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Sample records for hydraulic conductivity technical

  1. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  2. Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements Barrow 2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich; Jil Geller

    2015-02-22

    Six individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, in May of 2013 as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE). Each core was drilled from a different location at varying depths. A few days after drilling, the cores were stored in coolers packed with dry ice and flown to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. 3-dimensional images of the cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner at 120kV. Hydraulic conductivity samples were extracted from these cores at LBNL Richmond Field Station in Richmond, CA, in February 2014 by cutting 5 to 8 inch segments using a chop saw. Samples were packed individually and stored at freezing temperatures to minimize any changes in structure or loss of ice content prior to analysis. Hydraulic conductivity was determined through falling head tests using a permeameter [ELE International, Model #: K-770B]. After approximately 12 hours of thaw, initial falling head tests were performed. Two to four measurements were collected on each sample and collection stopped when the applied head load exceeded 25% change from the original load. Analyses were performed between 2 to 3 times for each sample. The final hydraulic conductivity calculations were computed using methodology of Das et al., 1985.

  3. The hydraulic conductivity of chopped sorghum

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, M.H.; Reddell, D.L.; Sweeten, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity of water through chopped sweet sorghum at various packing densities and soaking times was measured using permeameters. Hydraulic conductivity decreased by two orders of magnitude as packing density increased from 400 to 897 kg/m/sup 3/. Soaking time had less effect on hydraulic conductivity, and the effect depended on packing density.

  4. Mathematical and geological approaches to minimizing the data requirements for statistical analysis of hydraulic conductivity. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, F.M.; Wilson, J.L.; Gutjahr, A.L.; Love, D.W.; Davis, J.M.; Lohmann, R.C.; Colarullo, S.J.; Gotkowitz, M.B.

    1992-12-01

    Field scale heterogeneity has been recognized as a dominant control on solute dispersion in groundwater. Numerous random field models exist for quantifying heterogeneity and its influence on solute transport. Minimizing data requirements in model selection and subsequent parameterization will be necessary for efficient application of quantitative models in contaminated subsurface environments. In this study, a detailed quantitative sedimentological study is performed to address the issue of incorporating geologic information into the geostatistical characterization process. A field air-minipermeameter is developed for rapid in-situ measurements. The field study conducted on an outcrop of fluvial/interfluvial deposits of the Pliocene- Pleistocene Sierra Ladrones Formation in the Albuquerque Basin of central New Mexico. Architectural element analysis is adopted for mapping and analysis of depositional environment. Geostatistical analysis is performed at two scales. At the architectural element scale, geostatistical analysis of assigned mean log-permeabilities of a 0.16 km{sup 2} peninsular region indicates that the directions of maximum and minimum correlation correspond to the directions of the large-scale depositional processes. At the facies scale, permeability is found to be adequately represented as a log-normal process. Log-permeability within individual lithofacies appears uncorrelated. The overall correlation structure at the facies scale is found to be a function of the mean log-permeability and spatial distribution of the individual lithofacies. Based on field observations of abrupt spatial changes in lithology and hydrologic properties, an algorithm for simulating multi-dimensional discrete Markov random fields. Finally, a conceptual model is constructed relating the information inferred from dimensional environment analysis to the various random fields of heterogeneity.

  5. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF ESSENTIALLY SATURATED PEAT

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R

    2008-02-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory measured the hydraulic conductivity of peat samples using method ASTM D4511-00. Four samples of peat were packed into 73mm diameter plastic tubes and saturated from the bottom up with water. The columns were packed with Premier ProMoss III TBK peat to a dry density of approximately 0.16 gm/cc (10 lb/ft3). One column was packed using oven dried peat and the other 3 were packed using as delivered peat. The oven dried sample was the most difficult to saturate. All of the peat samples expanded during saturation resulting in a sample length (L) that was longer than when the sample was initially packed. Table 1 contains information related to the column packing. After saturation the hydraulic conductivity test was conducted using the apparatus shown in Figure 1. Three of the samples were tested at 2 different flow conductions, 1 high and 1 low. Table 2 and Figure 2 contain the results of the hydraulic conductivity testing. Each test was run for a minimum of 40 minutes to allow the test conditions to stabilize. The hydraulic conductivity at the end of each test is reported as the hydraulic conductivity for that test. The hydraulic conductivity of the 4 peat samples is 0.0052 {+-} 0.0009 cm/sec. This result compares well with the hydraulic conductivity measured in the pilot scale peat bed after approximately 2 months of operation. The similarity in results between the dry pack sample and moist pack samples shows the moisture content at the time of packing had a minimal effect on the hydraulic conductivity. Additionally, similarity between the results shows the test is reproducible. The hydraulic conductivity results are similar to those reported by other tests of peat samples reported in the literature.

  6. Practical issues in imaging hydraulic conductivity through hydraulic tomography.

    PubMed

    Illman, Walter A; Craig, Andrew J; Liu, Xiaoyi

    2008-01-01

    Hydraulic tomography has been developed as an alternative to traditional geostatistical methods to delineate heterogeneity patterns in parameters such as hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (S(s)). During hydraulic tomography surveys, a large number of hydraulic head data are collected from a series of cross-hole tests in the subsurface. These head data are then used to interpret the spatial distribution of K and S(s) using inverse modeling. Here, we use the Sequential Successive Linear Estimator (SSLE) of Yeh and Liu (2000) to interpret synthetic pumping test data created through numerical simulations and real data generated in a laboratory sandbox aquifer to obtain the K tomograms. Here, we define "K tomogram" as an image of K distribution of the subsurface (or the inverse results) obtained via hydraulic tomography. We examine the influence of signal-to-noise ratio and biases on results using inverse modeling of synthetic and real cross-hole pumping test data. To accomplish this, we first show that the pumping rate, which affects the signal-to-noise ratio, and the order of data included into the SSLE algorithm both have large impacts on the quality of the K tomograms. We then examine the role of conditioning on the K tomogram and find that conditioning can improve the quality of the K tomogram, but can also impair it, if the data are of poor quality and conditioning data have a larger support volume than the numerical grid used to conduct the inversion. Overall, these results show that the quality of the K tomogram depends on the design of pumping tests, their conduct, the order in which they are included in the inverse code, and the quality as well as the support volume of additional data that are used in its computation.

  7. Estimating Tortuosity Coefficients Based on Hydraulic Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Grant R; McBean, Edward A; Feenstra, Stan

    2016-07-01

    While the tortuosity coefficient is commonly estimated using an expression based on total porosity, this relationship is demonstrated to not be applicable (and thus is often misapplied) over a broad range of soil textures. The fundamental basis for a correlation between the apparent diffusion tortuosity coefficient and hydraulic conductivity is demonstrated, although such a relationship is not typically considered. An empirical regression for estimating the tortuosity coefficient based on hydraulic conductivity for saturated, unconsolidated soil is derived based on results from 14 previously reported diffusion experiments performed with a broad range of soil textures. Analyses of these experimental results confirm that total porosity is a poor predictor for the tortuosity coefficient over a large range of soil textures. The apparent diffusion tortuosity coefficient is more reliably estimated based on hydraulic conductivity. PMID:27315019

  8. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhu, Jianting

    2010-05-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or capillary pressure) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have not been fully understood. This study developed an approach based on a conceptualization of combining the neural network based pedo-transfer function (PTF) results with the thin layer concept to explore the capillary pressure-dependent anisotropy in relation to soil texture and soil bulk density. The main objective is to examine how anisotropy characteristics are related to the relationships between hydraulic parameters and the basic soil attributes such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic parameters are correlated with the texture and bulk density based on the pedo-transfer function (PTF) results. It is demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior of the unsaturated soil anisotropy in relation to the capillary pressure is only observed when the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the shape parameter are both related to the mean particle diameter. When only one hydraulic parameter is related to the grain diameter or when both are not related to the same attribute simultaneously, the unsaturated soil anisotropy increases monotonically with the increasing capillary pressure head. Therefore, it is suggested that this behavior is mainly due to the coupled dependence of the layer saturated hydraulic conductivities and the shape factors on the texture and bulk density. The correlation between the soil grain diameter and bulk density decreases the anisotropy effects of the unsaturated layered soils. The study illustrates that the inter-relationships of soil texture, bulk density, and hydraulic properties may cause vastly different characteristics of anisotropic unsaturated soils.

  9. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    The unsaturated zone plays an extremely important hydrologic role that influences water quality and quantity, ecosystem function and health, the connection between atmospheric and terrestrial processes, nutrient cycling, soil development, and natural hazards such as flooding and landslides. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is one of the main properties considered to govern flow; however it is very difficult to measure accurately. Knowledge of the highly nonlinear relationship between unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) and volumetric water content is required for widely-used models of water flow and solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments is costly and time consuming, therefore use of models that estimate this property from more easily measured bulk-physical properties is common. In hydrologic studies, calculations based on property-transfer models informed by hydraulic property databases are often used in lieu of measured data from the site of interest. Reliance on database-informed predicted values with the use of neural networks has become increasingly common. Hydraulic properties predicted using databases may be adequate in some applications, but not others. This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K. The parameters that describe the K curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  10. Hydraulic conductivity of three geosynthetic clay liners

    SciTech Connect

    Estornell, P.; Daniel, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of three 2.9 sq m (32 sq ft) geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) was measured. Tests were performed on individual sheets of the GCLs, on overlapped pieces of GCLs, and on composite liners consisting of a punctured geomembrane overlying a GCL. Hydraulic conductives of two of the GCLs were in the range of 10 to the minus 10 10 to the minus 8 cm/s. No flow was measured through the third GCL, but the conductivity was obviously very low. The hydraulic conductivities of overlapped GCLs were about the same as those of the control samples with no overlap; an effective hydraulic seal developed along the overlaps in all the materials tested. Performance of the punctured geomembrane-GCL composites varied--performance was best when the punctured geomembrane was placed directly against bentonite and no geotextile separated the punctured geomembrane from the bentonite. For those GCLs with geotextiles on both sides, problems with migration of bentonite into the underlying drainage layer were encountered when inadequate filtration was provided. However, with a suitable filtration layer separating the drainage layer from the GCL, problems with migration of bentonite were liminated.

  11. Measuring Soil Hydraulic Conductivity With Microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.; Oneill, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Soil mapping for large or small areas done rapidly. Technique requires simple radiometric measurements of L-band (15 to 30 cm) and thermal infrared emissions from ground within 2 days after saturation of surface. Technique based on observation that correlation exists between L-band emissivity and hydraulic conductivity of soil.

  12. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF THREE GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydraulic conductivity of three 2.9 m2 (32 sq ft) geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) was measured. Tests were performed on individual sheets of the GCLs, on overlapped pieces of GCLs, and on composite liners consisting of a punctured geomembrane overlying a GCL. Hyd...

  13. Hydraulic conductivity of desiccated geosynthetic clay liners

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, B.T.; Daniel, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    Large-scale tests were performed to determine the effect of a cycle of wetting and drying on the hydraulic conductivity of several geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). The GCLs were covered with 0.6 m of pea gravel and permeated with water. After steady seepage had developed, the water was drained away, and the GCL was desiccated by circulating heated air through the overlying gravel. The drying caused severe cracking in the bentonite component of the GCLs. The GCLs were again permeated with water. As the cracked bentonite hydrated and swelled, the hydraulic conductivity slowly decreased from an initially high value. The long-term, steady value of hydraulic conductivity after the wetting and drying cycle was found to be essentially the same as the value for the undesiccated GCL. It is concluded that GCLs possess the ability to self-heal after a cycle of wetting and drying, which is important for applications in which there may be alternate wetting and drying of a hydraulic barrier (e.g. within a landfill final cover).

  14. Iterative method of finding hydraulic conductivity characteristics of soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysbaiuly, Bolatbek; Adamov, Abilmazhin

    2016-08-01

    The work considers an initial boundary value problem for a nonlinear equation of hydraulic conductivity. A method of finding a nonlinear diffusion coefficient is developed and hydraulic conductivity of soil moisture is found. Numerical calculations are conducted.

  15. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  16. Variation in reach-scale hydraulic conductivity of streambeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewardson, M. J.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Pella, H.; Thommeret, N.; Valette, L.; Grant, S. B.

    2016-04-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity is an important control on flow within the hyporheic zone, affecting hydrological, ecological, and biogeochemical processes essential to river ecosystem function. Despite many published field measurements, few empirical studies examine the drivers of spatial and temporal variations in streambed hydraulic conductivity. Reach-averaged hydraulic conductivity estimated for 119 surveys in 83 stream reaches across continental France, even of coarse bed streams, are shown to be characteristic of sand and finer sediments. This supports a model where processes leading to the accumulation of finer sediments within streambeds largely control hydraulic conductivity rather than the size of the coarse bed sediment fraction. After describing a conceptual model of relevant processes, we fit an empirical model relating hydraulic conductivity to candidate geomorphic and hydraulic drivers. The fitted model explains 72% of the deviance in hydraulic conductivity (and 30% using an external cross-validation). Reach hydraulic conductivity increases with the amplitude of bedforms within the reach, the bankfull channel width-depth ratio, stream power and upstream catchment erodibility but reduces with time since the last streambed disturbance. The correlation between hydraulic conductivity and time since a streambed mobilisation event is likely a consequence of clogging processes. Streams with a predominantly suspended load and less frequent streambed disturbances are expected to have a lower streambed hydraulic conductivity and reduced hyporheic fluxes. This study suggests a close link between streambed sediment transport dynamics and connectivity between surface water and the hyporheic zone.

  17. Investigation of Hydraulic Conductivity Coefficient for different Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifan, H.; Komaki, B.; Davari, K.

    2009-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is ability of water movement into saturation soil This parameter is used by irrigation and drainage projects. Parameters of soil texture, soil structure, salts, kind of fluid, soil temperature effect on hydraulic conductivity. This coefficient is measured by inverted auger hole, Guelph permeameter, falling head methods in over water table. This research was performed in research farms of Gorgan university. Soil texture was sandy loam, loam, clay loam. Hydraulic conductivity was between 0.5- 1.8 m/day. Keyword : Hydraulic conductivity, Inverted auger hole, Guelph, Fallin head, Gorgan

  18. Hydraulic Conductivity Fields: Gaussian or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Dogan, Mine; Van Dam, Remke L.; Hyndman, David W.; Benson, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) fields are used to parameterize groundwater flow and transport models. Numerical simulations require a detailed representation of the K field, synthesized to interpolate between available data. Several recent studies introduced high resolution K data (HRK) at the Macro Dispersion Experiment (MADE) site, and used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to delineate the main structural features of the aquifer. This paper describes a statistical analysis of these data, and the implications for K field modeling in alluvial aquifers. Two striking observations have emerged from this analysis. The first is that a simple fractional difference filter can have a profound effect on data histograms, organizing non-Gaussian ln K data into a coherent distribution. The second is that using GPR facies allows us to reproduce the significantly non-Gaussian shape seen in real HRK data profiles, using a simulated Gaussian ln K field in each facies. This illuminates a current controversy in the literature, between those who favor Gaussian ln K models, and those who observe non-Gaussian ln K fields. Both camps are correct, but at different scales. PMID:24415806

  19. Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

  20. Relating relative hydraulic and electrical conductivity in the unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawer, Chloe; Knight, Rosemary; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical modeling was used to generate pore-scale structures with different structural properties. They were partially saturated according to wetting and drainage regimes using morphological operations for a range of saturations. The hydraulic and electrical conductivities of the resulting partially saturated grain packs were numerically computed to produce relative hydraulic conductivity versus saturation and relative electrical conductivity versus saturation curves. The relative hydraulic conductivities were then compared to the relative electrical conductivities for the same saturations and it was found that relative hydraulic conductivity could be expressed as relative electrical conductivity to a power law exponent, β. This exponent β was not correlated to porosity, specific surface area, or tortuosity. It did change according to whether the soil was wetting or draining. However, a β value of 2.1 reproduced relative hydraulic conductivity from relative electrical conductivity with little added error. The effects of surface conduction on the observed power law relationship due to either low fluid electrical conductivity or increased clay content were analyzed. The relationship was found to hold for fluid conductivities typical of groundwater and for clay content of less than 5% if the clays were layered perpendicular to electrical flow. The relationship breaks down for electrical flow parallel to clay layers, which makes the choice of electrode arrangement important in cases where clay may be present. This relationship can be used with secondary pressure or saturation data to characterize a soil's hydraulic conductivity curve.

  1. Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

    2009-09-27

    Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

  2. Relationship between Anisotropy in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. Fred

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is saturation-dependent. Accurate characterization of soil anisotropy is very important in simulating flow and contaminant (e.g., radioactive nuclides in Hanford) transport. A recently developed tensorial connectivity-tortuosity (TCT) concept describes the hydraulic conductivity tensor of the unsaturated anisotropic soils as the product of a scalar variable, the symmetric connectivity tortuosity tensor, and the hydraulic conductivity tensor at saturation. In this study, the TCT model is used to quantify soil anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The TCT model can describe different types of soil anisotropy; e.g., the anisotropy coefficient, C, can be monotonically increase or decrease with saturation and can vary from greater than unity to less than unity and vice versa. Soil anisotropy is independent of soil water retention properties and can be characterized by the ratio of the saturated hydraulic conductivities and the difference of the tortuosity-connectivity coefficients in two directions. ln(C) is linearly proportional to ln(Se) with Se being the effective saturation. The log-linear relationship between C and Se allows the saturation-dependent anisotropy to be determined using linear regression with the measurements of the directional hydraulic conductivities at a minimum of two water content levels, of which one may be at full saturation. The model was tested using measurements of directional hydraulic conductivities.

  3. Numerical simulations of hydraulic redistribution across climates: The role of the root hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Juan C.; Kumar, Praveen

    2015-10-01

    Hydraulic redistribution, a process by which vegetation roots redistribute soil moisture, has been recognized as an important mechanism impacting several processes that regulate plant water uptake, energy and water partitioning, and biogeochemical cycling. We analyze how the magnitude of hydraulic redistribution varies across ecosystems that are exposed to different climates and seasonal patterns of incoming shortwave radiation and precipitation. Numerical simulation studies are performed over 10 Ameriflux sites, which show that hydraulic redistribution predictions are significantly influenced by the specified root hydraulic conductivities. We performed sensitivity analyses by considering expected ranges of root conductivities based on previous experimental studies, and found contrasting patterns in energy-limited and water-limited ecosystems. In energy-limited ecosystems, there is a threshold above which high root conductivities enhance hydraulic redistribution with no increase in transpiration, while in water-limited ecosystems increase in root conductivities was always associated with enhancements in both transpiration and hydraulic redistribution. Further we found differences in the magnitude and seasonality of hydraulic redistribution and transpiration across different climates, regulated by interplay between precipitation and transpiration. The annual hydraulic redistribution to transpiration flux ratio (HR/Tr) was significant in Mediterranean climates (HR/Tr ≈ 30%), and in the tropical humid climates (HR/Tr ≈ 15%). However, in the continental climates hydraulic redistribution occurs only during sporadic precipitation events throughout the summer resulting in lower annual magnitudes (HR/Tr < 5%). These results provide more insights for suitable implementation of numerical models to capture belowground processes in eco-hydrology, and enhance our understanding about the variability of hydraulic redistribution across different climates.

  4. DEPTH-AVERAGING EFFECTS ON HYDRAULIC HEAD FOR MEDIA WITH STOCHASTIC HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Vecchia, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity of a porous medium frequently is considered to be a single realization of a three-dimensional spatial stochastic process. The most common observation of flow in porous media are hydraulic-head measurements obtained from wells which are screened over extensive sections of the medium. These measurements represent, approximately, a one-dimensional spatial average of the actual three-dimensional head distribution, the actual head distribution being a stochastic process resulting from flow through a random hydraulic-conductivity field. This paper examines, via ensemble averages, the effect of such spatial averages of groundwater flow on the spatial autocovariance function for a simple, yet viable, stochastic model of a bounded medium. The model is taken to be three-dimensional flow in a medium that is bounded above and below and in which the hydraulic conductivity is a second-order stationary stochastic process.

  5. Hydraulic Conductivity of Residual Soil-Cement Mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindasamy, P.; Taha, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    In Malaysia, although there are several researches on engineering properties of residual soils, however study on the hydraulic conductivity properties of metasedimentary residual soils is still lacking. Construction of containment walls like slurry wall techniques can be achieved with hydraulic conductivity of approximately 5 x 10-7cm/sec. The objectives of the study were to determine the physical properties of metasedimentary residual soils and to determine the influence of 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% of cement on hydraulic conductivity parameters. The coefficient of hydraulic conductivity of the soil naturally and soil-cement mixtures were determined by using the falling head test. According to the test, the hydraulic conductivity of the original soil was 4.16 x 10-8 m/s. The value decreases to 3.89 x 10-8 m/s, 2.78 x 10-8 m/s then 6.83 x 10-9 m/s with the addition of 1%, 3% and 5% of cement additives, respectively. During the hydration process, cement hydrates is formed followed by the increase in pH value and Ca(OH)2 which will alter the modification of pores size and distribution. When the quantity of cement increases, the pores size decrease. But, the addition of 10% cement gives an increased hydraulic conductivity value to 2.78 x 10-8 m/s. With 10%, the pore size increase might due to flocculation and agglomeration reaction. The generated hydraulic conductivity values will indirectly become a guide in the preliminary soil cement stabilization to modify the properties of the soil to become more like the properties of a soft rock.1. Introduction

  6. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity in an alluvial system using temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Jasperse, J.; Seymour, D.; Constantz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Well water temperatures are often collected simultaneously with water levels; however, temperature data are generally considered only as a water quality parameter and are not utilized as an environmental tracer. In this paper, water levels and seasonal temperatures are used to estimate hydraulic conductivities in a stream-aquifer system. To demonstrate this method, temperatures and water levels are analyzed from six observation wells along an example study site, the Russian River in Sonoma County, California. The range in seasonal ground water temperatures in these wells varied from < 0.2??C in two wells to ???8??C in the other four wells from June to October 2000. The temperature probes in the six wells are located at depths between 3.5 and 7.1 m relative to the river channel. Hydraulic conductivities are estimated by matching simulated ground water temperatures to the observed ground water temperatures. An anisotropy of 5 (horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) generally gives the best fit to the observed temperatures. Estimated conductivities vary over an order of magnitude in the six locations analyzed. In some locations, a change in the observed temperature profile occurred during the study, most likely due to deposition of fine-grained sediment and organic matter plugging the streambed. A reasonable fit to this change in the temperature profile is obtained by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity in the simulations. This study demonstrates that seasonal ground water temperatures monitored in observation wells provide an effective means of estimating hydraulic conductivities in alluvial aquifers.

  7. Estimating Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity: Study the Effect of Tortuosity Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, Behzad; Abbasi, Fariborz

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity is one of the key soil hydraulic properties that, in one hand, is widely used in the studies of water and solute transport in soils, and on the other hand its direct measurement is time consuming and expensive. In this research, in order to study tortuosity factor (l) in the Burdine-Brooks-Corey (BBC hereafter), 59 soil samples from the GRIZZLY database were used. Using a sensitivity analysis, sensitive parameters of this model were determined. To study tortuosity factor, its different values e.g. 2, 1, 0.5, 0, -0.5, -1 and -2 were used in the estimation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The results of sensitivity analysis showed that BBC model is more sensitive to the saturated water content and pore size distribution index. Whereas, the BBC model is less sensitive to tortuosity factor and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The calculated statistical parameter SAE in estimation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity indicated that the BBC model error with l=2 is less than other values. The results also showed that tortuosity factor is linearly correlated with the power of BCC model with goodness of fit R2=0.96. Based on this approach, tortuosity factor was removed from BCC model, and a new empirical equation was developed to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This model was verified using 33 samples of the UNSODA database. The results showed that the developed empirical equation estimated unsaturated hydraulic conductivity better than BCC model in which tortuosity factor was assumed to be equal to 2. Acknowledgments The authors are grateful to Drs. M.Th. van Genuchten and R. Haverkamp for providing the UNSODA and GRIZZLY data sets.

  8. Osteoblast hydraulic conductivity is regulated by calcitonin and parathyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    It is our hypothesis that osteoblasts play a major role in regulating bone (re)modeling by regulating interstitial fluid (ISF) flow through individual bone compartments. We hypothesize that osteoblasts of the blood-bone membrane lining the bone surfaces are capable of regulating transosseous fluid flow. This regulatory function of the osteoblasts was tested in vitro by culturing a layer of rat calvarial osteoblasts on porous membranes. Such a layer of osteoblasts subjected to 7.3 mm Hg of hydrostatic pressure posed a significant resistance to fluid flow across the cell layer similar in magnitude to the resistance posed by endothelial monolayers in vitro. The hydraulic conductivity, the volumetric fluid flux per unit pressure drop, of the osteoblast layer was altered in response to certain hormones. Hydraulic conductivity decreased approximately 40% in response to 33 nM parathyroid hormone, while it exhibited biphasic behavior in response to calcitonin: increased 40% in response to 100 nM calcitonin and decreased 40% in response to 1000 nM calcitonin. Further, activation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin dramatically increased the hydraulic conductivity, while elevation of intracellular calcium, [Ca2+]i, by the calcium ionophore A23187 initially decreased the hydraulic conductivity at 5 minutes before increasing conductivity by 30 minutes. These results suggest that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and [Ca2+]i may mediate changes in the osteoblast hydraulic conductivity. The increase in hydraulic conductivity in response to 100 nM calcitonin and the decrease in response to PTH suggest that the stimulatory and inhibitory effects on bone formation of calcitonin and parathyroid hormone, respectively, may be due in part to alterations in bone fluid flow.

  9. The temporal changes in saturated hydraulic conductivity of forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornél Szegedi, Balázs

    2015-04-01

    I investigated the temporal variability of forest soils infiltration capacity through compaction. I performed the measurements of mine in The Botanical Garden of Sopron between 15.09.2014 - 15.10.2014. I performed the measurements in 50-50 cm areas those have been cleaned of vegetation, where I measured the bulk density and volume of soil hydraulic conductivity with Tension Disk Infiltrometer (TDI) in 3-3 repetitions. I took undisturbed 160 cm3 from the upper 5 cm layer of the cleaned soil surface for the bulk density measurements. Then I loosened the top 10-15 cm layer of the soil surface with spade. After the cultivation of the soil I measured the bulk density and volume of water conductivity also 3-3 repetitions. Later I performed the hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) using the TDI and bulk density measurements on undisturbed samples on a weekly basis in the study area. I illustrated the measured hydraulic conductivity and bulk density values as a function of cumulative rainfall by using simple graphical and statistical methods. The rate of the soil compaction pace was fast and smooth based on the change of the measured bulk density values. There was a steady downward trend in hydraulic conductivity parallel the compaction. The cultivation increased the hydraulic conductivity nearly fourfold compared to original, than decreased to half by 1 week. In the following the redeposition rate declined, but based on the literature data, almost 3-4 months enough to return the original state before cultivation of the soil hydraulic conductivity and bulk density values. This publication has been supported by AGRARKLIMA.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034 project.

  10. Slope instability caused by small variations in hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    Variations in hydraulic conductivity can greatly modify hillslope ground-water flow fields, effective-stress fields, and slope stability. In materials with uniform texture, hydraulic conductivities can vary over one to two orders of magnitude, yet small variations can be difficult to determine. The destabilizing effects caused by small (one order of magnitude or less) hydraulic conductivity variations using ground-water flow modeling, finite-element deformation analysis, and limit-equilibrium analysis are examined here. Low hydraulic conductivity materials that impede downslope ground-water flow can create unstable areas with locally elevated pore-water pressures. The destabilizing effects of small hydraulic heterogeneities can be as great as those induced by typical variations in the frictional strength (approximately 4??-8??) of texturally similar materials. Common "worst-case" assumptions about ground-water flow, such as a completely saturated "hydrostatic" pore-pressure distribution, do not account for locally elevated pore-water pressures and may not provide a conservative slope stability analysis. In site characterization, special attention should be paid to any materials that might impede downslope ground-water flow and create unstable regions.

  11. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF SOME BENTONITES IN ARTIFICIAL SEAWATER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komine, Hideo; Yasuhara, Kazuya; Murakami, Satoshi

    A high-level radioactive waste disposal facility might be built in a coastal area in Japan from the viewpoint of feasible transportation of waste. Therefore, it is important to investigate the effects of seawater on a bentonite-based buffer. This study investigated the influence of seawater on hydraulic conductivity of three common sodium-types of bentonite and one calcium-type bentonite by the laboratory experiments. From the results of laboratory experiment, this study discussed the influence of seawater on hydraulic conductivity of bentonites from the viewpoints of kinds of bentonite such as exchangeable-cation type and montmorillonite content and dry density of bentonite-based buffer.

  12. Measurement of soil hydraulic conductivity in relation with vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Cheng, Qinbo

    2010-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is a key parameter which influences hydrological processes of infiltration, surface and subsurface runoff. Vegetation alters surface characteristics (e.g., surface roughness, litter absorption) or subsurface characteristics (e.g. hydraulic conductivity). Field infiltration experiment of a single ring permeameter is widely used for measuring soil hydraulic conductivity. Measurement equipment is a simple single-ring falling head permeameter which consists of a hollow cylinder that is simply inserted into the top soil. An optimization method on the basis of objective of minimum error between the measured and simulated water depths in the single-ring is developed for determination of the soil hydraulic parameters. Using the single ring permeameter, we measured saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks) of the red loam soil with and without vegetation covers on five hillslopes at Taoyuan Agro-Ecology Experimental Station, Hunan Province of China. For the measurement plots without vegetation roots, Ks value of the soil at 25cm depth is much smaller than that of surface soil (1.52×10-4 vs. 1.10×10-5 m/s). For the measurement plots with vegetation cover, plant roots significantly increase Ks of the lower layer soil but this increase is not significant for the shallow soil. Moreover, influences of vegetation root on Ks depend on vegetation species and ages. Ks value of the Camellia is about three times larger than that of seeding of Camphor (2.62×10-4 vs. 9.82×10-5 m/s). Ks value of the matured Camellia is 2.72×10-4 m/s while Ks value of the young Camellia is only 2.17×10-4 m/s. Key words: single ring permeameter; soil hydraulic conductivity; vegetation

  13. Spatial features of hydraulic conductivity in alluvial fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z.; Zhu, L.; Ke, Y.; Pan, Y.; Gong, H.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Alluvial fans are highly heterogeneous due to the complicated depositional processes, which make it difficult to characterize the spatial distributions of the hydraulic conductivity and to evaluate the evolution trends. This study develops a methodology to identify the spatial statistical parameters (mean, variance, correlation range) of the hydraulic conductivity by using the hydraulic and geophysical data. The Chaobai River alluvial fan in the Beijing Plain, China, is used as an example to test the developed methodology for depicting the spatial variations of the alluvial fan. Due to the non-stationary property of the hydraulic conductivity distributions in the alluvial fan, a multi-zone parameterization approach is applied to analyze conductivity statistical properties of different hydrofacies and the composite variance of each zone is computed to describe the evolution of the conductivity along the flow direction of the alluvial fan. Results show that conductivity variances of medium-coarse sand and gravel decrease from Zone 1 to Zone 3 along the flow direction, which is consistent with the scales of the sedimentary transport energy. In the upper zone of the alluvial fan sediments were formed by higher-energy flooding, which induces bad sorting and larger conductivity variances in the sediments. The variance of fine sand also decreases from Zone 1 to Zone 3. The variances of the sub-clay and clay increase from the upper zone of the alluvial fan to the lower zone, where multiple layers of the sub-clay and clay formed by different flooding events have quite different conductivity distributions and statistical properties. With a much larger thickness in the lower zone, the vertical variations of conductivity contribute mainly to the relatively increased variance. The result of this study will provide insight for understanding conductivity heterogeneity and a method for characterizing the conductivity spatial distributions in alluvial fans.

  14. Comparison of hydraulic and chemical methods for determining hydraulic conductivity and leakage rates in argillaceous aquitards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Cook, Peter G.; Harrington, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of argillaceous aquitards to effectively separate fresh water aquifers from lower quality waters has been widely studied for several decades using both hydraulic and chemical methods. Hydraulic methods, namely laboratory, field and regional groundwater flow modelling, are used to estimate hydraulic conductivity (K), whereas chemical methods, namely aquitard porewater and aquifer groundwater chemistry, are used to estimate either leakage rates or porewater velocity (V). We reviewed a total of 40 formations where either K or V (or both) have been estimated. Typical vertical hydraulic conductivity (KZ) values in argillaceous materials estimated using hydraulic methods are 10-12-10-9 m s-1. Usual V values, estimated using chemical methods, ranges between 0.01 and 1 mm y-1, although the range is as wide as 10-4-103 mm y-1, when inferred from hydraulic KZ measurements. Based on a Péclet number of 1, we calculated the lower limits of porewater velocity that can be reliably identified for different tracers, in most cases ranging from <1 mm y-1 for 2H, 18O and Cl- to >100 mm y-1 for temperature. Despite the limited number of sites where both methods were applied, comparison between hydraulic and chemical-derived values showed a reasonable correlation, although the range of KZ and V estimated using hydraulic methods is larger than that obtained using chemical methods. Methods applied to the whole aquitard thickness (some field hydraulic methods, regional groundwater flow modelling, aquitard porewater and aquifer chemistry) consistently result in lower KZ values, most probably indicating the presence of very low KZ layers within the aquitard, likely to be missed while using field hydraulic methods that test only a section of the entire thickness. KZ was observed to decrease with depth, presumably due to an increase in consolidation resulting in loss of porosity and smaller aperture of fractures and joints. Multi-disciplinary studies involving the use of

  15. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity in an alluvial system using temperatures.

    PubMed

    Su, Grace W; Jasperse, James; Seymour, Donald; Constantz, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Well water temperatures are often collected simultaneously with water levels; however, temperature data are generally considered only as a water quality parameter and are not utilized as an environmental tracer. In this paper, water levels and seasonal temperatures are used to estimate hydraulic conductivities in a stream-aquifer system. To demonstrate this method, temperatures and water levels are analyzed from six observation wells along an example study site, the Russian River in Sonoma County, California. The range in seasonal ground water temperatures in these wells varied from <0.2 degrees C in two wells to approximately 8 degrees C in the other four wells from June to October 2000. The temperature probes in the six wells are located at depths between 3.5 and 7.1 m relative to the river channel. Hydraulic conductivities are estimated by matching simulated ground water temperatures to the observed ground water temperatures. An anisotropy of 5 (horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) generally gives the best fit to the observed temperatures. Estimated conductivities vary over an order of magnitude in the six locations analyzed. In some locations, a change in the observed temperature profile occurred during the study, most likely due to deposition of fine-grained sediment and organic matter plugging the streambed. A reasonable fit to this change in the temperature profile is obtained by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity in the simulations. This study demonstrates that seasonal ground water temperatures monitored in observation wells provide an effective means of estimating hydraulic conductivities in alluvial aquifers. PMID:15584302

  16. Unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity: The field infiltrometer method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theory: Field methods to measure the unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity assume presence of steady-state water flow. Soil infiltrometers are desired to apply water onto the soil surface at constant negative pressure. Water is applied to the soil from the Marriott device through a porous membrane...

  17. Test of the Rosetta Pedotransfer Function for saturated hydraulic conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models are tools that can be used to explore, for example, effects of cultural practices on soil erosion and irrigation on crop yield. However, often these models require many soil related input data of which the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) is one of the most important ones. The...

  18. EVALUATION OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITIES CALCULATED FROM MULTIPORT-PERMEAMETER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiport permeameter was developed for use in estimating hydraulic conductivity over intact sections of aquifer core using the core liner as the permeameter body. Six cores obtained from one borehole through the upper 9 m of a stratified glacial-outwash aquifer were used to ev...

  19. Dynamic Hydraulic Conductivity, Streambed Sediment, and Biogeochemistry Following Stream Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Jefferson, A.; Kinsman-Costello, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Stream restoration projects strive to improve water quality and degraded habitat, yet restoration projects often fall short of achieving their goals. Hyporheic exchange facilitates biogeochemical interaction which can contribute to positive water quality and habitat, but there are limited data on how restoration affects hyporheic processes. Hyporheic flowpaths can be altered by the processes and products of stream restoration, as well as the transport of fine sediment through the stream bed post-restoration. In two northeastern Ohio headwater streams, variations in hydraulic conductivity and pore water chemistry were monitored following restoration, as measures of hyporheic functioning. A second-order stream restored in August 2013, had a slight decrease in average hydraulic conductivity but an increase in heterogeneity from pre-restoration to four months post-restoration. Data collected 10 and 15 months post-restoration show continued declines in hydraulic conductivity throughout large constructed riffles. These piezometers also indicate dominance of downwelling throughout the riffles with only isolated upwelling locations. Grain size analysis of freeze cores collected in streambed sediments show differences suggesting fluvial transport and sorting have occurred since construction was completed. Pore water sampled from piezometers within the riffles had Mn2+ concentrations ten times higher than surface water, suggesting redox transformations are occurring along hyporheic flowpaths. A first-order stream reach, immediately downstream of a dam, restored in April 2014 had no significant change in average hydraulic conductivity between 1 and 2 months post-restoration, but many individual piezometers had increases of over 100% in high gradient positions or decreases of over 50% in low gradient positions. Changes in hydraulic conductivities in both restored streams are thought to be an adjustments from disturbance to a new dynamic equilibrium influenced by the morphology

  20. Characterizing hydraulic conductivity with the direct-push permeameter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Dietrich, P.; Wittig, V.; Christy, T.

    2007-01-01

    The direct-push permeameter (DPP) is a promising approach for obtaining high-resolution information about vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity (K) in shallow unconsolidated settings. This small-diameter tool, which consists of a short screened section with a pair of transducers inset in the tool near the screen, is pushed into the subsurface to a depth at which a K estimate is desired. A short hydraulic test is then performed by injecting water through the screen at a constant rate (less than 4 L/min) while pressure changes are monitored at the transducer locations. Hydraulic conductivity is calculated using the injection rate and the pressure changes in simple expressions based on Darcy's Law. In units of moderate or higher hydraulic conductivity (more than 1 m/d), testing at a single level can be completed within 10 to 15 min. Two major advantages of the method are its speed and the insensitivity of the K estimates to the zone of compaction created by tool advancement. The potential of the approach has been assessed at two extensively studied sites in the United States and Germany over a K range commonly faced in practical field investigations (0.02 to 500 m/d). The results of this assessment demonstrate that the DPP can provide high-resolution K estimates that are in good agreement with estimates obtained through other means. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  1. Effective Hydraulic Conductivity of Unsaturated Isotropic Soils with Multidimensional Heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2010-05-01

    Accurate simulation and prediction of flow and transport of solutes in a heterogeneous vadose zone requires the appropriate hydraulic properties corresponding to the spatial scale of interest. Upscaling techniques provide effective properties to describe the vadose zone system’s behavior with information collected at a much smaller scale. Realizing that a saturated system can be considered as a special state of the unsaturated system, the methodologies for upscaling the saturated hydraulic conductivity of heterogeneous isotropic porous media under steady-state flow conditions can be extended for upscaling the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. An advantage of this approach is that the extended upscaling methods are independent of the choice of hydraulic function models. The Matheron, small-perturbation, and self-consistent upscaling methods were used to demonstrate the approach. The extended upscaling methods were tested using multi-step numerical experiments of gravity-induced flow into Miller-similar synthetic soils with different levels of heterogeneity. Results show that, under 3-D flow conditions in isotropic soils, the self-consistent method applies to all the soil heterogeneity conditions considered while the Matheron and small-perturbation methods are acceptable for soil of relatively low variability.

  2. Quantitative measurements of root water uptake and root hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Javaux, Mathieu; Meunier, Felicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    How is root water uptake distributed along the root system and what root properties control this distribution? Here we present a method to: 1) measure root water uptake and 2) inversely estimate the root hydraulic conductivities. The experimental method consists in using neutron radiography to trace deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. The method was applied to lupines grown aluminium containers filled with a sandy soil. When the lupines were 4 weeks old, D2O was locally injected in a selected soil regions and its transport was monitored in soil and roots using time-series neutron radiography. By image processing, we quantified the concentration of D2O in soil and roots. We simulated the transport of D2O into roots using a diffusion-convection numerical model. The diffusivity of the roots tissue was inversely estimated by simulating the transport of D2O into the roots during night. The convective fluxes (i.e. root water uptake) were inversely estimating by fitting the experiments during day, when plants were transpiring, and assuming that root diffusivity did not change. The results showed that root water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the lateral roots and it decreased by a factor of 10 towards the distal parts. We used the data of water fluxes to inversely estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The water fluxes in the lupine roots were simulated using the Hydraulic Tree Model by Doussan et al. (1998). The fitting parameters to be adjusted were the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities of the roots. The results showed that by using the root architectural model of Doussan et al. (1998) and detailed information of water fluxes into different root segments we could estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots. We also found that: 1) in a tap-rooted plant like lupine water is mostly taken up by lateral roots; (2) water

  3. Measurement of Fracture Geometry for Accurate Computation of Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, B.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kim, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Fluid flow in rock mass is controlled by geometry of fractures which is mainly characterized by roughness, aperture and orientation. Fracture roughness and aperture was observed by a new confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM; Olympus OLS1100). The wavelength of laser is 488nm, and the laser scanning is managed by a light polarization method using two galvano-meter scanner mirrors. The system improves resolution in the light axis (namely z) direction because of the confocal optics. The sampling is managed in a spacing 2.5 μ m along x and y directions. The highest measurement resolution of z direction is 0.05 μ m, which is the more accurate than other methods. For the roughness measurements, core specimens of coarse and fine grained granites were provided. Measurements were performed along three scan lines on each fracture surface. The measured data were represented as 2-D and 3-D digital images showing detailed features of roughness. Spectral analyses by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) were performed to characterize on the roughness data quantitatively and to identify influential frequency of roughness. The FFT results showed that components of low frequencies were dominant in the fracture roughness. This study also verifies that spectral analysis is a good approach to understand complicate characteristics of fracture roughness. For the aperture measurements, digital images of the aperture were acquired under applying five stages of uniaxial normal stresses. This method can characterize the response of aperture directly using the same specimen. Results of measurements show that reduction values of aperture are different at each part due to rough geometry of fracture walls. Laboratory permeability tests were also conducted to evaluate changes of hydraulic conductivities related to aperture variation due to different stress levels. The results showed non-uniform reduction of hydraulic conductivity under increase of the normal stress and different values of

  4. Functional parameterization for hydraulic conductivity inversion with uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianying; Zhang, Ye

    2015-05-01

    Functional inversion based on local approximate solutions (LAS) is developed for steady-state flow in heterogeneous aquifers. The method employs a set of LAS of flow to impose spatial continuity of hydraulic head and Darcy fluxes in the solution domain, which are conditioned to limited measurements. Hydraulic conductivity is first parameterized as piecewise continuous, which requires the addition of a smoothness constraint to reduce inversion artifacts. Alternatively, it is formulated as piecewise constant, for which the smoothness constraint is not required, but the data requirement is much higher. Success of the inversion with both parameterizations is demonstrated for both one-dimensional synthetic examples and an oil-field permeability profile. When measurement errors are increased, estimation becomes less accurate but the solution is stable, i.e., estimation errors remain bounded. Compared to piecewise constant parameterization, piecewise continuous parameterization leads to more stable and accurate inversion. Moreover, conductivity variation can also be captured at two spatial scales reflecting sub-facies smooth-varying heterogeneity as well as abrupt changes at facies boundaries. By combining inversion with geostatistical simulation, uncertainty in the estimated conductivity and the hydraulic head field can be quantified. For a given measurement dataset, inversion accuracy and estimation uncertainty with the piecewise continuous parameterization is not sensitive to increasing conductivity contrast.

  5. Analysis of Slug Tests in Formations of High Hydraulic Conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Garnett, E.J.; Healey, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for the analysis of slug tests performed in partially penetrating wells in formations of high hydraulic conductivity. This approach is a simple, spreadsheet-based implementation of existing models that can be used for analysis of tests from confined or unconfined aquifers. Field examples of tests exhibiting oscillatory and nonoscillatory behavior are used to illustrate the procedure and to compare results with estimates obtained using alternative approaches. The procedure is considerably simpler than recently proposed methods for this hydrogeologic setting. Although the simplifications required by the approach can introduce error into hydraulic-conductivity estimates, this additional error becomes negligible when appropriate measures are taken in the field. These measures are summarized in a set of practical field guidelines for slug tests in highly permeable aquifers.

  6. Changes in entrapped gas content and hydraulic conductivity with pressure.

    PubMed

    Marinas, Maricris; Roy, James W; Smith, James E

    2013-01-01

    Water table fluctuations continuously introduce entrapped air bubbles into the otherwise saturated capillary fringe and groundwater zone, which reduces the effective (quasi-saturated) hydraulic conductivity, K(quasi), thus impacting groundwater flow, aquifer recharge and solute and contaminant transport. These entrapped gases will be susceptible to compression or expansion with changes in water pressure, as would be expected with water table (and barometric pressure) fluctuations. Here we undertake laboratory experiments using sand-packed columns to quantify the effect of water table changes of up to 250 cm on the entrapped gas content and the quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivity, and discuss our ability to account for these mechanisms in ground water models. Initial entrapped air contents ranged between 0.080 and 0.158, with a corresponding K(quasi) ranging between 2 and 6 times lower compared to the K(s) value. The application of 250 cm of water pressure caused an 18% to 26% reduction in the entrapped air content, resulting in an increase in K(quasi) by 1.16 to 1.57 times compared to its initial (0 cm water pressure) value. The change in entrapped air content measured at pressure step intervals of 50 cm, was essentially linear, and could be modeled according to the ideal gas law. Meanwhile, the changes in K(quasi) with compression-expansion of the bubbles because of pressure changes could be adequately captured with several current hydraulic conductivity models.

  7. Capillary bundle model of hydraulic conductivity for frozen soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kunio; Flury, Markus

    2008-12-01

    We developed a capillary bundle model to describe water flow in frozen soil. We assume that the soil can be represented as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries. We consider that the freezing point in the capillaries is depressed according to the Gibbs-Thomson effect and that when stable ice forms in a capillary, the ice forms in the center of the capillaries, leaving a circular annulus open for liquid water flow. We use the model to demonstrate how the hydraulic conductivity changes as a function of temperature for both saturated and unsaturated soils, using a sand and two silt loam soils as examples. As temperature decreases, more and more ice forms, and the water flux consequently decreases. In frozen soil near 0°C, water predominantly flows through ice-free capillaries, so that the hydraulic conductivity of frozen soil is similar to that of an unfrozen soil with a water content equal to the unfrozen water content of the frozen soil. At low temperatures, however, ice forms in almost all capillaries, and the hydraulic conductivity of frozen soil is greater than that of unfrozen soil with the same water potential.

  8. Changes in entrapped gas content and hydraulic conductivity with pressure.

    PubMed

    Marinas, Maricris; Roy, James W; Smith, James E

    2013-01-01

    Water table fluctuations continuously introduce entrapped air bubbles into the otherwise saturated capillary fringe and groundwater zone, which reduces the effective (quasi-saturated) hydraulic conductivity, K(quasi), thus impacting groundwater flow, aquifer recharge and solute and contaminant transport. These entrapped gases will be susceptible to compression or expansion with changes in water pressure, as would be expected with water table (and barometric pressure) fluctuations. Here we undertake laboratory experiments using sand-packed columns to quantify the effect of water table changes of up to 250 cm on the entrapped gas content and the quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivity, and discuss our ability to account for these mechanisms in ground water models. Initial entrapped air contents ranged between 0.080 and 0.158, with a corresponding K(quasi) ranging between 2 and 6 times lower compared to the K(s) value. The application of 250 cm of water pressure caused an 18% to 26% reduction in the entrapped air content, resulting in an increase in K(quasi) by 1.16 to 1.57 times compared to its initial (0 cm water pressure) value. The change in entrapped air content measured at pressure step intervals of 50 cm, was essentially linear, and could be modeled according to the ideal gas law. Meanwhile, the changes in K(quasi) with compression-expansion of the bubbles because of pressure changes could be adequately captured with several current hydraulic conductivity models. PMID:22320934

  9. Hydraulic waste energy recovery, Phase 2. A technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The energy required for booster station operation is supplied by the electrical utility company and has an associated cost. Energy removed by pressure reducing valves in the system is lost or wasted. The objective of this project is to capture the wasted hydraulic energy with in-line turbines. In this application, the in-line turbines act as pressure reducing valves while removing energy from the water distribution system and converting it to electrical energy. The North Service Center pumping station was selected for the pilot program due to the availability of a wide range in pressure drop and flow, which are necessary for hydraulic energy recovery. The research performed during this project resulted in documentation of technical, economic, installation, and operational information necessary for local government officials to make an informed judgement as it relates to in-line turbine generation.

  10. Modification of hydraulic conductivity in granular soils using waste materials.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, S; Saglamer, A

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of waste products such as silica fume and fly ash in modification of the granular soils in order to remove some environmental problems and create new useful findings in the field of engineering. It is known that silica fume and fly ash, as well as clay material, are used in geotechnical engineering because of their pozzolanic reactivity and fineness to improve the soil properties needed with respect to engineering purposes. The main objective of this research project was to investigate the use of these materials in geotechnical engineering and to improve the hydraulic properties of soils by means of grouting. For this reason, firstly, suitable grouts in suspension forms were prepared by using silica fume, fly ash, clay and cement in different percentages. The properties of these cement-based grouts were then determined to obtain the desired optimum values for grouting. After that, these grouts were penetrated into the soil samples under pressure. The experimental work indicates that these waste materials and clay improved the physical properties and the fluidity of the cement-based grouts and they also decreased the hydraulic conductivity of the grouted soil samples by sealing the voids of the soil. The results of this study have important findings concerning the use of these materials in soil treatment and the improvement of hydraulic conductivity of the soils. PMID:15120433

  11. Statistical-physical model of the hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, B.; Marczewski, W.; Usowicz, J. B.; Lukowski, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    The water content in unsaturated subsurface soil layer is determined by processes of exchanging mass and energy between media of soil and atmosphere, and particular members of layered media. Generally they are non-homogeneous on different scales, considering soil porosity, soil texture including presence of vegetation elements in the root zone, and canopy above the surface, and varying biomass density of plants above the surface in clusters. That heterogeneity determines statistically effective values of particular physical properties. This work considers mainly those properties which determine the hydraulic conductivity of soil. This property is necessary for characterizing physically water transfer in the root zone and access of nutrient matter for plants, but it also the water capacity on the field scale. The temporal variability of forcing conditions and evolutionarily changing vegetation causes substantial effects of impact on the water capacity in large scales, bringing the evolution of water conditions in the entire area, spanning a possible temporal state in the range between floods and droughts. The dynamic of this evolution of water conditions is highly determined by vegetation but is hardly predictable in evaluations. Hydrological models require feeding with input data determining hydraulic properties of the porous soil which are proposed in this paper by means of the statistical-physical model of the water hydraulic conductivity. The statistical-physical model was determined for soils being typical in Euroregion Bug, Eastern Poland. The model is calibrated on the base of direct measurements in the field scales, and enables determining typical characteristics of water retention by the retention curves bounding the hydraulic conductivity to the state of water saturation of the soil. The values of the hydraulic conductivity in two reference states are used for calibrating the model. One is close to full saturation, and another is for low water content far

  12. Frequency-dependent effective hydraulic conductivity of strongly heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Caspari, E; Gurevich, B; Müller, T M

    2013-10-01

    The determination of the transport properties of heterogeneous porous rocks, such as an effective hydraulic conductivity, arises in a range of geoscience problems, from groundwater flow analysis to hydrocarbon reservoir modeling. In the presence of formation-scale heterogeneities, nonstationary flows, induced by pumping tests or propagating elastic waves, entail localized pressure diffusion processes with a characteristic frequency depending on the pressure diffusivity and size of the heterogeneity. Then, on a macroscale, a homogeneous equivalent medium exists, which has a frequency-dependent effective conductivity. The frequency dependence of the conductivity can be analyzed with Biot's equations of poroelasticity. In the quasistatic frequency regime of this framework, the slow compressional wave is a proxy for pressure diffusion processes. This slow compressional wave is associated with the out-of-phase motion of the fluid and solid phase, thereby creating a relative fluid-solid displacement vector field. Decoupling of the poroelasticity equations gives a diffusion equation for the fluid-solid displacement field valid in a poroelastic medium with spatial fluctuations in hydraulic conductivity. Then, an effective conductivity is found by a Green's function approach followed by a strong-contrast perturbation theory suggested earlier in the context of random dielectrics. This theory leads to closed-form expressions for the frequency-dependent effective conductivity as a function of the one- and two-point probability functions of the conductivity fluctuations. In one dimension, these expressions are consistent with exact solutions in both low- and high-frequency limits for arbitrary conductivity contrast. In 3D, the low-frequency limit depends on the details of the microstructure. However, the derived approximation for the effective conductivity is consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds.

  13. Effective soil hydraulic conductivity predicted with the maximum power principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westhoff, Martijn; Erpicum, Sébastien; Archambeau, Pierre; Pirotton, Michel; Zehe, Erwin; Dewals, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Drainage of water in soils happens for a large extent through preferential flowpaths, but these subsurface flowpaths are extremely difficult to observe or parameterize in hydrological models. To potentially overcome this problem, thermodynamic optimality principles have been suggested to predict effective parametrization of these (sub-grid) structures, such as the maximum entropy production principle or the equivalent maximum power principle. These principles have been successfully applied to predict heat transfer from the Equator to the Poles, or turbulent heat fluxes between the surface and the atmosphere. In these examples, the effective flux adapts itself to its boundary condition by adapting its effective conductance through the creation of e.g. convection cells. However, flow through porous media, such as soils, can only quickly adapt its effective flow conductance by creation of preferential flowpaths, but it is unknown if this is guided by the aim to create maximum power. Here we show experimentally that this is indeed the case: In the lab, we created a hydrological analogue to the atmospheric model dealing with heat transport between Equator and poles. The experimental setup consists of two freely draining reservoirs connected with each other by a confined aquifer. By adding water to only one reservoir, a potential difference will build up until a steady state is reached. From the steady state potential difference and the observed flow through the aquifer, and effective hydraulic conductance can be determined. This observed conductance does correspond to the one maximizing power of the flux through the confined aquifer. Although this experiment is done in an idealized setting, it opens doors for better parameterizing hydrological models. Furthermore, it shows that hydraulic properties of soils are not static, but they change with changing boundary conditions. A potential limitation to the principle is that it only applies to steady state conditions

  14. Relationships Between Electrical Conductivity - Water Content, Water Potential and Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity for Three Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruy, S.; Doussan, C.

    2006-05-01

    In soil physics, water retention and hydraulic conductivity are key parameters for predicting water fluxes in soils. Determination of these hydrodynamic characteristics in the lab, particularly unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, is most often complicated, time consuming and error-prone. These difficulties often prohibit the examination of numerous soil samples for determining these parameters as would be necessary to get a good estimation of the field variability. In this case, an indirect and easy to measure variable, closely linked to water retention or hydraulic conductivity, would be helpful in the assessment of these parameters. Electrical conductivity (EC) is a good candidate for such a variable because, in a porous medium, its magnitude is largely determined by the number of water filled pores and their connectivity. Relationships between water content (or saturation) and EC have been established both from empirical or theoretical point of view for some time. However, relationships between EC and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are much more scarce, as are experimental data. We present relationships between EC and water content or water potential for three soil types: a clay loam, a sandy loam and a sand. We also present experimental relationships between EC and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The soil were cored undisturbed in the field and water retention was measured together with E. Hydraulic conductivity was calculated from the Wind evaporation method and from steady state measurements for low suctions. Mercury porosimetry measurements were also performed after the experiments. Water saturation reasonably follows a power-law relationship with relative EC (EC/ECsat). Exponents of the power law being around 3 - 3.5 for the clay loam, 1.1 - 1.7 for the sandy loam and 8 - 12 for the sand (for matric potentials between 0 and -80 cm in the latter case). Variation of the relative EC with the log of water potential shows a S-shape, with an almost linear

  15. An Integrated View of Whole-Tree Hydraulic Architecture. Does Stomatal or Hydraulic Conductance Determine Whole Tree Transpiration?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gamir, Juan; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic conductance exerts a strong influence on many aspects of plant physiology, namely: transpiration, CO2 assimilation, growth, productivity or stress response. However we lack full understanding of the contribution of root or shoot water transport capacity to the total water balance, something which is difficult to study in trees. Here we tested the hypothesis that whole plant hydraulic conductance modulates plant transpiration using two different seedlings of citrus rootstocks, Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf. and Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort ex Tan.). The two genotypes presented important differences in their root or shoot hydraulic conductance contribution to whole plant hydraulic conductance but, even so, water balance proved highly dependent on whole plant conductance. Further, we propose there is a possible equilibrium between root and shoot hydraulic conductance, similar to that between shoot and root biomass production, which could be related with xylem anatomy.

  16. An Integrated View of Whole-Tree Hydraulic Architecture. Does Stomatal or Hydraulic Conductance Determine Whole Tree Transpiration?

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gamir, Juan; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Forner-Giner, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic conductance exerts a strong influence on many aspects of plant physiology, namely: transpiration, CO2 assimilation, growth, productivity or stress response. However we lack full understanding of the contribution of root or shoot water transport capacity to the total water balance, something which is difficult to study in trees. Here we tested the hypothesis that whole plant hydraulic conductance modulates plant transpiration using two different seedlings of citrus rootstocks, Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf. and Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort ex Tan.). The two genotypes presented important differences in their root or shoot hydraulic conductance contribution to whole plant hydraulic conductance but, even so, water balance proved highly dependent on whole plant conductance. Further, we propose there is a possible equilibrium between root and shoot hydraulic conductance, similar to that between shoot and root biomass production, which could be related with xylem anatomy. PMID:27223695

  17. Root hydraulic conductivity and adjustments in stomatal conductance: hydraulic strategy in response to salt stress in a halotolerant species.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Victoria; Bellati, Jorge; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás D; Amodeo, Gabriela

    2015-11-24

    Recent advances at the molecular level are introducing a new scenario that needs to be integrated into the analysis of plant hydraulic properties. Although it is not yet clear to what extent this scenario alters the current proposal for the hydraulic circuit models, it introduces new insights when studying plants that are able to easily overcome water restrictions. In this context, our aim was to explore water adjustments in a halotolerant model (Beta vulgaris) by studying the coordination between the root in terms of root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) and the shoot as reflected in the stomatal conductance (gs). The root water pathways were also analysed in terms of root suberization (apoplastic barrier) and aquaporin transcript levels (cell-to-cell pathway). Beta vulgaris showed the ability to rapidly lose (4 h) and gain (24 h) turgor when submitted to salt stress (200 mM). The reduction profile observed in Lpr and gs was consistent with a coupled process. The tuning of the root water flow involved small variations in the studied aquaporin's transcripts before anatomical modifications occurred. Exploring Lpr enhancement after halting the stress contributed to show not only a different profile in restoring Lpr but also the capacity to uncouple Lpr from gs. Beta vulgaris root plays a key role and can anticipate water loss before the aerial water status is affected.

  18. Root hydraulic conductivity and adjustments in stomatal conductance: hydraulic strategy in response to salt stress in a halotolerant species.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Victoria; Bellati, Jorge; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás D; Amodeo, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances at the molecular level are introducing a new scenario that needs to be integrated into the analysis of plant hydraulic properties. Although it is not yet clear to what extent this scenario alters the current proposal for the hydraulic circuit models, it introduces new insights when studying plants that are able to easily overcome water restrictions. In this context, our aim was to explore water adjustments in a halotolerant model (Beta vulgaris) by studying the coordination between the root in terms of root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) and the shoot as reflected in the stomatal conductance (gs). The root water pathways were also analysed in terms of root suberization (apoplastic barrier) and aquaporin transcript levels (cell-to-cell pathway). Beta vulgaris showed the ability to rapidly lose (4 h) and gain (24 h) turgor when submitted to salt stress (200 mM). The reduction profile observed in Lpr and gs was consistent with a coupled process. The tuning of the root water flow involved small variations in the studied aquaporin's transcripts before anatomical modifications occurred. Exploring Lpr enhancement after halting the stress contributed to show not only a different profile in restoring Lpr but also the capacity to uncouple Lpr from gs. Beta vulgaris root plays a key role and can anticipate water loss before the aerial water status is affected. PMID:26602985

  19. Root hydraulic conductivity and adjustments in stomatal conductance: hydraulic strategy in response to salt stress in a halotolerant species

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Victoria; Bellati, Jorge; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás D.; Amodeo, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances at the molecular level are introducing a new scenario that needs to be integrated into the analysis of plant hydraulic properties. Although it is not yet clear to what extent this scenario alters the current proposal for the hydraulic circuit models, it introduces new insights when studying plants that are able to easily overcome water restrictions. In this context, our aim was to explore water adjustments in a halotolerant model (Beta vulgaris) by studying the coordination between the root in terms of root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) and the shoot as reflected in the stomatal conductance (gs). The root water pathways were also analysed in terms of root suberization (apoplastic barrier) and aquaporin transcript levels (cell-to-cell pathway). Beta vulgaris showed the ability to rapidly lose (4 h) and gain (24 h) turgor when submitted to salt stress (200 mM). The reduction profile observed in Lpr and gs was consistent with a coupled process. The tuning of the root water flow involved small variations in the studied aquaporin's transcripts before anatomical modifications occurred. Exploring Lpr enhancement after halting the stress contributed to show not only a different profile in restoring Lpr but also the capacity to uncouple Lpr from gs. Beta vulgaris root plays a key role and can anticipate water loss before the aerial water status is affected. PMID:26602985

  20. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity: Chapter 21

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K(). The parameters that describe the K() curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  1. Improved apparatus for measuring hydraulic conductivity at low water content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Akstin, K.C.; Mello, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    A modification of the steady-state centrifuge method for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) measurement improves the range and adjustability of this method. The modified apparatus allows mechanical adjustment to vary the measured K by a factor of 360. In addition, the use of different flow-regulation ceramic materials can give a total K range covering about six orders of magnitude. The range extension afforded has led to the lowest steady-state K measurement to date, for a sandy soil of the Delhi series (Typic Xeropsamment). -from Authors

  2. Specific storage and hydraulic conductivity tomography through the joint inversion of hydraulic heads and self-potential data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A. Soueid; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    Transient hydraulic tomography is used to image the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity and specific storage fields of shallow aquifers using time series of hydraulic head data. Such ill-posed and non-unique inverse problem can be regularized using some spatial geostatistical characteristic of the two fields. In addition to hydraulic heads changes, the flow of water, during pumping tests, generates an electrical field of electrokinetic nature. These electrical field fluctuations can be passively recorded at the ground surface using a network of non-polarizing electrodes connected to a high impedance (> 10 MOhm) and sensitive (0.1 mV) voltmeter, a method known in geophysics as the self-potential method. We perform a joint inversion of the self-potential and hydraulic head data to image the hydraulic conductivity and specific storage fields. We work on a 3D synthetic confined aquifer and we use the adjoint state method to compute the sensitivities of the hydraulic parameters to the hydraulic head and self-potential data in both steady-state and transient conditions. The inverse problem is solved using the geostatistical quasi-linear algorithm framework of Kitanidis. When the number of piezometers is small, the record of the transient self-potential signals provides useful information to characterize the hydraulic conductivity and specific storage fields. These results show that the self-potential method reveals the heterogeneities of some areas of the aquifer, which could not been captured by the tomography based on the hydraulic heads alone. In our analysis, the improvement on the hydraulic conductivity and specific storage estimations were based on perfect knowledge of electrical resistivity field. This implies that electrical resistivity will need to be jointly inverted with the hydraulic parameters in future studies and the impact of its uncertainty assessed with respect to the final tomograms of the hydraulic parameters.

  3. Stochastic analysis of the hydraulic conductivity estimated for a heterogeneous aquifer via numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Zhang, Y.; Shu, L.; Chen, X.; Chen, S.; Li, S.; Wang, G.; Li, J.

    2015-05-01

    The paper aims to evaluate the impacts of the average hydraulic conductivity of the heterogeneous aquifer on the estimated hydraulic conductivity using the observations from pumping tests. The results of aquifer tests conducted at a karst aquifer are first introduced. A MODFLOW groundwater flow model was developed to perform numerical pumping tests, and the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) field was generated using the Monte Carlo method. The K was estimated by the Theis solution for an unconfined aquifer. The effective hydraulic conductivity (Ke) was calculated to represent the hydraulic conductivity of a heterogeneous aquifer. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that Ke increase with the mean of hydraulic conductivity (EK), and decrease with the coefficient of variation of the hydraulic conductivity (Cv). The impact of spatial variability of K on the estimated Ke at two observation wells with smaller EK is less significant compared to the cases with larger EK.

  4. Pore-structure models of hydraulic conductivity for permeable pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, X.; Sansalone, J.; Ying, G.; Ranieri, V.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryPermeable pavement functions as a porous infrastructure interface allowing the infiltration and evaporation of rainfall-runoff while functioning as a relatively smooth load-bearing surface for vehicular transport. Hydraulic conductivity ( k) of permeable pavement is an important hydraulic property and is a function of the pore structure. This study examines k for a cementitious permeable pavement (CPP) through a series of pore-structure models. Measurements utilized include hydraulic head as well as total porosity, ( ϕ t), effective porosity ( ϕ e), tortuosity ( L e/ L) and pore size distribution (PSD) indices generated through X-ray tomography (XRT). XRT results indicate that the permeable pavement pore matrix is hetero-disperse, with high tortuosity and ϕ t ≠ ϕ e. Power law models of k- ϕ t and k- ϕ e relationships are developed for a CPP mix design. Results indicate that the Krüger, Fair-Hatch, Hazen, Slichter, Beyer and Terzaghi models based on simple pore-structure indices do not reproduce measured k values. The conventional Kozeny-Carman model (KCM), a more parameterized pore-structure model, did not reproduce measured k values. This study proposes a modified KCM utilizing ϕ e, specific surface area (SSA) pe and weighted tortuosity ( L e/ L) w. Results demonstrate that such permeable pavement pore-structure parameters with the modified KCM can predict k. The k results are combined with continuous simulation modeling using historical rainfall to provide nomographs examining permeable pavement as a low impact development (LID) infrastructure component.

  5. Vertical hydraulic conductivity measurements in the Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barkmann, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Denver Basin is a structural basin on the eastern flank of the Rocky Mountain Front Range, Colorado, containing approximately 3000 ft of sediments that hold a critical groundwater resource supplying many thousands of households with water. Managing this groundwater resource requires understanding how water gets into and moves through water-bearing layers in a complex multiple-layered sedimentary sequence. The Denver Basin aquifer system consists of permeable sandstone interbedded with impermeable shale that has been subdivided into four principle aquifers named, in ascending order, the Laramie-Fox Hills, Arapahoe, Denver, and Dawson aquifers. Although shale can dominate the stratigraphic interval containing the aquifers, there is very little empirical data regarding the hydrogeologic properties of the shale layers that control groundwater flow in the basin. The amount of water that flows vertically within the basin is limited by the vertical hydraulic conductivity through the confining shale layers. Low vertical flow volumes translate to low natural recharge rates and can have a profound negative impact on long-term well yields and the economic viability of utilizing the resource. To date, direct measurements of vertical hydraulic conductivity from cores of fine-grained sediments have been published from only five locations; and the data span a wide range from 1??10-3 to 1??10-11 cm/sec. This range may be attributable, in part, to differences in sample handling and analytical methods; however, it may also reflect subtle differences in the lithologic characteristics of the fine-grained sediments such as grain-size, clay mineralogy, and compaction that relate to position in the basin. These limited data certainly call for the collection of additional data.

  6. Geostatistical analysis of field hydraulic conductivity in compacted clay

    SciTech Connect

    Rogowski, A.S.; Simmons, D.E.

    1988-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) of fractured or porous materials is associated intimately with water flow and chemical transport. Basic concepts imply uniform flux through a homogeneous cross-sectional area. If flow were to occur only through part of the area, actual rates could be considerably different. Because laboratory values of K in compacted clays seldom agree with field estimates, questions arise as to what the true values of K are and how they should be estimated. Hydraulic conductivity values were measured on a 10 x 25 m elevated bridge-like platform. A constant water level was maintained for 1 yr over a 0.3-m thick layer of compacted clay, and inflow and outflow rates were monitored using 10 x 25 grids of 0.3-m diameter infiltration rings and outflow drains subtending approximately 1 x 1 m blocks of compacted clay. Variography of inflow and outflow data established relationships between cores and blocks of clay, respectively. Because distributions of outflow rates were much less and bore little resemblance to the distributions of break-through rates based on tracer studies, presence of macropores and preferential flow through the macropores was suspected. Subsequently, probability kriging was applied to reevaluate distribution of flux rates and possible location of macropores. Sites exceeding a threshold outflow of 100 x 10/sup -9/ m/s were classified as outliers and were assumed to probably contain a significant population of macropores. Different sampling schemes were examined. Variogram analysis of outflows with and without outliers suggested adequacy of sampling the site at 50 randomly chosen locations. Because of the potential contribution of macropores to pollutant transport and the practical necessity of extrapolating small plot values to larger areas, conditional simulations with and without outliers were carried out.

  7. DEPTH CONTINUOUS HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY PROFILING USING AN ACTIVE SOURCE PENETROMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-12-01

    A method is developed to recover depth-continuous hydraulic conductivity profiles of an unconsolidated saturated aquifer using an active source penetrometer, the Hydraulic Profiling Tool (HPT). The tool yields estimates of K through continuous injection of fluid in the subsurface from a small port on the probe shaft while controlled measurements of net applied fluid pressure required to maintain a specified flow rate (typically 350 mL/min) are recorded. The tool gathers these data of flow rate and measured applied pressure during halted and constant-rate penetration (typically 2cm/sec) of the probe. The analysis is developed in two parts, first to explore the interplay between advective effects controlled by penetration rate and secondly flow volume effects controlled by the targeted flow rate. These two effects are analyzed through their respective influence on the measured applied pressure response in ΔP/σv’-Q/ΔP space, which shows a linear relationship for the flow rate to applied pressure response when Q/ΔP > 1 and when Q/ΔP < 1 the response tends towards an asymptotic limit representing soil failure limits as ΔP/σv’ > 1. The analysis shows that penetration rate does not significantly influence the applied pressure response at the tested penetration rates (0 ≤ U(cm/s)≤ 4). The targeted applied flow rate does however influence the applied pressure response as flow rates less than ~300 mL/min show a scattering of the data in ΔP/σv’-Q/ΔP space, where above 300 mL/min the data begins to form a linear response. A targeted flow rate of QT = 400mL/min is suggested as a suitable flow rate based on this analysis. Measurements of hydraulic conductivity are then obtained for the HPT data through the derivation of an equation based on a recast form of Darcy’s law where considerations of the flow geometry as K = (QHPT/ΔP)(δw/πΦ). K profiles obtained for the HPT system are then compared against K profiles obtained from an independent method (PSU

  8. Interstitial hydraulic conductivity and interstitial fluid pressure for avascular or poorly vascularized tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2015-09-01

    A correct description of the hydraulic conductivity is essential for determining the actual tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) distribution. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the hydraulic conductivities both in a tumor and normal tissue are constant, and that a tumor has a much larger interstitial hydraulic conductivity than normal tissue. The abrupt transition of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface leads to non-physical results (the hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the TIFP are not continuous at tumor surface). For the sake of simplicity and the need to represent reality, we focus our analysis on avascular or poorly vascularized tumors, which have a necrosis that is mostly in the center and vascularization that is mostly on the periphery. We suggest that there is an intermediary region between the tumor surface and normal tissue. Through this region, the interstitium (including the structure and composition of solid components and interstitial fluid) transitions from tumor to normal tissue. This process also causes the hydraulic conductivity to do the same. We introduce a continuous variation of the hydraulic conductivity, and show that the interstitial hydraulic conductivity in the intermediary region should be monotonically increasing up to the value of hydraulic conductivity in the normal tissue in order for the model to correspond to the actual TIFP distribution. The value of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface should be the lowest in value.

  9. Hydraulic conductivity and embolism in the mangrove tree Laguncularia racemosa.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Frank W; Lopez-Portillo, Jórge; Angeles, Guillermo; Fisher, Jack B

    2004-09-01

    We measured xylem pressure potentials, soil osmotic potentials, hydraulic conductivity and percent loss of conductivity (PLC) due to embolism, and made microscopic observations of perfused dye in the white mangrove tree, Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f., (1) to determine its vulnerability to air embolism compared with published results for the highly salt-tolerant red mangrove tree, Rhizophora mangle L., and (2) to identify possible relationships between air embolism, permanent blockage of vessels and stem diameter. Laguncularia racemosa was more vulnerable to embolism than reported for R. mangle, with 50 PLC at -3.4 MPa. Narrow stems (5-mm diameter) had higher PLC than larger stems (8.4- or 14-mm diameter) of the same plants. Basic fuchsin dye indicated that up to 89% of the vessels, especially in the narrow stems, had permanent blockage that could not be reversed by high pressure perfusion. Air embolism could lead to permanent vessel blockage and eventual stem mortality. Such vulnerability to embolism may restrict the growth of L. racemosa and limit its distribution to less salty areas of mangrove communities. PMID:15234903

  10. Hydraulic conductance and the maintenance of water balance in flowers.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Adam B; Brodersen, Craig R; Dawson, Todd E

    2016-10-01

    Flowers face desiccating conditions, yet little is known about their ability to transport water. We quantified variability in floral hydraulic conductance (Kflower ) for 20 species from 10 families and related it to traits hypothesized to be associated with liquid and vapour phase water transport. Basal angiosperm flowers had trait values associated with higher water and carbon costs than monocot and eudicot flowers. Kflower was coordinated with water supply (vein length per area, VLA) and loss (minimum epidermal conductance, gmin ) traits among the magnoliids, but was insensitive to variation in these traits among the monocots and eudicots. Phylogenetic independent contrast (PIC) correlations revealed that few traits had undergone coordinated evolution. However, VLA and the desiccation time (Tdes ), the quotient of water content and gmin , had significant trait and PIC correlations. The near absence of stomata from monocot and eudicot flowers may have been critical in minimizing water loss rates among these clades. Early divergent, basal angiosperm flowers maintain higher Kflower because of traits associated with high rates water loss and water supply, while monocot and eudicot flowers employ a more conservative strategy of limiting water loss and may rely on stored water to maintain turgor and delay desiccation. PMID:27144996

  11. [Effects of invertebrate bioturbation on vertical hydraulic conductivity of streambed for a river].

    PubMed

    Ren, Chao-Liang; Song, Jin-Xi; Yang, Xiao-Gang; Xue, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity is a key factor influencing water exchange between surface water and groundwater. However, the streambed invertebrate bioturbation has a great effect on the hydraulic conductivity. In order to determine the impact of invertebrate bioturbation on streambed hydraulic conductivity, the investigation of invertebrate bioturbation and in-situ test of vertical hydraulic conductivity of streambed are simultaneously conducted at five points along the main stream of the Weihe River. Firstly, correlation between the streambed vertical hydraulic conductivity and grain size distribution is analyzed. Secondly, type and density of the invertebrate and their correlation to hydraulic conductivity are determined. Finally, the effect of invertebrate bioturbation on the streambed hydraulic conductivity is illustrated. The results show that the vertical hydraulic conductivity and biological density of invertebrate are 18.479 m x d(-1) and 139 ind x m(-2), respectively for the Caotan site, where sediment composition with a large amount of sand and gravel particles. For Meixian site, the sediment constitutes a large amount of silt and clay particles, in which the vertical hydraulic conductivity and biological density of invertebrate are 2.807 m x d(-1) and 2 742 ind x m(-2) respectively. Besides, for the low permeability of four sites (Meixian, Xianyang, Lintong and Huaxian), grain size particles are similar while the vertical hydraulic conductivity and biological density of invertebrate are significantly different from one site to another. However, for each site, the vertical hydraulic conductivity closely related to biological density of invertebrate, the Pearson correlation coefficient is 0.987. It can be concluded that both grain size particles and invertebrate bioturbation influence sediment permeability. For example, higher values of streambed hydraulic conductivity from strong permeability site mainly due to the large amount of large-size particles

  12. Spatial Variability of Streambed Hydraulic Conductivity of a Lowland River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidewind, Uwe; Thornton, Steven; Van De Vijver, Ellen; Joris, Ingeborg; Seuntjens, Piet

    2015-04-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity K is a key physical parameter, which describes flow processes in the hyporheic zone (HZ), i.e. the dynamic interface between aquifers and streams or rivers. Knowledge of the spatial variability of K is also important for the interpretation of contaminant transport processes in the HZ. Streambed K can vary over several magnitudes at small spatial scales. It depends mostly on streambed sediment characteristics (e.g. effective porosity, grain size, packing), streambed processes (e.g. sedimentation, colmation and erosion) and the development of stream channel geometry and streambed morphology (e.g. dunes, anti-dunes, pool-riffle sequences, etc.). Although heterogeneous in natural streambeds, streambed K is often considered to be a constant parameter due to a lack of information on its spatial distribution. Here we show the spatial variability of streambed K for a small section of the River Tern, a lowland river in the UK. Streambed K was determined for more than 120 vertically and horizontally distributed locations from grain size analyses using four empirical approaches (Hazen, Beyer, Kozeny and the USBR model). Additionally, streambed K was estimated from falling head tests in 36 piezometers installed into the streambed on a 4 m by 16 m grid, by applying the Springer-Gelhar Model. For both methods streambed K followed a log-normal distribution. Variogram analysis was used to deduce the spatial variability of the streambed K values within several streambed profiles parallel and perpendicular to the main flow direction in the stream. Hydraulic conductivity Kg estimated from grain size analyses varied between 1 m/d and 155 m/d with standard deviations of 79% to 99% depending on the empirical approach used. Kh estimated from falling head tests varied between 1 m/d and 22 m/d with a standard deviation of about 50%, depending on the degree of anisotropy assumed. After rescaling the data to obtain a common sample support, Pearson correlation

  13. Measurement of 3-D hydraulic conductivity in aquifer cores at in situ effective stresses.

    PubMed

    Wright, Martin; Dillon, Peter; Pavelic, Paul; Peter, Paul; Nefiodovas, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    An innovative and nondestructive method to measure the hydraulic conductivity of drill core samples in horizontal and vertical directions within a triaxial cell has been developed. This has been applied to characterizing anisotropy and heterogeneity of a confined consolidated limestone aquifer. Most of the cores tested were isotropic, but hydraulic conductivity varied considerably and the core samples with lowest values were also the most anisotropic. Hydraulic conductivity decreased with increasing effective stress due to closure of microfractures caused by sampling for all core samples. This demonstrates the importance of replicating in situ effective stresses when measuring hydraulic conductivity of cores of deep aquifers in the laboratory. PMID:12236264

  14. Coordination of stem and leaf hydraulic conductance in southern California shrubs: a test of the hydraulic segmentation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pivovaroff, Alexandria L; Sack, Lawren; Santiago, Louis S

    2014-08-01

    Coordination of water movement among plant organs is important for understanding plant water use strategies. The hydraulic segmentation hypothesis (HSH) proposes that hydraulic conductance in shorter lived, 'expendable' organs such as leaves and longer lived, more 'expensive' organs such as stems may be decoupled, with resistance in leaves acting as a bottleneck or 'safety valve'. We tested the HSH in woody species from a Mediterranean-type ecosystem by measuring leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) and stem hydraulic conductivity (KS). We also investigated whether leaves function as safety valves by relating Kleaf and the hydraulic safety margin (stem water potential minus the water potential at which 50% of conductivity is lost (Ψstem-Ψ50)). We also examined related plant traits including the operating range of water potentials, wood density, leaf mass per area, and leaf area to sapwood area ratio to provide insight into whole-plant water use strategies. For hydrated shoots, Kleaf was negatively correlated with KS , supporting the HSH. Additionally, Kleaf was positively correlated with the hydraulic safety margin and negatively correlated with the leaf area to sapwood area ratio. Consistent with the HSH, our data indicate that leaves may act as control valves for species with high KS , or a low safety margin. This critical role of leaves appears to contribute importantly to plant ecological specialization in a drought-prone environment.

  15. NMR Logging to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity in Unconsolidated Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Knight, Rosemary; Walsh, David O; Butler, James J; Grunewald, Elliot; Liu, Gaisheng; Parsekian, Andrew D; Reboulet, Edward C; Knobbe, Steve; Barrows, Mercer

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging provides a new means of estimating the hydraulic conductivity (K) of unconsolidated aquifers. The estimation of K from the measured NMR parameters can be performed using the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) equation, which is based on the Kozeny-Carman equation and initially developed for obtaining permeability from NMR logging in petroleum reservoirs. The SDR equation includes empirically determined constants. Decades of research for petroleum applications have resulted in standard values for these constants that can provide accurate estimates of permeability in consolidated formations. The question we asked: Can standard values for the constants be defined for hydrogeologic applications that would yield accurate estimates of K in unconsolidated aquifers? Working at 10 locations at three field sites in Kansas and Washington, USA, we acquired NMR and K data using direct-push methods over a 10- to 20-m depth interval in the shallow subsurface. Analysis of pairs of NMR and K data revealed that we could dramatically improve K estimates by replacing the standard petroleum constants with new constants, optimal for estimating K in the unconsolidated materials at the field sites. Most significant was the finding that there was little change in the SDR constants between sites. This suggests that we can define a new set of constants that can be used to obtain high resolution, cost-effective estimates of K from NMR logging in unconsolidated aquifers. This significant result has the potential to change dramatically the approach to determining K for hydrogeologic applications. PMID:25810149

  16. Evaluation of vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity in unconsolidated sediments.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Michael; Dietrich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Detailed information on vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity (K) is essential to describe the dynamics of groundwater movement at contaminated sites or as input data used for modeling. K values in high vertical resolution should be determined because K tends to be more continuous in the horizontal than in the vertical direction. To determine K in shallow unconsolidated sediments and in the vertical direction, the recently developed direct-push injection logger can be used. The information obtained by this method serves as a proxy for K and has to be calibrated to obtain quantitative K values of measured vertical profiles. In this study, we performed direct-push soil sampling, sieve analyses and direct-push slug tests to obtain K values in vertical high resolution. Using the results of direct-push slug tests, quantitative K values obtained by the direct-push injection logger could be determined successfully. The results of sieve analyses provided lower accordance with the logs due to the inherent limitations of the sieving method.

  17. NMR Logging to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity in Unconsolidated Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Knight, Rosemary; Walsh, David O; Butler, James J; Grunewald, Elliot; Liu, Gaisheng; Parsekian, Andrew D; Reboulet, Edward C; Knobbe, Steve; Barrows, Mercer

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging provides a new means of estimating the hydraulic conductivity (K) of unconsolidated aquifers. The estimation of K from the measured NMR parameters can be performed using the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) equation, which is based on the Kozeny-Carman equation and initially developed for obtaining permeability from NMR logging in petroleum reservoirs. The SDR equation includes empirically determined constants. Decades of research for petroleum applications have resulted in standard values for these constants that can provide accurate estimates of permeability in consolidated formations. The question we asked: Can standard values for the constants be defined for hydrogeologic applications that would yield accurate estimates of K in unconsolidated aquifers? Working at 10 locations at three field sites in Kansas and Washington, USA, we acquired NMR and K data using direct-push methods over a 10- to 20-m depth interval in the shallow subsurface. Analysis of pairs of NMR and K data revealed that we could dramatically improve K estimates by replacing the standard petroleum constants with new constants, optimal for estimating K in the unconsolidated materials at the field sites. Most significant was the finding that there was little change in the SDR constants between sites. This suggests that we can define a new set of constants that can be used to obtain high resolution, cost-effective estimates of K from NMR logging in unconsolidated aquifers. This significant result has the potential to change dramatically the approach to determining K for hydrogeologic applications.

  18. Determining the Hydraulic Conductivity of the Subsurface in Wetland Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, L. E.; Mutiti, S.; Hazzard, S.

    2011-12-01

    Slug tests are a popular method for determining hydraulic conductivity (K) of subsurface material and have the potential to be very accurate because of minimal disturbance to the subsurface. A variety of methods and piezometer construction are widely used for slug tests. Most wetland environments are composed of low K material such as silt or clay, which can make determination of hydrogeologic properties challenging. This study is part of a broader ongoing project to understand the functions of wetlands in Milledgeville, Georgia, a city in the Oconee River Basin (ORB), which straddles the Piedmont and the Coastal Plain. The ORB sits on saprolite and gneiss bedrock, and consequently, its wetlands exhibit a high concentration of clay materials. One site, the Oconee River Greenway, lies along the riverbanks of the Oconee. The second site, Andalusia Farm, is a historical site formerly belonging to writer, Flannery O'Connor. The objective of this study was to determine the best method and/or piezometer type for determining K values for low permeability wetland material. We also investigated the potential of using heat and pressure monitoring to determine horizontal and vertical extent of slug tests. The Greenway wetland has significant seasonal interflow through a relatively more permeable sandy layer. Borehole logs and electrical resistivity profiling were used to study the subsurface stratigraphy. Slug test results from different types of piezometers (borehole, drive point, partially screened and fully screened) were compared. Pressure transducers and HOBO thermisters were used to collect water depth, pressure and temperature data. These results were also compared to results from sediment analyses, in-situ permeameters and heat monitoring. Drive point and borehole piezometers with equal diameters produced comparable K estimates at each site. However, fully screened piezometers of either installation type produced higher K values than partially screened piezometers

  19. Mapping saturated hydraulic conductivity in the presence of deterministic trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Alexander; Zimmermann, Beate

    2014-05-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) is an important soil characteristic. Accounting for Ks spatial patterns in distributed hydrological models can improve the model performance considerably. However, obtaining realistic fields of Ks is notoriously difficult because of the pronounced small-scale variability of this variable. In an attempt to adequately characterize Ks spatial variation in a tropical forest catchment, which features a high density of surficial flowlines, we applied a combination of two sampling approaches. At first, we conducted a classical nested sampling survey to assess the scales over which Ks varied in the target area. Next, we applied a purposive sampling strategy which considered hydrologic information on the temporal frequency of overland flow occurrence in the flowlines. The nested sampling approach revealed the dominance of small-scale variability, which is in line with previous findings. Data from the purposive sampling, however, indicated the presence of a strong spatial gradient: surface Ks was extremely low in flowlines and approached values similar to the spatial mean of Ks at a distance of 10 m to flowlines. To build a geostatistical model of the spatial variation of Ks we combined the data from both nested and purposive sampling and used a linear mixed modelling framework where the data are modeled as the additive combination of fixed effects, random effects and independent random error. We ascribed the fixed effects to an external drift variable, the distance to flowline of each point in space. Random effects and independent random error are described by the variogram. In this contribution we will discuss the hydrological relevance of the modelled Ks pattern using probability maps of Ks exceedance for a range of rainfall intensities.

  20. Hydraulic conductance of Acacia phyllodes (foliage) is driven by primary nerve (vein) conductance and density.

    PubMed

    Sommerville, Katy E; Sack, Lawren; Ball, Marilyn C

    2012-01-01

    We determined effects of venation traits on hydraulic conductance of phyllodes (foliage), using an array of Acacia s.str. species with diverse phyllode morphologies as the source of variation. Measurements were made on phyllodes from 44 species, grown in common gardens but originating from different positions along a precipitation gradient. K(phyllode) varied 18-fold and was positively correlated with primary nerve hydraulic conductance, and with primary nerve (vein) density but not with minor nerve density, in contrast with previous studies of true leaves in other dicotyledons. Phyllodes with higher primary nerve density also had greater mass per area (PMA) and larger bundle sheath extensions (BSEs) from their minor nerves. We suggest that higher primary nerve conductivity and density may decrease the distance travelled in the high-resistance extra-xylem pathways of the phyllode. Further, larger BSEs may increase the area available for dispersion of water from the xylem to the extra-xylem tissue. High PMA phyllodes were more common in acacias from areas receiving lower annual precipitation. Maximizing efficient water movement through phyllodes may be more important where rainfall is meagre and infrequent, explaining relationships between nerve patterns and the climates of origin in Australian phyllodinous Acacia.

  1. The use of electrical conductivity measurements in the prediction of hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Qifei; Fratta, Dante; Wang, Yu-Hsing

    2015-03-01

    Statistical models have been widely used in soil science, hydrogeology and geotechnical engineering to predict the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. However, no effective method is available yet for the determination of the associated model parameters such as the tortuosity factor q. Considering the analogy between water flow and electrical current flow in a porous medium, in this study, we proposed to improve the predictive capability of statistical models by determining the tortuosity factor q using electrical conductivity (EC) measurements. We first developed a theoretical hydraulic-electrical conductivity (K-EC) relationship for unsaturated soils based on the bundle of capillary tubes model. This K-EC relationship was then used to form a new unsaturated soil EC model, which was verified using published experimental data. The tortuosity factor q can then be determined by fitting the new EC model to soil EC measurements. Experimental data of six soils were used to test the effectiveness of this method and it was shown that the prediction was significantly improved when compared with the one using the commonly suggested value q = 0.5. The associated root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) between measurements and predictions is only 0.28 when q is obtained by using our proposed method. In contrast, the RMSD is 0.97 when q is simply assumed as 0.5.

  2. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR DETERMINING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.

    2013-09-30

    Plausible, but unvalidated, theoretical model constructs for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of fractured porous media are currently used in Performance Assessment (PA) modeling for cracked saltstone and concrete (Flach 2011). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has expressed concern about the lack of model support for these assumed Moisture Characteristic Curves (MCC) data, as noted in Requests for Additional Information (RAIs) PA-8 and SP-4 (Savannah River Remediation, LLC, 2011). The objective of this task was to advance PA model support by developing an experimental method for determining the hydraulic conductivity of fractured cementitious materials under unsaturated conditions, and to demonstrate the technique on fractured saltstone samples. The task was requested through Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-SSF-TTR-2012-0016 and conducted in accordance with Task Technical & Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-TR-2012-00090. Preliminary method development previously conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) identified transient outflow extraction as the most promising method for characterizing the unsaturated properties of fractured porous media. While the research conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) focused on fractured media analogs such as stacked glass slides, the current task focused directly on fractured saltstone. For this task, four sample types with differing fracture geometries were considered: 1) intact saltstone, 2) intact saltstone with a single saw cut, smooth surface fracture, 3) micro-fractured saltstone (induced by oven drying), and 4) micro-fractured saltstone with a single, fully-penetrating, rough-surface fracture. Each sample type was tested initially for saturated hydraulic conductivity following method ASTM D 5084 using a flexible wall permeameter. Samples were subsequently tested using the transient outflow extraction method to determine cumulative outflow as a function of time and applied pressure. Of the four sample types tested, two yielded

  3. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and porosity within macroaggregates modified by tillage

    SciTech Connect

    Park, E.J.; Smucker, A.J.M.

    2010-07-20

    Greater knowledge of intraaggregate porosity modifications by tillage conveys new information for identifying additional hydrologic, ion retention, and aggregate stability responses to specific management practices. Macroaggregates, 2 to 4, 4 to 6.3, and 6.3 to 9.5 mm across, were separated into multiple concentric layers and their porosities were determined. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (K{sub s}) of multiple aggregate fractions from two soil types subjected to conventional tillage (CT), no tillage (NT), and native forest (NF) soils were measured individually to identify the effects of tillage on aggregate structure, porosity, and K{sub s}. Intraaggregate porosities were the highest in NF aggregates. Greater porosities were identified in exterior layers of soil aggregates from all treatments. Lowest intraaggregate porosities were observed in the central regions of CT aggregates. Soil aggregates, 6.3 to 9.5 mm across, had the greatest total porosities, averaging 37.5% for both soil types. Long-term CT reduced intraaggregate porosities and K, within macroaggregates, of the same size fraction, from both the Hoytville silty clay loam and Wooster silt loam soil types. Values for K, of NF aggregates, 5.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, were reduced 50-fold by long-term CT treatments of the Hoytville series. The K, values through Wooster aggregates from NF, 16.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, were reduced 80-fold by long-term CT treatments. The K{sub s} values through NF and NT aggregates were positively correlated with their intraaggregate porosities (R{sup 2} = 0.84 for NF and R{sup 2} = 0.45 for NT at P < 0.005). Additional studies are needed to identify rates at which pore geometries within macroaggregates are degraded by CT or improved by NT.

  4. Statistical and geostatistical features of streambed hydraulic conductivities in the Platte River, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xunhong

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents streambed hydraulic conductivities of the Platte River from south-central to eastern Nebraska. The hydraulic conductivities were determined from river channels using permeameter tests. The vertical hydraulic conductivities ( K v ) from seven test sites along this river in south-central Nebraska belong to one statistical population. Its mean value is 40.2 m/d. However, the vertical hydraulic conductivities along four transects of the Ashland test site in eastern Nebraska have lower mean values, are statistically different from the K v values in south-central Nebraska, and belong to two different populations with mean values of 20.7 and 9.1 m/d, respectively. Finer sediments carried from the Loup River and Elkhorn River watersheds to the eastern reach of the Platte River lowers the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the streambed. Correlation coefficients between water depth and K v values along a test transect indicates a positive correlation a larger K v usually occurs in the part of channel with deeper water. Experimental variograms derived from the vertical hydraulic conductivities for several transects across the channels of the Platte River show periodicity of spatial correlation, which likely result from periodic variation of water depth across the channels. The sandy to gravelly streambed contains very local silt and clay layers; spatially continuous low-permeability streambed was not observed in the river channels. The horizontal hydraulic conductivities were larger than the vertical hydraulic conductivities for the same test locations.

  5. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  6. Determination of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity by automated minidisk infiltrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipa, Vladimir; Snehota, Michal; Dohnal, Michal; Zumr, David

    2013-04-01

    Numerical models in surface and subsurface hydrology require knowledge of infiltration properties of soils for their routine use in the field of water management, environmental protection or agriculture. A new automated tension infiltration module has been designed at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague to facilitate the measurements of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity. In the proposed infiltration module the amount of infiltrated water is registered via changes of buoyant force of stationary float attached to the load cell. Presented setup consists of six mini-disk infiltrometer modules held in the light aluminum frame and two Mariotte's bottles. Three infiltrometer modules connected to each Mariotte's bottle allow performing six simultaneous measurements at two different pressure heads. Infiltration modules are connected to the automatic data logging system and consist of: plastic cover with the integrated load cell and the float, reservoir tube (external diameter of 50 mm), and sintered stainless steel plate (diameter of 44.5 mm). The newly developed device was used for determination of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity of soils in experimental catchments Uhlirska (Jizera Mountains, Northern Bohemia) and Kopaninsky creek (Bohemian-Moravian Highlands). The acquired data show a good agreement with the data obtained from previous measurements.

  7. Leaf hydraulic conductance for a tank bromeliad: axial and radial pathways for moving and conserving water.

    PubMed

    North, Gretchen B; Lynch, Frank H; Maharaj, Franklin D R; Phillips, Carly A; Woodside, Walter T

    2013-01-01

    Epiphytic plants in the Bromeliaceae known as tank bromeliads essentially lack stems and absorptive roots and instead take up water from reservoirs formed by their overlapping leaf bases. For such plants, leaf hydraulic conductance is plant hydraulic conductance. Their simple strap-shaped leaves and parallel venation make them suitable for modeling leaf hydraulic conductance based on vasculature and other anatomical and morphological traits. Plants of the tank bromeliad Guzmania lingulata were investigated in a lowland tropical forest in Costa Rica and a shaded glasshouse in Los Angeles, CA, USA. Stomatal conductance to water vapor and leaf anatomical variables related to hydraulic conductance were measured for both groups. Tracheid diameters and numbers of vascular bundles (veins) were used with the Hagen-Poiseuille equation to calculate axial hydraulic conductance. Measurements of leaf hydraulic conductance using the evaporative flux method were also made for glasshouse plants. Values for axial conductance and leaf hydraulic conductance were used in a model based on leaky cable theory to estimate the conductance of the radial pathway from the vein to the leaf surface and to assess the relative contributions of both axial and radial pathways. In keeping with low stomatal conductance, low stomatal density, low vein density, and narrow tracheid diameters, leaf hydraulic conductance for G. lingulata was quite low in comparison with most other angiosperms. Using the predicted axial conductance in the leaky cable model, the radial resistance across the leaf mesophyll was predicted to predominate; lower, more realistic values of axial conductance resulted in predicted radial resistances that were closer to axial resistance in their impact on total leaf resistance. Tracer dyes suggested that water uptake through the tank region of the leaf was not limiting. Both dye movement and the leaky cable model indicated that the leaf blade of G. lingulata was structurally and

  8. Leaf hydraulic conductance for a tank bromeliad: axial and radial pathways for moving and conserving water.

    PubMed

    North, Gretchen B; Lynch, Frank H; Maharaj, Franklin D R; Phillips, Carly A; Woodside, Walter T

    2013-01-01

    Epiphytic plants in the Bromeliaceae known as tank bromeliads essentially lack stems and absorptive roots and instead take up water from reservoirs formed by their overlapping leaf bases. For such plants, leaf hydraulic conductance is plant hydraulic conductance. Their simple strap-shaped leaves and parallel venation make them suitable for modeling leaf hydraulic conductance based on vasculature and other anatomical and morphological traits. Plants of the tank bromeliad Guzmania lingulata were investigated in a lowland tropical forest in Costa Rica and a shaded glasshouse in Los Angeles, CA, USA. Stomatal conductance to water vapor and leaf anatomical variables related to hydraulic conductance were measured for both groups. Tracheid diameters and numbers of vascular bundles (veins) were used with the Hagen-Poiseuille equation to calculate axial hydraulic conductance. Measurements of leaf hydraulic conductance using the evaporative flux method were also made for glasshouse plants. Values for axial conductance and leaf hydraulic conductance were used in a model based on leaky cable theory to estimate the conductance of the radial pathway from the vein to the leaf surface and to assess the relative contributions of both axial and radial pathways. In keeping with low stomatal conductance, low stomatal density, low vein density, and narrow tracheid diameters, leaf hydraulic conductance for G. lingulata was quite low in comparison with most other angiosperms. Using the predicted axial conductance in the leaky cable model, the radial resistance across the leaf mesophyll was predicted to predominate; lower, more realistic values of axial conductance resulted in predicted radial resistances that were closer to axial resistance in their impact on total leaf resistance. Tracer dyes suggested that water uptake through the tank region of the leaf was not limiting. Both dye movement and the leaky cable model indicated that the leaf blade of G. lingulata was structurally and

  9. Leaf Hydraulic Conductance for a Tank Bromeliad: Axial and Radial Pathways for Moving and Conserving Water

    PubMed Central

    North, Gretchen B.; Lynch, Frank H.; Maharaj, Franklin D. R.; Phillips, Carly A.; Woodside, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Epiphytic plants in the Bromeliaceae known as tank bromeliads essentially lack stems and absorptive roots and instead take up water from reservoirs formed by their overlapping leaf bases. For such plants, leaf hydraulic conductance is plant hydraulic conductance. Their simple strap-shaped leaves and parallel venation make them suitable for modeling leaf hydraulic conductance based on vasculature and other anatomical and morphological traits. Plants of the tank bromeliad Guzmania lingulata were investigated in a lowland tropical forest in Costa Rica and a shaded glasshouse in Los Angeles, CA, USA. Stomatal conductance to water vapor and leaf anatomical variables related to hydraulic conductance were measured for both groups. Tracheid diameters and numbers of vascular bundles (veins) were used with the Hagen–Poiseuille equation to calculate axial hydraulic conductance. Measurements of leaf hydraulic conductance using the evaporative flux method were also made for glasshouse plants. Values for axial conductance and leaf hydraulic conductance were used in a model based on leaky cable theory to estimate the conductance of the radial pathway from the vein to the leaf surface and to assess the relative contributions of both axial and radial pathways. In keeping with low stomatal conductance, low stomatal density, low vein density, and narrow tracheid diameters, leaf hydraulic conductance for G. lingulata was quite low in comparison with most other angiosperms. Using the predicted axial conductance in the leaky cable model, the radial resistance across the leaf mesophyll was predicted to predominate; lower, more realistic values of axial conductance resulted in predicted radial resistances that were closer to axial resistance in their impact on total leaf resistance. Tracer dyes suggested that water uptake through the tank region of the leaf was not limiting. Both dye movement and the leaky cable model indicated that the leaf blade of G. lingulata was structurally and

  10. IN-SERVICE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF GCLS IN LANDFILL COVERS - LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments using multi-species inorganic solutions (containing calcium and sodium) were conducted on specimens of a new geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) containing sodium bentonite to determine how cation exchange and desiccation affected the hydraulic conductivity. Calc...

  11. MEASUREMENT OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY DISTRIBUTIONS: A MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of hydrologists to perform field measurements of aquifer hydraulic properties must be enhanced in order to significantly improve the capacity to solve groundwater contamination problems at Superfund and other sites. The primary purpose of this manual is to provide ne...

  12. A Self-Consistent Approach for Calculating the Effective Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bimodal, Heterogeneous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdniakov, Sergey; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-01-02

    In this paper, we consider an approach for estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 3D medium with a binary distribution of local hydraulic conductivities. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix medium conductivity with spatially distributed sets of inclusions. Estimation of effective conductivity is based on a self-consistent approach introduced by Shvidler (1985). The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated numerically by using a simple system of equations for the main diagonal elements. Verification of the method is done by comparison with theoretical results for special cases and numerical results of Desbarats (1987) and our own numerical modeling. The method was applied to estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 2D and 3D fractured porous medium. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix conductivity and a spatially distributed set of highly conductive fractures. The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated for parallel- and random-oriented sets of fractures. The obtained effective conductivity values coincide with Romm's (1966) and Snow's (1969) theories for infinite fracture length. These values are also physically acceptable for the sparsely-fractured-medium case with low fracture spatial density and finite fracture length. Verification of the effective hydraulic conductivity obtained for a fractured porous medium is done by comparison with our own numerical modeling for a 3D case and with Malkovsky and Pek's (1995) results for a 2D case.

  13. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.; Kirby, Klane

    This curriculum guide contains a course in hydraulics to train entry-level workers for automotive mechanics and other fields that utilize hydraulics. The module contains 14 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) introduction to hydraulics; (2) fundamentals of hydraulics; (3) reservoirs; (4) lines, fittings, and couplers; (5)…

  14. Determination of hydraulic conductivity from grain-size distribution for different depositional environments.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Jorge; Lopez, Oliver; Missimer, Thomas M; Coulibaly, Kapo M; Dehwah, Abdullah H A; Sesler, Kathryn; Lujan, Luis R; Mantilla, David

    2014-01-01

    Over 400 unlithified sediment samples were collected from four different depositional environments in global locations and the grain-size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured using standard methods. The measured hydraulic conductivity values were then compared to values calculated using 20 different empirical equations (e.g., Hazen, Carman-Kozeny) commonly used to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain-size distribution. It was found that most of the hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the empirical equations correlated very poorly to the measured hydraulic conductivity values with errors ranging to over 500%. To improve the empirical estimation methodology, the samples were grouped by depositional environment and subdivided into subgroups based on lithology and mud percentage. The empirical methods were then analyzed to assess which methods best estimated the measured values. Modifications of the empirical equations, including changes to special coefficients and addition of offsets, were made to produce modified equations that considerably improve the hydraulic conductivity estimates from grain size data for beach, dune, offshore marine, and river sediments. Estimated hydraulic conductivity errors were reduced to 6 to 7.1 m/day for the beach subgroups, 3.4 to 7.1 m/day for dune subgroups, and 2.2 to 11 m/day for offshore sediments subgroups. Improvements were made for river environments, but still produced high errors between 13 and 23 m/day.

  15. Effects of non-Gaussian copula-based hydraulic conductivity fields on macrodispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslauer, C. P.; Guthke, P.; BáRdossy, A.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    This is an application of a spatial copula model that is fitted to a real world data set. The copula model allows modeling of pure spatial dependence independently of the marginal distribution. Using non-Gaussian copula models it is demonstrated that the spatial dependence structure of the Borden aquifer is significantly non-Gaussian—despite the fact that the Borden aquifer is commonly thought of as a relatively homogeneous porous medium with a small variance of hydraulic conductivity. In addition to evaluating the spatial dependence structure of the Borden hydraulic conductivity data set using copulas, goal of this study is to explore if the structure of the hydraulic conductivity field influences a physical property, such as plume evolution as evaluated by second spatial central moments of concentration fields. For this comparison, two types of hydraulic conductivity fields were fitted to the Borden hydraulic conductivity data set: one with a Gaussian and the other with a non-Gaussian type of dependence. These two types of hydraulic conductivity fields were constructed such that their second-order spatial moments are identical, and hence they cannot be distinguished by semivariogram-based geostatistics. This paper illustrates that the spatial dependence structure of the Borden hydraulic conductivity data set is significantly non-Gaussian. Despite the fact that Borden is a relatively homogeneous porous medium, and despite the fact that both types of spatial fields are not distinguishable by their variograms, the solute transport characteristics based on these two types of isotropic fields differ significantly in two-dimensional settings. The difference is less pronounced in three-dimensions with anisotropy. It is postulated that non-Gaussian spatial dependence of hydraulic conductivity and a more skewed marginal distribution of hydraulic conductivity will have significant implications in the other more heterogeneous aquifers.

  16. Sample dimensions effect on prediction of soil water retention curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water retention curve (SWRC) and saturated hydraulic conductivity (SHC) are key hydraulic properties for unsaturated zone hydrology and groundwater. Not only are the SWRC and SHC measurements time-consuming, their results are scale dependent. Although prediction of the SWRC and SHC from availab...

  17. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of US soils grouped according textural class and bulk density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Importance of the saturated hydraulic conductivity as soil hydraulic property led to the development of multiple pedotransfer functions for estimating it. One approach to estimating Ksat was using textural classes rather than specific textural fraction contents as pedotransfer inputs. The objective...

  18. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of US soils grouped according to textural class and bulk density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Importance of the saturated hydraulic conductivity as soil hydraulic property led to the development of multiple pedotransfer functions for estimating it. One approach to estimating Ksat was using textural classes rather than specific textural fraction contents as pedotransfer inputs. The objective...

  19. A delineation of regional hydraulic conductivity based on water table fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eungyu; Kim, Kue-Young; Ding, Guoping; Kim, Kangjoo; Han, Weon Shik; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Kim, Namjin

    2011-03-01

    SummaryThe estimation of regional hydraulic conductivity is essential for the sustainable development and efficient management of groundwater. This paper presents a new physical method of estimating hydraulic conductivity based on the water level fluctuation model developed by Park and Parker (Park, E., Parker, J.C., 2008. A simple model for water table fluctuations in response to precipitation. J. Hydrol. 356, 344-349). The developed procedure was validated by comparison with the hypothetical numerical model for a variety of hydraulic conductivities, aquifer inclinations, and the heterogeneities. The model was found to be highly reliable when using water level data far from the hydraulic boundaries. The results show that the monitoring data obtained over a range of relative distances of an observation location ( x) to the flow domain ( W), x/ W > 0.2 avoided the boundary effects. A correction factor was also proposed based on the deviation analysis of the calibrated K and f/ n (ratio of recharge to precipitation divided by porosity). The results from the basal inclinations and the heterogeneities cases suggest that the estimated hydraulic conductivity is representing regional property rather than the local one. To confirm the validity of the proposed procedure, it was applied to the coastal aquifer of Jeju Island, Korea. The calibrated hydraulic conductivities were consistent with the results from previous studies. These results show that the proposed method is an effective and economical means to estimate hydraulic conductivity of large supporting volumes of subsurface aquifers with the convenient use of recharge and groundwater level data.

  20. Characterization of stony soils' hydraulic conductivity using laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Eléonore; Pichault, Mathieu; Pansak, Wanwisa; Degré, Aurore; Garré, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Determining soil hydraulic properties is of major concern in various fields of study. Although stony soils are widespread across the globe, most studies deal with gravel-free soils, so that the literature describing the impact of stones on the hydraulic conductivity of a soil is still rather scarce. Most frequently, models characterizing the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils assume that the only effect of rock fragments is to reduce the volume available for water flow, and therefore they predict a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with an increasing stoniness. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of rock fragments on the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was done by means of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations involving different amounts and types of coarse fragments. We compared our results with values predicted by the aforementioned predictive models. Our study suggests that it might be ill-founded to consider that stones only reduce the volume available for water flow. We pointed out several factors of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils that are not considered by these models. On the one hand, the shape and the size of inclusions may substantially affect the hydraulic conductivity. On the other hand, laboratory experiments show that an increasing stone content can counteract and even overcome the effect of a reduced volume in some cases: we observed an increase in saturated hydraulic conductivity with volume of inclusions. These differences are mainly important near to saturation. However, comparison of results from predictive models and our experiments in unsaturated conditions shows that models and data agree on a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with stone content, even though the experimental conditions did not allow testing for stone contents higher than 20 %.

  1. Crosswell seismic investigation of hydraulically conductive, fracture bedrock near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, K.J.; Hsieh, P.A.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire (USA), hydraulically conductive, fractured bedrock was investigated with the crosswell seismic method to determine whether this method could provide any information about hydraulic conductivity between wells. To this end, crosswell seismic data, acoustic logs from boreholes, image logs from boreholes, and single borehole hydraulic tests were analyzed. The analysis showed that, first, the P-wave velocities from the acoustic logs tended to be higher in schist than they were in granite. (Schist and granite were the dominant rock types). Second, the P-wave velocities from the acoustic logs tended to be low near fractures. Third, the hydraulic conductivity was always low (always less than to 10-8 m/s) where no fractures intersected the borehole, but the hydraulic conductivity ranged from low to high (from less than to 10-10 m/s to 10-4 m/s) where one or more fractures intersected the borehole. Fourth, high hydraulic conductivities were slightly more frequent when the P-wave velocity was low (less than 5200 m/s) than when it was high (greater than or equal to 5200 m/s). The interpretation of this statistical relation was that the fractures tended to increase the hydraulic conductivity and to lower the P-wave velocity. This statistical relation was applied to a velocity tomogram to create a map showing the probability of high hydraulic conductivity; the map was consistent with results from independent hydraulic tests. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hamiltonian Monte Carlo algorithm for the characterization of hydraulic conductivity from the heat tracing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djibrilla Saley, A.; Jardani, A.; Soueid Ahmed, A.; Raphael, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Estimating spatial distributions of the hydraulic conductivity in heterogeneous aquifers has always been an important and challenging task in hydrology. Generally, the hydraulic conductivity field is determined from hydraulic head or pressure measurements. In the present study, we propose to use temperature data as source of information for characterizing the spatial distributions of the hydraulic conductivity field. In this way, we performed a laboratory sandbox experiment with the aim of imaging the heterogeneities of the hydraulic conductivity field from thermal monitoring. During the laboratory experiment, we injected a hot water pulse, which induces a heat plume motion into the sandbox. The induced plume was followed by a set of thermocouples placed in the sandbox. After the temperature data acquisition, we performed a hydraulic tomography using the stochastic Hybrid Monte Carlo approach, also called the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm to invert the temperature data. This algorithm is based on a combination of the Metropolis Monte Carlo method and the Hamiltonian dynamics approach. The parameterization of the inverse problem was done with the Karhunen-Loève (KL) expansion to reduce the dimensionality of the unknown parameters. Our approach has provided successful reconstruction of the hydraulic conductivity field with low computational effort.

  3. Hydraulic conductivity of the streambed, east branch Grand Calumet River, northern Lake County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duwelius, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of the streambed generally was dependant on the type of sediments in the part of the streambed that was tested. Although most of the streambed contained soft, fine-grained sediments, parts of the streambed also contained fill materials including coal, cinders, and concrete and asphalt rubble. The highest values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity generally were calculated from data collected at locations where the streambed contained fill materials, particularly concrete and asphalt rubble. Horizontal hydraulic conductivities determined for 11 hydraulic tests in predominantly fill materials ranged from 1.2x1O+1 to 1.2x1O+3 feet per day and averaged 5.6x1O+2 feet per day. The lowest values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity were calculated from data collected at locations where the streambed contained fine-grained sediments. Horizontal hydraulic conductivities determined for 36 hydraulic tests in predominantly fine-grained sediments ranged from 1.Ox1O-2 to 2.4x1O+2 feet per day and averaged 1.5x1O+1 feet per day.

  4. TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF SAND AND GRAVEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods for determining small-scale variations in aquifer properties were investigated for a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. easurements of aquifer properties, in particular hydraulic conductivity, are needed for further investigations into the effects of aqui...

  5. Spatial characterization of hydraulic conductivity of perialpine alluvial gravel-and-sand aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, Samuel; Vogt, Tobias; Höhn, Eduard

    2010-05-01

    For many hydrogeological and modeling problems on a scale of the order of 10-100 m, an assessment of the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity is of great importance. This is one of the tasks of the RECORD project (Restored Corridor Dynamics) of CCES (Competence Center Environment and Sustainability of the ETH Domain). This project aims to understand, how river restoration measures affect river - river corridor - groundwater systems in hydrologic and ecologic terms. The river Thur and the alluvial gravel-and-sand aquifer of the perialpine Thur valley flood plain were chosen for field investigations. In this aquifer, the distribution of hydraulic conductivity at the required scale has not yet been investigated. Thus, the aim of this work is to assess the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer on a scale of the order of 10-100 m. To accomplish this, four methods were applied on different scales. Comparing the results of the different methods should lead to an optimization of future hydraulic investigations in alpine and perialpine alluvial gravel-and-sand aquifers. The different methods were applied at a test site in the central part of the valley (Widen, Felben-Wellhausen/TG), which was instrumented with a total of 18 piezometers, covering an approximately 10×20 m area (aquifer thickness, 7 m). The gravel samples of the pre-liminary core drillings were sieved and out of the grain size distributions hydraulic conductivity was calculated (decimeter scale). Further, work included the conduction and analysis of a pumping test (decameter scale), flowmeter logs and multilevel slug tests (meter scale) with appropriate methods. A statistical evaluation of the values of hydraulic conductivity from the above methods showed that the results are quite diverse. Thus, the choice of the method to assess the distribution of hydraulic conductivity has to be done according to the problem and the required level of detail. The following recommendations

  6. Estimating biozone hydraulic conductivity in wastewater soil-infiltration systems using inverse numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R; McCray, John E

    2007-06-01

    During operation of an onsite wastewater treatment system, a low-permeability biozone develops at the infiltrative surface (IS) during application of wastewater to soil. Inverse numerical-model simulations were used to estimate the biozone saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(biozone)) under variably saturated conditions for 29 wastewater infiltration test cells installed in a sandy loam field soil. Test cells employed two loading rates (4 and 8cm/day) and 3 IS designs: open chamber, gravel, and synthetic bundles. The ratio of K(biozone) to the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the natural soil (K(s)) was used to quantify the reductions in the IS hydraulic conductivity. A smaller value of K(biozone)/K(s,) reflects a greater reduction in hydraulic conductivity. The IS hydraulic conductivity was reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity was primarily influenced by wastewater loading rate and IS type and not by the K(s) of the native soil. The higher loading rate yielded greater reductions in IS hydraulic conductivity than the lower loading rate for bundle and gravel cells, but the difference was not statistically significant for chamber cells. Bundle and gravel cells exhibited a greater reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity than chamber cells at the higher loading rates, while the difference between gravel and bundle systems was not statistically significant. At the lower rate, bundle cells exhibited generally lower K(biozone)/K(s) values, but not at a statistically significant level, while gravel and chamber cells were statistically similar. Gravel cells exhibited the greatest variability in measured values, which may complicate design efforts based on K(biozone) evaluations for these systems. These results suggest that chamber systems may provide for a more robust design, particularly for high or variable wastewater infiltration rates.

  7. Estimating biozone hydraulic conductivity in wastewater soil-infiltration systems using inverse numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R; McCray, John E

    2007-06-01

    During operation of an onsite wastewater treatment system, a low-permeability biozone develops at the infiltrative surface (IS) during application of wastewater to soil. Inverse numerical-model simulations were used to estimate the biozone saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(biozone)) under variably saturated conditions for 29 wastewater infiltration test cells installed in a sandy loam field soil. Test cells employed two loading rates (4 and 8cm/day) and 3 IS designs: open chamber, gravel, and synthetic bundles. The ratio of K(biozone) to the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the natural soil (K(s)) was used to quantify the reductions in the IS hydraulic conductivity. A smaller value of K(biozone)/K(s,) reflects a greater reduction in hydraulic conductivity. The IS hydraulic conductivity was reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity was primarily influenced by wastewater loading rate and IS type and not by the K(s) of the native soil. The higher loading rate yielded greater reductions in IS hydraulic conductivity than the lower loading rate for bundle and gravel cells, but the difference was not statistically significant for chamber cells. Bundle and gravel cells exhibited a greater reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity than chamber cells at the higher loading rates, while the difference between gravel and bundle systems was not statistically significant. At the lower rate, bundle cells exhibited generally lower K(biozone)/K(s) values, but not at a statistically significant level, while gravel and chamber cells were statistically similar. Gravel cells exhibited the greatest variability in measured values, which may complicate design efforts based on K(biozone) evaluations for these systems. These results suggest that chamber systems may provide for a more robust design, particularly for high or variable wastewater infiltration rates. PMID:17449084

  8. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Nancy; And Others

    These instructional materials provide an orientation to hydraulics for use at the postsecondary level. The first of 12 sections presents an introduction to hydraulics, including discussion of principles of liquids, definitions, liquid flow, the two types of hydraulic fluids, pressure gauges, and strainers and filters. The second section identifies…

  9. Circadian rhythms of hydraulic conductance and growth are enhanced by drought and improve plant performance.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Cecilio F; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

    2014-11-05

    Circadian rhythms enable plants to anticipate daily environmental variations, resulting in growth oscillations under continuous light. Because plants daily transpire up to 200% of their water content, their water status oscillates from favourable during the night to unfavourable during the day. We show that rhythmic leaf growth under continuous light is observed in plants that experience large alternations of water status during an entrainment period, but is considerably buffered otherwise. Measurements and computer simulations show that this is due to oscillations of plant hydraulic conductance and plasma membrane aquaporin messenger RNA abundance in roots during continuous light. A simulation model suggests that circadian oscillations of root hydraulic conductance contribute to acclimation to water stress by increasing root water uptake, thereby favouring growth and photosynthesis. They have a negative effect in favourable hydraulic conditions. Climate-driven control of root hydraulic conductance therefore improves plant performances in both stressed and non-stressed conditions.

  10. Circadian rhythms of hydraulic conductance and growth are enhanced by drought and improve plant performance

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, Cecilio F.; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms enable plants to anticipate daily environmental variations, resulting in growth oscillations under continuous light. Because plants daily transpire up to 200% of their water content, their water status oscillates from favourable during the night to unfavourable during the day. We show that rhythmic leaf growth under continuous light is observed in plants that experience large alternations of water status during an entrainment period, but is considerably buffered otherwise. Measurements and computer simulations show that this is due to oscillations of plant hydraulic conductance and plasma membrane aquaporin messenger RNA abundance in roots during continuous light. A simulation model suggests that circadian oscillations of root hydraulic conductance contribute to acclimation to water stress by increasing root water uptake, thereby favouring growth and photosynthesis. They have a negative effect in favourable hydraulic conditions. Climate-driven control of root hydraulic conductance therefore improves plant performances in both stressed and non-stressed conditions. PMID:25370944

  11. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  12. Characterization of stony soils' hydraulic conductivity using laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichault, M.; Beckers, E.; Degré, A.; Garré, S.

    2015-10-01

    Determining soil hydraulic properties is of major concern in various fields of study. Though stony soils are widespread across the globe, most studies deal with gravel-free soils so that the literature describing the impact of stones on soil's hydraulic conductivity is still rather scarce. Most frequently, models characterizing the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils assume that the only effect of rock fragments is to reduce the volume available for water flow and therefore they predict a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with an increasing stoniness. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of rock fragments on the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was done by means of laboratory and numerical experiments involving different amounts and types of coarse fragments. We compared our results with values predicted by the aforementioned models. Our study suggests that considering that stones only reduce the volume available for water flow might be ill-founded. We pointed out several drivers of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils, not considered by these models. On the one hand, the shape and the size of inclusions may substantially affect the hydraulic conductivity. On the other hand, the presence of rock fragments can counteract and even overcome the effect of a reduced volume in some cases. We attribute this to the creation of voids at the fine earth-stone interface. Nevertheless, these differences are mainly important near to saturation. However, we come up with a more nuanced view regarding the validity of the models under unsaturated conditions. Indeed, under unsaturated conditions, the models seem to represent the hydraulic behaviour of stones reasonably well.

  13. EFFECT OF FREEZE-THAW ON THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF BARRIER MATERIALS: LABORATORY AND FIELD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted on barrier materials to determine if their hydraulic conductivity changes as a result of freezing and thawing. esults of the tests were compared to data collected from a field study. ests were conducted on two compacted clays, one sand-bentonite mi...

  14. Getting saturated hydraulic conductivity from surface Ground-Penetrating Radar measurements inside a ring infiltrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, E.; Saintenoy, A.; Coquet, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic properties of soils, described by the soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions, strongly influence water flow in the vadoze zone, as well as the partitioning of precipitation between infiltration into the soil and runoff along the ground surface. Their evaluation has important applications for modelling available water resources and for flood forecasting. It is also crucial to evaluate soil's capacity to retain chemical pollutants and to assess the potential of groundwater pollution. The determination of the parameters involved in soil water retention functions, 5 parameters when using the van Genuchten function, is usually done by laboratory experiments, such as the water hanging column. Hydraulic conductivity, on the other hand can be estimated either in laboratory, or in situ using infiltrometry tests. Among the large panel of existing tests, the single or double ring infiltrometers give the field saturated hydraulic conductivity by applying a positive charge on soils, whereas the disk infiltrometer allows to reconstruct the whole hydraulic conductivity curve, by applying different charges smaller than or equal to zero. In their classical use, volume of infiltrated water versus time are fitted to infer soil's hydraulic conductivity close to water saturation. Those tests are time-consuming and difficult to apply to landscape-scale forecasting of infiltration. Furthermore they involve many assumptions concerning the form of the infiltration bulb and its evolution. Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a geophysical method based on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is highly sensitive to water content variations directly related to the dielectric permittivity. In this study GPR was used to monitor water infiltration inside a ring infiltrometer and retrieve the saturated hydraulic conductivity. We carried out experiments in a quarry of Fontainebleau sand, using a Mala RAMAC system with antennae centered on 1600 MHz. We recorded traces at

  15. The Dependence of Peat Soil Hydraulic Conductivity on Dominant Vegetation Type in Mountain Fens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, A. C.; Ronayne, M. J.; Cooper, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The peat soil within fen wetlands provides water storage that can substantially influence the hydrology of mountain watersheds. In this study, we investigated the relationship between hydraulic conductivity and vegetation type for fens occurring in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), Colorado, USA. Vegetation in RMNP fens can be dominated by woody plants and shrubs, such as willows; by mosses; or by herbaceous plants such as sedges. Fens dominated by each vegetation type were selected for study. Six fens were investigated, all of which are in the Colorado River watershed on the west side of RMNP. For each site, soil hydraulic conductivity was measured at multiple locations using a single-ring infiltrometer. As a result of the shallow water table in these fens (the water table was always within 10 cm of the surface), horizontal hydraulic gradients were produced during the field tests. The measured infiltration rates were analyzed using the numerical model HYDRUS. In order to determine the hydraulic conductivity, a parameter estimation problem was solved using HYDRUS as the forward simulator. Horizontal flow was explicitly accounted for in the model. This approach produced more accurate estimates of hydraulic conductivity than would be obtained using an analytical solution that assumes strictly vertical flow. Significant differences in hydraulic properties between fens appear to result at least in part from the effects of different dominant vegetation types on peat soil formation.

  16. Using boosted regression trees to predict the near-saturated hydraulic conductivity of undisturbed soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestel, John; Bechtold, Michel; Jorda, Helena; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    The saturated and near-saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil is of key importance for modelling water and solute fluxes in the vadose zone. Hydraulic conductivity measurements are cumbersome at the Darcy scale and practically impossible at larger scales where water and solute transport models are mostly applied. Hydraulic conductivity must therefore be estimated from proxy variables. Such pedotransfer functions are known to work decently well for e.g. water retention curves but rather poorly for near-saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivities. Recently, Weynants et al. (2009, Revisiting Vereecken pedotransfer functions: Introducing a closed-form hydraulic model. Vadose Zone Journal, 8, 86-95) reported a coefficients of determination of 0.25 (validation with an independent data set) for the saturated hydraulic conductivity from lab-measurements of Belgian soil samples. In our study, we trained boosted regression trees on a global meta-database containing tension-disk infiltrometer data (see Jarvis et al. 2013. Influence of soil, land use and climatic factors on the hydraulic conductivity of soil. Hydrology & Earth System Sciences, 17, 5185-5195) to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and the conductivity at a tension of 10 cm (K10). We found coefficients of determination of 0.39 and 0.62 under a simple 10-fold cross-validation for Ks and K10. When carrying out the validation folded over the data-sources, i.e. the source publications, we found that the corresponding coefficients of determination reduced to 0.15 and 0.36, respectively. We conclude that the stricter source-wise cross-validation should be applied in future pedotransfer studies to prevent overly optimistic validation results. The boosted regression trees also allowed for an investigation of relevant predictors for estimating the near-saturated hydraulic conductivity. We found that land use and bulk density were most important to predict Ks. We also observed that Ks is large in fine

  17. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and biofilms: A theoretical approach linking pore and pedon scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, M.; Moenickes, S.; Richter, O.; Schröder, T.

    2012-04-01

    The fate of active substances in the soil environment is shaped by soil physical properties as well as microbial life. Microorganisms degrading those substances occur in soil pores either in suspension or as biofilms on grain surfaces. At the same scale, i.e. pore scale, the soil physical properties texture, density, porosity, and water content have an impact on transport behaviour of active substances. Macroscopic parameters describe these processes at pedon scale; e.g. hydraulic conductivity summarizes the effect of named pore scale parameters. Narsilio et al. [2009] derived a relationship between the saturated hydraulic conductivity and pore scale water velocity fields based on Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids. However, they did not analyse the influence of heterogeneity and microbial activity, whereas microorganisms, especially biofilms, do have an impact on hydraulic conductivity [Vandevivere and Baveye, 1992]. Biofilms alter the pore geometry while growing. This alteration directly influences the soil water flow field and hence the convective transport of active substances. Here, we present a way to couple the saturated hydraulic conductivity at macro scale to biomass population dynamics and pore space. The hydraulic conductivity will be analysed with regard to heterogeneous soils. The model combining fluid flow, reactive transport, and biofilm dynamics is applied to investigate the degradation and transport behaviour of pesticides in heterogeneous soils.

  18. Geophysical data integration and conditional uncertainty analysis on hydraulic conductivity estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahman, A.; Tsai, F.T.-C.; White, C.D.; Carlson, D.A.; Willson, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Integration of various geophysical data is essential to better understand aquifer heterogeneity. However, data integration is challenging because there are different levels of support between primary and secondary data needed to be correlated in various ways. This study proposes a geostatistical method to integrate the hydraulic conductivity measurements and electrical resistivity data to better estimate the hydraulic conductivity (K) distribution. The K measurements are obtained from the pumping tests and represent the primary data (hard data). The borehole electrical resistivity data from electrical logs are regarded as the secondary data (soft data). The electrical resistivity data is used to infer hydraulic conductivity values through the Archie law and Kozeny-Carman equation. A pseudo cross-semivariogram is developed to cope with the resistivity data non-collocation. Uncertainty in the auto-semivariograms and pseudo cross-semivariogram is quantified. The methodology is demonstrated by a real-world case study where the hydraulic conductivity is estimated in the Upper Chicot aquifer of Southwestern Louisiana. The groundwater responses by the cokriging and cosimulation of hydraulic conductivity are compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA). ?? 2007 ASCE.

  19. The influence of stream bed hydraulic conductivity on sustaining baseflow in rivers.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, O

    2007-01-01

    This study presents the results of the influence of stream bed hydraulic conductivity on baseflow sustainability by using a coupled model of surface and subsurface hydrology. The model provides a coupled solution to the dynamic interactions between a river and a surfacial aquifer and is used to numerically study the effect of stream bed conductivity on the overall system response. To achieve this objective, the model is formulated to include a one-dimensional river flow model and a two-dimensional vertically averaged groundwater flow model in an unconfined aquifer. The coupling is achieved at the river bed via a hydraulic flux that is described as a function of river bed conductivity and the gradient between river stage and groundwater head. The model incorporates the concept of simultaneous presence of the two hydrologic processes for simulating the dynamic interactions and uses a novel numerical technique to solve the two systems concurrently. These interactions are analyzed by numerical experimentation under different hydraulic conductivity conditions. The influence of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic gradient is studied under steady and unsteady flow regimes to assess the occurrence of baseflow. The analysis also reveals critical insights into the governing mechanisms that provide and sustain the baseflow in rivers.

  20. Temperature dependence of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of two soils.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.

    1982-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the soil water matric potential, surface tension, and diffuse double-layer thickness are discussed in terms of their possible interaction with the unsaturated conductivity values obtained. A case is presented for further study to isolate these temperature-sensitive parameters as well as additional parameters related to fluid flow path changes with temperature.-from Author

  1. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.

    Designed for use in courses where students are expected to become proficient in the area of hydraulics, including diesel engine mechanic programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of fourteen units of instruction. Unit titles include (1) Introduction, (2) Fundamentals of Hydraulics, (3) Reservoirs, (4) Lines, Fittings, and Couplers, (5) Seals,…

  2. Temporal changes of topsoil hydraulic conductivity studied by multiple-point tension disk infiltrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipa, Vladimir; Zumr, David; Snehota, Michal; Dohnal, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity of cultivated soils is strongly affected by agrotechnical procedures, soil compaction, plant growth etc. This contribution is focused on series of measurement of topsoil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using automated multipoint tension infiltrometer developed at CTU in Prague. The apparatus consists of two triplets of minidisk infiltrometers that are supported by a light aluminum frame. Therefore it allows simultaneous measurement of six tension infiltrations at two different pressure heads. Experiments were conducted at the experimental agricultural catchment Nučice (Central Bohemia, Czech Republic) as a part of the broader research of rainfall-runoff and soil erosion processes. The soil in the catchment is classified as Cambisol with texture that is ranging from loam to clay loam and is conservatively tilled. Series of ten infiltration campaigns (56 individual infiltration experiments) were carried out on a single experimental plot during period of two years. Dataset involves measurement under various agricultural activities and crop phenophases. The hydraulic conductivities were determined using extended semiempirical estimation procedure of Zhang. Additionally, large undisturbed soil samples were analyzed with use of X-ray computed tomography to assess the soil structure morphology in detail. Results show that unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was the lowest in early spring and did increase at beginning of summer. Unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity was higher when the soil bulk density was high. During the summer and autumn the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity remained relatively unchanged. The impact of agricultural procedures was not apparent in the dataset.. The study has been supported by the Czech Science Foundation Project No. 13-20388P and by CTU in Prague funding via Student's Grant Competition SGS No. SGS14/131/OHK1/2T/11. The MultiDisk infiltrometer was developed within the framework of the project supported by the

  3. Effect of wet-dry cycling on swelling and hydraulic conductivity of GCLs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.C.; Benson, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    Atterberg limits, free swell, and hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted to assess how wet-dry cycling affects the plasticity and swell of bentonite, and the hydraulic conductivity of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) hydrated with deionized (DI) water (pH 6.5), tap water (pH 6.8), and 0.0125-M CaCl{sub 2} solution (pH 6.2). The plasticity of bentonite hydrated with DI water increased during each wetting cycle, whereas the plasticity of bentonite hydrated with tap water and CaCl{sub 2} decreased during each wetting cycle. Wet-dry cycling in DI water and tap water had little effect on swelling of the bentonite, even after seven wet-dry cycles. However, swelling decreased dramatically after two wetting cycles with CaCl{sub 2} solution. Hydraulic conductivity of GCL specimens remained low during the first four wetting cycles ({approximately}1 x 10{sup {minus}9} cm/s). However, within five to eight cycles, the hydraulic conductivity of all specimens permeated with the 0.0125-M CaCl{sub 2} solution increased dramatically, to as high as 7.6 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm/s. the hydraulic conductivity increased because cracks, formed during desiccation, did not fully heal when the bentonite rehydrated. In contrast, a specimen continuously permeated for 10 months with the 0.0125-M CaCl{sub 2} solution had low hydraulic conductivity ({approximately}1 x 10{sup {minus}9} cm/s), even after eight pore volumes of flow.

  4. Scaling of material properties for Yucca Mountain: literature review and numerical experiments on saturated hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, S.A.; Rautman, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    A review of pertinent literature reveals techniques which may be practical for upscaling saturated hydraulic conductivity at Yucca Mountain: geometric mean, spatial averaging, inverse numerical modeling, renormalization, and a perturbation technique. Isotropic realizations of log hydraulic conductivity exhibiting various spatial correlation lengths are scaled from the point values to five discrete scales through these techniques. For the variances in log{sub 10} saturated hydraulic conductivity examined here, geometric mean, numerical inverse and renormalization adequately reproduce point scale fluxes across the modeled domains. Fastest particle velocities and dispersion measured on the point scale are not reproduced by the upscaled fields. Additional numerical experiments examine the utility of power law averaging on a geostatistical realization of a cross-section similar to the cross-sections that will be used in the 1995 groundwater travel time calculations. A literature review on scaling techniques for thermal and mechanical properties is included. 153 refs., 29 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Method for estimating spatially variable seepage loss and hydraulic conductivity in intermittent and ephemeral streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, R.G.; Prudic, D.E.; Fogg, G.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Buckland, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating seepage loss and streambed hydraulic conductivity along intermittent and ephemeral streams using streamflow front velocities in initially dry channels. The method uses the kinematic wave equation for routing streamflow in channels coupled to Philip's equation for infiltration. The coupled model considers variations in seepage loss both across and along the channel. Water redistribution in the unsaturated zone is also represented in the model. Sensitivity of the streamflow front velocity to parameters used for calculating seepage loss and for routing streamflow shows that the streambed hydraulic conductivity has the greatest sensitivity for moderate to large seepage loss rates. Channel roughness, geometry, and slope are most important for low seepage loss rates; however, streambed hydraulic conductivity is still important for values greater than 0.008 m/d. Two example applications are presented to demonstrate the utility of the method. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Evaluation of actual and estimated hydraulic conductivity of sands with different gradation and shape.

    PubMed

    Cabalar, Ali Firat; Akbulut, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of sands with different gradation and grain shape were estimated experimentally at a relative density (Dr) of about 40 % and a 22 ± 2 °C of constant temperature. Narli Sand (NS) with 0.67 of sphericity (S) and 0.72 of roundness (R), and Crushed Stone Sand (CSS) with 0.55 of S and 0.15 of R values were artificially graded into sixteen different grain-size fractions (4.75-2, 2-1.18, 1.18-0.6, 0.6-0.425, 0.425-0.3, 0.3-0.075, 4.75-0.075, 2-0.075, 1.18-0.075, 0.6-0.075, 0.425-0.075, 4.75-0.6, 2-0.6, 4.75-0.425, 2-0.425, 1.18-0.425 mm). Hydraulic conductivities of the NS estimated by use of constant head test ranged from 1.61 to 0.01 cm/s, whilst those of the CSS estimated by the same test ranged from 2.45 to 0.012 cm/s. It was observed that the hydraulic conductivity values of the NS are lower than those of the CSS samples, which is likely to be the result of differences in shape, particularly in R values. The results clearly demonstrated that the hydraulic conductivity can be significantly influenced by grading characteristics (d10, d20, d30, d50, d60, cu, cc, n, Io). Furthermore, comparisons between results obtained in the present study and hydraulic conductivity estimated with other formulas available in the literature were made. The comparisons indicated that the best estimation of hydraulic conductivity changes based on the gradation and shape properties of the sands tested.

  7. Evaluation of actual and estimated hydraulic conductivity of sands with different gradation and shape.

    PubMed

    Cabalar, Ali Firat; Akbulut, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of sands with different gradation and grain shape were estimated experimentally at a relative density (Dr) of about 40 % and a 22 ± 2 °C of constant temperature. Narli Sand (NS) with 0.67 of sphericity (S) and 0.72 of roundness (R), and Crushed Stone Sand (CSS) with 0.55 of S and 0.15 of R values were artificially graded into sixteen different grain-size fractions (4.75-2, 2-1.18, 1.18-0.6, 0.6-0.425, 0.425-0.3, 0.3-0.075, 4.75-0.075, 2-0.075, 1.18-0.075, 0.6-0.075, 0.425-0.075, 4.75-0.6, 2-0.6, 4.75-0.425, 2-0.425, 1.18-0.425 mm). Hydraulic conductivities of the NS estimated by use of constant head test ranged from 1.61 to 0.01 cm/s, whilst those of the CSS estimated by the same test ranged from 2.45 to 0.012 cm/s. It was observed that the hydraulic conductivity values of the NS are lower than those of the CSS samples, which is likely to be the result of differences in shape, particularly in R values. The results clearly demonstrated that the hydraulic conductivity can be significantly influenced by grading characteristics (d10, d20, d30, d50, d60, cu, cc, n, Io). Furthermore, comparisons between results obtained in the present study and hydraulic conductivity estimated with other formulas available in the literature were made. The comparisons indicated that the best estimation of hydraulic conductivity changes based on the gradation and shape properties of the sands tested. PMID:27390660

  8. Characterization of hydraulic conductivity of the alluvium and basin fill, Pinal Creek Basin near Globe, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angeroth, Cory E.

    2002-01-01

    Acidic waters containing elevated concentrations of dissolved metals have contaminated the regional aquifer in the Pinal Creek Basin, which is in Gila County, Arizona, about 100 kilometers east of Phoenix. The aquifer is made up of two geologic units: unconsolidated stream alluvium and consolidated basin fill. To better understand how contaminants are transported through these units, a better understanding of the distribution of hydraulic conductivity and processes that affect it within the aquifer is needed. Slug tests were done in September 1997 and October 1998 on 9 wells finished in the basin fill and 14 wells finished in the stream alluvium. Data from the tests were analyzed by using either the Bouwer and Rice (1976) method, or by using an extension to the method developed by Springer and Gellhar (1991). Both methods are applicable for unconfined aquifers and partially penetrating wells. The results of the analyses show wide variability within and between the two geologic units. Hydraulic conductivity estimates ranged from 0.5 to 250 meters per day for the basin fill and from 3 to 200 meters per day for the stream alluvium. Results of the slug tests also show a correlation coefficient of 0.83 between the hydraulic conductivity and the pH of the ground water. The areas of highest hydraulic conductivity coincide with the areas of lowest pH, and the areas of lowest hydraulic conductivity coincide with the areas of highest pH, suggesting that the acidic water is increasing the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer by dissolution of carbonate minerals.

  9. Hydraulic characterization for steam enhanced remediation conducted in fractured rock.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kyle M; Novakowski, Kent; Davis, Eva; Heron, Gorm

    2006-01-10

    To explore the viability of Steam Enhanced Remediation (SER) in fractured rock a small-scale steam injection and water/vapour extraction pilot study was conducted at the former Loring Air Force Base in northern Maine, USA. A detailed well testing program was undertaken to assist in the design of the injection and extraction well array, and to assess the possibility of off-site heat and contaminant migration. A structurally complex limestone having low matrix porosity and a sparse distribution of fractures underlies the study site. To characterize the groundwater and steam flow pathways, single-well slug tests and more than 100 pulse interference tests were conducted. The results of the well testing indicate that the study site is dominated by steeply dipping bedding plane fractures that are interconnected only between some wells in the injection/extraction array. The SER system was designed to take advantage of interconnected fractures located at depth in the eastern end of the site. An array of 29 wells located in an area of 60 by 40 m was used for steam injection and water/vapour extraction. The migration of heat was monitored in several wells using thermistor arrays having a 1.5 m vertical spacing. Temperature measurements obtained during and after the 3 month steam injection period showed that heat migration generally occurred along those fracture features identified by the pulse interference testing. Based on these results, it is concluded that the pulse interference tests were valuable in assisting with the design of the injection/extraction well geometry and in predicting the migration pathways of the hot water associated with the steam injection. The pulse interference test method should also prove useful in support of any other remedial method dependant on the fracture network for delivery of remedial fluid or extraction of contaminants.

  10. Steady state method to determine unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at the ambient water potential

    DOEpatents

    HUbbell, Joel M.

    2014-08-19

    The present invention relates to a new laboratory apparatus for measuring the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at a single water potential. One or more embodiments of the invented apparatus can be used over a wide range of water potential values within the tensiometric range, requires minimal laboratory preparation, and operates unattended for extended periods with minimal supervision. The present invention relates to a new laboratory apparatus for measuring the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at a single water potential. One or more embodiments of the invented apparatus can be used over a wide range of water potential values within the tensiometric range, requires minimal laboratory preparation, and operates unattended for extended periods with minimal supervision.

  11. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  12. An Inverse Method to Estimate Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity in Seepage Flow in Non-isothermal Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Tomoki; Takeuchi, Junichiro; Kawachi, Toshihiko; Fujihara, Masayuki

    An inverse method to estimate the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in seepage flow from field observations is presented. Considering the water movement in soil significantly affected by the soil temperature, the soil column of interest is assumed to be non-isothermal, and therefore the problem is based on coupled 1D water movement and thermal conduction equations. Since the saturated hydraulic conductivity could be definitely known, the inverse problem associated with the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is reduced to that of identifying the relative hydraulic conductivity (RHC) from the hydro-geological information available. For functional representation of RHC, the free-form parameterized function is employed in lieu of the conventional fixed-form function. Values of the parameters included in the functions are optimally determined according to a simulation-optimization algorithm. For easy application of the method, a utilitarian observation system with simple instrumentation is specially contrived which implements collection of the hydro-geological data relatively easily in-situ available. Validity of the method developed is examined through its practical application to a real soil column in an upland crop field. The results show that the water movement model provides the forward solutions of high reproducibility, when coupled with thermal conduction model and calibrated through identifying the RHC by use of a free-form function.

  13. 15 CFR 270.200 - Technical conduct of investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... beyond preliminary reconnaissance include: (i) Consult with experts in building design and construction... NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS Investigations § 270.200 Technical conduct of investigation....

  14. 15 CFR 270.200 - Technical conduct of investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... beyond preliminary reconnaissance include: (i) Consult with experts in building design and construction... NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS Investigations § 270.200 Technical conduct of investigation....

  15. 15 CFR 270.200 - Technical conduct of investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... beyond preliminary reconnaissance include: (i) Consult with experts in building design and construction... NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS Investigations § 270.200 Technical conduct of investigation....

  16. Light response of hydraulic conductance in bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) leaves.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Mihaela C; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Tyree, Melvin T

    2008-07-01

    A four- to seven-fold enhancement of leaf hydraulic conductance by light has been reported in three temperate tree species. The enhancement occurs in the liquid-flow pathway between the petiole and the site of water evaporation. The enhancement occurs within 1 h, and dissipates in darkness over a period of 1 to 10 h depending on species. Here we report light-induced enhancement of leaf hydraulic conductance in a fourth species, bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.), the dependence of the effect on light flux and color, its absence in leaves of seedlings, and the impact on the response of leaf vein severance and several metabolic inhibitors. The light response of leaf hydraulic conductance approached saturation at a photosynthetic photon flux of 150 mumol m(-2) s(-1). Hydraulic enhancement was greater in response to blue and green light than to visible radiation of longer wavelengths, although at the same irradiance, the response to white light was greater than to light of any single color. Atrazine (a photosystem II inhibitor), fusicoccin (which stimulates plasma membrane-bound H(+)-ATPase) and HgCl(2) (an aquaporin blocker) reduced the light response of leaf lamina hydraulic conductance. When 2-mercaptoethanol was added following mercury treatment, the light response was totally suppressed. Our results are consistent with the notion that the effect of light on leaf lamina hydraulic conductance is controlled by factors acting outside the leaf veins, possibly through light-induced changes in membrane permeability of either mesophyll or bundle sheath cells, or both.

  17. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT PRESSURE RESPONSE FROM A CONSTANT FLOW RATE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Olsen, Harold W.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporating a flow pump into a conventional triaxial laboratory system allows fluid to be supplied to or withdrawn from the base of a sediment sample at small and constant rates. An initial transient record of hydraulic head versus time is observed which eventually stabilizes to a constant steady state gradient across the sample; values of hydraulic conductivity can subsequently be determined from Darcy's law. In this paper, analytical methods are presented for determining values of specific storage and hydraulic conductivity from the initial transient phase of such a constant flow rate test. These methods are based on a diffusion equation involving pore pressure and are analogous to those used to describe the soil consolidation process and also to interpret aquifer properties from pumping tests.

  18. Stomatal responses to changes in vapor pressure deficit reflect tissue-specific differences in hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Ocheltree, T W; Nippert, J B; Prasad, P V V

    2014-01-01

    The vapor pressure deficit (D) of the atmosphere can negatively affect plant growth as plants reduce stomatal conductance to water vapor (g(wv)) in response to increasing D, limiting the ability of plants to assimilate carbon. The sensitivity of g(wv) to changes in D varies among species and has been correlated with the hydraulic conductance of leaves (K(leaf) ), but the hydraulic conductance of other tissues has also been implicated in plant responses to changing D. Among the 19 grass species, we found that K(leaf) was correlated with the hydraulic conductance of large longitudinal veins (K(lv), r(2) = 0.81), but was not related to K(root) (r(2) = 0.01). Stomatal sensitivity to D was correlated with K(leaf) relative to total leaf area (r(2) = 0.50), and did not differ between C3 and C4 species. Transpiration (E) increased in response to D, but 8 of the 19 plants showed a decline in E at high D, indicative of an 'apparent feedforward' response. For these individuals, E began to decline at lower values of D in plants with low K(root) (r(2) = 0.72). These results show the significance of both leaf and root hydraulic conductance as drivers of plant responses to evaporative demand.

  19. Improving prediction of hydraulic conductivity by constraining capillary bundle models to a maximum pore size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Sascha C.; Peters, Andre; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    The prediction of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the soil water retention curve by pore-bundle models is a cost-effective and widely applied technique. One problem for conductivity predictions from retention functions with continuous derivatives, i.e. continuous water capacity functions, is that the hydraulic conductivity curve exhibits a sharp drop close to water saturation if the pore-size distribution is wide. So far this artifact has been ignored or removed by introducing an explicit air-entry value into the capillary saturation function. However, this correction leads to a retention function which is not continuously differentiable. We present a new parameterization of the hydraulic properties which uses the original saturation function (e.g. of van Genuchten) and introduces a maximum pore radius only in the pore-bundle model. In contrast to models using an explicit air entry, the resulting conductivity function is smooth and increases monotonically close to saturation. The model concept can easily be applied to any combination of retention curve and pore-bundle model. We derive closed-form expressions for the unimodal and multimodal van Genuchten-Mualem models and apply the model concept to curve fitting and inverse modeling of a transient outflow experiment. Since the new model retains the smoothness and continuous differentiability of the retention model and eliminates the sharp drop in conductivity close to saturation, the resulting hydraulic functions are physically more reasonable and ideal for numerical simulations with the Richards equation or multiphase flow models.

  20. Evaluating temporal changes in hydraulic conductivities near karst-terrain dams: Dokan Dam (Kurdistan-Iraq)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafny, Elad; Tawfeeq, Kochar Jamal; Ghabraie, Kazem

    2015-10-01

    Dam sites provide an outstanding opportunity to explore dynamic changes in the groundwater flow regime because of the high hydraulic gradient rapidly induced in their surroundings. This paper investigates the temporal changes of the hydraulic conductivities of the rocks and engineered structures via a thorough analysis of hydrological data collected at the Dokam Dam, Iraq, and a numerical model that simulates the Darcian component of the seepage. Analysis of the data indicates increased seepage with time and suggests that the hydraulic conductivity of the rocks increased as the conductivity of the grout curtain decreased. Conductivity changes on the order of 10-8 m/s, in a 20-yr period were quantified using the numerical analysis. It is postulated that the changes in hydraulic properties in the vicinity of Dokan Dam are due to suspension of fine materials, interbedded in small fissures in the rocks, and re-settlement of these materials along the curtain. Consequently, the importance of the grout curtain to minimize the downstream seepage, not only as a result of the conductivity contrast with the rocks, but also as a barrier to suspended clay sediments, is demonstrated. The numerical analysis also helped us to estimate the proportion of the disconnected karstic conduit flow to the overall flow.

  1. A multiscale approach to determine hydraulic conductivity in thick claystone aquitards using field, laboratory, and numerical modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.; Barbour, S. L.; Hendry, M. J.; Novakowski, K.; van der Kamp, G.

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the hydraulic conductivity (K) of aquitards is difficult due to technical and logistical difficulties associated with field-based methods as well as the cost and challenge of collecting representative and competent core samples for laboratory analysis. The objective of this study was to produce a multiscale comparison of vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kv and Kh, respectively) of a regionally extensive Cretaceous clay-rich aquitard in southern Saskatchewan. Ten vibrating wire pressure transducers were lowered into place at depths between 25 and 325 m, then the annular was space was filled with a cement-bentonite grout. The in situ Kh was estimated at the location of each transducer by simulating the early-time pore pressure measurements following setting of the grout using a 2-D axisymmetric, finite element, numerical model. Core samples were collected during drilling for conventional laboratory testing for Kv to compare with the transducer-determined in situ Kh. Results highlight the importance of scale and consideration of the presence of possible secondary features (e.g., fractures) in the aquitard. The proximity of the transducers to an active potash mine (˜1 km) where depressurization of an underlying aquifer resulted in drawdown through the aquitard provided a unique opportunity to model the current hydraulic head profile using both the Kh and Kv estimates. Results indicate that the transducer-determined Kh estimates would allow for the development of the current hydraulic head distribution, and that simulating the pore pressure recovery can be used to estimate moderately low in situ Kh (<10-11 m s-1).

  2. Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells

    SciTech Connect

    P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

    2007-10-31

    Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and

  3. Inverse groundwater modeling for hydraulic conductivity estimation using Bayesian model averaging and variance window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Frank T.-C.; Li, Xiaobao

    2008-09-01

    This study proposes a Bayesian model averaging (BMA) method to address parameter estimation uncertainty arising from nonuniqueness in parameterization methods. BMA is able to incorporate multiple parameterization methods for prediction through the law of total probability and to obtain an ensemble average of hydraulic conductivity estimates. Two major issues in applying BMA to hydraulic conductivity estimation are discussed. The first problem is using Occam's window in usual BMA applications to measure approximated posterior model probabilities. Occam's window only accepts models in a very narrow range, tending to single out the best method and discard other good methods. We propose a variance window to replace Occam's window to cope with this problem. The second problem is the Kashyap information criterion (KIC) in the approximated posterior model probabilities, which tends to prefer highly uncertain parameterization methods by considering the Fisher information matrix. With sufficient amounts of observation data, the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) is a good approximation and is able to avoid controversial results from using KIC. This study adopts multiple generalized parameterization (GP) methods such as the BMA models to estimate spatially correlated hydraulic conductivity. Numerical examples illustrate the issues of using KIC and Occam's window and show the advantages of using BIC and the variance window in BMA application. Finally, we apply BMA to the hydraulic conductivity estimation of the "1500-foot" sand in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana.

  4. Geostatistical analysis of regional hydraulic conductivity variations in the Snake River Plain aquifer, eastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welhan, J.A.; Reed, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    The regional spatial correlation structure of bulk horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kb) estimated from published transmissivity data from 79 open boreholes in the fractured basalt aquifer of the eastern Snake River Plain was analyzed with geostatistical methods. The two-dimensional spatial correlation structure of In Kb shows a pronounced 4:1 range anisotropy, with a maximum correlation range in the north-northwest- south-southeast direction of about 6 km. The maximum variogram range of In Kb is similar to the mean length of flow groups exposed at the surface. The In Kb range anisotropy is similar to the mean width/length ratio of late Quaternary and Holocene basalt lava flows and the orientations of the major volcanic structural features on the eastern Snake River Plain. The similarity between In Kb correlation scales and basalt flow dimensions and between basalt flow orientations and correlation range anisotropy suggests that the spatial distribution of zones of high hydraulic conductivity may be controlled by the lateral dimensions, spatial distribution, and interconnection between highly permeable zones which are known to occur between lava flows within flow groups. If hydraulic conductivity and lithology are eventually shown to be cross correlative in this geologic setting, it may be possible to stochastically simulate hydraulic conductivity distributions, which are conditional on a knowledge of volcanic stratigraphy.

  5. Predicting Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity from Percolation Test Results in Layered Silt Loam Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The size of on-site waste disposal systems is usually determined by one or more percolation tests performed on the proposed site. The objectives of this study were to develop an empirical relationship between the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of layered soils and their percolation times (PT)...

  6. The effect of mineral-ion interactions on soil hydraulic conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reuse of winery wastewater (WW) for irrigation could provide an alternative water source for wine production. The shift of many wineries and other food processing industries to K+-based cleaners requires studies on the effects of K+ on soil hydraulic conductivity (HC). Soils of contrasting mine...

  7. Saturation-Dependent Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy for Multifluid Systems in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Oostrom, Mart; Ward, Andy L.

    2007-11-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated anisotropic soils has recently been described with a tensorial connectivity-tortuosity (TCT) concept. We extend this concept to unsaturated porous media with two or three immiscible fluids. Mathematical expressions to describe the conductivity of each fluid in anisotropic porous media under unsaturated condition are derived in the form of symmetric second order tensors. The theory is applicable to the combination of any type of saturation-pressure formulation and a generalized hydraulic conductivity model. The extended model shows that the anisotropic coefficient of a fluid is independent of the saturation of other fluids. Synthetic Miller-similar soils having hypothetical anisotropy were defined by allowing the saturated hydraulic conductivity to have different correlation ranges for different directions of flow. The extended TCT concept was tested using synthetic soils with four levels of heterogeneity and four levels of anisotropy. Numerical experiments of infiltration of two liquid phases, i.e., water and the nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) carbon tetrachloride, were carried out to test the extended model. The results show that, similar to water in a two-fluid (air-water) system, NAPL retention curves in a three-fluid (air-NAPL-water) system were independent of flow direction but dependent on soil heterogeneity, while the connectivity-tortuosity coefficients are functions of both soil heterogeneity and anisotropy. The extended TCT model accurately describes unsaturated hydraulic functions of anisotropic soils and can be combined into commonly used relative permeability functions for use in multifluid flow and transport numerical simulations.

  8. HOW WELL ARE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY VARIATIONS APPROXIMATED BY ADDITIVE STABLE PROCESSES? (R826171)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Analysis of the higher statistical moments of a hydraulic conductivity (K) and an intrinsic permeability (k) data set leads to the conclusion that the increments of the data and the logs of the data are not governed by Levy-stable or Gaussian dis...

  9. Hydraulic Conductivity Estimates from Particle Size Distributions of Sediments from the Los Alamos Chromium Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R.; Reimus, P. W.; Ding, M.

    2015-12-01

    Chromium used in Los Alamos National Laboratory cooling towers was released as effluent onto laboratory property between 1956 and 1972. As a result, the underlying regional aquifer is contaminated with chromium (VI), a toxin and carcinogen. The highest concentration of chromium is ~1 ppm in monitoring well R-42, exceeding the New Mexico drinking water standard of 50 ppb. The chromium plume is currently being investigated to identify an effective remediation method. Geologic heterogeneity within the aquifer causes the hydraulic conductivity within the plume to be spatially variable. This variability, particularly with depth, is crucial for predicting plume transport behavior. Though pump tests are useful for obtaining estimates of site specific hydraulic conductivity, they tend to interrogate hydraulic properties of only the most conductive strata. Variations in particle size distribution as a function of depth can complement pump test data by providing estimates of vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity. Samples were collected from five different sonically-drilled core holes within the chromium plume at depths ranging from 732'-1125' below the surface. To obtain particle size distributions, the samples were sieved into six different fractions from the fine sands to gravel range (>4 mm, 2-4 mm, 1.4-2 mm, 0.355-1.4 mm, 180-355 µm, and smaller than 180 µm). The Kozeny-Carmen equation (k=(δg/µ)(dm2/180)(Φ3/(1-Φ)2)), was used to estimate permeability from the particle size distribution data. Pump tests estimated a hydraulic conductivity varying between 1 and 50 feet per day. The Kozeny-Carmen equation narrowed this estimate down to an average value of 2.635 feet per day for the samples analyzed, with a range of 0.971 ft/day to 6.069 ft/day. The results of this study show that the Kozeny-Carmen equation provides quite specific estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the Los Alamos aquifer. More importantly, it provides pertinent information on the expected

  10. Hydraulic and thermal effects of in-stream structure-induced hyporheic exchange across a range of hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichino, Garrett T.; Hester, Erich T.

    2014-06-01

    In-stream structure-induced hyporheic exchange and associated thermal dynamics affect stream ecosystems. Their importance is controlled by spatial variability of sediment hydraulic conductivity (K). We calibrated a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of surface and groundwater hydraulics near a channel-spanning weir (represents log dams, boulder weirs) to field data and varied K from 10-7 to 10-2 m/s (silt to gravel). Surface water stopped cresting the weir for K > 10-3 m/s. Non-Darcy hyporheic flow was also prevalent for K > 10-3 m/s, and velocity errors using non-CFD models ranged up to 32.2%. We also modeled weir-induced heat transport during summer. As K increased from 10-7 to 10-3 m/s, weir-induced hyporheic heat advection steadily increased. Cooling and buffering along hyporheic flow paths decreased with increasing K, particularly above K = 10-5 and 10-4 m/s, respectively. Vertical heat conduction between surface water and groundwater near the weir decreased with increasing K, particularly for K > 10-5 m/s. Conduction between hyporheic flow paths and adjacent groundwater helped cool hyporheic flow. Downstream surface water cooling by hyporheic advection increased steadily with K as increases in hyporheic flow overwhelmed decreases in cooling along hyporheic flow paths. Yet such effects were small (0.016°C) even at K = 10-3 m/s. The largest thermal effect of weir-induced exchange was therefore spatial expansion of subsurface diel variability (particularly for K > 10-5 m/s) which affects benthic habitat and chemical reactions. The specific values of K where such trend shifts occur is likely variable among streams based on flow conditions, but we expect the presence of such trend shifts to be widespread.

  11. Reducing hydraulic conductivity of porous media using CaCO₃ precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii.

    PubMed

    Eryürük, Kağan; Yang, Suyin; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakaguchi, Iwao; Akatsuka, Tetsuji; Tsuchiya, Takayuki; Katayama, Arata

    2015-03-01

    The effect on hydraulic conductivity in porous media of CaCO3 precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii (ATCC 11859) was investigated using continuous-flow columns containing glass beads between 0.01 mm and 3 mm in diameter. Resting S. pasteurii cells and a precipitation solution composed of 0.5 M CaCl2 and 0.5 M urea were introduced into the columns, and it was shown that the subsequent formation of CaCO3 precipitation reduced hydraulic conductivity from between 8.38 × 10(-1) and 3.27 × 10(-4) cm/s to between 3.70 × 10(-1) and 3.07 × 10(-5) cm/s. The bacterial cells themselves did not decrease the hydraulic conductivity. The amount of precipitation was proportional with the bacterial number in the column. The specific CaCO3 precipitation rate of the resting cells was estimated as 4.0 ± 0.1 × 10(-3) μg CaCO3/cell. Larger amounts of CaCO3 precipitation were deposited in columns packed with small glass beads than in those packed with large glass beads, resulting in a greater reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the columns containing small glass beads. Analysis using the Kozeny-Carman equation suggested that the effect of microbially induced CaCO3 precipitation on hydraulic conductivity was not due to the formation of individual CaCO3 crystals but instead that the precipitate aggregated with the glass beads, thus increasing their diameter and consequently decreasing the pore size in the column. PMID:25239069

  12. Reducing hydraulic conductivity of porous media using CaCO₃ precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii.

    PubMed

    Eryürük, Kağan; Yang, Suyin; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakaguchi, Iwao; Akatsuka, Tetsuji; Tsuchiya, Takayuki; Katayama, Arata

    2015-03-01

    The effect on hydraulic conductivity in porous media of CaCO3 precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii (ATCC 11859) was investigated using continuous-flow columns containing glass beads between 0.01 mm and 3 mm in diameter. Resting S. pasteurii cells and a precipitation solution composed of 0.5 M CaCl2 and 0.5 M urea were introduced into the columns, and it was shown that the subsequent formation of CaCO3 precipitation reduced hydraulic conductivity from between 8.38 × 10(-1) and 3.27 × 10(-4) cm/s to between 3.70 × 10(-1) and 3.07 × 10(-5) cm/s. The bacterial cells themselves did not decrease the hydraulic conductivity. The amount of precipitation was proportional with the bacterial number in the column. The specific CaCO3 precipitation rate of the resting cells was estimated as 4.0 ± 0.1 × 10(-3) μg CaCO3/cell. Larger amounts of CaCO3 precipitation were deposited in columns packed with small glass beads than in those packed with large glass beads, resulting in a greater reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the columns containing small glass beads. Analysis using the Kozeny-Carman equation suggested that the effect of microbially induced CaCO3 precipitation on hydraulic conductivity was not due to the formation of individual CaCO3 crystals but instead that the precipitate aggregated with the glass beads, thus increasing their diameter and consequently decreasing the pore size in the column.

  13. Effects Of Evaporation Rate of Some Common Organic Contaminants on Hydraulic Conductivity of Aquifer Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saud, Q. J.; Hasan, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    As part of a larger study to investigate potential effects of hydrocarbons on the geotechnical properties of aquifer solids, a series of laboratory experiments were carried out to ascertain the influence of evaporation rate of some common and widespread organic contaminants on the hydraulic conductivity of aquifer sand. Gasoline and its constituent chemicals-benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), isooctane- and trichloroethylene (TCE) were used to contaminate sand samples collected from the aquifer and vadose zone, at varying concentrations for extended periods of time. The goal was to study any change in the chemical makeup of the contaminants and its control on hydraulic conductivity of the sand. It was found that: (a) gasoline breaks down into constituent compounds when subjected to evaporation, e.g. during oil spills and leaks; and (b) lighter compounds volatilize faster and in the following order: TCE> benzene > isooctane > toluene > gasoline> ethylbenzene > xylene. In addition, these contaminants also caused a decrease in hydraulic conductivity of sand by up to 60% as compared to the uncontaminated sand. The inherent differences in the chemical structure of contaminating chemicals influenced hydraulic conductivity such that the observed decrease was greater for aliphatic than aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The presentation includes details of the experimental set up; evaporation rate, and geotechnical tests; X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope studies; and data analyses and interpretation. Rate of evaporation test indicates that residual LNAPLs will occupy a certain portion of the pores in the soil either as liquid or vapor phase in the vadose zone, and will create a coating on the adjacent solid mineral grains in the aquifer. Replacement of air by the LNAPLs along with grain coatings and the intramolecular forces would impede groundwater movement, thus affecting overall permeability of contaminated aquifers. Keywords: aquifer

  14. Contaminant removal and hydraulic conductivity of laboratory rain garden systems for stormwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Good, J F; O'Sullivan, A D; Wicke, D; Cochrane, T A

    2012-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of substrate composition on stormwater treatment and hydraulic effectiveness, mesocosm-scale (180 L, 0.17 m(2)) laboratory rain gardens were established. Saturated (constant head) hydraulic conductivity was determined before and after contaminant (Cu, Zn, Pb and nutrients) removal experiments on three rain garden systems with various proportions of organic topsoil. The system with only topsoil had the lowest saturated hydraulic conductivity (160-164 mm/h) and poorest metal removal efficiency (Cu ≤ 69.0% and Zn ≤ 71.4%). Systems with sand and a sand-topsoil mix demonstrated good metal removal (Cu up to 83.3%, Zn up to 94.5%, Pb up to 97.3%) with adequate hydraulic conductivity (sand: 800-805 mm/h, sand-topsoil: 290-302 mm/h). Total metal amounts in the effluent were <50% of influent amounts for all experiments, with the exception of Cu removal in the topsoil-only system, which was negligible due to high dissolved fraction. Metal removal was greater when effluent pH was elevated (up to 7.38) provided by the calcareous sand in two of the systems, whereas the topsoil-only system lacked an alkaline source. Organic topsoil, a typical component in rain garden systems, influenced pH, resulting in poorer treatment due to higher dissolved metal fractions.

  15. Contaminant removal and hydraulic conductivity of laboratory rain garden systems for stormwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Good, J F; O'Sullivan, A D; Wicke, D; Cochrane, T A

    2012-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of substrate composition on stormwater treatment and hydraulic effectiveness, mesocosm-scale (180 L, 0.17 m(2)) laboratory rain gardens were established. Saturated (constant head) hydraulic conductivity was determined before and after contaminant (Cu, Zn, Pb and nutrients) removal experiments on three rain garden systems with various proportions of organic topsoil. The system with only topsoil had the lowest saturated hydraulic conductivity (160-164 mm/h) and poorest metal removal efficiency (Cu ≤ 69.0% and Zn ≤ 71.4%). Systems with sand and a sand-topsoil mix demonstrated good metal removal (Cu up to 83.3%, Zn up to 94.5%, Pb up to 97.3%) with adequate hydraulic conductivity (sand: 800-805 mm/h, sand-topsoil: 290-302 mm/h). Total metal amounts in the effluent were <50% of influent amounts for all experiments, with the exception of Cu removal in the topsoil-only system, which was negligible due to high dissolved fraction. Metal removal was greater when effluent pH was elevated (up to 7.38) provided by the calcareous sand in two of the systems, whereas the topsoil-only system lacked an alkaline source. Organic topsoil, a typical component in rain garden systems, influenced pH, resulting in poorer treatment due to higher dissolved metal fractions. PMID:22643410

  16. Hydraulic conductance and water potential gradients in squash leaves showing mycorrhiza-induced increases in stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Augé, Robert M; Toler, Heather D; Sams, Carl E; Nasim, Ghazala

    2008-03-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration rates vary widely across plant species. Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) tends to change with g (s), to maintain hydraulic homeostasis and prevent wide and potentially harmful fluctuations in transpiration-induced water potential gradients across the leaf (Delta Psi leaf). Because arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis often increases gs in the plant host, we tested whether the symbiosis affects leaf hydraulic homeostasis. Specifically, we tested whether k leaf changes with gs to maintain Delta Psi leaf or whether Delta Psi leaf differs when gs differs in AM and non-AM plants. Colonization of squash plants with Glomus intraradices resulted in increased gs relative to non-AM controls, by an average of 27% under amply watered, unstressed conditions. Stomatal conductance was similar in AM and non-AM plants with exposure to NaCl stress. Across all AM and NaCl treatments, k leaf did change in synchrony with gs (positive correlation of gs and k leaf), corroborating leaf tendency toward hydraulic homeostasis under varying rates of transpirational water loss. However, k leaf did not increase in AM plants to compensate for the higher gs of unstressed AM plants relative to non-AM plants. Consequently, Delta Psi leaf did tend to be higher in AM leaves. A trend toward slightly higher Delta Psi leaf has been observed recently in more highly evolved plant taxa having higher productivity. Higher Delta Psi leaf in leaves of mycorrhizal plants would therefore be consistent with the higher rates of gas exchange that often accompany mycorrhizal symbiosis and that are presumed to be necessary to supply the carbon needs of the fungal symbiont.

  17. Regional groundwater characteristics and hydraulic conductivity based on geological units in Korean peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Suk, H.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, about 2,000 deep observation wells, stream and/or river distribution, and river's density were analyzed to identify regional groundwater flow trend, based on the regional groundwater survey of four major river watersheds including Geum river, Han river, Youngsan-Seomjin river, and Nakdong river in Korea. Hydrogeologial data were collected to analyze regional groundwater flow characteristics according to geological units. Additionally, hydrological soil type data were collected to estimate direct runoff through SCS-CN method. Temperature and precipitation data were used to quantify infiltration rate. The temperature and precipitation data were also used to quantify evaporation by Thornthwaite method and to evaluate groundwater recharge, respectively. Understanding the regional groundwater characteristics requires the database of groundwater flow parameters, but most hydrogeological data include limited information such as groundwater level and well configuration. In this study, therefore, groundwater flow parameters such as hydraulic conductivities or transmissivities were estimated using observed groundwater level by inverse model, namely PEST (Non-linear Parameter ESTimation). Since groundwater modeling studies have some uncertainties in data collection, conceptualization, and model results, model calibration should be performed. The calibration may be manually performed by changing parameters step by step, or various parameters are simultaneously changed by automatic procedure using PEST program. In this study, both manual and automatic procedures were employed to calibrate and estimate hydraulic parameter distributions. In summary, regional groundwater survey data obtained from four major river watersheds and various data of hydrology, meteorology, geology, soil, and topography in Korea were used to estimate hydraulic conductivities using PEST program. Especially, in order to estimate hydraulic conductivity effectively, it is important to perform

  18. Empirical prediction of the temporal change of hydraulic conductivity in tilled Mediterranean vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paré, N.; Andrieux, P.; Louchart, X.; Biarnès, A.; Voltz, M.

    2009-04-01

    The use of distributed runoff models for the evaluation of hydrological impacts of crop management practices in cultivated catchments (e.g erosion, water pollution) requires recognition of the temporal change of soil hydraulic parameters as influenced by tillage operations and subsequent reconsolidation of the tilled layer under the influence of climatic factors. The more numerous the tillages are during the cultural cycle, the more complicated this recognition is. That is the case of crops with small soil cover like vineyards for which soil tillage is operated several times between the vines rows troughout the vegetative cycle. The objective of this study was to predict with only few parameters the temporal change of hydraulic conductivity at the plot-scale in a viticultural Mediterranean catchment in southern France. Hydraulic conductivity was evaluated through 4 classes of soil surface caracteristics (SSC) which differ by different levels of soil crusting, roughness and porosity. A previous experiment showed that each class has a significantly different infiltration property as measured by rainfall simulation. A number of 600 observations of SSC were performed on 59 tilled plots from which 480 from march to july 2007 and 120 from february 2004 to february 2007. The dates of tillages were known thanks to weekly observations and to farmer's declarations. Rainfall was measured by a rain gauge. A discriminant analysis was applied to the observed data in order to derive an empirical equation that predicts the temporal change of SSC. The results showed that during the vegetative cycle, with regular tillages operations between the vines rows, the temporal change of SSC was well predicted by two parameters : total amount of rainfall and cumulative rainfall kinetic energy since last tillage. Then, each SSC was linked to an hydraulic conductivity, and consequently, the evolution of the soil hydraulic conductivity could be predicted from the evolution of SSC.

  19. Deciphering transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer by vertical electrical sounding (VES) experiments in Northwest Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattar, Golam Shabbir; Keramat, Mumnunul; Shahid, Shamsuddin

    2016-03-01

    The vertical electrical soundings (VESs) are carried out in 24 selective locations of Chapai-Nawabganj area of northwest Bangladesh to determine the transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer. Initially, the transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity are determined from the pumping data of nearby available production wells. Afterwards, the T and K are correlated with geoelectrical resistance and the total resistivity of the aquifer. The present study deciphers the functional analogous relations of the geoelectrical resistance with the transmissivity and the total resistivity with the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer in northwest Bangladesh. It has been shown that the given equations provide reasonable values of transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity where pumping test information is unavailable. It can be expected that the aquifer properties viz. transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity of geologically similar area can be determined with the help of the obtained equations by conducting VES experiments.

  20. Toward A 3-D Picture of Hydraulic Conductivity With Multilevel Slug Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwee, C. D.; McElwee, C. D.; Ross, H. C.

    2001-12-01

    The GEMS (Geohydrologic Experiment and Monitoring Site) field area has been established (in the Kansas River valley near Lawrence, Kansas) for a variety of reasons relating to research and teaching in hydrogeology at the University of Kansas. Over 70 wells have been installed for various purposes. The site overlies an alluvial aquifer with a total thickness of about 70 feet. The water table is typically about 20 feet below the surface, giving a total saturated thickness of about 50 feet. The upper part of the aquifer is finer material consisting of silt and clay. Typically, the lower 35 feet of the aquifer is sand and gravel. A number of wells through out the site are fully screened through the sand and gravel aquifer. Some of these fully screened wells are larger diameters; however, most wells are constructed of 2 inch PVC casing. Slug tests are widely used in hydrogeology to measure hydraulic conductivity. Over the last several years we have been conducting research to improve the slug test method. We have previously reported the detailed structure of hydraulic conductivity that can be seen in a 5 inch well (McElwee and Zemansky, EOS, v. 80, no. 46, p. F397, 1999) at this site, using multilevel slug tests. The existing 2 inch, fully screened wells are spread out over the site and offer the opportunity for developing a 3-D picture of the hydraulic conductivity distribution. However, it is difficult to develop a system that allows multilevel slug tests to be done accurately and efficiently in a 2 inch well. This is especially true in regions of very high hydraulic conductivity, where the water velocity in the casing will be relatively high. The resistance caused by frictional forces in the equipment must be minimized and a model taking account of these forces must be used. We have developed a system (equipment, software, and technique) for performing multilevel slug tests in 2 inch wells. Some equipment configurations work better than others. The data that we have

  1. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity of slowly permeable and swelling materials from single-ring experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GéRard-Marchant, P.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Haverkamp, R.; Vauclin, M.; Groenevelt, P.; Elrick, D. E.

    1997-06-01

    The in situ determination of the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of low-permeability porous materials is a major concern for both geotechnics and soil physics with regards to environmental protection or water resources management. Recent early-time single-ring infiltration experiments, involving sequential constant head and falling head conditions, allow its efficient estimation. Nevertheless, the theory on which the interpretation was based was still strictly valid to nondeformable soils and implicity relied on a particular form of the hydraulic conductivity-soil water pressure head relationship. This theory is now extended to deformable materials, without any restrictive hypothesis. A new concept, bulk sorptivity, which characterizes the solid phase movement, is introduced. Field experiments, conducted on two liners of swelling and slowly permeable materials, revealed that neglecting the soil deformation induces an underestimation of the actual coefficient of permeability of the soil.

  2. Tensor hydraulic conductivity estimation for heterogeneous aquifers under unknown boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jianying; Zhang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    A physically based inverse method is developed using hybrid formulation and coordinate transform to simultaneously estimate hydraulic conductivity tensors, steady-state flow field, and boundary conditions for a confined aquifer under ambient flow or pumping condition. Unlike existing indirect inversion techniques, the physically based method does not require forward simulations to assess model-data misfits. It imposes continuity of hydraulic head and Darcy fluxes in the model domain while incorporating observations (hydraulic heads, Darcy fluxes, or well rates) at measurement locations. Given sufficient measurements, it yields a well-posed inverse system of equations that can be solved efficiently with coarse grids and nonlinear optimization. When pumping and injection are active, well rates are used as measurements and flux sampling is not needed. The method is successfully tested on synthetic aquifer problems with regular and irregular geometries, different hydrofacies and flow patterns, and increasing conductivity anisotropy ratios. All problems yield stable inverse solutions under increasing head measurement errors. For a given set of observations, inversion accuracy is strongly affected by the conductivity anisotropy ratio. Conductivity estimation is also affected by flow pattern: within a hydrofacies, when Darcy flux component is very small, the corresponding directional conductivity perpendicular to streamlines becomes less identifiable. Finally, inversion is successful even if the location of aquifer boundaries is unknown. In this case, the inversion domain is defined by the location of the measurements.

  3. Estimation of hydraulic conductivities of Yucca Mountain tuffs from sorptivity and water retention measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1995-06-01

    The hydraulic conductivity functions of the matrix rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are among the most important data needed as input for the site-scale hydrological model of the unsaturated zone. The difficult and time-consuming nature of hydraulic conductivity measurements renders it infeasible to directly measure this property on large numbers of cores. Water retention and sorptivity measurements, however, can be made relatively rapidly. The sorptivity is, in principle, a unique functional of the conductivity and water retention functions. It therefore should be possible to invert sorptivity and water retention measurements in order to estimate the conductivity; the porosity is the only other parameter that is required for this inversion. In this report two methods of carrying out this inversion are presented, and are tested against a limited data set that has been collected by Flint et al. at the USGS on a set of Yucca Mountain tuffs. The absolute permeability is usually predicted by both methods to within an average error of about 0.5 - 1.0 orders of magnitude. The discrepancy appears to be due to the fact that the water retention curves have only been measured during drainage, whereas the imbibition water retention curve is the one that is relevant to sorptivity measurements. Although the inversion methods also yield predictions of the relative permeability function, there are yet no unsaturated hydraulic conductivity data against which to test these predictions.

  4. Recovery performance in xylem hydraulic conductivity is correlated with cavitation resistance for temperate deciduous tree species.

    PubMed

    Ogasa, Mayumi; Miki, Naoko H; Murakami, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Woody species hydraulically vulnerable to xylem cavitation may experience daily xylem embolism. How such species cope with the possibility of accumulated embolism is unclear. In this study, we examined seven temperate woody species to assess the hypothesis that low cavitation resistance (high vulnerability to cavitation) is compensated by high recovery performance via vessel refilling. We also evaluated leaf functional and xylem structural traits. The xylem recovery index (XRI), defined as the ratio of xylem hydraulic conductivity in plants rewatered after soil drought to that in plants under moist conditions, varied among species. The xylem water potential causing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (Ψ50) varied among the species studied, whereas only a slight difference was detected with respect to midday xylem water potential (Ψmin), indicating smaller hydraulic safety margins (Ψmin - Ψ50) for species more vulnerable to cavitation. Cavitation resistance (|Ψ50|) was negatively correlated with XRI across species, with cavitation-vulnerable species showing a higher performance in xylem recovery. Wood density was positively correlated with cavitation resistance and was negatively correlated with XRI. These novel results reveal that coordination exists between cavitation resistance and xylem recovery performance, in association with wood functional traits such as denser wood for cavitation-resistant xylem and less-dense but water-storable wood for refillable xylem. These findings provide insights into long-term maintenance of water transport in tree species growing under variable environmental conditions.

  5. Automated Dual-Head Infiltrometer for Measuring Field Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity (Kfs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Leonardo; Cobos, Doug; Campbell, Gaylon

    2016-04-01

    Traditional methods for determining field saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) based on infiltration measurements require numerous factors to correct for three-dimensional flow. Analysis for determining Kfs employs numerically determined shape factors for ring radius, depth of ring insertion, ponding depth, and soil hydraulic properties. The correction factors for soil hydraulic properties are typically taken from a table based on soil capillary length. Significant error can occur in the calculation of Kfs when the correction factor is large and infiltration is low. Using a dual-head infiltration measurement and methods proposed by Reynolds and Elrick (1990) for analysis of steady flow from a ponded infiltration in a single ring, we can reduce the error by eliminating the need to use soil capillary length as a correction factor in analysis. This method has traditionally required constant monitoring and user intervention to change the water levels and can take hours to complete a single measurement. There is also a lag time after changing the water head setting, especially in low conductivity soils. An automated infiltrometer capable of producing variable hydraulic head conditions without actually varying the water depth has been developed in our lab. The infiltrometer has been used successfully to determine Kfs under field conditions and shows great promise to be an easy to use, accurate tool for measuring Kfs.

  6. Polyacrylamide effect on hydraulic conductivity of hardsetting soils in Northeast of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Laércio; Almeida, Brivaldo; Melo, Diego; Marques, Karina; Almeida, Ceres

    2013-04-01

    Among soil hydro-physical properties, hydraulic conductivity is more sensitive to changes in soil structure. Hydraulic conductivity describes the ease with which a fluid (usually water) can move through pore spaces or fractures. It depends on the intrinsic permeability of the material and on the degree of saturation, and on the density and viscosity of the fluid. Hardsetting soils present very low hydraulic conductivity values. When dry, these soils show high penetration resistance and consistency extremely hard, but change to friable when moist. In this condition are poorly structured, slaking when moist, limit agricultural machinery use and it may reduce the growth of the root system. In Brazil, these soils occur throughout of coastal zone in flat areas called "coastal tableland". Chemical ameliorant, such as polymers based on anionic polyacrylamide (PAM), improve hydraulic conductivity of soil in hardsetting soils. The primary functions of polyacrylamide soil conditioners are to increase soil tilth, aeration, and porosity and reduce compaction and water run-off. PAM effect is attributed to its ability to expand when placed in water, storing it in soil pore space, releasing it gradually to the plants. This process occurs by reducing the water flow through the pores of the soil, due to water molecules can be absorbed by PAM, providing water gradually. Thus, this study tested the hypothesis that PAM reduces the soil hardsetting character. The area is located in coastal zone in Goiana city, Pernambuco, northeastern of Brazil. This soil is typical hardsetting soil. Intact soil cores were collected from four horizons until 70cm depth. In the laboratory, the soil cores were saturated with different PAM concentrations (0.01, 0.005, 0.00125%) and H2O (control). Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) was determined using a constant head method, according to Klute and Dirksen (1986). Four replicates were used for each horizon and Tukey test at 5% probability was used by

  7. Temporal changes in hydraulic conductivity of sand porous media biofilters during wastewater infiltration due to biomat formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Deborah N. H.; McCray, John E.; Lowe, Kathryn S.; Siegrist, Robert L.

    2005-09-01

    Porous media biofilters (PMBs) are commonly used to treat domestic wastewater. Biomats develop at the infiltrative surface of PMBs due to continued wastewater application and create an impedance to flow. The goal of this research is to quantify the temporal evolution of normalized biomat hydraulic conductivity ( Kbm/ bbm) and effective hydraulic conductivity ( Ke). Ke is the overall hydraulic conductivity of the infiltrative zone, including biomat and unsaturated media below the biomat. Research was conducted using eight one-dimensional (1D) sand columns with gravel-free and gravel-laden infiltrative surfaces. The columns were loaded at design rates of 100-200 cm/d for 20 weeks of column operation. The Ke values for these continuously loaded columns were determined from analyses of bromide-tracer tests, falling-head permeability tests, and volumetric water content measurements during biomat development. The reduction in the Ke due to biomat formation is due to two factors: reduced hydraulic conductivity of the thin biomat, and a reduced hydraulic conductivity of the subsoil due to development of a biomat-induced unsaturated flow regime. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities of the subsoil below the biomat ( Kss) were estimated from capillary curves and water content measurements. For observed final biomat thicknesses (less than 1 cm), the biomat hydraulic conductivity, Kbm, is three orders of magnitude smaller than the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity ( Kss). However, the relatively large thickness of the vadose zone causes the Kss to be an important contributor to the overall Ke value. For these columns, the final Ke values were approximately two orders of magnitude smaller than the original value. Because the exact thickness of the biomat ( bbm) is unknown during the flow experiments, the hydraulic conductance of the biomat zone is presented using a normalized hydraulic conductivity function ( Kbm/ bbm). A similar Kbm/ bbm is reached regardless of wastewater

  8. Estimating Hydraulic Conductivities in a Fractured Shale Formation from Pressure Pulse Testing and 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbet, C.; DICK, P.; Lefevre, M.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.; Barnichon, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the framework of its research on the deep disposal of radioactive waste in shale formations, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a large array of in situ programs concerning the confining properties of shales in their underground research laboratory at Tournemire (SW France). One of its aims is to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling radionuclide migration through the host rock, from the disposal system to the biosphere. Past research programs carried out at Tournemire covered mechanical, hydro-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire shale as well as water chemistry and long-term behaviour of the host rock. Studies show that fluid circulations in the undisturbed matrix are very slow (hydraulic conductivity of 10-14 to 10-15 m.s-1). However, recent work related to the occurrence of small scale fractures and clay-rich fault gouges indicate that fluid circulations may have been significantly modified in the vicinity of such features. To assess the transport properties associated with such faults, IRSN designed a series of in situ and laboratory experiments to evaluate the contribution of both diffusive and advective process on water and solute flux through a clay-rich fault zone (fault core and damaged zone) and in an undisturbed shale formation. As part of these studies, Modular Mini-Packer System (MMPS) hydraulic testing was conducted in multiple boreholes to characterize hydraulic conductivities within the formation. Pressure data collected during the hydraulic tests were analyzed using the nSIGHTS (n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator) code to estimate hydraulic conductivity and formation pressures of the tested intervals. Preliminary results indicate hydraulic conductivities of 5.10-12 m.s-1 in the fault core and damaged zone and 10-14 m.s-1 in the adjacent undisturbed shale. Furthermore, when compared with neutron porosity data from borehole

  9. An inverse procedure for estimating the unsaturated hydraulic conductivities of volcanic tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure is developed for estimating the hydraulic conductivity function of unsaturated volcanic tuff, using measurements of the sorptivity and capillary pressure functions. The method assumes that the sorptivity is a linear function of the initial saturation, as is suggested by experimental data. The procedure is tested on a vitrified tuff from the Calico Hills unit at Yucca Mountain, and the predicted conductivities are in reasonable agreement with measured values. Further tests of this method are needed to establish whether or not it can be routinely used for conductivity predictions.

  10. An inverse procedure for estimating the unsaturated hydraulic conductivities of volcanic tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.

    1993-12-31

    A procedure is developed for estimating the hydraulic conductivity function of unsaturated volcanic tuff, using measurements of the sorptivity and capillary pressure functions. The method assumes that the sorptivity is a linear function of the initial saturation, as is suggested by experimental data. The procedure is tested on a vitrified tuff from the Calico Hills unit at Yucca Mountain, and the predicted conductivities are in reasonable agreement with measured values. Further tests of this method are needed to establish whether or not it can be routinely used for conductivity predictions.

  11. Method and apparatus for determining the hydraulic conductivity of earthen material

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, J.B.; Honeycutt, T.K.; Hubbell, J.M.

    1996-05-28

    An earthen material hydraulic conductivity determining apparatus includes: (a) a semipermeable membrane having a fore earthen material bearing surface and an opposing rear liquid receiving surface; (b) a pump in fluid communication with the semipermeable membrane rear surface, the pump being capable of delivering liquid to the membrane rear surface at a plurality of selected variable flow rates or at a plurality of selected variable pressures; (c) a liquid reservoir in fluid communication with the pump, the liquid reservoir retaining a liquid for pumping to the membrane rear surface; and (d) a pressure sensor in fluid communication with the membrane rear surface to measure pressure of liquid delivered to the membrane by the pump. Preferably, the pump comprises a pair of longitudinally opposed and aligned syringes which are operable to simultaneously fill one syringe while emptying the other. Methods of determining the hydraulic conductivity of earthen material are also disclosed. 15 figs.

  12. Method and apparatus for determining the hydraulic conductivity of earthen material

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, James B.; Honeycutt, Thomas K.; Hubbell, Joel M.

    1996-01-01

    An earthen material hydraulic conductivity determining apparatus includes, a) a semipermeable membrane having a fore earthen material bearing surface and an opposing rear liquid receiving surface; b) a pump in fluid communication with the semipermeable membrane rear surface, the pump being capable of delivering liquid to the membrane rear surface at a plurality of selected variable flow rates or at a plurality of selected variable pressures; c) a liquid reservoir in fluid communication with the pump, the liquid reservoir retaining a liquid for pumping to the membrane rear surface; and d) a pressure sensor in fluid communication with the membrane rear surface to measure pressure of liquid delivered to the membrane by the pump. Preferably, the pump comprises a pair of longitudinally opposed and aligned syringes which are operable to simultaneously fill one syringe while emptying the other. Methods of determining the hydraulic conductivity of earthen material are also disclosed.

  13. Regression models for hydraulic conductivity and field test of borehole permeameter

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Daniel B.; Watson, David B; Lambert, Kevin

    1987-12-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity K{sub s} of sediments in the vadose zone is an important parameter in predicting the seepage rates of water and contaminants. The borehole permeameter is an in situ technique to test a relatively large sample size at any depth. Solutions are presented which account for the effects of unsaturated flow. These solutions are derived from a regression analysis of results of numerical simulations in which unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is represented by one or two parameters. The results of a borehole permeameter test in a uniform sand are compared with field ponding tests and air entry permeameter tests. The regression-based solutions for the borehole permeameter which account for capillarity provide very good agreement with other permeameter results. Depending upon the approach used to solve the borehole problem K{sub s} values determined by methods which neglected and included capillary effects varied by a factor of only about two for the soil tested.

  14. Regression models for hydraulic conductivity and field test of the borehole permeameter

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D.B.; Lambert, K.; Watson, D.

    1987-12-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity K/sub s/ of sediments in the vadose zone is an important parameter in predicting the seepage rates of water and contaminants. The borehole permeameter is an in situ technique to test a relatively large sample size at any depth. Solutions are presented which account for the effects of unsaturated flow. These solutions are derived from a regression analysis of results of numerical simulations in which unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is represented by one or two parameters. The results of a borehole permeameter test in a uniform sand are compared with field ponding tests and air entry permeameter tests. The regression-based solutions for the borehole permeameter which account for capillarity provide very good agreement with other permeameter results. Depending upon the approach used to solve the borehole problem K/sub s/ values determined by methods which neglected and included capillary effects varied by a factor of only about two for the soil test.

  15. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity of a coastal aquifer using satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.; Marino-Tapia, I.

    2012-12-01

    The northern Yucatan Peninsula is characterized by a young and dynamic karstic system that yields very high secondary porosity and permeability. However, we have little, if none, knowledge about the hydraulic conductivity and the amount of groundwater being discharged in to ocean. Here we present and estimation of the hydraulic conductivity and quantity of groundwater being discharged by the northern Yucatan Peninsula coastal aquifer into the Gulf of Mexico, using the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Images offshore the Yucatan coast, where we have detected a thermal anomaly that appears few hours after heavy rainfall in northern Yucatan. We associated these thermal anomalies of the SST to the groundwater being discharged into the ocean. To test our hypothesis we conducted a review of extreme rainfall events in the last 10 years; in parallel we used data from pressure and flow direction gauges installed in a known submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and the quantity of groundwater being discharged. The satellite imagery and the rainfall data, allowed us to estimate the time lag between the rainfall and the SGD beginning, along with the hydraulic data from the gauges we have estimated the hydrogeological parameters of the coastal aquifer. This data is very important to contribute to the understanding the hydrogeological setting of the Yucatan coastal aquifer and its implications of the impact of human activities on the water quality. July 29th, 2005, NOAA's Sea Surface Temperature (SST) image of the Gulf of Mexico taken a week after hurricane Emily (2005). A thermal low is present offshore northern Yucatan.

  16. Silicon Enhances Water Stress Tolerance by Improving Root Hydraulic Conductance in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Zhang, Yi; Han, Weihua; Feng, Ru; Hu, Yanhong; Guo, Jia; Gong, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) can improve drought tolerance in plants, but the mechanism is still not fully understood. Previous research has been concentrating on Si's role in leaf water maintenance in Si accumulators, while little information is available on its role in water uptake and in less Si-accumulating plants. Here, we investigated the effects of Si on root water uptake and its role in decreasing oxidative damage in relation to root hydraulic conductance in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Zhongza No.9') under water stress. Tomato seedlings were subjected to water stress induced by 10% (w/v) polyethylene glycol-6000 in the absence or presence of 2.5 mM added silicate. The results showed that Si addition ameliorated the inhibition in tomato growth and photosynthesis, and improved water status under water stress. The root hydraulic conductance of tomato plants was decreased under water stress, and it was significantly increased by added Si. There was no significant contribution of osmotic adjustment in Si-enhanced root water uptake under water stress. The transcriptions of plasma membrane aquaporin genes were not obviously changed by Si under water stress. Water stress increased the production of reactive oxygen species and induced oxidative damage, while added Si reversed these. In addition, Si addition increased the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase and the levels of ascorbic acid and glutathione in the roots under stress. It is concluded that Si enhances the water stress tolerance via enhancing root hydraulic conductance and water uptake in tomato plants. Si-mediated decrease in membrane oxidative damage may have contributed to the enhanced root hydraulic conductance.

  17. Silicon Enhances Water Stress Tolerance by Improving Root Hydraulic Conductance in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; Zhang, Yi; Han, Weihua; Feng, Ru; Hu, Yanhong; Guo, Jia; Gong, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) can improve drought tolerance in plants, but the mechanism is still not fully understood. Previous research has been concentrating on Si’s role in leaf water maintenance in Si accumulators, while little information is available on its role in water uptake and in less Si-accumulating plants. Here, we investigated the effects of Si on root water uptake and its role in decreasing oxidative damage in relation to root hydraulic conductance in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Zhongza No.9’) under water stress. Tomato seedlings were subjected to water stress induced by 10% (w/v) polyethylene glycol-6000 in the absence or presence of 2.5 mM added silicate. The results showed that Si addition ameliorated the inhibition in tomato growth and photosynthesis, and improved water status under water stress. The root hydraulic conductance of tomato plants was decreased under water stress, and it was significantly increased by added Si. There was no significant contribution of osmotic adjustment in Si-enhanced root water uptake under water stress. The transcriptions of plasma membrane aquaporin genes were not obviously changed by Si under water stress. Water stress increased the production of reactive oxygen species and induced oxidative damage, while added Si reversed these. In addition, Si addition increased the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase and the levels of ascorbic acid and glutathione in the roots under stress. It is concluded that Si enhances the water stress tolerance via enhancing root hydraulic conductance and water uptake in tomato plants. Si-mediated decrease in membrane oxidative damage may have contributed to the enhanced root hydraulic conductance. PMID:26941762

  18. The effect of the shape parameters of a sample on the hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucza, Jarosław; Ilek, Anna

    2016-03-01

    The present study is a complement to the research investigating a laboratory method for measuring the saturated hydraulic conductivity of mountain forest soils, the results of which were presented in a paper by Ilek and Kucza (2014). The aim of the study is to analyse the influence of variation of particular cross-sections of samples and their enlarged side surface on the hydraulic conductivity measurement. The results show that a narrowing in the upper section of the sample results in an approximately twice lower disturbance of the laminar water flow than the narrowing occurring inside the sample. For that reason, the extent of the effect of the cross-section narrowing on the hydraulic conductivity measurement error is dependent on the location of the narrowing. An enlarged side surface of a sample, as described by the coefficient of side surface development, is on average 30% larger than the surface of a sample having the same volume and the same average cross-sectional area but a regular shape. The values of the coefficient of side surface development for a given sample were adopted in the range of 1.10-1.56. Among the shape parameters of the analysed irregular soil samples, the greatest impact on the measurement error is exerted by their enlarged lateral surface, which almost entirely explains the whole error of hydraulic conductivity measurement. The variability of successive cross-sectional areas of samples appears to be of marginal importance for the occurrence of this error, whose mean value was 1.15%.

  19. Bayesian Model Averaging of Artificial Intelligence Models for Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiri, A.; Chitsazan, N.; Tsai, F. T.; Asghari Moghaddam, A.

    2012-12-01

    This research presents a Bayesian artificial intelligence model averaging (BAIMA) method that incorporates multiple artificial intelligence (AI) models to estimate hydraulic conductivity and evaluate estimation uncertainties. Uncertainty in the AI model outputs stems from error in model input as well as non-uniqueness in selecting different AI methods. Using one single AI model tends to bias the estimation and underestimate uncertainty. BAIMA employs Bayesian model averaging (BMA) technique to address the issue of using one single AI model for estimation. BAIMA estimates hydraulic conductivity by averaging the outputs of AI models according to their model weights. In this study, the model weights were determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) that follows the parsimony principle. BAIMA calculates the within-model variances to account for uncertainty propagation from input data to AI model output. Between-model variances are evaluated to account for uncertainty due to model non-uniqueness. We employed Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy logic (TS-FL), artificial neural network (ANN) and neurofuzzy (NF) to estimate hydraulic conductivity for the Tasuj plain aquifer, Iran. BAIMA combined three AI models and produced better fitting than individual models. While NF was expected to be the best AI model owing to its utilization of both TS-FL and ANN models, the NF model is nearly discarded by the parsimony principle. The TS-FL model and the ANN model showed equal importance although their hydraulic conductivity estimates were quite different. This resulted in significant between-model variances that are normally ignored by using one AI model.

  20. Technical Conduct of the Child Sexual Abuse Medical Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Martin A.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the technical conduct of the child-sexual-abuse medical examination and offers a research agenda. Introduction of the colposcope in the early 1980s is noted, as are other technological advances, such as the videocolposcopy and linkage with computer technology. Achievement highlights in the last 20 years of research are identified, along…

  1. The effect of subsurface military detonations on vadose zone hydraulic conductivity, contaminant transport and aquifer recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Burman, Jan; Edlund, Christina; Simonsson, Louise; Berglind, Rune; Leffler, Per; Qvarfort, Ulf; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Meuken, Denise; Duvalois, Willem; Martel, Richard; Sjöström, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Live fire military training involves the detonation of explosive warheads on training ranges. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the hydrogeological changes to the vadose zone caused by military training with high explosive ammunition. In particular, this study investigates artillery ammunition which penetrates underground prior to exploding, either by design or by defective fuze mechanisms. A 105 mm artillery round was detonated 2.6 m underground, and hydraulic conductivity measurements were taken before and after the explosion. A total of 114 hydraulic conductivity measurements were obtained within a radius of 3 m from the detonation point, at four different depths and at three different time periods separated by 18 months. This data was used to produce a three dimensional numerical model of the soil affected by the exploding artillery round. This model was then used to investigate potential changes to aquifer recharge and contaminant transport caused by the detonating round. The results indicate that an exploding artillery round can strongly affect the hydraulic conductivity in the vadose zone, increasing it locally by over an order of magnitude. These variations, however, appear to cause relatively small changes to both local groundwater recharge and contaminant transport.

  2. The effect of subsurface military detonations on vadose zone hydraulic conductivity, contaminant transport and aquifer recharge.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Burman, Jan; Edlund, Christina; Simonsson, Louise; Berglind, Rune; Leffler, Per; Qvarfort, Ulf; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Meuken, Denise; Duvalois, Willem; Martel, Richard; Sjöström, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Live fire military training involves the detonation of explosive warheads on training ranges. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the hydrogeological changes to the vadose zone caused by military training with high explosive ammunition. In particular, this study investigates artillery ammunition which penetrates underground prior to exploding, either by design or by defective fuze mechanisms. A 105 mm artillery round was detonated 2.6 m underground, and hydraulic conductivity measurements were taken before and after the explosion. A total of 114 hydraulic conductivity measurements were obtained within a radius of 3m from the detonation point, at four different depths and at three different time periods separated by 18months. This data was used to produce a three dimensional numerical model of the soil affected by the exploding artillery round. This model was then used to investigate potential changes to aquifer recharge and contaminant transport caused by the detonating round. The results indicate that an exploding artillery round can strongly affect the hydraulic conductivity in the vadose zone, increasing it locally by over an order of magnitude. These variations, however, appear to cause relatively small changes to both local groundwater recharge and contaminant transport.

  3. Influence of soil, land use and climatic factors on the hydraulic conductivity of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, N.; Koestel, J.; Messing, I.; Moeys, J.; Lindahl, A.

    2013-08-01

    Due to inadequate data support, existing algorithms used to estimate soil hydraulic conductivity, K, in (eco)hydrological models ignore the effects of key site factors such as land use and climate and neglect the significant effects of soil structure on water flow at and near saturation. These limitations may introduce serious bias and error into predictions of terrestrial water balances and soil moisture status, and thus plant growth and rates of biogeochemical processes. To resolve these issues, we collated a new global database of hydraulic conductivity measured by tension infiltrometer under field conditions. The results of our analyses on this dataset contrast markedly with those of existing algorithms used to estimate K. We show that the saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, in topsoil (< 0.3 m depth) is only very weakly related to texture. Instead, Ks depends more strongly on bulk density, organic carbon content and land use and management factors. In this respect, the results show that arable sites have, on average, ca. 2 to 3 times smaller Ks values than natural vegetation, forests and perennial agriculture. The data also clearly demonstrates that clay soils have smaller K in the soil matrix and thus a larger contribution of soil macropores to K at and near saturation.

  4. Influence of soil, land use and climatic factors on the hydraulic conductivity of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, N.; Koestel, J.; Messing, I.; Moeys, J.; Lindahl, A.

    2013-12-01

    Due to inadequate data support, existing algorithms used to estimate soil hydraulic conductivity, K, in (eco)hydrological models ignore the effects of key site factors such as land use and climate and underplay the significant effects of soil structure on water flow at and near saturation. These limitations may introduce serious bias and error into predictions of terrestrial water balances and soil moisture status, and thus plant growth and rates of biogeochemical processes. To resolve these issues, we collated a new global database of hydraulic conductivity measured by tension infiltrometer under field conditions. The results of our analyses on this data set contrast markedly with those of existing algorithms used to estimate K. For example, saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, in the topsoil (< 0.3 m depth) was found to be only weakly related to texture. Instead, the data suggests that Ks depends more strongly on bulk density, organic carbon content and land use. In this respect, organic carbon was negatively correlated with Ks, presumably due to water repellency, while Ks at arable sites was, on average, ca. 2-3 times smaller than under natural vegetation, forests and perennial agriculture. The data also clearly demonstrates that clay soils have smaller K in the soil matrix and thus a larger contribution of soil macropores to K at and near saturation.

  5. Indirect measurements of field-scale hydraulic conductivity of waste from two landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Fleming, I R

    2011-12-01

    Management and prediction of the movement and distribution of fluids in large landfills is important for various reasons. Bioreactor landfill technology shows promise, but in arid or semi-arid regions, the natural content of landfilled waste may be low, thus requiring addition of significant volumes of water. In more humid locations, landfills can become saturated, flooding gas collection systems and causing sideslope leachate seeps or other undesirable occurrences. This paper compares results from two different approaches to monitoring water in waste. At the Brock West Landfill in eastern Canada, positive pore pressures were measured at various depths in saturated waste. The downward seepage flux through the waste is known, thus the vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity of the waste at this landfill was determined to be 3 × 10(-7)cm/s. By comparison, the Spadina Landfill in western Canada is predominantly unsaturated. The infiltration of moisture into the waste was measured using moisture sensors installed in boreholes which determined arrival time for moisture fronts resulting from major precipitation events as well as longer-term change in moisture content resulting from unsaturated drainage during winter when frozen ground prevented infiltration. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity calculated from these data ranged from approximately 10(-6)cm/s for the slow winter drainage in the absence of significant recharge to 10(-2)cm/s or higher for shallow waste subject to high infiltration through apparent preferential pathways. These two very different approaches to field-scale measurements of vertical hydraulic conductivity provide insight into the nature of fluid movement in saturated and unsaturated waste masses. It is suggested that the principles of unsaturated seepage apply reasonably well for landfilled waste and that the hydraulic behavior of waste is profoundly influenced by the nature and size of voids and by the degree of saturation prevailing in the

  6. Comparison of hydraulic conductivities for a sand and gravel aquifer in southeastern Massachusetts, estimated by three methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, L.P.; Church, P.E.; Turtora, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of a sand and gravel aquifer were estimated by three methods: constant- head multiport-permeameter tests, grain-size analyses (with the Hazen approximation method), and slug tests. Sediment cores from 45 boreholes were undivided or divided into two or three vertical sections to estimate hydraulic conductivity based on permeameter tests and grain-size analyses. The cores were collected from depth intervals in the screened zone of the aquifer in each observation well. Slug tests were performed on 29 observation wells installed in the boreholes. Hydraulic conductivities of 35 sediment cores estimated by use of permeameter tests ranged from 0.9 to 86 meters per day, with a mean of 22.8 meters per day. Hydraulic conductivities of 45 sediment cores estimated by use of grain-size analyses ranged from 0.5 to 206 meters per day, with a mean of 40.7 meters per day. Hydraulic conductivities of aquifer material at 29 observation wells estimated by use of slug tests ranged from 0.6 to 79 meters per day, with a mean of 32.9 meters per day. The repeatability of estimated hydraulic conductivities were estimated to be within 30 percent for the permeameter method, 12 percent for the grain-size method, and 9.5 percent for the slug test method. Statistical tests determined that the medians of estimates resulting from the slug tests and grain-size analyses were not significantly different but were significantly higher than the median of estimates resulting from the permeameter tests. Because the permeameter test is the only method considered which estimates vertical hydraulic conductivity, the difference in estimates may be attributed to vertical or horizontal anisotropy. The difference in the average hydraulic conductivities estimated by use of each method was less than 55 percent when compared to the estimated hydraulic conductivity determined from an aquifer test conducted near the study area.

  7. The use of slug tests to describe vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Bohling, G.C.; Hyder, Z.; McElwee, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    Multilevel slug tests provide one means of obtaining estimates of hydraulic conductivity on a scale of relevance for contaminant transport investigations. A numerical model is employed here to assess the potential of multilevel slug tests to provide information about vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity under conditions commonly faced in field settings. The results of the numerical simulations raise several important issues concerning the effectiveness of this technique. If the length of the test interval is of the order of the average layer thickness, considerable error may be introduced into the conductivity estimates owing to the effects of adjoining layers. The influence of adjoining layers is dependent on the aspect ratio (length of test interval/well radius) of the tesy interval and the flow properties of the individual layers. If a low-permeability skin is present at the well, the measured vertical variations will be much less than the actual variations, owing to the influence of the skin conductivity on the parameter estimates. A high-permeability skin can also produce apparent vertical variations that are much less than the actual, owing to water flowing vertically along the conductive skin. In cases where the test interval spans a number of layers, a slug test will yield an approximate thickness-weighted average of the hydraulic conductivities of the intersected layers. In most cases, packer circumvention should not be a major concern when packers of 0.75 m or longer are employed. Results of this study are substantiated by recently reported field tests that demonstrate the importance of well emplacement and development activities for obtaining meaningful estimates from a program of multilevel slug tests. ?? 1994.

  8. Impact Of Standing Water On Saltstone Placement II - Hydraulic Conductivity Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-12-06

    The amount of water present during placement and subsequent curing of saltstone has the potential to impact several properties important for grout quality. An active drain water system can remove residual standing water and expose the surface of the placed saltstone to air. Oxidation of the saltstone may result in an increase in the leachability of redox sensitive elements. A dry surface can lead to cracking, causing an increase in hydraulic conductivity. An inactive drain water system can allow standing water that generates unnecessary hydrostatic head on the vault walls. Standing water that cannot be removed via the drain system will be available for potential incorporation into subsequent grout placements. The objective of this work is to study the impact of standing water on grout quality pertaining to disposal units. A series of saltstone mixes was prepared and cured at ambient temperature to evaluate the impact of standing water on saltstone placement. The samples were managed to control drying effects on leachability by either exposing or capping the samples. The water to premix ratio was varied to represent a range of processing conditions. Samples were analyzed for density, leachability, and hydraulic conductivity. Report SRNL-STI-2012-00546 was issued detailing the experimental procedure, results, and conclusions related to density and leachability. In the previous report, it was concluded that: density tends to increase toward the bottom of the samples. This effect is pronounced with excess bleed water; drying of the saltstone during curing leads to decreased Leachability Index (more leaching) for potassium, sodium, rhenium, nitrite, and nitrate; there is no noticeable effect on saltstone oxidation/leachability by changing the water to premix ratio (over the range studied), or by pouring into standing water (when tested up to 10 volume percent). The hydraulic conductivity data presented in this report show that samples cured exposed to the atmosphere had

  9. Integrating Multiple Scales of Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements in Training Image-Based Stochastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, K.; Mariethoz, G.; Baker, A.

    2013-12-01

    It has been widely demonstrated that the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer increases with a larger portion of the aquifer tested. This poses a challenge when different hydraulic conductivity measurements coexist in a field study and have to be integrated simultaneously (e.g. core analysis, slug tests and well tests). While the scaling of hydraulic conductivity can be analytically derived in multiGaussian media, there is no general methodology to simultaneously integrate hydraulic conductivity measurements taken at different scales in highly heterogeneous media. Here we address this issue in the context of multiple-point statistics simulations (MPS). In MPS, the spatial continuity is based on a training image (TI) that contains the variability, connectivity, and structural properties of the medium. The key principle of our methodology is to consider the different scales of hydraulic conductivity as joint variables which are simulated together. Based on a TI that represents the fine-scale spatial variability, we use a classical upscaling method to obtain a series of upscaled TIs that correspond to the different scales at which measurements are available. In our case, the renormalization method is used for this upscaling step, but any upscaling method could be employed. Considered together, the different scales obtained are considered a single multi-scale representation of the initial TI, in a similar fashion as the multiscale pyramids used in image processing. We then use recent MPS simulation methods that allow dealing with multivariate TIs to generate conditional realizations of the different scales together. One characteristic of these realizations is that the possible non-linear relationships between the different simulated scales are statistically similar to the relationships observed in the multiscale TI. Therefore these relationships are considered a reasonable approximation of the renormalization results that were used on the TI. Another characteristic of

  10. Impact of root growth and root hydraulic conductance on water availability of young walnut trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerszurki, Daniela; Couvreur, Valentin; Hopmans, Jan W.; Silva, Lucas C. R.; Shackel, Kenneth A.; de Souza, Jorge L. M.

    2015-04-01

    Walnut (Juglans regia L.) is a tree species of high economic importance in the Central Valley of California. This crop has particularly high water requirements, which makes it highly dependent on irrigation. The context of decreasing water availability in the state calls for efficient water management practices, which requires improving our understanding of the relationship between water application and walnut water availability. In addition to the soil's hydraulic conductivity, two plant properties are thought to control the supply of water from the bulk soil to the canopy: (i) root distribution and (ii) plant hydraulic conductance. Even though these properties are clearly linked to crop water requirements, their quantitative relation remains unclear. The aim of this study is to quantitatively explain walnut water requirements under water deficit from continuous measurements of its water consumption, soil and stem water potential, root growth and root system hydraulic conductance. For that purpose, a greenhouse experiment was conducted for a two month period. Young walnut trees were planted in transparent cylindrical pots, equipped with: (i) rhizotron tubes, which allowed for non-invasive monitoring of root growth, (ii) pressure transducer tensiometers for soil water potential, (iii) psychrometers attached to non-transpiring leaves for stem water potential, and (iv) weighing scales for plant transpiration. Treatments consisted of different irrigation rates: 100%, 75% and 50% of potential crop evapotranspiration. Plant responses were compared to predictions from three simple process-based soil-plant-atmosphere models of water flow: (i) a hydraulic model of stomatal regulation based on stem water potential and vapor pressure deficit, (ii) a model of plant hydraulics predicting stem water potential from soil-root interfaces water potential, and (iii) a model of soil water depletion predicting the water potential drop between the bulk soil and soil-root interfaces

  11. Borehole Heat Exchanger Systems: Hydraulic Conductivity and Frost-Resistance of Backfill Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbergen, Hauke; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are economic solutions for both, domestic heating energy supply, as well as underground thermal energy storage (UTES). Over the past decades the technology developed to complex, advanced and highly efficient systems. For an efficient operation of the most common type of UTES, borehole heat exchanger (BHE) systems, it is necessary to design the system for a wide range of carrier fluid temperatures. During heat extraction, a cooled carrier fluid is heated up by geothermal energy. This collected thermal energy is energetically used by the heat pump. Thereby the carrier fluid temperature must have a lower temperature than the surrounding underground in order to collect heat energy. The steeper the thermal gradient, the more energy is transferred to the carrier fluid. The heat injection case works vice versa. For fast and sufficient heat extraction, even over long periods of heating (winter), it might become necessary to run the BHE with fluid temperatures below 0°C. As the heat pump runs periodically, a cyclic freezing of the pore water and corresponding ice-lens growth in the nearfield of the BHE pipes becomes possible. These so called freeze-thaw-cycles (FTC) are a critical state for the backfill material, as the sealing effect eventually decreases. From a hydrogeological point of view the vertical sealing of the BHE needs to be secured at any time (e.g. VDI 4640-2, Draft 2015). The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the BHE is influenced not only by the permeability of the grouting material itself, but by the contact area between BHE pipes and grout. In order to assess the sealing capacity of grouting materials a laboratory testing procedure was developed that measures the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the system BHE pipe and grout. The key features of the procedure are: • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity after simulation of freeze-thaw-cycle

  12. Studies and projections of hydraulic conductivity of Devonian Plavinu and Daugava carbonate aquifers in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkone, E.; Delina, A.; Saks, T.; Raga, B.; Jātnieks, J.; Klints, I.; Popovs, K.; Babre, A.; Bikše, J.; Kalvāns, A.; Retike, I.; Ukass, J.

    2012-04-01

    Carbonate aquifers show a very wide range of hydrogeological characteristics. Carbonate rock hydrogeology display two extremes: on one hand hydrogeological properties of the carbonates are governed by the pathways of the preferential groundwater flow typical in karstic regions, on the other - some carbonate aquifers behave almost like a homogeneous, isotropic, porous medium. Most lie between these extremes, but these case variations complicates the study of carbonate aquifer properties. In this study the results of the hydraulic conductivity in carbonate aquifers measurements, hydraulic conductivity correlation between sediments lithology and the aquifer surface depth and fractures research is presented. Upper Devonian Frasnian stage Pļaviņu and Daugava carbonate aquifers in the Latvian part of the Baltic basin is considered. The aim of this research is to elaborate characteristic hydraulic conductivity values for each aquifer based on existing data of the pumping test results and other aquifer properties. Pļaviņu and Daugava carbonate aquifers mainly consist of jointed dolomite with intermediate layers of dolomitic marlstone, limestone, clays and gypsum. These aquifers are prevalent in most of the study area, except Northern and South - Eastern parts of the territory. In geological structure Daugava aquifer lies above Pļaviņu aquifer. Daugava aquifer depth changes from 10 - 20 and even less meters in Eastern part to 250 - 300 m in South - West part of study area, but thickness varies from few meters to 30 m. Pļaviņu aquifer surface depth varies from 20 - 30 m, but in uplands surface depth reaches more than 120 m, in Eastern part to more than 300 m in South - West part of study area. Aquifer average thickness varies from 20 - 40 m, but in areas with buried valleys thickness can be less than 10 meters. Outcrops of these sediments are occurring in banks of largest rivers and in some areas aquifers are karstified. In studies of the carbonate aquifers it is

  13. Hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, and pumpage--High Plains aquifer system, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettijohn, Robert A.; Chen, Hsiu-Hsiung

    1983-01-01

    Hydrologic data used to evalute the ground-water potential of the High Plains aquifer system in Nebraska are presented on maps showing the hydraulic conductivity and specific yield of the aquifer system and the volume and distribution of water pumped for irrigation from the aquifer system during 1980. The High Plains aquifer system underlies 177,000 square miles in parts of eight states, including 64,770 square miles in Nebraska. It consists of the Ogallala Formation and Tertiary and Quaternary deposits that are saturated and hydraulically connected to the Ogallala. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer system varies from greater than 200 feet per day in parts of the North Platte, Platte, Elkhorn, and Republican River valleys to less than 25 feet per day in the northwestern part of the state. Specific yield of the aquifer system ranges from 10 to 20 percent in most of the state and averages 16 percent. The estimated volume of water recoverable from the aquifer system in Nebraska is 2,237 million acre-feet. Inches of water withdrawn from the aquifer system during 1980 varied from less than 1.5 in the sandhills of north-central Nebraska to more than 12 in the Platte River and Blue River basins. This withdrawal represents about 6,703,000 acre-feet of ground water. (USGS)

  14. A novel approach to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.; Sahimi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate prediction of conductivity in partially-saturated porous media has broad applications in various phenomena in porous media, and has been studied intensively since the 1940s by petroleum, chemical and civil engineers, and hydrologists. Many of the models developed in the past are based on the bundle of capillary tubes. In addition, pore network models have also been developed for simulating multiphase fluid flow in porous media and computing the conductivity in unsaturated porous media. In this study, we propose a novel approach using concepts from the effective-medium approximation (EMA) and percolation theory to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media whose pore-size distributions exhibit power-law scaling. In our approach, the EMA, originally developed for predicting electrical conductivity of composite materials, is used to predict the effective conductivity, from complete saturation to some intermediate water content that represents a crossover point. Below the crossover water content, but still above a critical saturation (percolation threshold), a universal scaling predicted by percolation theory, a power law that expresses the dependence of the conductivity on the water content (less a critical water saturation) with an exponent of 2, is invoked to describe the effective conductivity. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the approach, experimental data were used from the literature. The predicted hydraulic conductivities for most cases are in excellent agreement with the data. In a few cases the theory underestimates the hydraulic conductivities, which correspond to porous media with very broad pore-size distribution in which the largest pore radius is more than 7 orders of magnitude greater than the smallest one. The approach is also used to predict the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity for experiments in which capillary pressure data are available. The results indicate that the universal scaling of

  15. The influence of topology on hydraulic conductivity in a sand-and-gravel aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    A field experiment consisting of geophysical logging and tracer testing was conducted in a single well that penetrated a sand-and-gravel aquifer at the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Geophysical logs and flowmeter/pumping measurements were obtained to estimate vertical profiles of porosity ??, hydraulic conductivity K, temperature, and bulk electrical conductivity under background, freshwater conditions. Saline-tracer fluid was then injected into the well for 2 h and its radial migration into the surrounding deposits was monitored by recording an electromagnetic-induction log every 10 min. The field data are analyzed and interpreted primarily through the use of Archie's (1942) law to investigate the role of topological factors such as pore geometry and connectivity, and grain size and packing configuration in regulating fluid flow through these coarse-grained materials. The logs reveal no significant correlation between K and ??, and imply that groundwater models that link these two properties may not be useful at this site. Rather, it is the distribution and connectivity of the fluid phase as defined by formation factor F, cementation index m, and tortuosity ?? that primarily control the hydraulic conductivity. Results show that F correlates well with K, thereby indicating that induction logs provide qualitative information on the distribution of hydraulic conductivity. A comparison of ??, which incorporates porosity data, with K produces only a slightly better correlation and further emphasizes the weak influence of the bulk value of ?? on K. Copyright ?? 2009 The Author(s) are Federal Government Employees. Journal compilation ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  16. Wall Extensibility and Cell Hydraulic Conductivity Decrease in Enlarging Stem Tissues at Low Water Potentials 1

    PubMed Central

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Boyer, John S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements with a guillotine psychrometer (H Nonami, JS Boyer [1990] Plant Physiol 94: 1601-1609) indicate that the inhibition of stem growth at low water potentials (low ψw) is accompanied by decreases in cell wall extensibility and tissue hydraulic conductance to water that eventually limit growth rate in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.). To check this conclusion, we measured cell wall properties and cell hydraulic conductivities with independent techniques in soybean seedlings grown and treated the same way, i.e. grown in the dark and exposed to low ψw by transplanting dark grown seedlings to vermiculite of low water content. Wall properties were measured with an extensiometer modified for intact plants, and conductances were measured with a cell pressure probe in intact plants. Theory was developed to relate the wall measurements to those with the psychrometer. In the elongation zone, the plastic deformability of the walls decreased when measured with the extensiometer while growth was inhibited at low ψw. It increased during a modest growth recovery. This behavior was the same as that for the wall extensibility observed previously with the psychrometer. Tissue that was killed before measurement with the extensiometer also showed a similar response, indicating that changes in wall extensibility represented changes in wall physical properties and not rates of wall biosynthesis. The elastic compliance (reciprocal of bulk elastic modulus) did not change in the elongating or mature tissue. The hydraulic conductivity of cortical cells decreased in the elongating tissue and increased slightly during growth recovery in a response similar to that observed with the psychrometer. We conclude that the plastic properties of the cell walls and the conductance of the cells to water were decreased at low ψw but that the elastic properties of the walls were of little consequence in this response. PMID:16667664

  17. Hydraulic conductivity of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaf tissue does not respond to light.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, F E; Holbrook, N M; Zwieniecki, M A

    2011-04-01

    The permeability of leaf tissue to water has been reported to increase under illumination, a response reputed to involve aquaporins. We studied this 'light response' in red oak (Quercus rubra L.), the species in which the phenomenon was first detected during measurements of leaf hydraulic conductance with the high-pressure flow meter (HPFM). In our HPFM measurements, we found that pre-conditioning leaves in darkness was not sufficient to bring them to their minimum conductance, which was attained only after an hour of submersion and pressurization. However, pre-conditioning leaves under anoxic conditions resulted in an immediate reduction in conductance. Leaves light- and dark-acclimated while on the tree showed no differences in the time course of HPFM measurement under illumination. We also studied the effect of light level and anoxia on rehydration kinetics, finding that anoxia slowed rehydration, but light had no effect either in the lab (rehydration under low light, high humidity) or on the tree (acclimation under high light, 10 min of dark prior to rehydration). We conclude that the declines in conductance observed in the HPFM must involve a resistance downstream of the extracellular air space, and that in red oak the hydraulic conductivity of leaf tissue is insensitive to light. PMID:21309791

  18. Improved estimation of hydraulic conductivity by combining stochastically simulated hydrofacies with geophysical data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Chen, Yun; Li, Xiaojuan; Chang, Xiang; Cui, Yijiao

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is a major parameter affecting the output accuracy of groundwater flow and transport models. The most commonly used semi-empirical formula for estimating conductivity is Kozeny-Carman equation. However, this method alone does not work well with heterogeneous strata. Two important parameters, grain size and porosity, often show spatial variations at different scales. This study proposes a method for estimating conductivity distributions by combining a stochastic hydrofacies model with geophysical methods. The Markov chain model with transition probability matrix was adopted to re-construct structures of hydrofacies for deriving spatial deposit information. The geophysical and hydro-chemical data were used to estimate the porosity distribution through the Archie's law. Results show that the stochastic simulated hydrofacies model reflects the sedimentary features with an average model accuracy of 78% in comparison with borehole log data in the Chaobai alluvial fan. The estimated conductivity is reasonable and of the same order of magnitude of the outcomes of the pumping tests. The conductivity distribution is consistent with the sedimentary distributions. This study provides more reliable spatial distributions of the hydraulic parameters for further numerical modeling. PMID:26927886

  19. Improved estimation of hydraulic conductivity by combining stochastically simulated hydrofacies with geophysical data

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Chen, Yun; Li, Xiaojuan; Chang, Xiang; Cui, Yijiao

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is a major parameter affecting the output accuracy of groundwater flow and transport models. The most commonly used semi-empirical formula for estimating conductivity is Kozeny-Carman equation. However, this method alone does not work well with heterogeneous strata. Two important parameters, grain size and porosity, often show spatial variations at different scales. This study proposes a method for estimating conductivity distributions by combining a stochastic hydrofacies model with geophysical methods. The Markov chain model with transition probability matrix was adopted to re-construct structures of hydrofacies for deriving spatial deposit information. The geophysical and hydro-chemical data were used to estimate the porosity distribution through the Archie’s law. Results show that the stochastic simulated hydrofacies model reflects the sedimentary features with an average model accuracy of 78% in comparison with borehole log data in the Chaobai alluvial fan. The estimated conductivity is reasonable and of the same order of magnitude of the outcomes of the pumping tests. The conductivity distribution is consistent with the sedimentary distributions. This study provides more reliable spatial distributions of the hydraulic parameters for further numerical modeling. PMID:26927886

  20. Laboratory Studies to Examine the Impact of Polyacrylamide (PAM) on Soil Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, E. A.; Young, M. H.; Yu, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) is a long-chain synthetic polymer made of the monomer acrylamide (AMD). PAM has numerous uses ranging from food processing to drilling to wastewater treatment. More recently it has been proposed as a canal sealant in the western US to improve water conservation. To support a larger field-based experimental program being implemented in Grand Junction, CO, soil column experiments are being conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of how, and to what extent, PAM reduces soil hydraulic conductivity. The goal of the experiments is to find the optimum concentration and application method of PAM that reduces hydraulic conductivity to the greatest extent. Column tests were conducted, in triplicate, using a constant head method in acrylic columns of 15 cm length and 6.4 cm diameter. An unbalanced multi-factorial design was used with experimental variables including soil type (medium silica sand, locally-derived sand, and locally-derived loam), PAM concentration (11, 22, 44, 88 kg/canal-ha), turbidity (0, 100, 350 NTU), and application method (hydrated PAM on dry soil and powdered PAM applied to water column above saturated soil). Non-crosslinked anionic PAM with a molecular weight of 12 to 24 Mg/mol was used for all experiments. Additional experiments were conducted in graduated cylinders to evaluate interactions between PAM, turbidity and water chemistry. Results of the laboratory tests will be presented and discussed in the context of water conservation in the western US.

  1. Improved estimation of hydraulic conductivity by combining stochastically simulated hydrofacies with geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Chen, Yun; Li, Xiaojuan; Chang, Xiang; Cui, Yijiao

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is a major parameter affecting the output accuracy of groundwater flow and transport models. The most commonly used semi-empirical formula for estimating conductivity is Kozeny-Carman equation. However, this method alone does not work well with heterogeneous strata. Two important parameters, grain size and porosity, often show spatial variations at different scales. This study proposes a method for estimating conductivity distributions by combining a stochastic hydrofacies model with geophysical methods. The Markov chain model with transition probability matrix was adopted to re-construct structures of hydrofacies for deriving spatial deposit information. The geophysical and hydro-chemical data were used to estimate the porosity distribution through the Archie’s law. Results show that the stochastic simulated hydrofacies model reflects the sedimentary features with an average model accuracy of 78% in comparison with borehole log data in the Chaobai alluvial fan. The estimated conductivity is reasonable and of the same order of magnitude of the outcomes of the pumping tests. The conductivity distribution is consistent with the sedimentary distributions. This study provides more reliable spatial distributions of the hydraulic parameters for further numerical modeling.

  2. Soil hydraulic properties and REV study using X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modelling: saturated hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Kirill; Khirevich, Siarhei; Sizonenko, Timofey; Karsanina, Marina; Umarova, Aminat; Korost, Dmitry; Matthai, Stephan; Mallants, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    To verify pore-scale modelling approach for determination of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity properties we scanned three cylindrical soil samples taken from A, Ah and B horizons using X-ray microtomography method. Resulting 3D soil images with resolutions of 15.25-20.96 μm were segmented into pores and solids and their maximum inscribed cube subvolumes were used as input data for three major pore-scale modelling methods to simulate saturated flow - lattice-Boltzmann method, finite-difference solution of the Stokes problem, and pore-network model. Provided that imaging resolution is high enough to capture the backbone of effective porosity and the main conducting pores all three methods resulted in simulated soil permeabilities close to experimental values for Ah and B samples. The resolution of A sample was not enough for an accurate modelling and we concluded that this soil requires multi-scale imaging to cover all relevant heterogeneities. We demonstrate that popular SWV method to choose segmentation threshold resulted in oversegmentation and order of magnitude higher permeability values. Careful manual thresholding combined with local segmentation algorithm provided much more accurate results. Detailed analysis of water retention curves showed that air-filled porosity at relevant pressure stages cannot be used for verification of the segmentation results. Representativity analysis by simulating flow in increasing soil volume up to 2.8 cm3 revealed no representative elementary volume (REV) within Ah sample and non-uniqueness of REV for B sample. The latter was explained by soil structure non-stationarity. We further speculate that structures soil horizons can exhibit no REV at all. We discuss numerous advantages of coupled imaging and pore-scale modelling approach and show how it can become a successor of the conventional soil coring method to parametrize large scale continuum models.

  3. Statistical and simulation analysis of hydraulic-conductivity data for Bear Creek and Melton Valleys, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, J.F.; Bailey, Z.C.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 338 single-well aquifer tests from Bear Creek and Melton Valley, Tennessee were statistically grouped to estimate hydraulic conductivities for the geologic formations in the valleys. A cross-sectional simulation model linked to a regression model was used to further refine the statistical estimates for each of the formations and to improve understanding of ground-water flow in Bear Creek Valley. Median hydraulic-conductivity values were used as initial values in the model. Model-calculated estimates of hydraulic conductivity were generally lower than the statistical estimates. Simulations indicate that (1) the Pumpkin Valley Shale controls groundwater flow between Pine Ridge and Bear Creek; (2) all the recharge on Chestnut Ridge discharges to the Maynardville Limestone; (3) the formations having smaller hydraulic gradients may have a greater tendency for flow along strike; (4) local hydraulic conditions in the Maynardville Limestone cause inaccurate model-calculated estimates of hydraulic conductivity; and (5) the conductivity of deep bedrock neither affects the results of the model nor does it add information on the flow system. Improved model performance would require: (1) more water level data for the Copper Ridge Dolomite; (2) improved estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone; and (3) more water level data and aquifer tests in deep bedrock. (USGS)

  4. Property-Transfer Modeling to Estimate Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Deep Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Winfield, Kari A.

    2007-01-01

    The unsaturated zone at the Idaho National Laboratory is complex, comprising thick basalt flow sequences interbedded with thinner sedimentary layers. Understanding the highly nonlinear relation between water content and hydraulic conductivity within the sedimentary interbeds is one element in predicting water flow and solute transport processes in this geologically complex environment. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments is costly and time consuming, therefore use of models that estimate this property from more easily measured bulk-physical properties is desirable. A capillary bundle model was used to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for 40 samples from sedimentary interbeds using water-retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity derived from (1) laboratory measurements on core samples, and (2) site-specific property transfer regression models developed for the sedimentary interbeds. Four regression models were previously developed using bulk-physical property measurements (bulk density, the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient) as the explanatory variables. The response variables, estimated from linear combinations of the bulk physical properties, included saturated hydraulic conductivity and three parameters that define the water-retention curve. The degree to which the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves estimated from property-transfer-modeled water-retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity approximated the laboratory-measured data was evaluated using a goodness-of-fit indicator, the root-mean-square error. Because numerical models of variably saturated flow and transport require parameterized hydraulic properties as input, simulations were run to evaluate the effect of the various parameters on model results. Results show that the property transfer models based on easily measured bulk properties perform nearly as well as using curve fits to laboratory-measured water

  5. Seasonal variability of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity on cultivated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klípa, Vladimír; Zumr, David; Sněhota, Michal

    2014-05-01

    The soil structure and hydraulic properties of arable soils considerably vary during the year due to the periodical tillage and fertilization activities, soil compaction, plant and root grow, climate impact etc. The knowledge of the effect of temporal soil variability is essential when assessing water regime and associated dissolved substance transport in soils. The main aim of this contribution is to describe the temporal development of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity on arable land during a year. The experimental site is located in Nucice catchment (Central Bohemia, Czech republic), where also rainfall-runoff and soil erosion processes are studied. The soil is classified as Cambisol, typical texture ranges from loam to clay loam classes. Soil is conservatively tilled till depth of approximately 17 cm, below the topsoil a compacted subsoil was observed. Tension infiltration experiments were performed repeatedly at single location in order to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the topsoil. So far four tension infiltration campaigns were carried out under tension h0 = -3.0 cm with different field conditions: (i) young winter barley (October 2012), (ii) between postharvest stubble breaking and seeding (April 2013), (iii) full-grown oat (June 2013) and (iv) after fresh postharvest stubble breaking (October 2013). Measurements were carried out using newly introduced automated multi minidisk tension infiltrometer (Klipa et al., EGU2014-7230). All experiments were performed on the levelled soil surface after removing upper soil layer (1 to 3 cm). A thin layer of quartz sand (thickness 1 - 2 mm, grain size 0.1 - 0.6 mm) was applied to improve contact between the infiltrometer and the soil surface. Each infiltration campaign consisted of six tension infiltration experiments, the total number of 24 infiltration data sets was obtained for this study. Results show that unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was significantly smaller in April, but rather the

  6. Impact of electroviscosity on the hydraulic conductance of the bordered pit membrane: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Michael; Pagay, Vinay; Stroock, Abraham D

    2013-10-01

    In perfusion experiments, the hydraulic conductance of stem segments ( ) responds to changes in the properties of the perfusate, such as the ionic strength ( ), pH, and cationic identity. We review the experimental and theoretical work on this phenomenon. We then proceed to explore the hypothesis that electrokinetic effects in the bordered pit membrane (BPM) contribute to this response. In particular, we develop a model based on electroviscosity in which hydraulic conductance of an electrically charged porous membrane varies with the properties of the electrolyte. We use standard electrokinetic theory, coupled with measurements of electrokinetic properties of plant materials from the literature, to determine how the conductance of BPMs, and therefore , may change due to electroviscosity. We predict a nonmonotonic variation of with with a maximum reduction of 18%. We explore how this reduction depends on the characteristics of the sap and features of the BPM, such as pore size, density of chargeable sites, and their dissociation constant. Our predictions are consistent with changes in observed for physiological values of sap and pH. We conclude that electroviscosity is likely responsible, at least partially, for the electrolyte dependence of conductance through pits and that electroviscosity may be strong enough to play an important role in other transport processes in xylem. We conclude by proposing experiments to differentiate the impact of electroviscosity on from that of other proposed mechanisms.

  7. Bootstrap calibration and uncertainty estimation of downhole NMR hydraulic conductivity estimates in an unconsolidated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Parsekian, A D; Dlubac, K; Grunewald, E; Butler, J J; Knight, R; Walsh, D O

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of hydraulic conductivity (K) in aquifers is critical for evaluation, management, and remediation of groundwater resources. While estimates of K have been traditionally obtained using hydraulic tests over discrete intervals in wells, geophysical measurements are emerging as an alternative way to estimate this parameter. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging, a technology once largely applied to characterization of deep consolidated rock petroleum reservoirs, is beginning to see use in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers. Using a well-known rock physics relationship-the Schlumberger Doll Research (SDR) equation--K and porosity can be estimated from NMR water content and relaxation time. Calibration of SDR parameters is necessary for this transformation because NMR relaxation properties are, in part, a function of magnetic mineralization and pore space geometry, which are locally variable quantities. Here, we present a statistically based method for calibrating SDR parameters that establishes a range for the estimated parameters and simultaneously estimates the uncertainty of the resulting K values. We used co-located logging NMR and direct K measurements in an unconsolidated fluvial aquifer in Lawrence, Kansas, USA to demonstrate that K can be estimated using logging NMR to a similar level of uncertainty as with traditional direct hydraulic measurements in unconsolidated sediments under field conditions. Results of this study provide a benchmark for future calibrations of NMR to obtain K in unconsolidated sediments and suggest a method for evaluating uncertainty in both K and SDR parameter values.

  8. Interrelations among the soil-water retention, hydraulic conductivity, and suction-stress characteristic curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Murat; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The three fundamental constitutive relations that describe fluid flow, strength, and deformation behavior of variably saturated soils are the soil-water retention curve (SWRC), hydraulic conductivity function (HCF), and suction-stress characteristic curve (SSCC). Until recently, the interrelations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC have not been well established. This work sought experimental confirmation of interrelations among these three constitutive functions. Results taken from the literature for six soils and those obtained for 11 different soils were used. Using newly established analytical relations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC and these test results, the authors showed that these three constitutive relations can be defined by a common set of hydromechanical parameters. The coefficient of determination for air-entry pressures determined independently using hydraulic and mechanical methods is >0.99, >0.98 for the pore size parameter, and 0.94 for the residual degree of saturation. One practical implication is that one of any of the four experiments (axis-translation, hydraulic, shear-strength, or deformation) is sufficient to quantify all three constitutive relations.

  9. Role of leaf hydraulic conductance in the regulation of stomatal conductance in almond and olive in response to water stress.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Santana, Virginia; Rodriguez-Dominguez, Celia M; Fernández, J Enrique; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The decrease of stomatal conductance (gs) is one of the prime responses to water shortage and the main determinant of yield limitation in fruit trees. Understanding the mechanisms related to stomatal closure in response to imposed water stress is crucial for correct irrigation management. The loss of leaf hydraulic functioning is considered as one of the major factors triggering stomatal closure. Thus, we conducted an experiment to quantify the dehydration response of leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) and its impact on gs in two Mediterranean fruit tree species, one deciduous (almond) and one evergreen (olive). Our hypothesis was that a higher Kleaf would be associated with a higher gs and that the reduction in Kleaf would predict the reduction in gs in both species. We measured Kleaf in olive and almond during a cycle of irrigation withholding. We also compared the results of two methods to measure Kleaf: dynamic rehydration kinetics and evaporative flux methods. In addition, determined gs, leaf water potential (Ψleaf), vein density, photosynthetic capacity and turgor loss point. Results showed that gs was higher in almond than in olive and so was Kleaf (Kmax = 4.70 and 3.42 mmol s(-1) MPa(-1) m(-2), in almond and olive, respectively) for Ψleaf > -1.2 MPa. At greater water stress levels than -1.2 MPa, however, Kleaf decreased exponentially, being similar for both species, while gs was still higher in almond than in olive. We conclude that although the Kleaf decrease with increasing water stress does not drive unequivocally the gs response to water stress, Kleaf is the variable most strongly related to the gs response to water stress, especially in olive. Other variables such as the increase in abscisic acid (ABA) may be playing an important role in gs regulation, although in our study the gs-ABA relationship did not show a clear pattern. PMID:26846979

  10. Role of leaf hydraulic conductance in the regulation of stomatal conductance in almond and olive in response to water stress.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Santana, Virginia; Rodriguez-Dominguez, Celia M; Fernández, J Enrique; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The decrease of stomatal conductance (gs) is one of the prime responses to water shortage and the main determinant of yield limitation in fruit trees. Understanding the mechanisms related to stomatal closure in response to imposed water stress is crucial for correct irrigation management. The loss of leaf hydraulic functioning is considered as one of the major factors triggering stomatal closure. Thus, we conducted an experiment to quantify the dehydration response of leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) and its impact on gs in two Mediterranean fruit tree species, one deciduous (almond) and one evergreen (olive). Our hypothesis was that a higher Kleaf would be associated with a higher gs and that the reduction in Kleaf would predict the reduction in gs in both species. We measured Kleaf in olive and almond during a cycle of irrigation withholding. We also compared the results of two methods to measure Kleaf: dynamic rehydration kinetics and evaporative flux methods. In addition, determined gs, leaf water potential (Ψleaf), vein density, photosynthetic capacity and turgor loss point. Results showed that gs was higher in almond than in olive and so was Kleaf (Kmax = 4.70 and 3.42 mmol s(-1) MPa(-1) m(-2), in almond and olive, respectively) for Ψleaf > -1.2 MPa. At greater water stress levels than -1.2 MPa, however, Kleaf decreased exponentially, being similar for both species, while gs was still higher in almond than in olive. We conclude that although the Kleaf decrease with increasing water stress does not drive unequivocally the gs response to water stress, Kleaf is the variable most strongly related to the gs response to water stress, especially in olive. Other variables such as the increase in abscisic acid (ABA) may be playing an important role in gs regulation, although in our study the gs-ABA relationship did not show a clear pattern.

  11. Spatial variation in hydraulic conductivity determined by slug tests in the Canadian River alluvium near the Norman Landfill, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, Martha A.; Christenson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Slug tests were used to characterize hydraulic conductivity variations at a spatial scale on the order of meters in the alluvial aquifer downgradient of the Norman Landfill. Forty hydraulic conductivity measurements were made, most along a 215-meter flow path transect. Measured hydraulic conductivity, excluding clayey layers, ranged from 8.4 ? 10-7 to 2.8 ? 10-4 meters per second, with a median value of 6.6 ? 10-5 meters per second. The hydraulic conductivity measurements yield a preliminary concept of the permeability structure of the aquifer along this transect. A low hydraulic conductivity silt-clay layer at about 4 meters below the water table and a high hydraulic conductivity layer at the base of the aquifer appear to have the most potential to affect contaminant transport. Specific conductance measurements show the leachate plume along this transect becomes attenuated between 150 and 200 meters downgradient of the landfill, except at the base of the aquifer, where it extends at least 225 meters downgradient of the landfill.

  12. Role of vegetation type on hydraulic conductivity in urban rain gardens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, K.; Balster, N. J.; Johnston, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Although case studies report improved control of urban stormwater within residential rain gardens, the extent to which vegetation type (shrub, turf, prairie) affects the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) of these depressions has yet to be investigated in a controlled experiment. We hypothesized that there would be significant differences in hydraulic conductivity by vegetation type due to differences in soil physical characteristics and rooting dynamics such that Ksat of shrub gardens would exceed that of prairie, followed by turf. To test this hypothesis, we measured changes in Ksat relative to the above vegetation types as well as non-vegetative controls, each of which were replicated three times for a total of 12 rain gardens. Ksat was calculated using a published method for curve-fitting to single-ring infiltration with a two-head approach where the shape factor is independent of ponding depth. Constant-head infiltration rates were measured at two alternating ponding depths within each garden twice over the growing season. Root core samples were also taken to qualify belowground characteristics including soil bulk density and rooting dynamics relative to differences in Ksat. We found the control and shrub gardens had the lowest mean Ksat of 3.56 (SE = 0.96) and 3.73 (1.22) cm3 hr-1, respectively. Prairie gardens had the next highest mean Ksat of 12.18 (2.26) cm3 hr-1, and turf had the highest mean value of 23.63 (1.81) cm3 hr-1. These data suggest that a denser rooting network near the soil surface may influence saturated hydraulic conductivity. We applied our observed flow rates to a Glover solution model for 3-dimensional flow, which revealed considerably larger discrepancies in turf gardens than beneath prairie or shrub. This indicated that lateral flow conditions in the turf plots could be the explanation for our observed infiltration rates.

  13. Modulation of proximal tubular hydraulic conductivity by peritubular capillary oncotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Agerup, B; Persson, A E

    1982-07-01

    Fluid absorption from the proximal tubular lumen is probably a multifactorial process. Earlier studies from our laboratory have indicated that a transepithelial hydrostatic and oncotic pressure difference may be the driving force for as much as 30% of the reabsorbed fluid. During saline volume expansion proximal tubular reabsorption declines and the present experiments were undertaken to investigate whether this reduction could be caused by changes in the passively driven flux component. The hydraulic conductivity was therefore determined from the reabsorptive rate in split oil droplets with normal and high hydrostatic pressure gradients across the wall, at the same time as the peritubular capillary net-work was perfused with solutions containing a colloid of high or low concentration. In the reabsorption experiments the split oil droplet radius was measured and in a separate series of experiments the relationship between droplet radius and pressure was determined; this was found to be 7.3 mmHg pressure increase per 1 micrometer increase in radius. The increase in the rate of reabsorption from the droplets due to increased intraluminal hydrostatic pressure was 1.02 +/- 0.13 nl/min/mm tubular length when a solution with a high colloid concentration was perfused through the capillary net-work, compared with 0.41=0.11 nl/min/mm tubular length when a low colloid containing solution was used for perfusion. The hydraulic conductance in the proximal tubular wall at high colloid perfusion was calculated to be 0.54 nl/min.mm.mmHg while at a low capillary colloid oncotic pressure it was significantly lower 0.025 nl/min.mm.mmHg. This drop in hydraulic conductance might be one factor responsible for the decline in fluid absorption in animals exposed to saline volume expansion.

  14. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity of a riverbed and aquifer system on the Susquehanna River in Broome County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference model of groundwater flow was used to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of riverbed and aquifer material in a 1-square-mile valley-fill aquifer system near a large river in which induced infiltration due to pumping cannot be measured directly. The aquifer consists of a 30- to 70-foot thickness of sand and gravel containing discontinuous layers of compact and silty sand and gravel. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer material, estimated through trial-and-error calibration of simulated water levels to drawdowns measured during an aquifer test, ranged from 500 to 10,000 feet per day; anisotropy (ratio of horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) ranged from 125:1 to 250:1. The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed was estimated to be 0.1 to 0.5 foot per day, whereas permeameter tests on samples of silty sand and gravel layers from the riverbed yielded vertical hydraulic conductivity of 10 -3 foot per day. A sensitivity analysis indicated that a narrow range of anisotropy values gave the smallest residual error in simulated drawdowns. Residual error increased sharply when the maximum hydraulic conductivity value for the aquifer was lowered to less than 5,000 feet per day. Residual error also was large for large values of vertical hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed, but decreased to a constant amount for values less than 0.1 foot per day. Residual error was relatively insensitive to changes in the storage coefficient and specific yield. A nonlinear regression method that approximated the sensitivity matrix with a perturbation technique was applied to refine the estimates of these parameters and compute standard error of the estimates. The nonlinear regression indicated that the model was sensitive to hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer and anisotropy of the upper part of the aquifer but not to anisotropy of the lower part, and that vertical hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed was less than 0

  15. An analysis of saturated hydraulic conductivity in a forested glacial till slope

    SciTech Connect

    Espeby, B. )

    1990-08-01

    The author made a statistical analysis of 100 soil core samples taken from six soil pits in a forested glacial till slope in south central Sweden to determine the spatial variability of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, K{sub 8}. He also analyzed correlations to other soil properties. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) determined whether the K{sub 8} values were significantly dependent upon the position in the slope and the sampling depth below soil surface. A multifactor analysis of variance (MANOVA) tested the interaction effect between position in the slope (elevation level) and soil depth (horizon level) on K{sub 8}.

  16. A similarity law in botanic. The case of hydraulic conductivity of trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyra, A. G.; Zarragoicoechea, G. J.; Kuz, V. A.

    2011-03-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of xylem vascular systems is modelled via the Verhulst differential equation with the introduction of relevant dimensionless quantities. Sap pressure is scaled to the geometrical and elastic properties of the xylem tubes, and cavitation events are considered as a limited growth process. The self-similar solution of Verhulst equation is a sigmoidal function, that is the same empirical correlation used to fit the experimental data. An important result of this approach is to reveal the existence of a control parameter. This number, which embodies morphological and physicochemical properties of vascular system, characterizes the discharge of tense fluids.The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Scale effect of hydraulic conductivity measurements in Pre-Illinoian and Wisconsinan tills in Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Bruner, D.R. . Geological Survey Bureau)

    1993-03-01

    Two long-term study sites have been established as the basis for a multi-year study of the hydrogeologic properties of glacial tills in Iowa. One is located in Eastern Iowa in Pre-Illinoian till and has had laboratory permeameter tests conducted on Shelby tube samples, collected during construction of piezometers, from the zone to be screen. These piezometers were used to run bailer tests and perform a pumping test. The other site is located in North-Central Iowa in Wisconsinan till and has piezometers constructed to run bailer and pumping tests. Results from both sites has shown that the bulk hydraulic conductivity increases as larger volumes of till are tested. There is consistently at least one order of magnitude increase between bailer and pumping test results. There is also at least three orders of magnitude increase between laboratory permeameter and pumping test results. A system is proposed to conduct pumping tests using vibrating wire transducers hydraulically pushed into the ground to monitor water levels before, during and after the test, and record the measurements to a datalogger.

  18. Internal hydraulic redistribution prevents the loss of root conductivity during drought.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Iván; Ryel, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Shrubs of the Great Basin desert in Utah are subjected to a prolonged summer drought with the potential consequence of reduced water transport capability of the xylem due to drought-induced cavitation. Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is the passive movement of water from deep to shallow soil through plant roots. Hydraulic redistribution can increase water availability in shallow soil and ameliorate drought stress, providing better soil and root water status, which could affect shallow root conductivity (Ks) and native root embolism. We tested this hypothesis in an Artemisia tridentata Nutt. mono-specific stand grown in a common garden in Utah. We enhanced HR artificially by applying a once a week deep-irrigation treatment increasing the water potential gradient between deep and shallow soil layers. Plants that were deep-watered had less negative water potentials and greater stomatal conductance and transpiration rates than non-watered control plants. After irrigation with labeled water (δD), xylem water in stems and shallow roots of watered shrubs was enriched with respect to control shrubs, a clear indication of deep water uptake and HR. Shallow root conductivity was threefold greater and shrubs experienced lower native embolism when deep-watered. We found clear evidence of water transfer between deep and shallow roots through internal HR that delayed depletion of shallow soil water content, maintained Ks and prevented root embolism. Overall, our results show a positive effect of HR on root water transport capacity in otherwise dry soil, with important implications for plant water status.

  19. Internal hydraulic redistribution prevents the loss of root conductivity during drought.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Iván; Ryel, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Shrubs of the Great Basin desert in Utah are subjected to a prolonged summer drought with the potential consequence of reduced water transport capability of the xylem due to drought-induced cavitation. Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is the passive movement of water from deep to shallow soil through plant roots. Hydraulic redistribution can increase water availability in shallow soil and ameliorate drought stress, providing better soil and root water status, which could affect shallow root conductivity (Ks) and native root embolism. We tested this hypothesis in an Artemisia tridentata Nutt. mono-specific stand grown in a common garden in Utah. We enhanced HR artificially by applying a once a week deep-irrigation treatment increasing the water potential gradient between deep and shallow soil layers. Plants that were deep-watered had less negative water potentials and greater stomatal conductance and transpiration rates than non-watered control plants. After irrigation with labeled water (δD), xylem water in stems and shallow roots of watered shrubs was enriched with respect to control shrubs, a clear indication of deep water uptake and HR. Shallow root conductivity was threefold greater and shrubs experienced lower native embolism when deep-watered. We found clear evidence of water transfer between deep and shallow roots through internal HR that delayed depletion of shallow soil water content, maintained Ks and prevented root embolism. Overall, our results show a positive effect of HR on root water transport capacity in otherwise dry soil, with important implications for plant water status. PMID:24436338

  20. Quantifying Hydraulic Conductivity and Fluid Pressures in the Alpine Fault Hanging-Wall Using DFDP-2 Data and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussens, J. P.; Woodman, N. D.; Menzies, C. D.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Sutherland, R.; Capova, L.; Cox, S.; Upton, P.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow can play an important role in fault failure, due to the influence of pore pressure on effective confining stress and through chemical and thermal alteration of the fault zone. Rocks of the Alpine Fault Zone, both exposed at the surface and recovered in cores, show evidence for significant alteration by fluids. However, the fluid flow regime in the region is poorly constrained and its relationship with the behaviour of the fault is uncertain. In 2014 the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) drilled the DFDP-2B borehole, penetrating 893 m into the hanging-wall of the Alpine Fault. Prior to drilling, a set of hydrogeological models for the Whataroa Valley region, encompassing the DFDP-2B drill site, were constructed using the modelling software FEFLOW. Models were constructed for a range of plausible hydraulic conductivity structures for the region. They predicted strongly artesian hydraulic heads of 50-150 m above surface elevation and temperatures exceeding 100 °C within 1 km depth in bedrock beneath the DFDP-2 drill site, with the exact hydraulic and thermal gradients dependent on the hydraulic conductivity structure chosen. During the drilling project hydraulic and thermal data from the borehole was collected. This included 33 slug test datasets, carried out at a range of borehole depths throughout the project. Estimates for hydraulic conductivity were obtained by analysis of slug test data. Steady state hydraulic heads for the borehole, across a range of depths, were estimated from the slug test measurements. Depth profiles of hydraulic head show rapid increases in hydraulic head with depth, in line with model predictions. Results show fluid pressures greatly exceeding hydrostatic pressure in the shallow crust, reflecting significant upward flow of groundwater beneath the Whataroa Valley. Hydraulic conductivity estimates provide constraints on the hydraulic conductivity structure of the region. All hydraulic conductivity structures modelled thus far

  1. [Spatial variation characteristics of surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on Karst slopes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Chen, Hong-Song; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Yun-Peng; Ye, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ke-Lin

    2014-06-01

    Surface soil water-physical properties play a decisive role in the dynamics of deep soil water. Knowledge of their spatial variation is helpful in understanding the processes of rainfall infiltration and runoff generation, which will contribute to the reasonable utilization of soil water resources in mountainous areas. Based on a grid sampling scheme (10 m x 10 m) and geostatistical methods, this paper aimed to study the spatial variability of surface (0-10 cm) soil water content, soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on a typical shrub slope (90 m x 120 m, projected length) in Karst area of northwest Guangxi, southwest China. The results showed that the surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity had different spatial dependence and spatial structure. Sample variogram of the soil water content was fitted well by Gaussian models with the nugget effect, while soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity were fitted well by exponential models with the nugget effect. Variability of soil water content showed strong spatial dependence, while the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity showed moderate spatial dependence. The spatial ranges of the soil water content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were small, while that of the soil bulk density was much bigger. In general, the soil water content increased with the increase of altitude while it was opposite for the soil bulk densi- ty. However, the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity had a random distribution of large amounts of small patches, showing high spatial heterogeneity. Soil water content negatively (P < 0.01) correlated with the bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity, while there was no significant correlation between the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  2. Determining the distribution of hydraulic conductivity in a fractured limestone aquifer by simultaneous injection and geophysical logging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; Hess, A.E.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    1988-01-01

    A field technique for assessing the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in an aquifer was applied to a fractured carbonate formation in southeastern Nevada. The technique combines the simultaneous use of fluid injection and geophysical logging to measure in situ vertical distributions of fluid velocity and hydraulic head down the borehole; these data subsequently are analyzed to arrive at quantitative estimates of hydraulic conductivity across discrete intervals in the aquifer. The results of this analysis identified the contact margin between the Anchor and Dawn Members of the Monte Cristo Limestone as being the dominant transmissive unit. -from Authors

  3. Predicting saturated hydraulic conductivity from percolation test results in layered silt loam soils.

    PubMed

    Jabro, Jay D

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of the study discussed in this article were to develop an empirical relationship between the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of layered soils and their percolation times (PT) in order to understand the influence of individual layers and compare this with the equations developed by Winneberger (1974) and Fritton, Ratvasky, and Petersen (1986). Field research was conducted on three silt loam soils. Six holes were spaced evenly in two parallel rows of three holes. The Ks was measured at three different layers for each soil using a constant head well permeameter. After completion of the second Ks measurement, the percolation test was conducted. Three linear equations for the upper, middle, and lower layers were developed between the Ks values of each individual layer in all three sites and the corresponding PT. Significant differences were found between the author's results and those predicted by Winneberger (1974) and Fritton and co-authors (1986). PMID:20063609

  4. Water Transport in Onion (Allium cepa L.) Roots (Changes of Axial and Radial Hydraulic Conductivities during Root Development).

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, W.; Steudle, E.

    1993-01-01

    The hydraulic architecture of developing onion (Allium cepa L. cv Calypso) roots grown hydroponically was determined by measuring axial and radial hydraulic conductivities (equal to inverse of specific hydraulic resistances). In the roots, Casparian bands and suberin lamellae develop in the endodermis and exodermis (equal to hypodermis). Using the root pressure probe, changes of hydraulic conductivities along the developing roots were analyzed with high resolution. Axial hydraulic conductivity (Lx) was also calculated from stained cross-sections according to Poiseuille's law. Near the base and the tip of the roots, measured and calculated Lx values were similar. However, at distances between 200 and 300 mm from the apex, measured values of Lx were smaller by more than 1 order of magnitude than those calculated, probably because of remaining cross walls between xylem vessel members. During development of root xylem, Lx increased by 3 orders of magnitude. In the apical 30 mm (tip region), axial resistance limited water transport, whereas in basal parts radial resistances (low radial hydraulic conductivity, Lpr) controlled the uptake. Because of the high axial hydraulic resistance in the tip region, this zone appeared to be "hydraulically isolated" from the rest of the root. Changes of the Lpr of the roots were determined by measuring the hydraulic conductance of roots of different length and referring these data to unit surface area. At distances between 30 and 150 mm from the root tip, Lpr was fairly constant (1.4 x 10-7 m s-1 MPa-1). In more basal root zones, Lpr was considerably smaller and varied between roots. The low contribution of basal zones to the overall water uptake indicated an influence of the exodermal Casparian bands and/or suberin lamellae in the endodermis or exodermis, which develop at distances larger than 50 to 60 mm from the root tip. PMID:12231786

  5. Changes in hydraulic soil conductivity in the walls of zoogenic macropores due to the soil compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelíšek, Igor

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on assessement of the hydric functions and effectiveness of the preferential zoogenic routes (preferentially lumbricid burrows), with primary focus on the hydric functions and parameters of individual vertical tubular macropores and on the analysis of selected possible detailed effects on these functions. The effect of earthworms (Lumbricidae) on the physical soil properties is notable. During burrowing, earthworms press the material in the vicinity of the hollowed burrows. Several variants of the relationship between the macropores and the soil compaction, permeability and erodibility were verified. Both measurements in the field and laboratory tests of intact collected samples and engineered samples were performed. With regard to preferential focus on the hydraulic processes in gravity macropores, to the limits of the instrumentation and the size of individual earthworms in agricultural soils in the Czech Republic, we assessed the processes in the macropores with diameter of ca 5 mm or larger. In some cases, saturated hydraulic conductivity of zoogenic macropore walls was reduced in order of tens of percent compared with hydraulic conductivity of soil matrix, and the increase of bulk density of soil in the macropore vicinity achieved 25%. The effect of repeated rise and water level stagnation (repeated macropore washing during multiple wetting cycles) was tested. Investigation of water erosion of macropores was limited by adjustable flow, vessel capacity and pump capacity of the accurate continuous infiltrometer. Investigation of the water inlet from above gave more data on the washed-off material in the selected time intervals. Analysis of water rise from below and macropore sealing provided one cumulative data for each testing period.

  6. Leaf hydraulic conductance, measured in situ, declines and recovers daily: leaf hydraulics, water potential and stomatal conductance in four temperate and three tropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D M; Woodruff, D R; McCulloh, K A; Meinzer, F C

    2009-07-01

    Adequate leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) is critical for preventing transpiration-induced desiccation and subsequent stomatal closure that would restrict carbon gain. A few studies have reported midday depression of Kleaf (or petiole conductivity) and its subsequent recovery in situ, but the extent to which this phenomenon is universal is not known. The objectives of this study were to measure Kleaf, using a rehydration kinetics method, (1) in the laboratory (under controlled conditions) across a range of water potentials to construct vulnerability curves (VC) and (2) over the course of the day in the field along with leaf water potential and stomatal conductance (gs). Two broadleaf (one evergreen, Arbutus menziesii Pursh., and one deciduous, Quercus garryana Dougl.) and two coniferous species (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. and Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirbel]) were chosen as representative of different plant types. In addition, Kleaf in the laboratory and leaf water potential in the field were measured for three tropical evergreen species (Protium panamense (Rose), Tachigalia versicolor Standley and L.O. Williams and Vochysia ferruginea Mart) to predict their daily changes in field Kleaf in situ. It was hypothesized that in the field, leaves would close their stomata at water potential thresholds at which Kleaf begins to decline sharply in laboratory-generated VC, thus preventing substantial losses of Kleaf. The temperate species showed a 15-66% decline in Kleaf by midday, before stomatal closure. Although there were substantial midday declines in Kleaf, recovery was nearly complete by late afternoon. Stomatal conductance began to decrease in Pseudotsuga, Pinus and Quercus once Kleaf began to decline; however, there was no detectable reduction in gs in Arbutus. Predicted Kleaf in the tropical species, based on laboratory-generated VC, decreased by 74% of maximum Kleaf in Tachigalia, but only 22-32% in Vochysia and Protium. The results presented here, from the previous

  7. Tracer diffusion coefficients in sedimentary rocks: correlation to porosity and hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Boving, T B; Grathwohl, P

    2001-12-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important transport process in geologic materials of low hydraulic conductivity. For predicting the fate and transport of contaminants, a detailed understanding of the diffusion processes in natural porous media is essential. In this study, diffusive tracer transport (iodide) was investigated in a variety of geologically different limestone and sandstone rocks. Porosity, structural and mineralogical composition, hydraulic conductivity, and other rock properties were determined. The effective diffusion coefficients were measured using the time-lag method. The results of the diffusion experiments indicate that there is a close relationship between total porosity and the effective diffusion coefficient of a rock (analogous to Archie's Law). Consequently, the tortousity factor can be expressed as a function of total porosity. The relationship fits best for thicker samples (> 1.0 cm) with high porosities (> 20%), because of the reduced influence of heterogeneity in larger samples. In general, these correlations appear to be a simple way to determine tortuosity and the effective diffusion coefficient from easy to determine rock porosity values.

  8. Ecohydrological controls on soil moisture and hydraulic conductivity within a pinyon-juniper woodland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lebron, I.; Madsen, M.D.; Chandler, D.G.; Robinson, D.A.; Wendroth, O.; Belnap, J.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of pinyon-juniper woodland encroachment on rangeland ecosystems is often associated with a reduction of streamflow and recharge and an increase in soil erosion. The objective of this study is to investigate vegetational control on seasonal soil hydrologic properties along a 15-m transect in pinyon-juniper woodland with biocrust. We demonstrate that the juniper tree controls soil water content (SWC) patterns directly under the canopy via interception, and beyond the canopy via shading in a preferred orientation, opposite to the prevailing wind direction. The juniper also controls the SWC and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured close to water saturation (K(h)) under the canopy by the creation of soil water repellency due to needle drop. We use this information to refine the hydrologic functional unit (HFU) concept into three interacting hydrologic units: canopy patches, intercanopy patches, and a transitional unit formed by intercanopy patches in the rain shadow of the juniper tree. Spatial autoregressive state-space models show the close relationship between K(h) close to soil water saturation and SWC at medium and low levels, integrating a number of influences on hydraulic conductivity. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Vertical series hydraulic conductance classes to characterize the unsaturated zone in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eimers, Jo Leslie; Terziotti, Silvia; Ferrell, Gloria M.

    2001-01-01

    This web site contains the Federal Geographic Data Committee-compliant metadata (documentation) for digital data produced for the North Carolina, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Public Water Supply Section, Source Water Assessment Program. The metadata are for 11 individual Geographic Information System data sets. An overlay and indexing method was used with the data to derive a rating for unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics for use by the State of North Carolina in assessing more than 11,000 public water-supply wells and approximately 245 public surface-water intakes for susceptibility to contamination. For ground-water supplies, the digital data sets used in the assessment included unsaturated zone rating, vertical series hydraulic conductance, land-surface slope, and land cover. For assessment of public surface-water intakes, the data sets included watershed characteristics rating, average annual precipitation, land-surface slope, land cover, and ground-water contribution. Documentation for the land-use data set applies to both the unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics ratings. Documentation for the estimated depth-to-water map used in the calculation of the vertical series hydraulic conductance also is included.

  10. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-4

    SciTech Connect

    Phil L. Oberlander; Charles E. Russell

    2005-12-31

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-4 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,132 m (3,713 ft bgs) below ground surface (bgs). The screened section of the well consists of alternating sections of slotted well screen and blank casing from 948 to 1,132 m bgs (3,111 to 3,713 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus in the well casing likely causes the calculated borehole flow rates being highly nonrepresentative of inflow from the formation. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  11. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-3

    SciTech Connect

    P. Oberlander; C. Russell

    2005-09-01

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-3 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,487 m (4,880 ft) below ground surface (bgs). Slotted screen is placed in an upper screened section from 1,095 to 1,160 m bgs (3,591 to 3,805 ft bgs) and in the lower screened section from 1,278 to 1,474 m bgs (4,191 to 4,834 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is significant upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus and large vertical flow velocities in the well casing result in the measured borehole flow rates being potentially highly nonrepresentative of conditions in the aquifer. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  12. Decoupling Scale Effects and Natural Variability to Develop Pedotransfer Functions for Soil Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Park, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The USDA-ARS database on soil saturated hydraulic conductivities included around 1000 datasets and was previously analyzed to estimate quartiles of Ksat statistical distributions for each of common 12 textural classes subdivided into two subclasses by soil porosity. Inspection of the database sources showed that samples of different sizes were used in different works. Soil hydraulic conductivity is a scale-dependent property, and can increase by half to one order of magnitude when support area increases one order of magnitude in laboratory conditions. The objective of this work was to reanalyze this database accounting for differences in sizes and to develop pedotransfer relationships for the dominant support area should such area be found. The range of support area from 20 cm2 to 50 cm2 was well represented in the database and was selected to analyze statistical distributions of Ksat for each of 24 abovementioned subclasses. The distributions were close to lognormal, and an excellent dependence of both geometric means and standard deviations on the average clay content of subclasses was established. The new table of Ksat values for textural classes in two porosity ranges provides substantially less variability in estimates. Decoupling scale effects and natural variability allows one to focus on derivation of scaling relationships to obtain Ksat estimates appropriate for the scale of a specific soil hydrology project.

  13. Ear Rachis Xylem Occlusion and Associated Loss in Hydraulic Conductance Coincide with the End of Grain Filling for Wheat.

    PubMed

    Neghliz, Hayet; Cochard, Hervé; Brunel, Nicole; Martre, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Seed dehydration is the normal terminal event in the development of orthodox seeds and is physiologically related to the cessation of grain dry mass accumulation and crop grain yield. For a better understanding of grain dehydration, we evaluated the hypothesis that hydraulic conductance of the ear decreases during the latter stages of development and that this decrease results from disruption or occlusion of xylem conduits. Whole ear, rachis, and stem nodes hydraulic conductance and percentage loss of xylem conductivity were measured from flowering to harvest-ripeness on bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cv. Récital grown under controlled environments. Flag leaf transpiration, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content and grain and ear water potentials were also measured during grain development. We show that grain dehydration was not related with whole plant physiology and leaf senescence, but closely correlated with the hydraulic properties of the xylem conduits irrigating the grains. Indeed, there was a substantial decrease in rachis hydraulic conductance at the onset of the grain dehydration phase. This hydraulic impairment was not caused by the presence of air embolism in xylem conduits of the stem internodes or rachis but by the occlusion of the xylem lumens by polysaccharides (pectins and callose). Our results demonstrate that xylem hydraulics plays a key role during grain maturation.

  14. Ear Rachis Xylem Occlusion and Associated Loss in Hydraulic Conductance Coincide with the End of Grain Filling for Wheat.

    PubMed

    Neghliz, Hayet; Cochard, Hervé; Brunel, Nicole; Martre, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Seed dehydration is the normal terminal event in the development of orthodox seeds and is physiologically related to the cessation of grain dry mass accumulation and crop grain yield. For a better understanding of grain dehydration, we evaluated the hypothesis that hydraulic conductance of the ear decreases during the latter stages of development and that this decrease results from disruption or occlusion of xylem conduits. Whole ear, rachis, and stem nodes hydraulic conductance and percentage loss of xylem conductivity were measured from flowering to harvest-ripeness on bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cv. Récital grown under controlled environments. Flag leaf transpiration, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content and grain and ear water potentials were also measured during grain development. We show that grain dehydration was not related with whole plant physiology and leaf senescence, but closely correlated with the hydraulic properties of the xylem conduits irrigating the grains. Indeed, there was a substantial decrease in rachis hydraulic conductance at the onset of the grain dehydration phase. This hydraulic impairment was not caused by the presence of air embolism in xylem conduits of the stem internodes or rachis but by the occlusion of the xylem lumens by polysaccharides (pectins and callose). Our results demonstrate that xylem hydraulics plays a key role during grain maturation. PMID:27446150

  15. Ear Rachis Xylem Occlusion and Associated Loss in Hydraulic Conductance Coincide with the End of Grain Filling for Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Neghliz, Hayet; Cochard, Hervé; Brunel, Nicole; Martre, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Seed dehydration is the normal terminal event in the development of orthodox seeds and is physiologically related to the cessation of grain dry mass accumulation and crop grain yield. For a better understanding of grain dehydration, we evaluated the hypothesis that hydraulic conductance of the ear decreases during the latter stages of development and that this decrease results from disruption or occlusion of xylem conduits. Whole ear, rachis, and stem nodes hydraulic conductance and percentage loss of xylem conductivity were measured from flowering to harvest-ripeness on bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cv. Récital grown under controlled environments. Flag leaf transpiration, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content and grain and ear water potentials were also measured during grain development. We show that grain dehydration was not related with whole plant physiology and leaf senescence, but closely correlated with the hydraulic properties of the xylem conduits irrigating the grains. Indeed, there was a substantial decrease in rachis hydraulic conductance at the onset of the grain dehydration phase. This hydraulic impairment was not caused by the presence of air embolism in xylem conduits of the stem internodes or rachis but by the occlusion of the xylem lumens by polysaccharides (pectins and callose). Our results demonstrate that xylem hydraulics plays a key role during grain maturation. PMID:27446150

  16. Using Pneumatics to Perform Laboratory Hydraulic Conductivity Tests on Gravel with Underdamped Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    A permeameter has been designed and built to perform laboratory hydraulic conductivity tests on various kinds of gravel samples with hydraulic conductivity values ranging from 0.1 to 1 m/s. The tests are commenced by applying 200 Pa of pneumatic pressure to the free surface of the water column in a riser connected above a cylinder that holds large gravel specimens. This setup forms a permeameter specially designed for these tests which is placed in a barrel filled with water, which acts as a reservoir. The applied pressure depresses the free surface in the riser 2 cm until it is instantly released by opening a ball valve. The water then flows through the base of the cylinder and the specimen like a falling head test, but the water level oscillates about the static value. The water pressure and the applied air pressure in the riser are measured with vented pressure transducers at 100 Hz. The change in diameter lowers the damping frequency of the fluctuations of the water level in the riser, which allows for underdamped responses to be observed for all tests. The results of tests without this diameter change would otherwise be a series of critically damped responses with only one or two oscillations that dampen within seconds and cannot be evaluated with equations for the falling head test. The underdamped responses oscillate about the static value at about 1 Hz and are very sensitive to the hydraulic conductivity of all the soils tested. These fluctuations are also very sensitive to the inertia and friction in the permeameter that are calculated considering the geometry of the permeameter and verified experimentally. Several gravel specimens of various shapes and sizes are tested that show distinct differences in water level fluctuations. The friction of the system is determined by calibrating the model with the results of tests performed where the cylinder had no soil in it. The calculation of the inertia in the response of the water column for the typical testing

  17. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with scale of measurement during aquifer tests in heterogeneous, porous carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Cherkauer, Douglas S.

    Previous studies have shown that hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer seems to increase as the portion of the aquifer tested increases. To date, such studies have all relied on different methods to determine hydraulic conductivity at each scale of interest, which raises the possibility that the observed increase in hydraulic conductivity is due to the measurement method, not to the scale. This study analyzes hydraulic conductivity with respect to scale during individual aquifer tests in porous, heterogeneous carbonate rocks in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Results from this study indicate that hydraulic conductivity generally increases during an individual test as the volume of aquifer impacted increases, and the rate of this increase is the same as the rate of increase determined by using different measurement methods. Thus, scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity during single tests does not depend on the method of measurement. This conclusion is supported by 22 of 26 aquifer tests conducted in porous-flow-dominated carbonate units within the aquifer. Instead, scale dependency is probably caused by heterogeneities within the aquifer, a conclusion supported by digital simulation. All of the observed types of hydraulic-conductivity variations with scale during individual aquifer tests can be explained by a conceptual model of a simple heterogeneous aquifer composed of high-conductivity zones within a low-conductivity matrix. Résumé Certaines études ont montré que la conductivité hydraulique d'un aquifère semble augmenter en même temps que la partie testée de l'aquifère s'étend. Jusqu'à présent, ces études ont toutes reposé sur des méthodes de détermination de la conductivité hydraulique différentes pour chaque niveau d'échelle, ce qui a conduit à penser que l'augmentation observée de la conductivité hydraulique pouvait être due aux méthodes de mesure et non à l'effet d'échelle. Cette étude analyse la conductivité hydraulique par

  18. Soil hydraulic conductivity changes caused by irrigation with reclaimed waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, G.J.; Rosenthal, A.; Tarchitzky, J.; Shainberg, I.; Chen, Y.

    1999-10-01

    Use of reclaimed waste water (RWW) in arid and semiarid regions may alleviate problems of fresh water shortage; however, it also involves some potential risks among which are degradation of soil hydraulic properties. The objectives of the current study were to study the effects of organic matter (OM) loads found in RWW obtained from a secondary treatment plant in Tel Aviv, Israel, and different size fractions of the suspended solids in the RWW on the hydraulic conductivity (HC) of three Israeli soils. The hydraulic conductivity of a clayey grumusol (Typic Chromoxerert), a typic loamy loess (Calcic Haploxeralf), and a sandy loam hamra (Typic Rhodexeralf) was determined in the laboratory using soil columns, by leaching with RWW containing zero, low, or high OM load, followed by leaching with distilled water (DW). The effects of suspended solids' size fraction on the HC was determined by filtering RWW. Leaching with high OM load RWW caused the relative HC of the grumusol, loess and hamra to drop to final values of 13.9, 24.2, and 58.8%, respectively. Filtering out suspended solids {gt}1.2 {micro} in this water improved the HC of the hamra, but did not significantly affect the final relative HC of the grumusol and loess. Leaching with low OM load RWW did not significantly decrease the HC beyond the decrease attributed to the effects of the concentration and composition of the electrolytes present in the zero OM load RWW. Subsequent leaching with DW caused an additional decrease in HC, whose magnitude for a given soil did not depend on the quality of the RWW previously used. The presence of OM in the irrigation water did not seem to have significant residual effects on soil HC. Evidently, in high OM load RWW the OM fraction determines the soils' HC, whereas in low OM load RWW, it is the electrolyte concentration and composition in the water, that seem to pose the hazard to soil hydraulic properties, especially during subsequent leaching with DW.

  19. Field-Obtained Soil Water Characteristic Curves and Hydraulic Conductivity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Ishimwe

    A compacted clay liner (test pad) was constructed and instrumented with volumetric water content and soil matric potential sensors to determine soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) and hydraulic conductivity (k) functions. Specifically, the compacted clay liner was subjected to an infiltration cycle during a sealed double ring infiltrometer (SDRI) test followed by a drying cycle. After the drying cycle, Shelby tube samples were collected from the compacted clay liner and flexible wall permeability (FWP) tests were conducted on sub-samples to determine the saturated hydraulic conductivity. Moreover, two computer programs (RETC and UNSAT-H) were utilized to model the SWCCs and k-functions of the soil based on obtained measurements including the volumetric water content, the soil matric potential, and the saturated hudraulic conductivity (ks). Results obtained from the RETC program (s, r, α, n and ks) were ingested into UNSAT-H program to calculate the movement of water (rate and location) through the compacted clay liner. Although a linear wetting front (location of water infiltration as a function of time) is typically utilized for SDRI calculations, the use of a hyperbolic wetting front is recommended as a hyperbolic wetting front was modeled from the testing results. The suggested shape of the wetting front is associated with utilization of the desorption SWCC instead of the sorption SWCC and with relatively high values of ks (average value of 7.2E-7 cm/sec) were measured in the FWP tests while relatively low values of ks (average value of 1.2E-7 cm/sec) were measured in the SDRI test.

  20. Modelling the effect of rock fragment on soil saturated hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Sergio; Costanza Andrenelli, Maria; Vignozzi, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    Stoniness may be a key factor in determining the soil hydrological properties. Nevertheless, how coarse fraction takes part in some important processes (e.g., runoff, infiltration and percolation) is not univocally recognized, mainly because of the difficulties in obtaining reliable experimental data and, secondarily, for the employment of different approaches to evaluate the role of the coarse fraction. With that regard, equations developed by hydrogeologists to account for water fluxes in porous media, consider permeability as mere function of grain size distribution (particles >2 mm included), with permeability values increasing when passing from sand to gravel. Conversely, soil scientists consider the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) of soil exclusively as function of the fine-earth fraction and attribute a contrasting effect to the coarse fraction, both in relation to the decrease of porosity and to the increase of flow path tortuosity. Nevertheless, the Soil Survey Handbook includes all fragmental soils (gravel content ≥35% by weight) into the highest class of soil hydraulic conductivity, and this partly disagrees with the mostly adopted soil scientists' approaches. At the same time, lab- experiments carried out by engineers on particle mixture point out that the addition of increasing amounts of coarse material to finer grains progressively reduces the overall porosity until a critical threshold is reached; beyond this level, the void proportion rises again. In relation to the engineers' results, the present paper attempts to conceptually approach the dual effects of rock fragment content on Ksat by considering a decay of the water transmission properties of the fine-earth fraction at low gravel contents and, conversely, a drastic improvement of the conductivity whenever the porosity increases. For that purpose a data set of 50 soils of different textural classes is used to define the procedure by virtually increasing the rock fragment fraction (SK

  1. Potential use of calcareous mudstones in low hydraulic conductivity earthen barriers for environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Musso, T B; Francisca, F M; Musso, T B; Musso, T B

    2013-01-01

    Earthen layers play a significant role in isolating contaminants in the subsurface, controlling the migration of contaminant plumes, and as landfill liners and covers. The physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of three calcareous mudstones from the Jagüel and Roca formations in North Patagonia, Argentina, are evaluated to determine their potential for the construction of liners. These mudstones were deposited in a marine environment in the Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene. The tested specimens mainly comprise silt and clay-sized particles, and their mineralogy is dominated by a smectite/illite mixed layer (70-90% Sm) and calcite in smaller proportion. Powdered mudstone samples have little viscosity and swelling potential when suspended in water. The hydraulic conductivity of compacted mudstones and sand-mudstone mixtures is very low (around 1-3 x 10(-10) m/s) and in good agreement with the expected hydraulic behaviour of compacted earthen layers. This behaviour can be attributed to the large amount of fine particles, high specific surface and the close packing of particles as confirmed by scanning electron microscope analysis. The tested materials also show a high cation exchange capacity (50-70 cmol/kg), indicating a high contaminant retardation capability. The calcareous mudstones show satisfactory mineralogical and chemical properties as well as an adequate hydraulic behaviour, demonstrating the potential use of these materials for the construction of compacted liners for the containment of leachate or as covers in landfills. These findings confirm the potential usage of marine calcareous mudstones as a low-cost geomaterial in environmental engineering projects. PMID:24527607

  2. Potential use of calcareous mudstones in low hydraulic conductivity earthen barriers for environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Musso, T B; Francisca, F M; Musso, T B; Musso, T B

    2013-01-01

    Earthen layers play a significant role in isolating contaminants in the subsurface, controlling the migration of contaminant plumes, and as landfill liners and covers. The physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of three calcareous mudstones from the Jagüel and Roca formations in North Patagonia, Argentina, are evaluated to determine their potential for the construction of liners. These mudstones were deposited in a marine environment in the Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene. The tested specimens mainly comprise silt and clay-sized particles, and their mineralogy is dominated by a smectite/illite mixed layer (70-90% Sm) and calcite in smaller proportion. Powdered mudstone samples have little viscosity and swelling potential when suspended in water. The hydraulic conductivity of compacted mudstones and sand-mudstone mixtures is very low (around 1-3 x 10(-10) m/s) and in good agreement with the expected hydraulic behaviour of compacted earthen layers. This behaviour can be attributed to the large amount of fine particles, high specific surface and the close packing of particles as confirmed by scanning electron microscope analysis. The tested materials also show a high cation exchange capacity (50-70 cmol/kg), indicating a high contaminant retardation capability. The calcareous mudstones show satisfactory mineralogical and chemical properties as well as an adequate hydraulic behaviour, demonstrating the potential use of these materials for the construction of compacted liners for the containment of leachate or as covers in landfills. These findings confirm the potential usage of marine calcareous mudstones as a low-cost geomaterial in environmental engineering projects.

  3. Interaction between soil mineralogy and the application of crop residues on aggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity of the soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado, M.; Kiptoon, R.; Bar-Tal, A.; Wakindiki, I. I. C.; Ben-Hur, M.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main goals of modern agriculture is to achieve sustainability by maintaining crop productivity while avoiding soil degradation. Intensive cultivation could lead to a reduction in soil organic matter that could affect the structure stability and hydraulic conductivity of the soil. Moreover, crops extract nutrients from the soil that are taken away from the field when harvested, and as a consequence, the addition of fertilizers to the soil is necessary to maintain crop productivity. One way to deal with these problems is to incorporate crop residues into the soil after harvest. Crop residues are a source of organic matter that could improve soil physical properties, such as aggregate stability and soil hydraulic conductivity. However, this effect could vary according to other soil properties, such as clay content, clay mineralogy, and the presence of other cementing materials in the soil (mainly carbonates and aluminum and iron oxides). In the present work, the interaction between the addition of chickpea crop residues to the soil and clay mineralogy on aggregate stability and saturated hydraulic conductivity were studied. Chickpea plant residues were added at a rate of 0.5% (w/w) to smectitic, kaolinitic, illitic and non-phyllosilicate soils from different regions. The soils without (control) and with chickpea residues were incubated for 0, 3, 7 and 30 days, and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soils was measured in columns after each incubation time. The response of hydraulic conductivity to the addition of residues and incubation time was different in the soils with various mineralogies, although in general, the addition of chickpea residues increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity as compared with the control soils. This positive effect of crop residues on hydraulic conductivity was mainly a result of improved aggregate stability and resistance to slaking during wetting.

  4. The vertical hydraulic conductivity of an aquitard at two spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, D.J.; Bradbury, K.R.; Feinstein, D.T.

    2006-01-01

    Aquitards protect underlying aquifers from contaminants and limit recharge to those aquifers. Understanding the mechanisms and quantity of ground water flow across aquitards to underlying aquifers is essential for ground water planning and assessment. We present results of laboratory testing for shale hydraulic conductivities, a methodology for determining the vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) of aquitards at regional scales and demonstrate the importance of discrete flow pathways across aquitards. A regional shale aquitard in southeastern Wisconsin, the Maquoketa Formation, was studied to define the role that an aquitard plays in a regional ground water flow system. Calibration of a regional ground water flow model for southeastern Wisconsin using both predevelopment steady-state and transient targets suggested that the regional Kv of the Maquoketa Formation is 1.8 ?? 10 -11 m/s. The core-scale measurements of the Kv of the Maquoketa Formation range from 1.8 ?? 10-14 to 4.1 ?? 10-12 m/s. Flow through some additional pathways in the shale, potential fractures or open boreholes, can explain the apparent increase of the regional-scale Kv. Based on well logs, erosional windows or high-conductivity zones seem unlikely pathways. Fractures cutting through the entire thickness of the shale spaced 5 km apart with an aperture of 50 microns could provide enough flow across the aquitard to match that provided by an equivalent bulk Kv of 1.8 ?? 10-11 m/s. In a similar fashion, only 50 wells of 0.1 m radius open to aquifers above and below the shale and evenly spaced 10 km apart across southeastern Wisconsin can match the model Kv. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  5. The vertical hydraulic conductivity of an aquitard at two spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Hart, David J; Bradbury, Kenneth R; Feinstein, Daniel T

    2006-01-01

    Aquitards protect underlying aquifers from contaminants and limit recharge to those aquifers. Understanding the mechanisms and quantity of ground water flow across aquitards to underlying aquifers is essential for ground water planning and assessment. We present results of laboratory testing for shale hydraulic conductivities, a methodology for determining the vertical hydraulic conductivity (K(v)) of aquitards at regional scales and demonstrate the importance of discrete flow pathways across aquitards. A regional shale aquitard in southeastern Wisconsin, the Maquoketa Formation, was studied to define the role that an aquitard plays in a regional ground water flow system. Calibration of a regional ground water flow model for southeastern Wisconsin using both predevelopment steady-state and transient targets suggested that the regional K(v) of the Maquoketa Formation is 1.8 x 10(-11) m/s. The core-scale measurements of the K(v) of the Maquoketa Formation range from 1.8 x 10(-14) to 4.1 x 10(-12) m/s. Flow through some additional pathways in the shale, potential fractures or open boreholes, can explain the apparent increase of the regional-scale K(v). Based on well logs, erosional windows or high-conductivity zones seem unlikely pathways. Fractures cutting through the entire thickness of the shale spaced 5 km apart with an aperture of 50 microns could provide enough flow across the aquitard to match that provided by an equivalent bulk K(v) of 1.8 x 10(-11) m/s. In a similar fashion, only 50 wells of 0.1 m radius open to aquifers above and below the shale and evenly spaced 10 km apart across southeastern Wisconsin can match the model K(v). PMID:16556202

  6. Deep rooting plants influence on soil hydraulic properties and air conductivity over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uteau, Daniel; Peth, Stephan; Diercks, Charlotte; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Horn, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Crop sequences are commonly suggested as an alternative to improve subsoil structure. A well structured soil can be characterized by enhanced transport properties. Our main hypothesis was, that different root systems can modify the soil's macro/mesopore network if enough cultivation time is given. We analyzed the influence of three crops with either shallower roots (Festuca arundinacea, fescue) or taproots (Cichorium intybus, chicory and Medicago sativa, alfalfa). The crops where cultivated on a Haplic Luvisol near Bonn (Germany) for one, two or three years. Undisturbed soil cores were taken for measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and air permeability. The unsaturated conductivity was measured using the evaporation method, monitoring the water content and tension at two depths of each undisturbed soil core. The van Genuchten-Mualem model (1991) was fitted to the measured data. Air permeability was measured in a permeameter with constant flow at low pressure gradient. The measurements were repeated at -1, -3, -6, -15, -30 and -50 kPa matric tension and the model of Ball et al. (1988) was used to describe permeability as function of matric tension. Furthermore, the cores equilibrated at -15 kPa matric tension were scanned with X-Ray computer tomography. By means of 3D image analysis, geometrical features as pore size distribution, tortuosity and connectivity of the pore network was analyzed. The measurements showed an increased unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated to coarser pores at the taprooted cultivations. A enhanced pore system (related to shrink-swell processes) under alfalfa was observed in both transport measurements and was confirmed by the 3D image analysis. This highly functional pore system (consisting mainly of root paths, earthworm channels and shrinking cracks) was clearly visible below the 75 cm of depth and differentiated significantly from the other two treatments only after three years of cultivation, which shows the time

  7. Plant hydraulic conductance measured by the high pressure flow meter in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, M; Tyree, M T

    2000-04-01

    A new high pressure flow meter (HPFM) method for measuring plant hydraulic conductances (K) was investigated to examine whether its results are comparable to those from a conventional evaporative flux (EF) method in crops. Hydraulic conductance (K) was measured by the two methods under quasi-steady-state conditions in six crops grown in pots: soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv. Tsurunoko daizu), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Russian mammoth), kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Tsurunashi morocco), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Sekai-ichi), green pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. shishitou), and eggplant (Solanum melongena L. cv. Seiguro chunaga nasu). There was a 1:1 agreement between K values measured by the two methods for K values of whole plant, root and stem, and leaf under quasi-steady-state conditions. Leaf water potential (psi leaf) and evaporative flux density (E) in sunflower was curvilinear, indicating whole plant K estimated by the EF method increased with increase of E. Predicted psi leaf (= E divided by whole plant K measured by the HPFM method) agreed with measured psi leaf. Diurnal changes were also found in K measured by the HPFM confirming that K changed in response to temperature and E. The HPFM revealed that variable conductance was located in all organs: roots, stems, petioles, and leaves. These observations indicated that the HPFM is valid for crops as well as for trees (as previously established by Tsuda and Tyree) and has advantages over the EF method because of the speed and ease of the HPFM method.

  8. A combined use of Archie and van Genuchten models for predicting hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated pyroclastic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, Rosa; Piegari, Ester; Todero, Giovanna; Fabbrocino, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogeophysics has been developing in recent years to improve characterization and monitoring of saturated/unsaturated aquifers, through the combination of geophysical and hydrogeological methods. To exploit the potential benefits of this integration, definition of petrophysical relationships that allow the translation of geophysical data into hydrogeological parameters (and vice versa) is essential. In this paper, Archie's and van Genuchten's models, which relate electrical resistivity and hydraulic conductivity to the degree of saturation, are combined to obtain a closed-form link between hydraulic conductivity and electrical resistivity. Such an expression is used to characterize pyroclastic deposits covering Sarno Mountains (southern Italy), which are often affected by landslide phenomena. As expected, an inverse relationship is found between hydraulic conductivity and electrical resistivity due to predominance of the electrolytic component over the interfacial component of the electrical conductivity. The variability of the hydraulic conductivity marks out the texture of the investigated pyroclastic horizons. Finally, a hydraulic conductivity-matric suction relationship is retrieved by using an empirical correlation between electrical resistivity and matric suction.

  9. Rapid shoot-to-root signalling regulates root hydraulic conductance via aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Vandeleur, Rebecca K; Sullivan, Wendy; Athman, Asmini; Jordans, Charlotte; Gilliham, Matthew; Kaiser, Brent N; Tyerman, Stephen D

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how root hydraulic conductance (normalized to root dry weight, Lo ) is regulated by the shoot. Shoot topping (about 30% reduction in leaf area) reduced Lo of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.), soybean (Glycine max L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) by 50 to 60%. More detailed investigations with soybean and grapevine showed that the reduction in Lo was not correlated with the reduction in leaf area, and shading or cutting single leaves had a similar effect. Percentage reduction in Lo was largest when initial Lo was high in soybean. Inhibition of Lo by weak acid (low pH) was smaller after shoot damage or leaf shading. The half time of reduction in Lo was approximately 5 min after total shoot decapitation. These characteristics indicate involvement of aquaporins. We excluded phloem-borne signals and auxin-mediated signals. Xylem-mediated hydraulic signals are possible since turgor rapidly decreased within root cortex cells after shoot topping. There was a significant reduction in the expression of several aquaporins in the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) family of both grapevine and soybean. In soybean, there was a five- to 10-fold reduction in GmPIP1;6 expression over 0.5-1 h which was sustained over the period of reduced Lo .

  10. Verification of combined thermal-hydraulic and heat conduction analysis code FLOWNET/TRUMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Soh; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Kiso, Yoshihiro; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Sudo, Yukio

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the verification results of the combined thermal-hydraulic and heat conduction analysis code, FLOWNET/TRUMP which has been utilized for the core thermal hydraulic design, especially for the analysis of flow distribution among fuel block coolant channels, the determination of thermal boundary conditions for fuel block stress analysis and the estimation of fuel temperature in the case of fuel block coolant channel blockage accident in the design of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor(HTTR), which the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been planning to construct in order to establish basic technologies for future advanced very high temperature gas-cooled reactors and to be served as an irradiation test reactor for promotion of innovative high temperature new frontier technologies. The verification of the code was done through the comparison between the analytical results and experimental results of the Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop Multi-channel Test Section(HENDEL T(sub 1-M)) with simulated fuel rods and fuel blocks.

  11. In-Situ Hydraulic Conductivities of Soils and Anomalies at a Future Biofuel Production Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, M. F.; Jackson, C. R.; Hale, J. C.; Sletten, H. R.

    2010-12-01

    Forested hillslopes of the Upper Coastal Plain at the Savannah River Site, SC, feature a shallow clay loam argillic layer with low median saturated hydraulic conductivity. Observations from a grid of shallow, maximum-rise piezometers indicate that perching on this clay layer is common. However, flow measurements from an interflow-interception trench indicate that lateral flow is rare and most soil water percolates through the clay layer. We hypothesize that the lack of frequent lateral flow is due to penetration of the clay layer by roots of pine trees. We used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map the soil structure and potential anomalies, such as root holes, down to two meters depth at three 10×10-m plots. At each plot, a 1×10-m trench was later back-hoe excavated along a transect that showed the most anomalies on the GPR maps. Each trench was excavated at 0.5-m intervals until the clay layer was reached (two plots were excavated to a final depth of 0.875 m and the third plot was excavated to a final depth of 1.0 m). At each interval, compact constant-head permeameters (CCHPs) were used to measure in-situ hydraulic conductivities in the clay-loam matrix and in any visually apparent anomalies. Conductivity was also estimated using a second 1×10-m transect of CCHP measurements taken within randomly placed augur holes. Additional holes targeted GPR anomalies. The second transect was created in case the back-hoe impacted conductivity readings. High-conductivity anomalies were also visually investigated by excavating with a shovel. Photographs of soil wetness were taken at visually apparent anomalies with a multispectral camera. We discovered that all visually apparent anomalies found are represented on the GPR maps, but that not all of the predicted anomalies on the GPR maps are visually apparent. We discovered that tree root holes create anomalies, but that there were also many conductivity anomalies that could not be visually distinguished from low-conductivity

  12. On the effective hydraulic conductivity in mean vertical unsaturated steady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, Gerardo; Santini, Alessandro

    2005-09-01

    Water flow in partially saturated heterogeneous porous formations is modelled by regarding the hydraulic parameters as stationary random space functions (RSFs). As a consequence, the flow variables are also RSFs, and we aim to develop a procedure to derive the effective hydraulic conductivity (EHC). The methodology relies on a perturbation approach which regards the variances of the hydraulic parameters as small quantities. By using the Gardner's [Gardner WR. Some steady state solutions of unsaturated moisture flow equations with application to evaporation from a water table. Soil Sci 1958;85:228-32] two-parameters ( Ks, α) model for the local unsaturated conductivity, we obtain the EHC for any dimensionality d of the flow domain, and arbitrary correlation functions of the input RSFs. Unlike previous studies [e.g. Yeh T-CJ, Gelhar J, Gutjahr A. Stochastic analysis of unsaturated flow in heterogenous soils. 1. Statistically isotropic media. Water Resour Res 1985;21;447-56, Yeh T-CJ, Gelhar J, Gutjahr A. Stochastic analysis of unsaturated flow in heterogenous soils. 2. Statistically anisotropic media with variable α. Water Resour Res 1985:21:457-64], the EHC is represented here as product between the local scale conductivity valid for a domain of mean parameters, and a correction function κ∗ which depends on the medium heterogeneity structure and the mean pressure head. Generally, the correction function κ∗ is expressed by d-fold quadrature. These quadratures are further reduced after adopting specific (i.e. exponential and Gaussian) structure for the (cross) correlation functions involved in the computation of κ∗. We have also focused on some particular formation structures which are relevant for the applications, and permit simplification of the computational aspect, as well. We investigate effects of the heterogeneity formation properties as well as the mean head on the structure of κ∗. Overall, results suggest that, given the formation statistics

  13. Characterization And Simulation Of Hydraulic Conductivity Fields Using Copula Based Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Bárdossy, A.

    2008-12-01

    The flow and transport behavior in the subsurface is influenced by the heterogeneity organization of the sub- soils or aquifers. To estimate the effective flow and transport parameters, flow and transport simulations with the spatial fields of hydraulic or chemical properties of the subsurface are necessary. Hence the characterization of the spatial variabilities of relevant soil properties and subsequent simulations of the spatial fields based on the available measurements are required. However, in traditional geostatistics, the spatial variability is often described by an empirical or covariance function, which describes the dependence in an averaged sense and encounters problems if the marginal distribution of the soil property is highly skewed. Furthermore, these conventional statistics are only sufficient to characterize spatial fields with Guassian dependence. Non-Guassian spatial fields may exhibit spatial patterns which cannot be characterized by the conventional statistics. Moreover, in most cases, spatial simulations are carried out for log-conductivity values assuming a multivariate normal distribution, which implies the minimal spatial correlation of extreme values. This assumption is in contradiction with some geological formations, e.g. channels or flow barriers, which are critical for flow and transport. In addition, various non-Gaussian spatial structures exist in the world of heterogeneous fields. To conquer these problems, more and more researches have been carried out recently for modelling non- Gaussian dependence. The aims of this work are to apply the concept of copula to describe the spatial dependence of the hydraulic conductivity fields to reveal how the dependence strength varies across the whole distribution of the attribute values without the influence of the marginal distribution, and to develop different multivariate random functions and stochastic simulation procedures to generate random fields with non-Gaussian dependence. The

  14. Evolution of neural networks for the prediction of hydraulic conductivity as a function of borehole geophysical logs: Shobasama site, Japan.

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Paul C.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2004-06-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of a project to develop a neural network for the prediction of the measured hydraulic conductivity or transmissivity in a series of boreholes at the Tono, Japan study site. Geophysical measurements were used as the input to EL feed-forward neural network. A simple genetic algorithm was used to evolve the architecture and parameters of the neural network in conjunction with an optimal subset of geophysical measurements for the prediction of hydraulic conductivity. The first attempt was focused on the estimation of the class of the hydraulic conductivity, high, medium or low, from the geophysical logs. This estimation was done while using the genetic algorithm to simultaneously determine which geophysical logs were the most important and optimizing the architecture of the neural network. Initial results showed that certain geophysical logs provided more information than others- most notably the 'short-normal', micro-resistivity, porosity and sonic logs provided the most information on hydraulic conductivity. The neural network produced excellent training results with accuracy of 90 percent or greater, but was unable to produce accurate predictions of the hydraulic conductivity class. The second attempt at prediction was done using a new methodology and a modified data set. The new methodology builds on the results of the first attempts at prediction by limiting the choices of geophysical logs to only those that provide significant information. Additionally, this second attempt uses a modified data set and predicts transmissivity instead of hydraulic conductivity. Results of these simulations indicate that the most informative geophysical measurements for the prediction of transmissivity are depth and sonic log. The long normal resistivity and self potential borehole logs are moderately informative. In addition, it was found that porosity and crack counts (clear, open, or hairline) do not inform predictions of

  15. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand.

  16. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  17. Detection of QTL for exudation rate at ripening stage in rice and its contribution to hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshio; Suzuki, Tadafumi; Suzuki, Kenji; Adachi, Shunsuke; Sun, Jian; Yano, Masahiro; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Dry matter production of crops is determined by how much light they intercept and how efficiently they use it for carbon fixation; i.e., photosynthesis. The high-yielding rice cultivar, Akenohoshi, maintains a high photosynthetic rate in the middle of the day owing to its high hydraulic conductance in comparison with the elite commercial rice cultivar, Koshihikari. We developed 94 recombinant inbred lines derived from Akenohoshi and Koshihikari and measured their exudation rate to calculate hydraulic conductance to osmotic water transport in a paddy field. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) for exudation rate was detected on the long arm of chromosome 2 at the heading and ripening stages. We developed chromosome segment substitution lines which carried Akenohoshi segments in the Koshihikari genetic background, and measured hydraulic conductance to both osmotic and passive water transport. The QTL was confirmed to be located within a region of about 4.2Mbp on the distal end of long arm of chromosome 2. The Akenohoshi allele increased root surface area and hydraulic conductance, but didn't increase hydraulic conductivity of a plant.

  18. Detection of QTL for exudation rate at ripening stage in rice and its contribution to hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshio; Suzuki, Tadafumi; Suzuki, Kenji; Adachi, Shunsuke; Sun, Jian; Yano, Masahiro; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Dry matter production of crops is determined by how much light they intercept and how efficiently they use it for carbon fixation; i.e., photosynthesis. The high-yielding rice cultivar, Akenohoshi, maintains a high photosynthetic rate in the middle of the day owing to its high hydraulic conductance in comparison with the elite commercial rice cultivar, Koshihikari. We developed 94 recombinant inbred lines derived from Akenohoshi and Koshihikari and measured their exudation rate to calculate hydraulic conductance to osmotic water transport in a paddy field. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) for exudation rate was detected on the long arm of chromosome 2 at the heading and ripening stages. We developed chromosome segment substitution lines which carried Akenohoshi segments in the Koshihikari genetic background, and measured hydraulic conductance to both osmotic and passive water transport. The QTL was confirmed to be located within a region of about 4.2Mbp on the distal end of long arm of chromosome 2. The Akenohoshi allele increased root surface area and hydraulic conductance, but didn't increase hydraulic conductivity of a plant. PMID:26566844

  19. A new method for high-resolution characterization of hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Gaisheng; Butler, J.J.; Bohling, G.C.; Reboulet, E.; Knobbe, S.; Hyndman, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    A new probe has been developed for high-resolution characterization of hydraulic conductivity (K) in shallow unconsolidated formations. The probe was recently applied at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Mississippi where K was rapidly characterized at a resolution as fine as 0.015 m, which has not previously been possible. Eleven profiles were obtained with K varying up to 7 orders of magnitude in individual profiles. Currently, high-resolution (0.015-m) profiling has an upper K limit of 10 m/d; lower-resolution (???0.4-m) mode is used in more permeable zones pending modifications. The probe presents a new means to help address unresolved issues of solute transport in heterogeneous systems. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Estimation of the change in hydraulic conductivity above mined longwall panels.

    PubMed

    Tammetta, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The change in hydraulic conductivity (K) above subsided longwall panels at underground coal mines is determined using a data base of pre-mining and post-mining K measurements made at multiple locations down the depth profile at each of a number of sites worldwide. Results show that, following caving of roof strata, there is a clear difference in the magnitude of changes in K above and below the top of the collapsed zone. Within the collapsed zone, relative increases in K are larger, even when taking account of measurements made in potentially unsaturated strata. A generalized conceptual model is presented for K change above subsided longwall panels. These results form a third independent database supporting the height of desaturation reported in an earlier study. PMID:24405232

  1. UNSATURATED FLOW IN A CENTRIFUGAL FIELD: MEASUREMENT OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND TESTING OF DARCY'S LAW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Rubin, J.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed to establish steady flow of water in unsaturated soil sample spinning in a centrifuge. Theoretical analysis predicts moisture conditions in the sample that depend strongly on soil type and certain operating parameter. For Oakley sand, measurements of flux, water content, and matric potential during and after centrifugation verify that steady state flow can be achieved. Experiments have confirmed the theoretical prediction of a nearly uniform moisture distribution for this medium and have demonstrated that the flow can be effectively one-dimensional. The method was used for steady state measurements of hydraulic conductivity K for relatively dry soil, giving values at low as 7. 6 multiplied by 10** minus **1**1 m/s with data obtained in a few hours. Darcy's law was tested by measuring K for different centrifugal driving forces but with the same water content.

  2. Statistical Distribution of Streambed Vertical Hydraulic Conductivity along the Platte River, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Song, J.; Chen, X.; Wang, D.

    2009-12-01

    Streambed vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) plays an important role in understanding the stream-aquifer interactions. While several researchers have discussed the spatial variability of streambed horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kh) or Kv at one or several close-located sites in a river, they did not develop any statistical distribution analysis of streambed Kv at distant sites along a large river. In this study, the statistical distribution and spatial variation of streambed Kv at 18 test sites in a 300-km reach of the Platte River in Nebraska were presented. In-situ permeameter tests using the falling-head method were carried out to calculate the streambed Kv values. Streambed Kv values in the studied river reach can be placed into three groups decreasing downstream. The streambed Kv values between Schuyler and Woods Landing in the Platte River were lower than those values between Kearney and Central City, a result of contribution of fine-grained sediments from the Loup River downstream to the Platte River. The streambed Kv value at the Ashland site was even smaller, which can be attributed to the additional effects of lower-K sediments from the Elkhorn River deposited in the downstream Platte River. The streambed Kv values were normally distributed nearly at each test site. When the correlated Kv values were taken out from the grid sampling plots, the remaining sub-datasets of streambed Kv values were still in normal distribution at each test site. Furthermore, the combined streambed Kv values of nine test sites in the Platte River from Kearney to Central City was normally distributed, which may be due to the lack of tributaries in-between and thus streambed sediments were well distributed. In contrast, the combined streambed Kv values of seven sites between Schuyler and Woods Landing did not show normal distribution, instead, display somewhat bimodal distribution.

  3. Scale-dependency of effective hydraulic conductivity on fire-affected hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Christoph; Lane, Patrick N. J.; Nyman, Petter; Noske, Philip J.; Cawson, Jane G.; Oono, Akiko; Sheridan, Gary J.

    2016-07-01

    Effective hydraulic conductivity (Ke) for Hortonian overland flow modeling has been defined as a function of rainfall intensity and runon infiltration assuming a distribution of saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks). But surface boundary condition during infiltration and its interactions with the distribution of Ks are not well represented in models. As a result, the mean value of the Ks distribution (KS¯), which is the central parameter for Ke, varies between scales. Here we quantify this discrepancy with a large infiltration data set comprising four different methods and scales from fire-affected hillslopes in SE Australia using a relatively simple yet widely used conceptual model of Ke. Ponded disk (0.002 m2) and ring infiltrometers (0.07 m2) were used at the small scales and rainfall simulations (3 m2) and small catchments (ca 3000 m2) at the larger scales. We compared KS¯ between methods measured at the same time and place. Disk and ring infiltrometer measurements had on average 4.8 times higher values of KS¯ than rainfall simulations and catchment-scale estimates. Furthermore, the distribution of Ks was not clearly log-normal and scale-independent, as supposed in the conceptual model. In our interpretation, water repellency and preferential flow paths increase the variance of the measured distribution of Ks and bias ponding toward areas of very low Ks during rainfall simulations and small catchment runoff events while areas with high preferential flow capacity remain water supply-limited more than the conceptual model of Ke predicts. The study highlights problems in the current theory of scaling runoff generation.

  4. Combined use of flowmeter and time-drawdown data to estimate hydraulic conductivities in layered aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Nishikawa, T.

    1996-01-01

    The vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in layered aquifer systems commonly is needed for model simulations of ground-water flow and transport. In previous studies, time-drawdown data or flowmeter data were used individually, but not in combination, to estimate hydraulic conductivity. In this study, flowmeter data and time-drawdown data collected from a long-screened production well and nearby monitoring wells are combined to estimate the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in a complex multilayer coastal aquifer system. Flowmeter measurements recorded as a function of depth delineate nonuniform inflow to the wellbore, and this information is used to better discretize the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity using analytical and numerical methods. The time-drawdown data complement the flowmeter data by giving insight into the hydraulic response of aquitards when flow rates within the wellbore are below the detection limit of the flowmeter. The combination of these field data allows for the testing of alternative conceptual models of radial flow to the wellbore.

  5. Evaluating vertical variability analysis (VVA) for estimating the hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, and transmissivity of four simulated geologic configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, G.D. ); Kolm, K.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Aquifer systems derived from fluvial, eolian, glacial, or mass movement processes may have considerable vertical and areal variability in saturated thickness, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, and bed thickness. Frequently, hydraulic data from aquifer tests are not readily available, whereas lithologic and grain-size information from drillers' logs is generally abundant. Therefore, the vertical variability method was devised to evaluate the aquifer properties for individual lithologic units based on drillers' information. These estimates provide vital information about aquifer characterization and are useful for hydraulic analysis and computer modeling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the VVA for estimating the hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, and transmissivity of four simulated geological configurations. The objectives were to: (1) test the validity of VVA using the method of moments and the 0.5 criterion for relative center of gravity (RCOG); and (2) conduct a sensitivity analysis of material parameters relative to the RCOG. Results show that the 0.5 criterion for RCOG is valid only on a case-by-case basis depending primarily on the geometry of the geologic deposits, and secondarily on the thickness of individual geologic units. Sensitivity analyses reveal that the parameters of hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity are insensitive to changes in RCOG to plus or minus two to three orders of magnitude. Additional results indicate that the variance of RCOG for eolian, glacial, and incomplete two-cycle fluvial deposits is minimal as compared to the those for single and multiple fluvial cycles.

  6. Spatial characterization of the hydraulic conductivity using direct-push injection logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessoff, Steven C.; Schneidewind, Uwe; Leven, Carsten; Blum, Philipp; Dietrich, Peter; Dagan, Gedeon

    2010-12-01

    Detailed information on the spatial structure of hydraulic conductivity (K) is important for understanding and predicting groundwater flow and transport. Direct-push injection logging (DPIL) is a promising technology for rapid measurement of K in unconsolidated formations. This technology was used to gain information on the highly heterogeneous aquifer at the Lauswiesen test site in Germany. Using a large body of DPIL and direct-push slug testing measurements, we characterize the structure of K on scales not previously possible. Two new applications of DPIL are put forward: (1) use of raw DPIL measurements of relative conductivity Kr to characterize the spatial distribution of K and (2) transformation of Kr measurements to K values based on their statistical moments. The DPIL results are compatible to those obtained using more conventional methodologies. The main achievement of the methodology is the possibility to delineate deterministic aquifer subunits as well as the identification of the statistical parameters of the log conductivity for each subunit. In particular, the horizontal integral scale I, a parameter affecting solute transport, is difficult and costly to identify using other approaches. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to clarify questions on low Kr measurements and the nature of the relationship between Kr and K.

  7. A model for estimating the hydraulic conductivity of granular material based on grain shape, grain size, and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Sperry, J.M.; Peirce, J.J.

    1995-11-01

    Particle shape is an important parameter in numerous civil, environmental, and petroleum engineering applications. In ground-water flow, the shape of individual particles comprising the soil affects the soil`s pore size distribution and, hence, the important flow characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity and headloss. A model for delineating the relative importance of particle size, particle shape, and porosity, (and their interactions), in explaining the variability of hydraulic conductivity of a granular porous medium is developed and tested. Three types of porous media are considered in this work: spherical glass beads; granular sand; and irregularly shaped, shredded glass particles. A reliable method for quantifying the three-dimensional shape and packing of large samples of irregular particles based on their angle of repose is presented. The results of column experiments indicate that in the size range examined (i.e., 149 {micro}m to 2,380 {micro}m), the single most important predictor of hydraulic conductivity is seen to be particle size, explaining 69% of the variability. Porous media comprising irregular particles exhibit lower hydraulic conductivity only for the larger (707 to 841 {micro}m) particles. For the smaller (149 to 177 {micro}m) particles, particle shape has no observable influence on hydraulic conductivity. The results of the regression analysis reveal the importance off the interaction between particle size and porosity, indicating that similar pore configurations for a given type of particle are not achieved at different sizes. This empirical model seems to provide better estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of granular porous media comprising irregular particles than selected models based solely on grain size, including Hazen, Kozeny-Carman, and more recently Alyamani and Sen.

  8. Inversion of multi-frequency electromagnetic induction data for 3D characterization of hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, T.R.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Schultz, G.M.; Curtis, G.P.; Lane, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) instruments provide rapid, noninvasive, and spatially dense data for characterization of soil and groundwater properties. Data from multi-frequency EMI tools can be inverted to provide quantitative electrical conductivity estimates as a function of depth. In this study, multi-frequency EMI data collected across an abandoned uranium mill site near Naturita, Colorado, USA, are inverted to produce vertical distribution of electrical conductivity (EC) across the site. The relation between measured apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and hydraulic conductivity (K) is weak (correlation coefficient of 0.20), whereas the correlation between the depth dependent EC obtained from the inversions, and K is sufficiently strong to be used for hydrologic estimation (correlation coefficient of -0.62). Depth-specific EC values were correlated with co-located K measurements to develop a site-specific ln(EC)-ln(K) relation. This petrophysical relation was applied to produce a spatially detailed map of K across the study area. A synthetic example based on ECa values at the site was used to assess model resolution and correlation loss given variations in depth and/or measurement error. Results from synthetic modeling indicate that optimum correlation with K occurs at ~0.5m followed by a gradual correlation loss of 90% at 2.3m. These results are consistent with an analysis of depth of investigation (DOI) given the range of frequencies, transmitter-receiver separation, and measurement errors for the field data. DOIs were estimated at 2.0??0.5m depending on the soil conductivities. A 4-layer model, with varying thicknesses, was used to invert the ECa to maximize available information within the aquifer region for improved correlations with K. Results show improved correlation between K and the corresponding inverted EC at similar depths, underscoring the importance of inversion in using multi-frequency EMI data for hydrologic estimation. ?? 2011.

  9. Biochar-induced changes in soil hydraulic conductivity and dissolved nutrient fluxes constrained by laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Rebecca T; Gallagher, Morgan E; Masiello, Caroline A; Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The addition of charcoal (or biochar) to soil has significant carbon sequestration and agronomic potential, making it important to determine how this potentially large anthropogenic carbon influx will alter ecosystem functions. We used column experiments to quantify how hydrologic and nutrient-retention characteristics of three soil materials differed with biochar amendment. We compared three homogeneous soil materials (sand, organic-rich topsoil, and clay-rich Hapludert) to provide a basic understanding of biochar-soil-water interactions. On average, biochar amendment decreased saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) by 92% in sand and 67% in organic soil, but increased K by 328% in clay-rich soil. The change in K for sand was not predicted by the accompanying physical changes to the soil mixture; the sand-biochar mixture was less dense and more porous than sand without biochar. We propose two hydrologic pathways that are potential drivers for this behavior: one through the interstitial biochar-sand space and a second through pores within the biochar grains themselves. This second pathway adds to the porosity of the soil mixture; however, it likely does not add to the effective soil K due to its tortuosity and smaller pore size. Therefore, the addition of biochar can increase or decrease soil drainage, and suggests that any potential improvement of water delivery to plants is dependent on soil type, biochar amendment rate, and biochar properties. Changes in dissolved carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes also differed; with biochar increasing the C flux from organic-poor sand, decreasing it from organic-rich soils, and retaining small amounts of soil-derived N. The aromaticity of C lost from sand and clay increased, suggesting lost C was biochar-derived; though the loss accounts for only 0.05% of added biochar-C. Thus, the direction and magnitude of hydraulic, C, and N changes associated with biochar amendments are soil type (composition and particle size) dependent.

  10. Biochar-Induced Changes in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Dissolved Nutrient Fluxes Constrained by Laboratory Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Rebecca T.; Gallagher, Morgan E.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The addition of charcoal (or biochar) to soil has significant carbon sequestration and agronomic potential, making it important to determine how this potentially large anthropogenic carbon influx will alter ecosystem functions. We used column experiments to quantify how hydrologic and nutrient-retention characteristics of three soil materials differed with biochar amendment. We compared three homogeneous soil materials (sand, organic-rich topsoil, and clay-rich Hapludert) to provide a basic understanding of biochar-soil-water interactions. On average, biochar amendment decreased saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) by 92% in sand and 67% in organic soil, but increased K by 328% in clay-rich soil. The change in K for sand was not predicted by the accompanying physical changes to the soil mixture; the sand-biochar mixture was less dense and more porous than sand without biochar. We propose two hydrologic pathways that are potential drivers for this behavior: one through the interstitial biochar-sand space and a second through pores within the biochar grains themselves. This second pathway adds to the porosity of the soil mixture; however, it likely does not add to the effective soil K due to its tortuosity and smaller pore size. Therefore, the addition of biochar can increase or decrease soil drainage, and suggests that any potential improvement of water delivery to plants is dependent on soil type, biochar amendment rate, and biochar properties. Changes in dissolved carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes also differed; with biochar increasing the C flux from organic-poor sand, decreasing it from organic-rich soils, and retaining small amounts of soil-derived N. The aromaticity of C lost from sand and clay increased, suggesting lost C was biochar-derived; though the loss accounts for only 0.05% of added biochar-C. Thus, the direction and magnitude of hydraulic, C, and N changes associated with biochar amendments are soil type (composition and particle size) dependent

  11. Effect of the method of estimation of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity with regards to the design of stormwater infiltration trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva coutinho, Artur; Predelus, Dieuseul; Lassabatere, Laurent; Ben Slimene, Erij; Celso Dantas Antonino, Antonio; Winiarski, Thierry; Joaquim da Silva Pereira Cabral, Jaime; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    Best management practices are based on the infiltration of stormwater (e.g. infiltration into basins or trenches) to reduce the risk of flooding of urban areas. Proper estimations of saturated hydraulic conductivity of the vadose zone are required to avoid inappropriate design of infiltration devices. This article aims at assessing (i) the method-dependency of the estimation of soils saturated hydraulic conductivity and (ii) the consequences of such dependency on the design of infiltration trenches. This is illustrated for the specific case of an infiltration trench to be constructed to receive stormwater from a specific parking surface, 250 m2 in area, in Recife (Brazil). Water infiltration experiments were conducted according to the Beerkan Method, i.e. application of a zero water pressure head through a disc source (D=15 cm) and measures of the amount of infiltrated water with time. Saturated hydraulic conductivity estimates are derived from the analysis of these infiltration tests using several different conceptual approaches: one-dimensional models of Horton(1933) and Philip(1957), three-dimensional methods recently developed (Lassabatere et al., 2006, Wu et al., 1999, and Bagarello et al., 2013) and direct 3-dimensional numerical inversion. The estimations for saturated hydraulic conductivity ranged between 65.5 mm/h and 94 mm/h for one-dimensional methods, whereas using three-dimensional methods saturated hydraulic conductivity ranged between 15.6 mm/h and 50 mm/h. These results shows the need for accounting for 3D geometry, and more generally, the physics of water infiltration in soils, if a proper characterization of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity is targeted. In a second step, each estimate of the saturated hydraulic conductivity was used to calculate the stormwater to be stored in the studied trench for several rainfall events of recurrence intervals of 2 to 25 years. The calculation of these volumes showed a great sensitivity with regards to the

  12. Simulation assessment of the direct-push permeameter for characterizing vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Gaisheng; Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    [1] The direct-push permeameter (DPP) is a tool for the in situ characterization of hydraulic conductivity (K) in shallow, unconsolidated formations. This device, which consists of a short screened section with a pair of pressure transducers near the screen, is advanced into the subsurface with direct-push technology. K is determined through a series of injection tests conducted between advancements. Recent field work by Butler et al. (2007) has shown that the DPP holds great potential for describing vertical variations in K at an unprecedented level of detail, accuracy and speed. In this paper, the fundamental efficacy of the DPP is evaluated through a series of numerical simulations. These simulations demonstrate that the DPP can provide accurate K information under conditions commonly faced in the field. A single DPP test provides an effective K for the domain immediately surrounding the interval between the injection screen and the most distant pressure transducer. Features that are thinner than that interval can be quantified by reducing the vertical distance between successive tests and analyzing the data from all tests simultaneously. A particular advantage of the DPP is that, unlike most other single borehole techniques, a low-K skin or a clogged screen has a minimal impact on the K estimate. In addition, the requirement that only steady-shape conditions be attained allows for a dramatic reduction in the time required for each injection test. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Techniques for measuring the vertical hydraulic conductivity of flood basalts at the Basalt Waste Isolation Project site

    SciTech Connect

    Javandel, I.

    1983-06-01

    A regional model that can predict groundwater movement through the reference repository location and surrounding area is essential to assessing the site suitability for a nuclear waste repository. During the last two decades, several models have been developed to handle complicated flow patterns through complex geologic materials. The basic problem, however, is obtaining the data base needed to apply these models. The hydrological data needed include the spatial distribution of effective porosity, the hydraulic conductivity tensor and its variation in space, values of specific storage, the hydraulic head distribution, and the fluid properties. In this report, we discuss conventional methods of obtaining vertical hydraulic conductivity and examine their applicability to the BWIP site. 39 references, 12 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Hydraulic bridges in unsaturated coarse granular media: Influence of bridge size and conductivity on flow through clasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakody, Jeevan A.; Nicholl, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Unsaturated flow in coarse granular media must pass through hydraulic bridges (e.g., pendular water, porous connections) that form a physical connection between adjoining clasts. Previous studies suggest that volumetric flow through a porous clast (Q) will be linearly dependent on the cross-sectional area of the hydraulic bridges, and understate the importance of bridge conductivity. Numerical simulations were performed to explore steady-state flow through a spherical clast with identical bridges located at the top and bottom. The cross-sectional area of the bridges relative to that of the clast (Ar) was varied across six orders of magnitude. The ratio of hydraulic conductivity between bridges and clasts (Kb/Kc) was varied across 12 orders of magnitude to consider resistive, neutral, and conductive bridges. Results show that hydraulic bridges place a primary control on both Q and flux distribution within the clast. For neutral and conductive bridges (Kb/Kc ≥1), Ar is the dominant factor in determining Q, while Kb/Kc is the primary control for resistive bridges (Kb/Kc < 1). For all bridges, Q shows a non-linear dependency on both Ar and Kb/Kc. The intra-clast flow distribution shifts outwards as Ar increases. Conductive bridges promote this process and resistive bridges impede it.

  15. Mind the bubbles: achieving stable measurements of maximum hydraulic conductivity through woody plant samples

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Susana; Schenk, H. Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The maximum specific hydraulic conductivity (kmax) of a plant sample is a measure of the ability of a plants’ vascular system to transport water and dissolved nutrients under optimum conditions. Precise measurements of kmax are needed in comparative studies of hydraulic conductivity, as well as for measuring the formation and repair of xylem embolisms. Unstable measurements of kmax are a common problem when measuring woody plant samples and it is commonly observed that kmax declines from initially high values, especially when positive water pressure is used to flush out embolisms. This study was designed to test five hypotheses that could potentially explain declines in kmax under positive pressure: (i) non-steady-state flow; (ii) swelling of pectin hydrogels in inter-vessel pit membranes; (iii) nucleation and coalescence of bubbles at constrictions in the xylem; (iv) physiological wounding responses; and (v) passive wounding responses, such as clogging of the xylem by debris. Prehydrated woody stems from Laurus nobilis (Lauraceae) and Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae) collected from plants grown in the Fullerton Arboretum in Southern California, were used to test these hypotheses using a xylem embolism meter (XYL'EM). Treatments included simultaneous measurements of stem inflow and outflow, enzyme inhibitors, stem-debarking, low water temperatures, different water degassing techniques, and varied concentrations of calcium, potassium, magnesium, and copper salts in aqueous measurement solutions. Stable measurements of kmax were observed at concentrations of calcium, potassium, and magnesium salts high enough to suppress bubble coalescence, as well as with deionized water that was degassed using a membrane contactor under strong vacuum. Bubble formation and coalescence under positive pressure in the xylem therefore appear to be the main cause for declining kmax values. Our findings suggest that degassing of water is essential for achieving stable and precise

  16. Mind the bubbles: achieving stable measurements of maximum hydraulic conductivity through woody plant samples.

    PubMed

    Espino, Susana; Schenk, H Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The maximum specific hydraulic conductivity (k(max)) of a plant sample is a measure of the ability of a plants' vascular system to transport water and dissolved nutrients under optimum conditions. Precise measurements of k(max) are needed in comparative studies of hydraulic conductivity, as well as for measuring the formation and repair of xylem embolisms. Unstable measurements of k(max) are a common problem when measuring woody plant samples and it is commonly observed that k(max) declines from initially high values, especially when positive water pressure is used to flush out embolisms. This study was designed to test five hypotheses that could potentially explain declines in k(max) under positive pressure: (i) non-steady-state flow; (ii) swelling of pectin hydrogels in inter-vessel pit membranes; (iii) nucleation and coalescence of bubbles at constrictions in the xylem; (iv) physiological wounding responses; and (v) passive wounding responses, such as clogging of the xylem by debris. Prehydrated woody stems from Laurus nobilis (Lauraceae) and Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae) collected from plants grown in the Fullerton Arboretum in Southern California, were used to test these hypotheses using a xylem embolism meter (XYL'EM). Treatments included simultaneous measurements of stem inflow and outflow, enzyme inhibitors, stem-debarking, low water temperatures, different water degassing techniques, and varied concentrations of calcium, potassium, magnesium, and copper salts in aqueous measurement solutions. Stable measurements of k(max) were observed at concentrations of calcium, potassium, and magnesium salts high enough to suppress bubble coalescence, as well as with deionized water that was degassed using a membrane contactor under strong vacuum. Bubble formation and coalescence under positive pressure in the xylem therefore appear to be the main cause for declining k(max) values. Our findings suggest that degassing of water is essential for achieving stable and

  17. Loss of whole-tree hydraulic conductance during severe drought and multi-year forest die-off.

    PubMed

    Anderegg, William R L; Anderegg, Leander D L; Berry, Joseph A; Field, Christopher B

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the pathways through which drought stress kills woody vegetation can improve projections of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems and carbon-cycle feedbacks. Continuous in situ measurements of whole trees during drought and as trees die hold promise to illuminate physiological pathways but are relatively rare. We monitored leaf characteristics, water use efficiency, water potentials, branch hydraulic conductivity, soil moisture, meteorological variables, and sap flux on mature healthy and sudden aspen decline-affected (SAD) trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) ramets over two growing seasons, including a severe summer drought. We calculated daily estimates of whole-ramet hydraulic conductance and modeled whole-ramet assimilation. Healthy ramets experienced rapid declines of whole-ramet conductance during the severe drought, providing an analog for what likely occurred during the previous drought that induced SAD. Even in wetter periods, SAD-affected ramets exhibited fivefold lower whole-ramet hydraulic conductance and sevenfold lower assimilation than counterpart healthy ramets, mediated by changes in leaf area, water use efficiency, and embolism. Extant differences between healthy and SAD ramets reveal that ongoing multi-year forest die-off is primarily driven by loss of whole-ramet hydraulic capability, which in turn limits assimilation capacity. Branch-level measurements largely captured whole-plant hydraulic limitations during drought and mortality, but whole-plant measurements revealed a potential role of other losses in the hydraulic continuum. Our results highlight the importance of a whole-tree perspective in assessing physiological pathways to tree mortality and indicate that the effects of mortality on these forests' assimilation and productivity are larger than expected based on canopy leaf area differences. PMID:24394863

  18. On the variability and use of the hydraulic conductivity alpha parameter in stochastic treatments of unsaturated flow

    SciTech Connect

    White, I.; Sully, M.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-linear parameterization for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity K({Psi}) = K{sub s} exp ({alpha}{Psi}), where K is hydraulic conductivity, {Psi} is soil water matric potential, K{sub s} is saturated hydraulic conductivity, and {alpha} is a porous material parameter, has been used in both stochastic and deterministic models of unsaturated water flow in porous materials. In the stochastic approach, K{sub s} is assumed lognormally distributed, but {alpha} and the volumetric soil water capacity C = d{theta}/d{Psi}, with {theta} volumetric soil water content, are assumed normally distributed. The authors point out here that {alpha} and K{sub s} are related to the same internal pore geometry of the soil. This interrelationship ensures that if K{sub s} is lognormal, then {alpha}, and possibly C, will also be lognormal. Additionally, the authors present preliminary field results which indicate that {alpha} is better described by a lognormal than a normal distribution. The quasi-linear parameterization can be expected to be correct only in some integral sense. Predictions of increases in the variability of hydraulic conductivity with decreasing {Psi} may therefore be prejudiced by the use of the exponential form for K({Psi}). Tests of the sensitivity of stochastic model predictions to both the parameterizations adopted for K({Psi}) and the assumed distribution functions of parameters seem warranted. Reliable experimental evidence on field variability of K({Psi}) and {Psi}({theta}) at substantial negative values of {Psi} are also needed.

  19. Evaluation of clogging in planted and unplanted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: solids accumulation and hydraulic conductivity reduction.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, André Cordeiro; von Sperling, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the behaviour of two horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland units regarding solids build up and clogging of the filter medium. In order to analyse the causes of this process, which is considered the major operational problem of constructed wetlands, studies were carried out to characterize accumulated solids and hydraulic conductivity at specific points of the beds of two wetlands (planted with Typha latifolia and unplanted units) receiving effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating sanitary sewage (population equivalent of 50 inhabitants each unit). The experiments were performed after the units were operating for 2 years and 4 months. This study presents comparative results related to the quantification and characterization of accumulated solids and hydraulic conductivity along the length and width of the filter beds. Approximately 80% of the solids found were inorganic (fixed). Near the inlet end, the rate interstitial solids/attached solids was 5.0, while in the outlet end it was reduced to 1.5. Hydraulic conductivity was lower near the inlet of the units (as expected) and, by comparing the planted wetland with the unplanted, the hydraulic conductivity was lower in the former, resulting in larger undesired surface flow.

  20. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF SALTSTONE FORMULATED USING 1Q11, 2Q11 AND 3Q11 TANK 50 SLURRY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Nichols, R.

    2012-06-27

    As part of the Saltstone formulation work requested by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing Saltstone samples for fresh property analysis and hydraulic conductivity measurements using actual Tank 50 salt solution rather than simulated salt solution. Samples of low level waste salt solution collected from Tank 50H during the first, second, and third quarters of 2011 were used to formulate the Saltstone samples. The salt solution was mixed with premix (45 wt % slag, 45 wt % fly ash, and 10 wt % cement), in a ratio consistent with facility operating conditions during the quarter of interest. The fresh properties (gel, set, bleed) of each mix were evaluated and compared to the recommended acceptance criteria for the Saltstone Production Facility. ASTM D5084-03, Method C was used to measure the hydraulic conductivity of the Saltstone samples. The hydraulic conductivity of Saltstone samples prepared from 1Q11 and 2Q11 samples of Tank 50H is 4.2E-9 cm/sec and 2.6E-9 cm/sec, respectively. Two additional 2Q11 and one 3Q11 sample were not successfully tested due to the inability to achieve stable readings during saturation and testing. The hydraulic conductivity of the samples made from Tank 50H salt solution compare well to samples prepared with simulated salt solution and cured under similar conditions (1.4E-9 - 4.9E-8 cm/sec).

  1. The chemical identity of intervessel pit membranes in Acer challenges hydrogel control of xylem hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Klepsch, Matthias M; Schmitt, Marco; Paul Knox, J; Jansen, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Ion-mediated enhancement of the hydraulic conductivity of xylem tissue (i.e. the ionic effect) has been reported for various angiosperm species. One explanation of the ionic effect is that it is caused by the swelling and shrinking of intervessel pit membranes due to the presence of pectins and/or other cell-wall matrix polymers such as heteroxylans or arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) that may contain acidic sugars. Here, we examined the ionic effect for six Acer species and their pit membrane chemistry using immunocytochemistry, including antibodies against glycoproteins. Moreover, anatomical features related to the bordered pit morphology and vessel dimensions were investigated using light and electron microscopy. The ionic effect varied from 18 % (± 9) to 32 % (± 13). Epitopes of homogalacturonan (LM18) and xylan (LM11) were not detected in intervessel pit membranes. Negative results were also obtained for glycoproteins (extensin: LM1, JIM20; AGP glycan: LM2), although AGP (JIM13)-related epitopes were detected in parenchyma cells. The mean vessel length was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the ionic effect, unlike other pit or vessel-related characteristics. Our results suggest that intervessel pit membranes of Acer are unlikely to contain pectic or other acidic polysaccharides. Therefore, alternative explanations should be tested to clarify the ionic effect.

  2. IDENTIFYING HYDRAULICALLY CONDUCTIVE FRACTURES WITH A SLOW-VELOCITY BOREHOLE FLOWMETER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Alfred E.

    1986-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey used a recently developed heat-pulse flowmeter to measure very slow borehole axial water velocities in granitic rock at a site near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, Canada. The flowmeter was used with other geophysical measurements to locate and identify hydraulically conducting fractures contributing to the very slow vertical water flow in the two boreholes selected for study. The heat-pulse flowmeter has a flow-measuring range in water of 0. 06-6m/min, and can resolve velocity differences as slow as 0. 01 m/min. This is an order of magnitude slower than the stall speed of spinner flowmeters. The flowmeter is 1. 16 m long and 44 mm in diameter. It was calibrated in columns of 76 and 152 mm diameter, to correspond to the boreholes studied. The heat-pulse flowmeter system is evaluated, and problems peculiar to the measurement of very slow axial water velocities in boreholes are discussed.

  3. Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations: A bayesian geostatistical parameter estimation approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, M.; Hunt, R.; Krabbenhoft, D.; Clemo, T.

    2009-01-01

    Flow path delineation is a valuable tool for interpreting the subsurface hydrogeochemical environment. Different types of data, such as groundwater flow and transport, inform different aspects of hydrogeologie parameter values (hydraulic conductivity in this case) which, in turn, determine flow paths. This work combines flow and transport information to estimate a unified set of hydrogeologic parameters using the Bayesian geostatistical inverse approach. Parameter flexibility is allowed by using a highly parameterized approach with the level of complexity informed by the data. Despite the effort to adhere to the ideal of minimal a priori structure imposed on the problem, extreme contrasts in parameters can result in the need to censor correlation across hydrostratigraphic bounding surfaces. These partitions segregate parameters into faci??s associations. With an iterative approach in which partitions are based on inspection of initial estimates, flow path interpretation is progressively refined through the inclusion of more types of data. Head observations, stable oxygen isotopes (18O/16O) ratios), and tritium are all used to progressively refine flow path delineation on an isthmus between two lakes in the Trout Lake watershed, northern Wisconsin, United States. Despite allowing significant parameter freedom by estimating many distributed parameter values, a smooth field is obtained. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Hydraulic conductivity of the High Plains Aquifer re-evaluated using surface drainage patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Pederson, Darryll T.

    2012-01-01

    The High Plains Aquifer (HPA), underlying parts of 8 states from South Dakota to Texas, is one of the largest fresh water aquifers in the world and accounts for 30% of the groundwater used for irrigation in the US. Determining the distribution of HPA's hydraulic conductivity (K) is critical for water management and addressing water quality issues. K is traditionally estimated from well pumping data coupled with computer modeling and is known to be highly variable, spanning several orders of magnitude for the same type of rock. Here we show that applying our innovative method of determining effective horizontal K to HPA (based on surface drainage patterns and a dynamic equilibrium assumption) produced results generally consistent with those from traditional methods but reveals much more detailed spatial variation. With the exception of a few places such as the Sand Hills area, our results also show for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) a distinct relationship between surface stream drainage density and subsurface aquifer K in a major aquifer system on a regional scale. Because aquifer particle size strongly controls K, our results can be used to study patterns of past sediment movement and deposition.

  5. The chemical identity of intervessel pit membranes in Acer challenges hydrogel control of xylem hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Klepsch, Matthias M; Schmitt, Marco; Paul Knox, J; Jansen, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Ion-mediated enhancement of the hydraulic conductivity of xylem tissue (i.e. the ionic effect) has been reported for various angiosperm species. One explanation of the ionic effect is that it is caused by the swelling and shrinking of intervessel pit membranes due to the presence of pectins and/or other cell-wall matrix polymers such as heteroxylans or arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) that may contain acidic sugars. Here, we examined the ionic effect for six Acer species and their pit membrane chemistry using immunocytochemistry, including antibodies against glycoproteins. Moreover, anatomical features related to the bordered pit morphology and vessel dimensions were investigated using light and electron microscopy. The ionic effect varied from 18 % (± 9) to 32 % (± 13). Epitopes of homogalacturonan (LM18) and xylan (LM11) were not detected in intervessel pit membranes. Negative results were also obtained for glycoproteins (extensin: LM1, JIM20; AGP glycan: LM2), although AGP (JIM13)-related epitopes were detected in parenchyma cells. The mean vessel length was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the ionic effect, unlike other pit or vessel-related characteristics. Our results suggest that intervessel pit membranes of Acer are unlikely to contain pectic or other acidic polysaccharides. Therefore, alternative explanations should be tested to clarify the ionic effect. PMID:27354661

  6. The calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK7 acts on root hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Guowei; Boudsocq, Marie; Hem, Sonia; Vialaret, Jérôme; Rossignol, Michel; Maurel, Christophe; Santoni, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of plant roots (Lp(r)) is determined in large part by the activity of aquaporins. Mechanisms occurring at the post-translational level, in particular phosphorylation of aquaporins of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2 (PIP2) subfamily, are thought to be of critical importance for regulating root water transport. However, knowledge of protein kinases and phosphatases acting on aquaporin function is still scarce. In the present work, we investigated the Lp(r) of knockout Arabidopsis plants for four Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. cpk7 plants showed a 30% increase in Lp(r) because of a higher aquaporin activity. A quantitative proteomic analysis of wild-type and cpk7 plants revealed that PIP gene expression and PIP protein quantity were not correlated and that CPK7 has no effect on PIP2 phosphorylation. In contrast, CPK7 exerts a negative control on the cellular abundance of PIP1s, which likely accounts for the higher Lp(r) of cpk7. In addition, this study revealed that the cellular amount of a few additional proteins including membrane transporters is controlled by CPK7. The overall work provides evidence for CPK7-dependent stability of specific membrane proteins. PMID:25366820

  7. Measurement of the volume flow and hydraulic conductivity across the isolated dog retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, S

    1987-11-01

    The isolated dog retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid was gently stretched on the inner surface of a spherical stainless mesh, retinal side upward, and clamped between half-chambers made of Kel-F. The volume flow across the tissue was monitored by the movement of water in capillary tubes connected to both chambers. With zero pressure difference across the RPE-choroid, retina-to-choroid fluid flow was determined to be 6.4 microliters/hr/cm2 (absorption). Removal of HCO-3 from the solution did not affect the fluid flow. However, the flow was reduced 88% in Cl- -free medium, indicating a coupling between water and Cl- absorption. The flow was also inhibited by ouabain (10(-5) M) and furosemide (10(-4) M). Hydraulic conductivity (Lp) of the RPE-choroid was determined to be 0.0126 microliters/min/cm2/mm Hg which places the dog RPE-choroid in the category of a "leaky" epithelium.

  8. Effect of bacterial extracellular polymers on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sand columns.

    PubMed Central

    Vandevivere, P; Baveye, P

    1992-01-01

    Columns were packed with clean quartz sand, sterilized, and inoculated with different strains of bacteria, which multiplied within the sand at the expense of a continuous supply of fresh nutrient medium. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (HCsat) of the sand was monitored over time. Among the four bacterial strains tested, one formed a capsule, one produced slime layers, and two did not produce any detectable exopolymers. The last two strains were nonmucoid variants of the first two. Only one strain, the slime producer, had a large impact on the HCsat. The production of exopolymers had no effect on either cell multiplication within or movement through the sand columns. Therefore, the HCsat reduction observed with the slime producer was tentatively attributed to the obstruction of flow channels with slime. Compared with the results with Arthrobacter sp. strain AK19 used in a previous study, there was a 100-fold increase in detachment from the solid substratum and movement through the sand of the strains used in this study. All strains induced severe clogging when they colonized the inlet chamber of the columns. Under these conditions, the inlet end was covered by a confluent mat with an extremely low HCsat. Images PMID:1622240

  9. Effect of bacterial extracellular polymers on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sand columns

    SciTech Connect

    Vandevivere, P.; Baveye, P. )

    1992-05-01

    Columns were packed with clean quartz sand, sterilized, and inoculated with different strains of bacteria, which multiplied within the sand at the expense of a continuous supply of fresh nutrient medium. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (HC[sub sat]) of the sand was monitored over time. Among the four bacterial strains tested, one formed a capsule, one produced slime layers, and two did not produce any detectable exopolymers. The last two strains were nonmucoid variants of the first two. Only one strain, the slime producer, had a large impact on the HC[sub sat]. The production of exopolymers had no effect on either cell multiplication within or movement through the sand columns. Therefore, the HC[sub sat] reduction observed with the slime producer was tentatively attributed to the obstruction of flow channels with slime. Compared with the results with Arthrobacter sp. strain AK19 used in a previous study, there was a 100-fold increase in detachment from the solid substratum and movement through the sand of the strains used in this study. All strains induced severe clogging when they colonized the inlet chamber of the columns. Under these conditions, the inlet end was covered by a confluent mat with an extremely low HC[sub sat].

  10. Do electroviscous effects impact the hydraulic conductance of xylem? A theoretical inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Michael; Pagay, Vinay; Stroock, Abraham

    2013-03-01

    Experiments show that the hydraulic conductance of plant xylem (K) varies with the ionic-strength (I) and pH of the sap, a behavior usually attributed to the swelling of hydrogels that cover bordered pits--conduits that interconnect individual xylem vessels. These gels are believed to swell at low I or large pH, and thus decrease the flow cross-section and K. But experiments have shown behaviors that contradict this hypothesis, where a decrease in I serves to increase K. Here, we investigate whether these observations could be explained by electroviscous effects in the pores of bordered pits, since the literature suggests that pits are covered by materials that develop electric charge in aqueous solution, e.g. lignin and pectin. We use experimental measurements from the literature, combined with standard electrokinetic theory, to estimate the electroviscous effect of I and pH on K. We find that K varies non-monotonically with I and can drop to a minimum of 0.8 of its maximum value, and that our predictions fit the available experimental data for physiologically relevant conditions in I and pH. We conclude that electrokinetics could explain, at least partially, the observed changes in K, and propose experiments to test this hypothesis. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 1144153.

  11. Rapid measurement of field-saturated hydraulic conductivity for areal characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Schmidt, K.M.; Perkins, K.S.; Stock, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To provide an improved methodology for characterizing the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) over broad areas with extreme spatial variability and ordinary limitations of time and resources, we developed and tested a simplified apparatus and procedure, correcting mathematically for the major deficiencies of the simplified implementation. The methodology includes use of a portable, falling-head, small-diameter (???20 cm) single-ring infiltrometer and an analytical formula for Kfs that compensates both for nonconstant falling head and for the subsurface radial spreading that unavoidably occurs with small ring size. We applied this method to alluvial fan deposits varying in degree of pedogenic maturity in the arid Mojave National Preserve, California. The measurements are consistent with a more rigorous and time-consuming Kfs measurement method, produce the expected systematic trends in Kfs when compared among soils of contrasting degrees of pedogenic development, and relate in expected ways to results of widely accepted methods. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  12. The chemical identity of intervessel pit membranes in Acer challenges hydrogel control of xylem hydraulic conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Klepsch, Matthias M.; Schmitt, Marco; Paul Knox, J.; Jansen, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Ion-mediated enhancement of the hydraulic conductivity of xylem tissue (i.e. the ionic effect) has been reported for various angiosperm species. One explanation of the ionic effect is that it is caused by the swelling and shrinking of intervessel pit membranes due to the presence of pectins and/or other cell-wall matrix polymers such as heteroxylans or arabinogalactan–proteins (AGPs) that may contain acidic sugars. Here, we examined the ionic effect for six Acer species and their pit membrane chemistry using immunocytochemistry, including antibodies against glycoproteins. Moreover, anatomical features related to the bordered pit morphology and vessel dimensions were investigated using light and electron microscopy. The ionic effect varied from 18 % (± 9) to 32 % (± 13). Epitopes of homogalacturonan (LM18) and xylan (LM11) were not detected in intervessel pit membranes. Negative results were also obtained for glycoproteins (extensin: LM1, JIM20; AGP glycan: LM2), although AGP (JIM13)-related epitopes were detected in parenchyma cells. The mean vessel length was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the ionic effect, unlike other pit or vessel-related characteristics. Our results suggest that intervessel pit membranes of Acer are unlikely to contain pectic or other acidic polysaccharides. Therefore, alternative explanations should be tested to clarify the ionic effect. PMID:27354661

  13. Root zone salinity and sodicity under seasonal rainfall due to feedback of decreasing hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Shah, S. H. H.; Vervoort, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    Soil sodicity, where the soil cation exchange complex is occupied for a significant fraction by Na+, may lead to vulnerability to soil structure deterioration. With a root zone flow and salt transport model, we modeled the feedback effects of salt concentration (C) and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) on saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks(C, ESP) for different groundwater depths and climates, using the functional approach of McNeal (1968). We assume that a decrease of Ks is practically irreversible at a time scale of decades. Representing climate with a Poisson rainfall process, the feedback hardly affects salt and sodium accumulation compared with the case that feedback is ignored. However, if salinity decreases, the much more buffered ESP stays at elevated values, while Ks decreases. This situation may develop if rainfall has a seasonal pattern where drought periods with accumulation of salts in the root zone alternate with wet rainfall periods in which salts are leached. Feedback that affects both drainage/leaching and capillary upward flow from groundwater, or only drainage, leads to opposing effects. If both fluxes are affected by sodicity-induced degradation, this leads to reduced salinity (C) and sodicity (ESP), which suggests that the system dynamics and feedback oppose further degradation. Experiences in the field point in the same direction.

  14. Estimation of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity by artificial neural networks ensemble in smectitic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, A.; Bayat, H.; Safari Sinegani, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity ( K s ) of the soil is one of the main soil physical properties. Indirect estimation of this parameter using pedo-transfer functions (PTFs) has received considerable attention. The Purpose of this study was to improve the estimation of K s using fractal parameters of particle and micro-aggregate size distributions in smectitic soils. In this study 260 disturbed and undisturbed soil samples were collected from Guilan province, the north of Iran. The fractal model of Bird and Perrier was used to compute the fractal parameters of particle and micro-aggregate size distributions. The PTFs were developed by artificial neural networks (ANNs) ensemble to estimate K s by using available soil data and fractal parameters. There were found significant correlations between K s and fractal parameters of particles and microaggregates. Estimation of K s was improved significantly by using fractal parameters of soil micro-aggregates as predictors. But using geometric mean and geometric standard deviation of particles diameter did not improve K s estimations significantly. Using fractal parameters of particles and micro-aggregates simultaneously, had the most effect in the estimation of K s . Generally, fractal parameters can be successfully used as input parameters to improve the estimation of K s in the PTFs in smectitic soils. As a result, ANNs ensemble successfully correlated the fractal parameters of particles and micro-aggregates to K s .

  15. Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations: A Bayesian geostatistical parameter estimation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienen, M.; Hunt, R.; Krabbenhoft, D.; Clemo, T.

    2009-08-01

    Flow path delineation is a valuable tool for interpreting the subsurface hydrogeochemical environment. Different types of data, such as groundwater flow and transport, inform different aspects of hydrogeologic parameter values (hydraulic conductivity in this case) which, in turn, determine flow paths. This work combines flow and transport information to estimate a unified set of hydrogeologic parameters using the Bayesian geostatistical inverse approach. Parameter flexibility is allowed by using a highly parameterized approach with the level of complexity informed by the data. Despite the effort to adhere to the ideal of minimal a priori structure imposed on the problem, extreme contrasts in parameters can result in the need to censor correlation across hydrostratigraphic bounding surfaces. These partitions segregate parameters into facies associations. With an iterative approach in which partitions are based on inspection of initial estimates, flow path interpretation is progressively refined through the inclusion of more types of data. Head observations, stable oxygen isotopes (18O/16O ratios), and tritium are all used to progressively refine flow path delineation on an isthmus between two lakes in the Trout Lake watershed, northern Wisconsin, United States. Despite allowing significant parameter freedom by estimating many distributed parameter values, a smooth field is obtained.

  16. High Plains Aquifer as Megafans? - Perspective from Spatial Distribution of Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Pederson, D. T.

    2011-12-01

    High Plains Aquifer (HPA) is one on the largest fresh water aquifers in the world and accounts for 30% of the groundwater used for irrigation in the United States. It consists mainly of hydraulically connected geologic units of late Tertiary to Quaternary age, produced from weathering, erosion, and fluvial transportation and deposition processes associated with the post-Paleozoic uplift of the Rocky Mountains, and represents a mountain front megafan deposition environment. We use an innovative method to map the hydraulic conductivity (K) of the aquifer based on surface drainage patterns and a dynamic equilibrium assumption. Under dynamic equilibrium conditions developed over long time scales, the groundwater discharge and seepage induced weathering processes prepare and precondition the rocks for preferential erosion in areas weakened by weathering. The erosion further concentrates groundwater flow at the points of incision due to higher and directional groundwater gradients, guiding further valley development. The resulting drainage system thus reflects the underlying groundwater flow patterns. This linkage between valley development and the groundwater flow system develops a unique overall drainage dissection pattern over geologic time that is controlled by the interplay between surface water, topography, and subsurface aquifer properties. We can thus estimate K based on drainage dissection pattern derived from DEM data. Our K result is generally consistent with previous USGS data but shows much greater detail of its spatial distribution. As K is a function of grain size, its spatial distribution can also indirectly reflect the sediment size distribution. The spatial distribution of K reveals the following: (1) In general, the higher values of K were located closer to the Rocky Mountains, consistent with the large sediment grain sizes that would be expected in a mountain front environment. (2) The high K value near the Platte and Arkansas rivers are also

  17. Reflection seismic imaging of a hydraulically conductive fracture zone in a high noise area, Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, C.; Stephens, M. B.; Cosma, C.

    2007-05-01

    borehole shows that the reflection corresponds to a hydraulically conductive fracture zone that was intersected at about 320 m depth.

  18. Comparison of instream methods for measuring hydraulic conductivity in sandy streambeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, M.K.; Rus, D.L.; Edwin, Harvey F.

    2001-01-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity (K) values were determined at seven stream transects in the Platte River Basin in Nebraska using different instream measurement techniques. Values were compared to determine the most appropriate technique(s) for use in sandy streambeds. Values of K determined from field falling- and constant-head permeameter tests analyzed using the Darcy equation decreased as permeameter diameter increased. Seepage meters coupled with hydraulic gradient measurements failed to yield K values in 40% of the trials. Consequently, Darcy permeameter and seepage meter tests were not preferred approaches. In the upper 0.25 m of the streambed, field falling- and constant-head permeameter tests analyzed with the Hvorslev solution generally had similar K values that were significantly greater than those determined using the Hazen grain-size, Bouwer and Rice slug test for anisotropic and isotropic conditions, and Alyamani and Sen grain-size methods; median differences between these tests and the Hvorslev falling-head 60 cm diameter permeameter were about 8, 9, 17, and 35 m/day, respectively. The Hvorslev falling-head permeameter test is considered the most robust method for measuring K of the upper 0.25 m of the streambed because of the inherent limitations of the empirical grain-size methods and less sediment disturbance for permeameter than slug tests. However, lateral variability in K along transects on the Platte, North Platte, and Wood Rivers was greater than variability in K between valid permeameter, grain-size, or slug tests, indicating that the method used may matter less than making enough measurements to characterize spatial variability adequately. At the Platte River tributary sites, the upper 0.3 m of the streambed typically had greater K than sediment located 0.3 to 2.5 m below the streambed surface, indicating that deposits below the streambed may limit ground water/surface water fluxes. The Hvorslev permeameter tests are not a practical

  19. Scale dependent parameterization of soil hydraulic conductivity in 3D simulation of hydrological processes in a forested headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhufeng; Bogena, Heye; Kollet, Stefan; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-05-01

    In distributed hydrological modelling one often faces the problem that input data need to be aggregated to match the model resolution. However, aggregated data may be too coarse for the parametrization of the processes represented. This dilemma can be circumvented by the adjustment of certain model parameters. For instance, the reduction of local hydraulic gradients due to spatial aggregation can be partially compensated by increasing soil hydraulic conductivity. In this study, we employed the information entropy concept for the scale dependent parameterization of soil hydraulic conductivity. The loss of information content of terrain curvature as consequence of spatial aggregation was used to determine an amplification factor for soil hydraulic conductivity to compensate the resulting retardation of water flow. To test the usefulness of this approach, continuous 3D hydrological simulations were conducted with different spatial resolutions in the highly instrumented Wüstebach catchment, Germany. Our results indicated that the introduction of an amplification factor can effectively improve model performances both in terms of soil moisture and runoff simulation. However, comparing simulated soil moisture pattern with observation indicated that uniform application of an amplification factor can lead to local overcorrection of soil hydraulic conductivity. This problem could be circumvented by applying the amplification factor only to model grid cells that suffer from high information loss. To this end, we tested two schemes to define appropriate location-specific correction factors. Both schemes led to improved model performance both in terms of soil water content and runoff simulation. Thus, we anticipate that our proposed scaling approach is useful for the application of next-generation hyper-resolution global land surface models.

  20. Co-ordination of hydraulic and stomatal conductances across light qualities in cucumber leaves.

    PubMed

    Savvides, Andreas; Fanourakis, Dimitrios; van Ieperen, Wim

    2012-02-01

    Long-term effects of light quality on leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) were studied in cucumber, and their joint impact on leaf photosynthesis in response to osmotic-induced water stress was assessed. Plants were grown under low intensity monochromatic red (R, 640 nm), blue (B, 420 nm) or combined red and blue (R:B, 70:30) light. K(leaf) and g(s) were much lower in leaves that developed without blue light. Differences in g(s) were caused by differences in stomatal aperture and stomatal density, of which the latter was largely due to differences in epidermal cell size and hardly due to stomatal development. Net photosynthesis (A(N)) was lowest in R-, intermediate in B-, and highest in RB- grown leaves. The low A(N) in R-grown leaves correlated with a low leaf internal CO(2) concentration and reduced PSII operating efficiency. In response to osmotic stress, all leaves showed similar degrees of stomatal closure, but the reduction in A(N) was larger in R- than in B- and RB-grown leaves. This was probably due to damage of the photosynthetic apparatus, which only occurred in R-grown leaves. The present study shows the co-ordination of K(leaf) and g(s) across different light qualities, while the presence of blue in the light spectrum seems to drive both K(leaf) and g(s) towards high, sun-type leaf values, as was previously reported for maximal photosynthetic capacity and leaf morphology. The present results suggest the involvement of blue light receptors in the usually harmonized development of leaf characteristics related to water relations and photosynthesis under different light environments.

  1. Fractal analysis of the hydraulic conductivity on a sandy porous media reproduced in a laboratory facility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bartolo, S.; Fallico, C.; Straface, S.; Troisi, S.; Veltri, M.

    2009-04-01

    The complexity characterization of the porous media structure, in terms of the "pore" phase and the "solid" phase, can be carried out by means of the fractal geometry which is able to put in relationship the soil structural properties and the water content. It is particularly complicated to describe analytically the hydraulic conductivity for the irregularity of the porous media structure. However these can be described by many fractal models considering the soil structure as the distribution of particles dimensions, the distribution of the solid aggregates, the surface of the pore-solid interface and the fractal mass of the "pore" and "solid" phases. In this paper the fractal model of Yu and Cheng (2002) and Yu and Liu (2004), for a saturated bidispersed porous media, was considered. This model, using the Sierpinsky-type gasket scheme, doesn't contain empiric constants and furnishes a well accord with the experimental data. For this study an unconfined aquifer was reproduced by means of a tank with a volume of 10 Ã- 7 Ã- 3 m3, filled with a homogeneous sand (95% of SiO2), with a high percentage (86.4%) of grains between 0.063mm and 0.125mm and a medium-high permeability. From the hydraulic point of view, 17 boreholes, a pumping well and a drainage ring around its edge were placed. The permeability was measured utilizing three different methods, consisting respectively in pumping test, slug test and laboratory analysis of an undisturbed soil cores, each of that involving in the measurement a different support volume. The temporal series of the drawdown obtained by the pumping test were analyzed by the Neuman-type Curve method (1972), because the saturated part above the bottom of the facility represents an unconfined aquifer. The data analysis of the slug test were performed by the Bouwer & Rice (1976) method and the laboratory analysis were performed on undisturbed saturated soil samples utilizing a falling head permeameter. The obtained values either of the

  2. Isometric partitioning of hydraulic conductance between leaves and stems: balancing safety and efficiency in different growth forms and habitats.

    PubMed

    Drake, Paul L; Price, Charles A; Poot, Pieter; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2015-08-01

    Recent advances in modelling the architecture and function of the plant hydraulic network have led to improvements in predicting and interpreting the consequences of functional trait variation on CO2 uptake and water loss. We build upon one such model to make novel predictions for scaling of the total specific hydraulic conductance of leaves and shoots (kL and kSH , respectively) and variation in the partitioning of hydraulic conductance. Consistent with theory, we observed isometric (slope = 1) scaling between kL and kSH across several independently collected datasets and a lower ratio of kL and kSH , termed the leaf-to-shoot conductance ratio (CLSCR ), in arid environments and in woody species. Isometric scaling of kL and kSH supports the concept that hydraulic design is coordinated across the plant. We propose that CLSCR is an important adaptive trait that represents the trade-off between efficiency and safety at the scale of the whole plant.

  3. Geologic Controls of Hydraulic Conductivity in the Snake River Plain Aquifer At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    S. R. Anderson; M. A. Kuntz; L. C. Davis

    1999-02-01

    The effective hydraulic conductivity of basalt and interbedded sediment that compose the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) ranges from about 1.0x10 -2 to 3.2x10 4 feet per day (ft/d). This six-order-of-magnitude range of hydraulic conductivity was estimated from single-well aquifer tests in 114 wells, and is attributed mainly to the physical characteristics and distribution of basalt flows and dikes. Hydraulic conductivity is greatest in thin pahoehoe flows and near-vent volcanic deposits. Hydraulic conductivity is least in flows and deposits cut by dikes. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity at and near the INEEL are similar to those measured in similar volcanic settings in Hawaii. The largest variety of rock types and the greatest range of hydraulic conductivity are in volcanic rift zones, which are characterized by numerous aligned volcanic vents and fissures related to underlying dikes. Three broad categories of hydraulic conductivity corresponding to six general types of geologic controls can be inferred from the distribution of wells and vent corridors. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows probably is increased by localized fissures and coarse mixtures of interbedded sediment, scoria, and basalt rubble. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows is decreased locally by abundant alteration minerals of probable hydrothermal origin. Hydraulic conductivity varies as much as six orders of magnitude in a single vent corridor and varies from three to five orders of magnitude within distances of 500 to 1,000 feet. Abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivity over short distances suggest the presence of preferential pathways and local barriers that may greatly affect the movement of ground water and the dispersion of radioactive and chemical wastes downgradient from points of waste disposal.

  4. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated surficial deposits along the southern extent of the Illinoian glaciation, southern Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.A.; Padgett, R.J.; Esling, S.P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    In southern Illinois, glacially-derived surficial deposits control recharge and the migration of contaminants to regional groundwater resources. This study measured the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of the diamicton and the overlying loess with a Guelph permeameter specially modified to take measurements to a depth of 5 m. Six field sites were chosen, along a transect trending about 50 kilometers southeast of the Mississippi Valley. Along this transect, the loess units thin dramatically, from 8 to 1 m and from 6 to 0.2 m for the Peoria and Roxana Silts, respectively, and the relative influence of the Ohio/Wabash Valleys source area increases. Twenty boreholes were drilled at each site at a spacing of 1.5 m forming a random grid pattern. Initial conductivity tests were conducted near the base of the loess in the B/C, or where possible C, horizon of the modern soil. Boreholes were then deepened and tests were conducted within the oxidized diamicton. The statistical relation between field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, particle size distribution, clay mineralogy, fracture distribution, and weathering zone was investigated. The main factors influencing spatial variability in field-saturated hydraulic conductivity are: (1) particle size distribution, (2) clay mineralogy, and (3) differences in soil development. Source area (Mississippi vs. Ohio/Wabash Valley systems) and distance from the source area control these physical factors.

  5. The contribution of vascular and extra-vascular water pathways to drought-induced decline of leaf hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Trifiló, Patrizia; Raimondo, Fabio; Savi, Tadeja; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Nardini, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Drought stress can impair leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf), but the relative contribution of changes in the efficiency of the vein xylem water pathway and in the mesophyll route outside the xylem in driving the decline of Kleaf is still debated. We report direct measurements of dehydration-induced changes in the hydraulic resistance (R=1/K) of whole leaf (Rleaf), as well as of the leaf xylem (Rx) and extra-vascular pathways (Rox) in four Angiosperm species. Rleaf, Rx, and Rox were measured using the vacuum chamber method (VCM). Rleaf values during progressive leaf dehydration were also validated with measurements performed using the rehydration kinetic method (RKM). We analysed correlations between changes in Rx or Rox and Rleaf, as well as between morpho-anatomical traits (including dehydration-induced leaf shrinkage), vulnerability to embolism, and leaf water relation parameters. Measurements revealed that the relative contribution of vascular and extra-vascular hydraulic properties in driving Kleaf decline during dehydration is species-specific. Whilst in two study species the progressive impairment of both vascular and extra-vascular pathways contributed to leaf hydraulic vulnerability, in the other two species the vascular pathway remained substantially unaltered during leaf dehydration, and Kleaf decline was apparently caused only by changes in the hydraulic properties of the extra-vascular compartment. PMID:27388214

  6. The contribution of vascular and extra-vascular water pathways to drought-induced decline of leaf hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Trifiló, Patrizia; Raimondo, Fabio; Savi, Tadeja; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Nardini, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Drought stress can impair leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf), but the relative contribution of changes in the efficiency of the vein xylem water pathway and in the mesophyll route outside the xylem in driving the decline of Kleaf is still debated. We report direct measurements of dehydration-induced changes in the hydraulic resistance (R=1/K) of whole leaf (Rleaf), as well as of the leaf xylem (Rx) and extra-vascular pathways (Rox) in four Angiosperm species. Rleaf, Rx, and Rox were measured using the vacuum chamber method (VCM). Rleaf values during progressive leaf dehydration were also validated with measurements performed using the rehydration kinetic method (RKM). We analysed correlations between changes in Rx or Rox and Rleaf, as well as between morpho-anatomical traits (including dehydration-induced leaf shrinkage), vulnerability to embolism, and leaf water relation parameters. Measurements revealed that the relative contribution of vascular and extra-vascular hydraulic properties in driving Kleaf decline during dehydration is species-specific. Whilst in two study species the progressive impairment of both vascular and extra-vascular pathways contributed to leaf hydraulic vulnerability, in the other two species the vascular pathway remained substantially unaltered during leaf dehydration, and Kleaf decline was apparently caused only by changes in the hydraulic properties of the extra-vascular compartment.

  7. The tidal slug test: estimating intertidal sediment hydraulic conductivity twice-per-tide from passive monitoring of shallow piezometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, K. B.; Gorelick, S.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment hydraulic properties is necessary to understand groundwater dynamics. In coastal settings, however, the corrosive and frequently flooded intertidal environment has historically hindered extensive hydraulic characterization. We present a method to easily and inexpensively quantify the hydraulic conductivity of fine intertidal sediments based on analysis of shallow piezometer response to tidal flooding. Specifically, we make use of the lag between surface water and groundwater tidal responses: during the flood (or ebb) tide, the surface water floods (or exposes) the intertidal sediment surface nearly instantaneously compared to the slower groundwater response. We analyze these tidal impulses as slug tests by extending the classic Bouwer and Rice [1976] slug test method to apply to the intertidal data. We test the 'tidal slug test' method using two sets of water level data from intertidal salt marshes in southern San Francisco Estuary: (i) two weeks of data from more than three-dozen piezometers in which manual slug tests were also conducted and (ii) three years of data from more than four-dozen piezometers at a site also characterized by inverse modeling and laboratory hydraulic tests. The method yields numerous comparable estimates of hydraulic conductivity, temporally-distributed twice per flooding tide (e.g., 14-28 times per spring tidal phase). We find good agreement among the conductivity values from the passive 'tidal slug tests' and the other methods. The simplicity and repeatability of the 'tidal slug test' method recommend it as a useful tool to aid in characterizing intertidal sediment heterogeneity and near-surface flow dynamics.

  8. Wall extensibility and cell hydraulic conductivity decrease in enlarging stem tissues at low water potentials. [Glycine max L. Merr

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Boyer, J.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Measurements with a guillotine psychrometer indicate that the inhibition of stem growth at low water potentials (low {psi}{sub w}) is accompanied by decreases in cell wall extensibility and tissue hydraulic conductance to water that eventually limit growth rate in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.). To check this conclusion, we measured cell wall properties and cell hydraulic conductivities with independent techniques in soybean seedlings grown and treated the same way, i.e. grown in the dark and exposed to low {psi}{sub w} by transplanting dark grown seedlings to vermiculite of low water content. Results suggest that the plastic properties of the cell walls and the conductance of the cells to water were decreased at low {psi}{sub w} but that the elastic properties of the walls were of little consequence in this response.

  9. Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity with Decreasing pH in a Biologically-Clogged Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M. F.; Santillan, E.; McGrath, L. K.; Altman, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Biological clogging can significantly lower the hydraulic conductivity of porous media, potentially helping to limit CO2 transport from geological carbon storage reservoirs. How clogging is affected by CO2 injection, however, is unclear. We used column experiments to examine how decreasing pH, a geochemical change associated with CO2 injection, will affect the hydraulic conductivity (K) of biologically clogged porous medium. Four biologically-active experiments and two control experiments were performed. Columns consisted of 1 mm2 capillary tubes filled with 105-150 μm diameter glass beads. Artificial groundwater medium containing 1 mM glucose was pumped through the columns at a rate of 0.015 mL/min (q = 21.6 m/day; Re = 0.045). Each column was inoculated with 10^8 CFU of Pseudomonas fluorescens tagged with a green fluorescent protein; cells introduced to control columns were heat sterilized. Biomass distribution and transport was monitored using scanning laser confocal microscopy and effluent plating. Growth was allowed to occur for 5 days in medium with pH 7 in the biologically active columns. During that time, K decreased to values ranging from 10 to 27% of the average control K and effluent cell levels increased to about 10^8 CFU/mL. Next, the pH of the inflowing medium was lowered to 4 in three experiments and 5.5 in one experiment. After pH 4 medium was introduced, K increased to values ranging from 21 to 64% of the average control K and culturable cell levels in the effluent fell by about 4 log units. Confocal images show that clogging persisted in the columns at pH 4 because most of the microbial biomass remained attached to bead surfaces. In the experiment where pH was lowered to 5.5, K changed little because biological clogging remained entirely intact. The concentration of culturable cells in the effluent was also invariant. These results suggest that biomass in porous medium will largely remain in place following exposure to acidic water in a CO2

  10. A tale of two plasticities: leaf hydraulic conductances and related traits diverge for two tropical epiphytes from contrasting light environments.

    PubMed

    North, Gretchen B; Browne, Marvin G; Fukui, Kyle; Maharaj, Franklin D R; Phillips, Carly A; Woodside, Walter T

    2016-07-01

    We compared the effects of different light environments on leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf ) for two congeneric epiphytes, the tank bromeliads Guzmania lingulata (L.) Mez and Guzmania monostachia (L.) Rusby ex Mez. They occur sympatrically at the study site, although G. monostachia is both wider ranging and typically found in higher light. We collected plants from two levels of irradiance and measured Kleaf as well as related morphological and anatomical traits. Leaf xylem conductance (Kxy ) was estimated from tracheid dimensions, and leaf conductance outside the xylem (Kox ) was derived from a leaky cable model. For G. monostachia, but not for G. lingulata, Kleaf and Kxy were significantly higher in high light conditions. Under both light conditions, Kxy and Kox were co-limiting for the two species, and all conductances were in the low range for angiosperms. With respect to hydraulic conductances and a number of related anatomical traits, G. monostachia exhibited greater plasticity than did G. lingulata, which responded to high light chiefly by reducing leaf size. The positive plasticity of leaf hydraulic traits in varying light environments in G. monostachia contrasted with negative plasticity in leaf size for G. lingulata, suggesting that G. monostachia may be better able to respond to forest conditions that are likely to be warmer and more disturbed in the future.

  11. A tale of two plasticities: leaf hydraulic conductances and related traits diverge for two tropical epiphytes from contrasting light environments.

    PubMed

    North, Gretchen B; Browne, Marvin G; Fukui, Kyle; Maharaj, Franklin D R; Phillips, Carly A; Woodside, Walter T

    2016-07-01

    We compared the effects of different light environments on leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf ) for two congeneric epiphytes, the tank bromeliads Guzmania lingulata (L.) Mez and Guzmania monostachia (L.) Rusby ex Mez. They occur sympatrically at the study site, although G. monostachia is both wider ranging and typically found in higher light. We collected plants from two levels of irradiance and measured Kleaf as well as related morphological and anatomical traits. Leaf xylem conductance (Kxy ) was estimated from tracheid dimensions, and leaf conductance outside the xylem (Kox ) was derived from a leaky cable model. For G. monostachia, but not for G. lingulata, Kleaf and Kxy were significantly higher in high light conditions. Under both light conditions, Kxy and Kox were co-limiting for the two species, and all conductances were in the low range for angiosperms. With respect to hydraulic conductances and a number of related anatomical traits, G. monostachia exhibited greater plasticity than did G. lingulata, which responded to high light chiefly by reducing leaf size. The positive plasticity of leaf hydraulic traits in varying light environments in G. monostachia contrasted with negative plasticity in leaf size for G. lingulata, suggesting that G. monostachia may be better able to respond to forest conditions that are likely to be warmer and more disturbed in the future. PMID:26679206

  12. Effect of urban waste compost application on soil near-saturated hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S; Coquet, Y; Vachier, P; Labat, C; Roger-Estrade, J; Benoit, P; Pot, V; Houot, S

    2009-01-01

    Compost application tends to increase soil fertility and is likely to modify soil hydrodynamic properties by acting on soil structural porosity. Two composts, a municipal solid waste compost (MSW) and a co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (SGW), have been applied every other year for 6 yr to cultivated plots located on a silt loam soil in the Parisian Basin, France. Four soil zones were defined in the topsoil after plowing: the plowpan located at the base of the plowed layer, compacted (Delta) or noncompacted (Gamma) zones located within the plowed layer, and interfurrows created by plowing and containing a large quantity of crop residues together with the recently-applied compost. To assess the effect of compost application on the near-saturated soil hydraulic conductivity, infiltration rates were measured using a tension disc infiltrometer at three water pressure potentials -0.6, -0.2, and -0.05 kPa in the various zones of the soil profile. Compost addition decreased K((sat)) in the interfurrows after plowing by almost one order of magnitude with average values of 5.6 x 10(-5) m.s(-1) in the MSW plot and 4.1 x 10(-5) m.s(-1) in the SGW plot, against 2.2 x 10(-4) m.s(-1) in the control plot. This effect had disappeared 6 mo after plowing when the average K((sat)) in the control plot had decreased to 1.9 x 10(-5) m.s(-1) while that in the compost-amended plots remained stable.

  13. Simulating soil-water movement through loess-veneered landscapes using nonconsilient saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Lee, Brad D.; Schoeneberger, Philip J.; McCauley, W. M.; Indorante, Samuel J.; Owens, Phillip R.

    2014-01-01

    Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) data are available for the entire United States, so are incorporated in many regional and national models of hydrology and environmental management. However, SSURGO does not provide an understanding of spatial variability and only includes saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) values estimated from particle size analysis (PSA). This study showed model sensitivity to the substitution of SSURGO data with locally described soil properties or alternate methods of measuring Ksat. Incorporation of these different soil data sets significantly changed the results of hydrologic modeling as a consequence of the amount of space available to store soil water and how this soil water is moved downslope. Locally described soil profiles indicated a difference in Ksat when measured in the field vs. being estimated from PSA. This, in turn, caused a difference in which soil layers were incorporated in the hydrologic simulations using TOPMODEL, ultimately affecting how soil water storage was simulated. Simulations of free-flowing soil water, the amount of water traveling through pores too large to retain water against gravity, were compared with field observations of water in wells at five slope positions along a catena. Comparison of the simulated data with the observed data showed that the ability to model the range of conditions observed in the field varied as a function of three soil data sets (SSURGO and local field descriptions using PSA-derived Ksat or field-measured Ksat) and that comparison of absolute values of soil water storage are not valid if different characterizations of soil properties are used.

  14. Pedotransfer functions for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity: implications for modeling storm flow generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobieraj, J. A.; Elsenbeer, H.; Vertessy, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    We evaluated the performance of nine published pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity ( Ks) in modeling the stormflow generated in a rainforest catchment. Using available input data consisting of particle size distribution, bulk density, and saturated moisture content information, these empirically-based PTFs were found to be inadequate in estimating Ks for this catchment. At shallow depths (0-0.1 m), PTFs commonly underestimated Ks by variable amounts with the exception of the Jabro PTF, which either overestimated Ks or was not significantly different from measured values. At subsequent depths (0.1-0.4 m), PTFs typically overestimated Ks by variable amounts, the exception being the Campbell and Shiozawa PTF, which typically underestimated Ks. We used TOPOG_SBM to model storm flow generation by replacing measured Ks values from the 0 to 0.1 m depth interval with PTF-estimated Ks values. The simulation set using Rosetta SSC (PTF with input of % sand, silt, clay) Ks values overestimated runoff for all events, and overland flow occurred across the entire catchment for all events. Simulations using Rosetta SSC-BD (PTF with input of % sand, silt, clay, and bulk density) Ks values predicted hydrograph attributes as well as the simulations using measured Ks values, but the Rosetta SSC-BD simulation set predicted a much larger spatial frequency of overland flow across the catchment than the measured Ks simulation set. Model simulations using the Jabro PTF, which generated large estimates of Ks, produced hydrographs that overestimated total runoff and time of rise but underestimated peak runoff. This model predicted much less overland flow than other models. Currently published PTFs used in this study are inadequate in estimating Ks for the La Cuenca catchment, which in turn make them inadequate for modeling storm flow generation. Enhanced model performance could likely be achieved by utilizing PTFs that better account for the

  15. Power function decay of hydraulic conductivity for a TOPMODEL-based infiltration routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Endreny, Theodore A.; Hassett, James M.

    2006-11-01

    TOPMODEL rainfall-runoff hydrologic concepts are based on soil saturation processes, where soil controls on hydrograph recession have been represented by linear, exponential, and power function decay with soil depth. Although these decay formulations have been incorporated into baseflow decay and topographic index computations, only the linear and exponential forms have been incorporated into infiltration subroutines. This study develops a power function formulation of the Green and Ampt infiltration equation for the case where the power n = 1 and 2. This new function was created to represent field measurements in the New York City, USA, Ward Pound Ridge drinking water supply area, and provide support for similar sites reported by other researchers. Derivation of the power-function-based Green and Ampt model begins with the Green and Ampt formulation used by Beven in deriving an exponential decay model. Differences between the linear, exponential, and power function infiltration scenarios are sensitive to the relative difference between rainfall rates and hydraulic conductivity. Using a low-frequency 30 min design storm with 4.8 cm h-1 rain, the n = 2 power function formulation allows for a faster decay of infiltration and more rapid generation of runoff. Infiltration excess runoff is rare in most forested watersheds, and advantages of the power function infiltration routine may primarily include replication of field-observed processes in urbanized areas and numerical consistency with power function decay of baseflow and topographic index distributions. Equation development is presented within a TOPMODEL-based Ward Pound Ridge rainfall-runoff simulation. Copyright

  16. Effect of urban waste compost application on soil near-saturated hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S; Coquet, Y; Vachier, P; Labat, C; Roger-Estrade, J; Benoit, P; Pot, V; Houot, S

    2009-01-01

    Compost application tends to increase soil fertility and is likely to modify soil hydrodynamic properties by acting on soil structural porosity. Two composts, a municipal solid waste compost (MSW) and a co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (SGW), have been applied every other year for 6 yr to cultivated plots located on a silt loam soil in the Parisian Basin, France. Four soil zones were defined in the topsoil after plowing: the plowpan located at the base of the plowed layer, compacted (Delta) or noncompacted (Gamma) zones located within the plowed layer, and interfurrows created by plowing and containing a large quantity of crop residues together with the recently-applied compost. To assess the effect of compost application on the near-saturated soil hydraulic conductivity, infiltration rates were measured using a tension disc infiltrometer at three water pressure potentials -0.6, -0.2, and -0.05 kPa in the various zones of the soil profile. Compost addition decreased K((sat)) in the interfurrows after plowing by almost one order of magnitude with average values of 5.6 x 10(-5) m.s(-1) in the MSW plot and 4.1 x 10(-5) m.s(-1) in the SGW plot, against 2.2 x 10(-4) m.s(-1) in the control plot. This effect had disappeared 6 mo after plowing when the average K((sat)) in the control plot had decreased to 1.9 x 10(-5) m.s(-1) while that in the compost-amended plots remained stable. PMID:19244499

  17. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of soils in the Horqin Sand Land of Inner Mongolia, northern China.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuxia; Zhang, Tonghui; Zhao, Chuancheng; Liu, Xinping

    2013-07-01

    Water is a limiting factor to plant growth in Horqin Sand Land of China. Knowledge of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(sat)) is of importance because K(sat) influences soil evaporation and water cycling at various scales. In order to analyze the variation of K(sat) along with sand types and soil depths, and its relationship with soil physiochemical properties, six typical lands were chosen, including mobile dune, fixed dune, pine woodland, poplar woodland, grassland, and cropland, and K(sat) was measured in situ by Guelph Permeameter at each type of land. Soil bulk density, organic matter content, and soil particle size distribution were determined in parallel with K(sat) measurement. The results showed that (1) The averaged K(sat) was decreased in the order: mobile dune > fixed dune > pine woodland > poplar woodland > grassland > cropland; changes in K(sat) varied considerably as soil depth increased, e.g., the changes of K(sat) along with soil depth in fixed dune was fitted by exponential model, but it was fitted by parabola model in the pine woodland and grassland. (2) The K(sat) values of fixed dune and mobile dune were varied considerably among three slope positions (dune top, windward slope, and leeward slope). (3) The relationships of K(sat) and soil physiochemical property revealed that soil bulk density, organic matter content, and coarse sand fraction (2∼0.1 mm) were the key factors affecting K(sat) in Horqin Sand Land. Compared with clay and silt content proportion, sand fraction in this region showed a more significant positive correlation with K(sat). PMID:23179727

  18. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the Bandelier Tuff at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.; Mockler, T.J.

    1995-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivities, K, were experimentally determined as a function of volumetric water content, {theta}, in Bandelier Tuff cores from Los Alamos, New Mexico. These data were used to determine the feasibility of applying a new unsaturated flow technology (UFA{trademark}) to further hydrologic studies of tuffaceous rocks at Los Alamos. The K({theta}) relationships for eight cores of Bandelier Tuff from boreholes AAA and AAB were measured using the UFA and, together with their in situ water contents, were used to determine transient water flux into these samples at the time of sampling. If the system is at steady-state, then these flux values correspond to the recharge through those points, a situation often encountered in semi-arid to arid regions such as Los Alamos and other sites in the western United States. Samples AAA 9956, AAB 0011, AAB 0012 and AAB 0040 exhibited fluxes of 6 x 10{sup -8} cm/s, 4.8 x 10{sup -7} cm/s, 2.8 x 10{sup -7} cm/s and 2.4 x 10{sup -8} cm/s, respectively, indicating significant flux. Samples AAB 0063, AAB 0065, AAB 0072 and AAB 0081 had very low water contents suggesting fluxes less than 10{sup -10} cm/s, and appear to be close to their residual water contents. Assuming that the samples AAB 0063, AAB 0065, AAB 0072 and AAB 0081 were not accidentally dried out during handling, these results imply that these samples have zero recharge and that redistribution of moisture at these horizons is controlled more by vapor diffusion than by advection. The vapor diffusivities in these cores can be determined using the new UFA gas permeameter. Samples AAA 9956, AAB 0011, AAB 0012 and AAB 0040 appear to be controlled by advection.

  19. Streambed Hydraulic Conductivity Structures: Enhanced Hyporheic Exchange and Contaminant Removal in Model and Constructed Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, S.; Higgins, C. P.; McCray, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Urban- and agriculturally-impacted streams face widespread water quality challenges from excess nutrients, metals, and pathogens from nonpoint sources, which the hyporheic zone (HZ) can capture and treat. However, flow through the HZ is typically small relative to stream flow and thus water quality contributions from the HZ are practically insignificant. Hyporheic exchange is a prominent topic in stream biogeochemistry, but growing understanding of HZ processes has not been translated into practical applications. In particular, existing HZ restoration structures (i.e. cross-vanes) do not exchange water efficiently nor control the residence time (RT) of downwelling streamwater. Here we present subsurface modifications to streambed hydraulic conductivity (K) to drive efficient hyporheic exchange and control RT, thereby enhancing the effectiveness of the HZ. Coordinated high K (i.e. gravel) and low K (i.e. concrete, clay) modifications are termed Biohydrochemical Enhancement structures for Streamwater Treatment (BEST). BEST can simply use native sediments or may also incorporate reactive geomedia to enhance reactions. The contaminant mitigation potentials of BEST were estimated based on hyporheic flow and RT outputs from MODFLOW and MODPATH models and reported nutrient, metal, and pathogen removal rate constants from literature for specific porous media. Reactions of interest include denitrification and removal of phosphate, metals, and E. coli. Simulations showed that BEST structures in series can substantially improve water quality in small streams along reaches of tens of meters. The model results are compared to observed data in tank and constructed stream experiments. Preliminary results with BEST incorporating woodchip geomedia demonstrate rapid denitrification exceeding model predictions. These experiments should establish BEST as a novel stream restoration structure or Best Management Practice (BMP) option to help practitioners achieve stormwater compliance.

  20. Ozone and simulated acid rain effects on growth root hydraulic conductivity, and photosynthesis of red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.; Chevone, B.I.; Seiler, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Three-year-old red spruce seedlings were exposed to ozone (O/sub 3/) at 0.00 (control) or 0.10 ppm, 4 hr/d, 3 d/wk in combination with simulated rain (pH 3.0 or 5.6, 1 hr/d, 2 d/wk at 0.75 cm/hr) for 10 wks. All seedlings were submitted to two drought cycles after the 10-wk-treatment. O/sub 3/ significantly decreased root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) by 21% after 10 wks across all rain pHs. The reduction of Lp in seedlings treated with O/sub 3/ was enhanced by drought stress. Rain pH alone did not affect Lp during the 10-wks-exposure and drought cycles. However, the O/sub 3/ effect on Lp was more severe at pH 5.6 than at pH 3.0. Rain at pH 3.0 stimulated shoot height growth by 31% compared with pH 5.6 across all O/sub 3/ treatments. However, root, shoot, and total dry weight of seedlings were not changed by any treatments. Neither O/sub 3/ nor rain pH affected net photosynthetic (P/sub i/) response to branch water potential in plants subjected to one or two drought cycles. However, P/sub i/ was less sensitive to water potential after two drought cycles, indicating physiological adjustment to drought stress.

  1. Freeze-thaw stress: effects of temperature on hydraulic conductivity and ultrasonic activity in ten woody angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Guillaume; Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Kasuga, Jun; Cochard, Hervé; Mayr, Stefan; Améglio, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    Freeze-thaw events can affect plant hydraulics by inducing embolism. This study analyzed the effect of temperature during the freezing process on hydraulic conductivity and ultrasonic emissions (UE). Stems of 10 angiosperms were dehydrated to a water potential at 12% percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC) and exposed to freeze-thaw cycles. The minimal temperature of the frost cycle correlated positively with induced PLC, whereby species with wider conduits (hydraulic diameter) showed higher freeze-thaw-induced PLC. Ultrasonic activity started with the onset of freezing and increased with decreasing subzero temperatures, whereas no UE were recorded during thawing. The temperature at which 50% of UE were reached varied between -9.1°C and -31.0°C across species. These findings indicate that temperatures during freezing are of relevance for bubble formation and air seeding. We suggest that species-specific cavitation thresholds are reached during freezing due to the temperature-dependent decrease of water potential in the ice, while bubble expansion and the resulting PLC occur during thawing. UE analysis can be used to monitor the cavitation process and estimate freeze-thaw-induced PLC.

  2. Impact of treated wastewater on growth, respiration and hydraulic conductivity of citrus root systems in light and heavy soils.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Indira; Cohen, Shabtai; Shaviv, Avi; Bar-Tal, Asher; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Ephrath, Jhonathan

    2016-06-01

    Roots interact with soil properties and irrigation water quality leading to changes in root growth, structure and function. We studied these interactions in an orchard and in lysimeters with clay and sandy loam soils. Minirhizotron imaging and manual sampling showed that root growth was three times lower in the clay relative to sandy loam soil. Treated wastewater (TWW) led to a large reduction in root growth with clay (45-55%) but not with sandy loam soil (<20%). Treated wastewater increased salt uptake, membrane leakage and proline content, and decreased root viability, carbohydrate content and osmotic potentials in the fine roots, especially in clay. These results provide evidence that TWW challenges and damages the root system. The phenology and physiology of root orders were studied in lysimeters. Soil type influenced diameter, specific root area, tissue density and cortex area similarly in all root orders, while TWW influenced these only in clay soil. Respiration rates were similar in both soils, and root hydraulic conductivity was severely reduced in clay soil. Treated wastewater increased respiration rate and reduced hydraulic conductivity of all root orders in clay but only of the lower root orders in sandy loam soil. Loss of hydraulic conductivity increased with root order in clay and clay irrigated with TWW. Respiration and hydraulic properties of all root orders were significantly affected by sodium-amended TWW in sandy loam soil. These changes in root order morphology, anatomy, physiology and hydraulic properties indicate rapid and major modifications of root systems in response to differences in soil type and water quality.

  3. Impact of treated wastewater on growth, respiration and hydraulic conductivity of citrus root systems in light and heavy soils.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Indira; Cohen, Shabtai; Shaviv, Avi; Bar-Tal, Asher; Bernstein, Nirit; Heuer, Bruria; Ephrath, Jhonathan

    2016-06-01

    Roots interact with soil properties and irrigation water quality leading to changes in root growth, structure and function. We studied these interactions in an orchard and in lysimeters with clay and sandy loam soils. Minirhizotron imaging and manual sampling showed that root growth was three times lower in the clay relative to sandy loam soil. Treated wastewater (TWW) led to a large reduction in root growth with clay (45-55%) but not with sandy loam soil (<20%). Treated wastewater increased salt uptake, membrane leakage and proline content, and decreased root viability, carbohydrate content and osmotic potentials in the fine roots, especially in clay. These results provide evidence that TWW challenges and damages the root system. The phenology and physiology of root orders were studied in lysimeters. Soil type influenced diameter, specific root area, tissue density and cortex area similarly in all root orders, while TWW influenced these only in clay soil. Respiration rates were similar in both soils, and root hydraulic conductivity was severely reduced in clay soil. Treated wastewater increased respiration rate and reduced hydraulic conductivity of all root orders in clay but only of the lower root orders in sandy loam soil. Loss of hydraulic conductivity increased with root order in clay and clay irrigated with TWW. Respiration and hydraulic properties of all root orders were significantly affected by sodium-amended TWW in sandy loam soil. These changes in root order morphology, anatomy, physiology and hydraulic properties indicate rapid and major modifications of root systems in response to differences in soil type and water quality. PMID:27022106

  4. Development of the helical reaction hydraulic turbine. Final technical report, July 1, 1996--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlov, A.

    1998-08-01

    The present report contains the final results obtained during July 1996--July 1998. This report should be considered in association with the Annual Progress Report submitted in July 1997 due to the fact that not all of the intermediate results reflected in the Progress Report have been included in the Final Report. The aim of the project was to build a helical hydraulic turbine prototype and demonstrate its suitability and advantages as a novel apparatus to harness hydropower from ultra low-head rivers and other free water streams such as ocean currents or rivers without dams. The research objectives of the project are: Design, optimization and selection of the hydro foil section for the helical turbine; Design of the turbine for demonstration project; Construction and testing of the turbine module; Assessing test results and determining scale-up feasibility. The research conducted under this project has substantially exceeded the original goals including designing, constructing and testing of a scaled-up triple-helix turbine, as well as developing recommendations for application of the turbine for direct water pumping in irrigation systems and for future use in wind farms. Measurements collected during two years of turbine testing are kept in the PI files.

  5. Metal ion effects on hydraulic conductivity of bacterial cellulose-pectin composites used as plant cell wall analogs.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brigid A; Kopittke, Peter M; Wehr, J Bernhard; Blamey, F Pax C; Menzies, Neal W

    2010-02-01

    Low concentrations of some trace metals markedly reduce root elongation rate and cause ruptures to root rhizodermal and outer cortical cells in the elongation zone. The interactions between the trace metals and plant components responsible for these effects are not well understood but may be linked to changes in water uptake, cell turgor and cell wall extensibility. An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Al, La, Cu, Gd, Sc and Ru on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of bacterial cellulose (BC)-pectin composites, used as plant cell wall analogs. Hydraulic conductivity was reduced to approximately 30% of the initial flow rate by 39 microM Al and 0.6 microM Cu, approximately 40% by 4.6 microM La, 3 microM Sc and 4.4 microM Ru and approximately 55% by 3.4 microM Gd. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed changes in the ultrastructure of the composites. The results suggest that trace metal binding decreases the hydraulic conductivity through changes in pectin porosity. The experiment illustrates the importance of metal interactions with pectin, and the implications of such an interaction in plant metal toxicity and in normal cell wall processes. PMID:20053181

  6. Quantitative comparison of impeller-flowmeter and particle-size-distribution techniques for the characterization of hydraulic conductivity variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahona-Palomo, Marco; Riva, Monica; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Vazquez-Sune, Enric; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2011-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivities associated with measurement scale of the order of 10-1 m and collected during an extensive field campaign near Tübingen, Germany, are analyzed. Estimates are provided at coinciding locations in the system using: (1) the empirical Kozeny-Carman formulation, providing conductivity values, K GS, based on particle-size distribution, and (2) borehole impeller-type flowmeter tests, which infer conductivity, K FM, from measurements of vertical flows within a borehole. Correlation between the two sets of estimates is virtually absent. However, statistics of the natural logarithm of K GS and K FM at the site are similar in terms of mean values (averages of ln K GS being slightly smaller) and differ in terms of variogram ranges and sample variances. This is consistent with the fact that the two types of estimates can be associated with different (albeit comparable) measurement (support) scales. It also matches published results on interpretations of variability of geostatistical descriptors of hydraulic parameters on multiple observation scales. The analysis strengthens the idea that hydraulic conductivity values and associated key geostatistical descriptors inferred from different methodologies and at similar observation scales (of the order of tens of cm) are not readily comparable and should not be embedded blindly into a flow (and eventually transport) prediction model.

  7. Field determination of the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity tensor of anisotropic media 2. Methodology and application to fractured rocks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, P.A.; Neuman, S.P.; Stiles, G.K.; Simpson, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical solutions developed in the first paper can be used to interpret the results of cross-hole tests conducted in anisotropic porous or fractured media. Test results from a granitic rock near Oracle in southern Arizona are presented to illustrate how the method works for fractured rocks. At the site, the Oracle granite is shown to respond as a near-uniform, anisotropic medium, the hydraulic conductivity of which is strongly controlled by the orientations of major fracture sets. The cross-hole test results are shown to be consistent with the results of more than 100 single- hole packer tests conducted at the site. -from Authors

  8. Effects of steady-state assumption on hydraulic conductivity and recharge estimates in a surficial aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of a calibrated flow model to predict the behavior of a surficial aquifer system is governed the quality of the hydraulic conductivity and recharge estimates used. Reasonable lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivities can be estimated by steady-state simulations driven effective recharge rates that approximate the net effects of evapotranspiration, and water released from storage during periods of recession. Results from a hypothetical, transient, cross-sectional model indicated that most of the water was contributed uniformly from storage from five to 25 days after a recharge event. Results also showed that a steady-state, snapshot calibration approach can be used on aquifers in a humid climate with diffusivities between 20 and 500 m2/d. Most estimates of the lateral and vertical hydraulic conductivities of the hypothetical aquifer system were within 30% of the actual values. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity from the transient cases were similar to those from the snapshot calibration cases. The long-term recharge rate could be identified calibrating to multiple synoptic surveys that were sampled over the range of drier to wetter conditions. The effective recharge rates estimated for the driest and wettest conditions bracketed the long-term recharge rate. Results suggested that the effective recharge rate estimated for the synoptic survey with the lowest water level root-mean-square (RMS) error was the best estimate of the long-term recharge rate. A field application of the snapshot calibration approach simulated the surficial aquifer system beneath Cecil Field Naval Air Station well and provided reasonable estimates of the long-term recharge rate (0.4 mm/d) relative to the range of recharge rates that were independently estimated the chloride concentration ratio method (0.2 to 0.6 mm/d).The ability of a calibrated flow model to predict the behavior of a surficial aquifer system is governed by the quality of the hydraulic conductivity and recharge

  9. Estimation of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity by minidisk infiltrometers for soils with wide pore-size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas

    2010-05-01

    Disk infiltrometers are widely used devices for quick and convenient measurement of soil surface hydraulic properties. In the present study, several estimation procedures, commonly used for the determination of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity from disk infiltration data, are evaluated using numerical modeling of three-dimensional axisymmetric flow below infiltrometer disk. The analysis is performed for a set of soils representing a wide spectrum of textural classes. Special attention is paid to the sandy loam soils typical for the mountain regions of Central Europe (classified as Cambisols). Improved conductivity estimates, specifically for the soils with low value of van Genuchten's parameter n (characterized by wide pore-size distribution), are obtained by extending the semi-empirical estimation procedure of Zhang (1997).

  10. A note on the fractal behavior of hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity for experimental values in a confined aquifer.

    PubMed

    De Bartolo, Samuele; Fallico, Carmine; Veltri, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity values for the confined sandy loam aquifer of the Montalto Uffugo (Italy) test field were obtained by laboratory and field measurements; the first ones were carried out on undisturbed soil samples and the others by slug and aquifer tests. A direct simple-scaling analysis was performed for the whole range of measurement and a comparison among the different types of fractal models describing the scale behavior was made. Some indications about the largest pore size to utilize in the fractal models were given. The results obtained for a sandy loam soil show that it is possible to obtain global indications on the behavior of the hydraulic conductivity versus the porosity utilizing a simple scaling relation and a fractal model in coupled manner. PMID:24385876

  11. A Note on the Fractal Behavior of Hydraulic Conductivity and Effective Porosity for Experimental Values in a Confined Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    De Bartolo, Samuele; Fallico, Carmine; Veltri, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity values for the confined sandy loam aquifer of the Montalto Uffugo (Italy) test field were obtained by laboratory and field measurements; the first ones were carried out on undisturbed soil samples and the others by slug and aquifer tests. A direct simple-scaling analysis was performed for the whole range of measurement and a comparison among the different types of fractal models describing the scale behavior was made. Some indications about the largest pore size to utilize in the fractal models were given. The results obtained for a sandy loam soil show that it is possible to obtain global indications on the behavior of the hydraulic conductivity versus the porosity utilizing a simple scaling relation and a fractal model in coupled manner. PMID:24385876

  12. Use of temperature profiles beneath streams to determine rates of vertical ground-water flow and vertical hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapham, Wayne W.

    1989-01-01

    The use of temperature profiles beneath streams to determine rates of vertical ground-water flow and effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of sediments was evaluated at three field sites by use of a model that numerically solves the partial differential equation governing simultaneous vertical flow of fluid and heat in the Earth. The field sites are located in Hardwick and New Braintree, Mass., and in Dover, N.J. In New England, stream temperature varies from about 0 to 25 ?C (degrees Celsius) during the year. This stream-temperature fluctuation causes ground-water temperatures beneath streams to fluctuate by more than 0.1 ?C during a year to a depth of about 35 ft (feet) in fine-grained sediments and to a depth of about 50 ft in coarse-grained sediments, if ground-water velocity is 0 ft/d (foot per day). Upward flow decreases the depth affected by stream-temperature fluctuation, and downward flow increases the depth. At the site in Hardwick, Mass., ground-water flow was upward at a rate of less than 0.01 ft/d. The maximum effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site is 0.1 ft/d. Ground-water velocities determined at three locations at the site in New Braintree, Mass., where ground water discharges naturally from the underlying aquifer to the Ware River, ranged from 0.10 to 0.20 ft/d upward. The effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site ranged from 2.4 to 17.1 ft/d. Ground-water velocities determined at three locations at the Dover, N.J., site, where infiltration from the Rockaway River into the underlying sediments occurs because of pumping, were 1.5 ft/d downward. The effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site ranged from 2.2 to 2.5 ft/d. Independent estimates of velocity at two of the three sites are in general agreement with the velocities determined using temperature profiles. The estimates of velocities and conductivities derived from the

  13. Toward a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity in climate models: Simulation of rapid groundwater fluctuations in Northern California

    DOE PAGES

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2015-12-31

    Preferential flow through weathered bedrock leads to rapid rise of the water table after the first rainstorms and significant water storage (also known as ‘‘rock moisture’’) in the fractures. We present a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that captures the preferential flow and is easy to implement in global climate models. To mimic the naturally varying heterogeneity with depth in the subsurface, the model represents the hydraulic conductivity as a product of the effective saturation and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a lognormal distribution. The mean of the background Kbkg decreases monotonically with depth, while its variance reducesmore » with the effective saturation. Model parameters are derived by assimilating into Richards’ equation 6 years of 30 min observations of precipitation (mm) and water table depths (m), from seven wells along a steep hillslope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California. The results show that the observed rapid penetration of precipitation and the fast rise of the water table from the well locations, after the first winter rains, are well captured with the new stochastic approach in contrast to the standard van Genuchten model of hydraulic conductivity, which requires significantly higher levels of saturated soils to produce the same results. ‘‘Rock moisture,’’ the moisture between the soil mantle and the water table, comprises 30% of the moisture because of the great depth of the weathered bedrock layer and could be a potential source of moisture to sustain trees through extended dry periods. Moreover, storage of moisture in the soil mantle is smaller, implying less surface runoff and less evaporation, with the proposed new model.« less

  14. [Effects of controlled alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation on apple seedling morphological characteristics and root hydraulic conductivity].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Liang; Zhang, Fu-Cang; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Ge, Zhen-Yang

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the effects of alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation (ADI) on the morphological characteristics and root hydraulic conductivity of apple seedlings, three irrigation modes, i.e., fixed partial root-zone drip irrigation (FDI, fixed watering on one side of the seedling root zone), controlled alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation (ADI, alternate watering on both sides of the seedling root zone), and conventional drip irrigation (CDI, watering cling to the seedling base), and three irrigation quotas, i. e., each irrigation amount of FDI and ADI was 10, 20 and 30 mm, and that of CDI was 20, 30 and 40 mm, respectively, were designed. In treatment ADI, the soil moisture content on the both sides of the root zone appeared a repeated alternation of dry and wet process; while in treatment CDI, the soil moisture content had less difference. At the same irrigation quotas, the soil moisture content at the watering sides had no significant difference under the three drip irrigation modes. At irrigation quota 30 mm, the root-shoot ratio, healthy index of seedlings, and root hydraulic conductivity in treatment ADI increased by 31.6% and 47.1%, 34.2% and 53.6%, and 9.0% and 11.0%, respectively, as compared with those in treatments CDI and FDI. The root dry mass and leaf area had a positive linear correlation with root hydraulic conductivity. It was suggested that controlled alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation had obvious compensatory effects on the root hydraulic conductivity of apple seedlings, improved the soil water use by the roots, benefited the equilibrated dry matter allocation in seedling organs, and markedly enhanced the root-shoot ratio and healthy index of the seedlings.

  15. [Effects of controlled alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation on apple seedling morphological characteristics and root hydraulic conductivity].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Liang; Zhang, Fu-Cang; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Ge, Zhen-Yang

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the effects of alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation (ADI) on the morphological characteristics and root hydraulic conductivity of apple seedlings, three irrigation modes, i.e., fixed partial root-zone drip irrigation (FDI, fixed watering on one side of the seedling root zone), controlled alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation (ADI, alternate watering on both sides of the seedling root zone), and conventional drip irrigation (CDI, watering cling to the seedling base), and three irrigation quotas, i. e., each irrigation amount of FDI and ADI was 10, 20 and 30 mm, and that of CDI was 20, 30 and 40 mm, respectively, were designed. In treatment ADI, the soil moisture content on the both sides of the root zone appeared a repeated alternation of dry and wet process; while in treatment CDI, the soil moisture content had less difference. At the same irrigation quotas, the soil moisture content at the watering sides had no significant difference under the three drip irrigation modes. At irrigation quota 30 mm, the root-shoot ratio, healthy index of seedlings, and root hydraulic conductivity in treatment ADI increased by 31.6% and 47.1%, 34.2% and 53.6%, and 9.0% and 11.0%, respectively, as compared with those in treatments CDI and FDI. The root dry mass and leaf area had a positive linear correlation with root hydraulic conductivity. It was suggested that controlled alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation had obvious compensatory effects on the root hydraulic conductivity of apple seedlings, improved the soil water use by the roots, benefited the equilibrated dry matter allocation in seedling organs, and markedly enhanced the root-shoot ratio and healthy index of the seedlings. PMID:22919832

  16. Toward a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity in climate models: Simulation of rapid groundwater fluctuations in Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2015-12-31

    Preferential flow through weathered bedrock leads to rapid rise of the water table after the first rainstorms and significant water storage (also known as ‘‘rock moisture’’) in the fractures. We present a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that captures the preferential flow and is easy to implement in global climate models. To mimic the naturally varying heterogeneity with depth in the subsurface, the model represents the hydraulic conductivity as a product of the effective saturation and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a lognormal distribution. The mean of the background Kbkg decreases monotonically with depth, while its variance reduces with the effective saturation. Model parameters are derived by assimilating into Richards’ equation 6 years of 30 min observations of precipitation (mm) and water table depths (m), from seven wells along a steep hillslope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California. The results show that the observed rapid penetration of precipitation and the fast rise of the water table from the well locations, after the first winter rains, are well captured with the new stochastic approach in contrast to the standard van Genuchten model of hydraulic conductivity, which requires significantly higher levels of saturated soils to produce the same results. ‘‘Rock moisture,’’ the moisture between the soil mantle and the water table, comprises 30% of the moisture because of the great depth of the weathered bedrock layer and could be a potential source of moisture to sustain trees through extended dry periods. Moreover, storage of moisture in the soil mantle is smaller, implying less surface runoff and less evaporation, with the proposed new model.

  17. Toward a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity in climate models: Simulation of rapid groundwater fluctuations in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2015-12-01

    Preferential flow through weathered bedrock leads to rapid rise of the water table after the first rainstorms and significant water storage (also known as "rock moisture") in the fractures. We present a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that captures the preferential flow and is easy to implement in global climate models. To mimic the naturally varying heterogeneity with depth in the subsurface, the model represents the hydraulic conductivity as a product of the effective saturation and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a lognormal distribution. The mean of the background Kbkg decreases monotonically with depth, while its variance reduces with the effective saturation. Model parameters are derived by assimilating into Richards' equation 6 years of 30 min observations of precipitation (mm) and water table depths (m), from seven wells along a steep hillslope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California. The results show that the observed rapid penetration of precipitation and the fast rise of the water table from the well locations, after the first winter rains, are well captured with the new stochastic approach in contrast to the standard van Genuchten model of hydraulic conductivity, which requires significantly higher levels of saturated soils to produce the same results. "Rock moisture," the moisture between the soil mantle and the water table, comprises 30% of the moisture because of the great depth of the weathered bedrock layer and could be a potential source of moisture to sustain trees through extended dry periods. Furthermore, storage of moisture in the soil mantle is smaller, implying less surface runoff and less evaporation, with the proposed new model.

  18. Application of a new hydraulic conductivity model to simulate rapid groundwater fluctuations in the Eel River watershed in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrettas, M. D.; Fung, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    High-frequency multi-year observations of the water table at several wells in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve in the Eel River Watershed in northern California show rapid fluctuations, where the water table, some 10-15 meters below the surface, rises by as much as 1 meter in a day or two after the first storms of the rain season. The observations highlight preferential flow through weathered bedrock, which can store as much as 30% of the moisture in the column ("rock moisture"). This rapid transfer of moisture and storage at depth could have a significant impact on ecosystem dynamics and the water and energy budgets of the atmosphere on various time scales. Despite its high importance, preferential flow through weather bedrock is not routinely captured in most climate models. This work presents a new hydraulic conductivity parameterization that captures the preferential flow, with straightforward implementation into current global climate models. The hydraulic conductivity is represented as a product of the effective saturation (normalized water content) and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a depth dependent lognormal distribution. A unique feature of the parameterization is that the variance of hydraulic conductivity is large when there is little rock moisture, and decreases with increasing saturation, mimicking flow through fractures. The new method is applied to seven wells locations on a steep (35 degrees) hill-slope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California, for the duration of six years and estimates of the model parameters are provided by assimilating, into Richards' equation, measurements of precipitation [mm] and water table depths [m] at 30-minute time intervals. The simulation results show that the new approach yields a good agreement of the rapid rise of the observed water table at the tested well locations. Furthermore, the water stored in the weathered bedrock is estimated to be in the range between 32% and 41%, which could

  19. Prolonged experimental drought reduces plant hydraulic conductance and transpiration and increases mortality in a piñon–juniper woodland

    PubMed Central

    Pangle, Robert E; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Plaut, Jennifer A; Yepez, Enrico A; Hudson, Patrick J; Boutz, Amanda L; Gehres, Nathan; Pockman, William T; McDowell, Nate G

    2015-01-01

    Plant hydraulic conductance (ks) is a critical control on whole-plant water use and carbon uptake and, during drought, influences whether plants survive or die. To assess long-term physiological and hydraulic responses of mature trees to water availability, we manipulated ecosystem-scale water availability from 2007 to 2013 in a piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We examined the relationship between ks and subsequent mortality using more than 5 years of physiological observations, and the subsequent impact of reduced hydraulic function and mortality on total woody canopy transpiration (EC) and conductance (GC). For both species, we observed significant reductions in plant transpiration (E) and ks under experimentally imposed drought. Conversely, supplemental water additions increased E and ks in both species. Interestingly, both species exhibited similar declines in ks under the imposed drought conditions, despite their differing stomatal responses and mortality patterns during drought. Reduced whole-plant ks also reduced carbon assimilation in both species, as leaf-level stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthesis (An) declined strongly with decreasing ks. Finally, we observed that chronically low whole-plant ks was associated with greater canopy dieback and mortality for both piñon and juniper and that subsequent reductions in woody canopy biomass due to mortality had a significant impact on both daily and annual canopy EC and GC. Our data indicate that significant reductions in ks precede drought-related tree mortality events in this system, and the consequence is a significant reduction in canopy gas exchange and carbon fixation. Our results suggest that reductions in productivity and woody plant cover in piñon–juniper woodlands can be expected due to reduced plant hydraulic conductance and increased mortality of both piñon pine and juniper under anticipated future conditions of more frequent and persistent

  20. Estimating hydraulic conductivities of the soil aggregates and their clay-organic coatings using numerical inversion of capillary rise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fér, Miroslav; Kodešová, Radka

    2012-10-01

    SummarySoil aggregates are in some soils and their horizons covered by organomineral coatings, which may significantly influence water and solute transfer into the aggregates. Knowledge of a coating occurrence, their structure and hydraulic properties is required for a more precise description of water flow and contaminant transport in soils. The aim of this study was to describe hydraulic properties of clay and organic matter coatings in the iluvial (Bt2) horizon of Haplic Luvisol. Sets of 30 unsorted aggregates, 24 aggregates with mostly clay coatings and 24 aggregates with clay-organic coatings, respectively, were studied to evaluate an impact of various coating composition. The coatings were removed from a half of the aggregates of each set. First, the wetting soil-water retention curve was measured on all soil aggregates. Then the capillary rise from the saturation pan into the multiple aggregates (set of 14 or 15 aggregates) without and with coatings was measured. Numerical inversion of the measured cumulative capillary rise data using the HYDRUS-1D program were applied to estimate the saturated hydraulic conductivities of the aggregates, Ks,aggr, and their coatings, Ks,coat. Results were compared with saturated hydraulic conductivities evaluated analytically using the sorptivity method, which was proposed previously. Data of the soil-water retention curves, measured on aggregates with and without coatings, did not allow distinguishing between retention curve parameters of the soil aggregates and their coatings. Therefore the same parameters were evaluated for both. Capillary rise into the soil aggregates without coatings was always faster than into the aggregates with coatings. As result the optimized saturated hydraulic conductivities, Ks,coat, of the clay and the organic matter coatings (the average values for unsorted, mostly clay and clay-organic coatings were 3.69 × 10-7, 2.76 × 10-7 and 1.81 × 10-7 cm min-1, respectively) were one to two order of

  1. The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on soil-root hydraulic conductance in Agrostis stolonifera L. under two water regimes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Dugo, Victoria

    2010-08-01

    The hypothesis that mycorrhizal colonization improves the soil-root conductance in plants was experimentally tested in a growth chamber using pot cultures of Agrostis stolonifera L. colonized by Glomus intraradices. Plants were grown in 50-l pots filled with autoclaved sand/silt soil (1:1), with and without the mycorrhizal fungus. Within the mycorrhizal treatment, half of the pots remained well watered, while the other half was subjected to a progressive water deficit. Soil water potential (estimated as plant water potential measured at the end of the dark period), xylem water potential measured at the tiller base, transpiration rate, and soil water content were monitored throughout the experiment. Soil-root hydraulic conductance was estimated as the ratio between the instantaneous transpiration rate and the soil and xylem water potential difference. To obtain cultures with similar nutritional status, the P in the modified Hoagland's nutrient solution was withheld from the inoculated pots and applied only once a month. Even though there were no differences on growth or nutrient status for the mycorrhizal treatments, water transport was enhanced by the inoculum presence. Transpiration rate was maintained at lower xylem water potential values in the presence of mycorrhizae. The analysis of the relationship between soil-root hydraulic resistance and soil water content showed that mycorrhizal colonization increased soil-root hydraulic conductance as the soil dried. For these growing conditions, this effect was ascribed to the range of 6-10%.

  2. A semi-analytical generalized Hvorslev formula for estimating riverbed hydraulic conductivity with an open-ended standpipe permeameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozdniakov, Sergey P.; Wang, Ping; Lekhov, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    The well-known Hvorslev (1951) formula was developed to estimate soil permeability using single-well slug tests and has been widely applied to determine riverbed hydraulic conductivity using in situ standpipe permeameter tests. Here, we further develop a general solution of the Hvorslev (1951) formula that accounts for flow in a bounded medium and assumes that the bottom of the river is a prescribed head boundary. The superposition of real and imaginary disk sources is used to obtain a semi-analytical expression of the total hydraulic resistance of the flow in and out of the pipe. As a result, we obtained a simple semi-analytical expression for the resistance, which represents a generalization of the Hvorslev (1951). The obtained expression is benchmarked against a finite-element numerical model of 2-D flow (in r-z coordinates) in an anisotropic medium. The results exhibit good agreement between the simulated and estimated riverbed hydraulic conductivity values. Furthermore, a set of simulations for layered, stochastically heterogeneous riverbed sediments was conducted and processed using the proposed expression to demonstrate the potential associated with measuring vertical heterogeneity in bottom sediments using a series of standpipe permeameter tests with different lengths of pipe inserted into the riverbed sediments.

  3. Hydraulic conductivity of near-surface alluvium in the vicinity of Cattlemans Detention Basin, South Lake Tahoe, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Jena M.; Henkelman, Katherine K.; Caskey, Rachel M.

    2004-01-01

    Cattlemans detention basin, South Lake Tahoe, California is designed to capture and reduce urban runoff and pollutants originating from developed areas before entering Cold Creek, which is tributary to Trout Creek and to Lake Tahoe. The effectiveness of the basin in reducing sediment and nutrient loads currently is being assessed with a five-year study. Hydraulic conductivity of the alluvium near the detention basin is needed to estimate ground-water flow and subsurface nutrient transport. Hydraulic conductivity was estimated using slug tests in 27 monitoring wells that surround the detention basin. For each test, water was poured rapidly into a well, changes in water-level were monitored, and the observed changes were analyzed using the Bouwer and Rice method. Each well was tested one to four times. A total of 24 wells were tested more than once. Of the 24 wells, the differences among the tests were within 10 percent of the average. Estimated hydraulic conductivities of basin alluvium range from 0.5 to 70 feet per day with an average of 17.8 feet per day. This range is consistent with the sandy alluvial deposits observed in the area of Cattlemans detention basin.

  4. Experimental design for estimating unknown hydraulic conductivity in an aquifer using a genetic algorithm and reduced order model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushijima, Timothy T.; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2015-12-01

    We develop an experimental design algorithm to select locations for a network of observation wells that provide the maximum robust information about unknown hydraulic conductivity in a confined, anisotropic aquifer. Since the information that a design provides is dependent on an aquifer's hydraulic conductivity, a robust design is one that provides the maximum information in the worst-case scenario. The design can be formulated as a max-min optimization problem. The problem is generally non-convex, non-differentiable, and contains integer variables. We use a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to perform the combinatorial search. We employ proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to reduce the dimension of the groundwater model, thereby reducing the computational burden posed by employing a GA. The GA algorithm exhaustively searches for the robust design across a set of hydraulic conductivities and finds an approximate design (called the High Frequency Observation Well Design) through a Monte Carlo-type search. The results from a small-scale 1-D test case validate the proposed methodology. We then apply the methodology to a realistically-scaled 2-D test case.

  5. Natural attenuation of fuel hydrocarbon contaminants: Hydraulic conductivity dependency of biodegradation rates in a field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-07-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  6. Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbon Contaminants: Correlation of Biodegradation with Hydraulic Conductivity in a Field Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-10-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, USA. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  7. Ion-mediated enhancement of xylem hydraulic conductivity in four Acer species: relationships with ecological and anatomical features.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Andrea; Dimasi, Federica; Klepsch, Matthias; Jansen, Steven

    2012-12-01

    The 'ionic effect', i.e., changes in xylem hydraulic conductivity (k(xyl)) due to variation of the ionic sap composition in vessels, was studied in four Acer species growing in contrasting environments differing in water availability. Hydraulic measurements of the ionic effect were performed together with measurements on the sap electrical conductivity, leaf water potential and vessel anatomy. The low ionic effect recorded in Acer pseudoplatanus L. and Acer campestre L. (15.8 and 14.7%, respectively), which represented two species from shady and humid habitats, was associated with a low vessel grouping index, high sap electrical conductivity and least negative leaf water potential. Opposite traits were found for Acer monspessulanum L. and Acer platanoides L., which showed an ionic effect of 23.6 and 23.1%, respectively, and represent species adapted to higher irradiance and/or lower water availability. These findings from closely related species provide additional support that the ionic effect could function as a compensation mechanism for embolism-induced loss of k(xyl), either as a result of high evaporative demand or increased risk of hydraulic failure.

  8. Simultaneous updating of spatially distributed hydraulic conductivities and leakage coefficients with the Ensemble Kalman Filter. Application: Zurich, Switzerland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Kaiser, Hans-Peter; Kuhlman, Uli; Bauser, Gero; Stauffer, Fritz; Müller, Robert; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    The aquifer of the upper Limmat Valley in the city of Zurich (Switzerland) is exploited intensively for drinking water purposes. The well field is located close to the city centre and artificial recharge from basins and infiltration wells should protect the pumping wells against contamination from the city. The aquifer gains important amounts of water from the river, and also receives some lateral inflow and recharge from net precipitation. A 3D variably saturated subsurface hydrological model was developed for the area, which takes river- aquifer interaction into account. The Ensemble Kalman Filter is used to update hydraulic heads in real-time and to provide predictions for the next 10 days. The simulation experiments showed that the characterisation of the hydraulic head distribution was considerable improved if piezometric data were assimilated, as compared with a calibrated model that was not updated in real-time. Predictions for a longer time horizon (10 days) were also improved with help of the assimilation of observations. If both states and parameters (spatially distributed hydraulic conductivity and leakage coefficient) were updated, predictions were better than without updating; the mean absolute errors for the 1-day and, especially 10-day hydraulic head predictions were reduced, both at assimilation locations and verification locations. In order to explore whether parameter estimates also improved a synthetic experiment with the model for the Limmat valley aquifer was carried out. The synthetic model used one specific stochastic realisation as reality, while forcings, initial and boundary conditions were not modified. In these experiments, too, the best results were obtained if both hydraulic conductivity and leakage coefficient were updated. The parameter estimates improved arriving at a reduction of the mean absolute error of up to 30% for hydraulic conductivity and 60% for the leakage coefficient. Better results were obtained if more stochastic

  9. Water infiltration and hydraulic conductivity in a natural Mediterranean oak forest: impacts of hydrology-oriented silviculture on soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Bautista, Inmaculada; Cerdà, Artemi; Cullotta, Sebastiano; del Campo, Antonio; González-Sanchis, María; Iovino, Massimo; Maetzke, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In the last years researchers reported an increasing need to have more awareness on the intimate link between land use and soil hydrological properties (soil organic matter storage, water infiltration, hydraulic conductivity) and their possible effects on water retention (e.g., Bens et al., 2006; del Campo et al., 2014; González-Sanchis et al., 2015; Molina and del Campo, 2012). In the Mediterranean ecosystems, special attention needs to be paid to the forest-water relationships due to the natural scarcity of water. Adaptive forest management (AFM) aims to adapt the forest to water availability by means of an artificial regulation of the forest structure and density in order to promote tree and stand resilience through enhancing soil water availability (del Campo et al., 2014). The opening of the canopy, due to the removal of a certain number of trees, is an important practice for the management of forests. It results in important modifications to the microclimatic conditions that influence the ecophysiological functioning of trees (Aussenac and Granier, 1988). However, the effect of thinning may vary depending on the specific conditions of the forest (Andréassian, 2004; Brooks et al., 2003; Cosandey et al., 2005; Lewis et al., 2000; Molina and del Campo, 2012). Different authors reported that a reduction in forest cover increases water yield due to the subsequent reduction in evapotranspiration (Brooks et al., 2003; González-Sanchis et al., 2015; Hibbert, 1983; Zhang et al., 2001). On the other hand, the water increase may be easily evaporated from the soil surface (Andréassian, 2004). In this context, determining soil hydraulic properties in forests is essential for understanding and simulating the hydrological processes (Alagna et al., 2015; Assouline and Mualem, 2002), in order to adapt a water-saving management to a specific case, or to study the effects of a particular management practice. However, it must be borne in mind that changes brought about by

  10. 48 CFR 2452.237-73 - Conduct of Work and Technical Guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Conduct of Work and Technical Guidance. 2452.237-73 Section 2452.237-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF... Provisions and Clauses 2452.237-73 Conduct of Work and Technical Guidance. As prescribed in...

  11. Preliminary data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, S.C.; Goering, T.J.; McVey, M.D.; Strong, W.R.; Peace, J.L.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The test was performed from December 1993 through 1995 as part of the environmental Restoration Project`s Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation of the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill. The instantaneous profile test and instrumentation are described, and the pressure and moisture content data from the test are presented. These data may be useful for understanding the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils in Technical Area 3 and for model validation, verification, and calibration.

  12. Fracture hydraulic conductivity in the Mexico City clayey aquitard: Field piezometer rising-head tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    A regional lacustrine aquitard covers the main aquifer of the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The aquitard's hydraulic conductivity (K') is fundamental for evaluating the natural protection of the aquifer against a variety of contaminants present on the surface and its hydraulic response. This study analyzes the distribution and variation of K' in the plains of Chalco, Texcoco and Mexico City (three of the six former lakes that existed in the Basin of Mexico), on the basis of 225 field-permeability tests, in nests of existing piezometers located at depths of 2-85 m. Tests were interpreted using the Hvorslev method and some by the Bouwer-Rice method. Results indicate that the distribution of K' fits log-Gaussian regression models. Dominant frequencies for K' in the Chalco and Texcoco plains range between 1E-09 and 1E-08 m/s, with similar population means of 1.19E-09 and 1.7E-09 m/s, respectively, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than the matrix conductivity. In the Mexico City Plain the population mean is near by one order of magnitude lower; K'=2.6E-10 m/s. The contrast between the measured K' and that of the matrix is attributed to the presence of fractures in the upper 25-40 m, which is consistent with the findings of previous studies on solute migration in the aquitard. Un imperméable régional d'origine lacustre recouvre le principal aquifère de la zone urbaine de la ville de Mexico. La conductivité hydraulique K' de cet imperméable est fondamentale pour évaluer la protection naturelle de l'aquifère, contre les différents contaminants présents en surface, et sa réponse hydraulique. Cette étude analyse et les variations de K' dans les plaines de Chalco, Texcoco et Mexico (trois des six anciens lacs qui existaient dans le Bassin de Mexico), sur la base de 225 essais de perméabilité sur le terrain, réalisés en grappes dans des piézomètres existants entre 2 et 85 m de profondeur. Les essais ont été interprétés avec la m

  13. Temporal evolution of the macropore network and saturated hydraulic conductivity in an arable, clayey topsoil during one growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandin, Maria; Köstel, Johannes; Jarvis, Nicholas; Larsbo, Mats

    2015-04-01

    Soil macropore networks and thus hydraulic properties at and close to saturation vary considerably with time, as a result of the dynamic nature of a diverse range of interacting soil structure-forming and degrading factors such as tillage and traffic events, faunal and plant root activity, swell/shrink arising from wetting and drying cycles, freeze-thaw etc. These properties are nevertheless treated as constants in most hydrological modelling studies. This is mostly justified by a lack of understanding of the processes driving these changes. Temporal variations of saturated and near-saturated hydraulic conductivity have been studied in the field (e.g. by tension disc infiltrometer), but these measurements only indirectly reflect the characteristics of the macropore network. In this study, we used non-destructive X-ray tomography to investigate the temporal changes in the macropore network characteristics occurring in the harrowed layer of a conventionally-tilled agricultural field over one growing season. Undisturbed soil cores (60-70 mm height, 68 mm diameter) were sampled on five different occasions. Changes in the geometric and topological properties of the X-ray imaged macropore system (voxel resolution = 120 µm) were compared with variations in saturated hydraulic conductivity measured on the same samples. Image analysis showed that total porosity, specific surface area, average pore diameter and the connectivity of the pore system in the uppermost 60-70 mm of ploughed and harrowed soil decreased from the first sampling occasion shortly after seedbed preparation and sowing until the middle of the growing season after which it slightly increased again. Separate analysis of the total porosity of the top 5 mm showed a marked decrease between the first two sampling occasions, followed by a gradual increase. Despite these structural changes in the macropore system, saturated hydraulic conductivity was only weakly correlated with macropore network characteristics.

  14. Drought effects on hydraulic conductivity and xylem vulnerability to embolism in diverse species and provenances of Mediterranean cedars.

    PubMed

    Ladjal, Mehdi; Huc, Roland; Ducrey, Michel

    2005-09-01

    We studied hydraulic traits of young plants of the Mediterranean cedar species Cedrus atlantica (Endl.) G. Manetti ex Carrière (Luberon, France), C. brevifolia (Hook. f.) Henry (Cyprus), C. libani A. Rich (Hadeth El Jebbe, Lebanon) and C. libani (Armut Alani, Turkey). With an optimum water supply, no major differences were observed among species or provenances in either stem hydraulic conductivity (Ks) or leaf specific conductivity (Kl) measured on the main shoot. A moderate soil drought applied for 10 weeks induced marked acclimation through a reduction in Ks, particularly in the Lebanese provenance of C. libani, and a decrease in tracheid lumen size in all species. Cedrus atlantica, which had the smallest tracheids, was the species most vulnerable to embolism: a 50% loss in hydraulic conductivity (PsiPLC50) occurred at a water potential of -4.4 MPa in the well-watered treatment, and at -6.0 MPa in the moderate drought treatment. In the other species, PsiPLC50 was unaffected by moderate soil drought, and only declined sharply at water potentials between -6.4 and -7.5 MPa in both irrigation treatments. During severe drought, Ks of twigs and stomatal conductance (g(s)) were measured simultaneously as leaf water potential declined. For all species, lower vulnerability to embolism based on loss of Ks was recorded on current-year twigs. The threshold for stomatal closure (10% of maximum g(s)) was reached at a predawn water potential (Psi(pd)) of -2.5 MPa in C. atlantica (Luberon) and at -3.1 MPa in C. libani (Lebanon), whereas the other provenance and species had intermediate Psi(pd) values. Cedrus brevifolia, with a Psi(pd) (-3.0 MPa) close to that of C. libani (Lebanon), had the highest stomatal conductance of the study species. The importance of a margin of safety between water potential causing stomatal closure and that causing xylem embolism induction is discussed. PMID:15996954

  15. Tree level hydrodynamic approach for resolving aboveground water storage and stomatal conductance and modeling the effects of tree hydraulic strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirfenderesgi, Golnazalsadat; Bohrer, Gil; Matheny, Ashley M.; Fatichi, Simone; Moraes Frasson, Renato Prata; Schäfer, Karina V. R.

    2016-07-01

    The finite difference ecosystem-scale tree crown hydrodynamics model version 2 (FETCH2) is a tree-scale hydrodynamic model of transpiration. The FETCH2 model employs a finite difference numerical methodology and a simplified single-beam conduit system to explicitly resolve xylem water potentials throughout the vertical extent of a tree. Empirical equations relate water potential within the stem to stomatal conductance of the leaves at each height throughout the crown. While highly simplified, this approach brings additional realism to the simulation of transpiration by linking stomatal responses to stem water potential rather than directly to soil moisture, as is currently the case in the majority of land surface models. FETCH2 accounts for plant hydraulic traits, such as the degree of anisohydric/isohydric response of stomata, maximal xylem conductivity, vertical distribution of leaf area, and maximal and minimal xylem water content. We used FETCH2 along with sap flow and eddy covariance data sets collected from a mixed plot of two genera (oak/pine) in Silas Little Experimental Forest, NJ, USA, to conduct an analysis of the intergeneric variation of hydraulic strategies and their effects on diurnal and seasonal transpiration dynamics. We define these strategies through the parameters that describe the genus level transpiration and xylem conductivity responses to changes in stem water potential. Our evaluation revealed that FETCH2 considerably improved the simulation of ecosystem transpiration and latent heat flux in comparison to more conventional models. A virtual experiment showed that the model was able to capture the effect of hydraulic strategies such as isohydric/anisohydric behavior on stomatal conductance under different soil-water availability conditions.

  16. Scalable Generalization of Hydraulic Conductivity in Quaternary Strata for Use in a Regional Groundwater Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatnieks, J.; Popovs, K.; Klints, I.; Timuhins, A.; Kalvans, A.; Delina, A.; Saks, T.

    2012-04-01

    The cover of Quaternary sediments especially in formerly glaciated territories usually is the most complex part of the sedimentary sequences. In regional hydro-geological models it is often assumed as a single layer with uniform or calibrated properties (Valner 2003). However, the properties and structure of Quaternary sediments control the groundwater recharge: it can either direct the groundwater flow horizontally towards discharge in topographic lows or vertically, recharging groundwater in the bedrock. This work aims to present calibration results and detail our experience while integrating a scalable generalization of hydraulic conductivity for Quaternary strata in the regional groundwater modelling system for the Baltic artesian basin - MOSYS V1. We also present a method for solving boundary transitions between spatial clusters of lithologically similar structure. In this study the main unit of generalization is the spatial cluster. Clusters are obtained from distance calculations combining the Normalized Compression Distance (NCD) metric, calculated by the CompLearn parameter-free machine learning toolkit, with normalized Euclidean distance measures for coordinates of the borehole log data. A hierarchical clustering solution is used for obtaining cluster membership identifier for each borehole. Using boreholes as generator points for Voronoi tessellation and dissolving resulting polygons according to their cluster membership attribute, allows us to obtain spatial regions representing a certain degree of similarity in lithological structure. This degree of similarity and the spatial heterogeneity of the cluster polygons can be varied by different flattening of the hierarchical cluster model into variable number of clusters. This provides a scalable generalization solution which can be adapted according to model calibration performance. Using the dissimilarity matrix of the NCD metric, a borehole most similar to all the others from the lithological structure

  17. Heat conduction in partial vacuum. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J R

    1980-09-01

    Methods developed for computing conduction heat losses from evacuated solar collectors are reported. Results of such calculations are given, including the minimum vacuum necessary to effectively eliminate conduction. Experiments performed at Owens-Illinois, Inc. to assess helium penetration rates into evacuated collectors are analyzed, and estimates are given as to the likely penetration rate of atmospheric helium. Conclusions are drawn as to the probable effect of helium penetration on the lifetimes of evacuated solar collectors.

  18. Differentiation in light energy dissipation between hemiepiphytic and non-hemiepiphytic Ficus species with contrasting xylem hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guang-You; Wang, Ai-Ying; Liu, Zhi-Hui; Franco, Augusto C; Goldstein, Guillermo; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2011-06-01

    Hemiepiphytic Ficus species (Hs) possess traits of more conservative water use compared with non-hemiepiphytic Ficus species (NHs) even during their terrestrial growth phase, which may result in significant differences in photosynthetic light use between these two growth forms. Stem hydraulic conductivity, leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were compared in adult trees of five Hs and five NHs grown in a common garden. Hs had significantly lower stem hydraulic conductivity, lower stomatal conductance and higher water use efficiency than NHs. Photorespiration played an important role in avoiding photoinhibition at high irradiance in both Hs and NHs. Under saturating irradiance levels, Hs tended to dissipate a higher proportion of excessive light energy through thermal processes than NHs, while NHs dissipated a larger proportion of electron flow than Hs through the alternative electron sinks. No significant difference in maximum net CO2 assimilation rate was found between Hs and NHs. Stem xylem hydraulic conductivity was positively correlated with maximum electron transport rate and negatively correlated with the quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching across the 10 studied Ficus species. These findings indicate that a canopy growth habit during early life stages in Hs of Ficus resulted in substantial adaptive differences from congeneric NHs not only in water relations but also in photosynthetic light use and carbon economy. The evolution of epiphytic growth habit, even for only part of their life cycle, involved profound changes in a suite of inter-correlated ecophysiological traits that persist to a large extent even during the later terrestrial growth phase.

  19. A Negative Hydraulic Message from Oxygen-Deficient Roots of Tomato Plants? (Influence of Soil Flooding on Leaf Water Potential, Leaf Expansion, and Synchrony between Stomatal Conductance and Root Hydraulic Conductivity).

    PubMed

    Else, M. A.; Davies, W. J.; Malone, M.; Jackson, M. B.

    1995-11-01

    Four to 10 h of soil flooding delayed and suppressed the normal daily increase in root hydraulic conductance (Lp) in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Ailsa Craig) plants. The resulting short-term loss of synchrony between Lp and stomatal conductance decreased leaf water potential ([psi]L) relative to well-drained plants within 2 h. A decrease in [psi]L persisted for 8 h and was mirrored by decreased leaf thickness measured using linear displacement transducers. After 10 h of flooding, further closing of stomata and re-convergence of Lp in flooded and well-drained roots returned [psi]L to control values. In the second photoperiod, Lp in flooded plants exceeded that in well-drained plants in association with much increased Lp and decreased stomatal conductance. Pneumatic balancing pressure applied to roots of intact flooded plants to prevent temporary loss of [psi]L in the 1st d did not modify the patterns of stomatal closure or leaf expansion. Thus, the magnitude of the early negative hydraulic message was neither sufficient nor necessary to promote stomatal closure and inhibit leaf growth in flooded tomato plants. Chemical messages are presumed to be responsible for these early responses to soil flooding.

  20. Impact of Electroviscosity on the Hydraulic Conductance of the Bordered Pit Membrane: A Theoretical Investigation1[C

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Michael; Pagay, Vinay; Stroock, Abraham D.

    2013-01-01

    In perfusion experiments, the hydraulic conductance of stem segments () responds to changes in the properties of the perfusate, such as the ionic strength (), pH, and cationic identity. We review the experimental and theoretical work on this phenomenon. We then proceed to explore the hypothesis that electrokinetic effects in the bordered pit membrane (BPM) contribute to this response. In particular, we develop a model based on electroviscosity in which hydraulic conductance of an electrically charged porous membrane varies with the properties of the electrolyte. We use standard electrokinetic theory, coupled with measurements of electrokinetic properties of plant materials from the literature, to determine how the conductance of BPMs, and therefore , may change due to electroviscosity. We predict a nonmonotonic variation of with with a maximum reduction of 18%. We explore how this reduction depends on the characteristics of the sap and features of the BPM, such as pore size, density of chargeable sites, and their dissociation constant. Our predictions are consistent with changes in observed for physiological values of sap and pH. We conclude that electroviscosity is likely responsible, at least partially, for the electrolyte dependence of conductance through pits and that electroviscosity may be strong enough to play an important role in other transport processes in xylem. We conclude by proposing experiments to differentiate the impact of electroviscosity on from that of other proposed mechanisms. PMID:24014573

  1. Decoupling the Influence of Leaf and Root Hydraulic Conductances on Stomatal Conductance and its Sensitivity to Vapor Pressure Deficit as Soil Dries in a Drained Loblolly Pine Plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domec, J.; Noormets, A.; King, J. S.; McNulty, S. G.; Sun, G.; Gavazzi, M. J.; Boggs, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    The conversion of wetlands to intensively managed forest lands in eastern North Carolina is widespread and the consequences on plant hydraulic properties and water balances are not well studied. Precipitation and soil moisture in North America will be modified in the future and forest trees in the US will be challenged by warmer temperature, higher leaf-to-air water vapor pressure deficit (D), and more frequent summer droughts. Many studies have examined the relationships between whole tree hydraulic conductance (Ktree) and stomatal conductance (gs), but Ktree remains an ill-defined quantity because it depends on a series of resistances, mainly controlled by the conductance in roots (Kroot) and leaves (Kleaf). To explain the variation in Ktree, we characterized Kroot and Kleaf and how they responded to environmental drivers such as soil moisture availability and D. In addition, the role of dynamic variations in Kroot and Kleaf in mediating stomatal control of transpiration and its response to D was studied. The 2007 summer drought was used as a means to challenge the hydraulic system, allowing testing how broadly predictions about its behaviour hold outside the range of typical conditions. Roots and leaves were the weakest points in the whole tree hydraulic system, and contributed for more than 75% of the total tree hydraulic resistance. Effects of drought on Ktree altered the partitioning of the resistance between roots and leaves and as soil moisture declined below 50% relative extractable water (REW), Kroot declined faster than Kleaf and became the dominant hydraulic fuse regulating Ktree. Although Ktree depended on soil moisture, its dynamics was tempered by current-year needle elongation that increased significantly Kleaf during the dry months when REW was below 50%. To maintain the integrity of the xylem hydraulic continuum from roots to leaves, stomata were highly responsive in coordinating transpiration with dynamic variation in Ktree. Daily maximum gs and

  2. Effect of uncertain hydraulic conductivity on the fate and transport of BTEX compounds at a field site

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao; Wolfsberg, Andrew

    2002-01-05

    A Monte Carlo analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of uncertain hydraulic conductivity on the fate and transport of BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene) at a field site on Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Microbially mediated BTEX degradation has occurred at the site through multiple terminal electron-accepting processes, including aerobic respiration, denitrification, Fe(III) reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis degradation. Multiple realizations of the hydraulic conductivity field were generated and substituted into a multispecies reactive transport model developed and calibrated for the Hill AFB site in a previous study. Simulation results show that the calculated total BTEX masses (released from a constant-concentration source) that remain in the aquifer at the end of the simulation period statistically follow a lognormal distribution. In the first analysis (base case), the calculated total BTEX mass varies from a minimum of 12% less and a maximum of 60% more than that of the previously calibrated model. This suggests that the uncertainty in hydraulic conductivity can lead to significant uncertainties in modeling the fate and transport of BTEX. Geometric analyses of calculated plume configurations show that a higher BTEX mass is associated with wider lateral spreading, while a lower mass is associated with longer longitudinal extension. More BTEX mass in the aquifer causes either a large depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO) and NO{sub 3}{sup -}, or a large depletion of DO and a large production of Fe{sup 2+}, with moderately depleted NO{sub 3}{sup -}. In an additional analysis, the effect of varying degrees of aquifer heterogeneity and associated uncertainty is examined by considering hydraulic conductivity with different variances and correlation lengths. An increase in variance leads to a higher average BTEX mass in the aquifer, while an increase in correlation length results in a lower average. This observation is

  3. Hydraulic conductivity and aquaporin transcription in roots of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by Laccaria bicolor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Cooke, Janice E K; Kemppainen, Minna; Pardo, Alejandro G; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2016-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi have been reported to increase root hydraulic conductivity (L pr) by altering apoplastic and plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP)-mediated cell-to-cell water transport pathways in associated roots, or to have little effect on root water transport, depending on the interacting species and imposed stresses. In this study, we investigated the water transport properties and PIP transcription in roots of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by the wild-type strain of Laccaria bicolor and by strains overexpressing a major fungal water-transporting aquaporin JQ585595. Inoculation of aspen seedlings with L. bicolor resulted in about 30 % colonization rate of root tips, which developed dense mantle and the Hartig net that was restricted in the modified root epidermis. Transcript abundance of the aspen aquaporins PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;2 decreased in colonized root tips. Root colonization by JQ585595-overexpressing strains had no significant impact on seedling shoot water potentials, gas exchange, or dry mass; however, it led to further decrease in transcript abundance of PIP1;2 and PIP2;3 and the significantly lower L pr than in non-inoculated roots. These results, taken together with our previous study that showed enhanced root water hydraulics of L. bicolor-colonized white spruce (Picea glauca), suggest that the impact of L. bicolor on root hydraulics varies by the ectomycorrhiza-associated tree species.

  4. Reduced content of homogalacturonan does not alter the ion-mediated increase in xylem hydraulic conductivity in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Andrea; Gascó, Antonio; Cervone, Felice; Salleo, Sebastiano

    2007-04-01

    Xylem hydraulic conductivity (K(s)) in stems of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) wild-type SR1 was compared to that of PG7 and PG16, two transgenic lines with increased levels of expression of the gene encoding the Aspergillus niger endopolygalacturonase (AnPGII). Activity of AnPGII removes in planta blocks of homogalacturonan (HG) with deesterified carboxyls, thus increasing the degree of neutrality of pectins. The effect of K+ was tested in increasing stem K(s) using model plants with more neutral polysaccharides in primary walls and, hence, in intervessel pit membranes. K(s) measured with deionized water was compared to that with KCl solutions at increasing concentrations (DeltaK(s), %). Plants transformed for HG degree of neutrality showed a dwarfed phenotype, but DeltaK(s) did not differ among the three experimental groups. The ion-mediated hydraulic effect saturated at a KCl concentration of 25 mm in SR1 plants. All the three tobacco lines showed DeltaK(s) of around +12.5% and +17.0% when perfused with 10 and 25 mm KCl, respectively. Because modification of HG content did not influence ion-mediated hydraulic enhancement, we suggest that pectin components other than HG, like rhamnogalacturonan-I and/or rhamnogalacturonan-II, might play important roles in the hydrogel behavior of pit membranes.

  5. Hydraulic conductivity and aquaporin transcription in roots of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by Laccaria bicolor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Cooke, Janice E K; Kemppainen, Minna; Pardo, Alejandro G; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2016-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi have been reported to increase root hydraulic conductivity (L pr) by altering apoplastic and plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP)-mediated cell-to-cell water transport pathways in associated roots, or to have little effect on root water transport, depending on the interacting species and imposed stresses. In this study, we investigated the water transport properties and PIP transcription in roots of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by the wild-type strain of Laccaria bicolor and by strains overexpressing a major fungal water-transporting aquaporin JQ585595. Inoculation of aspen seedlings with L. bicolor resulted in about 30 % colonization rate of root tips, which developed dense mantle and the Hartig net that was restricted in the modified root epidermis. Transcript abundance of the aspen aquaporins PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;2 decreased in colonized root tips. Root colonization by JQ585595-overexpressing strains had no significant impact on seedling shoot water potentials, gas exchange, or dry mass; however, it led to further decrease in transcript abundance of PIP1;2 and PIP2;3 and the significantly lower L pr than in non-inoculated roots. These results, taken together with our previous study that showed enhanced root water hydraulics of L. bicolor-colonized white spruce (Picea glauca), suggest that the impact of L. bicolor on root hydraulics varies by the ectomycorrhiza-associated tree species. PMID:26861480

  6. Temporal changes of hydraulic conductivity of cultivated soil studied with help of multipoint tension infiltrometer and X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipa, Vladimir; Zumr, David; Snehota, Michal; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregates, its shape, size and spatial distribution affect the pores arrangement and thus govern the hydraulic conductivity of soil and soil moisture regime. On arable lands the soil is exposed to rapid structural changes within each growing season due to agrotechnical practices, quick crop and root growth, soil biota and climatic conditions. This contribution is mainly focused on temporal changes of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of cultivated soil. The research is supplemented by detailed analysis of CT images of soil samples for better understanding of structural change of soil during the year and its impact on soil hydraulic conductivity. The infiltration experiments were done using automated multipoint tension infiltrometer recently developed at CTU in Prague on the plots located on the Nucice experimental catchment. The catchment is situated in a moderately hilly area in central Bohemia (Czech Republic). Fourteen regular infiltration campaigns (77 individual infiltration experiments) were conducted from October 2012 until July 2015 on a single arable plot. In general, agricultural practice captured involved complete life cycle from sowing, through harvest, to postharvest stubble breaking. Weather conditions during infiltration experiments ranged from clear-sky to light rain, with temperatures between 8 and 30°C. All measurements were consistently performed with small suction of 3 cm and hydraulic conductivities were determined using extended semiempirical estimation procedure of Zhang. Results show that unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was the lowest in early spring and did increase at beginning of summer in the years 2012 - 2014. During the summer and autumn (2012 - 2014) the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity remained relatively unchanged. On the contrary, results in the year 2015 show opposite trend - the highest hydraulic conductivity was observed in early spring and did gradually decrease until the end of July. In both cases, however, the

  7. Prolonged experimental drought reduces plant hydraulic conductance and transpiration and increases mortality in a piñon-juniper woodland.

    PubMed

    Pangle, Robert E; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Plaut, Jennifer A; Yepez, Enrico A; Hudson, Patrick J; Boutz, Amanda L; Gehres, Nathan; Pockman, William T; McDowell, Nate G

    2015-04-01

    Plant hydraulic conductance (k s) is a critical control on whole-plant water use and carbon uptake and, during drought, influences whether plants survive or die. To assess long-term physiological and hydraulic responses of mature trees to water availability, we manipulated ecosystem-scale water availability from 2007 to 2013 in a piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We examined the relationship between k s and subsequent mortality using more than 5 years of physiological observations, and the subsequent impact of reduced hydraulic function and mortality on total woody canopy transpiration (E C) and conductance (G C). For both species, we observed significant reductions in plant transpiration (E) and k s under experimentally imposed drought. Conversely, supplemental water additions increased E and k s in both species. Interestingly, both species exhibited similar declines in k s under the imposed drought conditions, despite their differing stomatal responses and mortality patterns during drought. Reduced whole-plant k s also reduced carbon assimilation in both species, as leaf-level stomatal conductance (g s) and net photosynthesis (A n) declined strongly with decreasing k s. Finally, we observed that chronically low whole-plant k s was associated with greater canopy dieback and mortality for both piñon and juniper and that subsequent reductions in woody canopy biomass due to mortality had a significant impact on both daily and annual canopy E C and G C. Our data indicate that significant reductions in k s precede drought-related tree mortality events in this system, and the consequence is a significant reduction in canopy gas exchange and carbon fixation. Our results suggest that reductions in productivity and woody plant cover in piñon-juniper woodlands can be expected due to reduced plant hydraulic conductance and increased mortality of both piñon pine and juniper under anticipated future conditions of more frequent and

  8. Joint inference of groundwater-recharge and hydraulic-conductivity fields from head data using the ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdal, D.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    Regional groundwater flow strongly depends on groundwater recharge and hydraulic conductivity. Both are spatially variable fields, and their estimation is an ongoing topic in groundwater research and practice. In this study, we use the ensemble Kalman filter as an inversion method to jointly estimate spatially variable recharge and conductivity fields from head observations. The success of the approach strongly depends on the assumed prior knowledge. If the structural assumptions underlying the initial ensemble of the parameter fields are correct, both estimated fields resemble the true ones. However, erroneous prior knowledge may not be corrected by the head data. In the worst case, the estimated recharge field resembles the true conductivity field, resulting in a model that meets the observations but has very poor predictive power. The study exemplifies the importance of prior knowledge in the joint estimation of parameters from ambiguous measurements.

  9. Geologically based model of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity in an alluvial setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, Graham E.; Noyes, Charles D.; Carle, Steven F.

    Information on sediment texture and spatial continuity are inherent to sedimentary depositional facies descriptions, which are therefore potentially good predictors of spatially varying hydraulic conductivity (K). Analysis of complex alluvial heterogeneity in Livermore Valley, California, USA, using relatively abundant core descriptions and field pumping-test data, demonstrates a depositional-facies approach to characterization of subsurface heterogeneity. Conventional textural classifications of the core show a poor correlation with K; however, further refinement of the textural classifications into channel, levee, debris-flow, and flood-plain depositional facies reveals a systematic framework for spatial modeling of K. This geologic framework shows that most of the system is composed of very low-K flood-plain materials, and that the K measurements predominantly represent the other, higher-K facies. Joint interpretation of both the K and geologic data shows that spatial distribution of K in this system could not be adequately modeled without geologic data and analysis. Furthermore, it appears that K should not be assumed to be log-normally distributed, except perhaps within each facies. Markov chain modeling of transition probability, representing spatial correlation within and among the facies, captures the relevant geologic features while highlighting a new approach for statistical characterization of hydrofacies spatial variability. The presence of fining-upward facies sequences, cross correlation between facies, as well as other geologic attributes captured by the Markov chains provoke questions about the suitability of conventional geostatistical approaches based on variograms or covariances for modeling geologic heterogeneity. Résumé Les informations sur la texture des sédiments et leur continuité spatiale font partie des descriptions de faciès sédimentaires de dépôt. Par conséquent, ces descriptions sont d'excellents prédicteurs potentiels des

  10. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  11. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  12. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, Wayne R.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Elliott, Peggy E.

    2002-01-01

    The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologically complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence hydraulic conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

  13. Use of air-pressurized slug tests to estimate hydraulic conductivity at selected piezometers completed in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Carole L.; Thorn, Conde R.

    2000-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque Public Works Department, Water Resources Management (City), is interested in quantifying aquifer hydraulic properties in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area to better understand and manage water resources in the Middle Rio Grande Basin. In 1998, the City and the U.S. Geological Survey entered into a cooperative program to determine hydraulic properties of aquifer material adjacent to screened intervals of piezometers in the Albuquerque area. Investigators conducted slug tests from March 8 through April 8, 1999, to estimate hydraulic conductivity of aquifer material adjacent to the screened intervals of 25 piezometers from 11 nested- piezometer sites in the Albuquerque area. At 20 of the piezometers, slug-test responses were typical; at 2 piezometers, tests were prematurely terminated because the tests were taking too long to complete; and at 3 piezometers, test responses were oscillatory. Methods used to estimate hydraulic conductivity were the Bouwer and Rice method or the Cooper, Bredehoeft, and Papadopulos method for most tests; the Shapiro and Greene method for prematurely terminated tests; and the van der Kamp method for oscillatory tests. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates ranged from about 0.15 to 92 feet per day. In general, the smaller estimated values are associated with fine-grained aquifer materials and the larger estimated hydraulic-conductivity values are associated with coarse- grained aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals of the piezometers. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates ranged from 0.15 to 8.2 feet per day for aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals at 12 piezometers and from 12 to 41 feet per day for aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals at 10 piezometers. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates at four piezometers were greater than 41 feet per day.

  14. Daily dynamics of leaf and soil-to-branch hydraulic conductance in silver birch (Betula pendula) measured in situ.

    PubMed

    Õunapuu, Eele; Sellin, Arne

    2013-07-01

    Daily dynamics of leaf (K(L)) and soil-to-branch hydraulic conductance (KS-B) was investigated in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) using evaporative flux method in situ: water potential drop was measured with a pressure chamber and evaporative flux was estimated as sap flux density measured with sap flow gauges. Canopy position had a significant (P < 0.001) effect on both K(L) and K(S-B). Upper-canopy leaves exhibited 1.7 and soil-to-branch pathway 2.3 times higher hydraulic efficiency than those for lower-canopy. K(L) varied significantly with time of day: K(L) for both upper- and lower-canopy leaves was lowest in the morning and rose gradually achieving maximal values in late afternoon (4.75 and 3.38 mmol m⁻² s⁻¹ MPa⁻¹, respectively). Relevant environmental factors affecting K(L) were photosynthetic photon flux density (Q(P)), air relative humidity (RH) and air temperature (T(A)). K(S-B) started rising in the morning and reached maximum in the lower canopy (1.44 mmol m⁻² s⁻¹ MPa⁻¹) at 1300 h and in the upper canopy (2.52 mmol m⁻² s⁻¹ MPa⁻¹) at 1500 h, decreasing afterwards. Environmental factors controlling K(S-B) were Ψ(S) and Q(P). The diurnal patterns of K(L) reflect a combination of environmental factors and endogenous rhythms. The temporal pattern of K(S-B) refers to daily up- and down-regulation of hydraulic conductance of water transport pathway from soil-root interface to leaves with respect to changing irradiance.

  15. Interactions among hydraulic conductivity distributions, subsurface topography, and transport thresholds revealed by a multitracer hillslope irrigation experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, C. Rhett; Du, Enhao; Klaus, Julian; Griffiths, Natalie A.; Bitew, Menberu; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-08-12

    Interactions among hydraulic conductivity distributions, subsurface topography, and lateral flow are poorly understood. We applied 407 mm of water and a suite of tracers over 51 h to a 12 by 16.5 m forested hillslope segment to determine interflow thresholds, preferential pathway pore velocities, large-scale conductivities, the time series of event water fractions, and the fate of dissolved nutrients. The 12% hillslope featured loamy sand A and E horizons overlying a sandy clay loam Bt at 1.25 m average depth. Interflow measured from two drains within an interception trench commenced after 131 and 208 mm of irrigation. Cumulative interflow equaledmore » 49% of applied water. Conservative tracer differences between the collection drains indicated differences in flow paths and storages within the plot. Event water fractions rose steadily throughout irrigation, peaking at 50% sixteen h after irrigation ceased. Data implied that tightly held water exchanged with event water throughout the experiment and a substantial portion of preevent water was released from the argillic layer. Surface-applied dye tracers bypassed the matrix, with peak concentrations measured shortly after flow commencement, indicating preferential network conductivities of 864–2240 mm/h, yet no macropore flow was observed. Near steady-state flow conditions indicated average conductivities of 460 mm/h and 2.5 mm/h for topsoils and the Bt horizon, respectively. Low ammonium and phosphorus concentrations in the interflow suggested rapid uptake or sorption, while higher nitrate concentrations suggested more conservative transport. Lastly, these results reveal how hydraulic conductivity variation and subsurface topographic complexity explain otherwise paradoxical solute and flow behaviors.« less

  16. Geologically based model of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity in an alluvial setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, Graham E.; Noyes, Charles D.; Carle, Steven F.

    Information on sediment texture and spatial continuity are inherent to sedimentary depositional facies descriptions, which are therefore potentially good predictors of spatially varying hydraulic conductivity (K). Analysis of complex alluvial heterogeneity in Livermore Valley, California, USA, using relatively abundant core descriptions and field pumping-test data, demonstrates a depositional-facies approach to characterization of subsurface heterogeneity. Conventional textural classifications of the core show a poor correlation with K; however, further refinement of the textural classifications into channel, levee, debris-flow, and flood-plain depositional facies reveals a systematic framework for spatial modeling of K. This geologic framework shows that most of the system is composed of very low-K flood-plain materials, and that the K measurements predominantly represent the other, higher-K facies. Joint interpretation of both the K and geologic data shows that spatial distribution of K in this system could not be adequately modeled without geologic data and analysis. Furthermore, it appears that K should not be assumed to be log-normally distributed, except perhaps within each facies. Markov chain modeling of transition probability, representing spatial correlation within and among the facies, captures the relevant geologic features while highlighting a new approach for statistical characterization of hydrofacies spatial variability. The presence of fining-upward facies sequences, cross correlation between facies, as well as other geologic attributes captured by the Markov chains provoke questions about the suitability of conventional geostatistical approaches based on variograms or covariances for modeling geologic heterogeneity. Résumé Les informations sur la texture des sédiments et leur continuité spatiale font partie des descriptions de faciès sédimentaires de dépôt. Par conséquent, ces descriptions sont d'excellents prédicteurs potentiels des

  17. Application of owner technical management in hydraulic machinery and electrical equipment investment target control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.

    2012-11-01

    Using technical means in investment target control is an effective method to improve investment benefit of a construction project. Take the practice of construction and management in hydropower station as an example, the investment and management need of the owner is put forward through the investment target decision-making process of electromechanical equipment. Owner technical management in the specific application measures and effects of investment target control was discussed in the paper, and the revelation in investment target control application of owner technical management was also summarized. The paper is aimed to provide a useful reference for the investment target control work in the construction of electromechanical equipment.

  18. Comparison of hydraulic conductivities by grain-size analysis pumping, and slug tests in Quaternary gravels, NE Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucko, Tatjana; Verbovšek, Timotej

    2015-08-01

    Hydraulic conductivities (K) can be obtained from pumping and slug tests as well as grain size analysis. Although empirical methods for such estimations are longstanding, there is still insufficient comparison of K values among the various approaches. Six grain-size analysis methods were tested on coarse-grained alluvial sediments from 12 water wells in NE Slovenia. Values of K from grainsize methods were compared to those of pumping tests and slug tests. Six grain-size methods (USBR, Slichter, Hazen, Beyer, Kozeny-Carman, and Terzaghi) were used for comparison with the Theis and Neuman pumping test method and the Bouwer-Rice method for slug tests. The results show that the USBR (US Bureau of Reclamation) method overestimates K values and there is no correlation with other results, so its use is not advised. Conversely, whilst the Slichter method gives much lower estimates of K, it is the only one to completely fulfill the grain size requirements. Other methods (Hazen, Beyer, Kozeny- Carman, and Terzaghi) result in intermediate values and are similar to the Slichter method; however they should be used for smaller-sized sediments. Due to their high transmissivity and small radius of inffiuence, slug tests should be avoided in the analysis of gravels, as they only test a small portion of the aquifer compared to pumping tests. This is confirmed by the low correlation coefficients between hydraulic conductivities obtained from pumping tests and slug tests.

  19. Water uptake by growing cells: an assessment of the controlling roles of wall relaxation, solute uptake, and hydraulic conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Growing plant cells increase in volume principally by water uptake into the vacuole. There are only three general mechanisms by which a cell can modulate the process of water uptake: (a) by relaxing wall stress to reduce cell turgor pressure (thereby reducing cell water potential), (b) by modifying the solute content of the cell or its surroundings (likewise affecting water potential), and (c) by changing the hydraulic conductance of the water uptake pathway (this works only for cells remote from water potential equilibrium). Recent studies supporting each of these potential mechanisms are reviewed and critically assessed. The importance of solute uptake and hydraulic conductance is advocated by some recent studies, but the evidence is indirect and conclusions remain controversial. For most growing plant cells with substantial turgor pressure, it appears that reduction in cell turgor pressure, as a consequence of wall relaxation, serves as the major initiator and control point for plant cell enlargement. Two views of wall relaxation as a viscoelastic or a chemorheological process are compared and distinguished.

  20. Leaf hydraulic conductance varies with vein anatomy across Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and leaf vein mutants.

    PubMed

    Caringella, Marissa A; Bongers, Franca J; Sack, Lawren

    2015-12-01

    Leaf venation is diverse across plant species and has practical applications from paleobotany to modern agriculture. However, the impact of vein traits on plant performance has not yet been tested in a model system such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies analysed cotyledons of A. thaliana vein mutants and identified visible differences in their vein systems from the wild type (WT). We measured leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf ), vein traits, and xylem and mesophyll anatomy for A. thaliana WT (Col-0) and four vein mutants (dot3-111 and dot3-134, and cvp1-3 and cvp2-1). Mutant true leaves did not possess the qualitative venation anomalies previously shown in the cotyledons, but varied quantitatively in vein traits and leaf anatomy across genotypes. The WT had significantly higher mean Kleaf . Across all genotypes, there was a strong correlation of Kleaf with traits related to hydraulic conductance across the bundle sheath, as influenced by the number and radial diameter of bundle sheath cells and vein length per area. These findings support the hypothesis that vein traits influence Kleaf , indicating the usefulness of this mutant system for testing theory that was primarily established comparatively across species, and supports a strong role for the bundle sheath in influencing Kleaf .

  1. Linking physiological processes with mangrove forest structure: phosphorus deficiency limits canopy development, hydraulic conductivity and photosynthetic carbon gain in dwarf Rhizophora mangle.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Catherine E; Ball, Marilyn C; Choat, Brendan; Engelbrecht, Bettina M J; Holbrook, N Michelle; Feller, Ilka C

    2006-05-01

    Spatial gradients in mangrove tree height in barrier islands of Belize are associated with nutrient deficiency and sustained flooding in the absence of a salinity gradient. While nutrient deficiency is likely to affect many parameters, here we show that addition of phosphorus (P) to dwarf mangroves stimulated increases in diameters of xylem vessels, area of conductive xylem tissue and leaf area index (LAI) of the canopy. These changes in structure were consistent with related changes in function, as addition of P also increased hydraulic conductivity (Ks), stomatal conductance and photosynthetic assimilation rates to the same levels measured in taller trees fringing the seaward margin of the mangrove. Increased xylem vessel size and corresponding enhancements in stem hydraulic conductivity in P fertilized dwarf trees came at the cost of enhanced mid-day loss of hydraulic conductivity and was associated with decreased assimilation rates in the afternoon. Analysis of trait plasticity identifies hydraulic properties of trees as more plastic than those of leaf structural and physiological characteristics, implying that hydraulic properties are key in controlling growth in mangroves. Alleviation of P deficiency, which released trees from hydraulic limitations, reduced the structural and functional distinctions between dwarf and taller fringing tree forms of Rhizophora mangle.

  2. Linking physiological processes with mangrove forest structure: phosphorus deficiency limits canopy development, hydraulic conductivity and photosynthetic carbon gain in dwarf Rhizophora mangle.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Catherine E; Ball, Marilyn C; Choat, Brendan; Engelbrecht, Bettina M J; Holbrook, N Michelle; Feller, Ilka C

    2006-05-01

    Spatial gradients in mangrove tree height in barrier islands of Belize are associated with nutrient deficiency and sustained flooding in the absence of a salinity gradient. While nutrient deficiency is likely to affect many parameters, here we show that addition of phosphorus (P) to dwarf mangroves stimulated increases in diameters of xylem vessels, area of conductive xylem tissue and leaf area index (LAI) of the canopy. These changes in structure were consistent with related changes in function, as addition of P also increased hydraulic conductivity (Ks), stomatal conductance and photosynthetic assimilation rates to the same levels measured in taller trees fringing the seaward margin of the mangrove. Increased xylem vessel size and corresponding enhancements in stem hydraulic conductivity in P fertilized dwarf trees came at the cost of enhanced mid-day loss of hydraulic conductivity and was associated with decreased assimilation rates in the afternoon. Analysis of trait plasticity identifies hydraulic properties of trees as more plastic than those of leaf structural and physiological characteristics, implying that hydraulic properties are key in controlling growth in mangroves. Alleviation of P deficiency, which released trees from hydraulic limitations, reduced the structural and functional distinctions between dwarf and taller fringing tree forms of Rhizophora mangle. PMID:17087463

  3. Seismic swarms, fluid flow and hydraulic conductivity in the forearc offshore North Costa Rica and Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorwart, Martin; Dzierma, Yvonne; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Hensen, Christian

    2014-10-01

    At the continental margin of north Costa Rica and Nicaragua, the strongly hydrated Cocos Plate subducts beneath the Caribbean Plate. From the downgoing Cocos plate fluids are released through extensional fractures in the overriding plate. At the seafloor, they form fluid seeps, mounds and other types of fluid expulsion. Using an offshore temporary seismic network, we investigated seismicity possibly related to these processes and observed several swarms of earthquakes located on the continental slope trenchward of the seismogenic zone of S Nicaragua. The seismicity occurred within the downgoing plate, near the plate interface and in the overriding plate. We interpret these swarm events as an expression of pore pressure propagation under critical stress conditions driven by fluid release from the downgoing plate. In order to estimate hydraulic diffusivity and permeability values, we applied a theory developed for injection test interpretation to the spatio-temporal development of the swarms. The resulting diffusivity and permeability values are in the ranges of 28-305 m²/s and 3.2 × 10-14 m²-35.1 × 10-14 m², respectively, applying to the continental and oceanic crust near the plate interface. These values are somewhat larger than observed in drill logs on the margin wedge off north Costa Rica, but of comparable magnitude to values estimated for the Antofagasta 1995 earthquake aftershock sequence.

  4. [Seasonal differences in the leaf hydraulic conductance of mature Acacia mangium in response to its leaf water use and photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Sun, Gu-Chou; Ni, Guang-Yan; Zeng, Xiao-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In this study, measurements were made on the leaf water potential (psi1), stomatal conductance (g(s)), transpiration rate, leaf area index, and sapwood area of mature Acacia mangium, aimed to understand the relationships of the leaf hydraulic conductance (K1) with the leaf water use and photosynthetic characteristics of the A. mangium in wet season (May) and dry season (November). The ratio of sapwood area to leaf area (A(sp)/A(cl)) of the larger trees with an average height of 20 m and a diameter at breast height (DBH) of 0.26 m was 8.5% higher than that of the smaller trees with an average height of 14.5 m and a DBH of 0.19 m, suggesting that the larger trees had a higher water flux in their leaf xylem, which facilitated the water use of canopy leaf. The analysis on the vulnerability curve of the xylem showed that when the K1 decreased by 50%, the psi1 in wet season and dry season was -1.41 and -1.55 MPa, respectively, and the vulnerability of the xylem cavitation was higher in dry season than in wet season. The K1 peak value in wet season and dry season was 5.5 and 4.5 mmol x m(-2) x s(-1) x MPa(-1), and the maximum transpiration rate (T(r max)) was 3.6 and 1.8 mmol x m(-2) x s(-1), respectively. Both the K1 and T(r max), were obviously higher in wet season than in dry season. Within a day, the K1 and T(r), fluctuated many times, reflecting the reciprocated cycle of the xylem cavitation and refilling. The leaf stomatal closure occurred when the K1 declined over 50% or the psi1 reached -1.6 MPa. The g(s) would be maintained at a high level till the K1 declined over 50%. The correlation between the hydraulic conductance and photosynthetic rate was more significant in dry season than in wet season. The loss of leaf hydraulic conductance induced by seasonal change could be the causes of the decrease of T(r) and CO2 gas exchange.

  5. [Seasonal differences in the leaf hydraulic conductance of mature Acacia mangium in response to its leaf water use and photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Sun, Gu-Chou; Ni, Guang-Yan; Zeng, Xiao-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In this study, measurements were made on the leaf water potential (psi1), stomatal conductance (g(s)), transpiration rate, leaf area index, and sapwood area of mature Acacia mangium, aimed to understand the relationships of the leaf hydraulic conductance (K1) with the leaf water use and photosynthetic characteristics of the A. mangium in wet season (May) and dry season (November). The ratio of sapwood area to leaf area (A(sp)/A(cl)) of the larger trees with an average height of 20 m and a diameter at breast height (DBH) of 0.26 m was 8.5% higher than that of the smaller trees with an average height of 14.5 m and a DBH of 0.19 m, suggesting that the larger trees had a higher water flux in their leaf xylem, which facilitated the water use of canopy leaf. The analysis on the vulnerability curve of the xylem showed that when the K1 decreased by 50%, the psi1 in wet season and dry season was -1.41 and -1.55 MPa, respectively, and the vulnerability of the xylem cavitation was higher in dry season than in wet season. The K1 peak value in wet season and dry season was 5.5 and 4.5 mmol x m(-2) x s(-1) x MPa(-1), and the maximum transpiration rate (T(r max)) was 3.6 and 1.8 mmol x m(-2) x s(-1), respectively. Both the K1 and T(r max), were obviously higher in wet season than in dry season. Within a day, the K1 and T(r), fluctuated many times, reflecting the reciprocated cycle of the xylem cavitation and refilling. The leaf stomatal closure occurred when the K1 declined over 50% or the psi1 reached -1.6 MPa. The g(s) would be maintained at a high level till the K1 declined over 50%. The correlation between the hydraulic conductance and photosynthetic rate was more significant in dry season than in wet season. The loss of leaf hydraulic conductance induced by seasonal change could be the causes of the decrease of T(r) and CO2 gas exchange. PMID:23717989

  6. Anisohydric but isohydrodynamic: seasonally constant plant water potential gradient explained by a stomatal control mechanism incorporating variable plant hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Franks, Peter J; Drake, Paul L; Froend, Ray H

    2007-01-01

    Isohydric and anisohydric regulations of plant water status have been observed over several decades of field, glasshouse and laboratory studies, yet the functional significance and mechanism of both remain obscure. We studied the seasonal trends in plant water status and hydraulic properties in a natural stand of Eucalyptus gomphocephala through cycles of varying environmental moisture (rainfall, groundwater depth, evaporative demand) in order to test for isohydry and to provide physiological information for the mechanistic interpretation of seasonal trends in plant water status. Over a 16 month period of monitoring, spanning two summers, midday leaf water potential (psi(leaf)) correlated with predawn psi(leaf), which was correlated with water table depth below ground level, which in turn was correlated with total monthly rainfall. Eucalyptus gomphocephala was therefore not seasonally isohydric. Despite strong stomatal down-regulation of transpiration rate in response to increasing evaporative demand, this was insufficient to prevent midday psi(leaf) from falling to levels below -2 MPa in the driest month, well into the region likely to induce xylem air embolisms, based on xylem vulnerability curves obtained in the study. However, even though midday psi(leaf) varied by over 1.2 MPa across seasons, the hydrodynamic (transpiration-induced) water potential gradient from roots to shoots (delta psi(plant)), measured as the difference between predawn and midday psi(leaf), was relatively constant across seasons, averaging 0.67 MPa. This unusual pattern of hydraulic regulation, referred to here as isohydrodynamic, is explained by a hydromechanical stomatal control model where plant hydraulic conductance is dependent on transpiration rate.

  7. Water infiltration and hydraulic conductivity in a natural Mediterranean oak forest: impacts of hydrology-oriented silviculture on soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Prima, Simone; Bagarello, Vincenzo; Bautista, Inmaculada; Cerdà, Artemi; Cullotta, Sebastiano; del Campo, Antonio; González-Sanchis, María; Iovino, Massimo; Maetzke, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In the last years researchers reported an increasing need to have more awareness on the intimate link between land use and soil hydrological properties (soil organic matter storage, water infiltration, hydraulic conductivity) and their possible effects on water retention (e.g., Bens et al., 2006; del Campo et al., 2014; González-Sanchis et al., 2015; Molina and del Campo, 2012). In the Mediterranean ecosystems, special attention needs to be paid to the forest-water relationships due to the natural scarcity of water. Adaptive forest management (AFM) aims to adapt the forest to water availability by means of an artificial regulation of the forest structure and density in order to promote tree and stand resilience through enhancing soil water availability (del Campo et al., 2014). The opening of the canopy, due to the removal of a certain number of trees, is an important practice for the management of forests. It results in important modifications to the microclimatic conditions that influence the ecophysiological functioning of trees (Aussenac and Granier, 1988). However, the effect of thinning may vary depending on the specific conditions of the forest (Andréassian, 2004; Brooks et al., 2003; Cosandey et al., 2005; Lewis et al., 2000; Molina and del Campo, 2012). Different authors reported that a reduction in forest cover increases water yield due to the subsequent reduction in evapotranspiration (Brooks et al., 2003; González-Sanchis et al., 2015; Hibbert, 1983; Zhang et al., 2001). On the other hand, the water increase may be easily evaporated from the soil surface (Andréassian, 2004). In this context, determining soil hydraulic properties in forests is essential for understanding and simulating the hydrological processes (Alagna et al., 2015; Assouline and Mualem, 2002), in order to adapt a water-saving management to a specific case, or to study the effects of a particular management practice. However, it must be borne in mind that changes brought about by

  8. Application of ground-penetrating radar, digital optical borehole images, and cores for characterization of porosity hydraulic conductivity and paleokarst in the Biscayne aquifer, southeastern Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents examples of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data from two study sites in southeastern Florida where karstic Pleistocene platform carbonates that comprise the unconfined Biscayne aquifer were imaged. Important features shown on resultant GPR profiles include: (1) upward and lateral qualitative interpretative distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity; (2) paleotopographic relief on karstic subaerial exposure surfaces; and (3) vertical stacking of chronostratigraphic high-frequency cycles (HFCs). These characteristics were verified by comparison to rock properties observed and measured in core samples, and identified in digital optical borehole images. Results demonstrate that an empirical relation exists between measured whole-core porosity and hydraulic conductivity, observed porosity on digital optical borehole images, formation conductivity, and GPR reflection amplitudes-as porosity and hydraulic conductivity determined from core and borehole images increases, formation conductivity increases, and GPR reflection amplitude decreases. This relation allows for qualitative interpretation of the vertical and lateral distribution of porosity and hydraulic conductivity within HFCs. Two subtidal HFCs in the uppermost Biscayne aquifer have significantly unique populations of whole-core porosity values and vertical hydraulic conductivity values. Porosity measurements from one cycle has a median value about two to three times greater than the values from the other HFC, and median values of vertical hydraulic-conductivity about three orders of magnitude higher than the other HFC. The HFC with the higher porosity and hydraulic conductivity values is shown as a discrete package of relatively low-amplitude reflections, whereas the HFC characterized by lower porosity and hydraulic-conductivity measurements is expressed by higher amplitude reflections. Porosity and hydraulic-conductivity values measured from whole-core samples, and vuggy porosity

  9. Non-hydraulic signals from maize roots in drying soil: inhibition of leaf elongation but not stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Saab, I N; Sharp, R E

    1989-11-01

    Conditions of soil drying and plant growth that lead to non-hydraulic inhibition of leaf elongation and stomatal conductance in maize (Zea mays L.) were investigated using plants grown with their root systems divided between two containers. The soil in one container was allowed to dry while the other container was kept well-watered. Soil drying resulted in a maximum 35% inhibition of leaf elongation rate which occurred during the light hours, with no measurable decline in leaf water potential (ψw). Leaf area was 15% less than in control plants after 18 d of soil drying. The inhibition of elongation was observed only when the soil ψw declined to below that of the leaves and, thus, the drying soil no longer contributed to transpiration. However, midday root ψw in the dry container (-0.29 MPa) remained much higher than that of the surrounding soil (-1.0 MPa) after 15 d of drying, indicating that the roots in drying soil were rehydrated in the dark.To prove that the inhibition of leaf elongation was not caused by undetectable changes in leaf water status as a result of loss of half the watergathering capacity, one-half of the root system of control plants was excised. This treatment had no effect on leaf elongation or stomatal conductance. The inhibition of leaf elongation was also not explained by reductions in nutrient supply.Soil drying had no effect on stomatal conductance despite variations in the rate or extent of soild drying, light, humidity or nutrition. The results indicate that non-hydraulic inhibition of leaf elongation may act to conserve water as the soil dries before the occurrence of shoot water deficits. PMID:24201770

  10. Use of NMR logging to obtain estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the High Plains aquifer, Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dlubac, Katherine; Knight, Rosemary; Song, Yi-Qiao; Bachman, Nate; Grau, Ben; Cannia, Jim; Williams, John

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) is one of the most important parameters of interest in groundwater applications because it quantifies the ease with which water can flow through an aquifer material. Hydraulic conductivity is typically measured by conducting aquifer tests or wellbore flow (WBF) logging. Of interest in our research is the use of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging to obtain information about water-filled porosity and pore space geometry, the combination of which can be used to estimate K. In this study, we acquired a suite of advanced geophysical logs, aquifer tests, WBF logs, and sidewall cores at the field site in Lexington, Nebraska, which is underlain by the High Plains aquifer. We first used two empirical equations developed for petroleum applications to predict K from NMR logging data: the Schlumberger Doll Research equation (KSDR) and the Timur-Coates equation (KT-C), with the standard empirical constants determined for consolidated materials. We upscaled our NMR-derived K estimates to the scale of the WBF-logging K(KWBF-logging) estimates for comparison. All the upscaled KT-C estimates were within an order of magnitude of KWBF-logging and all of the upscaled KSDR estimates were within 2 orders of magnitude of KWBF-logging. We optimized the fit between the upscaled NMR-derived K and KWBF-logging estimates to determine a set of site-specific empirical constants for the unconsolidated materials at our field site. We conclude that reliable estimates of K can be obtained from NMR logging data, thus providing an alternate method for obtaining estimates of K at high levels of vertical resolution.

  11. Use of NMR logging to obtain estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the High Plains aquifer, Nebraska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlubac, Katherine; Knight, Rosemary; Song, Yi-Qiao; Bachman, Nate; Grau, Ben; Cannia, Jim; Williams, John

    2013-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) is one of the most important parameters of interest in groundwater applications because it quantifies the ease with which water can flow through an aquifer material. Hydraulic conductivity is typically measured by conducting aquifer tests or wellbore flow (WBF) logging. Of interest in our research is the use of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging to obtain information about water-filled porosity and pore space geometry, the combination of which can be used to estimate K. In this study, we acquired a suite of advanced geophysical logs, aquifer tests, WBF logs, and sidewall cores at the field site in Lexington, Nebraska, which is underlain by the High Plains aquifer. We first used two empirical equations developed for petroleum applications to predict K from NMR logging data: the Schlumberger Doll Research equation (KSDR) and the Timur-Coates equation (KT-C), with the standard empirical constants determined for consolidated materials. We upscaled our NMR-derived K estimates to the scale of the WBF-logging K(KWBF-logging) estimates for comparison. All the upscaled KT-C estimates were within an order of magnitude of KWBF-logging and all of the upscaled KSDR estimates were within 2 orders of magnitude of KWBF-logging. We optimized the fit between the upscaled NMR-derived K and KWBF-logging estimates to determine a set of site-specific empirical constants for the unconsolidated materials at our field site. We conclude that reliable estimates of K can be obtained from NMR logging data, thus providing an alternate method for obtaining estimates of K at high levels of vertical resolution.

  12. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Belcher, W.R.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Elliott, P.E.

    2002-11-19

    The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologicaly complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

  13. Spatial variation in saturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments at a crude-oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobel, Michael L.; Delin, G.N.; Munson, Carissa J.

    1998-01-01

    The average linear velocity of ground water near the spill site was calculated to examine the effects of advective flow on migration of the plumes of oil and dissolved petroleum constituents. The average linear velocity in the well-sorted medium to fine sand facies during September 1996 was about 11 meters per year (m/year). If we assume that this was the average velocity during the 17-year period since the spill (1979-96), total advective flow of ground water in this facies was about 187 m. During this 17-year period, oil floating on the water table migrated only about 40 m. By comparison, the lower sand and gravel unit had an average linear velocity of about 29 m/year, or about 3 times greater than the velocity in the well-sorted medium to fine sand facies. Based on a 29 m/year velocity, advective flow of ground water in this unit during the 17-year period since the spill was about 493 m; whereas, the plume of dissolved petroleum constituents migrated only about 200 m. These results indicate that spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity and ground-water velocity at the research site likely is a factor affecting the rate of contaminant migration. Additional research is needed to fully evaluate how the contaminant plumes are affected by changes in hydraulic properties of the various lithologic units.

  14. Hydraulic conductivity estimation using direct current (DC) sounding data: a case study in East Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwa, M.; Basokur, A. T.; Akca, I.

    2014-08-01

    Automated vertical electrical sounding (VES) inversion schemes were applied for hydrogeological characterisation at a semi-arid area in the southeastern part of the East Nile Delta, Egypt. The apparent resistivity measurements were integrated with borehole, hydrogeological and structural information for a better description of the subsurface conditions. The final results were presented in the form of cross-sections, maps and 3D diagrams to visualise the geological and hydrogeological situations. The resistivity values derived from the VES data were used to predict the hydraulic conductivity ( K) values by using two empirical relations, which depend on the direct relation between K and the aquifer transverse resistance ( T) and the power relation between K and the aquifer resistivity ( ρ). The estimated values were compared with the observed K values obtained from the pumping tests. The power law relation produces more reliable predicted K values that show a good correlation with the data compiled for the hydraulic gradient of the main Pleistocene aquifer in the East Nile Delta. The results also indicate that the joint use of an automated 1D interpretation algorithm and the power law empirical relationship constitute a valuable tool to characterise the hydrogeophysical properties of aquifers in the study area.

  15. Impact of Extreme Events and Soil Hydraulic Conductivity on the Evolution of a Mesa-top Waste Repository Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, K. J.; Wilson, C. J.; Lane, L. J.; Newman, B. D.; Schofield, T. G.

    2005-12-01

    The Siberia model was used to optimize the design of a mesa-top waste repository cover at Los Alamos National Laboratory on the Pajarito Plateau in Northern New Mexico, USA. The cover was designed to meet criteria that the depth to waste from the cover surface would be greater than 1 meter after 1000 years of erosion. The model was run using two steady-state landscape forming events (2 and 5 year return periods) derived from a 20 year data set at the Santa Rita Experimental Watershed in Arizona, and hydraulic properties of two soils, loam and sandy loam. Although we were able to show that the final design cover met the performance criteria for both high and moderate erosion scenarios, concerns remained about the impact of extreme events. In addition, Hydrus simulations, based on saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) measurements from cores of cover material comprised of crushed tuff and a bentonite admixture, suggested that surface runoff on the cover might be orders of magnitude higher than the landscape forming runoff events used for the Siberia simulations. The Siberia runoff events were based on Ksat values for loam and sandy loam soils with identical texture (% sand , silt and clay) to the engineered cover soil, but these values assume soil structure that may or may not develop in the engineered cover. This work summarizes the impacts of both 1) the timing and size of extreme events and 2) the impact of soil structure and Ksat, on long-term repository cover evolution.

  16. Agricultural use of soil, consequences in soil organic matter and hydraulic conductivity compared with natural vegetation in central Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Verónica; Carral, Pilar; Alvarez, Ana Maria; Marques, Maria Jose

    2014-05-01

    When ecosystems are under pressure due to high temperatures and water scarcity, the use of land for agriculture can be a handicap for soil and water conservation. The interactions between plants and soils are site-specific. This study provides information about the influence of the preence vs. The absence of vegetation on soil in a semi-arid area of the sout-east of Madrid (Spain, in the Tagus River basin. In this area soil materials are developed over a calcareous-evaporitic lithology. Soils can be classified as Calcisols, having horizons of accumulation with powdered limestone and irregular nodules of calcium carbonate. They can be defined as Haplic Cambisols and Leptic Calcisols (WRB 2006-FAO). The area is mainly used for rainfed agriculture, olive groves, vineyards and cereals. There are some patches of bushes (Quercus sp.) and grasses (Stipa tenacissima L.) although only found on the top of the hills. This study analyses the differences found in soils having three different covers: Quercus coccifera, Stipa tenacissima and lack of vegetation. This last condition was found in the areas between cultivated olive trees. Soil organic matter, porosity and hydraulic conductivity are key properties of soil to understand its ability to adapt to climate or land use changes. In order to measure the influence of different soil covers, four replicates of soil were sampled in each condition at two soil depth, (0-10 cm and 10-20 cm). Hydraulic conductivity was measured in each soil condition and replicate using a Mini-disk® infiltrometer. There were no differences between the two depths sampled. Similarly, there were no changes in electric conductivity (average 0.1±0.03 dS m-1); pH (8.7±0.2) or calcium carbonate content (43±20 %). Nevertheless, significant differences (p>0.001) were found in soil organic matter. The maximum was found in soils under Quercus (4.7±0.5 %), followed by Stipa (2.2±1.1 %). The soil without vegetation in the areas between olive trees had only 0

  17. Estimation of hydraulic parameters from an unconfined aquifer test conducted in a glacial outwash deposit, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.; Garabedian, Stephen P.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2000-01-01

    An aquifer test conducted in a sand and gravel, glacial outwash deposit on Cape Cod, Massachusetts was analyzed by means of a model for flow to a partially penetrating well in a homogeneous, anisotropic unconfined aquifer. The model is designed to account for all significant mechanisms expected to influence drawdown in observation piezometers and in the pumped well. In addition to the usual fluid-flow and storage processes, additional processes include effects of storage in the pumped well, storage in observation piezometers, effects of skin at the pumped-well screen, and effects of drainage from the zone above the water table. The aquifer was pumped at a rate of 320 gallons per minute for 72-hours and drawdown measurements were made in the pumped well and in 20 piezometers located at various distances from the pumped well and depths below the land surface. To facilitate the analysis, an automatic parameter estimation algorithm was used to obtain relevant unconfined aquifer parameters, including the saturated thickness and a set of empirical parameters that relate to gradual drainage from the unsaturated zone. Drainage from the unsaturated zone is treated in this paper as a finite series of exponential terms, each of which contains one empirical parameter that is to be determined. It was necessary to account for effects of gradual drainage from the unsaturated zone to obtain satisfactory agreement between measured and simulated drawdown, particularly in piezometers located near the water table. The commonly used assumption of instantaneous drainage from the unsaturated zone gives rise to large discrepancies between measured and predicted drawdown in the intermediate-time range and can result in inaccurate estimates of aquifer parameters when automatic parameter estimation procedures are used. The values of the estimated hydraulic parameters are consistent with estimates from prior studies and from what is known about the aquifer at the site. Effects of

  18. Comparison of laboratory, in situ, and rock mass measurements of the hydraulic conductivity of metamorphic rock at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Marine, I W

    1980-01-01

    In situ testing of exploratory wells in metamorphic rock indicates that two types of fracturing occur in the rock mass. Rock containing small openings that permit only extremely slow movement of water is termed virtually impermeable rock. Rock containing openings of sufficient size to permit transmission of water at a significantly faster rate is termed hydraulically transmissive rock. Laboratory methods are unsuitable for measuring hydraulic conductivity in hydraulically transmissive rock; however, for the virtually impermeable rock, values comparable to the in situ tests are obtained. The hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass over a large region is calculated by using the hydraulic gradient, porosity, and regional velocity. This velocity is determined by dividing the inferred travel distance by the age of water which is determined by the helium content of the water. This rock mass hydraulic conductivity value is between the values measured for the two types of fractures, but is closer to the measured value for the virtually impermeable rock. This relationship is attributed to the control of the regional flow rate by the virtually impermeable rock where the discrete fractures do not form a continuous open connection through the entire rock mass. Thus, laboratory methods of measuring permeability in metamorphic rock are of value if they are properly applied.

  19. Hydraulic and hydrologic evaluation of PAR Pond Dam. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, M.; Wang, P.C.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Bezler, P.

    1993-10-01

    The PAR Pond Dam at Savannah River Plant was constructed in 1958--1959. Seepage, depressions, boils and spring flow were observed in varying locations on the dam in the last few years. Comprehensive geotechnical and hydraulic investigations pertaining to the effects of the above observations on the abilities of the dam to withstand future floods were made in 1991 and early 1993 where dam capacity to survive flooding and seismic events were evaluated. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was asked by the Department of Energy (EH) to carry out an independent review of the PAR Pond Dam response to future flooding and seismic events. This report addresses the studies made to evaluate the capacity of the dam to survive floods. A companion report will summarize the evaluations performed to assess the seismic capacity of the dam.

  20. Changes in hydraulic conductance cause the difference in growth response to short-term salt stress between salt-tolerant and -sensitive black gram (Vigna mungo) varieties.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Thuzar; Oo, Aung Zaw; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Kanekatsu, Motoki; Hirasawa, Tadashii

    2016-04-01

    Black gram (Vigna mungo) is an important crop in Asia, However, most black gram varieties are salt-sensitive. The causes of varietal differences in salt-induced growth reduction between two black gram varieties, 'U-Taung-2' (salt-tolerant; BT) and 'Mut Pe Khaing To' (salt-sensitive; BS), were examined the potential for the first step toward the genetic improvement of salt tolerance. Seedlings grown in vermiculite irrigated with full-strength Hoagland solution were treated with 0mM NaCl (control) or 225 mM NaCl for up to 10 days. In the 225 mM NaCl treatment, plant growth rate, net assimilation rate, mean leaf area, leaf water potential, and leaf photosynthesis were reduced more in BS than in BT plants. Leaf water potential was closely related to leaf photosynthesis, net assimilation rate, and increase in leaf area. In response to salinity stress, hydraulic conductance of the root, stem, and petiole decreased more strongly in BS than in BT plants. The reduction in stem and petiole hydraulic conductance was caused by cavitation, whereas the reduction in root hydraulic conductance in BS plants was caused by a reduction in root surface area and hydraulic conductivity. We conclude that the different reduction in hydraulic conductance is a cause of the differences in the growth response between the two black gram varieties under short-term salt stress.

  1. Changes in hydraulic conductance cause the difference in growth response to short-term salt stress between salt-tolerant and -sensitive black gram (Vigna mungo) varieties.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Thuzar; Oo, Aung Zaw; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Kanekatsu, Motoki; Hirasawa, Tadashii

    2016-04-01

    Black gram (Vigna mungo) is an important crop in Asia, However, most black gram varieties are salt-sensitive. The causes of varietal differences in salt-induced growth reduction between two black gram varieties, 'U-Taung-2' (salt-tolerant; BT) and 'Mut Pe Khaing To' (salt-sensitive; BS), were examined the potential for the first step toward the genetic improvement of salt tolerance. Seedlings grown in vermiculite irrigated with full-strength Hoagland solution were treated with 0mM NaCl (control) or 225 mM NaCl for up to 10 days. In the 225 mM NaCl treatment, plant growth rate, net assimilation rate, mean leaf area, leaf water potential, and leaf photosynthesis were reduced more in BS than in BT plants. Leaf water potential was closely related to leaf photosynthesis, net assimilation rate, and increase in leaf area. In response to salinity stress, hydraulic conductance of the root, stem, and petiole decreased more strongly in BS than in BT plants. The reduction in stem and petiole hydraulic conductance was caused by cavitation, whereas the reduction in root hydraulic conductance in BS plants was caused by a reduction in root surface area and hydraulic conductivity. We conclude that the different reduction in hydraulic conductance is a cause of the differences in the growth response between the two black gram varieties under short-term salt stress. PMID:26962708

  2. Correlation Between Bacterial Attachment Rate Coefficients and Hydraulic Conductivity and its Effect on Field-Scale Bacterial Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Dong, Hailiang; Xie, YuLong

    2007-06-01

    It has been widely observed in field experiments that the apparent rate of bacterial attachment, particularly as parameterized by the collision efficiency in filtration-based models, decreases with transport distance (i.e., exhibits scale-dependency). This effect has previously been attributed to microbial heterogeneity; that is, variability in cell-surface properties within a single monoclonal population. We demonstrate that this effect could also be interpreted as a field-scale manifestation of local-scale correlation between physical heterogeneity (hydraulic conductivity variability) and reaction heterogeneity (attachment rate coefficient variability). A field-scale model of bacterial transport developed for the South Oyster field research site located near Oyster, Virginia, and observations from field experiments performed at that site, are used as the basis for this study. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of bacterial transport were performed under four alternative scenarios: 1) homogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) and attachment rate coefficient (Kf), 2) heterogeneous K, homogeneous Kf, 3) heterogeneous K and Kf with local correlation based on empirical and theoretical relationships, and 4) heterogeneous K and Kf without local correlation. The results of the 3D simulations were analyzed using 1D model approximations following conventional methods of field data analysis. An apparent decrease with transport distance of effective collision efficiency was observed only in the case where the local properties were both heterogeneous and correlated. This effect was observed despite the fact that the local collision efficiency was specified as a constant in the 3D model, and can therefore be interpreted as a scale effect associated with the local correlated heterogeneity as manifested at the field scale.

  3. Irreversible soil degradation due to soil salinity and sodicity, and the role of reduced hydraulic conductivity feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Y.; Porporato, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Soil sodicity is characterized by a high relative amount of sodium cations in the soil, usually measured by the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) or by the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP). It negatively affects the soil's physical properties, causing slaking, swelling, and dispersion of clay, which lead to decreased hydraulic conductivity and infiltration rate. Soil sodicity is especially problematic in arid and semi-arid regions, where low-quality waters, such as treated wastewater or sodic/saline groundwater, are often used to meet agricultural demands. The dynamics of sodicity in the soil is intertwined with that of salinity, i.e., the total concentration of salt in the soil, and the soil water balance. We present a model for the coupled dynamics of relative soil water content s, salinity C, and sodicity ESP and investigate the effects of irrigation with water of good and bad quality on the soil. We explicitly account for the major feedback on the soil moisture dynamics due to decreased saturated hydraulic conductivity at low values of C and for high values of ESP, and show that it leads to a bifurcation of steady-state solutions along a control parameter axis (irrigation rate, SAR of irrigation water, etc). We study theoretically such bifurcations, which are related to a runaway sodification process, and determine the conditions in which there is an irreversible soil degradation and the time scales associated with it. Finally, we discuss different soil remediation strategies based on the optimal control theory applied to the proposed system for the coupled water, salinity and sodicy dynamics.

  4. An experimental investigation of the relationship between borehole-NMR derived effective diffusion in unconsolidated media and hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, T. P.; Martin, K.; Abraham, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    A staple in the oilfield-borehole NMR measurements are increasingly being relied upon for hydrologic characterization. Most tool designs utilize strong permanent magnets in order to achieve sufficient S/N, this has the side effect that the measured NMR phenomenon occur in the presence of a constant static-field gradient (∇B0)left( nabla mathbf{B}_0 right). The gradient can be exploited, using enhanced diffusion methods (EDM), in order to measure the temperature-dependent effective diffusion (Deff(T)D_{mathit{eff}}(T)) constant of the investigated fluids. EDM have proven to be powerful and reliable techniques for fluid-type discrimination.In water-only samples deviation of the apparent diffusion from the intrinsic molecular diffusion coefficient of water (Dw(T))(D_w(T)) is primarily controlled by restricted diffusion-the physical obstruction of spins which impedes free diffusion within the gradient. The ability to relate hydraulic conductivity to NMR measurements is of fundamental interest in hydrogeophysics. Commonly, NMR relaxation and recovery time constants (T1,2)left(T_{1,2}right) are used for this purpose. A growing body of work has highlighted the complicated nature of these relationships, particularity in unconsolidated high-porosity media. Furthermore, these relationships are dependent on the surface relaxivity (ρNrho_{N}) and micro-porosity of the media. DeffD_{mathit{eff}} is intrinsically linked to the mobility of spins within a sample, has been related to pore geometry, and intriguingly shares units with transmissivity. The short-time behavior of DeffD_{mathit{eff}} is independent of ρNrho_N while full records can be used to yield estimates of relaxivity. In this study we compare data collected from laboratory and borehole NMR instruments with laboratory permeameter measurements for unconsolidated mixtures of sands, silt, and fine gravels. A 2D inversion for T2T_2 and DeffD_{mathit{eff}} was developed under the assumption that all diffusion

  5. Dynamic effects of wet-dry cycles and crust formation on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of surface soils in the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Christoph; Schümberg, Sabine; Kubitz, Anita; Frank, Franzi; Cheng, Zhang; Nanu Frechen, Tobias; Pohle, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Highly disturbed soils and substrates used in land rehabilitation undergo rapid changes after the first wetting events which in turn can lead to ecosystem degradation. Such changes were detected during the early development of the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment in Lusatia, Germany. Surface substrates consisting of quaternary sandy sediments formed surface seals during the first rainfall events leading to reduced infiltration and substantially increased surface runoff. Subsequently biological soil crusts formed and stabilised the surface. The aim of this study is to investigate the factors that cause the hydraulic conductivity to decrease using undisturbed and disturbed soil samples. Based on the hypothesis that physical and biological crusts lower the hydraulic conductivity, the first set of experiments with undisturbed soil cores from the Hühnerwasser catchment were carried out to measure the saturated hydraulic conductivity using the constant head method. Measurements were done with intact cores and repeated after the surface crust was removed. As the quaternary glacial sediments tend to display hard setting behaviour, we further hypothesised that the mobilisation of fine particles within the cores lead to pore clogging and that wet-dry cycles will therefore decrease hydraulic conductivity. A second set of experiments using the same methodology consisted of five repeated measurements of hydraulic conductivity after each drying cycle. These measurements were done with undisturbed core samples as well as repacked cores in order to assess how dry packing affects the dynamics of the hydraulic conductivity somewhat similar to the situation during the first wetting after completion of the catchment construction. For all experiments, the temporal evolution of hydraulic conductivity was measured and the turbidity of the effluent was recorded. The results clearly demonstrated that the substrate is highly unstable. The first set of experiments

  6. Measurement of leaf hydraulic conductance and stomatal conductance and their responses to irradiance and dehydration using the Evaporative Flux Method (EFM).

    PubMed

    Sack, Lawren; Scoffoni, Christine

    2012-12-31

    Water is a key resource, and the plant water transport system sets limits on maximum growth and drought tolerance. When plants open their stomata to achieve a high stomatal conductance (gs) to capture CO2 for photosynthesis, water is lost by transpiration(1,2). Water evaporating from the airspaces is replaced from cell walls, in turn drawing water from the xylem of leaf veins, in turn drawing from xylem in the stems and roots. As water is pulled through the system, it experiences hydraulic resistance, creating tension throughout the system and a low leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)). The leaf itself is a critical bottleneck in the whole plant system, accounting for on average 30% of the plant hydraulic resistance(3). Leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf) = 1/ leaf hydraulic resistance) is the ratio of the water flow rate to the water potential gradient across the leaf, and summarizes the behavior of a complex system: water moves through the petiole and through several orders of veins, exits into the bundle sheath and passes through or around mesophyll cells before evaporating into the airspace and being transpired from the stomata. K(leaf) is of strong interest as an important physiological trait to compare species, quantifying the effectiveness of the leaf structure and physiology for water transport, and a key variable to investigate for its relationship to variation in structure (e.g., in leaf venation architecture) and its impacts on photosynthetic gas exchange. Further, K(leaf) responds strongly to the internal and external leaf environment(3). K(leaf) can increase dramatically with irradiance apparently due to changes in the expression and activation of aquaporins, the proteins involved in water transport through membranes(4), and K(leaf) declines strongly during drought, due to cavitation and/or collapse of xylem conduits, and/or loss of permeability in the extra-xylem tissues due to mesophyll and bundle sheath cell shrinkage or aquaporin deactivation(5

  7. Nonlinear effects of locally heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields on regional stream-aquifer exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Winter, C. L.; Wang, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Computational experiments are performed to evaluate the effects of locally heterogeneous conductivity fields on regional exchanges of water between stream and aquifer systems in the Middle Heihe River basin (MHRB) of northwestern China. The effects are found to be nonlinear in the sense that simulated discharges from aquifers to streams are systematically lower than discharges produced by a base model parameterized with relatively coarse effective conductivity. A similar, but weaker, effect is observed for stream leakage. The study is organized around three hypotheses: (H1) small-scale spatial variations of conductivity significantly affect regional exchanges of water between streams and aquifers in river basins, (H2) aggregating small-scale heterogeneities into regional effective parameters systematically biases estimates of stream-aquifer exchanges, and (H3) the biases result from slow paths in groundwater flow that emerge due to small-scale heterogeneities. The hypotheses are evaluated by comparing stream-aquifer fluxes produced by the base model to fluxes simulated using realizations of the MHRB characterized by local (grid-scale) heterogeneity. Levels of local heterogeneity are manipulated as control variables by adjusting coefficients of variation. All models are implemented using the MODFLOW (Modular Three-dimensional Finite-difference Groundwater Flow Model) simulation environment, and the PEST (parameter estimation) tool is used to calibrate effective conductivities defined over 16 zones within the MHRB. The effective parameters are also used as expected values to develop lognormally distributed conductivity (K) fields on local grid scales. Stream-aquifer exchanges are simulated with K fields at both scales and then compared. Results show that the effects of small-scale heterogeneities significantly influence exchanges with simulations based on local-scale heterogeneities always producing discharges that are less than those produced by the base model

  8. Effects of combined drought and heavy metal stresses on xylem structure and hydraulic conductivity in red maple (Acer rubrum L.).

    PubMed

    de Silva, Nayana Dilini Gardiyehewa; Cholewa, Ewa; Ryser, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The effects of heavy metal stress, drought stress, and their combination on xylem structure in red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings were investigated in an outdoor pot experiment. As metal-contaminated substrate, a mixture of 1.5% slag with sand was used, with Ni, Cu, Co, and Cr as the main contaminants. Plants grown on contaminated substrate had increased leaf metal concentrations. The two stresses reduced plant growth in an additive manner. The effects of metal and drought stresses on xylem characteristics were similar to each other, with a reduced proportion of xylem tissue, reduced conduit density in stems, and reduced conduit size in the roots. This resulted, in both stems and roots, in reductions in hydraulic conductance, xylem-specific conductivity, and leaf-specific conductivity. The similarity of the responses to the two stresses suggests that the plants' response to metals was actually a drought response, probably due to the reduced water uptake capacity of the metal-exposed roots. The only plant responses specific to metal stress were decreasing trends of stomatal density and chlorophyll content. In conclusion, the exposure to metals aggravates water stress in an additive manner, making the plants more vulnerable to drought.

  9. Correlations between morpho-anatomical changes and radial hydraulic conductivity in roots of olive trees under water deficit and rewatering.

    PubMed

    Tataranni, Giuseppe; Santarcangelo, Michele; Sofo, Adriano; Xiloyannis, Cristos; Tyerman, Stephen D; Dichio, Bartolomeo

    2015-12-01

    The effects of prolonged drought were studied on olive (Olea europaea L.; drought-sensitive cultivar Biancolilla and drought-tolerant cultivar Coratina) to examine how morpho-anatomical modifications in roots impact on root radial hydraulic conductivity (Lpr). Two-year-old self-rooted plants were subjected to a gradual water depletion. The levels of drought stress were defined by pre-dawn leaf water potentials (Ψw) of -1.5, -3.5 and -6.5 MPa. After reaching the maximum level of drought, plants were rewatered for 23 days. Progressive drought stress, for both cultivars, caused a strong reduction in Lpr (from 1.2 to 1.3 × 10(-5) m MPa(-1) s(-1) in unstressed plants to 0.2-0.6 × 10(-5) m MPa(-1) s(-1) in plants at Ψw = -6.5 MPa), particularly evident in the more suberized (brown) roots, accompanied with decreases in stomatal conductance (gs). No significant differences in Lpr and gs between the two olive cultivars were observed. Epifluorescence microscopy and image analyses revealed a parallel increase of wall suberization that doubled in white stressed roots and tripled in brown ones when compared with unstressed plants. In drought-stressed plants, the number of suberized cellular layers from the endodermis towards the cortex increased from 1-2 to 6-7. Recovery in Lpr during rewatering was correlated to the physical disruption of hydrophobic barriers, while the time necessary to obtain new mature roots likely accounted for the observed delay in the complete recovery of gs. Radial hydraulic conductivity in olive roots was strongly influenced by soil and plant water availability and it was also modulated by structural root modifications, size, growth and anatomy. These findings could be important for maintaining an optimal water status in cultivated olive trees by scheduling efficient irrigation methods, saving irrigation water and obtaining yield of high quality.

  10. Correlations between morpho-anatomical changes and radial hydraulic conductivity in roots of olive trees under water deficit and rewatering.

    PubMed

    Tataranni, Giuseppe; Santarcangelo, Michele; Sofo, Adriano; Xiloyannis, Cristos; Tyerman, Stephen D; Dichio, Bartolomeo

    2015-12-01

    The effects of prolonged drought were studied on olive (Olea europaea L.; drought-sensitive cultivar Biancolilla and drought-tolerant cultivar Coratina) to examine how morpho-anatomical modifications in roots impact on root radial hydraulic conductivity (Lpr). Two-year-old self-rooted plants were subjected to a gradual water depletion. The levels of drought stress were defined by pre-dawn leaf water potentials (Ψw) of -1.5, -3.5 and -6.5 MPa. After reaching the maximum level of drought, plants were rewatered for 23 days. Progressive drought stress, for both cultivars, caused a strong reduction in Lpr (from 1.2 to 1.3 × 10(-5) m MPa(-1) s(-1) in unstressed plants to 0.2-0.6 × 10(-5) m MPa(-1) s(-1) in plants at Ψw = -6.5 MPa), particularly evident in the more suberized (brown) roots, accompanied with decreases in stomatal conductance (gs). No significant differences in Lpr and gs between the two olive cultivars were observed. Epifluorescence microscopy and image analyses revealed a parallel increase of wall suberization that doubled in white stressed roots and tripled in brown ones when compared with unstressed plants. In drought-stressed plants, the number of suberized cellular layers from the endodermis towards the cortex increased from 1-2 to 6-7. Recovery in Lpr during rewatering was correlated to the physical disruption of hydrophobic barriers, while the time necessary to obtain new mature roots likely accounted for the observed delay in the complete recovery of gs. Radial hydraulic conductivity in olive roots was strongly influenced by soil and plant water availability and it was also modulated by structural root modifications, size, growth and anatomy. These findings could be important for maintaining an optimal water status in cultivated olive trees by scheduling efficient irrigation methods, saving irrigation water and obtaining yield of high quality. PMID:26446266

  11. Does the soil's effective hydraulic conductivity adapt in order to obey the Maximum Entropy Production principle? A lab experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westhoff, Martijn; Zehe, Erwin; Erpicum, Sébastien; Archambeau, Pierre; Pirotton, Michel; Dewals, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The Maximum Entropy Production (MEP) principle is a conjecture assuming that a medium is organized in such a way that maximum power is subtracted from a gradient driving a flux (with power being a flux times its driving gradient). This maximum power is also known as the Carnot limit. It has already been shown that the atmosphere operates close to this Carnot limit when it comes to heat transport from the Equator to the poles, or vertically, from the surface to the atmospheric boundary layer. To reach this state close to the Carnot limit, the effective thermal conductivity of the atmosphere is adapted by the creation of convection cells (e.g. wind). The aim of this study is to test if the soil's effective hydraulic conductivity also adapts itself in such a way that it operates close to the Carnot limit. The big difference between atmosphere and soil is the way of adaptation of its resistance. The soil's hydraulic conductivity is either changed by weathering processes, which is a very slow process, or by creation of preferential flow paths. In this study the latter process is simulated in a lab experiment, where we focus on the preferential flow paths created by piping. Piping is the process of backwards erosion of sand particles subject to a large pressure gradient. Since this is a relatively fast process, it is suitable for being tested in the lab. In the lab setup a horizontal sand bed connects two reservoirs that both drain freely at a level high enough to keep the sand bed always saturated. By adding water to only one reservoir, a horizontal pressure gradient is maintained. If the flow resistance is small, a large gradient develops, leading to the effect of piping. When pipes are being formed, the effective flow resistance decreases; the flow through the sand bed increases and the pressure gradient decreases. At a certain point, the flow velocity is small enough to stop the pipes from growing any further. In this steady state, the effective flow resistance of

  12. A safety vs efficiency trade-off identified in the hydraulic pathway of grass leaves is decoupled from photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Ocheltree, Troy W; Nippert, Jesse B; Prasad, P V Vara

    2016-04-01

    A common theme in plant physiological research is the trade-off between stress tolerance and growth; an example of this trade-off at the tissue level is the safety vs efficiency hypothesis, which suggests that plants with the greatest resistance to hydraulic failure should have low maximum hydraulic conductance. Here, we quantified the leaf-level drought tolerance of nine C4 grasses as the leaf water potential at which plants lost 50% (P50 × RR ) of maximum leaf hydraulic conductance (Ksat ), and compared this trait with other leaf-level and whole-plant functions. We found a clear trade-off between Ksat and P50 × RR when Ksat was normalized by leaf area and mass (P = 0.05 and 0.01, respectively). However, no trade-off existed between P50 × RR and gas-exchange rates; rather, there was a positive relationship between P50 × RR and photosynthesis (P = 0.08). P50 × RR was not correlated with species distributions based on precipitation (P = 0.70), but was correlated with temperature during the wettest quarter of the year (P < 0.01). These results suggest a trade-off between safety and efficiency in the hydraulic system of grass leaves, which can be decoupled from other leaf-level functions. The unique physiology of C4 plants and adaptations to pulse-driven systems may provide mechanisms that could decouple hydraulic conductance from other plant functions.

  13. Negative correlation between porosity and hydraulic conductivity in sand-and-gravel aquifers at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    Although it may be intuitive to think of the hydraulic conductivity K of unconsolidated, coarse-grained sediments as increasing monotonically with increasing porosity ??, studies have documented a negative correlation between these two parameters under certain grain-size distributions and packing arrangements. This is confirmed at two sites on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, where groundwater investigations were conducted in sand-and-gravel aquifers specifically to examine the interdependency of several aquifer properties using measurements from four geophysical well logs. Along with K and ??, the electrical resistivity R0 and the natural gamma activity ?? of saturated deposits were determined as functions of depth. Qualitative examination of results from the first site implies a negative correlation between K and ?? that is substantiated by a rigorous multivariate analysis of log data collected from the second site. A principal components analysis describes an over-determined system of inversion equations, with approximately 92% of the cumulative proportion of the total variance being accounted for by only three of the four eigenvectors. A subsequent R-mode factor analysis projects directional trends among the four variables (K, ??, R0 and ??), and a negative correlation between K and ?? emerges as the primary result. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 75 FR 42599 - Technical Amendment to Rules of Organization; Conduct and Ethics; and Information and Requests

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 200 Technical Amendment to Rules of Organization; Conduct and Ethics; and Information... (``APA''), notice of proposed rulemaking is not required when an agency, for good cause, finds that... Flexibility Act or analysis of major rule status under the Small Business Regulatory Fairness Act. See 5...

  15. Effects of branch height on leaf gas exchange, branch hydraulic conductance and branch sap flux in open-grown ponderosa pine.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Robert M; Bond, Barbara J; Senock, Randy S; Ryan, Michael G

    2002-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that stomata respond to changes in hydraulic conductance of the flow path from soil to leaf. In open-grown tall trees, branches of different heights may have different hydraulic conductances because of differences in path length and growth. We determined if leaf gas exchange, branch sap flux, leaf specific hydraulic conductance, foliar carbon isotope composition (delta13C) and ratios of leaf area to sapwood area within branches were dependent on branch height (10 and 25 m) within the crowns of four open-grown ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) trees. We found no difference in leaf gas exchange or leaf specific hydraulic conductance from soil to leaf between the upper and lower canopy of our study trees. Branch sap flux per unit leaf area and per unit sapwood area did not differ between the 10- and 25-m canopy positions; however, branch sap flux per unit sapwood area at the 25-m position had consistently lower values. Branches at the 25-m canopy position had lower leaf to sapwood area ratios (0.17 m2 cm-2) compared with branches at the 10-m position (0.27 m2 cm-2) (P = 0.03). Leaf specific conductance of branches in the upper crown did not differ from that in the lower crown. Other studies at our site indicate lower hydraulic conductance, sap flux, whole-tree canopy conductance and photosynthesis in old trees compared with young trees. This study suggests that height alone may not explain these differences.

  16. Diurnal depression in leaf hydraulic conductance at ambient and elevated [CO2] and reveals anisohydric water management in field-grown soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diurnal cycles of photosynthesis and water use in field-grown soybean (Glycine max) are tied to light intensity and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). At high mid-day VPD, transpiration rates can lead to a decline in leaf water potential ('leaf) if leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) is insufficient to su...

  17. Heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity and Darcian flux in the submerged streambed and adjacent exposed stream bank of the Beiluo River, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinxi; Jiang, Weiwei; Xu, Shaofeng; Zhang, Guotao; Wang, Liping; Wen, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yuanyuan; Long, Yongqing

    2016-08-01

    Recognizing the heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity and hyporheic flow is critical for understanding contaminant transfer and biogeochemical and hydrological processes involving streams and aquifers. In this study, the heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity and Darcian flux in a submerged streambed and its adjacent exposed stream banks were investigated in the Beiluo River, northwest China. In the submerged streambed, Darcian flux was estimated by measurement of vertical hydraulic conductivity (K v) and vertical head gradient (VHG) using in-situ permeameter tests. On exposed stream banks, both horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K h) and K v were measured by on-site permeameter tests. In the submerged streambed, K v values gradually decreased with depth and the higher values were concentrated in the center and close to the erosional bank. Compared to the exposed stream banks, the K v values were higher in the streambed. From stream stage to the topmost layer of tested sediment, through increasing elevation, the K h values increased on the erosional bank, while they decreased on the depositional bank. The values of VHG along the thalweg illustrate that downwelling flux occurred in the deepest area while upwelling flux appeared in the other areas, which might result from the change of streambed elevation. The higher value of the Darcian flux in the submerged streambed existed near the erosional bank.

  18. Abscisic Acid Regulation of Root Hydraulic Conductivity and Aquaporin Gene Expression Is Crucial to the Plant Shoot Growth Enhancement Caused by Rhizosphere Humic Acids.

    PubMed

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; Bacaicoa, Eva; Garnica, María; Fuentes, Marta; Casanova, Esther; Zamarreño, Angel M; Iriarte, Juan C; Etayo, David; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Baigorri, Roberto; García-Mina, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The physiological and metabolic mechanisms behind the humic acid-mediated plant growth enhancement are discussed in detail. Experiments using cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants show that the shoot growth enhancement caused by a structurally well-characterized humic acid with sedimentary origin is functionally associated with significant increases in abscisic acid (ABA) root concentration and root hydraulic conductivity. Complementary experiments involving a blocking agent of cell wall pores and water root transport (polyethylenglycol) show that increases in root hydraulic conductivity are essential in the shoot growth-promoting action of the model humic acid. Further experiments involving an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis in root and shoot (fluridone) show that the humic acid-mediated enhancement of both root hydraulic conductivity and shoot growth depended on ABA signaling pathways. These experiments also show that a significant increase in the gene expression of the main root plasma membrane aquaporins is associated with the increase of root hydraulic conductivity caused by the model humic acid. Finally, experimental data suggest that all of these actions of model humic acid on root functionality, which are linked to its beneficial action on plant shoot growth, are likely related to the conformational structure of humic acid in solution and its interaction with the cell wall at the root surface.

  19. Comparison of alternative representations of hydraulic-conductivity anisotropy in folded fractured-sedimentary rock: Modeling groundwater flow in the Shenandoah Valley (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, R.M.; Voss, C.I.; Southworth, S.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical representation that explicitly represents the generalized three-dimensional anisotropy of folded fractured-sedimentary rocks in a groundwater model best reproduces the salient features of the flow system in the Shenandoah Valley, USA. This conclusion results from a comparison of four alternative representations of anisotropy in which the hydraulic-conductivity tensor represents the bedrock structure as (model A) anisotropic with variable strikes and dips, (model B) horizontally anisotropic with a uniform strike, (model C) horizontally anisotropic with variable strikes, and (model D) isotropic. Simulations using the US Geological Survey groundwater flow and transport model SUTRA are based on a representation of hydraulic conductivity that conforms to bedding planes in a three-dimensional structural model of the valley that duplicates the pattern of folded sedimentary rocks. In the most general representation, (model A), the directions of maximum and medium hydraulic conductivity conform to the strike and dip of bedding, respectively, while the minimum hydraulic-conductivity direction is perpendicular to bedding. Model A produced a physically realistic flow system that reflects the underlying bedrock structure, with a flow field that is significantly different from those produced by the other three models. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  20. Differences in hydraulic conductivity and NO[sub 3]-N concentrations between weathered and unweathered zones in late Wisconsin till

    SciTech Connect

    Vondra, G.L.; Simpkins, W.W. . Dept. of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Transport of agricultural chemicals in late Wisconsin till of the Des Moines Lobe is a prime focus of the Management System Evaluation Area investigations in central Iowa. Recent hydrogeological and water quality investigations at the Ames Till Hydrology site (ATHS) and in the Walnut Creek Drainage Basin (WCDB) have shown significantly higher NO[sub 3]-N concentrations and saturated hydraulic conductivity (K[sub sat]) at the water table in the weathered, upper 4 m of sediment (WZ)(K[sub sat] = 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] ms[sup [minus]1]; NO[sub 3]-N = 0 to 30 mg L[sup [minus]1]) than in the unweathered zone beneath it (UWZ) (K[sub sat] = 6 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] ms[sup [minus]1]; NO[sub 3]N-N < 1.0 mg L[sup [minus]1]). The traditional interpretation for this difference is that weathering in the upper zone has increased porosity through oxidation, dissolution, and the formation of fractures and macropores. As a result, NO[sub 3]-N and other agricultural chemicals that enter the WZ are transported downward rapidly to the water table at about 2 m and then are transported laterally. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the process of weathering alone explains the difference in the K[sub sat] and NO[sub 3]-N between the WZ and UWZ.

  1. In vitro evaluation of dentinal hydraulic conductance and tubule sealing by a novel calcium-phosphate desensitizer.

    PubMed

    Thanatvarakorn, Ornnicha; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Prasansuttiporn, Taweesak; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2013-02-01

    In the current trend of materials used for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, calcium-phosphate-containing desensitizers are expected to have advantages in oral environment. A newly formulated desensitizer containing tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (CPD-100) was evaluated in comparison to oxalate containing desensitizer (SS) regarding permeability reduction (PR%) by measuring hydraulic conductance on the etched dentin discs in vitro. CPD-100 exhibited mean PR% of 91%, which significantly increased to 98% after immersion in artificial saliva (AS) for 4 weeks (p < 0.001), while SS showed a significant decrease from 99% to 93% (p < 0.01). SEM observation showed newly formed crystallites on CPD-100 treated dentin, which did not exist in SS treated dentin after AS immersion, suggesting that calcium oxalate inhibited formation of new calcium-phosphate minerals. Five-minute acid challenge did not significantly affect PR% of dentin treated by any of the desensitizers. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis indicated that the formed layer of CPD-100 were minerals with similar Ca/P ratio to hydroxyapatite. In conclusion, the newly developed calcium-phosphate desensitizer has the potential to exhibit long-term stability in the oral environment, owing to its chemical properties that promote the crystal growth in salivary fluid.

  2. A field-scale infiltration model accounting for spatial heterogeneity of rainfall and soil saturated hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Renato; Corradini, Corrado; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2006-04-01

    This study first explores the role of spatial heterogeneity, in both the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and rainfall intensity r, on the integrated hydrological response of a natural slope. On this basis, a mathematical model for estimating the expected areal-average infiltration is then formulated. Both Ks and r are considered as random variables with assessed probability density functions. The model relies upon a semi-analytical component, which describes the directly infiltrated rainfall, and an empirical component, which accounts further for the infiltration of surface water running downslope into pervious soils (the run-on effect). Monte Carlo simulations over a clay loam soil and a sandy loam soil were performed for constructing the ensemble averages of field-scale infiltration used for model validation. The model produced very accurate estimates of the expected field-scale infiltration rate, as well as of the outflow generated by significant rainfall events. Furthermore, the two model components were found to interact appropriately for different weights of the two infiltration mechanisms involved.

  3. Field Measurement of Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity at the Hillslope Scale under different Soil Series and Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhakeem, M.; Chang, Y.; Wilson, C. G.; Papanicolaou, T.

    2009-12-01

    Heterogeneity of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) was investigated at the hillslope scale in the South Amana Subwatershed (SAS), IA. Three fields of different soil series, and management practices (tilled, no-till, CRP) were examined at the SAS. Ksat was measured using 30 semi-automated double ring infiltrometer. Soil cores were also collected in the vicinity of the Ksat measurements via a truck-mounted Giddings Probe. Core sample analysis suggests that the spatial variability in Ksat very much reflects the overall soil texture variability found in the tested fields. The spatial variability of Ksat was log-normally distributed, which closely follows the distribution of the surface microroughness. Ksat varied over 3-orders of magnitude within the tested fields. The high sensitivity of Ksat was a good index to identify soil heterogeneity. Comparison between the published soil maps and observed soil series of the collected cores shows that erosion to varying degrees has occurred along the hillslope. Along the sides of the hillslope as we move downhill, the loam layer was found much deeper than along the centerline of the hillslope. This finding was indicative that significant erosion has occurred along the centerline of the hillslope. An outcome of the severe erosion was that the soil texture differed between the centerline and the sides. This different texture was found to affect Ksat at similar slope positions and land cover.

  4. HydrogeoSieveXL: an Excel-based tool to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain-size analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    For over a century, hydrogeologists have estimated hydraulic conductivity (K) from grain-size distribution curves. The benefits of the practice are simplicity, cost, and a means of identifying spatial variations in K. Many techniques have been developed over the years, but all suffer from similar shortcomings: no accounting of heterogeneity within samples (i.e., aquifer structure is lost), loss of grain packing characteristics, and failure to account for the effects of overburden pressure on K. In addition, K estimates can vary by an order of magnitude between the various methods, and it is not generally possible to identify the best method for a given sample. The drawbacks are serious, but the advantages have seen the use of grain-size distribution curves for K estimation continue, often using a single selected method to estimate K in a given project. In most cases, this restriction results from convenience. It is proposed here that extending the analysis to include several methods would be beneficial since it would provide a better indication of the range of K that might apply. To overcome the convenience limitation, an Excel-based spreadsheet program, HydrogeoSieveXL, is introduced here. HydrogeoSieveXL is a freely available program that calculates K from grain-size distribution curves using 15 different methods. HydrogeoSieveXL was found to calculate K values essentially identical to those reported in the literature, using the published grain-size distribution curves.

  5. Use of time-subsidence data during pumping to characterize specific storage and hydraulic conductivity of semi-confining units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, T. J.

    2003-09-01

    A new graphical technique is developed that takes advantage of time-subsidence data collected from either traditional extensometer installations or from newer technologies such as fixed-station global positioning systems or interferometric synthetic aperture radar imagery, to accurately estimate storage properties of the aquifer and vertical hydraulic conductivity of semi-confining units. Semi-log plots of time-compaction data are highly diagnostic with the straight-line portion of the plot reflecting the specific storage of the semi-confining unit. Calculation of compaction during one-log cycle of time from these plots can be used in a simple analytical expression based on the Cooper-Jacob technique to accurately calculate specific storage of the semi-confining units. In addition, these semi-log plots can be used to identify when the pressure transient has migrated through the confining layer into the unpumped aquifer, precluding the need for additional piezometers within the unpumped aquifer or within the semi-confining units as is necessary in the Neuman and Witherspoon method. Numerical simulations are used to evaluate the accuracy of the new technique. The technique was applied to time-drawdown and time-compaction data collected near Franklin Virginia, within the Potomac aquifers of the Coastal Plain, and shows that the method can be easily applied to estimate the inelastic skeletal specific storage of this aquifer system.

  6. Dynamic regulation of the root hydraulic conductivity of barley plants in response to salinity/osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Horie, Tomoaki; Nakahara, Yoshiki; Tsuji, Nobuya; Shibasaka, Mineo; Katsuhara, Maki

    2015-05-01

    Salinity stress significantly reduces the root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) of several plant species including barley (Hordeum vulgare). Here we characterized changes in the Lpr of barley plants in response to salinity/osmotic stress in detail using a pressure chamber. Salt-tolerant and intermediate barley cultivars, K305 and Haruna-nijyo, but not a salt-sensitive cultivar, I743, exhibited characteristic time-dependent Lpr changes induced by 100 mM NaCl. An identical response was evoked by isotonic sorbitol, indicating that this phenomenon was triggered by osmotic imbalances. Further examination of this mechanism using barley cv. Haruna-nijyo plants in combination with the use of various inhibitors suggested that various cellular processes such as protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and membrane internalization appear to be involved. Interestingly, the three above-mentioned barley cultivars did not exhibit a remarkable difference in root cell sap osmolality under hypertonic conditions, in contrast to the case of Lpr. The possible biological significance of the regulation of Lpr in barley plants upon salinity/osmotic stress is discussed.

  7. Heat as a Tracer to Examine Hydraulic Conductance Near the RussianRiver Bank Filtration Facility, Sonoma County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Constantz, Jim; Su, Grace; Hatch, Christine

    2004-08-01

    Both the measurement of temperature and the simulation of heat and water transport have benefited from significant recent advances in data acquisition and computer resources. This has afforded the opportunity for routine use of heat as a tracer in a variety of hydrological regimes. Heat is particularly well suited for investigations of stream/groundwater exchanges. Dynamic temperature patterns between the stream and underlying sediments are typical, due to large stream surface area to volume ratios relative to other surface water bodies. Heat is a naturally occurring tracer, free from (real or perceived) issues of contamination associated with use of chemical tracers in stream environments. The use of heat as a tracer relies on the measurement of temperature gradients, and temperature is an extremely robust parameter to monitor. Temperature data is immediately available as opposed to chemical tracers, which often require significant laboratory analysis. In this work, we report on the progress in the use of heat as a tracer to determine the hydraulic conductance of the streambed along the middle reaches of the Russian River, located west of Santa Rosa, CA. The general hydrological setting is described and the unique matter in which the water resources are managed in an environment of increasing population, a rapid shift to agricultural crops requiring more irrigation, and a series of fishery related mandates.

  8. Experimental Design for Estimating Unknown Hydraulic Conductivity in a Confined Aquifer using a Genetic Algorithm and a Reduced Order Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushijima, T.; Yeh, W.

    2013-12-01

    An optimal experimental design algorithm is developed to select locations for a network of observation wells that provides the maximum information about unknown hydraulic conductivity in a confined, anisotropic aquifer. The design employs a maximal information criterion that chooses, among competing designs, the design that maximizes the sum of squared sensitivities while conforming to specified design constraints. Because that the formulated problem is non-convex and contains integer variables (necessitating a combinatorial search), for a realistically-scaled model, the problem may be difficult, if not impossible, to solve through traditional mathematical programming techniques. Genetic Algorithms (GAs) are designed to search out the global optimum; however because a GA requires a large number of calls to a groundwater model, the formulated optimization problem may still be infeasible to solve. To overcome this, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is applied to the groundwater model to reduce its dimension. The information matrix in the full model space can then be searched without solving the full model.

  9. The effect of nutrient enrichment on growth, photosynthesis and hydraulic conductance of dwarf mangroves in Panamá

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovelock, C.E.; Feller, Ilka C.; McKee, K.L.; Engelbrecht, B.M.J.; Ball, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    1. Dwarf stands of the mangrove Rhizophora mangle L. are extensive in the Caribbean. We fertilized dwarf trees in Almirante Bay, Bocas del Toro Province, north-eastern Panama with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to determine (1) if growth limitations are due to nutrient deficiency; and (2) what morphological and/or physiological factors underlie nutrient limitations to growth. 2. Shoot growth was 10-fold when fertilized with P and twofold with N fertilization, indicating that stunted growth of these mangroves is partially due to nutrient deficiency. 3. Growth enhancements caused by N or P enrichment could not be attributed to increases in photosynthesis on a leaf area basis, although photosynthetic nutrient-use efficiency was improved. The most dramatic effect was on stem hydraulic conductance, which was increased sixfold by P and 2-5-fold with N enrichment. Fertilization with P enhanced leaf and stem P concentrations and reduced C:N ratio, but did not alter leaf damage by herbivores. 4. Our findings indicate that addition of N and P significantly alter tree growth and internal nutrient dynamics of mangroves at Bocas del Toro, but also that the magnitude, pattern and mechanisms of change will be differentially affected by each nutrient.

  10. Enhancement of root hydraulic conductivity by methyl jasmonate and the role of calcium and abscisic acid in this process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Romera, Beatriz; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Li, Guowei; Luu, Doan-Trung; Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela; Zamarreño, Angel María; García-Mina, Jose María; Maurel, Christophe; Aroca, Ricardo

    2014-04-01

    The role of jasmonic acid in the induction of stomatal closure is well known. However, its role in regulating root hydraulic conductivity (L) has not yet been explored. The objectives of the present research were to evaluate how JA regulates L and how calcium and abscisic acid (ABA) could be involved in such regulation. We found that exogenous methyl jasmonate (MeJA) increased L of Phaseolus vulgaris, Solanum lycopersicum and Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Tomato plants defective in JA biosynthesis had lower values of L than wild-type plants, and that L was restored by addition of MeJA. The increase of L by MeJA was accompanied by an increase of the phosphorylation state of the aquaporin PIP2. We observed that MeJA addition increased the concentration of cytosolic calcium and that calcium channel blockers inhibited the rise of L caused by MeJA. Treatment with fluoridone, an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis, partially inhibited the increase of L caused by MeJA, and tomato plants defective in ABA biosynthesis increased their L after application of MeJA. It is concluded that JA enhances L and that this enhancement is linked to calcium and ABA dependent and independent signalling pathways. PMID:24131347

  11. In vitro evaluation of dentinal hydraulic conductance and tubule sealing by a novel calcium-phosphate desensitizer.

    PubMed

    Thanatvarakorn, Ornnicha; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Prasansuttiporn, Taweesak; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2013-02-01

    In the current trend of materials used for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, calcium-phosphate-containing desensitizers are expected to have advantages in oral environment. A newly formulated desensitizer containing tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (CPD-100) was evaluated in comparison to oxalate containing desensitizer (SS) regarding permeability reduction (PR%) by measuring hydraulic conductance on the etched dentin discs in vitro. CPD-100 exhibited mean PR% of 91%, which significantly increased to 98% after immersion in artificial saliva (AS) for 4 weeks (p < 0.001), while SS showed a significant decrease from 99% to 93% (p < 0.01). SEM observation showed newly formed crystallites on CPD-100 treated dentin, which did not exist in SS treated dentin after AS immersion, suggesting that calcium oxalate inhibited formation of new calcium-phosphate minerals. Five-minute acid challenge did not significantly affect PR% of dentin treated by any of the desensitizers. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis indicated that the formed layer of CPD-100 were minerals with similar Ca/P ratio to hydroxyapatite. In conclusion, the newly developed calcium-phosphate desensitizer has the potential to exhibit long-term stability in the oral environment, owing to its chemical properties that promote the crystal growth in salivary fluid. PMID:23166091

  12. Wood anatomy reveals high theoretical hydraulic conductivity and low resistance to vessel implosion in a Cretaceous fossil forest from northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cabrera, Hugo I; Estrada-Ruiz, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    The Olmos Formation (upper Campanian), with over 60 angiosperm leaf morphotypes, is Mexico's richest Cretaceous flora. Paleoclimate leaf physiognomy estimates indicate that the Olmos paleoforest grew under wet and warm conditions, similar to those present in modern tropical rainforests. Leaf surface area, tree size and climate reconstructions suggest that this was a highly productive system. Efficient carbon fixation requires hydraulic efficiency to meet the evaporative demands of the photosynthetic surface, but it comes at the expense of increased risk of drought-induced cavitation. Here we tested the hypothesis that the Olmos paleoforest had high hydraulic efficiency, but was prone to cavitation. We characterized the hydraulic properties of the Olmos paleoforest using theoretical conductivity (Ks), vessel composition (S) and vessel fraction (F), and measured drought resistance using vessel implosion resistance (t/b)h(2) and the water potential at which there is 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P50). We found that the Olmos paleoforest had high hydraulic efficiency, similar to that present in several extant tropical-wet or semi-deciduous forest communities. Remarkably, the fossil flora had the lowest (t/b)h(2), which, together with low median P50 (-1.9 MPa), indicate that the Olmos paleoforest species were extremely vulnerable to drought-induced cavitation. Our findings support paleoclimate inferences from leaf physiognomy and paleoclimatic models suggesting it represented a highly productive wet tropical rainforest. Our results also indicate that the Olmos Formation plants had a large range of water conduction strategies, but more restricted variation in cavitation resistance. These straightforward methods for measuring hydraulic properties, used herein for the first time, can provide useful information on the ecological strategies of paleofloras and on temporal shifts in ecological function of fossil forests chronosequences.

  13. Wood Anatomy Reveals High Theoretical Hydraulic Conductivity and Low Resistance to Vessel Implosion in a Cretaceous Fossil Forest from Northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cabrera, Hugo I.; Estrada-Ruiz, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    The Olmos Formation (upper Campanian), with over 60 angiosperm leaf morphotypes, is Mexico's richest Cretaceous flora. Paleoclimate leaf physiognomy estimates indicate that the Olmos paleoforest grew under wet and warm conditions, similar to those present in modern tropical rainforests. Leaf surface area, tree size and climate reconstructions suggest that this was a highly productive system. Efficient carbon fixation requires hydraulic efficiency to meet the evaporative demands of the photosynthetic surface, but it comes at the expense of increased risk of drought-induced cavitation. Here we tested the hypothesis that the Olmos paleoforest had high hydraulic efficiency, but was prone to cavitation. We characterized the hydraulic properties of the Olmos paleoforest using theoretical conductivity (Ks), vessel composition (S) and vessel fraction (F), and measured drought resistance using vessel implosion resistance and the water potential at which there is 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P50). We found that the Olmos paleoforest had high hydraulic efficiency, similar to that present in several extant tropical-wet or semi-deciduous forest communities. Remarkably, the fossil flora had the lowest , which, together with low median P50 (−1.9 MPa), indicate that the Olmos paleoforest species were extremely vulnerable to drought-induced cavitation. Our findings support paleoclimate inferences from leaf physiognomy and paleoclimatic models suggesting it represented a highly productive wet tropical rainforest. Our results also indicate that the Olmos Formation plants had a large range of water conduction strategies, but more restricted variation in cavitation resistance. These straightforward methods for measuring hydraulic properties, used herein for the first time, can provide useful information on the ecological strategies of paleofloras and on temporal shifts in ecological function of fossil forests chronosequences. PMID:25279992

  14. Practical Estimates of Field-Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Bedrock Outcrops using a Modified Bottomless Bucket Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirus, B. B.; Perkins, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    The bottomless bucket (BB) approach (Nimmo et al., VZJ, 2009) is a cost-effective method for rapidly characterizing field-saturated hydraulic conductivity Kfs of soils and alluvial deposits. This practical approach is of particular value for quantifying infiltration rates in remote areas with limited accessibility. A similar approach for bedrock outcrops is also of great value for improving quantitative understanding of infiltration and recharge in rugged terrain. We develop a simple modification to the BB method for application to bedrock outcrops, which uses a non-toxic, quick-drying silicone gel to seal the BB to the bedrock. These modifications to the field method require only minor changes to the analytical solution for calculating Kfs on soils. We investigate the reproducibility of the method with laboratory experiments on a previously studied calcarenite rock and conduct a sensitivity analysis to quantify uncertainty in our predictions. We apply the BB method on both bedrock and soil for sites on Pahute Mesa, which is located in a remote area of the Nevada National Security Site. The bedrock BB tests may require monitoring over several hours to days, depending on infiltration rates, which necessitates a cover to prevent evaporative losses. Our field and laboratory results compare well to Kfs values inferred from independent reports, which suggests the modified BB method can provide useful estimates and facilitate simple hypothesis testing. The ease with which the bedrock BB method can be deployed should facilitate more rapid in-situ data collection than is possible with alternative methods for quantitative characterization of infiltration into bedrock. Typical deployment of bedrock bottomless buckets (BBB's) on an outcrop of volcanic tuff before the application of water.

  15. Scale Effects on Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements in Sandy Topsoils and Argillic Subsoils: from point to hillslope-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, E.; Jackson, C. R.; Williamson, M. F.; Greco, J.

    2012-12-01

    The contrast between conductivities of top soils and impeding layers is the first order controlling factor determining hillslope flowpaths and connectivity. While hydrologic models are highly sensitive to saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat), this property is often difficult to quantify. We measured Ksat values within sandy loam top soils (A and E horizons) and argillic sand clay loam subsoils within the Aiken plateau of the Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain at point scale, meso-scale, and hillslope scale. Measurement scale affected the variability of subsoil Ksat measurements but had little effect on central tendencies. Conversely, measurement scale affected both the variability and central tendencies of Ksat values in the sandy loam topsoil. The Ksat measured by Constant Compact Head Permeameter (Amoozemeter) within the argillic horizon varied over six orders of magnitude horizon (0.003-300 cm/hour). We found evidence of anomalies within the argillic formed by tree root rot and animal activities, and these anomalies were filled with sand and organic matter, which likely explains higher Ksat values at these locations. Targeted Amoozemeter measurements in the argillic confirmed that the anomalies identified by visual inspection have greater Ksat (1.3-360 cm/hour) than occurred in randomly selected measurements. Meso-scale (one meter) constant head infiltrometer measurements in the argillic showed a very constrained range of Ksat (0.13-0.37 cm/hour). The argillic Ksat estimate determined by a hillslope irrigation experiment (0.3 cm/hour) fell within the middle of the range of the 1m scale measurements. As measurement scale increased, argillic Ksat values became more uniform. In the topsoils, however, central tendencies of Ksat values increased with the scale of measurement. The hillslope scale and one meter measurements of topsoil Ksats were at the very high end of the range of Ksats determined at the point scale. The results indicate that Ksat measurements are highly

  16. Practical estimates of field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of bedrock outcrops using a modified bottomless bucket method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Perkins, Kim S.

    2012-01-01

    The bottomless bucket (BB) approach (Nimmo et al., 2009a) is a cost-effective method for rapidly characterizing field-saturated hydraulic conductivity Kfs of soils and alluvial deposits. This practical approach is of particular value for quantifying infiltration rates in remote areas with limited accessibility. A similar approach for bedrock outcrops is also of great value for improving quantitative understanding of infiltration and recharge in rugged terrain. We develop a simple modification to the BB method for application to bedrock outcrops, which uses a non-toxic, quick-drying silicone gel to seal the BB to the bedrock. These modifications to the field method require only minor changes to the analytical solution for calculating Kfs on soils. We investigate the reproducibility of the method with laboratory experiments on a previously studied calcarenite rock and conduct a sensitivity analysis to quantify uncertainty in our predictions. We apply the BB method on both bedrock and soil for sites on Pahute Mesa, which is located in a remote area of the Nevada National Security Site. The bedrock BB tests may require monitoring over several hours to days, depending on infiltration rates, which necessitates a cover to prevent evaporative losses. Our field and laboratory results compare well to Kfs values inferred from independent reports, which suggests the modified BB method can provide useful estimates and facilitate simple hypothesis testing. The ease with which the bedrock BB method can be deployed should facilitate more rapid in-situ data collection than is possible with alternative methods for quantitative characterization of infiltration into bedrock.

  17. Soybean leaf hydraulic conductance does not acclimate to growth at elevated [CO2] or temperature in growth chambers or in the field

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Anna M.; Sack, Lawren; Bernacchi, Carl J.; Ort, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf hydraulic properties are strongly linked with transpiration and photosynthesis in many species. However, it is not known if gas exchange and hydraulics will have co-ordinated responses to climate change. The objective of this study was to investigate the responses of leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) in Glycine max (soybean) to growth at elevated [CO2] and increased temperature compared with the responses of leaf gas exchange and leaf water status. Methods Two controlled-environment growth chamber experiments were conducted with soybean to measure Kleaf, stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthesis (A) during growth at elevated [CO2] and temperature relative to ambient levels. These results were validated with field experiments on soybean grown under free-air elevated [CO2] (FACE) and canopy warming. Key results In chamber studies, Kleaf did not acclimate to growth at elevated [CO2], even though stomatal conductance decreased and photosynthesis increased. Growth at elevated temperature also did not affect Kleaf, although gs and A showed significant but inconsistent decreases. The lack of response of Kleaf to growth at increased [CO2] and temperature in chamber-grown plants was confirmed with field-grown soybean at a FACE facility. Conclusions Leaf hydraulic and leaf gas exchange responses to these two climate change factors were not strongly linked in soybean, although gs responded to [CO2] and increased temperature as previously reported. This differential behaviour could lead to an imbalance between hydraulic supply and transpiration demand under extreme environmental conditions likely to become more common as global climate continues to change. PMID:23864003

  18. Is it important to characterize complex patterns of riverbed hydraulic conductivities for assessing river-aquifer exchange fluxes? An evaluation with an integrated fully coupled hydrological model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qi; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Schilling, Oliver; Brunner, Philip; Vereecken, Harry; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan

    2016-04-01

    Riverbed hydraulic conductivity is a critical parameter for the prediction of exchange fluxes between groundwater and surface water bodies. It was found in previous studies that it is important to characterize heterogeneity of riverbed hydraulic conductivity. In this context, we also investigated in the past whether the heterogeneity pattern of riverbed hydraulic conductivities (i.e., multiGaussian, different types of non-multiGaussian patterns) plays an important role. It was found that the heterogeneity pattern does not matter so much. However, these past studies were conducted with the subsurface hydrological model SPRING which only considers one way coupling and only vertical fluxes through the river-aquifer interface. In this study, the role of patterns was further explored using the fully coupled hydrological model HydroGeoSphere. A synthetic 3-D river-aquifer model was set up with a heterogeneous riverbed showing non-multiGaussian patterns in the form of meandering channels as the reference field. Data assimilation experiments were carried out with help of the Ensemble Kalman Filter to characterize the heterogeneous riverbed. The data assimilation experiments were conducted for four types of riverbed hydraulic conductivity (K) fields: (i) spatially homogeneous, (ii) heterogeneous with multiGaussian distribution, (iii) heterogeneous with non-multiGaussian distribution (channelized structures) and (iv) heterogeneous with non-multiGaussian distribution (elliptic structures). For all the data assimilation scenarios, state variables and riverbed K were updated by assimilating piezometric heads. The experiments were repeated for ten reference fields. Results show that for all prior geostatistical models data assimilation was able to reduce the difference between simulated and measured hydraulic heads, and to improve the characterization of riverbed hydraulic conductivities and river-aquifer exchange fluxes. Results were slightly better for non-multiGaussian fields

  19. Overview of EPA's Approach to Developing Prospective Case Studies Technical Workshop: Case Studies to Assess Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    One component of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) study of the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources is prospective case studies, which are being conducted to more fully understand and assess if and how site specific hydrau...

  20. Analysis of hydraulic tests of the Culebra and Magenta Dolomites and Dewey Lake Redbeds conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Beauheim, R.L.; Ruskauff, G.J.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents interpretations of hydraulic tests conducted at 15 well locations in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico between 1980 and 1996. The WIPP is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic wastes arising form the nation`s defense programs. The WIPP repository lies within bedded halite of the Salado Formation, 2,155 ft below ground surface. The tests reported herein were, with two exceptions, conducted in the Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation, which overlies the Salado Formation. The remaining tests were conducted in the Magenta Member of the Rustler and in the overlying formation, the Dewey Lake Redbeds. This report completes the documentation of hydraulic-test interpretations used as input to the WIPP Compliance Certification Application (US DOE, 1996).