using an electron probe micro-analyser, powder X-ray diffraction, 29Si magic angle spinning NMR, and Fourier-transform infrared and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopies. All samples can be described as nanocrystalline and defective tobermorite. At low Ca/Si ratio, the Si chains are defect free and the Si Q 3 and Q 2 environments account, respectively, for up to 40.2 ± 1.5% and 55.6 ± 3.0% of the total Si, with part of the Q 3 Si being attributable to remnants of the synthesis reactant. As the Ca/Si ratio increases up to 0.87 ± 0.02, the Si Q 3 environment decreases down to 0 and is preferentially replaced by the Q 2 environment, which reaches 87.9 ± 2.0%. At higher ratios, Q 2 decreases down to 32.0 ± 7.6% for Ca/Si = 1.38 ± 0.03 and is replaced by the Q 1 environment, which peaks at 68.1 ± 3.8%. The combination of X-ray diffraction and NMR allowed capturing the depolymerization of Si chains as well as a two-step variation in the layer-to-layer distance. This latter first increases from ∼11.3 Å (for samples having a Ca/Si ratio <∼0.6) up to 12.25 Å at Ca/Si = 0.87 ± 0.02, probably as a result of a weaker layer-to-layer connectivity, and then decreases down to 11 Å when the Ca/Si ratio reaches 1.38 ± 0.03. The decrease in layer-to-layer distance results from the incorporation of interlayer Ca that may form a Ca(OH)2-like structure, nanocrystalline and intermixed with C–S–H layers, at high Ca/Si ratios. PMID:27275135

  18. Inhibition of collagen synthesis by select calcium and sodium channel blockers can be mitigated by ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vadim; Ivanova, Svetlana; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, sodium and potassium channel blockers are widely prescribed medications for a variety of health problems, most frequently for cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, angina pectoris and other disorders. However, chronic application of channel blockers is associated with numerous side effects, including worsening cardiac pathology. For example, nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker was found to be associated with increased mortality and increased risk for myocardial infarction. In addition to the side effects mentioned above by different channel blockers, these drugs can cause arterial wall damage, thereby contributing to vascular wall structure destabilization and promoting events facilitating rupture of plaques. Collagen synthesis is regulated by ascorbic acid, which is also essential for its optimum structure as a cofactor in lysine and proline hydroxylation, a precondition for optimum crosslinking of collagen and elastin. Therefore, the main objective in this study was to evaluate effects of various types of channel blockers on intracellular accumulation and cellular functions of ascorbate, specifically in relation to formation and extracellular deposition of major collagen types relevant for vascular function. Effects of select Na- and Ca- channel blockers on collagen synthesis and deposition were evaluated in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and aortic smooth muscle cells by immunoassay. All channel blockers tested demonstrated inhibitory effects on collagen type I deposition to the ECM by fibroblasts, each to a different degree. Ascorbic acid significantly increased collagen I ECM deposition. Nifedipine (50 µM), a representative of channel blockers tested, significantly reduced ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate-dependent ECM deposition of collagen type l and collagen type lV by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. In addition, nifedipine (50 µM) significantly reduced ascorbate-dependent collagen type l and type lV synthesis by cultured aortic smooth

  19. Inhibition of collagen synthesis by select calcium and sodium channel blockers can be mitigated by ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vadim; Ivanova, Svetlana; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, sodium and potassium channel blockers are widely prescribed medications for a variety of health problems, most frequently for cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, angina pectoris and other disorders. However, chronic application of channel blockers is associated with numerous side effects, including worsening cardiac pathology. For example, nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker was found to be associated with increased mortality and increased risk for myocardial infarction. In addition to the side effects mentioned above by different channel blockers, these drugs can cause arterial wall damage, thereby contributing to vascular wall structure destabilization and promoting events facilitating rupture of plaques. Collagen synthesis is regulated by ascorbic acid, which is also essential for its optimum structure as a cofactor in lysine and proline hydroxylation, a precondition for optimum crosslinking of collagen and elastin. Therefore, the main objective in this study was to evaluate effects of various types of channel blockers on intracellular accumulation and cellular functions of ascorbate, specifically in relation to formation and extracellular deposition of major collagen types relevant for vascular function. Effects of select Na- and Ca- channel blockers on collagen synthesis and deposition were evaluated in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and aortic smooth muscle cells by immunoassay. All channel blockers tested demonstrated inhibitory effects on collagen type I deposition to the ECM by fibroblasts, each to a different degree. Ascorbic acid significantly increased collagen I ECM deposition. Nifedipine (50 µM), a representative of channel blockers tested, significantly reduced ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate-dependent ECM deposition of collagen type l and collagen type lV by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. In addition, nifedipine (50 µM) significantly reduced ascorbate-dependent collagen type l and type lV synthesis by cultured aortic smooth

  20. Inhibition of collagen synthesis by select calcium and sodium channel blockers can be mitigated by ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Vadim; Ivanova, Svetlana; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, sodium and potassium channel blockers are widely prescribed medications for a variety of health problems, most frequently for cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, angina pectoris and other disorders. However, chronic application of channel blockers is associated with numerous side effects, including worsening cardiac pathology. For example, nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker was found to be associated with increased mortality and increased risk for myocardial infarction. In addition to the side effects mentioned above by different channel blockers, these drugs can cause arterial wall damage, thereby contributing to vascular wall structure destabilization and promoting events facilitating rupture of plaques. Collagen synthesis is regulated by ascorbic acid, which is also essential for its optimum structure as a cofactor in lysine and proline hydroxylation, a precondition for optimum crosslinking of collagen and elastin. Therefore, the main objective in this study was to evaluate effects of various types of channel blockers on intracellular accumulation and cellular functions of ascorbate, specifically in relation to formation and extracellular deposition of major collagen types relevant for vascular function. Effects of select Na- and Ca- channel blockers on collagen synthesis and deposition were evaluated in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and aortic smooth muscle cells by immunoassay. All channel blockers tested demonstrated inhibitory effects on collagen type I deposition to the ECM by fibroblasts, each to a different degree. Ascorbic acid significantly increased collagen I ECM deposition. Nifedipine (50 µM), a representative of channel blockers tested, significantly reduced ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate-dependent ECM deposition of collagen type l and collagen type lV by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. In addition, nifedipine (50 µM) significantly reduced ascorbate-dependent collagen type l and type lV synthesis by cultured aortic smooth

  1. The ability to solve elementary logic tasks in mice with the knockout of sodium-calcium exchanger gene 2 (NCX2).

    PubMed

    Poletaeva, I I; Perepelkina, O V; Boyarshinova, O S; Golibrodo, V A; Lilp, I G; Lipp, H-P; Shin, Hee Sup

    2016-07-01

    Mice with a knockout of the sodium-calcium exchanger 2 (NCX2) gene were statistically significantly more successful than wild-type controls in the solution of two cognitive tasks, the test for the capacity to extrapolate the direction of the stimulus movement and the "puzzle-box" test for the capacity to find a hidden route to safe environment, which were based on food and aversive motivations, respectively. In both tests, the success of task solution was based on the animal's ability to use the object's "permanence" rule (according to J. Piaget). The data confirm that the knockout of this gene, which is accompanied by modulation of the temporal pattern of calcium membrane flux, also induces changes in mouse CNS plasticity. PMID:27595821

  2. Physico-chemical and sensory properties of reduced-fat mortadella prepared with blends of calcium, magnesium and potassium chloride as partial substitutes for sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Horita, C N; Morgano, M A; Celeghini, R M S; Pollonio, M A R

    2011-12-01

    Blends of calcium, magnesium and potassium chloride were used to partially replace sodium chloride (50-75%) in reduced-fat mortadella formulations. The presence of calcium chloride reduced the emulsion stability, cooking yield, elasticity and cohesiveness and increased hardness; however, it yielded the best sensory acceptance when 50% NaCl was replaced by 25% CaCl(2) and 25% KCl. There was no effect of the salt substitutes on mortadella color, appearance and aroma. All salt combinations studied showed stable lipid oxidation during its shelf life. The use of a blend with 1% NaCl, 0.5% KCl and 0.5% MgCl(2) resulted in the best emulsion stability, but the worst scores for flavor. This study suggests that it is possible to reduce the sodium chloride concentration by 50% in reduced-fat mortadella using the studied salt combinations with necessary adjustments to optimize the sensory properties (MgCl(2) 25%; KCl 25%) or emulsion stability (CaCl(2) 25%; KCl 25%).

  3. Populus euphratica Displays Apoplastic Sodium Accumulation, Osmotic Adjustment by Decreases in Calcium and Soluble Carbohydrates, and Develops Leaf Succulence under Salt Stress1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ottow, Eric A.; Brinker, Monika; Teichmann, Thomas; Fritz, Eberhard; Kaiser, Werner; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Jiang, Xiangning; Polle, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Populus euphratica Olivier is known to exist in saline and arid environments. In this study we investigated the physiological mechanisms enabling this species to cope with stress caused by salinity. Acclimation to increasing Na+ concentrations required adjustments of the osmotic pressure of leaves, which were achieved by accumulation of Na+ and compensatory decreases in calcium and soluble carbohydrates. The counterbalance of Na+/Ca2+ was also observed in mature leaves from field-grown P. euphratica trees exposed to an environmental gradient of increasing salinity. X-ray microanalysis showed that a primary strategy to protect the cytosol against sodium toxicity was apoplastic but not vacuolar salt accumulation. The ability to cope with salinity also included maintenance of cytosolic potassium concentrations and development of leaf succulence due to an increase in cell number and cell volume leading to sodium dilution. Decreases in apoplastic and vacuolar Ca2+ combined with suppression of calcineurin B-like protein transcripts suggest that Na+ adaptation required suppression of calcium-related signaling pathways. Significant increases in galactinol synthase and alternative oxidase after salt shock and salt adaptation point to shifts in carbohydrate metabolism and suppression of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria under salt stress. PMID:16299175

  4. Dissolution kinetics of granular calcium carbonate in concentrated aqueous sodium dichromate solution at pH 6.0-7.0 and 110-130 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiangui; Li, Zuohu

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the factors controlling calcite dissolution is important for modeling geochemical cycles and impacts of greenhouse gases on climate, diagenesis of sediments, and sedimentary rocks. It also has practical significance in the investigation of behavior of carbonates in petroleum and natural gas reservoirs and in the preservation of buildings and monuments constructed from limestone and marble. A large number of papers have been published on dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions. But few involved the near-equilibrium region, especially at elevated temperatures and in concentrated solutions. In this paper, the dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate in concentrated aqueous sodium dichromate solutions at pH 6.0-7.0 and 110-130 degrees C were studied in a 2-L autoclave. The results indicate that the dissolution reaction is mix-controlled, with surface reaction as the prevailing factor. The concentration of calcium ions in solution hardly affects the dissolution rate, but carbon dioxide in the vapor phase inhibits the dissolution reaction. The dissolution rate can be expressed by R = k(1)a(2)(H+) + k(2), and the apparent activation energy is 55-84 kJ mol(-1).

  5. Effects of calcium carbonate, magnesium oxide and sodium citrate bicarbonate health supplements on the urinary risk factors for kidney stone formation.

    PubMed

    Allie, Shameez; Rodgers, Allen

    2003-01-01

    We describe a model to illustrate different chemical interactions that can occur in urine following ingestion of individual and combined health supplements. Two types of interactions are defined: synergism and addition. The model was applied to eight healthy males who participated in a study to investigate the chemical interactions between calcium carbonate, magnesium oxide and sodium citrate-bicarbonate health supplements on calcium oxalate urinary stone risk factors. Subjects ingested these components individually and in combination for 7 days. Twenty-four-hour urines were collected at baseline and during the final day of supplementation. These were analysed using standard laboratory techniques. Three different chemical interactions, all involving citrate, were identified: magnesium and citrate exerted a synergistic effect on lowering the relative superaturation (RS) of brushite; the same two components produced a synergistic effect on raising pH; finally, calcium and citrate exerted an additive effect on lowering the RS of uric acid. We propose that the novel approach described in this paper allows for the evaluation of individual, additive and synergistic interactions in the assessment of the efficacy of stone-risk reducing preparations.

  6. The effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate paste and sodium fluoride mouthwash on the prevention of dentine erosion: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Moezizadeh, Maryam; Alimi, Azar

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose was to compare the effect of 0.2% sodium fluoride mouthwash and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate paste on prevention of dentin erosion. Materials and Methods: Buccal surfaces of 36 sound premolar teeth were ground flat and polished with abrasive discs. Half the polished surfaces were covered with tape to maintain a reference surface. Samples were randomly allocated into three groups. Group A was pretreated with tooth mousse (TM) 4 times a day for 5 days. Group B was pretreated with 0.2% sodium fluoride mouthwash 4 times a day for 5 days. Group C was considered as the control group with no pretreatment. In the next step, the samples were exposed to Coca-Cola 4 times a day for 3 days. After each erosive cycle, the samples were rinsed with deionized water and stored in artificial saliva. The surface loss was determined using profilometry. Results: The erosion in both Groups A and B was less than the control group. The surface loss in mouthwash group was significantly lower than in the control group. Erosion in TM group was more than the mouthwash group and less than the control group. Conclusion: Sodium fluoride mouthwash is more effective for prevention of dentin erosion. PMID:24944448

  7. Terahertz spectroscopy of concrete for evaluating the critical hydration level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Nallappan, Kathirvel; Sasmal, Saptarshi; Pesala, Bala

    2014-03-01

    Concrete, a mixture of cement, coarse aggregate, sand and filler material (if any), is widely used in the construction industry. Cement, mainly composed of Tricalcium Silicate (C3S) and Dicalcium Silicate (C2S) reacts readily with water, a process known as hydration. The hydration process forms a solid material known as hardened cement paste which is mainly composed of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H), Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. To quantify the critical hydration level, an accurate and fast technique is highly desired. However, in conventional XRD technique, the peaks of the constituents of anhydrated and hydrated cement cannot be resolved properly, where as Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy has low penetration depth and hence cannot be used to determine the hydration level of thicker concrete samples easily. Further, MIR spectroscopy cannot be used to effectively track the formation of Calcium Hydroxide, a key by-product during the hydration process. This paper describes a promising approach to quantify the hydration dynamics of cement using Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. This technique has been employed to track the time dependent reaction mechanism of the key constituents of cement that react with water and form the products in the hydrated cement, viz., C-S-H, Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. This study helps in providing an improved understanding on the hydration kinetics of cement and also to optimise the physio-mechanical characteristics of concrete.

  8. The effect of sulfate activation on the early age hydration of BFS:PC composite cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N. C.; Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Milestone, N. B.

    2015-09-01

    Blast furnace slag/Portland cement composites are routinely used for immobilising intermediate level nuclear wastes in the UK. Using high cement replacement levels reduces hydration exotherm and lowers pH. Although a lower grout pH will be beneficial in reducing the corrosion of certain encapsulated reactive metals such as aluminium, the degree of slag reaction will also be lower which may result in the formation of less hydration products and which in turn may reduce the capacity to immobilise waste ions. Adding neutral salts such as calcium and sodium sulfate to the composite cement can potentially increase slag activation without significantly altering the pH of the cement matrix. Thus the corrosion of any encapsulated metals would not be affected. This paper describes some of the properties of a hydrated 9:1 blast furnace slag:Portland cement matrix containing added sulfates of calcium and sodium. The findings show that all additives caused an increase in the amount of slag that reacted when cured for up to 28 days. This produced more material able to chemically bind waste ions. Activation with gypsum produced the highest rate of slag reaction.

  9. Mise en évidence, synthèse et caractérisation de nouveaux composés : les chlorures doubles d'ammonium et de calcium anhydres ou hydratés

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenu, R.; Berthet, J.; Etoh, M. A.; Counioux, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    The study of materials with phase change, often indicated PCM, has been developed because of their storage capacity of calorific or refrigerating energy. Their applications relate to the habitat, the transport, the protection of the electronic circuits exposed to strong variations in temperature or to the conservation of deep-frozen foods. A systematic study of the ternary system H2O-NH4Cl-CaCl2 was then undertaken at various temperatures by using different techniques like Isoplethic Thermal Analysis (I.T.A.), T.G.A., D.T.A. and X Ray diffraction. Five invariant transformations and three new ternary compounds are observed within the temperature range -20 / 70 °C. Finally, it appears that the calcium and ammonium chlorides form a rich family of anhydrous and hydrated double salts.

  10. Circadian Models of Serum Potassium, Sodium, and Calcium Concentrations in Healthy Individuals and Their Application to Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulations at Individual Level

    PubMed Central

    Fijorek, Kamil; Puskulluoglu, Miroslawa

    2013-01-01

    In the article a brief description of the biological basis of the regulation of human biological clocks was presented in order to introduce the role of circadian rhythms in physiology and specifically in the pharmacological translational tools based on the computational physiology models to motivate the need to provide models of circadian fluctuation in plasma cations. The main aim of the study was to develop statistical models of the circadian rhythm of potassium, sodium, and calcium concentrations in plasma. The developed ion models were further tested by assessing their influence on QT duration (cardiac endpoint) as simulated by the biophysically detailed models of human left ventricular cardiomyocyte. The main results are model equations along with an electronic supplement to the article that contains a fully functional implementation of all models. PMID:24078832

  11. Slurry Consistency and In-situ Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction during the Early Hydration of Portland Cements with Calcium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Jupe, A.C.; Wilkinson, A.P.; Luke, K.; Funkhouser, G.P.

    2008-07-08

    Class A and H oil well cements are compared at 25 and 50 C with 0%, 1%, 2%, and 4% CaCl{sub 2}. Up to 4% CaCl{sub 2} accelerated Class A thickening, but 4% led to slower thickening than 2% for Class H. C{sub 3}S hydration in the two cements responded differently to CaCl{sub 2}. CaCl{sub 2} always accelerated aluminate hydration. For Class A, CaCl{sub 2} accelerated early Ca(OH){sub 2} precipitation, but sometimes reduced the amount at longer times. This may be coupled to C-S-H gel composition changes. For Class H, Ca(OH){sub 2} precipitation changes nonlinearly with CaCl{sub 2} concentration. Ettringite to monosulfate conversion and Friedel's salt formation were sometimes seen.

  12. Comparative evaluation of human pulp tissue dissolution by different concentrations of chlorine dioxide, calcium hypochlorite and sodium hypochlorite: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Sonali; Mishra, Neha; Malik, Shubhra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Irrigation plays an indispensable role in removal of tissue remnants and debris from the complicated root canal system. This study compared the human pulp tissue dissolution by different concentrations of chlorine dioxide, calcium hypochlorite and sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods: Pulp tissue was standardized to a weight of 9 mg for each sample. In all,60 samples obtained were divided into 6 groups according to the irrigating solution used- 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% NaOCl, 5% calcium hypochlorite (Ca(OCl)2), 10% Ca(OCl)2, 5%chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and 13% ClO2. Pulp tissue was placed in each test tube carrying irrigants of measured volume (5ml) according to their specified subgroup time interval: 30 minutes (Subgroup A) and 60 minutes (Subgroup B). The solution from each sample test tube was filtered and was left for drying overnight. The residual weight was calculated by filtration method. Results: Mean tissue dissolution increases with increase in time period. Results showed 5.25% NaOCl to be most effective at both time intervals followed by 2.5% NaOCl at 60 minutes, 10%Ca(OCl)2 and 13% ClO2 at 60 minutes. Least amount of tissue dissolving ability was demonstrated by 5% Ca(OCl)2 and 5% ClO2 at 30 minutes. Distilled water showed no pulp tissue dissolution. Conclusion: Withinthe limitations of the study, NaOCl most efficiently dissolved the pulp tissue at both concentrations and at both time intervals. Mean tissue dissolution by Ca(OCl)2 and ClO2 gradually increased with time and with their increase in concentration. PMID:25506141

  13. Effects of acute sodium fluoride exposure on kidney function, water homeostasis, and renal handling of calcium and inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Santoyo-Sanchez, Mitzi Paola; del Carmen Silva-Lucero, Maria; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Barbier, Olivier Christophe

    2013-06-01

    Fluoride compounds are abundant and widely distributed in the environment at a variety of concentrations. Further, fluoride induces toxic effects in target organs such as the liver and kidney. In this study, we performed an early analysis of renal function using a clearance technique in Wistar rats acutely exposed to fluoride at a plasma concentration of 0.625 μg/ml. Our results revealed that fluoride, at a concentration close to the concentration present in the serum after environmental exposure, induced a significant tubular dysfunction, resulting in diluted urine, impaired protein reabsorption, and increased calcium and phosphate urinary excretion. Our work demonstrates that even acute exposures to low concentrations of NaF may induce renal damage and confirms that, after exposure, the kidney participates directly in the calcium and phosphate deficiencies observed in fluoride-exposed populations.

  14. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, citric acid and phosphoric acid in calcium hydroxide removal from the root canal: a microscopic cleanliness evaluation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Juliana Melo; Silveira, Amanda; Santos, Elizandra; Prado, Laiìs; Pessoa, Oscar F

    2011-12-01

    Rooted molars were subjected to standardized canal instrumentation to a master apical file (MAF). The samples were dressed with Ca(OH)(2), and after 7 days, teeth were reopened and Ca(OH)(2) medication was removed by 1 of 4 different experimental procedures: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (n = 10); 17% EDTA-T (n = 10); 10% citric acid (n = 10); or 37% phosphoric acid (n = 10). This was followed by reinstrumentation with MAF plus 15 mL saline solution. The roots were prepared for scanning electron microscopic analysis of the cervical, middle, and apical thirds. Statistical analysis was performed with the Kruskal-Wallis test. EDTA-T and phosphoric acid gave the best results in the apical third, with significant statistical differences compared with other groups. NaOCl gave the worst results. Irrigation with 17% EDTA-T and 37% phosphoric acid is more effective than sodium hypochlorite and citric acid in the removal of calcium hydroxide from the apical third.

  15. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  16. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-24

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  17. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  18. Separation of sodium-22 from irradiated targets

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Jamriska, David

    1996-01-01

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from an irradiated target including dissolving an irradiated target to form a first solution, contacting the first solution with hydrated antimony pentoxide to selectively separate sodium-22 from the first solution, separating the hydrated antimony pentoxide including the separated sodium-22 from the first solution, dissolving the hydrated antimony pentoxide including the separated sodium-22 in a mineral acid to form a second solution, and, separating the antimony from the sodium-22 in the second solution.

  19. Comparison of a dual-phase fluoride toothpaste containing calcium, phosphate, and sodium bicarbonate with a regular fluoride toothpaste on calculus formation.

    PubMed

    Putt, Mark S; Milleman, Kimberly R; Milleman, Jeffery L; Ghassemi, Annahita

    2004-09-01

    This clinical study compared the effect on dental calculus formation of a dual-phase fluoride dentifrice containing sodium bicarbonate, calcium, and phosphate with that of a regular dentifrice using a short-term clinical model in which calculus formation was facilitated. A total of 87 adult volunteers completed this study, which was a double-blind, parallel-group design, consisting of 2-week pretrial and trial periods separated by a washout period. A partial-mouth technique was used wherein the lower anterior teeth were protected from brushing by a custom-fitted toothshield, which doubled as an applicator for an undiluted dentifrice, twice daily. Calculus was measured on the labial/lingual surfaces of six lower anterior teeth by the Volpe-Manhold Index (V-MI). Subjects used a non-tartar-control dentifrice during the pretrial period to determine calculus formation rates, and these V-MI scores were used as baseline data for random allocation to either a control or test product for the trial period. Subjects who were accepted into the study, based on existing tartar deposits, readily formed calculus during the pretrial period using the toothshield method. During the trial period, subjects who were assigned the test dentifrice had comparable amounts of calculus accumulation to those who used the control dentifrice. However, subjects in the test dentifrice group had significantly lower (16%) calculus scores on lingual surfaces than those in the control group. Intragroup comparisons of V-MI data from the pretrial period with those from the trial period provided similar overall results to the comparisons between groups. This study demonstrated that a dual-phase baking soda dentifrice containing calcium and phosphate did not increase calculus accumulation relative to a regular dentifrice when used by adults with a propensity for developing calculus. PMID:15645907

  20. Structural changes in cytochrome c oxidase induced by binding of sodium and calcium ions: an ATR-FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Amandine; Iwaki, Masayo; Rich, Peter R

    2013-04-17

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the binding of Na(+) and Ca(2+)cations to bovine cytochrome c oxidase in its fully oxidized and partially reduced, cyanide-ligated (a(2+)a3(3+)-CN) (mixed valence) forms. These ions induced distinctly different IR binding spectra, indicating that the induced structural changes are different. Despite this, their binding spectra were mutually exclusive, confirming their known competitive binding behavior. Dissociation constants for Na(+) and Ca(2+) with the oxidized enzyme were 1.2 mM and 11 μM, respectively and Na(+) binding appeared to involve cooperative binding of two Na(+). Ca(2+) binding induced a large IR spectrum, with prominent amide I/II polypeptide changes, bandshifts assigned to carboxylate and an arginine, and a number of bandshifts of heme a. The Na(+)-induced binding spectrum showed much weaker amide I/II and heme a changes but had similar shifts assignable to carboxylate and arginine residues. Yeast CcO also displayed a calcium-induced IR and UV/visible binding spectra, though of lower intensities. This was attributed to the difficulty in fully depleting Ca(2+) from its binding site, as has been found with bacterial CcOs. The implications of Ca(2+)/Na(+) ion binding are discussed in terms of structure and possible modulation of core catalytic function. PMID:23537388

  1. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg. No. 1310-73-2) is also known as sodium hydrate, soda lye, caustic soda, white caustic, and lye. The empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium... manufacturing practice conditions of use: (1) The ingredient is used as a pH control agent as defined in §...

  2. Requirement for store-operated calcium entry in sodium butyrate-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Suxia; Li, Wenjun; Zhang, He; Zha, Longying; Xue, Yong; Wu, Xianbo; Zou, Fei

    2012-02-01

    The SOCE (store-operated Ca2+ entry) pathway plays a key role in both normal cells and cancerous cells. However, its molecular mechanism remains a long-lasting puzzle of Ca2+ signalling. In this paper, we provide evidence that butyric acid, a dietary fibre-derived short-chain fatty acid, induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via SOCE signalling networks. We found that sodium butyrate (NaB) induces Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum, which in turn causes extracellular Ca2+ influx in HCT-116 cells. The Ca2+ release and influx are important, because the addition of chelators, EGTA or BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)] respectively blocked NaB-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, down-regulation of STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1) by RNA interference or pharmacological blockade of the SOCC (store-operated Ca2+ channel) by 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) or SKF-96365 inhibited NaB-induced extracellular Ca2+ influx and apoptosis in HCT-116 cells. Thus we conclude that NaB triggers colon cancer cell apoptosis in an SOCE-dependent manner. This finding provides new insights into how butyric acid suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

  3. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  4. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seok-Woo

    2012-11-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  5. Hydrothermal treatment of naturally contaminated maize in the presence of sodium metabisulfite, methylamine and calcium hydroxide; effects on the concentration of zearalenone and deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Rempe, Inga; Kersten, Susanne; Valenta, Hana; Dänicke, Sven

    2013-08-01

    Fusarium toxin-contaminated ground maize was hydrothermally treated in the presence of different combinations of chemicals in order to simultaneously reduce zearalenone (ZEA) and deoxynivalenol (DON) concentrations. Treatments were carried out in a laboratory conditioner at 80 °C and 17 % moisture. Six different treatments were performed, consisting of 3 doses of methylamine (MMA; 2.5, 5 and 10 g/kg maize) at a constant dose of 5 g sodium metabisulfite (SBS)/kg, either with or without the addition of 20 g calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2)/kg. The used maize was contaminated with approximately 45.99 mg DON/kg and 3.46 mg ZEA/kg. Without the addition of Ca(OH)2, DON reductions reached approximately 82% after 1-min treatment and the toxin disappeared nearly completely after 10 min when 2.5 or 5 g MMA were applied. ZEA concentrations were only marginally affected. In the presence of Ca(OH)2, reductions in DON concentrations were lower, but were enhanced by increasing doses of MMA. ZEA concentrations were reduced by 72, 85 and 95% within the first 5 min of the treatment at MMA dosages of 2.5, 5 and 10 g/kg maize, respectively. The application of SBS in combination with a strong alkaline during hydrothermal treatment seems to be a promising approach to simultaneously decontaminate even high amounts of DON and ZEA in ground maize and may contribute to reduce the toxin load of diets.

  6. Determination of calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium in foodstuffs by using a microsampling flame atomic absorption spectrometric method after closed-vessel microwave digestion: method validation.

    PubMed

    Chekri, Rachida; Noël, Laurent; Vastel, Christelle; Millour, Sandrine; Kadar, Ali; Guérin, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a validation process in compliance with the NFIEN ISO/IEC 17025 standard for the determination of the macrominerals calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium in foodstuffs by microsampling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry after closed-vessel microwave digestion. The French Standards Commission (Agence Francaise de Normalisation) standards NF V03-110, NF EN V03-115, and XP T-90-210 were used to evaluate this method. The method was validated in the context of an analysis of the 1322 food samples of the second French Total Diet Study (TDS). Several performance criteria (linearity, LOQ, specificity, trueness, precision under repeatability conditions, and intermediate precision reproducibility) were evaluated. Furthermore, the method was monitored by several internal quality controls. The LOQ values obtained (25, 5, 8.3, and 8.3 mg/kg for Ca, Mg, Na, and K, respectively) were in compliance with the needs of the TDS. The method provided accurate results as demonstrated by a repeatability CV (CVr) of < 7% and a reproducibility CV (CVR) of < 12% for all the elements. Therefore, the results indicated that this method could be used in the laboratory for the routine determination of these four elements in foodstuffs with acceptable analytical performance. PMID:21313817

  7. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Radwan, M M; Abd El-Hamid, H K; Mohamed, A F

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C2S (27-30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450°C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7-15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4·12H2O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C2S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way. PMID:26354276

  8. Influence of saline solution on hydration behavior of β-dicalcium silicate in comparison with biphasic calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite bio-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Radwan, M M; Abd El-Hamid, H K; Mohamed, A F

    2015-12-01

    The influence of using saline solution as mixing and curing liquid on some characteristics of β-dicalcium silicate (β-C2S) and biphasic compound tri-calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HAp) bio-ceramics was investigated. β-C2S (27-30 nm) was prepared by solid state reaction at 1450°C, while biphasic compound TCP/HAp (7-15 nm) was synthesized from an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4·12H2O by chemical precipitation method. Setting times, compressive strength, pH values, X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were investigated. The evaluation of cytotoxicity of both calcium silicate and biphasic compounds to human gingival fibroblasts was carried out. The use of saline solution as mixing and immersing liquid shortened the setting time for the two bio-cements. TCP/HAp did not show any mechanical strength but β-C2S showed good strength values. Both synthesized compounds showed a moderate cytotoxicity and both materials were effective in a no significant way.

  9. Emissions of alkaline elements calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium from open sources in the contiguous United States

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.A. ); Stensland, G.J.; Williams, A.L.; Barnard, W.; Gatz, D. ); Sinclair, P.C. ); Johnson, T.C. )

    1992-12-01

    Models of dust emissions by wind erosion (including winds associated with regional activity as well as dust devils) and vehicular disturbances of unpaved roads were developed, calibrated, and used to estimate alkaline dust emissions from elemental soil and road composition data. Emissions from tillage of soils were estimated form the work of previous researchers. The area of maximum dust production by all of those sources is the area of the old Dust Bowl' of the 1930s (the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma, eastern New Mexico and Colorado, and western Kansas). The areas of maximum alkaline dust production are the arid southwest, the Dust Bowl,' and the midwestern-mideastern states from Iowa to Pennsylvania. Our calculations show that calcium is the dominant alkaline element produced by open sources' (sources too great in extent to be controlled by enclosure or ducting). Although the largest dust mass source is wind erosion (by winds associated with regional activity and convective activity), the largest producer of the alkaline component is road dust because the abundance of alkaline materials in road coverings (which include crushed limestone) is significantly higher than for soils. Comparing the above estimated sources of alkaline material with inventories of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions by previous investigators gives the rough approximation that alkaline emission rates are of the order of the SO[sub 2] + NO[sub x] emissions in the western United States and that they are much smaller than SO[sub 2] + NO[sub x] in the eastern United States. This approximation is substantiated by data on Ca/(SO[sub 4] + NO[sub 3]) for wet deposition for National Atmospheric Deposition Program sites. 53 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Optimization of growth medium for Sporosarcina pasteurii in bio-based cement pastes to mitigate delay in hydration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sarah L; Kirisits, Mary Jo; Ferron, Raissa Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Microbial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as a novel method to improve durability and remediate cracks in concrete. One way to introduce microorganisms to concrete is by replacing the mixing water with a bacterial culture in nutrient medium. In the literature, yeast extract often has been used as a carbon source for this application; however, severe retardation of hydration kinetics has been observed when yeast extract is added to cement. This study investigates the suitability of alternative carbon sources to replace yeast extract for microbial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation in cement-based materials. A combination of meat extract and sodium acetate was identified as a suitable replacement in growth medium for Sporosarcina pasteurii; this alternative growth medium reduced retardation by 75 % (as compared to yeast extract) without compromising bacterial growth, urea hydrolysis, cell zeta potential, and ability to promote calcium carbonate formation.

  11. Osteoblastic differentiation under controlled bioactive ion release by silica and titania doped sodium-free calcium phosphate-based glass.

    PubMed

    Shah Mohammadi, Maziar; Chicatun, Florencia; Stähli, Christoph; Muja, Naser; Bureau, Martin N; Nazhat, Showan N

    2014-09-01

    Sodium-free phosphate-based glasses (PGs) doped with both SiO2 and TiO2 (50P2O5-40CaO-xSiO2-(10-x)TiO2, where x=10, 7, 5, 3, and 0mol%) were developed and characterised for controlled ion release applications in bone tissue engineering. Substituting SiO2 with TiO2 directly increased PG density and glass transition temperature, indicating a cross-linking effect of Ti on the glass network which was reflected by significantly reduced degradation rates in an aqueous environment. X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of Ti(P2O7) in crystallised TiO2-containing PGs, and nuclear magnetic resonance showed an increase in Q(1) phosphate species with increasing TiO2 content. Substitution of SiO2 with TiO2 also reduced hydrophilicity and surface energy. In biological assays, MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts effectively adhered to the surface of PG discs and the incorporation of TiO2, and hence higher stability of the PG network, significantly increased cell viability and metabolic activity indicating the biocompatibility of the PGs. Addition of SiO2 increased ionic release from the PG, which stimulated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in MC3T3-E1 cells upon ion exposure. The incorporation of 3mol% TiO2 was required to stabilise the PG network against unfavourable rapid degradation in aqueous environments. However, ALP activity was greatest in PGs doped with 5-7mol% SiO2 due to up-regulation of ionic concentrations. Thus, the properties of PGs can be readily controlled by modifying the extent of Si and Ti doping in order to optimise ion release and osteoblastic differentiation for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:24945606

  12. Chloral hydrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chloral hydrate ; CASRN 302 - 17 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  13. Thermodynamics of calcium silicate hydrates, development of a database to model concrete dissolution at 25°C using the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code

    SciTech Connect

    Clodic, L; Meike, A

    1997-08-18

    Examination of the ability to model aqueous systems of interest to the repository proposed by the Yucca Mountain Project has revealed an historical deficit in the ability to model complex waterÐmaterial systems that contain ordinary Portland cement (OPC) at elevated temperature (e.g., Bruton et al., 1994; Meike et al., 1994). One of the reasons is that cement chemistry typically concentrates on two issues of importance to the concrete industry: the hydration of cement powder, which contains reactive phases that do not persist in the cured concrete, and the causes of mechanical degradation at earth surface temperatures such as delayed ettringite formation and alkali silica reaction. Such modeling capability is not available in the open literature, even from applications that might have developed high temperature approaches, such as deep drilling for oil and geothermal resource recovery. The ability to simulate the interaction between concrete, as it evolves over time, and water has become more critical as repository designers begin to consider the incorporation of OPC materials in the emplacement drifts. The Yucca Mountain Project is unique among the high-level radioactive waste repository projects in the world in terms of the need to understand and predict processes in excess of 100°C (see, e.g., Meike, 1997). Our aim has been to develop this capability in the area of aqueous chemistry.

  14. Deep formation waters of Western Europe, Russia and North America characterised by sodium, calcium, magnesium and chloride concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozau, Elke; Hemme, Christina; Sattler, Carl-Diedrich; van Berk, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Deep formation water can be classified according to depth, temperature, and salinity (e.g., Graf et al. 1966, Kharaka & Hanor 2007). Most of the deep formation waters contain dissolved solids in excess of sea water. The hydrogeochemical development of formation water has been discussed for a long time. It is widely accepted that deep aquifers are influenced by the meteoric cycle and geochemical processes within the crust (e.g., Hebig et al. 2012). Similar hydrogeochemical signatures are found in deep formation waters of all continents and can be explained by general geochemical processes within the deep reservoirs (e.g., Land 1995). Therefore, data of deep formation waters from Western Europe, Russia, and North America are collected and classified by the major water components. The data are used to identify important hydrogeochemical processes (e.g., halite dissolution and albitisation) leading to different compositions of formation water. Two significant water types are identified: Na-Cl water and Na-Ca-Cl water. Based on the collected hydrogeochemical data, development trends are stated for the formation waters, and albitisation is favoured as the main process for calcium enrichment. Furthermore, differences of formation water according to stratigraphical units are shown for deep reservoirs of the North German Basin and the North Sea. References: Graf, D.L., 1982. Chemical osmosis, reverse chemical osmosis, and the origin of subsurface brines. Geochimica Cosmochimica Acta 46, 1431-1448. Hebig, K.H., Ito, N., Scheytt, T., Marui, A., 2012. Review: Deep groundwater research with focus on Germany. Hydrogeology Journal 20, 227-243. Kharaka, Y.K., Hanor, J.S., 2007. Deep fluids in continents: I. Sedimentary Basins. Treatise on Geochemistry 5, 1-48. Land, L.S., 1995. The role of saline formation water in the crustal cycling. Aquatic Geochemistry 1, 137-145. Acknowledgements: The presented data are results of the collaborative research program "gebo" (Geothermal energy

  15. Fluid and salt supplementation effect on body hydration and electrolyte homeostasis during bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Kuznetsov, Nikolai A.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Bed rest (BR) induces significant urinary and blood electrolyte changes, but little is known about the effect of fluid and salt supplements (FSS) on catabolism, hydration and electrolytes. The aim was to measure the effect of FSS on catabolism, body hydration and electrolytes during BR. Studies were done during 7 days of a pre-bed rest period and during 30 days of a rigorous bed rest period. Thirty male athletes aged, 24.6±7.6 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided into three groups: unsupplemented ambulatory control subjects (UACS), unsupplemented bed rested subjects (UBRS) and supplemented bed rested subjects (SBRS). The UBRS and SBRS groups were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 30 days. The SBRS daily took 30 ml water per kg body weight and 0.1 sodium chloride per kg body weight. Plasma sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) levels, urinary Na, K, Ca and Mg excretion, plasma osmolality, plasma protein level, whole blood hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) level increased significantly ( p≤0.05), while plasma volume (PV), body weight, body fat, peak oxygen uptake, food and fluid intake decreased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the UBRS group when compared with the SBRS and UACS groups. In contrast, plasma and urinary electrolytes, osmolality, protein level, whole blood Hct and Hb level decreased significantly ( p≤0.05), while PV, fluid intake, body weight and peak oxygen uptake increased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the SBRS group when compared with the UBRS group. The measured parameters did not change significantly in the UACS group when compared with their baseline control values. The data indicate that FSS stabilizes electrolytes and body hydration during BR, while BR alone induces significant changes in electrolytes and body hydration. We conclude that FSS may be used to prevent catabolism and normalize body hydration status and electrolyte values during BR.

  16. The relationship between calcium, phosphorus, and sodium intake, race, and blood pressure in children with renal insufficiency: a report of the Growth Failure in Children with Renal Diseases (GFRD) Study.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, H; Chan, J C; Boyle, R; Farina, D; Baluarte, H J; Chinchilli, V M; Dresner, I G; Feld, L G

    1995-07-01

    Nutritional data compiled during the Growth Failure in Children with Renal Diseases Clinical Trial were analyzed to determine the relationship between the dietary intake of divalent minerals and sodium, nutritional status, and serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations and blood pressure in black versus white children. One hundred eighteen patients are included in this report; 25 were black (21%) and 93 were white (79%). Although more of the blacks were male, the age distribution, midarm circumference, midarm muscle circumference, blood pressure, and serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH concentrations were comparable in the two groups. Phosphorus intake was within the recommended daily allowance in both groups; in contrast, calcium intake was inadequate in all patients: 81% of the recommended daily allowance in whites, and 74% in blacks. Sixteen children were noted to be hypertensive during the observation period; six patients were receiving a variety of antihypertensive medications, including diuretics in two children. Linear regression analysis revealed that systolic and diastolic blood pressures were directly related to calcium and phosphorus intake in black patients. In white children, only dietary phosphorus intake and diastolic blood pressure were directly related. There was no relationship between sodium intake or GFR and blood pressure in the white or black children. PTH levels were directly correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure in all children. The correlations between PTH and blood pressure were stronger in white versus black patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Changes in sodium and calcium channel activity following axotomy of B-cells in bullfrog sympathetic ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Jassar, B S; Pennefather, P S; Smith, P A

    1993-01-01

    IBa properties may be secondary to enhanced inactivation associated with axotomy. 5. Axotomy reduced IC (measured at the end of a 3 ms step from -40 to +20 mV) from 34.5 +/- 4.9 (n = 26) to 19.2 +/- 1.5 nA (n = 49, P < 0.005). This reduction may be secondary to the reduction in calcium channels available for activation from -40 mV following axotomy. 6. The TTX-sensitive and TTX-insensitive components of peak Na+ conductance (GNa) were both increased after axotomy. Total GNa was increased from 184.9 +/- 8.4 to 315.2 +/- 16.4 nS (n = 37 for both P < 0.001). Most of the kinetic and steady-state properties of INa were unchanged after axotomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7511687

  18. Effects of a Fusarium toxin-contaminated maize treated with sodium metabisulphite, methylamine and calcium hydroxide in diets for female piglets.

    PubMed

    Rempe, Inga; Brezina, Ulrike; Kersten, Susanne; Dänicke, Sven

    2013-08-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN) contaminated maize was hydrothermally treated in the presence of sodium metabisulphite (SBS), methylamine and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and included into diets for female piglets to evaluate effects on performance, organ weights, development of hyperestrogenism, serum biochemical parameters, stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and toxin residues in serum. For this purpose, both uncontaminated maize (CON) and Fusarium toxin-contaminated maize (FUS) were included into diets either untreated (-) or treated (+) according to a 2 by 2-factorial design. One-hundred female weaned piglets were assigned to one of the four treatment groups (n = 25) CON-, CON+, FUS- and FUS+ with DON/ZEN concentrations of 0.43/0.03, 0.04/0.0, 3.67/0.32 and 0.36/0.08 mg per kg diet, respectively. After a feeding period of 27 days, 20 piglets (n = 5) were slaughtered. Performance parameters such as feed intake, live weight gain and feed-to-gain ratio remained unaffected by the treatments. Uterus weights were significantly reduced in group FUS+ compared to FUS- (p = 0.028), while visceral organ weights were not influenced. Vulva width in relation to body weight was highest in group FUS- at the end of the trial, while hydrothermal treatment significantly reduced the parameter (p < 0.01). The highest toxin and toxin metabolite concentrations in serum were detected in group FUS-, whereas ingestion of diet FUS+ reduced the concentrations to the level of the control groups. Serum biochemical and haematological parameters were mainly within the given reference ranges and showed no treatment-related alterations. Stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not affected. An effective detoxification of maize by hydrothermal treatment in the presence of SBS, methylamine and Ca(OH)2 could be demonstrated by means of serum toxin analyses. No undesired side effects of the treated-feed stuff or the chemicals themselves on the health of piglets

  19. Hydrated multivalent cations are new class of molten salt mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Electrical conductance and activation energy measurements on mixtures of calcium and potassium nitrate show the hydrated form to be a new class of molten salt. The theoretical glass transition temperature of the hydrate varied in a manner opposite to that of the anhydrous system.

  20. Hydrate habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Whoever said there is nothing new under the sun did not delve deeply enough to the bottom of the ocean. There in the Gulf of Mexico, about 150 miles south of New Orleans, scientists have just discovered what could be a new species of centipede—like worms living on or within gas hydrates— mounds of methane ice— rising from the ocean floor.Scientists have previously recognized an association between some bacteria and these hydrates. However, this is the first discovery of a higher life form there.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1754 - Sodium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Reg. No. 126-96-5) is a molecular compound of acetic acid, sodium acetate, and water of hydration. The technical grade is prepared synthetically by reacting sodium carbonate with acetic acid. Special grades are produced by reacting anhydrous sodium acetate and acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  2. [pH, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphate and chloride in the rumen and abomasal contents of cows with abomasal displacement].

    PubMed

    Geishauser, T; Reiche, D; Seeh, C; Thünker, B; Verwohlt, S; Failing, K

    1996-01-01

    Ruminal and abomasal contents were collected from cows with left abomasal displacement (L), right abomasal displacement (R-), or abomasal volvulus (R+), before the abomasum was corrected, as well as one and three days later, pH and concentrations of sodium (Na), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), and chloride (Cl) were determined. Results were compared with those from healthy control cattle fed a balanced diet. Ruminal concentrations of Na and Ca were reduced in cattle with abomasal displacement, whereas those of K, P and Cl were increased, and those of Mg and pH remained nearly unchanged. Concentrations of K and P before abomasal correction were lower in cattle with L than in those with R+, and declined after the correction. Concentrations of Cl decreased continuously after the abomasum was corrected in cattle with L, whereas they increased after replacement in cattle with R and declined later. These findings imply that cattle with abomasal displacement took up less feed before surgical correction and that ruminal contents backed up in the rumen, whereby the backup was less with L than with R+, and that the backed-up contents passed on after the abomasum was corrected. The results also indicate that a reflux of abomasal contents into the rumen took place in cattle with all forms of abomasal displacement, whereby with R+ increased amounts of abomasal contents passed into the rumen following correction and were then later passed out. Compared to controls, abomasal concentrations of Cl were increased in cattle with displacement and the concentrations of K, Mg, Ca, and P were reduced. Before abomasal correction, pH was decreased in cattle with L and unchanged in those with R- and R+. The concentrations of Na and K before correction in L were lower than those with R+, whereas the concentrations of K, Mg, Ca, and P were higher. After abomasal correction, the concentrations of Na declined, and those of K, Mg, Ca, and P increased. On the third day

  3. Effect of Azadirachta indica (neem), sodium thiosulphate and calcium chloride on changes in nitrogen transformations and inhibition of nitrification in soil incubated under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Hina, Munazza; Tahir, Majid Mahmood

    2011-03-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to examine the effects of nitrification inhibitors (NIs) neem seed-cake (Azadirachta indica) (NSC), sodium thiosulphate (Na₂S₂O₃) and calcium chloride (CaCl₂) on changes in NH₄(+)⁻N, inhibition of nitrification and recovery of applied nitrogen (N) in soil. Surface soil samples of 0-15 cm were collected from an arable field, amended with urea N (UN) at the rate 200 mg N kg⁻¹, UN+NSC, UN+Na₂S₂O₃ and UN+CaCl₂ and incubated at 22°C periodically over 50 d. Soil without any amendment was used as check (control). Results indicated that more than 58% of N applied as NH₄⁻ disappeared over a period of 50 d from the soil mineral-N pool. Some of this N (21%) was accumulated as NO₃⁻-N while the remaining N was unaccounted for. Addition of nitrification inhibitors NSC, Na₂S₂O₃, and CaCl₂ resulted in a decrease in the extent of NH₄(+) disappearance by 35%, 44% and 30%, respectively. In the treatment receiving UN alone, 56 mg NO₃⁻-N kg⁻¹ was accumulated over 50 d (maximum 93 mg kg⁻¹) indicated an active nitrification. Application of nitrification inhibitors NSC, Na₂S₂O₃, and CaCl₂ with UN inhibited nitrification by 54%, 64%, and 59%, respectively. Apparent N recovery (ANR) in the treatment receiving UN alone was 63% that substantially increased to 83%, 89% and 76% in the treatments receiving UN+NSC, UN+Na₂S₂O₃, and UN+CaCl₂, respectively indicating 32%, 41% and 20% increase in N recovery. Among three NIs tested, Na₂S₂O₃ proved superior in inhibiting nitrification and increasing ANR. The study demonstrated that application of NSC, Na₂S₂O₃, and CaCl₂ which are cheap and easily available NIs inhibited nitrification and improved N recovery efficiency of applied N in an arable soil very effectively. It is suggested that these inhibitors should be tested under field conditions for increasing NUE and improving crop productivity.

  4. Effect of Azadirachta indica (neem), sodium thiosulphate and calcium chloride on changes in nitrogen transformations and inhibition of nitrification in soil incubated under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Hina, Munazza; Tahir, Majid Mahmood

    2011-03-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to examine the effects of nitrification inhibitors (NIs) neem seed-cake (Azadirachta indica) (NSC), sodium thiosulphate (Na₂S₂O₃) and calcium chloride (CaCl₂) on changes in NH₄(+)⁻N, inhibition of nitrification and recovery of applied nitrogen (N) in soil. Surface soil samples of 0-15 cm were collected from an arable field, amended with urea N (UN) at the rate 200 mg N kg⁻¹, UN+NSC, UN+Na₂S₂O₃ and UN+CaCl₂ and incubated at 22°C periodically over 50 d. Soil without any amendment was used as check (control). Results indicated that more than 58% of N applied as NH₄⁻ disappeared over a period of 50 d from the soil mineral-N pool. Some of this N (21%) was accumulated as NO₃⁻-N while the remaining N was unaccounted for. Addition of nitrification inhibitors NSC, Na₂S₂O₃, and CaCl₂ resulted in a decrease in the extent of NH₄(+) disappearance by 35%, 44% and 30%, respectively. In the treatment receiving UN alone, 56 mg NO₃⁻-N kg⁻¹ was accumulated over 50 d (maximum 93 mg kg⁻¹) indicated an active nitrification. Application of nitrification inhibitors NSC, Na₂S₂O₃, and CaCl₂ with UN inhibited nitrification by 54%, 64%, and 59%, respectively. Apparent N recovery (ANR) in the treatment receiving UN alone was 63% that substantially increased to 83%, 89% and 76% in the treatments receiving UN+NSC, UN+Na₂S₂O₃, and UN+CaCl₂, respectively indicating 32%, 41% and 20% increase in N recovery. Among three NIs tested, Na₂S₂O₃ proved superior in inhibiting nitrification and increasing ANR. The study demonstrated that application of NSC, Na₂S₂O₃, and CaCl₂ which are cheap and easily available NIs inhibited nitrification and improved N recovery efficiency of applied N in an arable soil very effectively. It is suggested that these inhibitors should be tested under field conditions for increasing NUE and improving crop productivity. PMID:21146192

  5. Protein Phosphatase 1c Associated with the Cardiac Sodium Calcium Exchanger 1 Regulates Its Activity by Dephosphorylating Serine 68-phosphorylated Phospholemman.

    PubMed

    Hafver, Tandekile Lubelwana; Hodne, Kjetil; Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Dalhus, Bjørn; Lunde, Per Kristian; Lunde, Marianne; Martinsen, Marita; Enger, Ulla Helene; Fuller, William; Sjaastad, Ivar; Louch, William Edward; Sejersted, Ole Mathias; Carlson, Cathrine Rein

    2016-02-26

    The sodium (Na(+))-calcium (Ca(2+)) exchanger 1 (NCX1) is an important regulator of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Serine 68-phosphorylated phospholemman (pSer-68-PLM) inhibits NCX1 activity. In the context of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) regulation, pSer-68-PLM is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). PP1 also associates with NCX1; however, the molecular basis of this association is unknown. In this study, we aimed to analyze the mechanisms of PP1 targeting to the NCX1-pSer-68-PLM complex and hypothesized that a direct and functional NCX1-PP1 interaction is a prerequisite for pSer-68-PLM dephosphorylation. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we show that PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) co-localized, co-fractionated, and co-immunoprecipitated with NCX1 in rat cardiomyocytes, left ventricle lysates, and HEK293 cells. Bioinformatic analysis, immunoprecipitations, mutagenesis, pulldown experiments, and peptide arrays constrained PP1c anchoring to the K(I/V)FF motif in the first Ca(2+) binding domain (CBD) 1 in NCX1. This binding site is also partially in agreement with the extended PP1-binding motif K(V/I)FF-X5-8Φ1Φ2-X8-9-R. The cytosolic loop of NCX1, containing the K(I/V)FF motif, had no effect on PP1 activity in an in vitro assay. Dephosphorylation of pSer-68-PLM in HEK293 cells was not observed when NCX1 was absent, when the K(I/V)FF motif was mutated, or when the PLM- and PP1c-binding sites were separated (mimicking calpain cleavage of NCX1). Co-expression of PLM and NCX1 inhibited NCX1 current (both modes). Moreover, co-expression of PLM with NCX1(F407P) (mutated K(I/V)FF motif) resulted in the current being completely abolished. In conclusion, NCX1 is a substrate-specifying PP1c regulator protein, indirectly regulating NCX1 activity through pSer-68-PLM dephosphorylation.

  6. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  7. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  8. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  9. Formation and durability of hydrated layers for several oxide glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Nishii, Junji; Akai, Tomoko; Yamashita, Masaru; Yamanaka, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Hajimu

    1995-12-31

    Formations and durabilities of hydrated layers were compared between a soda-aluminosilicate (NAS), a soda-lime-aluminosilicate (NCAS) and a soda-lime-alumino-borosilicate (NCABS) glasses. The first step of the study was to prepare the optically transparent hydrated layers on the surface of specimens by an autoclave (400 C, 20 kgf/cm{sup 2}) treatment. Distributions of OH groups in hydrated layers were analyzed by an etch sectioning and FTIR measurement. The rates of hydration of the glasses were in the order NAS {much_gt} NCAS > NCABS. The hydration of the NCABS glass, which is a modified nuclear waste glass, required the treatment longer than those of the NAS and NCAS glasses. In the second step, the authors investigated the durabilities of hydrated layers by immersing the specimens into a distilled water at 100 C. The dissolutions of hydrated layers were confirmed for each glass. The dissolution rates of hydrated layers were in the order NCAS > NCABS {much_gt} NAS. It has become apparent by an XPS analysis that the highest durability of the hydrated NAS glass was due to the formation of a sodium free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} layer on the surface. The hydrated layer of the NCAS glass, while the sodium ions were almost leached out during immersion, dissolved to water most quickly than those of other glasses. In the hydrated layer of the NCABS glass, a half amount of sodium and boron ions remained and inhibited the dissolution of hydrated layer.

  10. Formation of calcium complexes by borogluconate in vitro and during calcium borogluconate infusion in sheep.

    PubMed

    Farningham, D A

    1985-07-01

    The effect of borogluconate on plasma calcium fractions was studied in vitro and in vivo in sheep. In vitro calcium chloride was more effective in raising ionised plasma calcium than calcium borogluconate. Sodium borate or gluconate added to blood caused only small decreases in blood ionised calcium. However, together, a synergistic reduction in ionised calcium was observed. Following calcium borogluconate infusions into sheep, total plasma calcium rose primarily because of an increase in the unionised ultrafiltrable fraction. Other changes observed following the infusion were hypercalciuria, decreased glomerular filtration rate and acidosis. Sodium borogluconate administered subcutaneously lowered total plasma calcium. This probably resulted from enhanced calcium excretion. It is suggested that since the anionic component of calcium solutions alters the availability and retention of calcium, it is likely to affect clinical efficacy significantly.

  11. Identifying inhibitors of hydrate formation rate with viscometric experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbus, J.S.; Christiansen, R.L.; Sloan, D. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Inhibiting the rate of hydrate formation with low concentration additives is an economically and environmentally attractive alternative to prevention of hydrates with large doses of methanol. Here, a method for screening possible rate inhibitors is described. In the method, a viscometer is used to follow the development of hydrate formation for water-THF solutions and for water-gas solutions at conditions favoring hydrate formation. The method was applied to about 30 different chemicals, plus binary combinations of many of these chemicals. The best chemical additives included BASF F-127, Mirawet ASC, Surfynol-465, sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS), Mirataine CBS with polyvinylpyrrolidone(PVP), and SDS with PVP.

  12. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  13. Pilot investigation of the hydrating effects of topical acne medications.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Yaxian; Stoudemayer, Marianne; Vamvakias, George; Kligman, Albert M

    2007-08-01

    Topical therapies are effective in managing acne vulgaris but are associated with local adverse effects such as irritation and dryness. This 4-week pilot study compared skin hydration in 36 healthy adult women randomized to treatment with 1 of 4 topical therapies: 2 different (jar and tube) clindamycin 1%/benzoyl peroxide 5% gels, sodium sulfacetamide 10% lotion, or over-the-counter (OTC) moisturizing cream. Subjects treated with OTC moisturizer or sodium sulfacetamide exhibited decreased water loss, increased water retention, similar or improved levels of skin hydration, and decreased desorption rates. In contrast, subjects treated with jar or tube clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide had increased water loss, decreased water retention, decreased hydration, and increased desorption rates. Skin dryness decreased slightly in the moisturizer group. No serious adverse events occurred. Overall, the OTC moisturizer had the best skin hydration profile. Sodium sulfacetamide demonstrated some moisturizing characteristics, and no clinically relevant differences were noted between jar and tube clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide gels.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1754 - Sodium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium diacetate. 184.1754 Section 184.1754 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1754 Sodium diacetate. (a) Sodium diacetate (C4H7O4Na·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 126-96-5) is a molecular compound of acetic acid, sodium acetate, and water of hydration....

  15. 21 CFR 184.1754 - Sodium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium diacetate. 184.1754 Section 184.1754 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1754 Sodium diacetate. (a) Sodium diacetate (C4H7O4Na·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 126-96-5) is a molecular compound of acetic acid, sodium acetate, and water of hydration....

  16. 21 CFR 184.1754 - Sodium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium diacetate. 184.1754 Section 184.1754 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1754 Sodium diacetate. (a) Sodium diacetate (C4H7O4Na·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 126-96-5) is a molecular compound of acetic acid, sodium acetate, and water of hydration....

  17. 21 CFR 184.1754 - Sodium diacetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium diacetate. 184.1754 Section 184.1754 Food... GRAS § 184.1754 Sodium diacetate. (a) Sodium diacetate (C4H7O4Na·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 126-96-5) is a molecular compound of acetic acid, sodium acetate, and water of hydration. The technical grade is...

  18. Combinatorial molecular optimization of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Abdolhosseini Qomi, M.J.; Krakowiak, K.J.; Bauchy, M.; Stewart, K.L.; Shahsavari, R.; Jagannathan, D.; Brommer, D.B.; Baronnet, A.; Buehler, M.J.; Yip, S.; Ulm, F.-J; Van Vliet, K.J.; Pellenq, R.J-.M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous presence in the built environment, concrete’s molecular-level properties are only recently being explored using experimental and simulation studies. Increasing societal concerns about concrete’s environmental footprint have provided strong motivation to develop new concrete with greater specific stiffness or strength (for structures with less material). Herein, a combinatorial approach is described to optimize properties of cement hydrates. The method entails screening a computationally generated database of atomic structures of calcium-silicate-hydrate, the binding phase of concrete, against a set of three defect attributes: calcium-to-silicon ratio as compositional index and two correlation distances describing medium-range silicon-oxygen and calcium-oxygen environments. Although structural and mechanical properties correlate well with calcium-to-silicon ratio, the cross-correlation between all three defect attributes reveals an indentation modulus-to-hardness ratio extremum, analogous to identifying optimum network connectivity in glass rheology. We also comment on implications of the present findings for a novel route to optimize the nanoscale mechanical properties of cement hydrate. PMID:25248305

  19. Co-Localization of Sodium Channel Na[v]1.6 and the Sodium--Calcium Exchanger at Sites of Axonal Injury in the Spinal Cord in EAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craner, Matthew J.; Hains, Bryan C.; Lo, Albert C.; Black, Joel A.; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to the development of non-remitting neurological deficits and disability in multiple sclerosis, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal loss in multiple sclerosis are not clearly understood. Studies of white matter axonal injury have demonstrated that voltage-gated sodium channels can provide a route for…

  20. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  1. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzozero, Julien Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  2. A comparative study of antioxidative activity of calcium-D-glucarate, sodium-D-gluconate and D-glucono-1,4-lactone in a human blood platelet model.

    PubMed

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    D-glucono-1,4-lactone, sodium D-gluconate and calcium D-glucarate are non-toxic glucose derivatives occurring naturally in fruits and vegetables. Calcium D-glucarate is promoted as an orally bioavailability dietary supplement with potential chemopreventive activity without adverse effects. Despite many commercial applications in pharmaceutical and food industries the potential activity mechanisms of glucarate and gluconate are not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the effects of these compounds on blood platelets under oxidative stress conditions and to examine their role in thrombin-induced platelet activation. Platelet activation is essential in haemostasis, tumor progression and allergic and non-allergic inflammation, where reactive oxygen species are involved. The antiplatelet and antioxidative activity was studied in vitro by measuring levels of specific oxidative stress markers: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, superoxide anion, carbonyl groups, 3-nitrotyrosine, protein and low molecular weight thiols. All tested compounds significantly inhibited thrombin-induced arachidonic peroxidation, O₂⁻ⁱ production and also platelet protein oxidation/nitration induced by peroxynitrite, which is a strong oxidant formed intravascularly in vivo. Carbonyl group generation, thiol oxidation and nitrotyrosine formation were significantly decreased in the presence of glucose derivatives. The obtained results demonstrate that tested compounds may be helpful in the prevention of excessive platelet activation through the antioxidant mechanisms. Comparative studies indicate the predominant preventive activity of sodium D-gluconate. In general, the consumption of apples or apple juice as well as oranges, grapefruit and cruciferous vegetables, sources of large amounts of tested derivatives, have beneficial effects on platelets under oxidative stress.

  3. Gas hydrate and humans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The potential effects of naturally occurring gas hydrate on humans are not understood with certainty, but enough information has been acquired over the past 30 years to make preliminary assessments possible. Three major issues are gas hydrate as (1) a potential energy resource, (2) a factor in global climate change, and (3) a submarine geohazard. The methane content is estimated to be between 1015 to 1017 m3 at STP and the worldwide distribution in outer continental margins of oceans and in polar regions are significant features of gas hydrate. However, its immediate development as an energy resource is not likely because there are various geological constraints and difficult technological problems that must be solved before economic recovery of methane from hydrate can be achieved. The role of gas hydrate in global climate change is uncertain. For hydrate methane to be an effective greenhouse gas, it must reach the atmosphere. Yet there are many obstacles to the transfer of methane from hydrate to the atmosphere. Rates of gas hydrate dissociation and the integrated rates of release and destruction of the methane in the geo/hydro/atmosphere are not adequately understood. Gas hydrate as a submarine geohazard, however, is of immediate and increasing importance to humans as our industrial society moves to exploit seabed resources at ever-greater depths in the waters of our coastal oceans. Human activities and installations in regions of gas-hydrate occurrence must take into account the presence of gas hydrate and deal with the consequences of its presence.

  4. Sealing of cracks in cement using microencapsulated sodium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannaros, P.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cement-based materials possess an inherent autogenous self-healing capability allowing them to seal, and potentially heal, microcracks. This can be improved through the addition of microencapsulated healing agents for autonomic self-healing. The fundamental principle of this self-healing mechanism is that when cracks propagate in the cementitious matrix, they rupture the dispersed capsules and their content (cargo material) is released into the crack volume. Various healing agents have been explored in the literature for their efficacy to recover mechanical and durability properties in cementitious materials. In these materials, the healing agents are most commonly encapsulated in macrocontainers (e.g. glass tubes or capsules) and placed into the material. In this work, microencapsulated sodium silicate in both liquid and solid form was added to cement specimens. Sodium silicate reacts with the calcium hydroxide in hydrated cement paste to form calcium-silicate-hydrate gel that fills cracks. The effect of microcapsule addition on rheological and mechanical properties of cement is reported. It is observed that the microcapsule addition inhibits compressive strength development in cement and this is observed through a plateau in strength between 28 and 56 days. The improvement in crack-sealing for microcapsule-containing specimens is quantified through sorptivity measurements over a 28 day healing period. After just seven days, the addition of 4% microcapsules resulted in a reduction in sorptivity of up to 45% when compared to specimens without any microcapsule addition. A qualitative description of the reaction between the cargo material and the cementitious matrix is also provided using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  5. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia. PMID:26994581

  6. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia.

  7. Modeling and simulation of cement hydration kinetics and microstructure development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Biernacki, Joseph J.; Bullard, Jeffrey W.; Bishnoi, Shashank; Dolado, Jorge S.; Scherer, George W.; Luttge, Andreas

    2011-12-15

    Efforts to model and simulate the highly complex cement hydration process over the past 40 years are reviewed, covering different modeling approaches such as single particle models, mathematical nucleation and growth models, and vector and lattice-based approaches to simulating microstructure development. Particular attention is given to promising developments that have taken place in the past few years. Recent applications of molecular-scale simulation methods to understanding the structure and formation of calcium-silicate-hydrate phases, and to understanding the process of dissolution of cement minerals in water are also discussed, as these topics are highly relevant to the future development of more complete and fundamental hydration models.

  8. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  9. The secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein in the saliva of sheep and its effects on the salivary clearance of phosphate, calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium ions.

    PubMed

    Dua, K; Abbas, S K; Care, A D

    1995-07-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP(1-34)) was infused into five sheep, each fitted with a large rumen cannula. After infusion, significant increases were observed in the total and ionized calcium concentrations in plasma but not in saliva. In contrast, significant decreases in the plasma concentrations of phosphate and potassium and corresponding increases in their salivary concentrations and clearance rates were observed. The salivary concentration of endogenous PTH1P(1-34) was significantly greater than that in plasma sampled simultaneously, but during the infusion of PTHrP(1-34) both plasma and salivary concentrations of PTHrP(1-34) increased.

  10. Conservation of body calcium by increased dietary intake of potassium: A potential measure to reduce the osteoporosis process during prolonged exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nechay, Bohdan R.

    1989-01-01

    During the 1988 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, it was proposed that the loss of skeletal calcium upon prolonged exposure to microgravity could be explained, in part, by a renal maladjustment characterized by an increased urinary excretion of calcium. It was theorized that because the conservation of body fluids and electrolytes depends upon the energy of adenosine triphosphate and enzymes that control the use of its energy for renal ion transport, an induction of renal sodium and potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na + K ATPase) by oral loading with potassium would increase the reabsorption of sodium directly and that of calcium indirectly, leading to improved hydration and to reduced calcium loss. Preliminary studies showed the following. Rats drinking water containing 0.2 M potassium chloride for six to 13 days excreted in urine 22 muEq of calcium and 135 muEq of sodium per 100 grams of body weight per day. The corresponding values for control rats drinking tap water were 43 muEq and 269 muEq respectively. Renal Na + K ATPase activity in potassium loaded rats was higher than in controls. Thus, oral potassium loading resulted in increased Na + K ATPase activity and diminished urinary excretion of calcium and of sodium as predicted by the hypothesis. An extension of these studies to humans has the potential of resulting in development of harmless, non-invasive, drug-free, convenient measures to reduce bone loss and other electrolyte and fluid problems in space travelers exposed to prolonged periods of microgravity.

  11. Hydration of hyaluronan polysaccharide observed by IR spectrometry. II. Definition and quantitative analysis of elementary hydration spectra and water uptake.

    PubMed

    Haxaire, K; Maréchal, Y; Milas, M; Rinaudo, M

    2003-01-01

    We recorded a series of spectra of sodium hyaluronan (HA) films that were in equilibrium with their surrounding humid atmosphere. The hygrometry of this atmosphere extended from 0 to 0.97% relative humidity. We performed a quantitative analysis of the corresponding series of hydration spectra that are the difference spectra of the film at a defined hygrometry minus the spectrum of the dried film (hygrometry = 0). The principle of this analysis is to use this series of hydration spectra to define a limited number (four) of "elementary hydration spectra" over which we can decompose all hydration spectra with good accuracy. This decomposition, combined with the measurements of the numbers of H(2)O molecules at the origin in these elementary hydration spectra of the three characteristic vibrational bands of H(2)O, allowed us to calculate the hydration number under different relative humidity conditions. This number compares well with that determined by thermogravimetry. Furthermore, the decomposition defines for each hygrometry value which chemical mechanisms represented by elementary hydration spectra are active. This analysis is pursued by determining for the elementary hydration spectra the number of hydrogen bonds established by each of the four alcohol groups found in each disaccharide repeat unit before performing the same analysis for amide and carboxylate groups. These results are later utilized to discuss the structure of HA at various stages of hydration. PMID:12722111

  12. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  13. The growth rate of gas hydrate from refrigerant R12

    SciTech Connect

    Kendoush, Abdullah Abbas; Jassim, Najim Abid; Joudi, Khalid A.

    2006-07-15

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were presented dealing with three phase direct-contact heat transfer by evaporation of refrigerant drops in an immiscible liquid. Refrigerant R12 was used as the dispersed phase, while water and brine were the immiscible continuous phase. A numerical solution is presented to predict the formation rate of gas hydrates in test column. The solution provided an acceptable agreement when compared with experimental results. The gas hydrate growth rate increased with time. It increased with increasing dispersed phase flow rate. The presence of surface-active sodium chloride in water had a strong inhibiting effect on the gas hydrate formation rate. (author)

  14. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  15. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    High levels of urine calcium (above 300 mg/day) may be due to: Chronic kidney disease High vitamin D levels Leaking of calcium from the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking ...

  16. Calcium hydroxide: its role in the fracture of tricalcium silicate paste.

    PubMed

    Berger, R L

    1972-02-11

    The large areas of crystalline calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)(2)] formed during the hydration of tricalcium silicate (Ca(3)SiO(5)) correspond to low-porosity regions in the hydrated paste. During the early stage of hydration, areas between Ca(OH)(2) crystals which consist of Ca(3)SiO(5) particles bonded together by calcium silicate hydrate represent the high-porosity portion of the paste. Because of the presence of Ca(OH)(2), fracture in the hardened paste during this period propagates preferentially through the areas bonded by the calcium silicate hydrate phase and around the Ca(OH)(8), crystals. Calcium hydroxide also acts as a crack arrester. The influence of Ca(OH)(2) on fracture diminishes with increased hydration.

  17. A Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of Amelogenin Nanosphere Self-Assembly Initiated with Sodium Chloride or Calcium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Bekhazi, Jacky G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2008-12-08

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early intermolecular interactions stabilizing amelogenin supramolecular assembly and the potential role of calcium ions have been discovered. Two-dimensional 1H-15N spectra were recorded for 15N-labeled amelogenin as a function of increasing Ca2+ concentration starting from monomeric conditions. Evidence for protein-protein interactions were observed between residues E18 and E40 in the N-terminus. At higher Ca2+ concentrations there was concurrent involvement of residues in both the N- (Y12-Q56) and the C-terminus (Q144-T171). Neither specific residues nor their stepwise interaction have previously been identified in the initial stages of nanosphere assembly.

  18. Fluoride coatings make effective lubricants in molten sodium environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Coating bearing surfaces with calcium fluoride-barium fluoride film provides effective lubrication against sliding friction in molten sodium and other severe environments at high and low temperatures.

  19. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A. )

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.

  20. TOUGH-Fx/Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George Julius

    2005-02-01

    TOUGH-Fx/HYORATL can model the non-isothermal gas release. phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural gas hydrate deposits in the subsurtace (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. T006H-Fx/HYDRATE vi .0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate Ibmiation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and up to four mass components-- i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dIssociation or formation, phase changes, and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects, and inhibItor-Induced effects.

  1. TOUGH-Fx/Hydrate

    2005-02-01

    TOUGH-Fx/HYORATL can model the non-isothermal gas release. phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural gas hydrate deposits in the subsurtace (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. T006H-Fx/HYDRATE vi .0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate Ibmiation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and upmore » to four mass components-- i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dIssociation or formation, phase changes, and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects, and inhibItor-Induced effects.« less

  2. Sodium Bicarbonate

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking sodium bicarbonate, call your doctor. ... your body. If you are on a sodium-restricted diet, check with your doctor before taking sodium bicarbonate.

  3. Effect of temperature on hydration kinetics and polymerization of tricalcium silicate in stirred suspensions of CaO-saturated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Steven A. . E-mail: steven.a.grant@usace.army.mil; Boitnott, Ginger E.; Korhonen, Charles J.; Sletten, Ronald S.

    2006-04-15

    Tricalcium silicate was hydrated at 274, 278, 283, 298, and 313 K in stirred suspensions of saturated CaO solutions under a nitrogen-gas atmosphere until the end of deceleratory period. The suspension conductivities and energy flows were measured continuously. The individual reaction rates for tricalcium silicate dissolution, calcium silicate hydrate precipitation, and calcium hydroxide precipitation were calculated from these measurements. The results suggest that the proportion of tricalcium silicate dissolved was determined by the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution and the time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation. The time to very rapid calcium hydroxide precipitation was more sensitive to changes in temperature than was the rate of tricalcium silicate dissolution, so that the proportion of tricalcium silicate hydration dissolved by the deceleratory period increased with decreasing temperature. The average chain length of the calcium silicate hydrate ascertained by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy increased with increasing temperature.

  4. [Renal calcium excretion and urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Aruga, Seiji; Honma, Yukio

    2011-10-01

    Patients with urolithiasis have been increasing in the world, especially morbidity of calcium nephrolithiasis has been increasing in the advanced countries. The changes in the environmental factors including alternation of diet are said to be associated with the increment of morbidity of kidney stone. Idiopathic hypercalciuria is one of the most important risk factor of calcium nephrolithiasis and is classified into absorptive, resorptive, and renal leak. Though the origins of these three types of hypercalciuria are different, increased bone resorption and increased calcium absorption from gut tend to be observed simultaneously. Not only genetic abnormalities in the proteins which are involved in calcium metabolisms but environmental factors such as high sodium intake and chronic acid load caused by increased ingestion of animal protein have been considered to be associated with increased urinary calcium excretion. Renal metabolisms of oxalate and phosphate which are important compositions of calcium containing stone, uric acid as a promoter and citrate as a inhibitor of nephrolithiasis are also described.

  5. The Nitric Oxide Donor SNAP-Induced Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Release in Cortical Neurons. Effects of Blockers of Voltage-Dependent Sodium and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Findings The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Conclusions Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons. PMID:24598811

  6. Vibrational spectra of the two hydrates of strontium oxalate.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Maria C; Torres, María M; Palacios, Daniel; González-Baró, Ana C; Baran, Enrique J

    2015-02-25

    The infrared and Raman spectra of the two hydrates of strontium oxalate, SrC2O4⋅H2O and SrC2O4⋅2H2O, were recorded and discussed on the basis of their structural peculiarities and in comparison with the spectra of the related calcium oxalates and other previously investigated metallic oxalates.

  7. DFT Calculations with van der Waals Interactions of Hydrated Calcium Carbonate Crystals CaCO3·(H2O, 6H2O): Structural, Electronic, Optical, and Vibrational Properties.

    PubMed

    Costa, Stefane N; Freire, Valder N; Caetano, Ewerton W S; Maia, Francisco F; Barboza, Carlos A; Fulco, Umberto L; Albuquerque, Eudenilson L

    2016-07-21

    The role of hydration on the structural, electronic, optical, and vibrational properties of monohydrated (CaCO3·H2O, hexagonal, P31, Z = 9) and hexahydrated (CaCO3·6H2O, monoclinic, C2/c, Z = 4) calcite crystals is assessed with the help of published experimental and theoretical data applying density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation and a dispersion correction scheme. We show that the presence of water increases the main band gap of monohydrocalcite by 0.4 eV relative to the anhydrous structure, although practically not changing the hexahydrocalcite band gap. The gap type, however, is modified from indirect to direct as one switches from the monohydrated to the hexahydrated crystal. A good agreement was obtained between the simulated vibrational infrared and Raman spectra and the experimental data, with an infrared signature of hexahydrocalcite relative to monohydrocalcite being observed at 837 cm(-1). Other important vibrational signatures of the lattice, water molecules, and CO3(2-) were identified as well. Analysis of the phonon dispersion curves shows that, as the hydration level of calcite increases, the longitudinal optical-transverse optical phonon splitting becomes smaller. The thermodynamics properties of hexahydrocalcite as a function of temperature resemble closely those of calcite, while monohydrocalcite exhibits a very distinct behavior. PMID:27409458

  8. Stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate in inorganic silica-rich environments.

    PubMed

    Kellermeier, Matthias; Melero-García, Emilio; Glaab, Fabian; Klein, Regina; Drechsler, Markus; Rachel, Reinhard; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Kunz, Werner

    2010-12-22

    In biomineralization, living organisms carefully control the crystallization of calcium carbonate to create functional materials and thereby often take advantage of polymorphism by stabilizing a specific phase that is most suitable for a given demand. In particular, the lifetime of usually transient amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) seems to be thoroughly regulated by the organic matrix, so as to use it either as an intermediate storage depot or directly as a structural element in a permanently stable state. In the present study, we show that the temporal stability of ACC can be influenced in a deliberate manner also in much simpler purely abiotic systems. To illustrate this, we have monitored the progress of calcium carbonate precipitation at high pH from solutions containing different amounts of sodium silicate. It was found that growing ACC particles provoke spontaneous polymerization of silica in their vicinity, which is proposed to result from a local decrease of pH nearby the surface. This leads to the deposition of hydrated amorphous silica layers on the ACC grains, which arrest growth and alter the size of the particles. Depending on the silica concentration, these skins have different thicknesses and exhibit distinct degrees of porosity, therefore impeding to varying extents the dissolution of ACC and energetically favored transformation to calcite. Under the given conditions, crystallization of calcium carbonate was slowed down over tunable periods or completely prevented on time scales of years, even when ACC coexisted side by side with calcite in solution.

  9. Determination of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, phosphorus, sodium, and zinc in fortified food products by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry: single-laboratory validation and ring trial.

    PubMed

    Poitevin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation (SLV) and a ring trial (RT) were undertaken to determine nine nutritional elements in food products by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry in order to modernize AOAC Official Method 984.27. The improvements involved extension of the scope to all food matrixes (including infant formula), optimized microwave digestion, selected analytical lines, internal standardization, and ion buffering. Simultaneous determination of nine elements (calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc) was made in food products. Sample digestion was performed through wet digestion of food samples by microwave technology with either closed- or open-vessel systems. Validation was performed to characterize the method for selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, ruggedness, and uncertainty. The robustness and efficiency of this method was proven through a successful RT using experienced independent food industry laboratories. Performance characteristics are reported for 13 certified and in-house reference materials, populating the AOAC triangle food sectors, which fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations for accuracy (trueness, recovery, and z-scores) and precision (repeatability and reproducibility RSD, and HorRat values) regarding SLVs and RTs. This multielemental method is cost-efficient, time-saving, accurate, and fit-for-purpose according to ISO 17025 Norm and AOAC acceptability criteria, and is proposed as an extended updated version of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for fortified food products, including infant formula. PMID:22468357

  10. The Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Addition of Rosemary Extract, Sodium Acetate and Calcium Lactate Mixture on the Quality of Pre-cooked Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    Muhlisin; Kang, Sun Moon; Choi, Won Hee; Lee, Keun Taik; Cheong, Sung Hee; Lee, Sung Ki

    2013-01-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 30% CO2+70% N2 or 100% N2) and an additive mixture (500 ppm rosemary extract, 3,000 ppm sodium acetate and 1,500 ppm calcium lactate) on the quality of pre-cooked hamburger patties during storage at 5°C for 14 d was evaluated. The addition of the additive mixture reduced aerobic and anaerobic bacteria counts in both 30% CO2-MAP (30% CO2+70% N2) and 100% N2-MAP (p<0.05). The 30% CO2-MAP was more effective to suppress the microbial growth than 100% N2-MAP, moreover the 30% CO2-MAP combined with additive mixture resulted in the lowest bacterial counts. The hamburger patties with additive mixture showed lower CIE L* and CIE a*, and higher CIE b* than those with no additive mixture. The 30% CO2-MAP tended to decrease the TBARS during storage regardless of the addition of additives. The use of 30% CO2-MAP in combination with additives mixture was effective for maintaining the quality and extending the shelf-life of pre-cooked hamburger patties. PMID:25049716

  11. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years. PMID:17782901

  12. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  13. Effects of ibandronate sodium, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, on intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in osteoclast precursor cells (RAW 264.7).

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Nan; Huang, Yan-Ming; Liao, Yu-Kai

    2015-02-01

    Ibanonate sodium (Iban), a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, is recognized to reduce skeletal complications through an inhibition of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. However, how this drug interacts with ion channels in osteoclasts and creates anti-osteoclastic activity remains largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of Iban and other related compounds on ionic currents in the osteoclast precursor RAW 264.7 cells. Iban suppressed the amplitude of whole-cell K(+) currents (I K) in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 28.9 μM. The I K amplitude was sensitive to block by TRAM-34 and Iban-mediated inhibition of I K was reversed by further addition of DCEBIO, an activator of intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (IKCa) channels. Intracellular dialysis with Iban diminished I K amplitude and further addition of ionomycin reversed its inhibition. In 17β-estradiol-treated cells, Iban-mediated inhibition of I K remained effective. In cell-attached current recordings, Iban applied to bath did not modify single-channel conductance of IKCa channels; however, it did reduce channel activity. Iban-induced inhibition of IKCa channels was voltage-dependent. As IKCa-channel activity was suppressed by KN-93, subsequent addition of Iban did not further decrease the channel open probability. Iban could not exert any effect on inwardly rectifying K(+) current in RAW 264.7 cells. Under current-clamp recordings, Iban depolarized the membrane of RAW 264.7 cells and DCEBIO reversed Iban-induced depolarization. Iban also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated migration of RAW 264.7 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Therefore, the inhibition by Iban of IKCa channels would be an important mechanism underlying its actions on the functional activity of osteoclasts occurring in vivo. PMID:25362532

  14. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  15. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  16. Here's butane hydrates equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Peettman, F.H.

    1984-06-01

    In 1961 McLeod and Campbell studied hydrates formation for binary mixtures of methane with ethane through butane at pressures up to 10,000 psia. Their data showed that butane lowered the pressure of hydrate formation for methane up to pressures ranging from 1,500 to 2,000 psia. At pressures above this range methane-n-butane mixtures generally followed the curve for pure methane or were slightly above it. McLeod and Campbell conclude that the crystal lattice is deformed at higher pressures (above 6,000 psia) and that hydrate composition on a water-free basis is the same as the gas.

  17. Effect of sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium salt cations on pH, proteolysis, organic acids, and microbial populations during storage of full-fat Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    McMahon, D J; Oberg, C J; Drake, M A; Farkye, N; Moyes, L V; Arnold, M R; Ganesan, B; Steele, J; Broadbent, J R

    2014-01-01

    Sodium reduction in cheese can assist in reducing overall dietary Na intake, yet saltiness is an important aspect of cheese flavor. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of partial substitution of Na with K on survival of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and nonstarter LAB (NSLAB), pH, organic acid production, and extent of proteolysis as water-soluble nitrogen (WSN) and protein profiles using urea-PAGE, in Cheddar cheese during 9mo of storage. Seven Cheddar cheeses with molar salt contents equivalent to 1.7% salt but with different ratios of Na, K, Ca, and Mg cations were manufactured as well as a low-salt cheese with 0.7% salt. The 1.7% salt cheeses had a mean composition of 352g of moisture/kg, 259g of protein/kg and 50% fat-on-dry-basis, and 17.5g of salt/kg (measured as Cl(-)). After salting, a faster initial decrease in cheese pH occurred with low salt or K substitution and it remained lower throughout storage. No difference in intact casein levels or percentage WSN levels between the various cheeses was observed, with the percentage WSN increasing from 5% at d 1 to 25% at 9mo. A greater decrease in intact αs1-casein than β-casein was detected, and the ratio of αs1-casein (f121-199) to αs1-casein could be used as an index of ripening. Typical changes in bacteria microflora occurred during storage, with lactococci decreasing gradually and NSLAB increasing. Lowering the Na content, even with K replacement, extended the crossover time when NSLAB became dominant. The crossover time was 4.5mo for the control cheese and was delayed to 5.2, 6.0, 6.1, and 6.2mo for cheeses with 10, 25, 50, and 75% K substitution. Including 10% Mg or Ca, along with 40% K, further increased crossover time, whereas the longest crossover time (7.3mo) was for low-salt cheese. By 9mo, NSLAB levels in all cheeses had increased from initial levels of ≤10(2) to approximately 10(6)cfu/g. Lactococci remained at 10(6) cfu/g in the low-salt cheese even after 9mo of storage. The propionic acid

  18. Effect of sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium salt cations on pH, proteolysis, organic acids, and microbial populations during storage of full-fat Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    McMahon, D J; Oberg, C J; Drake, M A; Farkye, N; Moyes, L V; Arnold, M R; Ganesan, B; Steele, J; Broadbent, J R

    2014-01-01

    Sodium reduction in cheese can assist in reducing overall dietary Na intake, yet saltiness is an important aspect of cheese flavor. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of partial substitution of Na with K on survival of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and nonstarter LAB (NSLAB), pH, organic acid production, and extent of proteolysis as water-soluble nitrogen (WSN) and protein profiles using urea-PAGE, in Cheddar cheese during 9mo of storage. Seven Cheddar cheeses with molar salt contents equivalent to 1.7% salt but with different ratios of Na, K, Ca, and Mg cations were manufactured as well as a low-salt cheese with 0.7% salt. The 1.7% salt cheeses had a mean composition of 352g of moisture/kg, 259g of protein/kg and 50% fat-on-dry-basis, and 17.5g of salt/kg (measured as Cl(-)). After salting, a faster initial decrease in cheese pH occurred with low salt or K substitution and it remained lower throughout storage. No difference in intact casein levels or percentage WSN levels between the various cheeses was observed, with the percentage WSN increasing from 5% at d 1 to 25% at 9mo. A greater decrease in intact αs1-casein than β-casein was detected, and the ratio of αs1-casein (f121-199) to αs1-casein could be used as an index of ripening. Typical changes in bacteria microflora occurred during storage, with lactococci decreasing gradually and NSLAB increasing. Lowering the Na content, even with K replacement, extended the crossover time when NSLAB became dominant. The crossover time was 4.5mo for the control cheese and was delayed to 5.2, 6.0, 6.1, and 6.2mo for cheeses with 10, 25, 50, and 75% K substitution. Including 10% Mg or Ca, along with 40% K, further increased crossover time, whereas the longest crossover time (7.3mo) was for low-salt cheese. By 9mo, NSLAB levels in all cheeses had increased from initial levels of ≤10(2) to approximately 10(6)cfu/g. Lactococci remained at 10(6) cfu/g in the low-salt cheese even after 9mo of storage. The propionic acid

  19. Diet and calcium stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Norman, R W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on the dietary modification of urinary risk factors as a means of reducing the likelihood of recurrent stone formation and to develop practical dietary recommendations that might be useful to this end. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published from 1983 to 1990. Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. STUDY SELECTION: Nonrandomized trials and retrospective reviews were included because of a paucity of randomized controlled trials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Information on the dietary intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and fibre and on alcohol and fluid intake was used to develop practical guidelines on dietary modification. CONCLUSION: Dietary modification plays an important role in the reduction of urinary risk factors in patients with calcium stone disease of the urinary tract. As an initial form of prevention attention should be directed toward moderating the intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and alcohol and increasing the intake of fibre and water. Future research should include an assessment of the long-term reduction of dietary and urinary risk factors and the rates of recurrence of calcium stones. PMID:1310430

  20. Transformations in methane hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Sharma, A.; Burruss, R.C.; Shu, J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, R.J.; Goncharov, A.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed study of pure methane hydrate in a diamond cell with in situ optical, Raman, and x-ray microprobe techniques reveals two previously unknown structures, structure II and structure H, at high pressures. The structure II methane hydrate at 250 MPa has a cubic unit cell of a = 17.158(2) A?? and volume V = 5051.3(13) A??3; structure H at 600 MPa has a hexagonal unit cell of a = 11.980(2) A??, c = 9.992(3) A??, and V = 1241.9(5) A??3. The compositions of these two investigated phases are still not known. With the effects of pressure and the presence of other gases in the structure, the structure II phase is likely to dominate over the known structure I methane hydrate within deep hydrate-bearing sediments underlying continental margins.

  1. Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Cancer.gov

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  2. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  3. Sodium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Sodium Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Na Formal name: Sodium Related tests: Chloride , Bicarbonate , Potassium , Electrolytes , Osmolality , Basic ...

  4. Natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, E.D. Jr. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on gas clathrates (commonly called hydrates), which are crystalline compounds that occur when water form a cage-like structure around smaller guest molecules. Gas hydrates of interest to the natural gas hydrocarbon industry are composed of water and eight molecules: methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, normal butane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. Hydrate formation is possible in any place where water exists with such molecules - in natural or artificial environments and at temperatures above and below 32{degrees} F when the pressure is elevated. Hydrates are considered a nuisance because they block transmission lines, plug blowout preventers, jeopardize the foundations of deepwater platforms and pipelines, cause tubing and casing collapse, and foul process heat exchangers, valves, and expanders. Common examples of preventive measures are the regulation of pipeline water content, unusual drilling-mud compositions, and large quantities of methanol injection into pipelines. We encounter conditions that encourage hydrate formation as we explore more unusual environments for gas and oil, including deepwater frontiers and permafrost regions.

  5. [Disorders in sodium-water balance].

    PubMed

    Petitclerc, Thierry

    2013-02-01

    Water balance control is aimed at normalizing cellular hydration, and sodium balance control at normalizing extracellular volume. Water balance control is based on the regulation of body fluid tonicity, while the control of sodium balance is based on the regulation of effective arterial volume. Disorders of water balance act on cellular hydration: primary disorders induce a proportional change in tonicity; secondary disorders are induced by a change in tonicity or effective arterial volume. Disorders of sodium balance act on extracellular volume: primary disorders of sodium balance induce a change in effective arterial volume; secondary disorders are induced by a change in effective arterial volume. Physical examination of the patient allows assessing the extracellular volume and the severity of the sodium balance disorder. Natremia - that generally reflects tonicity - allows to assess cellular hydration and to determine the type of water balance disorder. In the case of natremia disturbance, the assessment of both the tonicity and the extracellular volume allows the determination of the type of water and/or sodium balance disorder that is necessary for prescribing the adequate therapy. PMID:23177272

  6. Effect of food preservatives on the hydration properties and taste behavior of amino acids: a volumetric and viscometric approach.

    PubMed

    Banipal, Tarlok S; Kaur, Navalpreet; Kaur, Amanpreet; Gupta, Mehak; Banipal, Parampaul K

    2015-08-15

    Thermodynamic and transport properties of aqueous solutions are very useful in the elucidation of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions, which help to understand the hydration and taste behavior of solutes. The densities and viscosities of L-glycine, β-alanine and L-leucine have been determined in water and in aqueous solutions of sodium propionate (NaP) and calcium propionate (CaP) at temperatures 298.15 and 308.15K. From these data, apparent molar volumes (V2,ϕ), viscosity B-coefficients and corresponding transfer parameters (ΔtrV2,ϕo and ΔtrB) have been calculated. The dB/dT values suggest that L-glycine and β-alanine act as structure-breaker, while L-leucine acts as structure-maker both in water and in aqueous solutions of NaP and CaP. The decrease in hydration number and change in taste behavior have also been observed with increasing concentration of the cosolute.

  7. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  8. Dynamics of protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M; Emmert, S; Gulich, R; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water. PMID:26465518

  9. Gas hydrate growth morphology outside of horizontal heat transfer tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yingming; Guo, Kaihua; Liang, Deqing; Fan, Shuanshi; Gu, Jianming

    2005-03-01

    Visual observation of HCFC141b gas hydrate growth process outside of a horizontal heat transfer tube was done on a visual apparatus of gas hydrate reaction system. Growth processes of two situations (with, or without sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) were observed, their growth morphology were compared and explained with the theory of surface free energy. During the experiment process, phenomenon of gas hydrate fast nucleation from melting ice was found and explained with Zhou & Sloan's hypothesis qualitatively. From the experiment results, it was found that gas hydrate formed in the liquid HCFC141b phase along the heat transfer tube in a system with SDS (SDS water solution-liquid HCFC141b system), while along the glass in a system without SDS (distilled water-liquid HCFC141b system), so the formation heat of gas hydrate can be absorbed more quickly in a system with SDS than in a system without SDS, which lead to a more quick growth rate. According to the above research, some suggestions were presented on the designation of heat exchanger and reaction materials for the gas hydrate indirect-contact cool storage system.

  10. Ways of calcium reabsorption in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Moor, Matthias B; Bonny, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The role of the kidney in calcium homeostasis has been reshaped from a classic view in which the kidney was regulated by systemic calcitropic hormones such as vitamin D3 or parathyroid hormone to an organ actively taking part in the regulation of calcium handling. With the identification of the intrinsic renal calcium-sensing receptor feedback system, the regulation of paracellular calcium transport involving claudins, and new paracrine regulators such as klotho, the kidney has emerged as a crucial modulator not only of calciuria but also of calcium homeostasis. This review summarizes recent molecular and endocrine contributors to renal calcium handling and highlights the tight link between calcium and sodium reabsorption in the kidney.

  11. Poly[[bis­{μ3-2-[(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)(phen­yl)meth­yl]propane­dioato}tetra­sodium(I)] 7.5-hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Meskini, Ihssan; Daoudi, Maria; Daran, Jean-Claude; Ben Hadda, Taibi; Zouihri, Hafid

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title polymer, {[Na4(C15H14N2O4)2]·7.5H2O}n, contains two 2-[(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)(phen­yl)meth­yl]propane­dioate (ppmp) anions, eight water mol­ecules (one located on a twofold rotation axis) and five sodium cations (one located on an inversion center and the other one located on a twofold rotation axis). The carboxyl­ate groups of the ppmp anions and the water mol­ecules bridge the Na cations, forming a two-dimensional polymeric structure. In the structure there are two types of coordination environment around the metal cations: one Na cation is coordinated by five O atoms in a distorted square-pyramidal geometry while the other four Na cations are coordinated by six O atoms in a distorted octa­hedral geometry. Extensive O—H⋯O and O—H⋯N hydrogen bonding is present in the crystal structure. The H atoms of one methyl group of the ppmp anion are disordered equally over two positions. PMID:21588089

  12. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  13. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  14. Impact of admixtures on the hydration kinetics of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J.; Jeknavorian, A.; Roberts, L.; Silva, D.

    2011-12-15

    Most concrete produced today includes either chemical additions to the cement, chemical admixtures in the concrete, or both. These chemicals alter a number of properties of cementitious systems, including hydration behavior, and it has been long understood by practitioners that these systems can differ widely in response to such chemicals. In this paper the impact on hydration of several classes of chemicals is reviewed with an emphasis on the current understanding of interactions with cement chemistry. These include setting retarders, accelerators, and water reducing dispersants. The ability of the chemicals to alter the aluminate-sulfate balance of cementitious systems is discussed with a focus on the impact on silicate hydration. As a key example of this complex interaction, unusual behavior sometimes observed in systems containing high calcium fly ash is highlighted.

  15. Hydration reactions of cement combinations containing vitrified incinerator fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Thomas D.; Dhir, Ravindra K

    2004-05-01

    One treatment option for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash (IFA) is vitrification. The process yields a material containing reduced levels of trace metals relative to the original ash. The material is glassy and potentially suitable as a cement component in concrete. This paper examines the vitrification of an IFA and studies the hydration reactions of combinations of this vitrified material and Portland cement (PC). Isothermal conduction calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study the hydration reactions. As the levels of vitrified ash increase, the quantities of AFt phase produced decrease, whilst quantities of AFm phase increase, due to the reduced levels of sulfate in the vitrified ash. The levels of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel (inferred from estimates of quantities of gel-bound water) remain constant at 28 days regardless of vitrified ash content, indicating that the material is contributing toward the formation of this product.

  16. Final report on the safety assessment of Sodium Metaphosphate, Sodium Trimetaphosphate, and Sodium Hexametaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, R S

    2001-01-01

    These inorganic polyphosphate salts all function as chelating agents in cosmetic formulations. In addition, Sodium Metaphosphate functions as an oral care agent, Sodium Trimetaphosphate as a buffering agent, and Sodium Hexametaphosphate as a corrosion inhibitor. Only Sodium Hexametaphosphate is currently reported to be used. Although the typical concentrations historically have been less than 1%, higher concentrations have been used in products such as bath oils, which are diluted during normal use. Sodium Metaphosphate is the general term for any polyphosphate salt with four or more phosphate units. The four-phosphate unit version is cyclic, others are straight chains. The hexametaphosphate is the specific six-chain length form. The trimetaphosphate structure is cyclic. Rats fed 10% Sodium Trimetaphosphate for a month exhibited transient tubular necrosis; rats given 10% Sodium Metaphosphate had retarded growth and those fed 10% Sodium Hexametaphosphate had pale and swollen kidneys. In chronic studies using animals, growth inhibition, increased kidney weights (with calcium deposition and desquamation), bone decalcification, parathyroid hypertrophy and hyperplasia, inorganic phosphaturia, hepatic focal necrosis, and muscle fiber size alterations. Sodium Hexametaphosphate was a severe skin irritant in rabbits, whereas a 0.2% solution was only mildly irritating. A similar pattern was seen with ocular toxicity. These ingredients were not genotoxic in bacterial systems nor were they carcinogenic in rats. No reproductive or developmental toxicity was seen in studies using rats exposed to Sodium Hexametaphosphate or Sodium Trimetaphosphate. In clinical testing, irritation is seen as a function of concentration; concentrations as high as 1% produced no irritation in contact allergy patients. Because of the corrosive nature of Sodium Hexametaphosphate, it was concluded that these ingredients could be used safely if each formulation was prepared to avoid skin irritation; for

  17. Ethyl-enedi-ammonium sodium tetra-kis-[bis-(ethyl-enedi-amine-κ(2) N,N')(oxalato-κ(2) O (1),O (2))cobalt(III)] [penta-hydrogen di(phosphato-octa-deca-tungstate)] tetra-deca-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuzhuo; Wang, Jing; Xu, Yun

    2013-10-16

    The title compound, Na(C2H10N2)[Co(C2O4)(C2H8N2)2]4[H5(P2W18O62)2]·14H2O, prepared under hydro-thermal conditions, consists of two Dawson-type [P2W18O62](6-) anions, four isolated [Co(en)2(ox)](+) cations (en = ethyl-enedi-amine and ox = oxalate), one Na(+) cation, one [H2en](2+) cation, and a number of ordered (14) and disordered solvent water mol-ecules. The [P2W18O62](6-) polyoxidometalate anion has site symmetry 1 and contains two structurally distinct types of W atoms: viz. six W atoms on vertical pseudo-mirror planes grouped in two sets of three, and 12 equatorial W atoms that do not lie in the pseudo-mirror planes grouped in two sets of six. In each [Co(en)2(ox)](+) cation, the Co(III) ion is coordinated by four N atoms from two en ligands and two O atoms from the ox ligands, completing a distorted octa-hedral structure. The sodium cation lies on an inversion centre and additionally links the complex cations and anions. In the crystal, the various units are linked by N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which together with C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds form a three-dimensional structure. The contribution of a region of disordered electron density, possibly highly disordered solvent water mol-ecules, to the scattering was removed with the SQUEEZE option of PLATON [Spek (2009 ▶). Acta Cryst. D65, 148-155]. To equilibrate the charges five H(+) ions have been added to the polyoxidometalate. These H(+) ions and the disordered solvent contribution were not included in the reported mol-ecular weight and density. PMID:24454036

  18. Immunopharmacologic profile of nedocromil sodium.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, S I

    1995-01-01

    Nedocromil sodium, a pyranoquinolone, was specifically designed as an agent to suppress allergic inflammation. Nedocromil sodium significantly affects not only the early-phase of allergen-induced responses, but also expression of late-phase inflammation, even when administered after the onset of early-phase responses. Nedocromil sodium also limits bronchoconstriction induced by nonallergic factors, including cold air and sulfur dioxide at dosages lower than required with cromolyn sodium. Nedocromil sodium is more potent than cromolyn sodium in preventing mast cell degranulation in selective animal models. In addition, nedocromil sodium limits leukotriene C4 production by calcium ionophore-stimulated eosinophils and also limits the activity of platelet activating factor to induce neutrophil generation of superoxides. Diurnal variation of peak flow rates in asthmatics and requirement for both beta 2-agonists and inhaled beclomethasone have been noted to be reduced in several trials employing nedocromil sodium, suggesting that its in vivo activity parallels its in vitro activity as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  19. T-type calcium channels contribute to calcium disturbances in brain during hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Odackal, John; Sherpa, Ang D; Patel, Nisha; Colbourn, Robert; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-11-01

    Disturbance of calcium homeostasis is implicated in the normal process of aging and brain pathology prevalent in the elderly such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies demonstrated that applying a hyponatremic iso-osmotic (low-NaCl) artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) to rodent hippocampus causes extracellular calcium to rapidly decrease. Restoring normonatremia after low-NaCl treatment causes a rapid increase in extracellular calcium that overshoots baseline. This study examined the amplitude, timing, and mechanism of these surprising calcium changes. We also tested whether hyponatremia increased calcium entry into brain cells or calcium binding to chondroitin sulfate (CS), a negatively charged constituent of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that may be occupied by sodium during normonatremia. We report three major findings. First we show that CS does not contribute to extracellular calcium changes during low-NaCl treatments. Second, we show that the time to minimum extracellular calcium during low-NaCl treatment is significantly shorter than the time to maximum extracellular calcium in recovery from low-NaCl treatment. Third, we show that the decrease in extracellular calcium observed during hyponatremia is attenuated by ML 218, a highly selective T-type calcium channel blocker. Together these data suggest that calcium rapidly enters cells at the onset of low-NaCl treatment and is extruded from cells when normonatremia is restored. Calcium binding to CS does not significantly contribute to calcium changes in brain during hyponatremia. Differences in timing suggest that extracellular calcium changes during and in recovery from hyponatremia occur by distinct mechanisms or by a multistep process. Finally, partial block of extracellular calcium influx by ML 218 suggests that T-type channels are involved in calcium entering cells during hyponatremia. Given the high prevalence of hyponatremia among elderly patients and the

  20. Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Methane Gas Production from Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore Mohanty; Bill Cook; Mustafa Hakimuddin; Ramanan Pitchumani; Damiola Ogunlana; Jon Burger; John Shillinglaw

    2006-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Estimates of the amounts of methane sequestered in gas hydrates worldwide are speculative and range from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet (modified from Kvenvolden, 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In this project novel techniques were developed to form and dissociate methane hydrates in porous media, to measure acoustic properties and CT properties during hydrate dissociation in the presence of a porous medium. Hydrate depressurization experiments in cores were simulated with the use of TOUGHFx/HYDRATE simulator. Input/output software was developed to simulate variable pressure boundary condition and improve the ease of use of the simulator. A series of simulations needed to be run to mimic the variable pressure condition at the production well. The experiments can be matched qualitatively by the hydrate simulator. The temperature of the core falls during hydrate dissociation; the temperature drop is higher if the fluid withdrawal rate is higher. The pressure and temperature gradients are small within the core. The sodium iodide concentration affects the dissociation pressure and rate. This procedure and data will be useful in designing future hydrate studies.

  1. CaCl 2 -Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29 Si MAS NMR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Qinfei; Ge, Yong; Geng, Guoqing; Bae, Sungchul; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he effect of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) on tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra and 29 Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system.he Ca L 3,2 -edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C 3 S hydration in the presence of CaCl 2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which is the primary hydration product. O K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C 3 S. Based on the Ca L 3,2 -edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl 2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C 3 S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl 2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29 Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl 2 in hydrated C 3 S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups ( Q 2 ) and branch sites ( Q 3 ) in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration.« less

  2. Standard enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Burylev, B.P.

    1995-03-01

    Available experimental data on standard enthalpies of formation of alkali metal hydroxide hydrates have been summarized. Using equations derived, the authors have calculated previously unknown enthalpies of formation of some lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium hydroxide hydrates. Taking into account the contribution of water to the enthalpies of formation of monohydrates, the authors have estimated the enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates FrOH{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, FrOH{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, and FrOH{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O (-745.8, -1085.8, and -1515.8 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively).

  3. Computational Study of Phosphate Vibrations as Reporters of DNA Hydration.

    PubMed

    Floisand, D J; Corcelli, S A

    2015-10-15

    The sensitivity of the phosphate asymmetric stretch vibrational frequency to DNA hydration was investigated with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a spectroscopic map relating the vibrational frequency to the electrostatics of its environment. 95% of the phosphate vibrational frequency shift in fully hydrated DNA was due to water within two hydration layers. The phosphate vibration was relatively insensitive to water in the major and minor grooves and to the sodium counterions but was enormously sensitive to water interacting with the DNA backbone. Comparisons to experimental measurements on DNA as a function of relative humidity suggest that one water molecule per phosphate group likely persists at the lowest values of the relative humidity. Finally, the calculated spectral diffusion dynamics show that water in the vicinity of the DNA backbone is slowed by a factor of ∼5, in agreement with NMR and solvation dynamics experiments, as well as previous MD simulations. PMID:26722770

  4. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  5. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  6. Optimizing the calcium content of a copolymer acrylamide gel matrix for dark-grown seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, P. N.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    A copolymer acrylamide acrylate gel was investigated as the sole root matrix for dark-grown seedlings of soybean (Glycine max Merr. 'Century 84'). Increasing Ca2+ in the hydrating solution of the hydrogel from 1 to 10 mM decreased its water-holding capacity from 97 to 46 mL g-1, yet water potential of the medium remained high, sufficient for normal plant growth at all Ca2+ concentrations tested. Elongation rate of dark-grown soybean seedlings over a 54-hour period was 0.9, 1.5, and 1.8 mm h-1 with 1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 mM Ca2+, respectively, but did not increase with further increases in Ca2+ concentration. Further study revealed that Na+ was released from the hydrogel medium and was taken up by the seedlings as Ca2+ increased in the medium. In dry hypocotyl tissue, sodium content correlated negatively with calcium content. Despite the presence of Na+ in the hydrogel, seedling growth was normal when adequate Ca2+ was added in the hydrating solution. Acrylamide hydrogels hold good potential as a sole growth matrix for short-term experiments with dark-grown seedlings without irrigation.

  7. Optimizing the calcium content of a copolymer acrylamide gel matrix for dark-grown seedlings.

    PubMed

    Myers, P N; Mitchell, C A

    1998-11-01

    A copolymer acrylamide acrylate gel was investigated as the sole root matrix for dark-grown seedlings of soybean (Glycine max Merr. 'Century 84'). Increasing Ca2+ in the hydrating solution of the hydrogel from 1 to 10 mM decreased its water-holding capacity from 97 to 46 mL g-1, yet water potential of the medium remained high, sufficient for normal plant growth at all Ca2+ concentrations tested. Elongation rate of dark-grown soybean seedlings over a 54-hour period was 0.9, 1.5, and 1.8 mm h-1 with 1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 mM Ca2+, respectively, but did not increase with further increases in Ca2+ concentration. Further study revealed that Na+ was released from the hydrogel medium and was taken up by the seedlings as Ca2+ increased in the medium. In dry hypocotyl tissue, sodium content correlated negatively with calcium content. Despite the presence of Na+ in the hydrogel, seedling growth was normal when adequate Ca2+ was added in the hydrating solution. Acrylamide hydrogels hold good potential as a sole growth matrix for short-term experiments with dark-grown seedlings without irrigation. PMID:11542673

  8. Hydration-dependent dynamic crossover phenomenon in protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Fratini, Emiliano; Li, Mingda; Le, Peisi; Mamontov, Eugene; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2014-10-01

    The characteristic relaxation time τ of protein hydration water exhibits a strong hydration level h dependence. The dynamic crossover is observed when h is higher than the monolayer hydration level hc=0.2-0.25 and becomes more visible as h increases. When h is lower than hc, τ only exhibits Arrhenius behavior in the measured temperature range. The activation energy of the Arrhenius behavior is insensitive to h, indicating a local-like motion. Moreover, the h dependence of the crossover temperature shows that the protein dynamic transition is not directly or solely induced by the dynamic crossover in the hydration water.

  9. Characteristics of a Hydrated, Alginate-Based Delivery System for Cultivation of the Button Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Romaine, C. P.; Schlagnhaufer, B.

    1992-01-01

    The production of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus with mycelium-colonized alginate pellets as an inoculant of the growing medium was investigated. Pellets having an irregular surface and porous internal structure were prepared by complexing a mixture of 1% sodium alginate, 2 to 6% vermiculite, 2% hygramer, and various concentrations of Nutrisoy (soy protein) with calcium chloride. The porous structure allowed the pellets to be formed septically and then inoculated and colonized with the fungus following sterilization. By using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to estimate fungal biomass, the matrix components of the pellet were found to be of no nutritive value to A. bisporus. Pellets amended with Nutrisoy at a concentration of 0.5 to 8% supported extensive mycelial growth, as determined by significantly increased ELISA values, with a concentration of 4% being optimal and higher concentrations proving inhibitory. The addition of hydrated, mycelium-invaded pellets to the compost or casing layer supported the thorough colonization of the growing substrate and culminated in the formation of mushrooms that showed normal development and typical morphology. Yields and sizes of mushrooms were comparable from composts seeded with either colonized pellets or cereal grain spawn. Similarly, amending the casing layer with pelletized-mycelium-colonized compost resulted in a 2- to 3-day-earlier and more-synchronous emergence of mushrooms than with untreated casing. This technology shows the greatest potential as a pathogen-free inoculant of the casing layer in the commercial cultivation of mushrooms. Images PMID:16348774

  10. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  11. Global occurrences of gas hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2001-01-01

    Natural gas hydrate is found worldwide in sediments of outer continental margins of all oceans and in polar areas with continuous permafrost. There are currently 77 localities identified globally where geophysical, geochemical and/or geological evidence indicates the presence of gas hydrate. Details concerning individual gas-hydrate occurrences are compiled at a new world-wide-web (www) site (http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/globalhydrate). This site has been created to facilitate global gas-hydrate research by providing information on each of the localities where there is evidence for gas hydrate. Also considered are the implications of gas hydrate as a potential (1) energy resource, (2) factor in global climate change, and (3) geohazard.

  12. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  13. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Sarcopenia Skeletal Rare Disorders Data & Publications Facts and Statistics Vitamin D map Fracture Risk Map Hip Fracture ... Training Courses Working Groups Regional Audits Reports Facts and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What ...

  14. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables.

  15. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  16. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  17. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  18. Growth of nanofibrous barium carbonate on calcium carbonate seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeijer, Sara J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Barrett, Richard A.; Gower, Laurie B.

    2008-05-01

    Fibrous barium carbonate (BaCO 3/witherite) crystals 50-100 nm in diameter and several microns in length were grown on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) seeds at temperatures as low as 4 °C. The BaCO 3 fibers were deposited onto calcite rhombs or CaCO 3 films using the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, which was induced with the sodium salt of polyacrylic acid (PAA). The structure and morphology of the resultant fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Fibers were successfully grown on calcite seeds of various morphologies, with a range of barium concentrations, and PAA molecular weight and concentration. Two categories of fibers were grown: straight and twisted. Both types of fibers displayed single-crystalline SAED diffraction patterns, but after examining high-resolution TEM lattice images, it was revealed that the fibers were in fact made up of nanocrystalline domains. We postulate that these nanocrystalline domains are well aligned due to a singular nucleation event (i.e., each fiber propagates from a single nucleation event on the seed crystal) with the nanocrystalline domains resulting from stresses caused by dehydration during crystallization of the highly hydrated precursor phase. These BaCO 3 fibers grown on calcite substrates further illustrate the robustness and non-specificity of the PILP process.

  19. Cryopegs as destabilization factor of intra-permafrost gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Istomin, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic feature of permafrost soils in the Arctic is widespread intra-permafrost unfrozen brine lenses - cryopegs. They are often found in permafrost horizons in the north part of Western Siberia, in particular, on the Yamal Peninsula. Cryopegs depths in permafrost zone can be tens and hundreds of meters from the top of frozen strata. The chemical composition of natural cryopegs is close to sea waters, but is characterized by high mineralization. They have a sodium-chloride primary composition with a minor amount of sulphate. Mineralization of cryopegs brine is often hundreds of grams per liter, and the temperature is around -6…-8 °C. The formation of cryopegs in permafrost is associated with processes of long-term freezing of sediments and cryogenic concentration of salts and salt solutions in local areas. The cryopegs' formation can take place in the course of permafrost evolution at the sea transgressions and regressions during freezing of saline sea sediments. Very important feature of cryopegs in permafrost is their transformation in the process of changing temperature and pressure conditions. As a result, the salinity and chemical composition are changed and in addition the cryopegs' location can be changed during their migration. The cryopegs migration violates the thermodynamic conditions of existence intra-permafrost gas hydrate formations, especially the relic gas hydrates deposits, which are situated in the shallow permafrost up to 100 meters depth in a metastable state [1]. The interaction cryopegs with gas hydrates accumulations can cause decomposition of intra-permafrost hydrates. Moreover, the increasing of salt and unfrozen water content in sedimentary rocks sharply reduce the efficiency of gas hydrates self-preservation in frozen soils. It is confirmed by experimental investigations of interaction of frozen gas hydrate bearing sediments with salt solutions [2]. So, horizons with elevated pressure can appear, as a result of gas hydrate

  20. Sodium Oxybate

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to prevent attacks of cataplexy (episodes of muscle weakness that begin suddenly and last for a ... of your body that you cannot control, sweating, muscle cramps, and fast heartbeat.Sodium oxybate may help ...

  1. Hydration and physical performance.

    PubMed

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  2. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  3. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-01

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  4. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  5. Experimental evidence for empty cage methane clathrate hydrates grown using surfactants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, Jeffrey; Dunn-Rankin, Derek; Taborek, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Clathrate hydrates are non-stochiometric ice-like crystalline compounds consisting of host water molecules forming a cage-like structure around guest molecules. The guest molecule is necessary for the stability of the hydrate. Surfactants have been shown to greatly enhance the kinetics of hydrate growth, which is important for many applications. We have built custom cells that allow in situ Raman and optical imaging of the growth of methane clathrate hydrates from liquid water. In our studies, above 0C, we observe the formation of solid that precedes the absorption of methane gas required to form clathrate hydrates. Our research shows that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) causes a fundamental change in the growth mechanism of methane hydrates, creating a temporary empty cage clathrate structure. The existence of this transitional state is confirmed by in situ Raman measurements, in situ NMR. We have simultaneously monitored the gas uptake and the NMR signal of the growing hydrate in a high pressure NMR cell. The empty cage solid structure appears to be unique to surfactant assisted hydrate growth, and begins to disappear for low SDS concentrations (<25ppm). Supported by the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  6. Hydration products and thermokinetic properties of cement-bentonite and cement-chalk mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Klyusov, A.A.

    1988-08-20

    Bentonite and chalk are the most popular auxiliary additives to portland cement for borehole cementation. The authors studied by physicochemical analysis methods (x-ray phase, derivatographic, and scanning and electron microscopy in combination with microdiffraction) the newly formed solid-phase composition of cement-bentonite and cement-chalk mortars (binder-additive ratio 9:1) prepared from portland cement for cold boreholes and 8% calcium chloride solution at a water-mixing ratio of 0.9. The mechanism of the influence of Ca-bentonite and chalk additives on the portland cement hydration rate was ascertained from the heat evolution rate curves. It was found that the phase compositions of the hydration products are represented in the studied systems by newly formed substances typical for portland cement. It has been noted that Ca-bentonite interacts with the calcium hydroxide of hydrated cement with the formation of hexagonal and cubic calcium hydroaluminates. Unlike Ca-bentonite, chalk does not react with portland cement at normal and reduced temperatures, does not block hydrated cement particles, which, in turn, ensures all other conditions remaining equal, a higher initial rate of hydration of cement-chalk mortar.

  7. Gas Hydrate Petroleum System Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    In a gas hydrate petroleum system, the individual factors that contribute to the formation of gas hydrate accumulations, such as (1) gas hydrate pressure-temperature stability conditions, (2) gas source, (3) gas migration, and (4) the growth of the gas hydrate in suitable host sediment can identified and quantified. The study of know and inferred gas hydrate accumulations reveal the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly controlled by the presence of fractures and/or coarser grained sediments. Field studies have concluded that hydrate grows preferentially in coarse-grained sediments because lower capillary pressures in these sediments permit the migration of gas and nucleation of hydrate. Due to the relatively distal nature of the deep marine geologic settings, the overall abundance of sand within the shallow geologic section is usually low. However, drilling projects in the offshore of Japan, Korea, and in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the occurrence of significant hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The 1999/2000 Japan Nankai Trough drilling confirmed occurrence of hydrate-bearing sand-rich intervals (interpreted as turbidite fan deposits). Gas hydrate was determined to fill the pore spaces in these deposits, reaching saturations up to 80% in some layers. A multi-well drilling program titled "METI Toaki-oki to Kumano-nada" also identified sand-rich reservoirs with pore-filling hydrate. The recovered hydrate-bearing sand layers were described as very-fine- to fine-grained turbidite sand layers measuring from several centimeters up to a meter thick. However, the gross thickness of the hydrate-bearing sand layers were up to 50 m. In 2010, the Republic of Korea conducted the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate (UBGH2) Drilling Expedition. Seismic data clearly showed the development of a thick, potential basin wide, sedimentary sections characterized by mostly debris flows. The downhole LWD logs and core data from Site UBGH2-5 reveal that each debris flows is

  8. Potentiation of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by total and free intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, T R; Ginsburg, K S; Bers, D M

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content ([Ca](SRT)) and free SR [Ca] ([Ca](SR)) on the fraction of SR calcium released during voltage clamp steps in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. [Ca](SRT), as measured by caffeine application, was progressively increased by conditioning pulses. Sodium was absent in both the intracellular and in the extracellular solutions to block sodium/calcium exchange. Total cytosolic calcium flux during the transient was inferred from I(Ca), [Ca](SRT), [Ca](i), and cellular buffering characteristics. Fluxes via the calcium current (I(Ca)), the SR calcium pump, and passive leak from the SR were evaluated to determine SR calcium release flux (J(rel)). Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling was characterized with respect to both gain (integral J(rel)/integral I(Ca)) and fractional SR calcium release. Both parameters were virtually zero for a small, but measurable [Ca](SRT). Gain and fractional SR calcium release increased steeply and nonlinearly with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). We conclude that potentiation of EC coupling can be correlated with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). While fractional SR calcium release was not linearly dependent upon [Ca](SR), intra-SR calcium may play a crucial role in regulating the SR calcium release process. PMID:10620297

  9. Removal of phosphate from greenhouse wastewater using hydrated lime.

    PubMed

    Dunets, C Siobhan; Zheng, Youbin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate (P) contamination in nutrient-laden wastewater is currently a major topic of discussion in the North American greenhouse industry. Precipitation of P as calcium phosphate minerals using hydrated lime could provide a simple, inexpensive method for retrieval. A combination of batch experiments and chemical equilibrium modelling was used to confirm the viability of this P removal method and determine lime addition rates and pH requirements for greenhouse wastewater of varying nutrient compositions. Lime: P ratio (molar ratio of CaMg(OH)₄: PO₄‒P) provided a consistent parameter for estimating lime addition requirements regardless of initial P concentration, with a ratio of 1.5 providing around 99% removal of dissolved P. Optimal P removal occurred when lime addition increased the pH from 8.6 to 9.0, suggesting that pH monitoring during the P removal process could provide a simple method for ensuring consistent adherence to P removal standards. A Visual MINTEQ model, validated using experimental data, provided a means of predicting lime addition and pH requirements as influenced by changes in other parameters of the lime-wastewater system (e.g. calcium concentration, temperature, and initial wastewater pH). Hydrated lime addition did not contribute to the removal of macronutrient elements such as nitrate and ammonium, but did decrease the concentration of some micronutrients. This study provides basic guidance for greenhouse operators to use hydrated lime for phosphate removal from greenhouse wastewater. PMID:25176490

  10. Removal of phosphate from greenhouse wastewater using hydrated lime.

    PubMed

    Dunets, C Siobhan; Zheng, Youbin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate (P) contamination in nutrient-laden wastewater is currently a major topic of discussion in the North American greenhouse industry. Precipitation of P as calcium phosphate minerals using hydrated lime could provide a simple, inexpensive method for retrieval. A combination of batch experiments and chemical equilibrium modelling was used to confirm the viability of this P removal method and determine lime addition rates and pH requirements for greenhouse wastewater of varying nutrient compositions. Lime: P ratio (molar ratio of CaMg(OH)₄: PO₄‒P) provided a consistent parameter for estimating lime addition requirements regardless of initial P concentration, with a ratio of 1.5 providing around 99% removal of dissolved P. Optimal P removal occurred when lime addition increased the pH from 8.6 to 9.0, suggesting that pH monitoring during the P removal process could provide a simple method for ensuring consistent adherence to P removal standards. A Visual MINTEQ model, validated using experimental data, provided a means of predicting lime addition and pH requirements as influenced by changes in other parameters of the lime-wastewater system (e.g. calcium concentration, temperature, and initial wastewater pH). Hydrated lime addition did not contribute to the removal of macronutrient elements such as nitrate and ammonium, but did decrease the concentration of some micronutrients. This study provides basic guidance for greenhouse operators to use hydrated lime for phosphate removal from greenhouse wastewater.

  11. Liquid Crystals and Glasses in Binary Systems from Sodium and Alkali-Earth Metal Butyrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnaya, T. A.; Bereznitski, Y. V.; Volkov, S. V.

    1996-07-01

    The temperature and composition ranges of liquid crystal and glass formation have been established for the binary mixtures of mesogenic sodium butyrate with non-mesogenic magnesium, calcium and strontium butyrates by means of differential thermal analysis and hot stage polarization microscopy. The formation of a vitreous optically anisotropic mesophase has been found for binaries of sodium butyrate with calcium and strontium butyrates.

  12. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  13. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  14. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  15. Water, Hydration and Health

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Barry M.; D’Anci, Kristen E.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to provide some sense of our current knowledge of water including overall patterns of intake and some factors linked with intake, the complex mechanisms behind water homeostasis, the effects of variation in water intake on health and energy intake, weight, and human performance and functioning. Water represents a critical nutrient whose absence will be lethal within days. Water’s importance for prevention of nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases has emerged more recently because of the shift toward large proportions of fluids coming from caloric beverages. Nevertheless, there are major gaps in knowledge related to measurement of total fluid intake, hydration status at the population level, and few longer-term systematic interventions and no published random-controlled longer-term trials. We suggest some ways to examine water requirements as a means to encouraging more dialogue on this important topic. PMID:20646222

  16. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  17. Hydration mechanisms of two polymorphs of synthetic ye'elimite

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, A.; Álvarez-Pinazo, G.; Peral, I.; Aranda, M.A.G.; De la Torre, A.G.

    2014-09-15

    Ye'elimite is the main phase in calcium sulfoaluminate cements and also a key phase in sulfobelite cements. However, its hydration mechanism is not well understood. Here we reported new data on the hydration behavior of ye'elimite using synchrotron and laboratory powder diffraction coupled to the Rietveld methodology. Both internal and external standard methodologies have been used to determine the overall amorphous contents. We have addressed the standard variables: water-to-ye'elimite ratio and additional sulfate sources of different solubilities. Moreover, we report a deep study of the role of the polymorphism of pure ye'elimites. The hydration behavior of orthorhombic stoichiometric and pseudo-cubic solid-solution ye'elimites is discussed. In the absence of additional sulfate sources, stoichiometric-ye'elimite reacts slower than solid-solution-ye'elimite, and AFm-type phases are the main hydrated crystalline phases, as expected. Moreover, solid-solution-ye'elimite produces higher amounts of ettringite than stoichiometric-ye'elimite. However, in the presence of additional sulfates, stoichiometric-ye'elimite reacts faster than solid-solution-ye'elimite.

  18. Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate ; CASRN 148 - 18 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Non

  19. Sodium fluoroacetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium fluoroacetate ; CASRN 62 - 74 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  20. Sodium azide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium azide ; CASRN 26628 - 22 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  1. Acifluorfen, sodium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acifluorfen , sodium ; CASRN 62476 - 59 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  2. Sodium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for sodium cyanide is included in the

  3. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS)

    PubMed Central

    Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Pepa, Alex; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F.; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E.; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males), 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m2 BMI) participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L) than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L) (p = 0.019). Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p < 0.01). Applying urine osmolality cut-offs, approximately 60% of participants were euhydrated and 20% hyperhydrated or dehydrated. Most participants were euhydrated, but a substantial number of people (40%) deviated from a normal hydration level. PMID:27058557

  4. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS).

    PubMed

    Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Pepa, Alex; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males), 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m² BMI) participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L) than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L) (p = 0.019). Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p < 0.01). Applying urine osmolality cut-offs, approximately 60% of participants were euhydrated and 20% hyperhydrated or dehydrated. Most participants were euhydrated, but a substantial number of people (40%) deviated from a normal hydration level. PMID:27058557

  5. Individual and combined effects of chloride, sulfate, and magnesium ions on hydrated Portland-cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, T.S.; Wakeley, L.D.; Young, C.L.

    1994-03-01

    Ground water with a high concentration of magnesium ion is known to cause deterioration to portland cement concretes. A proposed mechanism for this deterioration process published previously involves an approximate 1:1 replacement of Ca ions by Mg ions in the crystalline phases of hydrated cement. The current study was undertaken to determine which ions, among magnesium, chloride, and sulfate, cause deterioration; whether their deleterious action is individual or interdependent; and to relate this mechanism of deterioration to the outlook for a 100-yr service life of concretes used in mass placements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Loss of Ca ion by cement pastes was found to be strongly related to the concentration of Mg ion in simulated ground-water solutions in which the paste samples were aged. This was true of both salt- containing and conventional cement pastes. No other ion in the solutions exerted a strong effect on Ca loss. Ca ion left first from calcium hydroxide in the pastes, depleting all calcium hydroxide by 60 days. Some calcium silicate hydrate remained even after 90 days in the solutions with the highest concentration of Mg ion, while the paste samples deteriorated noticeably. The results indicated a mechanism that involves dissolution of Ca phases and transport of Ca ions to the surface of the sample, followed by formation of Mg-bearing phases at this reaction surface rather than directly by substitution within the microstructure of hydrated cement. Given that calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate are the principal strength-giving phases of hydrated cement, this mechanism indicates the likelihood of significant loss of integrity of a concrete exposed to Mg-bearing ground water at the WIPP. The rate of deterioration ultimately will depend on Mg-ion concentration, the microstructure materials of the concrete exposed to that groundwater, and the availability of brine.

  6. Improving transesterification acitvity of CaO with hydration technique.

    PubMed

    Yoosuk, Boonyawan; Udomsap, Parncheewa; Puttasawat, Buppa; Krasae, Pawnprapa

    2010-05-01

    An efficient technique for increasing the transesterification activity of CaO obtained from calcination of CaCO(3) was proposed in order to make them highly suitable for use as heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production. CaO was refluxed in water followed by the synthesis of the oxide from hydroxide species. The characterization results indicate that this procedure substantially increases both the specific surface area and the amount of basic site. Hydration and subsequent calcination also generates a new calcium oxide with less crystalline. Transesterification of palm olein was used to determine the activity of catalysts to show that the decomposed-hydrated CaO exhibits higher catalytic activity than CaO generated from calcination of CaCO(3). The methyl ester content was enhanced 18.4 wt.%. PMID:20089395

  7. 40 CFR 721.2076 - D-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium potassium sodium salt. 721.2076 Section 721...-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium potassium sodium... identified as D-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium...

  8. Crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate and calcium sulfite hemihydrate from synthetic flue gas desulfurization solutions: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Trofe, T.W.; Fishman, V.A.; Meserole, F.B.

    1986-10-01

    The precipitation of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO/sub 4/.2H/sub 2/O) and calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO/sub 3/.1/2H/sub 2/O) from high, up to 240,000 mg/L, total dissolved solids (TDS) solutions was studied at 50/sup 0/C. The solutions were selected to cover a range of solution compositions of magnesium, calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate. Precipitation rates along with crystal habit and size changes were measured to determine the effects of these dissolved species as compared to dilute solution conditions. Calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum) precipitation rate was accelerated in the high TDS solutions, especially those containing chloride ion. Alternatively, calcium sulfite hemihydrate precipitation rate was found to be faster in high sulfate ion containing solutions. Sodium ion appears to produce gypsum crystals more columnar in habit while solutions containing high amounts of calcium produced very lamellar gypsum crystals. Solutions containing magnesium produced acicular gypsum crystals. Calcium sulfite hemihydrate solids precipitated from solutions containing high sulfate concentrations were rod shaped and globular as compared to the lamellar calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals precipitated from high chloride and dilute solution liquors. Calcium sulfate-calcium sulfite solid solutions were characterized using infrared spectroscopy. Ion scavenging of Na, Mg, and Cl by gypsum and calcium sulfite solids precipitated from these high TDS solutions was also investigated. 10 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

  9. 40 CFR 721.2076 - D-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium potassium sodium salt. 721.2076 Section 721...-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium potassium sodium... potassium sodium salt (PMN P-00-7; CAS No.125005-87-0) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow. PMID:17806883

  11. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA < 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is larger than the corresponding PA, while for an amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  12. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  13. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David R; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  14. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  15. The hydration of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D; Paddon, J M; Crisp, S

    1979-03-01

    A study was made of the hydration of dental cements, water being classified as "non-evaporable" and "evaporable". The ratio of these two types of water was found to vary greatly among different cement types, being lesser in zinc oxide and ionic polymer cements and greater in ion-leachable glass and phosphoric acid cements. The cement with the least "non-evaporable" water, i.e., showing least hydration (the zinc polycarboxylate cement), had the lowest strength and modulus and the greatest deformation at failure. A linear relationship was found to exist between strength and the degree of hydration of dental cements. All the cements were found to become more highly hydrated and stronger as they aged. PMID:284040

  16. Conformation and hydration of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y K

    1991-07-01

    Conformational free energy calculations using an empirical potential (ECEPP/2) and the hydration shell model were carried out on the neutral, acidic, zwitterionic, and basic forms of aspartame in the hydrated state. The results indicate that as the molecule becomes more charged, the number of low energy conformations becomes smaller and the molecule becomes less flexible. The calculated free energies of hydration of charged aspartames show that hydration has a significant effect on the conformation in solution. Only two feasible conformations were found for the zwitterionic form, and these are consistent with the conformations deduced from NMR and X-ray diffraction experiments. The calculated free energy difference between these two conformations was 1.25 kcal/mol. The less favored of the two solvated conformations can be expected to be stabilized by hydrophobic interaction of the phenyl groups in the crystal.

  17. Sulfate resistance of high calcium fly ash concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhole, Rajaram

    Sulfate attack is one of the mechanisms which can cause deterioration of concrete. In general, Class C fly ash mixtures are reported to provide poor sulfate resistance. Fly ashes, mainly those belonging to the Class C, were tested as per the ASTM C 1012 procedure to evaluate chemical sulfate resistance. Overall the Class C fly ashes showed poor resistance in the sulfate environment. Different strategies were used in this research work to improve the sulfate resistance of Class C fly ash mixes. The study revealed that some of the strategies such as use of low W/CM (water to cementing materials by mass ratio), silica fume or ultra fine fly ash, high volumes of fly ash and, ternary or quaternary mixes with suitable supplementary cementing materials, can successfully improve the sulfate resistance of the Class C fly ash mixes. Combined sulfate attack, involving physical and chemical action, was studied using sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate solutions. The specimens were subjected to wetting-drying cycles and temperature changes. These conditions were found to accelerate the rate of degradation of concrete placed in a sodium sulfate environment. W/CM was found to be the main governing factor in providing sulfate resistance to mixes. Calcium sulfate did not reveal damage as a result of mainly physical action. Characterization of the selected fly ashes was undertaken by using SEM, XRD and the Rietveld analysis techniques, to determine the relation between the composition of fly ashes and resistance to sulfate attack. The chemical composition of glass represented on the ternary diagram was the main factor which had a significant influence on the sulfate resistance of fly ash mixtures. Mixes prepared with fly ashes containing significant amounts of vulnerable crystalline phases offered poor sulfate resistance. Comparatively, fly ash mixes containing inert crystalline phases such as quartz, mullite and hematite offered good sulfate resistance. The analysis of hydrated lime

  18. Test Your Sodium Smarts

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may be surprised to learn how much sodium is in many foods. Sodium, including sodium chloride ... foods with little or no salt. Test your sodium smarts by answering these 10 questions about which ...

  19. Observation directe de la croissance d'hydrosilicate de calcium sur des surfaces d'alité et de silice par microscopie à force atomique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauffinet, Sandrine; Finot, Éric; Lesniewska, Eric; Nonat, André

    1998-08-01

    Direct observation of the growth of calcium silicate hydrates, the tricalcium silicate hydration products, at the solid-solution interface were performed by atomic force microscopy. The covering of the surface of alite or silica by a three-dimensional oriented aggregation of nano particles of calcium silicate hydrate is always observed whatever the sample. All observations and quantifications made on calcium silicate growth at the submicronic level are in agreement with the data deduced from the study of the system evolution at the macroscopic level.

  20. Anti-Adhesive Behaviors between Solid Hydrate and Liquid Aqueous Phase Induced by Hydrophobic Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Min, Juwon; Baek, Seungjun; Somasundaran, P; Lee, Jae W

    2016-09-20

    This study introduces an "anti-adhesive force" at the interface of solid hydrate and liquid solution phases. The force was induced by the presence of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles or one of the common anti-agglomerants (AAs), sorbitan monolaurate (Span 20), at the interface. The anti-adhesive force, which is defined as the maximum pushing force that does not induce the formation of a capillary bridge between the cyclopentane (CP) hydrate particle and the aqueous solution, was measured using a microbalance. Both hydrophobic silica nanoparticles and Span 20 can inhibit adhesion between the CP hydrate probe and the aqueous phase because silica nanoparticles have an aggregative property at the interface, and Span 20 enables the hydrate surface to be wetted with oil. Adding water-soluble sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the nanoparticle system cannot affect the aggregative property or the distribution of silica nanoparticles at the interface and, thus, cannot change the anti-adhesive effect. However, the combined system of Span 20 and SDS dramatically reduces the interfacial tension: emulsion drops were formed at the interface without any energy input and were adsorbed on the CP hydrate surface, which can cause the growth of hydrate particles. Silica nanoparticles have a good anti-adhesive performance with a relatively smaller dosage and are less influenced by the presence of molecular surfactants; consequently, these nanoparticles may have a good potential for hydrate inhibition as AAs. PMID:27564571

  1. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  2. Low sodium diet (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, or ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, or ...

  3. Effect of calcium on the physical properties of stirred probiotic yogurt.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, L; Restuccia, C; Deeth, H C

    2008-11-01

    The effect of calcium on the viscosity, firmness, and smoothness, as determined by extent of nodulation, of stirred probiotic yogurt produced by bacterial fermentation was investigated. Standardized milk for yogurt manufacture was prepared, and calcium was added or removed from the system. Calcium was added as Ca(2+) in the form of CaCl(2) (up to 13.6 mM) or nonionic calcium as Gadocal-K (calcium potassium citrate; up to 49.8 mM). Calcium was removed by chelating with sodium citrate (up to 16 mM) or by cation exchange with Amberlite IR-120 plus (sodium form) resin (up to 10 g/L). Calcium chloride and sodium citrate were added either before or after heat treatment of milk, and nonionic calcium was added before heat treatment. Calcium removal by ion exchange was performed before heat treatment. Neither Ca(2+) addition nor removal by chelation with citrate resulted in stirred yogurt with viscosity, firmness, and smoothness superior to those of the control yogurt, whereas addition of 49.8 mM nonionic calcium and removal of calcium (5.6 mM or ~10% of total calcium) by cation exchange improved the firmness and viscosity without affecting yogurt smoothness. The study identified Gadocal-K as a possible source of calcium fortification of stirred yogurt without loss of texture.

  4. Impacts of Hydrate Pore Habit on Physical Properties of Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Y.; Dai, S.; Choi, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments, to a large extent, are governed by the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. For sediments containing the same amount of hydrates, their overall physical properties may vary several orders of magnitude depending on hydrate pore habit. We investigate the interplay among hydrate formation methods, hydrate pore habits, and fundamental physical properties of hydrate bearing sediments. We have developed a new method to synthesize noncementing hydrate in sands, a multi-properties characterization chamber to test the hydrate bearing sediments, and pore network models to simulate fluid flow processes in hydrate bearing sediments. We have found that (1) the growth pattern of hydrate crystal in the pore spaces of water saturated sediments is dominated by the relative magnitude of the capillary force (between hydrate crystal and pore fluid) and the skeleton force, which will result in pore-filling or grain-displacing type of hydrate pore character; (2) the existing capillary tube models of water permeability in hydrate bearing sediments are sensitive to pore geometry and hydrate pore habit; and (3) preliminary CT results suggest that hydrate nucleation in partially water saturated sands tends to agglomerate in patches, rather than in an uniformly-distributed contact-cementing morphology. Additional CT results with a small amount of fines (5wt%) and visualization via micro-CT of hydrate pore habits in sediments using different hydrate formation methods will be discussed.

  5. In-situ early-age hydration study of sulfobelite cements by synchrotron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez-Pinazo, G.; Cuesta, A.; García-Maté, M.; Santacruz, I.; Losilla, E.R.; Fauth, F.; Aranda, M.A.G.; De la Torre, A.G.

    2014-02-15

    Eco-friendly belite calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement hydration behavior is not yet well understood. Here, we report an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study for the first hours of hydration of BCSA cements. Rietveld quantitative phase analysis has been used to establish the degree of reaction (α). The hydration of a mixture of ye'elimite and gypsum revealed that ettringite formation (α ∼ 70% at 50 h) is limited by ye'elimite dissolution. Two laboratory-prepared BCSA cements were also studied: non-active-BCSA and active-BCSA cements, with β- and α′{sub H}-belite as main phases, respectively. Ye'elimite, in the non-active-BCSA system, dissolves at higher pace (α ∼ 25% at 1 h) than in the active-BCSA one (α ∼ 10% at 1 h), with differences in the crystallization of ettringite (α ∼ 30% and α ∼ 5%, respectively). This behavior has strongly affected subsequent belite and ferrite reactivities, yielding stratlingite and other layered phases in non-active-BCSA. The dissolution and crystallization processes are reported and discussed in detail. -- Highlights: •Belite calcium sulfoaluminate cements early hydration mechanism has been determined. •Belite hydration strongly depends on availability of aluminum hydroxide. •Orthorhombic ye’elimite dissolved at a higher pace than cubic one. •Ye’elimite larger reaction degree yields stratlingite formation by belite reaction. •Rietveld method quantified gypsum, anhydrite and bassanite dissolution rates.

  6. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  7. Hydration and temperature in tennis - a practical review.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Mark S

    2006-01-01

    Competitive tennis is typically played in warm and hot environments. Because hypohydration will impair tennis performance and increases the risk of heat injury, consumption of appropriate fluid levels is necessary to prevent dehydration and enhance performance. The majority of research in this area has focused on continuous aerobic activity - unlike tennis, which has average points lasting less than ten seconds with rest periods dispersed between each work period. For this reason, hydration and temperature regulation methods need to be specific to the activity. Tennis players can sweat more than 2.5 L·h(-1) and replace fluids at a slower rate during matches than in practice. Latter stages of matches and tournaments are when tennis players are more susceptible to temperature and hydration related problems. Sodium (Na(+)) depletion, not potassium (K(+)), is a key electrolyte in tennis related muscle cramps. However, psychological and competitive factors also contribute. CHO drinks have been shown to promote fluid absorption to a greater degree than water alone, but no performance benefits have been shown in tennis players in short matches. It is advisable to consume a CHO beverage if practice or matches are scheduled longer than 90-120 minutes. Key PointsAlthough substantial research has been performed on temperature and hydration concerns in aerobic activities, there is little information with regard to tennis performance and safetyTennis athletes should be on an individualized hydration schedule, consuming greater than 200ml of fluid every changeover (approximately 15 minutes).Optimum hydration and temperature regulation will reduce the chance of tennis related muscle cramps and performance decrements. PMID:24198676

  8. Hydration and temperature in tennis - a practical review.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Mark S

    2006-03-01

    Competitive tennis is typically played in warm and hot environments. Because hypohydration will impair tennis performance and increases the risk of heat injury, consumption of appropriate fluid levels is necessary to prevent dehydration and enhance performance. The majority of research in this area has focused on continuous aerobic activity - unlike tennis, which has average points lasting less than ten seconds with rest periods dispersed between each work period. For this reason, hydration and temperature regulation methods need to be specific to the activity. Tennis players can sweat more than 2.5 L·h(-1) and replace fluids at a slower rate during matches than in practice. Latter stages of matches and tournaments are when tennis players are more susceptible to temperature and hydration related problems. Sodium (Na(+)) depletion, not potassium (K(+)), is a key electrolyte in tennis related muscle cramps. However, psychological and competitive factors also contribute. CHO drinks have been shown to promote fluid absorption to a greater degree than water alone, but no performance benefits have been shown in tennis players in short matches. It is advisable to consume a CHO beverage if practice or matches are scheduled longer than 90-120 minutes. Key PointsAlthough substantial research has been performed on temperature and hydration concerns in aerobic activities, there is little information with regard to tennis performance and safetyTennis athletes should be on an individualized hydration schedule, consuming greater than 200ml of fluid every changeover (approximately 15 minutes).Optimum hydration and temperature regulation will reduce the chance of tennis related muscle cramps and performance decrements.

  9. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  10. Making solutions from hydrated compounds.

    PubMed

    Adams, Dany Spencer

    2008-05-01

    INTRODUCTIONSolution making typically involves dissolving dry chemicals in water or other specified solvent. The amount of chemical to be added to a solvent depends on the final concentration or molarity (M) needed for the finished solution and the total amount in liters (L) of solution required. However, some chemicals come with water molecules attached. The molecular weight (MW) of such compounds, listed as formula weight (FW) on the bottle, includes the mass of the water. Whenever you would use the MW of an unhydrated compound in calculations, use instead the MW of the hydrated compound. If a recipe tells how many grams to use of the unhydrated compound, determine the target concentration and then calculate the grams to use of hydrated compound. When using a hydrated compound, the attached water molecules contribute water to the solution, potentially diluting the final concentration (if the solvent is water). Therefore, you must account for the contribution of water from the hydrated compound when determining the volume of solvent (water) to add. This article describes the calculations involved in making solutions from hydrated compounds.

  11. Herbal extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata inhibit growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V. S.; Parekh, B. B.; Joshi, M. J.; Vaidya, A. B.

    2005-02-01

    A large number of people in this world are suffering from urinary stone problem. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) containing stones (calculi) are commonly found. In the present study, COM crystals were grown by a double diffusion gel growth technique using U-tubes. The gel was prepared from hydrated sodium metasilicate solution. The gel framework acts like a three-dimensional crucible in which the crystal nuclei are delicately held in the position of their formation, and nutrients are supplied for the growth. This technique can be utilized as a simplified screening static model to study the growth, inhibition and dissolution of urinary stones in vitro. The action of putative litholytic medicinal plants, Tribulus terrestris Linn. ( T.t) and Bergenia ligulata Linn. ( B.l.), has been studied in the growth of COM crystals. Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata are commonly used as herbal medicines for urinary calculi in India. To verify the inhibitive effect, aqueous extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata were added along with the supernatant solutions. The growth was measured and compared, with and without the aqueous extracts. Inhibition of COM crystal growth was observed in the herbal extracts. Maximum inhibition was observed in Bergenia ligulata followed by Tribulus terrestris. The results are discussed.

  12. Dietary sodium intake and arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Dumler, Francis

    2009-01-01

    We sought to summarize major recent studies in the field of dietary sodium intake and arterial blood pressure, and discuss the following trials. INTERSALT: Sodium intake correlates with the rise in blood pressure with age, but not with the prevalence of hypertension. The population study identified a minimal impact of sodium intake on blood pressure (0.9 mm Hg/10 mmol difference in salt intake). DASH: This diet induced significant reductions in blood pressure compared with the control diet. Further decreases were observed with DASH and a 50 mmol/day sodium intake. VANGUARD: Blood pressure was inversely related to urinary potassium, calcium and magnesium but not to sodium excretion. TONE: Cardiovascular events were highest in the usual care group (83%) and lowest in the sodium reduction-plus-weight loss group (56%). META-ANALYSIS: A systematic review of 11 long-term controlled randomized trials reported a small decrease (1.1 mm Hg) in median systolic but not diastolic blood pressure with a reduced dietary sodium intake. In conclusion, (1) sodium restriction in hypertensive patients reduces blood pressure, and (2) the long-term impact of reduced salt intake on blood pressure, mortality, and morbidity remains to be defined.

  13. Intracellular calcium measurements with arsenazo III during cyclic AMP injections into molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Hockberger, P; Connor, J A

    1983-02-18

    Injections of cyclic adenosine monophosphate into molluscan neurons often produce a transient membrane depolarization. By using the calcium indicator dye arsenazo III, it was found that cyclic nucleotide injections into neurons of Archidoris montereyensis resulted in elevation of internal calcium concentrations. However, this was demonstrated to be a secondary consequence of an induced increase in membrane sodium permeability, and not due to any direct effect of cyclic adenosine monophosphate on cellular calcium influx or internal calcium regulating processes.

  14. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  15. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  16. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  17. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  18. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  19. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this “liquid stone” gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm3) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)1.65(SiO2)(H2O)1.75, also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking. PMID:19805265

  20. Hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

    PubMed

    Abel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles such as hydrated ions and transient hydrated electrons, the simplest anionic reducing agents in water, and the special hydronium and hydroxide ions at water interfaces play an important role in many fields of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, radiation chemistry, and biology, as well as biochemistry. This article focuses on these species near hydrophobic interfaces of water, such as the air or vacuum interface of water or water protein/membrane interfaces. Ions at interfaces as well as solvated electrons have been reviewed frequently during the past decade. Although all species have been known for some time with seemingly familiar features, recently the picture in all cases became increasingly diffuse rather than clearer. The current account gives a critical state-of-the art overview of what is known and what remains to be understood and investigated about hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

  1. Rheology of hydrate forming emulsions.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Jorge; Karanjkar, Prasad U; Lee, Jae W; Morris, Jeffrey F

    2010-07-20

    Results are reported on an experimental study of the rheology of hydrate-forming water-in-oil emulsions. Density-matched concentrated emulsions were quenched by reducing the temperature and an irreversible transition was observed where the viscosity increased dramatically. The hydrate-forming emulsions have characteristic times for abrupt viscosity change dependent only on the temperature, reflecting the importance of the effect of subcooling. Mechanical transition of hydrate-free water-in-oil emulsions may require longer times and depends on the shear rate, occurring more rapidly at higher rates but with significant scatter which is characterized through a probabilistic analysis. This rate dependence together with dependence on subcooling reflects the importance of hydrodynamic forces to bring drops or particles together.

  2. Carbonation Behavior of Pure Cement Hydrates under Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Conditions - 12199

    SciTech Connect

    Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi; Sawada, Kayo; Hertz, Audrey; Charton, Frederic

    2012-07-01

    Carbonation of cement-based waste forms using a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) is a developing technology for the waste immobilization of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes. However, the detail carbonation behaviors of cement matrices under the SCCO{sub 2} condition are unknown, since cement matrices forms very complex phases. In this study, in order to clarify the crystal phases, we synthesized pure cement hydrate phases as each single phases; portlandite (Ca(OH){sub 2}), ettringite (Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH){sub 12}.26H{sub 2}O), and calcium silicate hydrate (n CaO---m SiO{sub 2} ---x H{sub 2}O), using suspensions containing a stoichiometric mixture of chemical regents, and performed carbonation experiments using an autoclave under supercritical condition for carbon dioxide. The XRD results revealed both the carbonate phases and co-product phases depending on the initial hydrate phases; gypsum for Ettringite, amorphous or crystalline silica for calcium silicate hydroxide. Thermogravimetric analysis was also performed to understand carbonation behaviors quantitatively. According to the experimental results, it was found that the major reaction was formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) in all cases. However, the behaviors of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} content were quietly different: Portlandite was most reactive for carbonation under SCCO{sub 2} conditions, and the CO{sub 2} content per one molar CaO was ranged from 0.96 ∼ 0.98. In the case of Ettringite, the experiment indicates partial decomposition of ettringite phase during carbonation. Ettringite was comparatively stable even under the SCCO{sub 2} conditions. Therefore, a part of ettringite remained and formed similar phases after the ettringite carbonation. The CO{sub 2} content for ettringite showed almost constant values around 0.86 ∼ 0.87. In the case of calcium silicate hydrate, the carbonation behavior was significantly influenced by the condition of SCCO{sub 2

  3. The geochemical evolution of aqueous sodium in the Black Creek Aquifer, Horry and Georgetown counties, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zack, Allen L.; Roberts, Ivan

    1988-01-01

    The Black Creek aquifer contains dilute seawater near the North Carolina State line, probably the result of incomplete flushing of ancient seawater. Data do not indicate that the dilute seawater has migrated toward areas of fresh ground-water withdrawals. The concentration of chloride in ground-water samples ranges from 5 to 720 milligrams per liter and that of sodium from 160 to 690 milligrams per liter. Ion-exchange reactions (sodium for calcium and fluoride for hydroxyl) occur with the calcium carbonate dissolution reaction which produces calcium, bicarbonate, and hydroxyl ions. The reaction sequence and stoichiometry result in an aqueous solution in which the sum of bicarbonate and chloride equivalents per liter is equal to the equivalents per liter of sodium. Calcium ions are exchanged for sodium ions derived from sodium-rich clays upgradient of the dilute seawater. The cation-exchange reaction equilibrates at a sodium concentration of 280 milligrams per liter. Amounts of sodium greater than 280 milligrams per liter are contributed from dilute seawater. The cation-exchange reaction approaches an equilibrium which represents a mass-action limit in terms of the ratio of sodium to calcium in solution versus the ratio of exchangeable sodium to calcium on clay surfaces. Where the limit of calcium carbonate solubility is approached and dissolution ceases, some precipitation of calcite probably takes place. The dissolution of calcite exposes fossil shark teeth which release fluoride ions to the ground water through anion exchange with aqueous hydroxyl ions.

  4. Effect of hydration on the dielectric properties of C-S-H gel.

    PubMed

    Cerveny, Silvina; Arrese-Igor, Silvia; Dolado, Jorge S; Gaitero, Juan J; Alegría, Angel; Colmenero, Juan

    2011-01-21

    The behavior of water dynamics confined in hydrated calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel has been investigated using broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS; 10(-2)-10(6) Hz) in the low-temperature range (110-250 K). Different water contents in C-S-H gel were explored (from 6 to 15 wt%) where water remains amorphous for all the studied temperatures. Three relaxation processes were found by BDS (labeled 1 to 3 from the fastest to the slowest), two of them reported here for the first time. We show that a strong change in the dielectric relaxation of C-S-H gel occurs with increasing hydration, especially at a hydration level in which a monolayer of water around the basic units of cement materials is predicted by different structural models. Below this hydration level both processes 2 and 3 have an Arrhenius temperature dependence. However, at higher hydration level, a non-Arrhenius behavior temperature dependence for process 3 over the whole accessible temperature range and, a crossover from low-temperature Arrhenius to high-temperature non-Arrhenius behavior for process 2 are observed. Characteristics of these processes will be discussed in this work.

  5. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  6. Natural Gas Hydrates Update 1998-2000

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    Significant events have transpired on the natural gas hydrate research and development front since "Future Supply Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates" appeared in Natural Gas 1998 Issues and Trends and in the Potential Gas Committee's 1998 biennial report.

  7. Physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, W. F.; Santamarina, J. C.; Cortes, D. D.; Dugan, B.; Espinoza, D. N.; Germaine, J.; Jang, J.; Jung, J. W.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Shin, H.; Soga, K.; Winters, W. J.; Yun, T.-S.

    2009-12-01

    Methane gas hydrates, crystalline inclusion compounds formed from methane and water, are found in marine continental margin and permafrost sediments worldwide. This article reviews the current understanding of phenomena involved in gas hydrate formation and the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments. Formation phenomena include pore-scale habit, solubility, spatial variability, and host sediment aggregate properties. Physical properties include thermal properties, permeability, electrical conductivity and permittivity, small-strain elastic P and S wave velocities, shear strength, and volume changes resulting from hydrate dissociation. The magnitudes and interdependencies of these properties are critically important for predicting and quantifying macroscale responses of hydrate-bearing sediments to changes in mechanical, thermal, or chemical boundary conditions. These predictions are vital for mitigating borehole, local, and regional slope stability hazards; optimizing recovery techniques for extracting methane from hydrate-bearing sediments or sequestering carbon dioxide in gas hydrate; and evaluating the role of gas hydrate in the global carbon cycle.

  8. Natural gas hydrates; vast resource, uncertain future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring icelike solids in which water molecules trap gas molecules in a cagelike structure known as a clathrate. Although many gases form hydrates in nature, methane hydrate is by far the most common; methane is the most abundant natural gas. The volume of carbon contained in methane hydrates worldwide is estimated to be twice the amount contained in all fossil fuels on Earth, including coal.

  9. Calcination of calcium carbonate and blend therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, W.A.; Dziuk, J.J. Jr.

    1989-05-09

    This patent describes a method for the accelerated calcination of a calcium carbonate material. It comprises: heating the calcium carbonate material to a temperature and for a time sufficient to calcine the material to the degree desired while in the presence of a fused salt catalyst consisting of particles having a size above or below that of the calcium carbonate material; the catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula M{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. CaCO{sub 3}-CaO-H{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}}, wherein M is an alkali metal selected from sodium or potassium and x is 0 to 1 and the salt is formed by fusing M{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} in a molar ratio of about 1:2 to 2:1 when the alkali metal is sodium and about 1:1 to 2:1 when the alkali metal is potassium. This patent also describes a blend adapted to be heated to form CaO. It comprises: a calcium carbonate material and a catalyst consisting of particles having a size above or below that of the calcium carbonate material; the catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula M{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-CaCO{sub 3}CaO-H{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}}.

  10. Aqueous solubility of calcium L-lactate, calcium D-gluconate, and calcium D-lactobionate: importance of complex formation for solubility increase by hydroxycarboxylate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Vavrusova, Martina; Munk, Merete Bøgelund; Skibsted, Leif H

    2013-08-28

    Among the calcium hydroxycarboxylates important for cheese quality, D-lactobionate [Ksp = (7.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-3) mol(3) L(-3)] and L-lactate [Ksp = (5.8 ± 0.2) × 10(-3) mol(3) L(-3)] were found more soluble than D-gluconate [Ksp = (7.1 ± 0.2) × 10(-4) mol(3) L(-3)], as indicated by the solubility products determined electrochemically for aqueous 1.0 M NaCl at 25.0 °C. Still, solubility of calcium L-lactate increases by 45% in the presence of 0.50 M sodium D-gluconate and by 37% in the presence of 0.50 M sodium D-lactobionate, while solubility of calcium D-gluconate increases by 66 and 85% in the presence of 0.50 M sodium L-lactate and 0.50 M sodium D-lactobionate, respectively, as determined by complexometric titration. Sodium L-lactate and sodium D-gluconate have only little influence on solubility of calcium D-lactobionate. The increased solubility is described quantitatively by calcium binding to D-gluconate (K1 = 14 ± 3 mol(-1) L) in 1.0 M NaCl at 25 °C, D-lactobionate (K1 = 11 ± 2 mol(-1) L), and L-lactate (K1 = 8 ± 2 mol(-1) L), as indicated by the association constants determined electrochemically. In mixed hydroxycarboxylate solutions, calcium binding is quantitatively described by the geometric mean of the individual association constants for both aqueous 1.0 and 0.20 M NaCl, indicating a 1:1 stoichiometry for complex formation.

  11. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane hydrate...

  12. Low sodium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low sodium level is a condition in which the amount of sodium (salt) in the blood is lower than normal. The ... Sodium is found mostly in the body fluids outside the cells. It is very important for maintaining ...

  13. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago. PMID:17768978

  14. Attraction between hydrated hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-08-01

    According to common knowledge, hydrophilic surfaces repel via hydration forces while hydrophobic surfaces attract, but mounting experimental evidence suggests that also hydrophilic surfaces can attract. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations at prescribed water chemical potential we study the crossover from hydration repulsion to hydrophobic attraction for planar polar surfaces of varying stiffness and hydrogen-bonding capability. Rescaling the partial charges of the polar surface groups, we cover the complete spectrum from very hydrophobic surfaces (characterized by contact angles θ ≃ 135°) to hydrophilic surfaces exhibiting complete wetting (θ = 0°). Indeed, for a finite range θadh < θ < 90°, we find a regime where hydrophilic surfaces attract at sub-nanometer separation and stably adhere without intervening water. The adhesive contact angle θadh depends on surface type and lies in the range 65° < θadh < 80°, in good agreement with experiments. Analysis of the total number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed by water and surface groups rationalizes this crossover between hydration repulsion and hydrophilic attraction in terms of a subtle balance: Highly polar surfaces repel because of strongly bound hydration water, less polar hydrophilic surfaces attract because water-water HBs are preferred over surface-water HBs. Such solvent reorganization forces presumably underlie also other important phenomena, such as selective ion adsorption to interfaces as well as ion pair formation.

  15. Strong covalent hydration of terephthalaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Baymak, Melek S; Vercoe, Kellie L; Zuman, Petr

    2005-11-24

    Spectrophotometric and electroanalytical studies indicate that one of the formyl groups of terephthalaldehyde in aqueous solution is present in about 23% as a geminal diol. Stronger covalent hydration of CHO in terephthalaldehyde than in p-nitrobenzaldehyde is attributed to a strong resonance interaction between the two formyl groups.

  16. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  17. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1968-01-01

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  18. Intragastric calcium infusions support flavor preference learning by calcium-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, Michael G

    2002-08-01

    We investigated whether rats can associate the flavor of ingested solutions with the postingestive delivery of calcium. In one series of experiments using the "electronic esophagus" preparation, calcium-deprived rats received pairs of daily one-bottle training trials in which they received intragastric infusions whenever they ingested an arbitrary flavor of Kool Aid. Rats later preferred the flavor associated with infusions of 50 mM CaCl(2) or 50 mM calcium lactate (CaLa), but not with water, 10, 100 or 250 mM CaCl(2) or 100 mM sodium lactate (NaLa). In another experiment, rats had simultaneous access to two arbitrary flavors, ingestion of one of which produced intragastric infusion of 50 mM CaCl(2), 75 mM NaCl or water. Only the rats given 50 mM CaCl(2) developed a preference for the flavor associated with the infusion. The preference for calcium infusions was not as large as that seen for orally ingested calcium. Nevertheless, these results show that 50 mM calcium infusions are rewarding to calcium-deprived rats. They thus suggest that rats can associate flavor ingestion with the postingestive benefits of consuming calcium. PMID:12126988

  19. Idiopathic hypercalciuria and formation of calcium renal stones.

    PubMed

    Coe, Fredric L; Worcester, Elaine M; Evan, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    The most common presentation of nephrolithiasis is idiopathic calcium stones in patients without systemic disease. Most stones are primarily composed of calcium oxalate and form on a base of interstitial apatite deposits, known as Randall's plaque. By contrast some stones are composed largely of calcium phosphate, as either hydroxyapatite or brushite (calcium monohydrogen phosphate), and are usually accompanied by deposits of calcium phosphate in the Bellini ducts. These deposits result in local tissue damage and might serve as a site of mineral overgrowth. Stone formation is driven by supersaturation of urine with calcium oxalate and brushite. The level of supersaturation is related to fluid intake as well as to the levels of urinary citrate and calcium. Risk of stone formation is increased when urine citrate excretion is <400 mg per day, and treatment with potassium citrate has been used to prevent stones. Urine calcium levels >200 mg per day also increase stone risk and often result in negative calcium balance. Reduced renal calcium reabsorption has a role in idiopathic hypercalciuria. Low sodium diets and thiazide-type diuretics lower urine calcium levels and potentially reduce the risk of stone recurrence and bone disease. PMID:27452364

  20. Enhanced osteoconductivity of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite by system instability.

    PubMed

    Sang Cho, Jung; Um, Seung-Hoon; Su Yoo, Dong; Chung, Yong-Chae; Hye Chung, Shin; Lee, Jeong-Cheol; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-07-01

    The effect of substituting sodium for calcium on enhanced osteoconductivity of hydroxyapatite was newly investigated. Sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite was synthesized by reacting calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid with sodium nitrate followed by sintering. As a control, pure hydroxyapatite was prepared under identical conditions, but without the addition of sodium nitrate. Substitution of calcium with sodium in hydroxyapatite produced the structural vacancies for carbonate ion from phosphate site and hydrogen ion from hydroxide site of hydroxyapatite after sintering. The total system energy of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite with structural defects calculated by ab initio methods based on quantum mechanics was much higher than that of hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite was energetically less stable compared with hydroxyapatite. Indeed, sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite exhibited higher dissolution behavior of constituent elements of hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-buffered deionized water compared with hydroxyapatite, which directly affected low-crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate apatite forming capacity by increasing the degree of apatite supersaturation in SBF. Actually, sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite exhibited markedly improved low-crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate apatite forming capacity in SBF and noticeably higher osteoconductivity 4 weeks after implantation in calvarial defects of New Zealand white rabbits compared with hydroxyapatite. In addition, there were no statistically significant differences between hydroxyapatite and sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite on cytotoxicity as determined by BCA assay. Taken together, these results indicate that sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite with structural defects has promising potential for use as a bone grafting material due to its enhanced osteoconductivity compared with hydroxyapatite.