Science.gov

Sample records for hydraulic design features

  1. Design of hydraulic recuperation unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandourek, Pavel; Habán, Vladimír; Hudec, Martin; Dobšáková, Lenka; Štefan, David

    2016-03-01

    This article deals with design and measurement of hydraulic recuperation unit. Recuperation unit consist of radial turbine and axial pump, which are coupled on the same shaft. Speed of shaft with impellers are 6000 1/min. For economic reasons, is design of recuperation unit performed using commercially manufactured propellers.

  2. Hydraulic Design of Lock Culvert Valves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Engineering and Design HYDRAULIC DESIGN OF LOCK CULVERT VALVES Distribution Restriction Statement Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...Report Documentation Page Report Date 10 Jul 1989 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Hydraulic Design of Lock...from experience and research that may be useful to Corps of Engineers hydraulic designers concerned with the design of control valves for navigation lock

  3. Design of hydraulic output Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toscano, W. M.; Harvey, A. C.; Lee, K.

    1983-01-01

    A hydraulic output system for the RE-1000 free piston stirling engine (FPSE) was designed. The hydraulic output system can be readily integrated with the existing hot section of RE-1000 FPSE. The system has two simply supported diaphragms which separate the engine gas from the hydraulic fluid, a dynamic balance mechanism, and a novel, null center band hydraulic pump. The diaphragms are designed to endure more than 10 billion cycles, and to withstand the differential pressure load as high as 14 MPa. The projected thermodynamic performance of the hydraulic output version of RE-1000 FPSE is 1.87 kW at 29/7 percent brake efficiency.

  4. Hydraulic design of Three Gorges right bank powerhouse turbine for improvement of hydraulic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents the hydraulic design of Three Gorges Right Bank Powerhouse turbine for improvement of hydraulic stability. The technical challenges faced in the hydraulic design of the turbine are given. The method of hydraulic design for improving the hydraulic stability and particularly for eliminating the upper part load pressure pulsations is clarified. The final hydraulic design results of Three Gorges Right Bank Powerhouse turbine based on modern hydraulic design techniques are presented.

  5. Hydraulically powered dissimilar teleoperated system controller design

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.

    1996-04-01

    This paper will address two issues associated with the implementation of a hydraulically powered dissimilar master-slave teleoperated system. These issues are the overall system control architecture and the design of robust hydraulic servo controllers for the position control problem. Finally, a discussion of overall system performance on an actual teleoperated system will be presented.

  6. Designing using manufacturing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsi, T.; Hoque, A. S. M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a design system that enables the composition of a part using manufacturing features. Features are selected from feature libraries. Upon insertion, the system ensures that the feature does not contradict the design-for-manufacture rules. This helps eliminating costly manufacturing problems. The system is developed as an extension to a commercial CAD/CAM system Pro/Engineer.

  7. Issues of a Computer-Aided Design of Hydraulic Jacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averchenkov, V. I.; Averchenkov, A. V.; Kolyakinand, V. V.; Orekhov, O. D.

    2016-04-01

    The article deals with the issues of a computer-aided design of hydraulic equipment, namely hydraulic jacks. Design principles of the hydraulic jack CAD system are described. In addition, the possibilities for the system improvement and expansion are considered.

  8. Digital hydraulic valving system. [design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and development are reported of a digital hydraulic valving system that would accept direct digital inputs. Topics include: summary of contractual accomplishments, design and function description, valve parameters and calculations, conclusions, and recommendations. The electrical control circuit operating procedure is outlined in an appendix.

  9. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.

    Designed for use in courses where students are expected to become proficient in the area of hydraulics, including diesel engine mechanic programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of fourteen units of instruction. Unit titles include (1) Introduction, (2) Fundamentals of Hydraulics, (3) Reservoirs, (4) Lines, Fittings, and Couplers, (5) Seals,…

  10. Escalator design features evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Deshpande, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Escalators are available with design features such as dual speed (90 and 120 fpm), mat operation and flat steps. These design features were evaluated based on the impact of each on capital and operating costs, traffic flow, and safety. A human factors engineering model was developed to analyze the need for flat steps at various speeds. Mat operation of escalators was found to be cost effective in terms of energy savings. Dual speed operation of escalators with the higher speed used during peak hours allows for efficient operation. A minimum number of flat steps required as a function of escalator speed was developed to ensure safety for the elderly.

  11. Hydraulic design of pervious concrete highway shoulders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grahl, Nathan Andrew

    Stormwater drainage has been a factor in roadway design for years. Now stormwater quantity and quality are also becoming regulated for roadways. As regulations of stormwater management continue to increase so does the need for more viable and effect management practices. The research presented and discussed in this thesis presents the option of using pervious concrete in highway shoulders as a best management practice for stormwater management. Research focused on the hydraulic response of pervious concrete pavements exposed to sheet flowing water. Pervious concrete samples were placed in a hydraulic flume to determine capture discharges, infiltration rates, and by-pass flowrates for a broad range of void contents, across a broad range of pavement cross slopes. The results demonstrate that the capture discharge and infiltration rates are inversely related to the cross slope of the pavement. Results also showed the infiltration rate of the permeable pavement exposed to sheet flowing water, in the model, is significantly lower than the measured infiltration rate. Pervious concrete samples were also tested to determine hydraulic response when exposed to clogging associated with sand used in roadway de-icing. The results of the clogging of the permeable pavements followed similar trends as the unclogged samples, with the only difference being a more significant reduction in infiltration rates at higher applications of sand. Preliminary discussion of a design methodology is included with a design example.

  12. CFD Aided Design and Production of Hydraulic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alper; Cetinturk, Huseyin; Demirel, Gizem; Ayli, Ece; Celebioglu, Kutay; Aradag, Selin; ETU Hydro Research Center Team

    2014-11-01

    Hydraulic turbines are turbo machines which produce electricity from hydraulic energy. Francis type turbines are the most common one in use today. The design of these turbines requires high engineering effort since each turbine is tailor made due to different head and discharge. Therefore each component of the turbine is designed specifically. During the last decades, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has become very useful tool to predict hydraulic machinery performance and save time and money for designers. This paper describes a design methodology to optimize a Francis turbine by integrating theoretical and experimental fundamentals of hydraulic machines and commercial CFD codes. Specific turbines are designed and manufactured with the help of a collaborative CFD/CAD/CAM methodology based on computational fluid dynamics and five-axis machining for hydraulic electric power plants. The details are presented in this study. This study is financially supported by Turkish Ministry of Development.

  13. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.; Kirby, Klane

    This curriculum guide contains a course in hydraulics to train entry-level workers for automotive mechanics and other fields that utilize hydraulics. The module contains 14 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) introduction to hydraulics; (2) fundamentals of hydraulics; (3) reservoirs; (4) lines, fittings, and couplers; (5)…

  14. CFD based draft tube hydraulic design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, J.; Devals, C.; Kyriacou, S. A.; Murry, N.; Mullins, B. F.

    2014-03-01

    The draft tube design of a hydraulic turbine, particularly in low to medium head applications, plays an important role in determining the efficiency and power characteristics of the overall machine, since an important proportion of the available energy, being in kinetic form leaving the runner, needs to be recovered by the draft tube into static head. For large units, these efficiency and power characteristics can equate to large sums of money when considering the anticipated selling price of the energy produced over the machine's life-cycle. This same draft tube design is also a key factor in determining the overall civil costs of the powerhouse, primarily in excavation and concreting, which can amount to similar orders of magnitude as the price of the energy produced. Therefore, there is a need to find the optimum compromise between these two conflicting requirements. In this paper, an elaborate approach is described for dealing with this optimization problem. First, the draft tube's detailed geometry is defined as a function of a comprehensive set of design parameters (about 20 of which a subset is allowed to vary during the optimization process) and are then used in a non-uniform rational B-spline based geometric modeller to fully define the wetted surfaces geometry. Since the performance of the draft tube is largely governed by 3D viscous effects, such as boundary layer separation from the walls and swirling flow characteristics, which in turn governs the portion of the available kinetic energy which will be converted into pressure, a full 3D meshing and Navier-Stokes analysis is performed for each design. What makes this even more challenging is the fact that the inlet velocity distribution to the draft tube is governed by the runner at each of the various operating conditions that are of interest for the exploitation of the powerhouse. In order to determine these inlet conditions, a combined steady-state runner and an initial draft tube analysis, using a

  15. Lock Culvert Valves; Hydraulic Design Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    lock culvert valves with particular emphasis on reverse tainter valves. Hydraulic coefficients, used to quantify energy losses at valves and the jet...due to a sudden culvert expansion did increase the energy losses in the flow as the jet was dissipated. This additional head loss and associated...8 Figure 5. Loss coefficient for vertical-lift valve having a 45 degree lip

  16. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Nancy; And Others

    These instructional materials provide an orientation to hydraulics for use at the postsecondary level. The first of 12 sections presents an introduction to hydraulics, including discussion of principles of liquids, definitions, liquid flow, the two types of hydraulic fluids, pressure gauges, and strainers and filters. The second section identifies…

  17. Fluid-dynamic design optimization of hydraulic proportional directional valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirante, Riccardo; Catalano, Luciano Andrea; Poloni, Carlo; Tamburrano, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    This article proposes an effective methodology for the fluid-dynamic design optimization of the sliding spool of a hydraulic proportional directional valve: the goal is the minimization of the flow force at a prescribed flow rate, so as to reduce the required opening force while keeping the operation features unchanged. A full three-dimensional model of the flow field within the valve is employed to accurately predict the flow force acting on the spool. A theoretical analysis, based on both the axial momentum equation and flow simulations, is conducted to define the design parameters, which need to be properly selected in order to reduce the flow force without significantly affecting the flow rate. A genetic algorithm, coupled with a computational fluid dynamics flow solver, is employed to minimize the flow force acting on the valve spool at the maximum opening. A comparison with a typical single-objective optimization algorithm is performed to evaluate performance and effectiveness of the employed genetic algorithm. The optimized spool develops a maximum flow force which is smaller than that produced by the commercially available valve, mainly due to some major modifications occurring in the discharge section. Reducing the flow force and thus the electromagnetic force exerted by the solenoid actuators allows the operational range of direct (single-stage) driven valves to be enlarged.

  18. Hydraulic Design of Stepped Spillways Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stepped chutes and spillways are commonly used for routing discharges during flood events. In addition, stepped chutes are used for overtopping protection of earthen embankments. Stepped spillways provide significant energy dissipation due to its stepped feature; as a result, the stilling basin as...

  19. Conceptual design and cost analysis of hydraulic output unit for 15 kW free-piston Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A long-life hydraulic converter with unique features was conceptually designed to interface with a specified 15 kW(e) free-piston Stirling engine in a solar thermal dish application. Hydraulic fluid at 34.5 MPa (5000 psi) is produced to drive a conventional hydraulic motor and rotary alternator. Efficiency of the low-maintenance converter design was calculated at 93.5% for a counterbalanced version and 97.0% without the counterbalance feature. If the converter were coupled to a Stirling engine with design parameters more typcial of high-technology Stirling engines, counterbalanced converter efficiency could be increased to 99.6%. Dynamic computer simulation studies were conducted to evaluate performance and system sensitivities. Production costs of the complete Stirling hydraulic/electric power system were evaluated at $6506 which compared with $8746 for an alternative Stirling engine/linear alternator system.

  20. Effect of filter designs on hydraulic properties and well efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Woo

    2014-09-01

    To analyze the effect of filter pack arrangement on the hydraulic properties and the well efficiency of a well design, a step drawdown was conducted in a sand-filled tank model. Prior to the test, a single filter pack (SFP), granule only, and two dual filter packs (DFPs), type A (granule-pebble) and type B (pebble-granule), were designed to surround the well screen. The hydraulic properties and well efficiencies related to the filter packs were evaluated using the Hazen's, Eden-Hazel's, Jacob's, and Labadie-Helweg's methods. The results showed that the hydraulic properties and well efficiency of the DFPs were higher than those of a SFP, and the clogging effect and wellhead loss related to the aquifer material were the lowest owing to the grain size and the arrangement of the filter pack. The hydraulic conductivity of the DFPs types A and B was about 1.41 and 6.43 times that of a SFP, respectively. In addition, the well efficiency of the DFPs types A and B was about 1.38 and 1.60 times that of the SFP, respectively. In this study, hydraulic property and well efficiency changes were observed according to the variety of the filter pack used. The results differed from the predictions of previous studies on the grain-size ratio. Proper pack-aquifer ratios and filter pack arrangements are primary factors in the construction of efficient water wells, as is the grain ratio, intrinsic permeability (k), and hydraulic conductivity (K) between the grains of the filter packs and the grains of the aquifer.

  1. Corps of Engineers Hydraulic Design Criteria. Volume I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    of 13. The model scale was 1:25. The Ke ( loss coefficient) values shown are based on model ( ,221-1/1 M! discharge rating curves, computed energy ...available to offices of the Corps of Engineers for use as k hydraulic design criteria. Certain design aids based on accepted theory, such as energy -depth...612 Supercritical Flow 620 Nonuniform Flow 621 Mild Slopes 622 Steep Slopes 630 Energy Losses 631 Friction Losses 632 Special Losses 640Q Transitions

  2. Effects of Microneedle Design Parameters on Hydraulic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Hood, R Lyle; Kosoglu, Mehmet A; Parker, Matthew; Rylander, Christopher G

    2011-09-01

    Microneedles have been an expanding medical technology in recent years due to their ability to penetrate tissue and deliver therapy with minimal invasiveness and patient discomfort. Variations in design have allowed for enhanced fluid delivery, biopsy collection, and the measurement of electric potentials. Our novel microneedle design attempts to combine many of these functions into a single length of silica tubing capable of both light and fluid delivery terminating in a sharp tip of less than 100 microns in diameter. This manuscript focuses on the fluid flow aspects of the design, characterizing the contributions to hydraulic resistance from the geometric parameters of the microneedles. Experiments consisted of measuring the volumetric flow rate of de-ionized water at set pressures (ranging from 69-621 kPa) through a relevant range of tubing lengths, needle lengths, and needle tip diameters. Data analysis showed that the silica tubing (~150 micron bore diameter) adhered to within ±5% of the theoretical prediction by Poiseuille's Law describing laminar internal pipe flow at Reynolds numbers less than 700. High hydraulic resistance within the microneedles correlated with decreasing tip diameter. The hydraulic resistance offered by the silica tubing preceding the microneedle taper was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude less per unit length, but remained the dominating resistance in most experiments as the tubing length was >30 mm. These findings will be incorporated into future design permutations to produce a microneedle capable of both efficient fluid transfer and light delivery.

  3. Results From a Channel Restoration Project: Hydraulic Design Considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karle, K.F.; Densmore, R.V.; ,

    2001-01-01

    Techniques for the hydraulic restoration of placer-mined streams and floodplains were developed in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. The two-year study at Glen Creek focused on a design of stream and floodplain geometry using hydraulic capacity and shear stress equations. Slope and sinuosity values were based on regional relationships. Design requirements included a channel capacity for a bankfull discharge and a floodplain capacity for a 1.5- to 100-year discharge. Several bio-engineering techniques using alder and willow, including anchored brush bars, streambank hedge layering, seedlings, and cuttings, were tested to dissipate floodwater energy and encourage sediment deposition until natural revegetation stabilized the new floodplains. Permanently monumented cross-sections installed throughout the project site were surveyed every one to three years. Nine years after the project began, a summer flood caused substantial damage to the channel form, including a change in width/depth ratio, slope, and thalweg location. Many of the alder brush bars were heavily damaged or destroyed, resulting in significant bank erosion. This paper reviews the original hydraulic design process, and describes changes to the channel and floodplain geometry over time, based on nine years of cross-section surveys.

  4. The hydraulic design of pump turbine for Xianyou pumped storage power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J. S.; Liu, W. C.; Fu, Z. Y.; Shi, Q. H.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents the hydraulic design of pump turbines for Xianyou pumped storage power station. The method of improving the hydraulic performance of pump turbine with CFD analysis is given. The results of model test indicate that the final hydraulic design of pump turbine for Xianyou pumped storage power station is of high efficiencies, good

  5. Resolution of thermal-hydraulic safety and licensing issues for the system 80+{sup {trademark}} design

    SciTech Connect

    Carpentino, S.E.; Ritterbusch, S.E.; Schneider, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    The System 80+{sup {trademark}} Standard Design is an evolutionary Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) with a generating capacity of 3931 MWt (1350 MWe). The Final Design Approval (FDA) for this design was issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in July 1994. The design certification by the NRC is anticipated by the end of 1995 or early 1996. NRC review of the System 80+ design has involved several new safety issues never before addressed in a regulatory atmosphere. In addition, conformance with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) required that the System 80+ plant address nuclear industry concerns with regard to design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. A large number of these issues/concerns deals with previously unresolved generic thermal-hydraulic safety issues and severe accident prevention and mitigation. This paper discusses the thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations performed for the System 80+ design to resolve safety and licensing issues relevant to both the Nuclear Stream Supply System (NSSS) and containment designs. For the NSSS design, the Safety Depressurization System mitigation capability and resolution of the boron dilution concern are described. Examples of containment design issues dealing with containment shell strength, robustness of the reactor cavity walls and hydrogen mixing under severe accident conditions are also provided. Finally, the overall approach used in the application of NRC`s new (NUREG-1465) radiological source term for System 80+ evaluation is described. The robustness of the System 80+ containment design to withstand severe accident consequences was demonstrated through detailed thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations. This advanced design to shown to meet NRC severe accident policy goals and ALWR URD requirements without any special design features and unnecessary costs.

  6. New Design Feature in Virginia's Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Monica McTeague

    A study of new design features for public schools was conducted to determine what specific design features were being implemented in Virginia's schools. This report summarizes the major trends in facility design that were discovered in the following areas: safety and security features; classroom space; technology areas; administrative spaces;…

  7. Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.; Basher, A.M.H.

    1996-09-01

    To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical

  8. 46 CFR 128.240 - Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and... Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control—materials and pressure design. (a) Each standard piping component (such as pipe runs, fittings, flanges, and standard valves) for hydraulic or pneumatic power and...

  9. 46 CFR 128.240 - Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and... Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control—materials and pressure design. (a) Each standard piping component (such as pipe runs, fittings, flanges, and standard valves) for hydraulic or pneumatic power and...

  10. 46 CFR 128.240 - Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and... Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control—materials and pressure design. (a) Each standard piping component (such as pipe runs, fittings, flanges, and standard valves) for hydraulic or pneumatic power and...

  11. 46 CFR 128.240 - Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and... Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control—materials and pressure design. (a) Each standard piping component (such as pipe runs, fittings, flanges, and standard valves) for hydraulic or pneumatic power and...

  12. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  13. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the annular flow helium heater design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, N. C.; Sanders, J. P.

    1982-05-01

    Core support performance test (CSPT) by use of an existing facility, components flow test loop (CFTL), as part of the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) application program were conducted. A major objective of the CSPT is to study accelerated corrosion of the core graphite support structure in helium at reactor conditions. Concentration of impurities will be adjusted so that a 6 month test represents the 30 year reactor life. Thermal hydraulic and structural integrity of the graphite specimen, will be studied at high pressure of 7.24 MPa (1050 psi) and high temperature of 1000 deg C in a test vessel. To achieve the required high temperature at the test section, a heater bundle has to be specially designed and properly manufactured. Performance characteristics of the heater which were determined from an analysis based on this design are presented.

  14. Hydraulic design of a low-specific speed Francis runner for a hydraulic cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, H.; Luo, X. Q.; Liao, W. L.; Zhao, Y. P.

    2012-11-01

    The air blower in a cooling tower is normally driven by an electromotor, and the electric energy consumed by the electromotor is tremendous. The remaining energy at the outlet of the cooling cycle is considerable. This energy can be utilized to drive a hydraulic turbine and consequently to rotate the air blower. The purpose of this project is to recycle energy, lower energy consumption and reduce pollutant discharge. Firstly, a two-order polynomial is proposed to describe the blade setting angle distribution law along the meridional streamline in the streamline equation. The runner is designed by the point-to-point integration method with a specific blade setting angle distribution. Three different ultra-low-specificspeed Francis runners with different wrap angles are obtained in this method. Secondly, based on CFD numerical simulations, the effects of blade setting angle distribution on pressure coefficient distribution and relative efficiency have been analyzed. Finally, blade angles of inlet and outlet and control coefficients of blade setting angle distribution law are optimal variables, efficiency and minimum pressure are objective functions, adopting NSGA-II algorithm, a multi-objective optimization for ultra-low-specific speed Francis runner is carried out. The obtained results show that the optimal runner has higher efficiency and better cavitation performance.

  15. Hydraulic analysis and optimization design in Guri rehabilitation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.; Zhou, L. J.; Gong, L.; Wang, Z. N.; Wen, Q.; Zhao, Y. Z.; Wang, Y. L.

    2016-11-01

    Recently Dongfang was awarded the contract for rehabilitation of 6 units in Guri power plant, the biggest hydro power project in Venezuela. The rehabilitation includes, but not limited to, the extension of output capacity by about 50% and enhancement of efficiency level. To achieve the targets the runner and the guide vanes will be replaced by the newly optimized designs. In addition, the out-of-date stay vanes with straight plate shape will be modified into proper profiles after considering the application feasibility in field. The runner and vane profiles were optimized by using state-of-the-art flow simulation techniques. And the hydraulic performances were confirmed by the following model tests. This paper describes the flow analysis during the optimization procedure and the comparison between various technical concepts.

  16. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are

  17. Integration of Supportive Design Features and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazaros, Edward J.; Ahmadi, Reza

    2008-01-01

    Integrating supportive design features and technology into the home are excellent ways to plan to make a home "age-friendly." When an immediate need occurs for eliminating barriers in an existing home, supportive design features and technology will most often need to be examined, and some form of implementation will need to take place. While…

  18. 46 CFR 128.240 - Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and...) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.240 Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control—materials and pressure design. (a) Each standard piping...

  19. Hydraulic fracturing model featuring initiation beyond the wellbore wall for directional well in coal bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuwei; Jia, Dan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Jia; Fu, Chunkai; Yang, Xinliang; Ai, Chi

    2016-08-01

    In developing internal fracture systems in coal beds, the initiation mechanism differs greatly from that of conventional ones and initiations may be produced beyond the wellbore wall. This paper describes the features of the internal structure of coal beds and RFPA2D simulation is used to attest the possible occurrence of initiation beyond the wellbore wall in coal bed hydraulic fracturing. Using the theory of elasticity and fracture mechanics, we analyse the stress distribution in the vicinal coal rock. Then by taking into consideration the effects of the spatial relationship between coal bed cleats and the wellbore, we establish a model for calculating both tensile and shear initiation pressure that occur along cleats beyond the wellbore wall. The simulation in this paper indicates that for shear initiations that happen along coal cleats, the pressure required to initiate fracture for cleats beyond the wellbore wall is evidently lower than that on the wellbore wall, thus it is easier to initiate shear fractures for cleats beyond the wellbore wall. For tensile failure, the pressure required to initiate tensile fracture for cleats beyond the wellbore wall is obviously higher than that for cleats at the wellbore wall, thus it is easier to initiate tensile fractures for cleats at the wellbore wall. On the one hand, this paper has proved the possible occurrence of initiations beyond the wellbore wall and has changed the current assumption that hydraulic fractures can only occur at the wellbore wall. On the other hand, the established theoretical model provides a new approach to calculating the initiation pressure in hydraulic fracturing.

  20. Hydraulic and thermal design of a gas microchannel heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yahui; Brandner, Juergen J.; Morini, Gian Luca

    2012-05-01

    In this paper investigations on the design of a gas flow microchannel heat exchanger are described in terms of hydrodynamic and thermal aspects. The optimal choice for thermal conductivity of the solid material is discussed by analysis of its influences on the thermal performance of a micro heat exchanger. Two numerical models are built by means of a commercial CFD code (Fluent). The simulation results provide the distribution of mass flow rate, inlet pressure and pressure loss, outlet pressure and pressure loss, subjected to various feeding pressure values. Based on the thermal and hydrodynamic analysis, a micro heat exchanger made of polymer (PEEK) is designed and manufactured for flow and heat transfer measurements in air flows. Sensors are integrated into the micro heat exchanger in order to measure the local pressure and temperature in an accurate way. Finally, combined with numerical simulation, an operating range is suggested for the present micro heat exchanger in order to guarantee uniform flow distribution and best thermal and hydraulic performances.

  1. Which sampling design to monitor saturated hydraulic conductivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Sibylle; Lark, Murray; Zimmermann, Beate; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Soil in a changing world is subject to both anthropogenic and environmental stressors. Soil monitoring is essential to assess the magnitude of changes in soil variables and how they affect ecosystem processes and human livelihoods. But which sampling design is best for a given monitoring task? We employed a Rotational Stratified Simple Random Sampling (rotStRS) for the estimation of temporal changes in the spatial mean of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) at three sites in central Panama in 2009, 2010 and 2011. In order to assess this design's efficiency we compared the resulting estimates of the spatial mean and variance for 2009 to those gained from the Stratified Simple Random Sampling (StRS) which was effectively the data obtained on the first sampling time, and to an equivalent unexecuted Simple Random Sampling (SRS). The poor performance of geometrical stratification and the weak predictive relationship between measurements of successive years yielded no advantage of sampling designs more complex than SRS. The failure of stratification may be attributed to the small large-scale variability of Ks. Revisiting previously sampled locations was not beneficial because of the large small-scale variability in combination with destructive sampling, resulting in poor consistency between re-visited samples. We conclude that for our Ks monitoring scheme, repeated SRS is equally effective as rotStRS. Some problems of small-scale variability might be overcome by collecting several samples at close range to reduce the effect of fine-scale variation. Finally, we give recommendations how to consider including stratification and rotation when designing a soil monitoring scheme.

  2. APT target/blanket design and thermal hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Cappiello, M.; Pitcher, E.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    1999-04-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Target/Blanket (T/B) system is comprised of an assembly of tritium producing modules supported by control, heat removal, shielding and retargeting systems. The T/B assembly produces tritium using a high-energy proton beam, a tungsten/lead spallation neutron source and {sup 3}He gas as the tritium producing feedstock. For the nominal production mode, protons are accelerated to an energy of 1030 MeV at a current of 100 mA and are directed onto the T/B assembly. The protons are expanded using a raster/expansion system to illuminate a 0.19m by 1.9m beam spot on the front face of a centrally located tungsten neutron source. A surrounding lead blanket produces additional neutrons from scattered high-energy particles. The tungsten neutron source consists of nested, Inconel-718 clad tungsten cylinders assembled in horizontal Inconel-718 tubes. Each tube contains up to 6 cylinders with annular flow channel gaps of 0.102 cm. These horizontal tubes are manifolded into larger diameter vertical inlet and outlet pipes, which provide coolant. The horizontal and vertical tubes make up a structure similar to that of rungs on a ladder. The entire tungsten neutron source consists of 11 such ladders separated into two modules, one containing five ladders and the other six. Ladders are separated by a 0.3 m void region to increase nucleon leakage. The peak thermal-hydraulic conditions in the tungsten neutron source occur in the second ladder from the front. Because tungsten neutron source design has a significant number of parallel flow channels, the limiting thermal-hydraulic parameter is the onset of significant void (OSV) rather than critical heat flux (CHF). A blanket region surrounds the tungsten neutron source. The lateral blanket region is approximately 120 cm thick and 400 cm high. Blanket material consists of lead, {sup 3}He gas, aluminum, and light-water coolant. The blanket region is subdivided into rows based on the local power

  3. Extraction of features from ultrasound acoustic emissions: a tool to assess the hydraulic vulnerability of Norway spruce trunkwood?

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Sabine; Klein, Andrea; Wimmer, Rupert; Karlsson, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Summary • The aim of this study was to assess the hydraulic vulnerability of Norway spruce (Picea abies) trunkwood by extraction of selected features of acoustic emissions (AEs) detected during dehydration of standard size samples. • The hydraulic method was used as the reference method to assess the hydraulic vulnerability of trunkwood of different cambial ages. Vulnerability curves were constructed by plotting the percentage loss of conductivity vs an overpressure of compressed air. • Differences in hydraulic vulnerability were very pronounced between juvenile and mature wood samples; therefore, useful AE features, such as peak amplitude, duration and relative energy, could be filtered out. The AE rates of signals clustered by amplitude and duration ranges and the AE energies differed greatly between juvenile and mature wood at identical relative water losses. • Vulnerability curves could be constructed by relating the cumulated amount of relative AE energy to the relative loss of water and to xylem tension. AE testing in combination with feature extraction offers a readily automated and easy to use alternative to the hydraulic method. PMID:16771986

  4. Hydraulic Model Investigation: Functional Design of Control Structures for Oregon Inlet, North Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    REPORT HL-83-10 0 US-Army Corps .FUNCTIONAL DESIGN OF CONTROL STRUCTURES FOR OREGON INLET, NORTH CAROLINA Hydraulic Model Investigation TI. by Noel W...purpose of the functional model was to investigate flow control characteristics of the proposed jetty system. Important design parameters and other...above design considerations were investigated with a combina- tion fixed-bed and movable-bed physical hydraulic model molded to the bathymetry of the

  5. High penetration rates and extended bit life through revolutionary hydraulic and mechanical design in PDC drill bit development

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M.R.; Murdock, A.D.; Evans, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    PDC drill bit developments have been made to achieve higher penetration rates and longer life, involving a compromise between open, light set, bits for speed and heavy set ones for durability. Developments are described which provided the benefits of both in a revolutionary hydraulic and mechanical design. The hydraulic design causes mud to flow first towards the bit Centre and then outwards. It was extensively flow tested using high speed photography to ensure that bit balling was prevented. It includes features to address bit whirl which were demonstrated in full scale laboratory testing to reduce the bit`s vibration level. The mechanical design maximizes open face volume, known to benefit penetration rate, by using very high blades. However, the heights attainable can be limited by the bit body`s mechanical strength. Steel was chosen to maximize blade strength and was coated with a newly developed hardfacing to improve erosion resistance. A program of fatigue testing assured adequate strength.

  6. High penetration rates and extended bit life through revolutionary hydraulic and mechanical design in PDC drill bit development

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M.R.; Murdock, A.D.; Evans, S.M.

    1999-03-01

    PDC drill bit developments have been made to achieve higher penetration rates and longer life, involving a compromise between open, light set, bits for speed, and heavy set ones for durability. Developments are described which provided the benefits of both in a revolutionary hydraulic and mechanical design. The hydraulic design causes mud to flow first towards the bit center and then outwards. It was extensively flow tested using high-speed photography to ensure that bit balling was prevented. It includes features to address bit whirl which were demonstrated in full scale laboratory testing to reduce the bit`s vibration level. The mechanical design maximizes open-face volume, known to benefit penetration rate, by using very high blades. However, the heights attainable can be limited by the bit body`s mechanical strength. Steel was chosen to maximize blade strength and was coated with a newly developed hardfacing to improve erosion resistance. A program of fatigue testing assured adequate strength.

  7. CAL Packages for Civil Engineering Hydraulics and Structural Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, W. D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes computer assisted learning (CAL) packages written in FORTRAN IV and developed for use in a degree course in civil engineering dealing with hydraulics and structures. All are used in the interactive mode through a terminal with a keyboard and visual display unit. (Author/CMV)

  8. Design, test and model of a hybrid magnetostrictive hydraulic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Wereley, Norman M.

    2009-08-01

    The basic operation of hybrid hydraulic actuators involves high frequency bi-directional operation of an active material that is converted to uni-directional motion of hydraulic fluid using valves. A hybrid actuator was developed using magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D as the driving element and hydraulic oil as the working fluid. Two different lengths of Terfenol-D rod, 51 and 102 mm, with the same diameter, 12.7 mm, were used. Tests with no load and with load were carried out to measure the performance for uni-directional motion of the output piston at different pumping frequencies. The maximum no-load flow rates were 24.8 cm3 s-1 and 22.7 cm3 s-1 with the 51 mm and 102 mm long rods respectively, and the peaks were noted around 325 Hz pumping frequency. The blocked force of the actuator was close to 89 N in both cases. A key observation was that, at these high pumping frequencies, the inertial effects of the fluid mass dominate over the viscous effects and the problem becomes unsteady in nature. In this study, we also develop a mathematical model of the hydraulic hybrid actuator in the time domain to show the basic operational principle under varying conditions and to capture phenomena affecting system performance. Governing equations for the pumping piston and output shaft were obtained from force equilibrium considerations, while compressibility of the working fluid was taken into account by incorporating the bulk modulus. Fluid inertia was represented by a lumped parameter approach to the transmission line model, giving rise to strongly coupled ordinary differential equations. The model was then used to calculate the no-load velocities of the actuator at different pumping frequencies and simulation results were compared with experimental data for model validation.

  9. Design of a hydraulic actuator for active control of rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidi, Majid; Dirusso, Eliseo

    1991-01-01

    A hydraulic actuator is described which consists of a pump, a hydraulic servo-valve, and a thin elastic plate which transduces the generated pressure variations into forces acting on a mass which simulates the bearing of a rotor system. An actuator characteristic number is defined to provide a base for an optimum design of force actuators with combined weight, frequency, and force considerations. This characteristic number may also be used to compare hydraulic and electromagnetic force actuators. In tests, this actuator generated 182.3 Newton force at a frequency of 100 Hz and a displacement amplitude of 5.8 x 10 exp -5 meter.

  10. Application of characteristic time concepts for hydraulic fracture configuration design, control, and optimization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Advani, S.H.; Lee, T.S.; Moon, H.

    1992-10-01

    The analysis of pertinent energy components or affiliated characteristic times for hydraulic stimulation processes serves as an effective tool for fracture configuration designs optimization, and control. This evaluation, in conjunction with parametric sensitivity studies, provides a rational base for quantifying dominant process mechanisms and the roles of specified reservoir properties relative to controllable hydraulic fracture variables for a wide spectrum of treatment scenarios. Results are detailed for the following multi-task effort: (a) Application of characteristic time concept and parametric sensitivity studies for specialized fracture geometries (rectangular, penny-shaped, elliptical) and three-layered elliptic crack models (in situ stress, elastic moduli, and fracture toughness contrasts). (b) Incorporation of leak-off effects for models investigated in (a). (c) Simulation of generalized hydraulic fracture models and investigation of the role of controllable vaxiables and uncontrollable system properties. (d) Development of guidelines for hydraulic fracture design and optimization.

  11. Application of characteristic time concepts for hydraulic fracture configuration design, control, and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Advani, S.H.; Lee, T.S. ); Moon, H. )

    1992-10-01

    The analysis of pertinent energy components or affiliated characteristic times for hydraulic stimulation processes serves as an effective tool for fracture configuration designs optimization, and control. This evaluation, in conjunction with parametric sensitivity studies, provides a rational base for quantifying dominant process mechanisms and the roles of specified reservoir properties relative to controllable hydraulic fracture variables for a wide spectrum of treatment scenarios. Results are detailed for the following multi-task effort: (a) Application of characteristic time concept and parametric sensitivity studies for specialized fracture geometries (rectangular, penny-shaped, elliptical) and three-layered elliptic crack models (in situ stress, elastic moduli, and fracture toughness contrasts). (b) Incorporation of leak-off effects for models investigated in (a). (c) Simulation of generalized hydraulic fracture models and investigation of the role of controllable vaxiables and uncontrollable system properties. (d) Development of guidelines for hydraulic fracture design and optimization.

  12. Thermo-hydraulic analyses associated with a CEA design proposal for a DEMO TF conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallcorba, R.; Lacroix, B.; Ciazynski, D.; Torre, A.; Nunio, F.; Zani, L.; Le Coz, Q.; Lewandowska, M.; Coleman, M.

    2016-12-01

    The future DEMO Toroidal Field (TF) magnets are likely to feature cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) cooled by forced flow of supercritical helium. Design activities were carried out at CEA to provide a winding pack compatible with DEMO plant requirements. The CEA proposal comprises, for each of the 16 D-shaped windings, 10 double-pancakes (2 × 392 m long) wound in 10 turns. The conductor is a square-shaped Nb3Sn double channel conductor with a central spiral, carrying a nominal current of 95.5 kA. We present a thermo-hydraulic analyses focused on the central, most critical pancake, where the maximum field is reached, aiming at evaluating the integrity of the proposed conductor design. Both normal and off-normal simulations were performed using detailed electromagnetic and neutron heating load maps as input, and evaluating operational quantities such as the temperature margin in burn conditions, and the hot spot temperature in quench conditions. We assessed the sensitivity of these quantities to some driving parameters, notably mass flow rate and the choice of friction factor correlation for the temperature margin, and quench initiation features for the hot spot temperature. Furthermore, the influence of the casing cooling on the temperature margin is analyzed. The study is carried out using two thermohydraulic models.

  13. Design Features of Modern Mechanical Ventilators.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Neil

    2016-12-01

    A positive-pressure breath ideally should provide a VT that is adequate for gas exchange and appropriate muscle unloading while minimizing any risk for injury or discomfort. The latest generation of ventilators uses sophisticated feedback systems to sculpt positive-pressure breaths according to patient effort and respiratory system mechanics. Currently, however, these new control strategies are not totally closed-loop systems. This is because the automatic input variables remain limited, some clinician settings are still required, and the specific features of the perfect breath design still are not entirely clear. Despite these limitations, there are some rationale for many of these newer feedback features.

  14. The hydraulic separator Multidune: preliminary tests on fluid-dynamic features and plastic separation feasibility.

    PubMed

    De Sena, Giulia; Nardi, Camillo; Cenedese, Antonio; La Marca, Floriana; Massacci, Paolo; Moroni, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Recycling of plastic materials is a rapidly developing discipline because of environmental awareness, the need to conserve materials and energy, and the growing demand to increase the production economy. The main problem in plastics recovery and recycling is related to the variety of plastic wastes, even if selective collection occurs. Therefore, plastic materials can be recycled either as mixtures or as single types, separating the different typologies by their physical (size, specific mass, etc.) and/or chemical properties. However, separation of plastics in single typologies by traditional processes and devices is difficult due to their typical low variability in properties. This paper presents a new research development for recycling industry: the Multidune separator. This is a device constructed from a sequence of parallel semi-cylindrical tubes of transparent plastic welded together in a plane. The lower half is shifted laterally and then fixed relative to the upper half. Flow is then induced in the lateral direction normal to the axis of the tubes, creating a main flow channel and two recirculation zones. This apparatus creates a differential transport of particles of low specific mass, near to 1g/cm3, allowing their separation. The flow field in the Multidune separator is studied via Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Eulerian analysis of the data is performed to gather information about the fluid-dynamics features established by different hydraulic heads at the inlet of the Multidune. Preliminary tests on monomaterial samples have been performed, varying several operative parameters to determine the best set of values. Therefore, separation tests have been executed on composite samples, obtaining satisfactory results in terms of plastic separation feasibility.

  15. Modeling, Optimization, and Detailed Design of a Hydraulic Flywheel-Accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmaier, Kyle Glenn

    Improving mobile energy storage technology is an important means of addressing concerns over fossil fuel scarcity and energy independence. Traditional hydraulic accumulator energy storage, though favorable in power density, durability, cost, and environmental impact, suffers from relatively low energy density and a pressure-dependent state of charge. The hydraulic flywheel-accumulator concept utilizes both the hydro-pneumatic and rotating kinetic energy domains by employing a rotating pressure vessel. This thesis provides an in-depth analysis of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator concept and an assessment of the advantages it offers over traditional static accumulator energy storage. After specifying a practical architecture for the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator, this thesis addresses the complex fluid phenomena and control implications associated with multi-domain energy storage. To facilitate rapid selection of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator dimensions, computationally inexpensive material stress models are developed for each component. A drive cycle simulation strategy is also developed to assess the dynamic performance of the device. The stress models and performance simulation are combined to form a toolset that facilitates computationally-efficient model-based design. The aforementioned toolset has been embedded into a multi-objective optimization algorithm that aims to minimize the mass of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator system and to minimize the losses it incurs over the course of a drive cycle. Two optimizations have been performed - one with constraints that reflect a vehicle-scale application, and one with constraints that reflect a laboratory application. At both scales, the optimization results suggest that the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator offers at least an order of magnitude improvement over traditional static accumulator energy storage, while operating at efficiencies between 75% and 93%. A particular hydraulic flywheel-accumulator design

  16. The 25 kWe solar thermal Stirling hydraulic engine system: Conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Maurice; Emigh, Grant; Noble, Jack; Riggle, Peter; Sorenson, Torvald

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design and analysis of a solar thermal free-piston Stirling hydraulic engine system designed to deliver 25 kWe when coupled to a 11 meter test bed concentrator is documented. A manufacturing cost assessment for 10,000 units per year was made. The design meets all program objectives including a 60,000 hr design life, dynamic balancing, fully automated control, more than 33.3 percent overall system efficiency, properly conditioned power, maximum utilization of annualized insolation, and projected production costs. The system incorporates a simple, rugged, reliable pool boiler reflux heat pipe to transfer heat from the solar receiver to the Stirling engine. The free-piston engine produces high pressure hydraulic flow which powers a commercial hydraulic motor that, in turn, drives a commercial rotary induction generator. The Stirling hydraulic engine uses hermetic bellows seals to separate helium working gas from hydraulic fluid which provides hydrodynamic lubrication to all moving parts. Maximum utilization of highly refined, field proven commercial components for electric power generation minimizes development cost and risk.

  17. Design Feature 7: Continuous Preclosure Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Watkins

    1999-06-22

    This design feature (DF) is intended to evaluate the effects of continuous ventilation in the emplacement drifts during preclosure and how the effects, if any, compare to the Viability Assessment (VA) reference design for postclosure long term performance. This DF will be evaluated against a set of criteria provided by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) group. The VA reference design included a continuous ventilation airflow quantity of 0.1 m{sup 3}/s in the emplacement drifts in the design of the repository subsurface facilities. The effects of this continuous ventilation during the preclosure was considered to have a negligible effect on postclosure performance and therefore is not included during postclosure in the assessment of the long term performance. This DF discusses the effects of continuous ventilation on the emplacement drift environment and surrounding rock conditions during preclosure for three increased airflow quantities. The three cases of continuous ventilation systems are: System A, 1.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 8), System B, 5.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 9), and System C, 10.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 10) in each emplacement drift split. An emplacement drift split is half total length of emplacement drift going from the east or west main to the exhaust main. The difference in each system is the quantity of airflow in the emplacement drifts.

  18. Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G.

    1982-03-01

    As a result of prior EPRI-sponsored studies, it was concluded that a research program should be designed and implemented to provide an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions. This two-volume report contains a research plan which is based on a review of the present state of the art and which defines the necessary R and D program and estimates the benefits and costs of the program. The recommended research program consists of 30 interrelated tasks. It is designed to perform the needed research; to verify the results; to develop improved components; and to publish computer-aided design methods, pump specification guidelines, and a troubleshooting manual. Most of the technology proposed in the research plan is applicable to nuclear power plants as well as to fossil-fired plants. This volume contains appendixes on pump design, cavitation damage, performance testing, hydraulics, two-phase flow in pumps, flow stability, and rotor dynamics.

  19. Passive Safety Features in Advanced Nuclear Power Plant Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, M.; Chughtai, I. R.; Aslam, M.

    2013-03-01

    For implementation of advance passive safety features in future nuclear power plant design, a passive safety system has been proposed and its response has been observed for Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the cold leg of a reactor coolant system. In a transient simulation the performance of proposed system is validated against existing safety injection system for a reference power plant of 325 MWe. The existing safety injection system is a huge system and consists of many active components including pumps, valves, piping and Instrumentation and Control (I&C). A good running of the active components of this system is necessary for its functionality as high head safety injection system under design basis accidents. Using reactor simulation technique, the proposed passive safety injection system and existing safety injection system are simulated and tested for their performance under large break LOCA for the same boundary conditions. Critical thermal hydraulic parameters of both the systems are presented graphically and discussed. The results obtained are approximately the same in both the cases. However, the proposed passive safety injection system is a better choice for such type of reactors due to reduction in components with improved safety.

  20. Use of hydraulic models to identify and resolve design isssues in FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strock, T.W.; Gohara, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The hydraulics within a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber involve several complex two-phase gas/liquid interactions that directly affect the scrubber pressure drop, mist elimination efficiency, and the mass transfer process of SO{sub 2} removal. Current industrial efforts to develop cost effective, high-efficiency wet FGD scrubbers are focusing, in part, on the hydraulics. The development of an experimental approach and test facility for understanding and optimizing wet scrubber flow characteristics has been completed. Hydraulic models simulate full-scale units and allow the designer to view the gas/liquid flow interactions. Modeling procedures for downsizing the wet scrubber for the laboratory have been developed and validated with field data comparisons. A one-eighth scale hydraulic model has been used to study several FGD scrubber design issues. Design changes to reduce capital and operating cost have been developed and tested. Recently, the model was used to design a commercial, uniform flow, high gas velocity absorber for the next generation of FGD systems.

  1. Backfill LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Norman

    1999-11-17

    Backfill is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for License Application (LA). The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository of the inclusion of backfill in emplacement drifts. Backfill may act as a barrier to water flow, may reduce the waste dissolution rate, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. However, installation of the backfill material can be costly in terms of time, money, and human effort. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of backfill materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate dispersion of groundwater intrusions into backfill over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the backfill material. (2) Review the thermal effects of backfill on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of backfill and the depth of backfill required to protect waste packages under backfill. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of backfill. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of backfill. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and dusting potential. (6) Evaluate drift conditions and configurations to determine the suitability of backfilling methodology. (7) Perform cost assessment of backfill material placement. (8) Evaluate the feature with criteria that will be supplied by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) Team. This report does not discuss backfill for sealing of ramps, shafts and mains but is limited to backfill in emplacement drifts.

  2. AP600 design certification thermal hydraulics testing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hochreiter, L.E.; Piplica, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute, have been developing an advanced light water reactor design; the AP600. The AP600 is a 1940 Mwt, 600Mwe unit which is similar to a Westinghouse two-loop Pressurized Water Reactor. The accumulated knowledge on reactor design to reduce the capital costs, construction time, and the operational and maintenance cost of the unit once it begins to generate electrical power. The AP600 design goal is to maintain an overall cost advantage over fossil generated electrical power.

  3. Numerical Modeling of a Thermal-Hydraulic Loop and Test Section Design for Heat Transfer Studies in Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Daniel

    A numerical tool for the simulation of the thermal dynamics of pipe networks with heat transfer has been developed with the novel capability of modeling supercritical fluids. The tool was developed to support the design and deployment of two thermal-hydraulic loops at Carleton University for the purpose of heat transfer studies in supercritical and near-critical fluids. First, the system was characterized based on its defining features; the characteristic length of the flow path is orders of magnitude larger than the other characteristic lengths that define the system's geometry; the behaviour of the working fluid in the supercritical thermodynamic state. An analysis of the transient thermal behaviour of the model's domains is then performed to determine the accuracy and range of validity of the modeling approach for simulating the transient thermal behaviour of a thermal-hydraulic loop. Preliminary designs of three test section geometries, for the purpose of heat transfer studies, are presented in support of the overall design of the Carleton supercritical thermal-hydraulic loops. A 7-rod-bundle, annular and tubular geometries are developed with support from the new numerical tool. Materials capable of meeting the experimental requirements while operating in supercritical water are determined. The necessary geometries to satisfy the experimental goals are then developed based on the material characteristics and predicted heat transfer behaviour from previous simulation results. An initial safety analysis is performed on the test section designs, where they are evaluated against the ASME Boiler, Pressure Vessel, and Pressure Piping Code standard, required for safe operation and certification.

  4. Thermal-hydraulics design comparisons for the tandem mirror hybrid reactor blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.P.C.; Yang, Y.S.; Schultz, K.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor (TMHR) is a cylindrical reactor, and the fertile materials and tritium breeding fuel elements can be arranged with radial or axial orientation in the blanket module. Thermal-hydraulics performance comparisons were made between plate, axial rod and radial rod fuel geometrices. The three configurations result in different coolant/void fractions and different clad/structure fractions. The higher void fraction in the two rod designs means that these blankets will have to be thicker than the plate design blanket in order to achieve the same level of nuclear interactions. Their higher structural fractions will degrade the uranium breeding ratio and energy multiplication factor of the design. One difficulty in the thermal-hydraulics analysis of the plate design was caused by the varying energy multiplication of the blanket during the lifetime of the plate which forced the use of designs that operated in the transition flow regime at some point during life. To account for this, an approach was adopted from Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) experience for the pressure drop calculation and the corresponding heat transfer coefficient that was used for the film drop thermal calculation. Because of the superior nuclear performance, the acceptable thermal-hydraulic characteristics and the mechanical design feasibility, the plate geometry concept was chosen for the reference gas-cooled TMHR blanket design.

  5. HYDRAULIC SERVO

    DOEpatents

    Wiegand, D.E.

    1962-05-01

    A hydraulic servo is designed in which a small pressure difference produced at two orifices by an electrically operated flapper arm in a constantly flowing hydraulic loop is hydraulically amplified by two constant flow pumps, two additional orifices, and three unconnected ball pistons. Two of the pistons are of one size and operate against the additional orifices, and the third piston is of a different size and operates between and against the first two pistons. (AEC)

  6. Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dunfee, J.D.; Anwar, I.M.; Rusak, V.; Silvaggio, J.A. Jr.; Spring, H.

    1982-03-01

    As a result of surveys of the industry and the literature (1960 to 1980), which are described in detail, a proposed research plan is presented that is designed to improve the reliability of boiler feed pumps, which are a key factor in power plant availability. The proposed research tasks can be divided into three major categories: studies of flow phenomena in the pump, improvement of mechanical components supporting and sealing the rotor, and utility aids designed to offer immediate help to the utilities in areas of pump specification, procurement, maintenance, and reliability. A method is presented of estimating the anticipated payback versus estimated research costs.

  7. Recent Development of the Two-Stroke Engine. II - Design Features. 2; Design Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, J.

    1945-01-01

    Completing the first paper dealing with charging methods and arrangements, the present paper discusses the design forms of two-stroke engines. Features which largely influence piston running are: (a) The shape and surface condition of the sliding parts. (b) The cylinder and piston materials. (c) Heat conditions in the piston, and lubrication. There is little essential difference between four-stroke and two-stroke engines with ordinary pistons. In large engines, for example, are always found separately cast or welded frames in which the stresses are taken up by tie rods. Twin piston and timing piston engines often differ from this design. Examples can be found in many engines of German or foreign make. Their methods of operation will be dealt with in the third part of the present paper, which also includes the bibliography. The development of two-stroke engine design is, of course, mainly concerned with such features as are inherently difficult to master; that is, the piston barrel and the design of the gudgeon pin bearing. Designers of four-stroke engines now-a-days experience approximately the same difficulties, since heat stresses have increased to the point of influencing conditions in the piston barrel. Features which notably affect this are: (a) The material. (b) Prevailing heat conditions.

  8. Richards Barrier LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Kramer

    1999-11-17

    The Richards Barrier is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for the License Application (LA), Richards was a soil scientist who first described the diversion of moisture between two materials with different hydrologic properties. In this report, a Richards Barrier is a special type of backfill with a fine-grained material (such as sand) overlaying a coarse-grained material (such as gravel). Water that enters an emplacement drift will first encounter the fine-grained material and be transported around the coarse-grained material covering the waste package, thus protecting the waste package from contact with most of the groundwater. The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository by the inclusion of a Richards Barrier type backfill in emplacement drifts. The Richards Barrier can act as a barrier to water flow, can reduce the waste package material dissolution rate, limit mobilization of the radionuclides, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of barrier materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate diversion of groundwater intrusions into the barrier over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the Richards Barrier. (2) Review the thermal effects of the Richards Barrier on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of the Richards Barrier and the depth of the barrier required to protect waste packages under the barrier. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of multiple layers of the barrier. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of the barrier. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and

  9. A novel design of semi-active hydraulic mount with wide-band tunable notch frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Yao, Guo-feng; Zhao, Jing-zhou; Qin, Min

    2014-04-01

    Hydraulic engine mount is advanced vibration isolator with superior performance to reduce vibration transferred from engine to chassis. As the stiffness at notch frequency is small, some semi-active or active hydraulic mounts tune some parameters to let notch frequency coincide with exciting frequency for better vibration isolation performance. It is discovered the current semi-active mounts can tune the notch frequency in narrow frequency band when only one parameter is tuned. A novel semi-active hydraulic engine mount design which introduces screw thread is proposed and researched in the paper. This hydraulic mount can control both cross section area and the length of inertia track and the theoretical tunable notch frequency band is [0, ∞). Theoretical work is carried out to uncover the capability for the proposed design to tune notch frequency. Simulation work is performed to understand its high vibration isolation performance. For the purpose of energy conservation, the friction self-locking is introduced. This denotes once the mount is tuned at optimal condition, the energy can be cut off and the optimal condition will never change. We also determine the best time to tune the parameters of the proposed mount in order to decrease the acting force. The proposed semi-active mount has capability to obtain wide band tunable notch frequency and has merit of energy conservation.

  10. A brief history of the interactions between climate and Mexican hydraulic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platas, Francisco; Osnaya, Santiago; Ocaña, Raymundo; Zarur, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Weather in Mexico is always extreme, for instance, in some portions of the desert of México the temperature can reach 134° F in the shade. On the other side in the Sierra Tarahumara, which is in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, high altitude produce in this place a cool oceanic climate (Köppen climate classification Cwb), characterized by mild days (38° F) and cold nights (-9.4° F).Traditionally the equipment and hydraulic infrastructure in this kind of extreme zones has been building for engineers, architects and industrial designers. A brief history is given of the development of hydraulic design, infrastructure works and technical design guidelines from antiquity to XX Century.

  11. Design Features of the SMART Water Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Byung Seon Choi; Seong Hoon Kim; Juhyeon Yoon; Doo Jeong Lee; Yoon Yeong Bae; Sung Kyun Zee

    2004-07-01

    The design features for the primary water chemistry for the SMART are introduced from the viewpoint of the system characteristics and the chemical design concept. The most essential differences in water chemistry between the commercially operating PWRs and SMART are characterized by the presence of boron in the water and the operating mode of the purification system. SMART is a soluble boron free reactor, and the ammonia is used as a pH reagent. The material for SMART steam generator is also different from the standard material of the commercially operating PWRs: titanium alloy for the steam generator tubes. In SMART hydrogen gas which suppresses a generation of oxidizing species by the radiolysis processes in the reactors is not added to the primary coolant, but is normally generated from the radiolysis of the ammonia as the coolant passes through the core. Ammonia is added once per shift because SMART reactor has no letdown and charging system during power operation. Because of these competing processes, the concentrations of hydrogen, nitrogen and ammonia in the primary coolant are in equilibrium, which depend on the decomposition and/or combination rate of the ammonia. The level of permissible oxygen concentration in the primary coolant can be ensured by both suppression of the water radiolysis through maintaining a high enough hydrogen concentration in the primary coolant and by a restriction of the oxygen ingress into the primary coolant with the makeup water. The ammonia chemistry in SMART reactor eliminates the need for hydrogen injection for the control of the dissolved oxygen in the primary coolant because of spontaneous generation of hydrogen and nitrogen produced by the reaction of the ammonia decomposition. (authors)

  12. Hydraulic Jumps, Waves and Other Flow Features Found by Modeling Stably-Stratified Flows in the Salt Lake Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Ludwig, F.; Street, R.

    2003-12-01

    The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) was used to simulate weak synoptic wind conditions with stable stratification and pronounced drainage flow at night in the vicinity of the Jordan Narrows at the south end of Salt Lake Valley. The simulations showed the flow to be quite complex with hydraulic jumps and internal waves that make it essential to use a complete treatment of the fluid dynamics. Six one-way nested grids were used to resolve the topography; they ranged from 20-km grid spacing, initialized by ETA 40-km operational analyses down to 250-m horizontal resolution and 200 vertically stretched levels to a height of 20 km, beginning with a 10-m cell at the surface. Most of the features of interest resulted from interactions with local terrain features, so that little was lost by using one-way nesting. Canyon, gap, and over-terrain flows have a large effect on mixing and vertical transport, especially in the regions where hydraulic jumps are likely. Our results also showed that the effect of spatial resolution on simulation performance is profound. The horizontal resolution must be such that the smallest features that are likely to have important impact on the flow are spanned by at least a few grid points. Thus, the 250 m minimum resolution of this study is appropriate for treating the effects of features of about 1 km or greater extent. To be consistent, the vertical cell dimension must resolve the same terrain features resolved by the horizontal grid. These simulations show that many of the interesting flow features produce observable wind and temperature gradients at or near the surface. Accordingly, some relatively simple field measurements might be made to confirm that the mixing phenomena that were simulated actually take place in the real atmosphere, which would be very valuable for planning large, expensive field campaigns. The work was supported by the Atmospheric Sciences Program, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, U

  13. A survey on methods of design features identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowik, C.; Kalinowski, K.; Paprocka, I.; Kempa, W.

    2015-11-01

    It is widely accepted that design features are one of the most attractive integration method of most fields of engineering activities such as a design modelling, process planning or production scheduling. One of the most important tasks which are realized in the integration process of design and planning functions is a design translation meant as design data mapping into data which are important from process planning needs point of view, it is manufacturing data. A design geometrical shape translation process can be realized with application one of the following strategies: (i) designing with previously prepared design features library also known as DBF method it is design by feature, (ii) interactive design features recognition IFR, (iii) automatic design features recognition AFR. In case of the DBF method design geometrical shape is created with design features. There are two basic approaches for design modelling in DBF method it is classic in which a part design is modelled from beginning to end with application design features previously stored in a design features data base and hybrid where part is partially created with standard predefined CAD system tools and the rest with suitable design features. Automatic feature recognition consist in an autonomic searching of a product model represented with a specific design representation method in order to find those model features which might be potentially recognized as design features, manufacturing features, etc. This approach needs the searching algorithm to be prepared. The searching algorithm should allow carrying on the whole recognition process without a user supervision. Currently there are lots of AFR methods. These methods need the product model to be represented with B-Rep representation most often, CSG rarely, wireframe very rarely. In the IFR method potential features are being recognized by a user. This process is most often realized by a user who points out those surfaces which seem to belong to a

  14. Effects of radial diffuser hydraulic design on a double-suction centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, H. C.; Zhang, Y. X.; Xu, C.; Zhang, J. Y.; Li, Z. L.

    2016-05-01

    In order to study effects of radial diffuser on hydraulic performance of crude oil pump, the steady CFD numerical method is applied and one large double-suction oil pump running in long-distance pipeline is considered. The research focuses on analysing the influence of its diffuser vane profile on hydraulic performance of oil pump. The four different types of cylindrical vane have been designed by in-house codes mainly including double arcs (DA), triple arcs (TA), equiangular spiral line (ES) and linear variable angle spiral line (LVS). During design process diffuser vane angles at inlet and outlet are tentatively given within a certain range and then the wrapping angle of the four types of diffuser vanes can be calculated automatically. Under the given inlet and outlet angles, the linear variable angle spiral line profile has the biggest wrapping angle and profile length which is good to delay channel diffusion but bring more friction hydraulic loss. Finally the vane camber line is thickened at the certain uniform thickness distribution and the 3D diffuser models are generated. The whole flow passage of oil pump with different types of diffusers under various flow rate conditions are numerically simulated based on RNG k-ɛ turbulent model and SIMPLEC algorithm. The numerical results show that different types of diffusers can bring about great difference on the hydraulic performance of oil pump, of which the ES profile diffuser with its proper setting angle shows the best hydraulic performance and its inner flow field is improved obviously. Compared with the head data from model sample, all designed diffusers can make a certain improvement on head characteristic. At the large flow rate conditions the hydraulic efficiency increases obviously and the best efficiency point shift to the large flow rate range. The ES profile diffuser embodies the better advantages on pump performance which can be explained theoretically that the diffuser actually acts as a diffusion

  15. Hydraulic features of Engineered Log Jams (ELJs) and their influence on salmonid behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, W. D.; Fetter, D.; Somerville, G.; Tullos, D. D.; Palacijo, J.

    2010-12-01

    In an effort to recreate channel complexity and habitat, construction of Engineered Log Jams (ELJs) is increasing, yet questions remain regarding their effectiveness due to lack of observations of hydraulics and fish use around these structures. To address this limitation, we surveyed four different forms of engineered log jams in western Oregon. The structures and near-structure stream environments were surveyed for bathymetry, instrumented with an Acoustic Doppler Stream Profiler (ADCP) to measure velocities, and snorkeled to observe the behavior of salmonids. Further, tensor visualization of stream velocities were constructed to investigate circulation and flow patterns in and around the ELJ structures. We found that more complex structures created a more varied bottom profile, while simpler structures resulted in more simple pools. However, all log jams did increase the diversity of flow patterns, with areas of high and low velocity that appeared to influence fish behavior. Variation in the size of salmonids was related to greater variation in the velocity, and fish behavior (feeding, aggression) was observed to vary within the pools. Our results provide preliminary evidence of the influence of engineered structures on the diversity and versatility of fish habitat.

  16. Thermal-hydraulic design of the target/blanket for the accelerator production of tritium conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Willcutt, G.J.E. Jr.; Kapernick, R.J.

    1997-11-01

    A conceptual design was developed for the target/blanket system of an accelerator-based system to produce tritium. The target/blanket system uses clad tungsten rods for a spallation target and clad lead rods as a neutron multiplier in a blanket surrounding the target. The neutrons produce tritium in {sup 3}He, which is contained in aluminum tubes located in the decoupler and blanket regions. This paper presents the thermal-hydraulic design of the target, decoupler, and blanket developed for the conceptual design of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project, and demonstrates there is adequate margin in the design at full power operation.

  17. Bayesian Chance-Constrained Hydraulic Barrier Design under Geological Structure Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Chitsazan, Nima; Pham, Hai V; Tsai, Frank T-C

    2015-01-01

    The groundwater community has widely recognized geological structure uncertainty as a major source of model structure uncertainty. Previous studies in aquifer remediation design, however, rarely discuss the impact of geological structure uncertainty. This study combines chance-constrained (CC) programming with Bayesian model averaging (BMA) as a BMA-CC framework to assess the impact of geological structure uncertainty in remediation design. To pursue this goal, the BMA-CC method is compared with traditional CC programming that only considers model parameter uncertainty. The BMA-CC method is employed to design a hydraulic barrier to protect public supply wells of the Government St. pump station from salt water intrusion in the "1500-foot" sand and the "1700-foot" sand of the Baton Rouge area, southeastern Louisiana. To address geological structure uncertainty, three groundwater models based on three different hydrostratigraphic architectures are developed. The results show that using traditional CC programming overestimates design reliability. The results also show that at least five additional connector wells are needed to achieve more than 90% design reliability level. The total amount of injected water from the connector wells is higher than the total pumpage of the protected public supply wells. While reducing the injection rate can be achieved by reducing the reliability level, the study finds that the hydraulic barrier design to protect the Government St. pump station may not be economically attractive.

  18. The Process of Designing Task Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Malcolm Bauer, from Education Testing Services, provides his comments on the Focus article in this issue of "Measurement" entitled : "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" (Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, Valerie J. Shute). Bauer begins his remarks by noting…

  19. Optimal design of hydraulic head monitoring networks using space-time geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, G. S.; Júnez-Ferreira, H. E.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for the optimal design of space-time hydraulic head monitoring networks and its application to the Valle de Querétaro aquifer in Mexico. The selection of the space-time monitoring points is done using a static Kalman filter combined with a sequential optimization method. The Kalman filter requires as input a space-time covariance matrix, which is derived from a geostatistical analysis. A sequential optimization method that selects the space-time point that minimizes a function of the variance, in each step, is used. We demonstrate the methodology applying it to the redesign of the hydraulic head monitoring network of the Valle de Querétaro aquifer with the objective of selecting from a set of monitoring positions and times, those that minimize the spatiotemporal redundancy. The database for the geostatistical space-time analysis corresponds to information of 273 wells located within the aquifer for the period 1970-2007. A total of 1,435 hydraulic head data were used to construct the experimental space-time variogram. The results show that from the existing monitoring program that consists of 418 space-time monitoring points, only 178 are not redundant. The implied reduction of monitoring costs was possible because the proposed method is successful in propagating information in space and time.

  20. Optimal design of pump-and-treat systems under uncertain hydraulic conductivity and plume distribution.

    PubMed

    Baú, Domenico A; Mayer, Alex S

    2008-08-20

    In this work, we present a stochastic optimal control framework for assisting the management of the cleanup by pump-and-treat of polluted shallow aquifers. In the problem being investigated, hydraulic conductivity distribution and dissolved contaminant plume location are considered as the uncertain variables. The framework considers the subdivision of the cleanup horizon in a number of stress periods over which the pumping policy implemented until that stage is dynamically adjusted based upon new information that has become available in the previous stages. In particular, by following a geostatistical approach, we study the idea of monitoring the cumulative contaminant mass extracted from the installed recovery wells, and using these measurements to generate conditional realizations of the hydraulic conductivity field. These realizations are thus used to obtain a more accurate evaluation of the initial plume distribution, and modify accordingly the design of the pump-and-treat system for the remainder of the remedial process. The study indicates that measurements of contaminant mass extracted from pumping wells retain valuable information about the plume location and the spatial heterogeneity characterizing the hydraulic conductivity field. However, such an information may prove quite soft, particularly in the instances where recovery wells are installed in regions where contaminant concentration is low or zero. On the other hand, integrated solute mass measurements may effectively allow for reducing parameter uncertainty and identifying the plume distribution if more recovery wells are available, in particular in the early stages of the cleanup process.

  1. Optimal hydraulic design of earth dam cross section using saturated-unsaturated seepage flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.-Q.; Unami, K.; Kawachi, T.

    An optimal hydraulic design problem regarding an earth dam cross section is formulated as an inverse problem for the steady model of saturated-unsaturated seepage flows in porous media. In the problem formulation, the choice of soil material to be used in each point of the dam cross sectional domain is considered as the control variable to be identified. The performance index used to evaluate the appropriateness of the design is defined as the sum of two square integral norms, which represent reducing the saturated zone and minimizing material costs. It is also shown that the first norm bounds the total seepage discharge through the earth dam. Since the governing variational boundary value problem as well as the adjoint problem is well-posed, a deterministic approach is taken. A numerical scheme including pseudo-unsteady terms is developed to calculate the optimal solution in an ideal earth dam cross section to be designed utilizing two different types of soil material. The results show that an inclined clay core of less hydraulic conductivity should be located on the upstream side of the cross section. The unsaturated zone turns out to play an important role in the flow field and the optimal design.

  2. Design of a miniature hydraulic compression load frame for microdiffraction tests at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Varma, R.; Krasnicki, S.; Sinha, S.

    1999-10-11

    In support of the x-ray synchrotrons radiation multidiffraction project of Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), we have designed and fabricated a miniature hydraulic compression load frame with 20000 N load capacity for metal specimen tests at the APS. The compact design allows the load frame to sit on the center of a 6-circle goniometer with six degrees of freedom and maximum solid angle accessibility for the incoming x-ray beam and diffraction beam detectors. A set of compact precision stages with submicron resolution has been designed for the load frame positioning to compensate the sample internal elastic and/or plastic deformation during the loading process. The system design, specifications, and test results are presented.

  3. Designing attractive gamification features for collaborative storytelling websites.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang Hwa; Chang, Jen-Wei; Lee, Chun-Chia

    2013-06-01

    Gamification design is considered as the predictor of collaborative storytelling websites' success. Although aforementioned studies have mentioned a broad range of factors that may influence gamification, they neither depicted the actual design features nor relative attractiveness among them. This study aims to identify attractive gamification features for collaborative storytelling websites. We first constructed a hierarchical system structure of gamification design of collaborative storytelling websites and conducted a focus group interview with eighteen frequent users to identify 35gamification features. After that, this study determined the relative attractiveness of these gamification features by administrating an online survey to 6333 collaborative storytelling websites users. The results indicated that the top 10 most attractive gamification features could account for more than 50% of attractiveness among these 35 gamification features. The feature of unpredictable time pressure is important to website users, yet not revealed in previous relevant studies. Implications of the findings were discussed.

  4. 21 CFR 211.42 - Design and construction features.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sampling, testing, or examination by the quality control unit before release for manufacturing or packaging... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Design and construction features. 211.42 Section... § 211.42 Design and construction features. (a) Any building or buildings used in the...

  5. Thermal-hydraulic design issues and analysis for the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Watson, R.D. ); Hassanien, A.M. ); Goranson, P.L. . Fusion Engineering Design Center); Salmonson, J.C. . Special Projects)

    1990-01-01

    Critical Heat Flux (CHF), also called burnout, is one of the major design limits for water-cooled divertors in tokamaks. Another important design issue is the correct thermal modeling of the divertor plate geometry where heat is applied to only one side of the plate and highly subcooled flow boiling in internal passages is used for heat removal. This paper discusses analytical techniques developed to address these design issues, and the experimental evidence gathered in support of the approach. Typical water-cooled divertor designs for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are analyzed, and design margins estimated. Peaking of the heat flux at the tube-water boundary is shown to be an important issue, and design concerns which could lead to imposing large design safety margins are identified. The use of flow enhancement techniques such as internal twisted tapes and fins are discussed, and some estimates of the gains in the design margin are presented. Finally, unresolved issues and concerns regarding hydraulic design of divertors are summarized, and some experiments which could help the ITER final design process identified. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Non-linear hydraulic properties of woodchips necessary to design denitrification beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghane, Ehsan; Feyereisen, Gary W.; Rosen, Carl J.

    2016-11-01

    Denitrification beds are being used to reduce the transport of water-soluble nitrate via subsurface drainage systems to surface water. Only recently has the non-linearity of water flow through woodchips been ascertained. To successfully design and model denitrification beds with optimum nitrate removal, a better understanding of flow in denitrification beds is needed. The main objectives of this study were to characterize the hydraulic properties of old degraded woodchips and provide a better understanding of the factors affecting flow. To achieve this goal, we conducted constant-head column experiments using old woodchips that were excavated from a four-year old denitrification bed near Willmar, Minnesota, USA. For Izbash's equation, the non-Darcy exponent (n) ranged from 0.76 to 0.87 that indicates post-linear regime, and the permeability coefficient (M10) at 10°C ranged from 0.9 to 2.6 cm s-1. For Forchheimer's equation, the intrinsic permeability of 5.6 × 10-5 cm2 and ω constant of 0.40 (at drainable porosity of 0.41) closely resembled the in-situ properties found in a previous study. Forchheimer's equation was better than that of Izbash's for describing water flow through old woodchips, and the coefficients of the former provided stronger correlations with drainable porosity. The strong correlation between intrinsic permeability and drainable porosity showed that woodchip compaction is an important factor affecting water flow through woodchips. Furthermore, we demonstrated the importance of temperature effects on woodchip hydraulics. In conclusion, the hydraulic properties of old woodchips should be characterized using a non-Darcy equation to help design efficient systems with optimum nitrate removal.

  7. Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis Modeling for Analysis of Flood Design Features at the Picayune Strand Restoration Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    increases freshwater discharges to downstream estuaries, promotes invasive upland vegetation, interrupts ecological connectivity, degrades habitat...restore its predrainage hydrology and ecological function for beneficial effects on flora and fauna in the project area and surrounding public lands. The...hydraulic design of the project features. The PSRP-recommended plan was selected by the Project Delivery Team as having the greatest ecological benefit at

  8. Some design features, non-features, and ex-non-features of the Cornell microkelvin cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. N.

    1989-10-01

    Cryostats intended for very low temperature use must meet very stringent demands in the areas of vibrational isolation, electrical isolation, and reliable thermometry. The efforts which have been made in these areas during the construction of the new microkelvin cryostat at Cornell have met with varying success. In this paper will be described both a number of our ideas which we feel have worked well (features, in the jargon of the American advertising industry), some which seemed like good ideas at the time, but which should not be repeated elsewhere (non-features, by logical extension). Also corrections to some of the less successful approaches will be discussed, which have lead to the production of some ex-non-features.

  9. The design of an electro-hydraulically controlled, manual transmission for a hybrid electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.W.; Hoff, C.J.

    1998-07-01

    An electro-hydraulically controlled, manual transmission has been developed for the Department of Energy's FutureCar Challenge. This project which is jointly sponsored by the DOE and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) seeks to modify a production mid-size car to reach 80 mpg, yet still maintain the safety and consumer acceptability of the original vehicle. To meet this challenge, a 1996 Ford Taurus has been modified into a parallel drive, hybrid electric vehicle. The propulsion system of this vehicle is based on a DC electric motor, which is coupled via a belt drive, in parallel, with a 1.9 liter turbo-charged, direct injection diesel engine. Both propulsion units are then coupled to the transmission. The OEM automatic transmission has been replaced with a five-speed, manual transmission, which was adapted from an earlier model year production Taurus SHO vehicle. This transmission is both lighter and more mechanically efficient than the automatic transmission. In order to provide the automatic transmission shifting capabilities expected by the consumer for a vehicle of this size, an electro-hydraulic control unit was designed and built. This unit automatically engages the clutch and shifts gears as required during vehicle operation. Gear selection is controlled by a programmable logic controller (PLC), which utilizes throttle and vehicle speed input signals. Additionally, the driver may select gears using a modified steering-column PRNDL selector. This paper discusses the final design of this system and provides an evaluation of its performance.

  10. Quasi-three dimensional hydraulic design and performance calculation of high specific speed mixed-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, J. Y.; Hou, H. C.

    2016-05-01

    According to the basic parameters of 211-80 high specific speed mixed-flow pump, based on the quasi-three dimensional flow theory, the hydraulic design of impeller and its matching spaced guide vanes for high specific speed mixed flow pump was completed, in which the iterative calculation of S 1, S 2 stream surfaces was employed to obtain meridional flow fields and the point-by-point integration method was employed to draw blade camber lines. Blades are thickened as well as blade leading edges are smoothed in the conformal mapping surface. Subsequently the internal fields of the whole flow passage of the designed pump were simulated by using RANS equations with RNG k-ε two-equation turbulent model. The results show that, compared with the 211-80 model, the hydraulic efficiency of the designed pump at the optimal flow rate increases 9.1%. The hydraulic efficiency of designed pump in low flow rate condition (78% designed flow rate) increases 6.46%. The hydraulic efficiency in high flow rate areas increases obviously and there is no bad phenomenon of suddenly decrease of hydraulic efficiency in model pump. From the distributions of velocity and pressure fields, it can be seen that the flow in impeller is uniform and the increase of pressure is gentle. There are no obvious impact phenomenon on impeller inlet and obvious wake shedding vortex phenomenon from impeller outlet to guide vanes inlet.

  11. A Methodology for Selecting High Thermal-Hydraulic Performance Fuel Configurations for Tightly Packed Epithermal Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Antonino; Todreas, Neil E.

    2002-07-15

    Cylindrical fuel pins with wires are the design of choice for tightly packed fuel arrays. However, it is important to investigate novel fuel configurations in order to increase the thermal margins. Hence, new fuel designs have been studied for the epithermal option of the light water-cooled IRIS core. These designs are also of potential use in other tightly packed, epithermal advanced core designs.First, design equations have been used to determine number, height, and size of the principal features (clad, gap, fuel cross-sectional area) of the novel fuel configurations under investigation. Then, performance indices have been introduced to relate fuel geometrical characteristics to selected thermal-hydraulic parameters, such as pressure drop, critical heat flux (CHF), fuel centerline temperature, and clad surface temperature and stress distribution. Finally, variously shaped fuel configurations, including cylindrical, triangular, square, and hexagonal, have been ranked according to the performance indicators.The hexagonal fuel pins, both twisted and straight, proved to be good solutions for the epithermal tight core of the light water-cooled IRIS reactor, with performances comparable to those of the cylindrical fuel with wires. In particular, for water-to-fuel ratios {approx}0.33, the twisted hexagonal shape is the preferable design with a reduction of the total pressure drop by 16% and an increase of the CHF margin by 200%, compared to the traditional cylindrical pins with grids. Furthermore, the straight hexagonal shape allows flatter subchannel velocity profiles, wall shear stress, and wall temperature distributions. However, geometric constraints unfortunately do not allow application of the twisted hexagonal shape for smaller water-to-fuel ratios, which is a design regime of more favorable epithermal neutronics performance. In this regime, the cylindrical pins with wires are the solution of choice.

  12. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility thermal hydraulic analysis for Title II design

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, E.R.

    1994-11-10

    The purpose of this work was to provide the thermal hydraulic analysis for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Title II design. Temperature distributions throughout the tank structure were calculated for subsequent use in the structural analysis and in the safety evaluation. Calculated temperatures of critical areas were compared to design allowables. Expected operating parameters were calculated for use in the ventilation system design and in the environmental impact documentation. The design requirements were obtained from the MWTF Functional Design Criteria (FDC). The most restrictive temperature limit given in the FDC is the 200 limit for the haunch and dome steel and concrete. The temperature limit for the rest of the primary and secondary tanks and concrete base mat and supporting pad is 250 F. Also, the waste should not be allowed to boil. The tank geometry was taken from ICF Kaiser Engineers Hanford drawing ES-W236A-Z1, Revision 1, included here in Appendix B. Heat removal rates by evaporation from the waste surface were obtained from experimental data. It is concluded that the MWTF tank cooling system will meet the design temperature limits for the design heat load of 700,000 Btu/h, even if cooling flow is lost to the annulus region, and temperatures change very slowly during transients due to the high heat capacity of the tank structure and the waste. Accordingly, transients will not be a significant operational problem from the viewpoint of meeting the specified temperature limits.

  13. Design of a Magnetostrictive-Hydraulic Actuator Considering Nonlinear System Dynamics and Fluid-Structure Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, John Philip

    Smart material electro-hydraulic actuators (EHAs) utilize fluid rectification via one-way check valves to amplify the small, high-frequency vibrations of certain smart materials into large motions of a hydraulic cylinder. Although the concept has been demonstrated in previously, the operating frequency of smart material EHA systems has been limited to a small fraction of the available bandwidth of the driver materials. The focus of this work is to characterize and model the mechanical performance of a magnetostrictive EHA considering key system components: rectification valves, smart material driver, and fluid-system components, leading to an improved actuator design relative to prior work. The one-way valves were modeled using 3-D finite element analysis, and their behavior was characterized experimentally by static and dynamic experimental measurement. Taking into account the effect of the fluid and mechanical conditions applied to the valves within the pump, the dynamic response of the valve was quantified and applied to determine rectification bandwidth of different valve configurations. A novel miniature reed valve, designed for a frequency response above 10~kHz, was fabricated and tested within a magnetostrictive EHA. The nonlinear response of the magnetostrictive driver, including saturation and hysteresis effects, was modeled using the Jiles-Atherton approach to calculate the magnetization and the resulting magnetostriction based on the applied field calculated within the rod from Maxwell's equations. The dynamic pressure response of the fluid system components (pumping chamber, hydraulic cylinder, and connecting passages) was measured over a range of input frequencies. For the magnetostrictive EHA tested, the peak performance frequency was found to be limited by the fluid resonances within the system. A lumped-parameter modeling approach was applied to model the overall behavior of a magnetostrictive EHA, incorporating models for the reed valve response

  14. The design concept of the 6-degree-of-freedom hydraulic shaker at ESTEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkman, P. W.; Kretz, D.

    1992-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has decided to extend its test facilities at the European Space and Technology Center (ESTEC) at Noordwijk, The Netherlands, by implementing a 6-degree-of-freedom hydraulic shaker. This shaker will permit vibration testing of large payloads in the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 100 Hz. Conventional single axis sine and random vibration modes can be applied without the need for a configuration change of the test set-up for vertical and lateral excitations. Transients occurring during launch and/or landing of space vehicles can be accurately simulated in 6-degrees-of-freedom. The performance requirements of the shaker are outlined and the results of the various trade-offs, which are investigated during the initial phase of the design and engineering program are provided. Finally, the resulting baseline concept and the anticipated implementation plan of the new test facility are presented.

  15. Design of a pictogram of the operator-hydraulic filler system

    SciTech Connect

    Bukhgol'ts, V.P.; Dinershtein, V.A.

    1985-09-01

    A modern hydraulic filling system is discussed which consists of two lines: the crusher and sorter preparing the filling material, and the hydraulic filling unit, which includes a mixer and a system of pulp conduits. The process chart of the hydraulic filling system without the crusher-sorter is illustrated. When the system is started, water is first flushed through the pulp conduit, gate valves with drives are opened, and the quantity of water discharged is measured by water output sensors. For effective and failure-free operation of the system, remote control and monitoring elements are introduced into the hydraulic filling system.

  16. Hierarchical design of an electro-hydraulic actuator based on robust LPV methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Balázs; Varga, Balázs; Gáspár, Péter

    2015-08-01

    The paper proposes a hierarchical control design of an electro-hydraulic actuator, which is used to improve the roll stability of vehicles. The purpose of the control system is to generate a reference torque, which is required by the vehicle dynamic control. The control-oriented model of the actuator is formulated in two subsystems. The high-level hydromotor is described in a linear form, while the low-level spool valve is a polynomial system. These subsystems require different control strategies. At the high level, a linear parameter-varying control is used to guarantee performance specifications. At the low level, a control Lyapunov-function-based algorithm, which creates discrete control input values of the valve, is proposed. The interaction between the two subsystems is guaranteed by the spool displacement, which is control input at the high level and must be tracked at the low-level control. The spool displacement has physical constraints, which must also be incorporated into the control design. The robust design of the high-level control incorporates the imprecision of the low-level control as an uncertainty of the system.

  17. Structural health monitoring feature design by genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Dustin Y.; Todd, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems provide real-time damage and performance information for civil, aerospace, and other high-capital or life-safety critical structures. Conventional data processing involves pre-processing and extraction of low-dimensional features from in situ time series measurements. The features are then input to a statistical pattern recognition algorithm to perform the relevant classification or regression task necessary to facilitate decisions by the SHM system. Traditional design of signal processing and feature extraction algorithms can be an expensive and time-consuming process requiring extensive system knowledge and domain expertise. Genetic programming, a heuristic program search method from evolutionary computation, was recently adapted by the authors to perform automated, data-driven design of signal processing and feature extraction algorithms for statistical pattern recognition applications. The proposed method, called Autofead, is particularly suitable to handle the challenges inherent in algorithm design for SHM problems where the manifestation of damage in structural response measurements is often unclear or unknown. Autofead mines a training database of response measurements to discover information-rich features specific to the problem at hand. This study provides experimental validation on three SHM applications including ultrasonic damage detection, bearing damage classification for rotating machinery, and vibration-based structural health monitoring. Performance comparisons with common feature choices for each problem area are provided demonstrating the versatility of Autofead to produce significant algorithm improvements on a wide range of problems.

  18. Capture-zone design in an aquifer influenced by cyclic fluctuations in hydraulic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Willy; Chorley, Don; Patrick, Guy

    2002-10-01

    Design of a groundwater pumping and treatment system for a wood-treatment facility adjacent to the tidally influenced Fraser River estuary required the development of methodologies to account for cyclic variations in hydraulic gradients. Design of such systems must consider the effects of these cyclic fluctuations on the capture of dissolved-phase contaminants. When the period of the cyclic fluctuation is much less than the travel time of the dissolved contaminant from the source to the discharge point, the hydraulic-gradient variations resulting from these cycles can be ignored. Capture zones are then designed based on the average hydraulic gradient determined using filter techniques on continuous groundwater-level measurements. When the period of cyclic fluctuation in hydraulic gradient is near to or greater than the contaminant travel time, the resulting hydraulic-gradient variations cannot be ignored. In these instances, procedures are developed to account for these fluctuations in the capture-zone design. These include proper characterization of the groundwater regime, assessment of the average travel time and period of the cyclic fluctuations, and numerical techniques which allow accounting for the cyclic fluctuations in the design of the capture zone. Résumé. L'étude d'un système de pompage et de traitement de l'eau souterraine d'une usine de traitement du bois proche de l'estuaire de la rivière Fraser, influencé par les marées, a nécessité la mise au point de méthodologies pour prendre en compte les variations cycliques de gradients hydrauliques. L'étude de tels systèmes doit considérer les effets de ces variations cycliques sur l'extraction des contaminants en phase dissoute. Lorsque la période des variations cycliques est très inférieure au temps de parcours du contaminant dissous entre la source et le point d'émergence, les variations du gradient hydraulique résultant de ces cycles peuvent être ignorées. Les zones d'extraction sont

  19. Innovation in Aerodynamic Design Features of Soviet Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2006-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations of some tactical and strategic missile systems developed by the former Soviet Union have been included in the basic missile research programs of the NACA/NASA. Studies of the Soviet missiles sometimes revealed innovative design features that resulted in unusual or unexpected aerodynamic characteristics. In some cases these characteristics have been such that the measured performance of the missile exceeds what might have been predicted. In other cases some unusual design features have been found that would alleviate what might otherwise have been a serious aerodynamic problem. In some designs, what has appeared to be a lack of refinement has proven to be a matter of expediency. It is a purpose of this paper to describe some examples of unusual design features of some Soviet missiles and to illustrate the effectiveness of the design features on the aerodynamic behavior of the missile. The paper draws on the experience of the author who for over 60 years was involved in the aerodynamic wind tunnel testing of aircraft and missiles with the NACA/NASA.

  20. Spectral feature design in high dimensional multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chih-Chien Thomas; Landgrebe, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The High resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) is designed to acquire images simultaneously in 192 spectral bands in the 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers wavelength region. It will make possible the collection of essentially continuous reflectance spectra at a spectral resolution sufficient to extract significantly enhanced amounts of information from return signals as compared to existing systems. The advantages of such high dimensional data come at a cost of increased system and data complexity. For example, since the finer the spectral resolution, the higher the data rate, it becomes impractical to design the sensor to be operated continuously. It is essential to find new ways to preprocess the data which reduce the data rate while at the same time maintaining the information content of the high dimensional signal produced. Four spectral feature design techniques are developed from the Weighted Karhunen-Loeve Transforms: (1) non-overlapping band feature selection algorithm; (2) overlapping band feature selection algorithm; (3) Walsh function approach; and (4) infinite clipped optimal function approach. The infinite clipped optimal function approach is chosen since the features are easiest to find and their classification performance is the best. After the preprocessed data has been received at the ground station, canonical analysis is further used to find the best set of features under the criterion that maximal class separability is achieved. Both 100 dimensional vegetation data and 200 dimensional soil data were used to test the spectral feature design system. It was shown that the infinite clipped versions of the first 16 optimal features had excellent classification performance. The overall probability of correct classification is over 90 percent while providing for a reduced downlink data rate by a factor of 10.

  1. Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G.

    1982-03-01

    As a result of prior EPRI-sponsored studies, it was concluded that a research program should be designed and implemented to provide an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions. This two-volume report contains a research plan which is based on a review of the present state of the art and which defines the necessary R and D program and estimates the benefits and costs of the program. The recommended research program consists of 30 interrelated tasks. It is designed to perform the needed research; to verify the results; to develop improved components; and to publish computer-aided design methods, pump specification guidelines, and a troubleshooting manual. Most of the technology proposed in the research plan is applicable to nuclear power plants as well as to fossil-fired plants. This volume discusses the design, performance and failures of feed pumps, and recommendations for research on pump dynamics, design, and specifications.

  2. Numerical design and optimization of hydraulic resistance and wall shear stress inside pressure-driven microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Damiri, Hazem Salim; Bardaweel, Hamzeh Khalid

    2015-11-07

    Microfluidic networks represent the milestone of microfluidic devices. Recent advancements in microfluidic technologies mandate complex designs where both hydraulic resistance and pressure drop across the microfluidic network are minimized, while wall shear stress is precisely mapped throughout the network. In this work, a combination of theoretical and modeling techniques is used to construct a microfluidic network that operates under minimum hydraulic resistance and minimum pressure drop while constraining wall shear stress throughout the network. The results show that in order to minimize the hydraulic resistance and pressure drop throughout the network while maintaining constant wall shear stress throughout the network, geometric and shape conditions related to the compactness and aspect ratio of the parent and daughter branches must be followed. Also, results suggest that while a "local" minimum hydraulic resistance can be achieved for a geometry with an arbitrary aspect ratio, a "global" minimum hydraulic resistance occurs only when the aspect ratio of that geometry is set to unity. Thus, it is concluded that square and equilateral triangular cross-sectional area microfluidic networks have the least resistance compared to all rectangular and isosceles triangular cross-sectional microfluidic networks, respectively. Precise control over wall shear stress through the bifurcations of the microfluidic network is demonstrated in this work. Three multi-generation microfluidic network designs are considered. In these three designs, wall shear stress in the microfluidic network is successfully kept constant, increased in the daughter-branch direction, or decreased in the daughter-branch direction, respectively. For the multi-generation microfluidic network with constant wall shear stress, the design guidelines presented in this work result in identical profiles of wall shear stresses not only within a single generation but also through all the generations of the

  3. Effect of the method of estimation of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity with regards to the design of stormwater infiltration trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva coutinho, Artur; Predelus, Dieuseul; Lassabatere, Laurent; Ben Slimene, Erij; Celso Dantas Antonino, Antonio; Winiarski, Thierry; Joaquim da Silva Pereira Cabral, Jaime; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    Best management practices are based on the infiltration of stormwater (e.g. infiltration into basins or trenches) to reduce the risk of flooding of urban areas. Proper estimations of saturated hydraulic conductivity of the vadose zone are required to avoid inappropriate design of infiltration devices. This article aims at assessing (i) the method-dependency of the estimation of soils saturated hydraulic conductivity and (ii) the consequences of such dependency on the design of infiltration trenches. This is illustrated for the specific case of an infiltration trench to be constructed to receive stormwater from a specific parking surface, 250 m2 in area, in Recife (Brazil). Water infiltration experiments were conducted according to the Beerkan Method, i.e. application of a zero water pressure head through a disc source (D=15 cm) and measures of the amount of infiltrated water with time. Saturated hydraulic conductivity estimates are derived from the analysis of these infiltration tests using several different conceptual approaches: one-dimensional models of Horton(1933) and Philip(1957), three-dimensional methods recently developed (Lassabatere et al., 2006, Wu et al., 1999, and Bagarello et al., 2013) and direct 3-dimensional numerical inversion. The estimations for saturated hydraulic conductivity ranged between 65.5 mm/h and 94 mm/h for one-dimensional methods, whereas using three-dimensional methods saturated hydraulic conductivity ranged between 15.6 mm/h and 50 mm/h. These results shows the need for accounting for 3D geometry, and more generally, the physics of water infiltration in soils, if a proper characterization of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity is targeted. In a second step, each estimate of the saturated hydraulic conductivity was used to calculate the stormwater to be stored in the studied trench for several rainfall events of recurrence intervals of 2 to 25 years. The calculation of these volumes showed a great sensitivity with regards to the

  4. 21 CFR 211.42 - Design and construction features.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sampling, testing, or examination by the quality control unit before release for manufacturing or packaging...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and Facilities § 211.42 Design and construction features. (a) Any building or buildings used in the...

  5. 21 CFR 211.42 - Design and construction features.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sampling, testing, or examination by the quality control unit before release for manufacturing or packaging...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and Facilities § 211.42 Design and construction features. (a) Any building or buildings used in the...

  6. Thermal Hydraulic Design and Analysis of a Water-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket with Superheated Steam for CFETR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaoman; Ma, Xuebin; Jiang, Kecheng; Chen, Lei; Huang, Kai; Liu, Songlin

    2015-09-01

    The water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket (WCCB) is one of the blanket candidates for China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR). In order to improve power generation efficiency and tritium breeding ratio, WCCB with superheated steam is under development. The thermal-hydraulic design is the key to achieve the purpose of safe heat removal and efficient power generation under normal and partial loading operation conditions. In this paper, the coolant flow scheme was designed and one self-developed analytical program was developed, based on a theoretical heat transfer model and empirical correlations. Employing this program, the design and analysis of related thermal-hydraulic parameters were performed under different fusion power conditions. The results indicated that the superheated steam water-cooled blanket is feasible. supported by the National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2014GB122000 and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  7. Thermal hydraulic design analysis of ternary carbide fueled square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Eric M.; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-22

    A computational analysis is conducted to determine the optimum thermal-hydraulic design parameters for a square-lattice honeycomb nuclear rocket engine core that will incorporate ternary carbide based uranium fuels. Recent studies at the Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI) have demonstrated the feasibility of processing solid solution, ternary carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, (U, Zr, Ta)C, (U, Zr, Hf)C and (U, Zr, W)C. The square-lattice honeycomb design provides high strength and is amenable to the processing complexities of these ultrahigh temperature fuels. A parametric analysis is conducted to examine how core geometry, fuel thickness and the propellant flow area effect the thermal performance of the nuclear rocket engine. The principal variables include core size (length and diameter) and fuel element dimensions. The optimum core configuration requires a balance between high specific impulse and thrust level performance, and maintaining the temperature and strength limits of the fuel. A nuclear rocket engine simulation code is developed and used to examine the system performance as well as the performance of the main reactor core components. The system simulation code was originally developed for analysis of NERVA-Derivative and Pratt and Whitney XNR-2000 nuclear thermal rockets. The code is modified and adopted to the square-lattice geometry of the new fuel design. Thrust levels ranging from 44,500 to 222,400 N (10,000 to 50,000 lbf) are considered. The average hydrogen exit temperature is kept at 2800 K, which is well below the melting point of these fuels. For a nozzle area ratio of 300 and a thrust chamber pressure of 4.8 Mpa (700 psi), the specific impulse is 930 s. Hydrogen temperature and pressure distributions in the core and the fuel maximum temperatures are calculated.

  8. Ion-mediated enhancement of xylem hydraulic conductivity in four Acer species: relationships with ecological and anatomical features.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Andrea; Dimasi, Federica; Klepsch, Matthias; Jansen, Steven

    2012-12-01

    The 'ionic effect', i.e., changes in xylem hydraulic conductivity (k(xyl)) due to variation of the ionic sap composition in vessels, was studied in four Acer species growing in contrasting environments differing in water availability. Hydraulic measurements of the ionic effect were performed together with measurements on the sap electrical conductivity, leaf water potential and vessel anatomy. The low ionic effect recorded in Acer pseudoplatanus L. and Acer campestre L. (15.8 and 14.7%, respectively), which represented two species from shady and humid habitats, was associated with a low vessel grouping index, high sap electrical conductivity and least negative leaf water potential. Opposite traits were found for Acer monspessulanum L. and Acer platanoides L., which showed an ionic effect of 23.6 and 23.1%, respectively, and represent species adapted to higher irradiance and/or lower water availability. These findings from closely related species provide additional support that the ionic effect could function as a compensation mechanism for embolism-induced loss of k(xyl), either as a result of high evaporative demand or increased risk of hydraulic failure.

  9. Thermal-Hydraulic Design of a Fluoride High-Temperature Demonstration Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Qualls, A L

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Fluoride High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) named the Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a novel reactor concept using molten salt coolant and TRIstructural ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel that is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of the FHR DR is to advance the technology readiness level of FHRs. The FHR DR will demonstrate technologies needed to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. The FHR DR has a thermal power of 100 MWt, very similar to the SmAHTR, another FHR ORNL concept (Refs. 1 and 2) with a power of 125 MWt. The FHR DR is also a small version of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), with a power of 3400 MWt, cooled by a molten salt and also being developed at ORNL (Ref. 3). The FHR DR combines three existing technologies: (1) high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant, (2) high-temperature coated-particle TRISO fuel, (3) and passive decay heat cooling systems by using Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS). This paper presents FHR DR thermal-hydraulic design calculations.

  10. Design of a hydraulic analog of the circulatory system for evaluating artificial hearts.

    PubMed

    Donovan, F M

    1975-01-01

    A major problem in improving artificial heart designs is the absence of methods for accurate in vitro testing of artificial heart systems. A mock circulatory system has been constructed which hydraulically simulates the systemic and pulmonary circulations of the normal human. The device is constructed of 1/2 in. acrylic sheet and has overall dimensions of 24 in. wide, 16 in. tall, and 8 in. deep. The artificial heart to be tested is attached to the front of the device, and pumps fluid from the systemic venous chamber into the pulmonary arterial chamber and from the pulmonary venous chamber into the systemic arterial chamber. Each of the four chambers is hermetically sealed. The compliance of each chamber is determined by the volume of air trapped above the fluid in that chamber. The pulmonary and systemic resistances are set automatically by bellows-operated valves to simulate the barroreceptor response in the systemic arteries and the passive pulmonary resistance response in the pulmonary arteries. Cardiac output is measured by a turbine flowmeter in the systemic circulation. Results using the Kwan-Gett artificial heart show a good comparison between the mock circulatory system response and the calf response.

  11. Strength Design of Reinforced Concrete Hydraulic Structures. Report 9. Analysis and Design of Reinforced Concrete Conduits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    American Concrete Pipe Association ( ACPA ) Approach 15. The "indirect method" of the ACPA (2-5) follows the D-load method of ASTM, but accounts for...been used on many occasions and is currently being converted from main frame to PC use. ACPA intends to distribute this program to designers, so there...Philadelphia, Pa., 1984. 2-5. American Concrete Pipe Association, "Concrete Pipe Handbook", Chap.4, ACPA , Vienna, Va. 1988. 2-6. Olander, H.C., U.S

  12. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  13. Cost effectiveness of operator features in equipment design.

    PubMed

    Williams, J C

    1983-06-01

    In design negotiation, the attribution of credible values to the incorporation or deletion of operator features allows engineers the freedom to judge the overall effect of human factors recommendations in relation to the achievement of a design specification. Likewise in the development phase, product planners frequently need more precise statements about productivity, training needs and general operational performance than, "it will be greater/less, worse/better than...". The method described utilises measured and synthetic data, learning theory and Markov processes to calculate the likelihood of operator task failure. These failure rates are then treated via filter factors derived from the application of the Nominal Groups Technique to give a global statement of the likelihood of operator failure resulting in unscheduled calls for service. Using the relationship between the cost of service calls and the overall life cost of developing, manufacturing, marketing and supporting a leased product, it is then possible to place credible values on the design features in question. Thus during the design process it becomes feasible to calculate the likely effects of human factors recommendations and modifications in relation to manufacturing costs, and thereby facilitate rational assessment of their implementation on a sound economic basis. This technique has been used to considerable effect, and represents a useful additional tool for the human factors practitioner in the design negotiation process. Further developments and refinements are planned, and it is anticipated that a similar technique will shortly be available to enable assessment of the effectiveness of product training programmes and job aids.

  14. Kinetic Assessment of Golf Shoe Outer Sole Design Features

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Neal A.; Dyson, Rosemary J.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed human kinetics in relation to golf shoe outer sole design features during the golf swing using a driver club by measuring both within the shoe, and beneath the shoe at the natural grass interface. Three different shoes were assessed: metal 7- spike shoe, alternative 7-spike shoe, and a flat soled shoe. In-shoe plantar pressure data were recorded using Footscan RS International pressure insoles and sampling at 500 Hz. Simultaneously ground reaction force at the shoe outer sole was measured using 2 natural grass covered Kistler force platforms and 1000 Hz data acquisition. Video recording of the 18 right-handed golfers at 200 Hz was undertaken while the golfer performed 5 golf shots with his own driver in each type of shoe. Front foot (nearest to shot direction) maximum vertical force and torque were greater than at the back foot, and there was no significant difference related to the shoe type. Wearing the metal spike shoe when using a driver was associated with more torque generation at the back foot (p < 0. 05) than when the flat soled shoe was worn. Within shoe regional pressures differed significantly with golf shoe outer sole design features (p < 0.05). Comparison of the metal spike and alternative spike shoe results provided indications of the quality of regional traction on the outer sole. Potential golf shoe outer sole design features and traction were presented in relation to phases of the golf swing movement. Application of two kinetic measurement methods identified that moderated (adapted) muscular control of foot and body movement may be induced by golf shoe outer sole design features. Ground reaction force measures inform comparisons of overall shoe functional performance, and insole pressure measurements inform comparisons of the underfoot conditions induced by specific regions of the golf shoe outer sole. Key points Assessments of within golf shoe pressures and beneath shoe forces at the natural grass interface were conducted

  15. Ecological Engineering Approaches to Improve Hydraulic Properties of Infiltration Basins Designed for Groundwater Recharge.

    PubMed

    Gette-Bouvarot, Morgane; Volatier, Laurence; Lassabatere, Laurent; Lemoine, Damien; Simon, Laurent; Delolme, Cécile; Mermillod-Blondin, Florian

    2015-08-18

    Infiltration systems are increasingly used in urban areas for groundwater recharge. The reduction of sediment permeability by physical and/or biological processes is a major problem in management of infiltration systems often requiring expensive engineering operations for hydraulic performance maintenance. To reduce these costs and for the sake of sustainable development, we proposed to evaluate the ability of ecological engineering approaches to reduce the biological clogging of infiltration basins. A 36-day field-scale experiment using enclosures was performed to test the influences of abiotic (light reduction by shading) and biotic (introduction of the macrophyte Vallisneria spiralis (L.) or the gastropod Viviparus viviparus (Linnaeus, 1758)) treatments to limit benthic biofilm biomass and to maintain or even increase hydraulic performances. We coupled biological characterization of sediment (algal biomass, bacterial abundance, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, microbial enzymatic activity, photosynthetic activity, and photosystem II efficiency) with hydraulic conductivity measurements to assess the effects of treatments on sediment permeability. The grazer Viviparus viviparus significantly reduced benthic biofilm biomass and enhanced hydraulic conductivity. The other treatments did not produce significant changes in hydraulic conductivity although Vallisneria spiralis affected photosynthetic activity of biofilm. Finally, our results obtained with Viviparus viviparus are promising for the development of ecological engineering solutions to prevent biological fouling in infiltration systems.

  16. New simulation tools for long-term hydraulic design for a geological repository

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, S.; Chaudon, L.

    1995-12-31

    Hydraulic concepts for a geological repository were investigated. Numerical simulations were adapted for this purpose and an experimental rheoelectric method based on an analogy between hydraulic flows and electric currents was developed. The results are discussed in this paper. A simplified representation of the host rock was adopted to account for the geometric details of the concept; this rock was described by a homogeneous porous medium associated with two major discontinuities. Steady-state hydraulic conditions were considered, and heating by the waste packages was assumed to be negligible (these conditions correspond to the long-term repository setting). The hydraulic structures obtained by the two methods are comparable, but significant differences were observed in the drained water distribution in the excavations; these discrepancies highlight the importance of the calculation mesh dimensions. Drainage barriers (drainage drifts and boreholes) surrounding the disposal boreholes may reduce water circulation in the disposal areas to their initial levels by constituting a partial hydraulic Faraday cage. This could be achieved with a reasonable number of boreholes if necessary.

  17. An ontology design pattern for surface water features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

  18. Design and analysis of an active optics system for a 4-m telescope mirror combining hydraulic and pneumatic supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousberg, Gregory P.; Moreau, Vincent; Schumacher, Jean-Marc; Piérard, Maxime; Somja, Aude; Gloesener, Pierre; Flebus, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    AMOS has developed a hybrid active optics system that combines hydraulic and pneumatic properties of actuators to support a 4-m primary mirror. The mirror is intended to be used in the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope) that will be installed by the National Solar Observatory (NSO) atop the Haleakala volcano in Hawaii. The mirror support design is driven by the needs of (1) minimizing the support-induced mirror distortions under telescope operating conditions, (2) shaping the mirror surface to the desired profile, and (3) providing a high stiffness against wind loads. In order to fulfill these requirements, AMOS proposes an innovative support design that consist of 118 axial actuators and 24 lateral actuators. The axial support is based on coupled hydraulic and pneumatic actuators. The hydraulic part is a passive system whose main function is to support the mirror weight with a high stiffness. The pneumatic part is actively controlled so as to compensate for low-order wavefront aberrations that are generated by the mirror support itself or by any other elements in the telescope optical chain. The performances of the support and its adequacy with the requirements are assessed with the help of a comprehensive analysis loop involving finite-element, thermal and optical modellings.

  19. The design of hydraulic pressure regulators that are stable without the use of sensing line restrictors or frictional dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H.

    1977-01-01

    Parameters controlled in design determine the stability of hydraulic pressure regulators in service. The non-linear sensing line restrictor can provide stability, but degrades the transient response. Linear damping is not always physically realizable and is sensitive to clearance and viscosity. Design relationships are analytically derived through which regulators can be made to be stable without the use of either of these damping means. The analytical distinctions between the parameters derived and those in prior literature are discussed. An analytically derived circuit component that stabilizes an otherwise unstable regulator and its experimental verification is described.

  20. AiResearch QCGAT engine, airplane, and nacelle design features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan engine and nacelle system was designed and tested. The engine utilized the core of the AiResearch model TFE731-3 engine and incorporated several unique noise- and emissions-reduction features. Components that were successfully adapted to this core include the fan, gearbox, combustor, low-pressure turbine, and associated structure. A highly versatile workhorse nacelle incorporating interchangeable acoustic and hardwall duct liners, showed that large-engine attenuation technology could be applied to small propulsion engines. The application of the mixer compound nozzle demonstrated both performance and noise advantages on the engine. Major performance, emissions, and noise goals were demonstrated.

  1. Space Station services and design features for users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurzhals, Peter R.; Mckinney, Royce L.

    1987-01-01

    The operational design features and services planned for the NASA Space Station will furnish, in addition to novel opportunities and facilities, lower costs through interface standardization and automation and faster access by means of computer-aided integration and control processes. By furnishing a basis for large-scale space exploitation, the Space Station will possess industrial production and operational services capabilities that may be used by the private sector for commercial ventures; it could also ultimately support lunar and planetary exploration spacecraft assembly and launch facilities.

  2. Design of haptic master featuring small-sized MR brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Han Gyeol; Choi, Seung-Bok; Sohn, Jung Woo

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a new type of haptic master featuring small-sized MR brake is proposed and its performances are evaluated. The proposed haptic master consists of base frame, stick grip and small-sized four MR brakes for 3-DOF rotational motion and 1-DOF gripper motion. To obtain large braking torque under limited small size of MR brake, dual tapered shape inner magnetic core is proposed and its performance is evaluated via both numerical estimation and experimental test. After design and implementation of control algorithm, it has been demonstrated through experiment that the proposed actuator has good performances on tracking control of desired torques. Then, a new haptic master device is designed and constructed by adopting the proposed MR brakes and light weight frame structures. It is verified that the proposed haptic master device is effective for the real application in the field.

  3. Fluid Power/Basic Hydraulics. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanbery, Richard

    This guide is designed to assist industrial vocational instructors in teaching a course on fluid power and basic hydraulics. Covered in the unit on the basics of fluid power and hydraulics are the following topics: the fundamentals of fluid power and hydraulics, basic hydraulic circuits, and servicing a hydraulic jack. The second unit, consisting…

  4. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  5. Design of a cost effective solar powered water pump. Hydrology and hydraulics series report

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, D.G.

    1980-04-01

    The design and performance of a vacuum lift, solar powered water pump is discussed. The basic design consists of an expanding gaseous piston confined inside a chamber which is located in series with, and between, an inlet and an outlet check valve. The gas is generated by volatilizing cyclopentane or hexane. Four variations of this basic design concept were built and evaluated. The various features of each are discussed. Considerations in the choice of a cost-effective solar collector are also reviewed. Several of the more promising types of solar collectors were built and evaluated for use on the pump. A 70C heat source temperature is required to operate the pump if cyclopentane is used as the volatile fluid, 90C is required if hexane is used. The volatile fluid is not expended in the pumping process. The pumps constructed on this project have a capacity of approximately 6 liters/minute when pumped to a height of 2 meters. Two square meters of sunshine are sufficient to operate the pump.

  6. Design optimization of axial flow hydraulic turbine runner: Part I - an improved Q3D inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Guoyi; Cao, Shuliang; Ishizuka, Masaru; Hayama, Shinji

    2002-06-01

    With the aim of constructing a comprehensive design optimization procedure of axial flow hydraulic turbine, an improved quasi-three-dimensional inverse method has been proposed from the viewpoint of system and a set of rotational flow governing equations as well as a blade geometry design equation has been derived. The computation domain is firstly taken from the inlet of guide vane to the far outlet of runner blade in the inverse method and flows in different regions are solved simultaneously. So the influence of wicket gate parameters on the runner blade design can be considered and the difficulty to define the flow condition at the runner blade inlet is surmounted. As a pre-computation of initial blade design on S2m surface is newly adopted, the iteration of S1 and S2m surfaces has been reduced greatly and the convergence of inverse computation has been improved. The present model has been applied to the inverse computation of a Kaplan turbine runner. Experimental results and the direct flow analysis have proved the validation of inverse computation. Numerical investigations show that a proper enlargement of guide vane distribution diameter is advantageous to improve the performance of axial hydraulic turbine runner. Copyright

  7. Statistical Design Features of the Healthy Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Warren J; Sroka, Christopher J; Frongillo, Edward A; Arteaga, S Sonia; Loria, Catherine M; Leifer, Eric S; Wu, Colin O; Patrick, Heather; Fishbein, Howard A; John, Lisa V

    2015-10-01

    The Healthy Communities Study is designed to assess relationships between characteristics of community programs and policies targeting childhood obesity and children's BMI, diet, and physical activity. The study involved a complex data collection protocol implemented over a 2-year period (2013-2015) across a diverse sample of 130 communities, defined as public high school catchment areas. The protocol involved baseline assessment within each community that included in-person or telephone interviews regarding community programs and policies and in-home collection of BMI, nutritional, and physical activity outcomes from a sample of up to 81 children enrolled in kindergarten through eighth grade in public schools. The protocol also involved medical record reviews to establish a longitudinal trajectory of BMI for an estimated 70% of participating children. Staged sampling was used to collect less detailed measures of physical activity and nutrition across the entire sample of children, with a subset assessed using more costly, burdensome, and detailed measures. Data from the Healthy Community Study will be analyzed using both cross-sectional and longitudinal models that account for the complex design and correct for measurement error and bias using a likelihood-based Markov-chain Monte Carlo methodology. This methods paper provides insights into the complex design features of the Healthy Communities Study and may serve as an example for future large-scale studies that assess the relationship between community-based programs and policies and health outcomes of community residents.

  8. Statistical Design Features of the Healthy Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Warren J.; Sroka, Christopher J.; Frongillo, Edward A.; Arteaga, S. Sonia; Loria, Catherine M.; Leifer, Eric S.; Wu, Colin O.; Patrick, Heather; Fishbein, Howard A.; John, Lisa V.

    2015-01-01

    The Healthy Communities Study is designed to assess relationships between characteristics of community programs and policies targeting childhood obesity and children’s BMI, diet, and physical activity. The study involved a complex data collection protocol implemented over a 2-year period (2013–2015) across a diverse sample of up to 125 communities, defined as public high school catchment areas. The protocol involved baseline assessment within each community that included in-person or telephone interviews regarding community programs and policies and in-home collection of BMI, nutritional, and physical activity outcomes from a sample of up to 81 children enrolled in kindergarten through eighth grade in public schools. The protocol also involved medical record reviews to establish a longitudinal trajectory of BMI for an estimated 70% of participating children. Staged sampling was used to collect less detailed measures of physical activity and nutrition across the entire sample of children, with a subset assessed using more costly, burdensome, and detailed measures. Data from the Healthy Community Study will be analyzed using both cross-sectional and longitudinal models that account for the complex design and correct for measurement error and bias using a likelihood-based Markov chain Monte Carlo methodology. This methods paper provides insights into the complex design features of the Healthy Communities Study and may serve as an example for future large-scale studies that assess the relationship between community-based programs and policies and health outcomes of community residents. PMID:26384932

  9. Design of MR brake featuring tapered inner magnetic core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Oh, Jong-Soek; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    In this work, a new type of MR brake featuring tapered inner magnetic core is proposed and its braking performance is numerically evaluated. In order to achieve high braking torque with restricted size and weight of MR brake system, tapered inner magnetic core is designed and expands the area that the magnetic flux is passing by MR fluid-filled gap. The mathematical braking torque model of the proposed MR brake is derived based on the field-dependent Bingham rheological model of MR fluid. Finite element analysis is carried out to identify electromagnetic characteristics of the conventional and the proposed MR brake configuration. To demonstrate the superiority of the proposed MR brake, the braking torque of the proposed MR brake is numerically evaluated and compared with that of conventional MR brake model.

  10. Launch vehicle payload adapter design with vibration isolation features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gareth R.; Fadick, Cynthia M.; Fram, Bryan J.

    2005-05-01

    Payloads, such as satellites or spacecraft, which are mounted on launch vehicles, are subject to severe vibrations during flight. These vibrations are induced by multiple sources that occur between liftoff and the instant of final separation from the launch vehicle. A direct result of the severe vibrations is that fatigue damage and failure can be incurred by sensitive payload components. For this reason a payload adapter has been designed with special emphasis on its vibration isolation characteristics. The design consists of an annular plate that has top and bottom face sheets separated by radial ribs and close-out rings. These components are manufactured from graphite epoxy composites to ensure a high stiffness to weight ratio. The design is tuned to keep the frequency of the axial mode of vibration of the payload on the flexibility of the adapter to a low value. This is the main strategy adopted for isolating the payload from damaging vibrations in the intermediate to higher frequency range (45Hz-200Hz). A design challenge for this type of adapter is to keep the pitch frequency of the payload above a critical value in order to avoid dynamic interactions with the launch vehicle control system. This high frequency requirement conflicts with the low axial mode frequency requirement and this problem is overcome by innovative tuning of the directional stiffnesses of the composite parts. A second design strategy that is utilized to achieve good isolation characteristics is the use of constrained layer damping. This feature is particularly effective at keeping the responses to a minimum for one of the most important dynamic loading mechanisms. This mechanism consists of the almost-tonal vibratory load associated with the resonant burn condition present in any stage powered by a solid rocket motor. The frequency of such a load typically falls in the 45-75Hz range and this phenomenon drives the low frequency design of the adapter. Detailed finite element analysis is

  11. Hydraulic design of a re-circulating water cooling system of a combined cycle power plant in Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, C.K.; Pandit, D.R.; Kwon, S.G.

    1998-12-31

    The paper describes the hydraulic design and hydraulic transient analysis of the re-circulating water cooling system of the combined cyclo Sipco power cogeneration plant in Thailand. The power plant of 450 MW total capacity is proposed to be built in two stages. Stage one will produce 300 MW of power and will consist of two gas turbine generators (GTG) and one steam turbine generator (STG). Stage two will produce 150 MW of power and will consist of one GTG and one STG. The cooling system will consist of one GTG and one STG. The cooling system will consist of cooling towers, a combined collecting basin and pump intake sump, pumps and motors, and separate conveyance systems and condensers for the generator units in the two stages. In a re-circulating water cooling system, cold water is pumped from the pump intake sump to the condensers through the conveyance system and hot water from the condensers is carried through the returning pipeline system to the cooling towers, whence the water after cooling is drained into the sump at the base of the towers. Total cooling water requirement for the system in stage one is estimated to be 112,000 gallons per minute (GPM), and that in stage two, 56,000 GPM. The sump is designed using the computer program HEC-2, developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) and the pump intake basin, following the recommendations of the Hydraulic Institute. The pumps were sized by computing the head loss in the system, and, the steady state and transient performances (during pump start-up and shut-down procedures and due to possible power or mechanical failure of one or all pumps) of the system were analyzed by mathematically modeling the system using the computer program WHAMO (Water Hammer nd Mass Oscillations), also developed by the COE.

  12. Orthogonal design for scale invariant feature transform optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xintao; Luo, Yonglong; Yi, Yunyun; Jie, Biao; Wang, Taochun; Bian, Weixin

    2016-09-01

    To improve object recognition capabilities in applications, we used orthogonal design (OD) to choose a group of optimal parameters in the parameter space of scale invariant feature transform (SIFT). In the case of global optimization (GOP) and local optimization (LOP) objectives, our aim is to show the operation of OD on the SIFT method. The GOP aims to increase the number of correctly detected true matches (NoCDTM) and the ratio of NoCDTM to all matches. In contrast, the LOP mainly aims to increase the performance of recall-precision. In detail, we first abstracted the SIFT method to a 9-way fixed-effect model with an interaction. Second, we designed a mixed orthogonal array, MA(64,23420,2), and its header table to optimize the SIFT parameters. Finally, two groups of parameters were obtained for GOP and LOP after orthogonal experiments and statistical analyses were implemented. Our experiments on four groups of data demonstrate that compared with the state-of-the-art methods, GOP can access more correct matches and is more effective against object recognition. In addition, LOP is favorable in terms of the recall-precision.

  13. Designing Crane Controls with applied Mechanical and Electrical Safety Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, Bradford P.; Walczak, Thomas A.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The use of overhead traveling bridge cranes in many varied applications is common practice. In particular, the use of cranes in the nuclear, military, commercial, aerospace, and other industries can involve safety critical situations. Considerations for Human Injury or Casualty, Loss of Assets, Endangering the Environment, or Economic Reduction must be addressed. Traditionally, in order to achieve additional safety in these applications, mechanical systems have been augmented with a variety of devices. These devices assure that a mechanical component failure shall reduce the risk of a catastrophic loss of the correct and/or safe load carrying capability. ASME NOG-1-1998, (Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes, Top Running Bridge, and Multiple Girder), provides design standards for cranes in safety critical areas. Over and above the minimum safety requirements of todays design standards, users struggle with obtaining a higher degree of reliability through more precise functional specifications while attempting to provide "smart" safety systems. Electrical control systems also may be equipped with protective devices similar to the mechanical design features. Demands for improvement of the cranes "control system" is often recognized, but difficult to quantify for this traditionally "mechanically" oriented market. Finite details for each operation must be examined and understood. As an example, load drift (or small motions) at close tolerances can be unacceptable (and considered critical). To meet these high functional demands encoders and other devices are independently added to control systems to provide motion and velocity feedback to the control drive. This paper will examine the implementation of Programmable Electronic Systems (PES). PES is a term this paper will use to describe any control system utilizing any programmable electronic device such as Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), or an Adjustable Frequency Drive (AID) 'smart' programmable

  14. Nonlinear dynamic analysis and robust controller design for Francis hydraulic turbine regulating system with a straight-tube surge tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ji; Yuan, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yanbin; Chen, Zhihuan; Li, Yuanzheng

    2017-02-01

    The safety and stability of hydraulic turbine regulating system (HTRS) in hydropower plants become increasingly important since the rapid development and the broad application of hydro energy technology. In this paper, a novel mathematical model of Francis hydraulic turbine regulating system with a straight-tube surge tank based on a few state-space equations is introduced to study the dynamic behaviors of the HTRS system, where the existence of possible unstable oscillations of this model is studied extensively and presented in the forms of the bifurcation diagram, time waveform plot, phase trajectories, and power spectrum. To eliminate these undesirable behaviors, a specified fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed. In this hybrid controller, the sliding mode control law makes full use of the proposed model to guarantee the robust control in the presence of system uncertainties, while the fuzzy system is applied to approximate the proper gains of the switching control in sliding mode technique to reduce the chattering effect, and particle swarm optimization is developed to search the optimal gains of the controller. Numerical simulations are presented to verify the effectiveness of the designed controller, and the results show that the performances of the nonlinear HTRS system assisted with the proposed controller is much better than that with the commonly used optimal PID controller.

  15. 14 CFR 23.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 23.1435 Section 23.1435... § 23.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, the structural loads expected...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 29.1435 Section 29.1435... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each element of the hydraulic system...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 23.1435 Section 23.1435... § 23.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, the structural loads expected...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 23.1435 Section 23.1435... § 23.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, the structural loads expected...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 29.1435 Section 29.1435... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each element of the hydraulic system...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 29.1435 Section 29.1435... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each element of the hydraulic system...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL HYDRAULICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thermal, chemical, and biological quality of water in rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and near coastal areas is inseparable from a consideration of hydraulic engineering principles: therefore, the term environmental hydraulics. In this chapter we discuss the basic principles of w...

  2. Design of aquifer remediation systems: (1) describing hydraulic structure and NAPL architecture using tracers.

    PubMed

    Enfield, Carl G; Wood, A Lynn; Espinoza, Felipe P; Brooks, Michael C; Annable, Michael; Rao, P S C

    2005-12-01

    Aquifer heterogeneity (structure) and NAPL distribution (architecture) are described based on tracer data. An inverse modelling approach that estimates the hydraulic structure and NAPL architecture based on a Lagrangian stochastic model where the hydraulic structure is described by one or more populations of lognormally distributed travel times and the NAPL architecture is selected from eight possible assumed distributions. Optimization of the model parameters for each tested realization is based on the minimization of the sum of the square residuals between the log of measured tracer data and model predictions for the same temporal observation. For a given NAPL architecture the error is reduced with each added population. Model selection was based on a fitness which penalized models for increasing complexity. The technique is demonstrated under a range of hydrologic and contaminant settings using data from three small field-scale tracer tests: the first implementation at an LNAPL site using a line-drive flow pattern, the second at a DNAPL site with an inverted five-spot flow pattern, and the third at the same DNAPL site using a vertical circulation flow pattern. The Lagrangian model was capable of accurately duplicating experimentally derived tracer breakthrough curves, with a correlation coefficient of 0.97 or better. Furthermore, the model estimate of the NAPL volume is similar to the estimates based on moment analysis of field data.

  3. Thermal hydraulic method for whole core design analysis of an HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Huning, A. J.; Garimella, S.

    2013-07-01

    A new thermal hydraulic method and initial results are presented for core-wide steady state analysis of prismatic High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR). The method allows for the complete solution of temperature and coolant mass flow distribution by solving quasi-steady energy balances for the discretized core. Assembly blocks are discretized into unit cells for which the average temperature of each unit cell is determined. Convective heat removal is coupled to the unit cell energy balances by a 1-D axial flow model. The flow model uses established correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number. Bypass flow is explicitly calculated by using an initial guess for mass flow distribution and determining the exit pressure of each flow channel. The mass flow distribution is updated until a uniform core exit pressure condition is reached. Results are obtained for the MHTGR-350 with emphasis on the change in thermal hydraulic parameters due to various steady state power profiles and bypass gap widths. Steady state temperature distribution and its variations are discussed. (authors)

  4. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, Roman; Makarashvili, Vakho; Heltemes, Thad; Sun, Zaijing; Wardle, Kent E.; Bailey, James; Quigley, Kevin; Stepinski, Dominique; Vandegrift, George

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  5. The Design Features of the National Writing Project's New Teacher Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heenan, Barbara; Houghton, Nina

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the key design features of the new teacher support programs that emerged from the National Writing Project (NWP) New Teacher Initiative (NTI). As the New Teacher Initiative unfolded, a number of design features appeared frequently and consistently across the sites. This report explains how these design features of the NTI are…

  6. Nonflammable Hydraulic Power System for Tactical Aircraft. Volume 1. Aircraft System Definition, Design and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    200- 00400 8.00 12.00 16.00 20.00 24.100 28.00 32.00 36.00 40.00 44.00 48.00 Distance - in. Figure 54. Abex - Pump Staning Wave Pressure Plot at 3350...37,100 lb)’ 33,000 lb TENSION pecification LOAD -. Performance0 (lbs) -10.. Test System Performance(1,5 lb Neutral LOAD (lbs) 3.92 in.3.2i. 0...ALIF RIchrgoTub* WmWr. Oierrido | F V .Poi bon 7~ Ir.icutct ( RED ) 2225u Figure 97. Parker Metal Bellows - Reservoir Detail Drawing 5.5.3 Hydraulic

  7. Hydraulic Resistance of Vitreous Cutters: The Impact of Blade Design and Cut Rate

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Tommaso; Querzoli, Giorgio; Angelini, Giampiero; Malvasi, Carlo; Rossi, Alessandro; Morini, Mario; Esposito, Graziana; Micera, Alessandra; di Luca, Natale Mario; Ripandelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To measure the hydraulic resistance (HR) of vitreous cutters equipped with a Regular guillotine Blade (RB) or double edge blade (DEB) at cut rates comprised between 0 and 12,000 cuts per minute (CPM) and compare it with vitreous fragment size. This was an in vitro experimental study; in vivo HR measure and vitreous sampling. Methods HR, defined as aspiration pressure/flow rate, was measured in balanced salt solution (BSS; Alcon, Fort Worth, TX) (in vitro) and during pars plana vitrectomy of 20 consecutive patients aged 18 to 65, undergoing macular surgery. HR was recorded at increasing cut rates (500–6000 CPM for the RB and 500–12,000 CPM for the DEB; 5 mL/min flow). Vitreous samples were withdrawn and analyzed with Western and collagen type II and IX immunostaining to evaluate protein size. The main outcome measures were hydraulic resistance (mm Hg/ml/min [±SD]) and optic density for Western blot and immunostaining. Results RB and DEB showed identical HR in BSS between 0 and 3000 CPM. Above 3000 CPM, RB HR steadily increased, and was significantly higher than DEB HR. Vitreous HR was also similar for the two blades between 0 and 1500 CPM. Above 1500 CPM, RB offered a significantly higher resistance. Western blot and immunostaining of vitreous samples did not yield a significant difference in size, regardless of blade type and cut rate. Conclusions DEB is more efficient, offering a lower HR than RB over 1500 CPM in human vitreous. There is no viscosity reduction as a function of cut-rate between 1500 and 12,000 CPM, as HR does not vary. Translational Relevance Future vitreous cutters will benefit of a DEB; optimal cut rate needs to be defined, and the simple increase of cut rate does not provide benefits after a certain limit to be assessed. PMID:27441099

  8. Multi-objective optimization of long-term groundwater monitoring network design under uncertainty of the hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Q.; Wu, J.; Yang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study develops a new probabilistic Pareto genetic algorithm (PPGA) for long-term groundwater monitoring network design under uncertainty associated with the hydraulic conductivity field of aquifers. The PPGA integrates the previously developed deterministic multi-objective optimization method, namely improved niched Pareto genetic algorithm (INPGA) with a probabilistic Pareto domination ranking and probabilistic niche technique to search for Pareto-optimal solutions to multi-objective optimization problems in a noisy hydrogeological environment arising from insufficient hydraulic conductivity data. The PPGA is then coupled with the commonly used flow and transport codes, MODFLOW and MT3DMS, to identify the optimal sampling network design of a two-dimensional hypothetical test problem and a three-dimensional field problem in Indiana (USA) involving four objectives: (i) minimization of total sampling and analysis costs for contaminant plume monitoring, (ii) minimization of mass estimation error of the plume, (iii) minimization of the first moment estimation error of the plume, and (iv) minimization of the second moment estimation error of the plume. Also, Monte Carlo (MC) analysis is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. All of the Pareto-optimal solutions lie on the Pareto band of the MC analysis. Moreover, the root mean square errors of the second and third objectives between the Pareto-optimal solutions by the PPGA and the average values of optimal solutions by the MC analysis are quite small, at 0.0426 and 0.0149 for the hypothetical test problem and at 0.0167 and 0.0094 for the Indiana field application, respectively, but that of the fourth objective is notably larger at 0.9819 for the hypothetical test problem and at 1.2980 for the field application. The higher values of the second moment estimation errors can be attributed to the significant variation of plume shape caused by the variability in the hydraulic conductivity field

  9. Ultrahigh head pump/turbine development program: Volume 2, Advanced design, hydraulic and mechanical: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents details of the process and the results of Task 2, Advanced Design. This task includes all the theoretical studies, detailed designs of components, and evaluations of method and materials that result in a complete ready-to-build design. The design drawings and assessments of manufacturability and reliability are included.

  10. Optimal design of an electro-hydraulic valve for heavy-duty vehicle clutch actuator with certain constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fei; Shi, Peng; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Zhang, Hui

    2016-02-01

    The main objective of this paper is to investigate the sensitivity analysis and optimal design of a proportional solenoid valve (PSV) operated pressure reducing valve (PRV) for heavy-duty automatic transmission clutch actuators. The nonlinear electro-hydraulic valve model is developed based on fluid dynamics. In order to implement the sensitivity analysis and optimization for the PRV, the PSV model is validated by comparing the results with data obtained from a real test-bench. The sensitivity of the PSV pressure response with regard to the structural parameters is investigated by using Sobol's method. Finally, simulations and experimental investigations are performed on the optimized prototype and the results reveal that the dynamical characteristics of the valve have been improved in comparison with the original valve.

  11. Thermal Hydraulics Design and Analysis Methodology for a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Chen, Yen-Sen; Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions. This chapter describes a thermal hydraulics design and analysis methodology developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in support of the nuclear thermal propulsion development effort. The objective of this campaign is to bridge the design methods in the Rover/NERVA era, with a modern computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer methodology, to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments of a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine the Small Engine, designed in the 1960s. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer platform, while formulations of flow and heat transfer through porous and solid media were implemented to describe those of hydrogen flow channels inside the solid24 core. Design analyses of a single flow element and the entire solid-core thrust chamber of the Small Engine were performed and the results are presented herein

  12. Do Particular Design Features Assist People with Aphasia to Comprehend Text? An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lucy; Read, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Much of the evidence underlying guidelines for producing accessible information for people with aphasia focuses on client preference for particular design features. There is limited evidence regarding the effects of these features on comprehension. Aims: To examine the effects of specific design features on text comprehension. It was…

  13. Binding the Electronic Book: Design Features for Bibliophiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruecker, Stan; Uszkalo, Kirsten C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a design for the electronic book based on discussions with frequent book readers. We adopted a conceptual framework for this project consisting of a spectrum of possible designs, with the conventional bound book at one difference pole, and the laptop computer at the other; the design activity then consisted of appropriately…

  14. Scaling of Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments for a Space Rankine Cycle and Selection of a Preconceptual Scaled Experiment Design

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, CD

    2006-01-27

    To assist with the development of a space-based Rankine cycle power system using liquid potassium as the working fluid, a study has been conducted on possible scaled experiments with simulant fluids. This report will consider several possible working fluids and describe a scaling methodology to achieve thermal-hydraulic similarity between an actual potassium system and scaled representations of the Rankine cycle boiler or condenser. The most practical scaling approach examined is based on the selection of perfluorohexane (FC-72) as the simulant. Using the scaling methodology, a series of possible solutions have been calculated for the FC-72 boiler and condenser. The possible scaled systems will then be compared and preconceptual specifications and drawings given for the most promising design. The preconceptual design concept will also include integrating the scaled boiler and scaled condenser into a single experimental loop. All the preconceptual system specifications appear practical from a fabrication and experimental standpoint, but further work will be needed to arrive at a final experiment design.

  15. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

  16. 78 FR 26810 - Adequacy of Design Features and Functional Capabilities Identified and Described for Withstanding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... COMMISSION Adequacy of Design Features and Functional Capabilities Identified and Described for Withstanding... Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition.'' The new section, designated as Revision 0, is Section 19.5, ``Adequacy of design features and...

  17. Design Features of Pedagogically-Sound Software in Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Howard; And Others

    Weaknesses in educational software currently available in the domain of mathematics are discussed. A technique that was used for the design and production of mathematics software aimed at improving problem-solving skills which combines sound pedagogy and innovative programming is presented. To illustrate the design portion of this technique, a…

  18. Design Features of Small Brayton Cycles for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    considered for small autonomous submersibles to meet long duration and high speed operations. The closed cycle Brayton engine using lithium sulfur...will be hull mounted to save space, to alleviate the need for a pump to circulate the sea water and for improved maintenance. Cooler calculations can...the analysis, aided not only recuperator design, but system design as well . Additionally, to maintain system efficiency and to provide a viable

  19. Three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic analysis of an advanced liquid metal reactor design by the COMMIX computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.

    1991-01-01

    The emphasis in the development of advanced liquid metal reactors (LMRs) is on inherent safety and economics. One such feature is the adoption of thermal radiation and natural-convection cooling of the reactor to handle decay heat following a reactor shutdown. The decay heat removal feature of the LMR design under investigation here involves an in-vessel overflow of hot-pool sodium next to the reactor vessel (RV) in such a way that in the event of a reactor heat-up due to decay heat, the RV temperature is elevated and thereby the rate of heat removal from the reactor to the ambient air is increased. The purpose is to limit the temperature rise due to the decay heat. The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of the simple passive decay heat removal feature of an advanced LMR design based on radiation and natural convection. The evaluation was carried out by performing calculations using the COMMIX Code for two cases, one with the passive heat removal features and the other without the features, and comparing the results. 2 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Design features and results from fatigue reliability research machines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Kececioglu, D.; Mcconnell, J. B.

    1971-01-01

    The design, fabrication, development, operation, calibration and results from reversed bending combined with steady torque fatigue research machines are presented. Fifteen-centimeter long, notched, SAE 4340 steel specimens are subjected to various combinations of these stresses and cycled to failure. Failure occurs when the crack in the notch passes through the specimen automatically shutting down the test machine. These cycles-to-failure data are statistically analyzed to develop a probabilistic S-N diagram. These diagrams have many uses; a rotating component design example given in the literature shows that minimum size and weight for a specified number of cycles and reliability can be calculated using these diagrams.

  1. Design of active disturbance rejection controller for the hydraulic APC system of the rolling mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruicheng; Chen, Zhikun

    2011-10-01

    Considering uncertain external disturbance, the model of automatic position control system is established. Then, according to the information of input and output, using extended states observer (ESO), a newer observer is proposed to observe and compensate this integrated disturbance, and a controller is designed based on active disturbance rejection control (ADRC). This controller has very strong robustness not only to external disturbance, but also to unpredictable plant parameter variations.

  2. Final Report - Advanced Hydraulic and Mass Transfer Models for Distillation Column Optimization and Design

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, Robert, B.

    2005-10-13

    The project successfully developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based simulation of the hydrodynamics of flow in a commercial structured packing element. This result fulfilled the prime objective of the research program. The simulation utilized commercial CFD code marketed by Fluent Inc. in combination with a novel graphical interface developed by Oak Ridge National Lab. The end product will allow the design of next generation column internals without the need for extensive experimental validation and will expand the fundamental understanding of the vapor-liquid contacting process.

  3. Gas Transfer in Hydraulic Jumps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    gas transfer based on measurements made in a hydraulic model. 5. Hydraulic jumps are flow phenomena that are part of the energy dissipation design at...gas transfer to energy dissipation. In a hydraulic jump, the energy loss is related to the Froude number of incoming flow. Fig- ures 15, 16, and 17...number in a similar manner for each of the unit discharges tested. As energy dissipation and Froude number in- creased, gas loss increased for a

  4. Strength Design of Reinforced Concrete Hydraulic Structures: Report 8. Design of Buried Circular Conduits - Flexure and Shear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    American Concrete Pipe Association ( ACPA ) that will be discussed. The ACPA studies have resulted in design criteria for the effects of radial tension...7 (Gerstle, i988) for flexural strength with the radial tension and shear criteria developed by ACPA . The procedure uses the EM loading distribution... ACPA (Heger, Liepins, and Selig, 1985). The computer program called SPIDA (Soil-Pipe Interaction Design and Analysis) incorporates multiple finite

  5. Development and design of a dynamic armrest for hydraulic-actuation joystick controlled mobile machines.

    PubMed

    Murphy, T; Oliver, M L

    2008-05-01

    Standard armrests used in conjunction with joysticks of heavy mobile machinery have been proven to inadequately meet operator needs, resulting in excessive static loading of shoulder musculature. During joystick operation, the trajectory of the user's forearm is governed by the motion of the controller, which creates horizontal and vertical movement of the forearm. The vertical motion of the forearm in the forward and backward motion create postures that stationary armrests cannot support thereby generating increased muscle activation and risk of repetitive strain injuries. The current paper describes the design process used in creating a dynamic armrest that replicates the operator's natural motion trajectories. By incorporating the natural motion paths into a dynamic armrest, the postural requirements and muscular activation of the operator's shoulder may be reduced.

  6. The effect of roundabout design features on cyclist accident rate.

    PubMed

    Hels, Tove; Orozova-Bekkevold, Ivanka

    2007-03-01

    Roundabouts are known to result in fewer traffic accidents than traditional intersections. However, this is to a lesser degree true for bicycles than for vehicles. In this paper, we aimed at establishing statistical relationships through Poisson regression and logistic regression analyses between yearly rate of cyclist accidents on one hand and roundabout geometry, age and traffic volume (vehicles and cyclists) on the other. We related all roundabout cyclist accidents recorded by the hospital emergency department of the town of Odense, Denmark, through the years 1999-2003 (N=171) to various geometric features, age and traffic volume of all roundabouts on the Danish island of Funen (N=88). Cyclist and vehicle volumes turned out to be significant predictors in most of our models-the higher the volumes, the more accidents. Moreover, potential vehicle speed was a significant predictor, and so was age of the roundabout-older roundabouts related to more accidents and higher accident probability. Excluding 48 single cyclist accidents strengthened the relationship between accidents on one hand and vehicle and cyclist volume and potential vehicle speed on the other. This stresses the significance of speed and traffic volume for traffic accidents with more than one partner involved. The 48 single cyclist accidents were significantly related to the traffic volume of cyclists only. Due to our limited number of observations, the models should be regarded as indicative.

  7. Hydraulic design to optimize the treatment capacity of Multi-Stage Filtration units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushila, C. N.; Ochieng, G. M.; Otieno, F. A. O.; Shitote, S. M.; Sitters, C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Multi-Stage Filtration (MSF) can provide a robust treatment alternative for surface water sources of variable water quality in rural communities at low operation and maintenance costs. MSF is a combination of Slow Sand Filters (SSFs) and Pre-treatment systems. The general objective of this research was to optimize the treatment capacity of MSF. A pilot plant study was undertaken to meet this objective. The pilot plant was monitored for a continuous 98 days from commissioning till the end of the project. Three main stages of MSF namely: The Dynamic Gravel Filter (DGF), Horizontal-flow Roughing Filter (HRF) and SSF were identified, designed and built. The response of the respective MSF units in removal of selected parameters guiding drinking water quality such as microbiological (Faecal and Total coliform), Suspended Solids, Turbidity, PH, Temperature, Iron and Manganese was investigated. The benchmark was the Kenya Bureau (KEBS) and World Health Organization (WHO) Standards for drinking water quality. With respect to microbiological raw water quality improvement, MSF units achieved on average 98% Faecal and 96% Total coliform removal. Results obtained indicate that implementation of MSF in rural communities has the potential to increase access to portable water to the rural populace with a probable consequent decrease in waterborne diseases. With a reduced down time due to illness, more time would be spent in undertaking other economic activities.

  8. Hydraulic tool

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, J.T.

    1988-04-05

    A hydraulic force-delivering tool including a cylinder, a piston slidable in the cylinder and a hydraulic pump to deliver fluid under pressure to the cylinder the hydraulic pump is described, comprising: a pump body; means forming a cylindrical chamber in the pump body; at least one inlet port opening into one end of the chamber from outside the body; means forming an outlet port at the other end of the chamber; a check valve in the outlet port enabling outward flow only; a pump rod plunger reciprocable through a given stroke in the chamber; inner and outer concentric cylindrical surfaces in the chamber and on the plunger, respectively; an annular shoulder on the chamber inner cylindrical surface facing toward the other end of the chamber; an annular seal member slidable along the pump rod and conditioned to seal against the shoulder; and spring means biasing the seal member toward the shoulder.

  9. Water Treatment Technology - Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on hydraulics provides instructional materials for three competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: head loss in pipes in series, function loss in…

  10. Using observed postconstruction peak discharges to evaluate a hydrologic and hydraulic design model, Boneyard Creek, Champaign and Urbana, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Over, Thomas M.; Soong, David T.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Boneyard Creek—which drains an urbanized watershed in the cities of Champaign and Urbana, Illinois, including part of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) campus—has historically been prone to flooding. Using the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM), a hydrologic and hydraulic model of Boneyard Creek was developed for the design of the projects making up the first phase of a long-term plan for flood control on Boneyard Creek, and the construction of the projects was completed in May 2003. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Cities of Champaign and Urbana and UIUC, installed and operated stream and rain gages in order to obtain data for evaluation of the design-model simulations. In this study, design-model simulations were evaluated by using observed postconstruction precipitation and peak-discharge data. Between May 2003 and September 2008, five high-flow events on Boneyard Creek satisfied the study criterion. The five events were simulated with the design model by using observed precipitation. The simulations were run with two different values of the parameter controlling the soil moisture at the beginning of the storms and two different ways of spatially distributing the precipitation, making a total of four simulation scenarios. The simulated and observed peak discharges and stages were compared at gaged locations along the Creek. The discharge at one of these locations was deemed to be critical for evaluating the design model. The uncertainty of the measured peak discharge was also estimated at the critical location with a method based on linear regression of the stage and discharge relation, an estimate of the uncertainty of the acoustic Doppler velocity meter measurements, and the uncertainty of the stage measurements. For four of the five events, the simulated peak discharges lie within the 95-percent confidence interval of the observed peak discharges at the critical location; the fifth was just outside the upper end of

  11. Current and anticipated uses of thermal-hydraulic codes in NFI

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuda, K.; Takayasu, M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the thermal-hydraulic codes currently used in NFI for the LWR fuel development and licensing application including transient and design basis accident analyses of LWR plants. The current status of the codes are described in the context of code capability, modeling feature, and experience of code application related to the fuel development and licensing. Finally, the anticipated use of the future thermal-hydraulic code in NFI is briefly given.

  12. 14 CFR 27.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 27.1435 Section 27.1435... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, any structural loads...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 27.1435 Section 27.1435... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, any structural loads...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 27.1435 Section 27.1435... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, any structural loads...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 27.1435 Section 27.1435... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, any structural loads...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 27.1435 Section 27.1435... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, any structural loads...

  17. 3D computations of flow field in a guide vane blading designed by means of 2D model for a low head hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzemianowski, Z.; Puzyrewski, R.

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents the main parameters of the flow field behind the guide vane cascade designed by means of 2D inverse problem and following check by means of 3D commercial program ANSYS/Fluent applied for a direct problem. This approach of using different models reflects the contemporary design procedure for non-standardized turbomachinery stage. Depending on the model, the set of conservation equation to be solved differs, although the physical background remains the same. The example of computations for guide vane cascade for a low head hydraulic turbine is presented.

  18. Computer-Aided Structural Engineering (CASE) Project. CBASIN--Structural Design of Saint Anthony Falls Stilling Basins According to Corps of Engineers Criteria for Hydraulic Structures. Computer Program X0098

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    designs for essentially all sections of ordinary, straight inlet, chute spillways on earth foundations. This material should be useful to both...Engineers criteria for working stress design of hydraulic structures. Geometry is in accordance with the Saint Anthony Falls (SAF) stilling basin of the...accepts as input the overall geometry , hydraulic data, and soils parameters; therefore, this information must all be determined before starting the

  19. Similarity analysis applied to the design of scaled tests of hydraulic mitigation methods for Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, L.M.

    1993-02-01

    The episodic gas releases from Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) pose a potential safety hazard. It is thought that gas releases occur because gases are generated and trapped in layers of settled solids located at the bottom of the tank. This document focuses on issues associated with testing of hydraulic mitigation technologies proposed for SY-101. The basic assumption underlying the concept of hydraulic mitigation is that mobilization or maintained suspension of the solids settled in the bottom of the tank wig prevent gas accumulation. Engineering of hydraulic technologies will require testing to determine the operating parameters required to mobilize the solids and to maintain these solids in suspension. Because full scale testing is extremely expensive (even when possible), scaled tests are needed to assess the merit of the proposed technologies and to provide data for numerical or analytical modeling. This research is conducted to support testing and evaluation of proposed hydraulic mitigation concepts only. The work here is oriented towards determining the jet velocities, nozzle sizes, and other operating parameters required to mobilize the settled solids in SY- 101 and maintain them in suspension.

  20. Influence of Hydraulic Design on Stability and on Pressure Pulsations in Francis Turbines at Overload, Part Load and Deep Part Load based on Numerical Simulations and Experimental Model Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoli, M. V.; Maiwald, M.

    2014-03-01

    Francis turbines have been running more and more frequently in part load conditions, in order to satisfy the new market requirements for more dynamic and flexible energy generation, ancillary services and grid regulation. The turbines should be able to be operated for longer durations with flows below the optimum point, going from part load to deep part load and even speed-no-load. These operating conditions are characterised by important unsteady flow phenomena taking place at the draft tube cone and in the runner channels, in the respective cases of part load and deep part load. The current expectations are that new Francis turbines present appropriate hydraulic stability and moderate pressure pulsations at overload, part load, deep part load and speed-no-load with high efficiency levels at normal operating range. This study presents series of investigations performed by Voith Hydro with the objective to improve the hydraulic stability of Francis turbines at overload, part load and deep part load, reduce pressure pulsations and enlarge the know-how about the transient fluid flow through the turbine at these challenging conditions. Model test measurements showed that distinct runner designs were able to influence the pressure pulsation level in the machine. Extensive experimental investigations focused on the runner deflector geometry, on runner features and how they could reduce the pressure oscillation level. The impact of design variants and machine configurations on the vortex rope at the draft tube cone at overload and part load and on the runner channel vortex at deep part load were experimentally observed and evaluated based on the measured pressure pulsation amplitudes. Numerical investigations were employed for improving the understanding of such dynamic fluid flow effects. As example for the design and experimental investigations, model test observations and pressure pulsation curves for Francis machines in mid specific speed range, around nqopt = 50 min

  1. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2. UNIT III, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS--HYDRAULICS (PART I).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 25-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO INTRODUCE BASIC HYDRAULIC PRINCIPLES AND PROVIDE AN UNDERSTANDING OF HYDRAULIC TRANSMISSIONS USED IN DIESEL POWERED VEHICLES. TOPICS ARE WHY USE HYDRAULICS, REVIEWING BASIC PHYSICS LAWS IN RELATION TO HYDRAULICS, UNDERSTANDING THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM, AND DEVELOPING A BASIC HYDRAULIC SYSTEM. THE MODULE…

  2. Treatment Plant Hydraulics for Environmental Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, John A.

    This book presents the elements of process design and of hydraulic design for water and wastewater treatment plants. In particular, hydraulic principles and methods are given for the analysis and design of flows in pipe systems and open channels, for the characteristics of flow measurement devices, and for single and multiple pump operation and selection. These fundamentals are used to illustrate the steps in the hydraulic design of a wastewater treatment plant. In addition, the hydraulic design of pipe manifolds (for distributing flow amongst basins) and of diffusers (for distributing treated wastewater to a body of water) is presented.

  3. A geostatistical methodology for the optimal design of space-time hydraulic head monitoring networks and its application to the Valle de Querétaro aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, G. S.; Júnez-Ferreira, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This work introduces a new methodology for the optimal design of space-time hydraulic head monitoring networks and its application to the Valle de Querétaro aquifer in Mexico. The selection of the space-time monitoring points is done using a static Kalman filter combined with a sequential optimization method. The Kalman filter requires as input a space-time covariance matrix, which is derived from a geostatistical analysis. A sequential optimization method that selects the space-time point that minimizes a function of the variance, in each step, is used. We demonstrate the methodology applying it to the redesign of the hydraulic head monitoring network of the Valle de Querétaro aquifer with the objective of selecting from a set of monitoring positions and times, those that minimize the spatiotemporal redundancy. The database for the geostatistical space-time analysis corresponds to information of 273 wells located within the aquifer for the period 1970-2007. A total of 1,435 hydraulic head data were used to construct the experimental space-time variogram. The results show that from the existing monitoring program that consists of 418 space-time monitoring points, only 178 are not redundant. The implied reduction of monitoring costs was possible because the proposed method is successful in propagating information in space and time.

  4. A geostatistical methodology for the optimal design of space-time hydraulic head monitoring networks and its application to the Valle de Querétaro aquifer.

    PubMed

    Júnez-Ferreira, H E; Herrera, G S

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for the optimal design of space-time hydraulic head monitoring networks and its application to the Valle de Querétaro aquifer in Mexico. The selection of the space-time monitoring points is done using a static Kalman filter combined with a sequential optimization method. The Kalman filter requires as input a space-time covariance matrix, which is derived from a geostatistical analysis. A sequential optimization method that selects the space-time point that minimizes a function of the variance, in each step, is used. We demonstrate the methodology applying it to the redesign of the hydraulic head monitoring network of the Valle de Querétaro aquifer with the objective of selecting from a set of monitoring positions and times, those that minimize the spatiotemporal redundancy. The database for the geostatistical space-time analysis corresponds to information of 273 wells located within the aquifer for the period 1970-2007. A total of 1,435 hydraulic head data were used to construct the experimental space-time variogram. The results show that from the existing monitoring program that consists of 418 space-time monitoring points, only 178 are not redundant. The implied reduction of monitoring costs was possible because the proposed method is successful in propagating information in space and time.

  5. Cold regions hydrology and hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.L. ); Crissman, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This monograph addresses a narrow aspect of cold regions engineering, namely the effects of cold weather on the traditional civil engineering disciplines of hydrology and hydraulics. Hydrologic and hydraulic considerations in the design, construction, and operation of civil works are very important. Many of the problems encountered in the design and construction of buildings, transportation systems, water supply facilities, waste treatment facilities, and hazardous waste disposal facilities, for example are closely tied to the characteristics of the site hydrology.

  6. Advanced Performance Hydraulic Wind Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Bruce, Allan; Lam, Adrienne S.

    2013-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, has developed a novel advanced hydraulic wind energy design, which has up to 23% performance improvement over conventional wind turbine and conventional hydraulic wind energy systems with 5 m/sec winds. It also has significant cost advantages with levelized costs equal to coal (after carbon tax rebate). The design is equally applicable to tidal energy systems and has passed preliminary laboratory proof-of-performance tests, as funded by the Department of Energy.

  7. Accommodation of unprotected accidents by inherent safety design features in metallic and oxide-fueled LMFBRs

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J.E.; Sevy, R.H.; Su, S.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the effectivness of intrinsic design features to mitigate the consequences of unprotected accidents in metallic and oxide-fueled LMFBRs. The accidents analyzed belong to the class generally considered to lead to core disruption; unprotected loss-of-flow (LOF) and transient over-power (TOP). Results of the study demonstrate the potential for design features to meliorate accident consequences, and in some cases to render them benign. Emphasis is placed on the relative performance of metallic and oxide-fueled core designs.

  8. Ambient response of a unique performance-based design building with dynamic response modification features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet; Huang, Moh; Shakal, Antony; Hooper, John; Klemencic, Ron

    2012-01-01

    A 64-story, performance-based design building with reinforced concrete core shear-walls and unique dynamic response modification features (tuned liquid sloshing dampers and buckling-restrained braces) has been instrumented with a monitoring array of 72 channels of accelerometers. Ambient vibration data recorded are analyzed to identify modes and associated frequencies and damping. The low-amplitude dynamic characteristics are considerably different than those computed from design analyses, but serve as a baseline against which to compare with future strong shaking responses. Such studies help to improve our understanding of the effectiveness of the added features to the building and help improve designs in the future.

  9. Characterization of Hardening by Design Techniques on Commercial, Small Feature Sized Field-Programmable Gate Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    AFIT/GE/ENG/09-43 CHARACTERIZATION OF HARDENING BY DESIGN TECHNIQUES ON COMMERCIAL, SMALL FEATURE SIZED FIELD-PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAYS THESIS...The purpose of which is to determine the radiation effects and characterize the improvements of various hardening by design techniques. The...Distributed RAM memory elements that are loaded both with ECC and non-error corrected data. The circuit is designed to check for errors in memory data, stuck

  10. The development and calibration of a physical model to assist in optimising the hydraulic performance and design of maturation ponds.

    PubMed

    Aldana, G J; Lloyd, B J; Guganesharajah, K; Bracho, N

    2005-01-01

    A physical and a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model (HYDRO-3D) were developed to simulate the effects of novel maturation pond configurations, and critical environmental factors (wind speed and direction) on the hydraulic efficiency (HE) of full-scale maturation ponds. The aims of the study were to assess the reliability of the physical model and convergence with HYDRO-3D, as tools for assessing and predicting best hydraulic performance of ponds. The physical model of the open ponds was scaled to provide a similar nominal retention time (NRT) of 52 hours. Under natural conditions, with a variable prevailing westerly wind opposite to the inlet, a rhodamine tracer study on the full-scale prototype pond produced a mean hydraulic retention time (MHRT) of 18.5 hours (HE = 35.5%). Simulations of these wind conditions, but with constant wind speed and direction in both the physical model and HYDRO-3D, produced a higher MHRT of 21 hours in both models and an HE of 40.4%. In the absence of wind tracer studies in the open pond physical model revealed incomplete mixing with peak concentrations leaving the model in several hours, but an increase in MHRT to 24.5-28 hours (HE = 50.2-57.1%). Although wind blowing opposite to the inlet flow increases dispersion (mixing), it reduced hydraulic performance by 18-25%. Much higher HE values were achieved by baffles (67-74%) and three channel configurations (69-92%), compared with the original open pond configuration. Good agreement was achieved between the two models where key environmental and flow parameters can be controlled and set, but it is difficult to accurately simulate full-scale works conditions due to the unpredictability of natural hourly and daily fluctuation in these parameters.

  11. Design and hydraulic characteristics of a field-scale bi-phasic bioretention rain garden system for storm water management.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Florence, D C; McCoy, E L; Dick, W A; Grewal, P S

    2009-01-01

    A field-scale bioretention rain garden system was constructed using a novel bi-phasic (i.e. sequence of anaerobic to aerobic) concept for improving retention and removal of storm water runoff pollutants. Hydraulic tests with bromide tracer and simulated runoff pollutants (nitrate-N, phosphate-P, Cu, Pb, and Zn) were performed in the system under a simulated continuous rainfall. The objectives of the tests were (1) to determine hydraulic characteristics of the system, and (2) to evaluate the movement of runoff pollutants through the system. For the 180 mm/24 h rainfall, the bi-phasic bioretention system effectively reduced both peak flow (approximately 70%) and runoff volume (approximately 42%). The breakthrough curves (BTCs) of bromide tracer suggest that the transport pattern of the system is similar to dispersed plug flow under this large runoff event. The BTCs of bromide showed mean 10% and 90% breakthrough times of 5.7 h and 12.5 h, respectively. Under the continuous rainfall, a significantly different transport pattern was found between each runoff pollutant. Nitrate-N was easily transported through the system with potential leaching risk from the initial soil medium, whereas phosphate-P and metals were significantly retained indicating sorption-mediated transport. These findings support the importance of hydraulics, in combination with the soil medium, when creating bioretention systems for bioremediation that are effective for various rainfall sizes and intervals.

  12. The MeTeOR trial (Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research): rationale and design features.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jeffrey N; Chaisson, Christine E; Cole, Brian; Guermazi, Ali; Hunter, David J; Jones, Morgan; Levy, Bruce A; Mandl, Lisa A; Martin, Scott; Marx, Robert G; Safran-Norton, Clare; Roemer, Frank W; Skoniecki, Debra; Solomon, Daniel H; Spindler, Kurt P; Wright, John; Wright, Rick W; Losina, Elena

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents the rationale and design features of the MeTeOR Trial (Meniscal Tear in Osteoarthritis Research; Clinical Trials.gov NCT00597012). MeTeOR is an NIH-funded seven-center prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to establish the efficacy of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy combined with a standardized physical therapy program as compared with a standardized physical therapy program alone in patients with a symptomatic meniscal tear in the setting of mild to moderate knee osteoarthritic change (OA). The design and execution of a trial that compares surgery with a nonoperative treatment strategy presents distinctive challenges. The goal of this paper is to provide the clinical rationale for MeTeOR and to highlight salient design features, with particular attention to those that present clinical and methodologic challenges.

  13. Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

    2004-06-01

    This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

  14. Gender Differences in Figural Matrices: The Moderating Role of Item Design Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arendasy, Martin E.; Sommer, Markus

    2012-01-01

    There is a heated debate on whether observed gender differences in some figural matrices in adults can be attributed to gender differences in inductive reasoning/G[subscript f] or differential item functioning and/or test bias. Based on previous studies we hypothesized that three specific item design features moderate the effect size of the gender…

  15. Experimental Methodology in English Teaching and Learning: Method Features, Validity Issues, and Embedded Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jang Ho

    2012-01-01

    Experimental methods have played a significant role in the growth of English teaching and learning studies. The paper presented here outlines basic features of experimental design, including the manipulation of independent variables, the role and practicality of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in educational research, and alternative methods…

  16. With the Design in Mind: "High School Reform Model Features That Matter in Implementation." Conference Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiffman, Catherine Dunn

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for analyzing program design features that seem to matter in implementation. The framework is based on findings from a study conducted by the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) between 2004 and 2007 that explored how reform ideas and practices created by five external provider organizations were…

  17. Improving similarity-driven library design: customized matching and regioselective feature trees.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J Robert; Lessel, Uta; Rarey, Matthias

    2011-09-26

    Reduced graph descriptors, like feature trees, are frequently applied in cases where the relative arrangement of functional groups is more important than exact substructure matches. Due to their ability to deal with fragmented molecules, they are well-suited for fragment space search and library design. We recently presented LoFT, a novel focused library design approach based on feature trees. During evaluation two drawbacks of the reduced graph descriptor were discovered: First, regioisomeric substructures cannot be distinguished in feature tree mappings which results in a large information loss especially when connecting R-groups to cores. Second, the automatic matching procedure might result in undesired alignments, since the knowledge on what is considered as core by the user is not taken into account. In the following, we will present two approaches to overcome those drawbacks. The generation of the feature trees is modified, so that different arene substitution patterns can be recognized and a customized matching is introduced, allowing the user to determine the parts of the query, where the reagents are allowed to match. Subsequently we investigate the improvements on library design by reviewing the design scenarios which were already used for the evaluation of LoFT.

  18. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  19. Hydraulic processes on alluvial fans

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Alluvial fans are among the most prominent landscape features in the American Southwest and throughout the semi-arid and arid regions of the world. The importance of developing a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the hydraulic processes which formed, and which continue to modify, these features derives from their rapid and significant development over the past four decades. As unplanned urban sprawl moved from valley floors onto alluvial fans, the serious damage incurred from infrequent flow events has dramatically increased. This book presents a discussion of our current and rapidly expanding knowledge of hydraulic processes on alluvial fans. It addresses the subject from a multidisciplinary viewpoint, acquainting the reader with geological principles pertinent to the analysis of hydraulic processes on alluvial fans.

  20. Accommodation of unprotected accidents by inherent safety design features in metallic and oxide-fueled LMFBRs

    SciTech Connect

    Su, S.F.; Cahalan, J.E.; Sevy, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a systematic study of the effectiveness of intrinsic design features to mitigate the consequences of unprotected accidents in metallic and oxide-fueled LMFBRs. The accidents analyzed belong to the class generally considered to lead to core disruption; unprotected loss-of-flow (LOF) and transient over-power (TOP). The results of the study demonstrate the potential for design features to meliorate accident consequences, and in some cases to render them benign. Emphasis is placed on the relative performance of metallic and oxide-fueled core designs, and safety margins are quantified in sensitivity studies. All analyses were carried out using the SASSYS LMFBR systems analysis code (1).

  1. Isotope signals and anatomical features in tree rings suggest a role for hydraulic strategies in diffuse drought-induced die-back of Pinus nigra.

    PubMed

    Petrucco, Laura; Nardini, Andrea; von Arx, Georg; Saurer, Matthias; Cherubini, Paolo

    2017-03-17

    The 2003 and 2012 summer seasons were among the warmest and driest of the last 200 years over southeastern Europe, and in particular in the Karst region (northeastern Italy). Starting from winter-spring 2013, several black pines (Pinus nigra J.F. Arnold) suffered crown die-back. Declining trees occurred nearby individuals with no signs of die-back, raising hypotheses about the occurrence of individual-specific hydraulic strategies underlying different responses to extreme drought. We investigated possible processes driving black pine decline by dendrochronological and wood anatomical measurements, coupled with analysis of tree-ring carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopic composition in healthy trees (H) and trees suffering die-back (D). Die-back trees showed higher growth rates than H trees at the beginning of the last century, but suffered important growth reduction following the dry summers in 2003 and 2012. After the 2012 drought, D trees produced tracheids with larger diameter and greater vulnerability to implosion than H ones. Healthy trees had significantly higher wood δ13C than D trees, reflecting higher water-use efficiency for the surviving trees, i.e., less water transpired per unit carbon gain, which could be related to lower stomatal conductance and a more conservative use of water. Relatively high δ18O for D trees indicates that they were strongly dependent on shallow water sources, or that they sustained higher transpiration rates than H trees. Our results suggest that H trees adopted a more conservative water-use strategy under drought stress compared with D trees. We speculate that this diversity might have a genotypic basis, but other possible explanations, like different rooting depth, cannot be ruled out.

  2. Multiple approaches to valuation of conservation design and low-impact development features in residential subdivisions.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Troy; Tyndall, John C; Thompson, Janette; Kliebenstein, James; Colletti, Joe P

    2012-08-15

    Residents, developers and civic officials are often faced with difficult decisions about appropriate land uses in and around metropolitan boundaries. Urban expansion brings with it the potential for negative environmental impacts, but there are alternatives, such as conservation subdivision design (CSD) or low-impact development (LID), which offer the possibility of mitigating some of these effects at the development site. Many urban planning jurisdictions across the Midwest do not currently have any examples of these designs and lack information to identify public support or barriers to use of these methods. This is a case study examining consumer value for conservation and low-impact design features in one housing market by using four different valuation techniques to estimate residents' willingness to pay for CSD and LID features in residential subdivisions. A contingent valuation survey of 1804 residents in Ames, IA assessed familiarity with and perceptions of subdivision development and used an ordered value approach to estimate willingness to pay for CSD and LID features. A majority of residents were not familiar with CSD or LID practices. Residents indicated a willingness to pay for most CSD and LID features with the exception of clustered housing. Gender, age, income, familiarity with LID practices, perceptions of attractiveness of features and the perceived effect of CSD and LID features on ease of future home sales were important factors influencing residents' willingness to pay. A hypothetical referendum measured willingness to pay for tax-funded conservation land purchases and estimated that a property tax of around $50 would be the maximum increase that would pass. Twenty-seven survey respondents participated in a subsequent series of experimental real estate negotiations that used an experimental auction mechanism to estimate willingness to pay for CSD and LID features. Participants indicated that clustered housing (with interspersed preserved forest

  3. Integrated siRNA design based on surveying of features associated with high RNAi effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wuming; Ren, Yongliang; Xu, Qiqi; Wang, Yejun; Lin, Dong; Zhou, Haiyan; Li, Tongbin

    2006-01-01

    Background Short interfering RNAs have allowed the development of clean and easily regulated methods for disruption of gene expression. However, while these methods continue to grow in popularity, designing effective siRNA experiments can be challenging. The various existing siRNA design guidelines suffer from two problems: they differ considerably from each other, and they produce high levels of false-positive predictions when tested on data of independent origins. Results Using a distinctly large set of siRNA efficacy data assembled from a vast diversity of origins (the siRecords data, containing records of 3,277 siRNA experiments targeting 1,518 genes, derived from 1,417 independent studies), we conducted extensive analyses of all known features that have been implicated in increasing RNAi effectiveness. A number of features having positive impacts on siRNA efficacy were identified. By performing quantitative analyses on cooperative effects among these features, then applying a disjunctive rule merging (DRM) algorithm, we developed a bundle of siRNA design rule sets with the false positive problem well curbed. A comparison with 15 online siRNA design tools indicated that some of the rule sets we developed surpassed all of these design tools commonly used in siRNA design practice in positive predictive values (PPVs). Conclusion The availability of the large and diverse siRNA dataset from siRecords and the approach we describe in this report have allowed the development of highly effective and generally applicable siRNA design rule sets. Together with ever improving RNAi lab techniques, these design rule sets are expected to make siRNAs a more useful tool for molecular genetics, functional genomics, and drug discovery studies. PMID:17129386

  4. Geomechanics of Hydraulic Stimulation in Geothermal Systems: Designing and Implementing a Successful Enhanced Geothermal System at Desert Peak, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, S. H.; Davatzes, N. C.; Zemach, E.; Chabora, E.; Lutz, S.; Rose, P.; Majer, E. L.; Robertson-Tait, A.

    2013-12-01

    Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in hot but low-permeability rocks involves hydraulic stimulation of fracture permeability to develop a complex heat exchange system with low hydraulic impedance. An integrated study of stress, fractures and rock mechanical properties was conducted to develop the geomechanical framework for a multi-stage EGS stimulation in Desert Peak well 27-15, located at the low-permeability margins of an active geothermal field. The stimulation targeted silicified tuffs and metamorphosed mudstones at depths of 0.9 to 1.8 km and temperatures ~180 to 210° C. Drilling-induced tensile fractures in image logs from well 27-15 show that the least horizontal principal stress (Shmin) is consistent with normal faulting on ESE- and WNW-dipping fractures mapped at the surface and seen in the image logs. A hydraulic fracturing stress measurement indicates that the magnitude of Shmin at ~0.93 km depth is 0.61 of the calculated vertical stress. Coulomb failure calculations using these stresses together with measurements of friction and permeability on core predict that dilatant shear failure should be induced on pre-existing conjugate normal faults once pore pressures are increased ~2.5 MPa or more above ambient values, generating a zone of enhanced permeability elongated in the direction toward active geothermal wells ~0.5 km to the SSW. Hydraulic stimulation of well 27-15 began in September 2010 by injecting water into the open-hole interval between the casing shoe at 0.9 km depth and a temporary cement plug at 1.1 km. Stimulation was monitored by combined surface and down-hole seismic monitoring, inter-well tracer testing and periodic pressure-temperature-flowmeter logging. An initial stage of low-pressure (shear) stimulation was conducted for ~100 days at a series of pressure steps

  5. Latest design features and operational history of LNG inground tanks at the Negishi LNG receiving terminal

    SciTech Connect

    Hiro-oka, T.

    1982-01-01

    The status of liquified natural gas inground tank construction is studied, specifically those of Tokyo Gas Company, Fourteen are compared in table form. Latest design features are described in terms of soil conditions and concrete structure design, soil freezing and heater design, membrane design, verification of membrane stability, and earthquake resistant design. The operational history is presented in terms of special test before start-up, start-up operation, boil-off ratio, and soil freezing and heater operation. The latter is illustrated schematically. Conclusions include ecological considerations and proposal for future work. Subsequent recorded discussion concerned evaporation instabilities, which have not been experienced; apparently instable evaporation does not occur during long storage periods.

  6. Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

    2013-11-29

    This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the code’s versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research project’s primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

  7. Design features of the radioactive Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter system

    SciTech Connect

    Holton, L.K. Jr.

    1985-06-01

    During 1983, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), at the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), undertook a program with the principal objective of testing the Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM) process in actual radioactive operations. This activity, termed the Radioactive LFCM (RLFCM) Operations is being conducted in existing shielded hot-cell facilities in B-Cell of the 324 Building, 300 Area, located at Hanford, Washington. This report summarizes the design features of the RLFCM system. These features include: a waste preparation and feed system which uses pulse-agitated waste preparation tanks for waste slurry agitation and an air displacement slurry pump for transferring waste slurries to the LFCM; a waste vitrification system (LFCM) - the design features, design approach, and reasoning for the design of the LFCM are described; a canister-handling turntable for positioning canisters underneath the RLFCM discharge port; a gamma source positioning and detection system for monitoring the glass fill level of the product canisters; and a primary off-gas treatment system for removing the majority of the radionuclide contamination from the RLFCM off gas. 8 refs., 48 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Design features of portable wheelchair ramps and their implications for curb and vehicle access.

    PubMed

    Storr, Tim; Spicer, Julie; Frost, Peggy; Attfield, Steve; Ward, Christopher D; Pinnington, Lorraine L

    2004-05-01

    This study evaluated a range of portable wheelchair ramps to highlight the effect of different product features on ease of use when wheelchair users climb curbs or access vehicles. Twelve portable ramps were evaluated. Although all the ramps were designed to load powered wheelchairs into motor vehicles, they were manufactured in different designs. The ramps were based on a "singlewide" platform or "channel" design. Some ramps had fixed dimensions, whereas others could be reduced in size because they were telescopic or designed to allow folding. Overall, the ramps could be divided into four subgroups on the basis of their key features. These were horizontally and longitudinally folding ramps, telescopic ramps, and ramps with fixed dimensions. The telescopic ramps could be subdivided into "U"-shaped gutter ramps and reverse profile ramps. Product appraisals and trials involving wheelchair users and caregivers of wheelchair users were done to evaluate each of these ramp designs. Although wheelchair ramps are available in a wide range of designs and configurations, we found that no single ramp design successfully met the needs of all wheelchair users or their caregivers. The evaluation highlighted a number of specific problems and potential hazards. Some ramps were found to move during a maneuver, showed poor stability when used with some vehicles, or were too narrow to allow wheelchair castors to pass through the channel without jamming. Some features, such as handles and locking mechanisms, influenced the ease with which the caregivers could use the ramps. Wheelchair users preferred the wide platform ramps because they were able to drive up these with ease and little preparation. The caregivers preferred folding or telescopic channel ramps because these were easier to handle and store.

  9. Design features and remote maintenance test results for equipment racks designed for reprocessing cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schrock, S.L.; Chesser, J.B.; Peishel, F.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a concept for equipment rack design and cell placement for highly radioactive process cells developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This concept takes advantage of the dexterity and mobility of advanced bridge-mounted, force-reflecting servomanipulators to minimize cell size and increase facility availability. Several prototype racks have been fabricated and maintenance demonstrations have been performed on equipment mounted on these racks. The results of these tests are also described in this paper. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Hydraulic hammer drilling technology: Developments and capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melamed, Y.; Kiselev, A.; Gelfgat, M.; Dreesen, D.; Blacic, J.

    1996-12-31

    Percussion drilling technology was considered many years ago as one of the best approaches for hard rock drilling. Unfortunately the efficiency of most hydraulic hammer (HH) designs was very low (8% maximum), so they were successfully used in shallow boreholes only. Thirty years of research and field drilling experience with HH application in Former Soviet Union (FSU) countries led to the development of a new generation of HH designs with a proven efficiency of 40%. That advance achieved good operational results in hard rock at depths up to 2,000 m and more. The most recent research has shown that there are opportunities to increase HH efficiency up to 70%. This paper presents HH basic design principles and operational features. The advantages of HH technology for coiled-tubing drilling is shown on the basis of test results recently conducted in the US.

  11. Fatigue and fail-safe design features of the DC-10 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    The philosophy and methods used in the design of the DC-10 aircraft to assure structural reliability against cracks under repeated service loads are described in detail. The approach consists of three complementary parts: (1) the structure is designed to be fatigue resistant for a crack-free life of 60,000 flight hours; (2) inasmuch as small undetected cracks could develop from other sources, such as material flaws and manufacturing preloads, the structure also is designed to arrest and control cracks within a reasonable service-inspection interval; and (3) a meaningful service-inspection program has been defined on the basis of analysis and test experience from the design development program. This service-inspection program closes the loop to assure the structural integrity of the DC-10 airframe. Selected materials, fasteners, and structural arrangements are used to achieve these design features with minimum structural weight and with economy in manufacturing and maintenance. Extensive analyses and testing were performed to develop and verify the design. The basic design considerations for fatigue-resistant structure are illustrated in terms of material selection, design loads spectra, methods for accurate stress and fatigue damage analysis, and proven concepts for efficient detail design.

  12. Teledesic Global Wireless Broadband Network: Space Infrastructure Architecture, Design Features and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The Teledesic satellites are a new class of small satellites which demonstrate the important commercial benefits of using technologies developed for other purposes by U.S. National Laboratories. The Teledesic satellite architecture, subsystem design features, and new technologies are described. The new Teledesic satellite manufacturing, integration, and test approaches which use modern high volume production techniques and result in surprisingly low space segment costs are discussed. The constellation control and management features and attendant software architecture features are addressed. After briefly discussing the economic and technological impact on the USA commercial space industries of the space communications revolution and such large constellation projects, the paper concludes with observations on the trend toward future system architectures using networked groups of much smaller satellites.

  13. Design of an activity landscape view taking compound-based feature probabilities into account.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bijun; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Activity landscapes (ALs) of compound data sets are rationalized as graphical representations that integrate similarity and potency relationships between active compounds. ALs enable the visualization of structure-activity relationship (SAR) information and are thus computational tools of interest for medicinal chemistry. For AL generation, similarity and potency relationships are typically evaluated in a pairwise manner and major AL features are assessed at the level of compound pairs. In this study, we add a conditional probability formalism to AL design that makes it possible to quantify the probability of individual compounds to contribute to characteristic AL features. Making this information graphically accessible in a molecular network-based AL representation is shown to further increase AL information content and helps to quickly focus on SAR-informative compound subsets. This feature probability-based AL variant extends the current spectrum of AL representations for medicinal chemistry applications.

  14. Design of an activity landscape view taking compound-based feature probabilities into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bijun; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Activity landscapes (ALs) of compound data sets are rationalized as graphical representations that integrate similarity and potency relationships between active compounds. ALs enable the visualization of structure-activity relationship (SAR) information and are thus computational tools of interest for medicinal chemistry. For AL generation, similarity and potency relationships are typically evaluated in a pairwise manner and major AL features are assessed at the level of compound pairs. In this study, we add a conditional probability formalism to AL design that makes it possible to quantify the probability of individual compounds to contribute to characteristic AL features. Making this information graphically accessible in a molecular network-based AL representation is shown to further increase AL information content and helps to quickly focus on SAR-informative compound subsets. This feature probability-based AL variant extends the current spectrum of AL representations for medicinal chemistry applications.

  15. Design and marketing features influencing choice of e-cigarettes and tobacco in the EU.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Anthony A; Vardavas, Constantine I; Filippidis, Filippos T

    2016-10-01

    Data were analysed from the 2014 Special Eurobarometer for Tobacco survey. We estimated self-rated importance of various factors in the choice of both tobacco and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) among tobacco smokers who had ever used an e-cigarette. Among ever users of tobacco and e-cigarettes (N = 2430), taste (39.4%), price (39.2%) and amount of nicotine (27.3%) were the most commonly cited reasons for choosing their brand of e-cigarettes. Those aged 15-24 were more likely to cite external packaging [adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR = 2.06, 95% CI 1.00-4.23)] and design features (aPR = 1.99, 1.20-3.29) as important. As further legislation is debated and enacted enhanced regulation of price, design and marketing features of e-cigarettes may help to reduce the appeal of e-cigarettes.

  16. Design and marketing features influencing choice of e-cigarettes and tobacco in the EU

    PubMed Central

    Vardavas, Constantine I.; Filippidis, Filippos T.

    2016-01-01

    Data were analysed from the 2014 Special Eurobarometer for Tobacco survey. We estimated self-rated importance of various factors in the choice of both tobacco and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) among tobacco smokers who had ever used an e-cigarette. Among ever users of tobacco and e-cigarettes (N = 2430), taste (39.4%), price (39.2%) and amount of nicotine (27.3%) were the most commonly cited reasons for choosing their brand of e-cigarettes. Those aged 15–24 were more likely to cite external packaging [adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR = 2.06, 95% CI 1.00–4.23)] and design features (aPR = 1.99, 1.20–3.29) as important. As further legislation is debated and enacted enhanced regulation of price, design and marketing features of e-cigarettes may help to reduce the appeal of e-cigarettes. PMID:27471217

  17. Hydraulic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, P.R.; Jantzen, D.E.

    1984-05-15

    This invention relates to an improved pump jack characterized by a hollow piston rod which telescopes down over the sucker rod to which it is clamped for reciprocating motion. The cylinder, in turn, is fastened in fixed position directly to the upper exposed end of the well casing. As fluid is introduced into the lower end of the cylinder it raises the piston into engagement with a pushrod housed in the upper cylinder head that lifts switch-actuating means associated therewith into a position operative to actuate a switch located adjacent thereto thereby causing the latter to change state and actuate a multi-function solenoid valve so as to cut off fluid flow to the cylinder. As gravity lowers the sucker rod and piston exhausting the hydraulic fluid therebeneath, an adjustable stop engages the pushrod from above so as to return it together with the switch-actuating means associated therewith to their original positions thereby resetting the switch to complete the operating cycle.

  18. Assessment of hydraulic performance and biocompatibility of a MagLev centrifugal pump system designed for pediatric cardiac or cardiopulmonary support.

    PubMed

    Dasse, Kurt A; Gellman, Barry; Kameneva, Marina V; Woolley, Joshua R; Johnson, Carl A; Gempp, Thomas; Marks, John D; Kent, Stella; Koert, Andrew; Richardson, J Scott; Franklin, Steve; Snyder, Trevor A; Wearden, Peter; Wagner, William R; Gilbert, Richard J; Borovetz, Harvey S

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of children with life-threatening cardiac and cardiopulmonary failure is a large and underappreciated public health concern. We have previously shown that the CentriMag is a magnetically levitated centrifugal pump system, having the utility for treating adults and large children (1,500 utilized worldwide). We present here the PediVAS, a pump system whose design was modified from the CentriMag to meet the physiological requirements of young pediatric and neonatal patients. The PediVAS is comprised of a single-use centrifugal blood pump, reusable motor, and console, and is suitable for right ventricular assist device (RVAD), left ventricular assist device (LVAD), biventricular assist device (BVAD), or extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) applications. It is designed to operate without bearings, seals and valves, and without regions of blood stasis, friction, or wear. The PediVAS pump is compatible with the CentriMag hardware, although the priming volume was reduced from 31 to 14 ml, and the port size reduced from 3/8 to (1/4) in. For the expected range of pediatric flow (0.3-3.0 L/min), the PediVAS exhibited superior hydraulic efficiency compared with the CentriMag. The PediVAS was evaluated in 14 pediatric animals for up to 30 days, demonstrating acceptable hydraulic function and hemocompatibility. The current results substantiate the performance and biocompatibility of the PediVAS cardiac assist system and are likely to support initiation of a US clinical trial in the future.

  19. Electric versus hydraulics versus pneumatics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents a collection of papers from a conference which considered the advantages and disadvantages of electric, hydraulic and pneumatic drives and actuators. The volume follows on the success of the 1983 conference on electric and hydraulic drives. Topics considered include fork lift trucks - an ideal application for regenerative transmissions; a hybrid-electric power system with hydrostatic transmission; electrics and hydraulics on roadheader machinery; hydraulic, electrical, pneumatic control - which way to go. an electrically-powered servo to drive the two axes of a missile launching platform - pros and cons when compared with the traditional hydraulic solution; the encapsulation of a novel intrinsically safe displacement transducer; mobile cryogenic pumping systems; automation of a wood-turning machine, hydraulic or electric. The choice of a servo motor for a specific application; developments in the design and control of pneumatic linear actuators; compressed air purification for instrumentation in the high technology industries; trends in prime mover choice for powered hand tools; and choosing the drive system for the right application.

  20. Green Infrastructure Design Based on Spatial Conservation Prioritization and Modeling of Biodiversity Features and Ecosystem Services.

    PubMed

    Snäll, Tord; Lehtomäki, Joona; Arponen, Anni; Elith, Jane; Moilanen, Atte

    2016-02-01

    There is high-level political support for the use of green infrastructure (GI) across Europe, to maintain viable populations and to provide ecosystem services (ES). Even though GI is inherently a spatial concept, the modern tools for spatial planning have not been recognized, such as in the recent European Environment Agency (EEA) report. We outline a toolbox of methods useful for GI design that explicitly accounts for biodiversity and ES. Data on species occurrence, habitats, and environmental variables are increasingly available via open-access internet platforms. Such data can be synthesized by statistical species distribution modeling, producing maps of biodiversity features. These, together with maps of ES, can form the basis for GI design. We argue that spatial conservation prioritization (SCP) methods are effective tools for GI design, as the overall SCP goal is cost-effective allocation of conservation efforts. Corridors are currently promoted by the EEA as the means for implementing GI design, but they typically target the needs of only a subset of the regional species pool. SCP methods would help to ensure that GI provides a balanced solution for the requirements of many biodiversity features (e.g., species, habitat types) and ES simultaneously in a cost-effective manner. Such tools are necessary to make GI into an operational concept for combating biodiversity loss and promoting ES.

  1. Green Infrastructure Design Based on Spatial Conservation Prioritization and Modeling of Biodiversity Features and Ecosystem Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snäll, Tord; Lehtomäki, Joona; Arponen, Anni; Elith, Jane; Moilanen, Atte

    2016-02-01

    There is high-level political support for the use of green infrastructure (GI) across Europe, to maintain viable populations and to provide ecosystem services (ES). Even though GI is inherently a spatial concept, the modern tools for spatial planning have not been recognized, such as in the recent European Environment Agency (EEA) report. We outline a toolbox of methods useful for GI design that explicitly accounts for biodiversity and ES. Data on species occurrence, habitats, and environmental variables are increasingly available via open-access internet platforms. Such data can be synthesized by statistical species distribution modeling, producing maps of biodiversity features. These, together with maps of ES, can form the basis for GI design. We argue that spatial conservation prioritization (SCP) methods are effective tools for GI design, as the overall SCP goal is cost-effective allocation of conservation efforts. Corridors are currently promoted by the EEA as the means for implementing GI design, but they typically target the needs of only a subset of the regional species pool. SCP methods would help to ensure that GI provides a balanced solution for the requirements of many biodiversity features (e.g., species, habitat types) and ES simultaneously in a cost-effective manner. Such tools are necessary to make GI into an operational concept for combating biodiversity loss and promoting ES.

  2. Design Features and Commissioning of the Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) at Seoul National University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J. Chung, K.; H. An, Y.; K. Jung, B.; Y. Lee, H.; C., Sung; S. Na, Y.; S. Hahm, T.; S. Hwang, Y.

    2013-03-01

    A new spherical torus called VEST (Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus) is designed, constructed and successfully commissioned at Seoul National University. A unique design feature of the VEST is two partial solenoid coils installed at both vertical ends of a center stack, which can provide sufficient magnetic fluxes to initiate tokamak plasmas while keeping a low aspect ratio configuration in the central region. According to initial double null merging start-up scenario using the partial solenoid coils, appropriate power supplies for driving a toroidal field coil, outer poloidal field coils, and the partial solenoid coils are fabricated and successfully commissioned. For reliable start-up, a pre-ionization system with two cost-effective homemade magnetron power supplies is also prepared. In addition, magnetic and spectroscopic diagnostics with appropriate data acquisition and control systems are well prepared for initial operation of the device. The VEST is ready for tokamak plasma operation by completing and commissioning most of the designed components.

  3. Some novel design features of the LBL metal vapor vacuum arc ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The family of MEVVA (metal vapor vacuum arc) high current metal ion sources developed at LBL over the past several years has grown to include a number of different source versions with a wide range of some of the design and operational parameters. The MicroMEVVA source is a particularly compact version, about 2 cm diameter and 10 cm long, while the MEVVA IV weighs some 30 kG. MEVVAs IV and V incorporate multiple cathode assemblies (16 and 18 separate cathodes, respectively), and the operating cathode can be switched rapidly and without down-time. The new MEVVA V embodiment is quite compact considering its broad beam (10 cm), high voltage (100 kV) and multiple cathode features. The large-area extractor grids used in the MEVVA V were fabricated using a particularly simple technique, and they are clamped into position and so can be changed simply and quickly. The electrical system used to drive the arc is particularly simple and incorporates several attractive features. In this paper we review and describe a number of the mechanical and electrical design features that have been developed for these sources. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Acoustical features of two Mayan monuments at Chichen Itza: Accident or design?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubman, David

    2002-11-01

    Chichen Itza dominated the early postclassic Maya world, ca. 900-1200 C.E. Two of its colossal monuments, the Great Ball Court and the temple of Kukulkan, reflect the sophisticated, hybrid culture of a Mexicanized Maya civilization. The architecture seems intended for ceremony and ritual drama. Deducing ritual practices will advance the understanding of a lost civilization, but what took place there is largely unknown. Perhaps acoustical science can add value. Unexpected and unusual acoustical features can be interpreted as intriguing clues or irrelevant accidents. Acoustical advocates believe that, when combined with an understanding of the Maya worldview, acoustical features can provide unique insights into how the Maya designed and used theater spaces. At Chichen Itza's monuments, sound reinforcement features improve rulers and priests ability to address large crowds, and Ball Court whispering galleries permit speech communication over unexpectedly large distances. Handclaps at Kukulkan stimulate chirps that mimic a revered bird (''Kukul''), thus reinforcing cultic beliefs. A ball striking playing field wall stimulates flutter echoes at the Great Ball Court; their strength and duration arguably had dramatic, mythic, and practical significance. Interpretations of the possible mythic, magic, and political significance of sound phenomena at these Maya monuments strongly suggests intentional design.

  5. 77 FR 46128 - Proposed Revision 0 to Standard Review Plan Section 19.5: Adequacy of Design Features and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... Review Plan Section 19.5: Adequacy of Design Features and Functional Capabilities Identified and... of the SRP: Section 19.5: ``Adequacy of Design Features and Functional Capabilities Identified and Described for Withstanding Aircraft Impacts,'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System...

  6. Housing Stakeholder Preferences for the "Soft" Features of Sustainable and Healthy Housing Design in the UK.

    PubMed

    Prochorskaite, Agne; Couch, Chris; Malys, Naglis; Maliene, Vida

    2016-01-07

    It is widely recognised that the quantity and sustainability of new homes in the UK need to increase. However, it is important that sustainable housing is regarded holistically, and not merely in environmental terms, and incorporates elements that enhance the quality of life, health and well-being of its users. This paper focuses on the "soft" features of sustainable housing, that is, the non-technological components of sustainable housing and neighbourhood design that can impact occupants' health and well-being. Aims of the study are to ascertain the relative level of importance that key housing stakeholders attach to these features and to investigate whether the opinions of housing users and housing providers are aligned with regards to their importance. An online survey was carried out to gauge the level of importance that the key stakeholders, such as housing users, local authorities, housing associations, and developers (n = 235), attach to these features. Results revealed that while suitable indoor space was the feature regarded as most important by all stakeholders, there were also a number of disparities in opinion between housing users and housing providers (and among the different types of providers). This implies a scope for initiatives to achieve a better alignment between housing users and providers.

  7. System requirements and design features of Space Station Remote Manipulator System mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Hayes, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is a long robotic arm for handling large objects/payloads on the International Space Station Freedom. The mechanical components of the SSRMS include seven joints, two latching end effectors (LEEs), and two boom assemblies. The joints and LEEs are complex aerospace mechanisms. The system requirements and design features of these mechanisms are presented. All seven joints of the SSRMS have identical functional performance. The two LEES are identical. This feature allows either end of the SSRMS to be used as tip or base. As compared to the end effector of the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, the LEE has a latch and umbilical mechanism in addition to the snare and rigidize mechanisms. The latches increase the interface preload and allow large payloads (up to 116,000 Kg) to be handled. The umbilical connectors provide power, data, and video signal transfer capability to/from the SSRMS.

  8. NGNP Point Design - Results of the Initial Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulic Assessments During FY-03, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. MacDonald; James W. Sterbentz; Robert L. Sant; P. Bayless; H. D. Gougar; R. L. Moore; A. M. Ougouag; W. K. Terry

    2003-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary preconceptual designs for two possible versions of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), one for a prismatic fuel type helium gas-cooled reactor and one for a pebble bed fuel helium gas reactor. Both designs are to meet three basic requirements: a coolant outlet temperature of 1000 °C, passive safety, and a total power output consistent with that expected for commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The two efforts are discussed separately below. The analytical results presented in this report are very promising, however, we wish to caution the reader that future, more detailed, design work will be needed to provide final answers to a number of key questions including the allowable power level, the inlet temperature, the power density, the optimum fuel form, and others. The point design work presented in this report provides a starting point for other evaluations, and directions for the detailed design, but not final answers.

  9. Iodine atoms: a new molecular feature for the design of potent transthyretin fibrillogenesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mairal, Teresa; Nieto, Joan; Pinto, Marta; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Gales, Luis; Ballesteros, Alfredo; Barluenga, José; Pérez, Juan J; Vázquez, Jesús T; Centeno, Nuria B; Saraiva, Maria Joao; Damas, Ana M; Planas, Antoni; Arsequell, Gemma; Valencia, Gregorio

    2009-01-01

    The thyroid hormone and retinol transporter protein known as transthyretin (TTR) is in the origin of one of the 20 or so known amyloid diseases. TTR self assembles as a homotetramer leaving a central hydrophobic channel with two symmetrical binding sites. The aggregation pathway of TTR into amiloid fibrils is not yet well characterized but in vitro binding of thyroid hormones and other small organic molecules to TTR binding channel results in tetramer stabilization which prevents amyloid formation in an extent which is proportional to the binding constant. Up to now, TTR aggregation inhibitors have been designed looking at various structural features of this binding channel others than its ability to host iodine atoms. In the present work, greatly improved inhibitors have been designed and tested by taking into account that thyroid hormones are unique in human biochemistry owing to the presence of multiple iodine atoms in their molecules which are probed to interact with specific halogen binding domains sitting at the TTR binding channel. The new TTR fibrillogenesis inhibitors are based on the diflunisal core structure because diflunisal is a registered salicylate drug with NSAID activity now undergoing clinical trials for TTR amyloid diseases. Biochemical and biophysical evidence confirms that iodine atoms can be an important design feature in the search for candidate drugs for TTR related amyloidosis.

  10. Iodine Atoms: A New Molecular Feature for the Design of Potent Transthyretin Fibrillogenesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Marta; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Gales, Luis; Ballesteros, Alfredo; Barluenga, José; Pérez, Juan J.; Vázquez, Jesús T.; Centeno, Nuria B.; Saraiva, Maria Joao; Damas, Ana M.; Planas, Antoni; Arsequell, Gemma; Valencia, Gregorio

    2009-01-01

    The thyroid hormone and retinol transporter protein known as transthyretin (TTR) is in the origin of one of the 20 or so known amyloid diseases. TTR self assembles as a homotetramer leaving a central hydrophobic channel with two symmetrical binding sites. The aggregation pathway of TTR into amiloid fibrils is not yet well characterized but in vitro binding of thyroid hormones and other small organic molecules to TTR binding channel results in tetramer stabilization which prevents amyloid formation in an extent which is proportional to the binding constant. Up to now, TTR aggregation inhibitors have been designed looking at various structural features of this binding channel others than its ability to host iodine atoms. In the present work, greatly improved inhibitors have been designed and tested by taking into account that thyroid hormones are unique in human biochemistry owing to the presence of multiple iodine atoms in their molecules which are probed to interact with specific halogen binding domains sitting at the TTR binding channel. The new TTR fibrillogenesis inhibitors are based on the diflunisal core structure because diflunisal is a registered salicylate drug with NSAID activity now undergoing clinical trials for TTR amyloid diseases. Biochemical and biophysical evidence confirms that iodine atoms can be an important design feature in the search for candidate drugs for TTR related amyloidosis. PMID:19125186

  11. Design Features and Capabilities of the First Materials Science Research Rack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettigrew, P. J.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Cobb, S. D.; Holloway, T.; Kitchens, L.

    2003-01-01

    The First Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) will offer many unique capabilities and design features to facilitate a wide range of materials science investigations. The initial configuration of MSRR-1 will accommodate two independent Experiment Modules (EMS) and provide the capability for simultaneous on-orbit processing. The facility will provide the common subsystems and interfaces required for the operation of experiment hardware and accommodate telescience capabilities. MSRR1 will utilize an International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) equipped with an Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) for vibration isolation of the facility.

  12. Effect of design features on performance of a double-annular ram-induction combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive test program was undertaken to determine the effect of many design features such as the size and number of air scoops, and the type of diffuser airflow distribution to use to optimize performance of a double-annular ram-induction combustor of 94 cm outer diameter. Six combustor configurations were tested. It was found that a snouted double annular combustor built with 256 ram-induction air scoops with a combustor open area giving a total pressure loss of 5.0 percent at a diffuser inlet Mach number of 0.25 gave the best overall performance of the configurations tested.

  13. Review of Well Operator Files for Hydraulically Fractured Oil and Gas Production Wells: Well Design and Construction Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA reviewed a statistically representative sample of oil and gas production wells reported by nine service companies to help understand the role of well design and construction practices preventing pathways for subsurface fluid movement.

  14. Design of free patterns of nanocrystals with ad hoc features via templated dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouassa, M.; Berbezier, I.; Favre, L.; Ronda, A.; Bollani, M.; Sordan, R.; Delobbe, A.; Sudraud, P.

    2012-07-01

    Design of monodisperse ultra-small nanocrystals (NCs) into large scale patterns with ad hoc features is demonstrated. The process makes use of solid state dewetting of a thin film templated through alloy liquid metal ion source focused ion beam (LMIS-FIB) nanopatterning. The solid state dewetting initiated at the edges of the patterns controllably creates the ordering of NCs with ad hoc placement and periodicity. The NC size is tuned by varying the nominal thickness of the film while their position results from the association of film retraction from the edges of the lay out and Rayleigh-like instability. The use of ultra-high resolution LMIS-FIB enables to produce monocrystalline NCs with size, periodicity, and placement tunable as well. It provides routes for the free design of nanostructures for generic applications in nanoelectronics.

  15. Design of Unstructured Adaptive (UA) NAS Parallel Benchmark Featuring Irregular, Dynamic Memory Accesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Hui-Yu; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the design of a new method for the measurement of the performance of modern computer systems when solving scientific problems featuring irregular, dynamic memory accesses. The method involves the solution of a stylized heat transfer problem on an unstructured, adaptive grid. A Spectral Element Method (SEM) with an adaptive, nonconforming mesh is selected to discretize the transport equation. The relatively high order of the SEM lowers the fraction of wall clock time spent on inter-processor communication, which eases the load balancing task and allows us to concentrate on the memory accesses. The benchmark is designed to be three-dimensional. Parallelization and load balance issues of a reference implementation will be described in detail in future reports.

  16. Introduction to Hydraulics. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Instruction and Materials Center.

    This manual on hydraulics is one of a series of individualized instructional materials for students. The manual is self-paced, but is designed to be used under the supervision of an instructor. The manual contains 10 assignments, each with all the information needed, a list of objectives that should be met, and exercise questions that can help in…

  17. Preliminary design features of the RASCAL - A NASA/Army rotorcraft in-flight simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, Edwin W.; Jacobsen, Robert A.; Eshow, Michelle M.; Hindson, William S.; Doane, Douglas H.

    1992-01-01

    Salient design features of a new NASA/Army research rotorcraft - the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) - are described. Using a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter as a baseline vehicle, the RASCAL will be a flying laboratory capable of supporting the research requirements of major NASA and Army guidance, control, and display research programs. The paper describes the research facility requirements of these programs together with other critical constraints on the design of the research system, including safety-of-flight. Research program schedules demand a phased development approach, wherein specific research capability milestones are met and flight research projects are flown throughout the complete development cycle of the RASCAL. This development approach is summarized, and selected features of the research system are described. The research system includes a full-authority, programmable, fault-tolerant/fail-safe, fly-by-wire flight control system and a real-time obstacle detection and avoidance system which will generate low-latitude guidance commands to the pilot on a wide field-of-view, color helmet-mounted display.

  18. Preliminary design features of the RASCAL: A NASA /Army rotorcraft in-flight simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, Edwin W.; Jacobsen, Robert A.; Eshow, Michelle M.; Hindson, William S.; Doane, Douglas H.

    1993-01-01

    Salient design features of a new NASA/Army research rotorcraft - the Rotorcraft-Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) - are described. Using a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter as a baseline vehicle, the RASCAL will be a flying laboratory capable of supporting the research requirements of major NASA and Army guidance, control, and display research programs. The paper describes the research facility requirements of these programs together with other critical constraints on the design of the research system, including safety-of-flight. Research program schedules demand a phased development approach, wherein specific research capability milestones are met and flight research projects are flown throughout the complete development cycle of the RASCAL. This development approach is summarized, and selected features of the research system are described. The research system includes a full-authority, programmable, fault-tolerant/fail-safe, fly-by-wire flight control system and a real-time obstacle detection and avoidance system which will generate low-altitude guidance commands to the pilot on a wide field-of-view, color helmet-mounted display.

  19. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ([minus]60[degrees]F) temperatures.

  20. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ({minus}60{degrees}F) temperatures.

  1. Diffusive Barrier and Getter Under Waste Packages VA Reference Design Feature Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    MacNeil, K.

    1999-05-24

    This technical document evaluates those aspects of the diffusive barrier and getter features which have the potential for enhancing the performance of the Viability Assessment Reference Design and are also directly related to the key attributes for the repository safety strategy of that design. The effects of advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, and diffusion on the radionuclide migration rates through the diffusive barrier were determined through the application of the one-dimensional, advection/dispersion/diffusion equation. The results showed that because advective flow described by the advection-dispersion equation dominates, the diffusive barrier feature alone would not be effective in retarding migration of radiocuclides. However, if the diffusive barrier were combined with one or more features that reduced the potential for advection, then transport of radionuclides would be dominated by diffusion and their migration from the EBS would be impeded. Apatite was chosen as the getter material used for this report. Two getter configurations were developed, Case 1 and Case 2. As in the evaluation of the diffusive barrier, the effects of advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, and diffusion on the migration of radionuclides through the getter are evaluated. However, in addition to these mechanisms, the one-dimensional advection/dispersion/diffusion model is modified to include the effect of sorption on radionuclide migration rates through the sorptive medium (getter). As a result of sorption, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, and the average linear velocity are effectively reduced by the retardation factor. The retardation factor is a function of the getter material's dry bulk density, sorption coefficient and moisture content. The results of the evaluation showed that a significant delay in breakthrough through the getter can be achieved if the thickness of the getter barrier is increased.

  2. [Design and Preparation of Plant Bionic Materials Based on Optical and Infrared Features Simulation].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao-jun; Lu, Xu-liang; Pan, Jia-liang; Zhang, Shuan-qin

    2015-07-01

    Due to the life characteristics such as physiological structure and transpiration, plants have unique optical and infrared features. In the optical band, because of the common effects of chlorophyll and water, plant leafs show spectral reflectance characteristics change in 550, 680, 1400 and 1900 nm significantly. In the infrared wave band, driven by transpiration, plants could regulate temperature on their own initiative, which make the infrared characteristics of plants different from artificial materials. So palnt bionic materials were proposed to simulate optical and infrared characteristics of plants. By analyzing formation mechanism of optical and infrared features about green plants, the component design and heat-transfer process of plants bionic materials were studied, above these the heat-transfer control formulation was established. Based on water adsorption/release compound, optical pigments and other man-made materials, plant bionic materials preparation methods were designed which could simulate the optical and infrared features of green plants. By chemical casting methods plant bionic material films were prepared, which use polyvinyl alcohol as film forming and water adsorption/release compound, and use optical pigments like chrome green and macromolecule yellow as colouring materials. The research conclusions achieved by testings figured out: water adsorption/release testing showed that the plant bionic materials with a certain thickness could absorb 1.3 kg water per square meter, which could satisfy the water usage of transpiration simulation one day; the optical and infrared simulated effect tests indicated that the plant bionic materials could preferably simulate the spectral reflective performance of green plants in optical wave band (380-2500 nm, expecially in 1400 and 1900 nm which were water absorption wave band of plants), and also it had similar daily infrared radiation variations with green plants, daily average radiation temperature

  3. Coarse coal hydraulic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Petry, E.F.

    1982-10-01

    Discusses the development of coarse coal pipeline technology requiring a minimum of product size reduction. Initial concentration on continuous face haulage and later on mainline haulage areas led eventually to the system in operation at Loveridge mine in West Virginia. Key features of the hydraulic transport system (as shown in diagram) include the pump house, vertical hoisting, overland slurry lines, a preparation/ dewatering plant, a continuous miner, a coal crusher/injection vehicle, a flexible hose hauler, a rigid slurry line, a longwall injection station, and a slurry storage/reclaim system. Explains that the system was built primarily to serve a longwall face, but it also handles coal from 2 continuous miners on longwall development work.

  4. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Cigarette Design Feature Influence on ISO TNCO Yields.

    PubMed

    Agnew-Heard, Kimberly A; Lancaster, Vicki A; Bravo, Roberto; Watson, Clifford; Walters, Matthew J; Holman, Matthew R

    2016-06-20

    The aim of this study is to explore how differences in cigarette physical design parameters influence tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide (TNCO) yields in mainstream smoke (MSS) using the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) smoking regimen. Standardized smoking methods were used to evaluate 50 U.S. domestic brand cigarettes and a reference cigarette representing a range of TNCO yields in MSS collected from linear smoking machines using a nonintense smoking regimen. Multivariate statistical methods were used to form clusters of cigarettes based on their ISO TNCO yields and then to explore the relationship between the ISO generated TNCO yields and the nine cigarette physical design parameters between and within each cluster simultaneously. The ISO generated TNCO yields in MSS are 1.1-17.0 mg tar/cigarette, 0.1-2.2 mg nicotine/cigarette, and 1.6-17.3 mg CO/cigarette. Cluster analysis divided the 51 cigarettes into five discrete clusters based on their ISO TNCO yields. No one physical parameter dominated across all clusters. Predicting ISO machine generated TNCO yields based on these nine physical design parameters is complex due to the correlation among and between the nine physical design parameters and TNCO yields. From these analyses, it is estimated that approximately 20% of the variability in the ISO generated TNCO yields comes from other parameters (e.g., filter material, filter type, inclusion of expanded or reconstituted tobacco, and tobacco blend composition, along with differences in tobacco leaf origin and stalk positions and added ingredients). A future article will examine the influence of these physical design parameters on TNCO yields under a Canadian Intense (CI) smoking regimen. Together, these papers will provide a more robust picture of the design features that contribute to TNCO exposure across the range of real world smoking patterns.

  5. Inherent Limitations of Hydraulic Tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    We offer a cautionary note in response to an increasing level of enthusiasm regarding high-resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. We use synthetic examples based on two recent field experiments to demonstrate that a high degree of nonuniqueness remains in estimates of hydraulic parameter fields even when those estimates are based on simultaneous analysis of a number of carefully controlled hydraulic tests. We must, therefore, be careful not to oversell the technique to the community of practicing hydrogeologists, promising a degree of accuracy and resolution that, in many settings, will remain unattainable, regardless of the amount of effort invested in the field investigation. No practically feasible amount of hydraulic tomography data will ever remove the need to regularize or bias the inverse problem in some fashion in order to obtain a unique solution. Thus, along with improving the resolution of hydraulic tomography techniques, we must also strive to couple those techniques with procedures for experimental design and uncertainty assessment and with other more cost-effective field methods, such as geophysical surveying and, in unconsolidated formations, direct-push profiling, in order to develop methods for subsurface characterization with the resolution and accuracy needed for practical field applications. Copyright ?? 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  6. Selective perceptions of hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Sarge, Melanie A; VanDyke, Matthew S; King, Andy J; White, Shawna R

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) is a focal topic in discussions about domestic energy production, yet the American public is largely unfamiliar and undecided about the practice. This study sheds light on how individuals may come to understand hydraulic fracturing as this unconventional production technology becomes more prominent in the United States. For the study, a thorough search of HF photographs was performed, and a systematic evaluation of 40 images using an online experimental design involving N = 250 participants was conducted. Key indicators of hydraulic fracturing support and beliefs were identified. Participants showed diversity in their support for the practice, with 47 percent expressing low support, 22 percent high support, and 31 percent undecided. Support for HF was positively associated with beliefs that hydraulic fracturing is primarily an economic issue and negatively associated with beliefs that it is an environmental issue. Level of support was also investigated as a perceptual filter that facilitates biased issue perceptions and affective evaluations of economic benefit and environmental cost frames presented in visual content of hydraulic fracturing. Results suggested an interactive relationship between visual framing and level of support, pointing to a substantial barrier to common understanding about the issue that strategic communicators should consider.

  7. Inherent limitations of hydraulic tomography.

    PubMed

    Bohling, Geoffrey C; Butler, James J

    2010-01-01

    We offer a cautionary note in response to an increasing level of enthusiasm regarding high-resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. We use synthetic examples based on two recent field experiments to demonstrate that a high degree of nonuniqueness remains in estimates of hydraulic parameter fields even when those estimates are based on simultaneous analysis of a number of carefully controlled hydraulic tests. We must, therefore, be careful not to oversell the technique to the community of practicing hydrogeologists, promising a degree of accuracy and resolution that, in many settings, will remain unattainable, regardless of the amount of effort invested in the field investigation. No practically feasible amount of hydraulic tomography data will ever remove the need to regularize or bias the inverse problem in some fashion in order to obtain a unique solution. Thus, along with improving the resolution of hydraulic tomography techniques, we must also strive to couple those techniques with procedures for experimental design and uncertainty assessment and with other more cost-effective field methods, such as geophysical surveying and, in unconsolidated formations, direct-push profiling, in order to develop methods for subsurface characterization with the resolution and accuracy needed for practical field applications.

  8. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  9. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  10. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  11. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  12. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  13. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  14. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  15. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  16. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  17. 14 CFR 33.72 - Hydraulic actuating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hydraulic actuating systems. 33.72 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.72 Hydraulic actuating systems. Each hydraulic actuating system must function properly under all conditions in which...

  18. Advantages of Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanidis, P. K.; Bakhos, T.; Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.

    2012-12-01

    Characterizing the subsurface is significant for most hydrogeologic studies, such as those involving site remediation and groundwater resource explo¬ration. A variety of hydraulic and geophysical methods have been developed to estimate hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Hydraulic methods based on the analysis of conventional pumping tests allow the estimation of conductivity and storage without need for approximate petrophysical relations, which is an advantage over most geophysical methods that first estimate other properties and then infer values of hydraulic parameters. However, hydraulic methods have the disadvantage that the head-change signal decays with distance from the pumping well and thus becomes difficult to separate from noise except in close proximity to the source. Oscillatory hydraulic tomography (OHT) is an emerging technology to im¬age the subsurface. This method utilizes the idea of imposing sinusoidally varying pressure or discharge signals at several points, collecting head observations at several other points, and then processing these data in a tomographic fashion to estimate conductivity and storage coefficients. After an overview of the methodology, including a description of the most important potential advantages and challenges associated with this approach, two key promising features of the approach will be discussed. First, the signal at an observation point is orthogonal to and thus can be separated from nuisance inputs like head fluctuation from production wells, evapotranspiration, irrigation, and changes in the level of adjacent streams. Second, although the signal amplitude may be weak, one can extract the phase and amplitude of the os¬cillatory signal by collecting measurements over a longer time, thus compensating for the effect of large distance through longer sampling period.

  19. Biomaterial design for specific cellular interactions: Role of surface functionalization and geometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhar, Poornima

    The areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering have experienced extraordinary growth in recent years with the application of engineering principles and their potential to support and improve the field of medicine. The tremendous progress in nanotechnology and biotechnology has lead to this explosion of research and development in biomedical applications. Biomaterials can now be engineered at a nanoscale and their specific interactions with the biological tissues can be modulated. Various design parameters are being established and researched for design of drug-delivery carriers and scaffolds to be implanted into humans. Nanoparticles made from versatile biomaterial can deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of bio-macromolecules, such as proteins and oligonucleotides. Similarly in the field of tissue engineering, current approaches emphasize nanoscale control of cell behavior by mimicking the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) unlike, traditional scaffolds. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely connected fields and both of these applications require materials with exceptional physical, chemical, biological, and biomechanical properties to provide superior therapy. In the current study the surface functionalization and the geometric features of the biomaterials has been explored. In particular, a synthetic surface for culture of human embryonic stem cells has been developed, demonstrating the importance of surface functionalization in maintaining the pluripotency of hESCs. In the second study, the geometric features of the drug delivery carriers are investigated and the polymeric nanoneedles mediated cellular permeabilization and direct cytoplasmic delivery is reported. In the third study, the combined effect of surface functionalization and geometric modification of carriers for vascular targeting is enunciated. These studies illustrate how the biomaterials can be designed to achieve various cellular behaviors and control the

  20. Engineering and Design: Selecting Reaction-Type Hydraulic Turbines and Pump Turbines and Hydroelectric Generators and Generator-Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    turbines must k designed to suit the specific range of conditions under which they will operate, each generator and generator- motor is unique in that the... conditions . Continuous, heavy-duty amortisseur windings me required for generator-rotors which are to be started as induction motors . (2) ~rtisseur...cubic feet, and the available water horsepwer is: WHP = wQH 550 d. The amount of power that can be prducd under pradical working conditions is less

  1. A distributed hydrologic model for the estimation of the design flood and for the hydraulic safety of existing dams in Sardinia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortis, Clorinda; Sarigu, Alessio; Montaldo, Nicola; Saba, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The recent floods observed in 2004 and 2008 in Sardinia (Italy) showed a significant flood increase in magnitude and frequency and put the attention on the problem of the hydraulic safety of existing dams. Thirty dams built for both electric production and water supply for irrigation and civil uses during the 1920-1960 are present in Sardinia (Italy). The distributed hydrologic model is an event model (FEST) which assesses runoff through a simplified approach based on Soil Conservation Service equations and runoff propagation through the Muskingum-Cunge approach. The FEST needs the calibration of different parameters: 1) the critical support area that defines the minimum drainage area required to initiate a channel, 2) the ratio between cross-section width and flood flow depth for hillslope, 3) the hillslope values of the Gaulckler-Stickler roughness coefficient, and 4) the Curve Number obtained/extracted from the landscape characteristics of each basin. The data collection of numerous historical flood observations of the Sardinian basins allow for the first time to accurately calibrate an hydrologic model for the Sardinian basins, characterized by hortonian runoff mechanisms typically, steep hillslopes and thin soils. Areas of the catchments are between 4 and 3147 Km2 and the basins are characterized by an high variability of the landscape characteristics such as geology, topography, soil, land use and vegetation. Using the calibrated hydrologic model and the synthetic design hyetograph the design floods of the dams are estimated. The comparison between peak flows of the generated design floods and those estimated using typical regionalized statistical methods (based for Sardinian studies on two components extreme value (TCEV) and logarithmic probabilistic distributions) shows contradiction and interesting results. For large scale basin (> 200 km2) the two contrasting methods agree, while for small basins the proposed method underestimates the peak respect to the

  2. Extraction of Airport Features from High Resolution Satellite Imagery for Design and Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Chris; Qiu, You-Liang; Jensen, John R.; Schill, Steven R.; Floyd, Mike

    2001-01-01

    The LPA Group, consisting of 17 offices located throughout the eastern and central United States is an architectural, engineering and planning firm specializing in the development of Airports, Roads and Bridges. The primary focus of this ARC project is concerned with assisting their aviation specialists who work in the areas of Airport Planning, Airfield Design, Landside Design, Terminal Building Planning and design, and various other construction services. The LPA Group wanted to test the utility of high-resolution commercial satellite imagery for the purpose of extracting airport elevation features in the glide path areas surrounding the Columbia Metropolitan Airport. By incorporating remote sensing techniques into their airport planning process, LPA wanted to investigate whether or not it is possible to save time and money while achieving the equivalent accuracy as traditional planning methods. The Affiliate Research Center (ARC) at the University of South Carolina investigated the use of remotely sensed imagery for the extraction of feature elevations in the glide path zone. A stereo pair of IKONOS panchromatic satellite images, which has a spatial resolution of 1 x 1 m, was used to determine elevations of aviation obstructions such as buildings, trees, towers and fence-lines. A validation dataset was provided by the LPA Group to assess the accuracy of the measurements derived from the IKONOS imagery. The initial goal of this project was to test the utility of IKONOS imagery in feature extraction using ERDAS Stereo Analyst. This goal was never achieved due to problems with ERDAS software support of the IKONOS sensor model and the unavailability of imperative sensor model information from Space Imaging. The obstacles encountered in this project pertaining to ERDAS Stereo Analyst and IKONOS imagery will be reviewed in more detail later in this report. As a result of the technical difficulties with Stereo Analyst, ERDAS OrthoBASE was used to derive aviation

  3. Optimal design of a new 3D haptic gripper for telemanipulation, featuring magnetorheological fluid brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this research work, a new configuration of a 3D haptic gripper for telemanipulation is proposed and optimally designed. The proposed haptic gripper, featuring three magnetorheological fluid brakes (MRBs), reflects the rolling torque, the grasping force and the approach force from the slave manipulator to the master operator. After describing the operational principle of the haptic gripper, an optimal design of the MRBs for the gripper is performed. The purpose of the optimization problem is to find the most compact MRB that can provide a required braking torque/force to the master operator while the off-state torque/force is kept as small as possible. In the optimal design, different types of MRBs and different MR fluids (MRFs) are considered. In order to obtain the optimal solution of the MRBs, an optimization approach based on finite element analysis (FEA) integrated with an optimization tool is used. The optimal solutions of the MRBs are then obtained and the optimized MRBs for the haptic gripper are identified. In addition, discussions on the optimal solutions and performance of the optimized MRBs are given.

  4. Comparing Infants' Use of Featural and Spatiotemporal Information in an Object Individuation Task Using a New Event-Monitoring Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krojgaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Discussions have recently taken place on whether spatiotemporal information is more important than featural information when infants attempt to individuate objects. Hitherto, spatiotemporal and featural information have only been compared directly by using cognitively demanding "event-mapping" designs" (e.g. Xu & Carey, 1996 ), whereas the simpler…

  5. Design, fabrication, and testing of a Shack–Hartmann sensor with an automatic registration feature

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenchen; Raasch, Thomas W.; Yi, Allen Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, design, construction, and testing of an innovative Shack–Hartmann sensor are described. As the most critical component, a polymer microlens array is injection molded and mounted on a board-level CMOS camera such that the focal plane of the microlens array is on the camera’s image plane. To allow for automatic registration of the spots of the measured area, a diffusing surface was created at the center of the lens array in the same diamond machining process in an uninterrupted operation. This unique diffusing surface does not generate an image spot. The no-spot feature functions as the reference in the measurement on the camera’s image plane. Using this unique feature, large global tip-tilt error can be detected and eliminated. In this research, both experiments and simulation have shown that the Shack–Hartmann sensor built using low cost components is capable of precision wavefront detection. This research also demonstrated that automatic registration based on the diffusing surface is simple and reliable. PMID:27828021

  6. Implementation of Novel Design Features for qPCR-Based eDNA Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Veldhoen, Nik; Hobbs, Jared; Ikonomou, Georgios; Hii, Michael; Lesperance, Mary; Helbing, Caren C.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stewardship requires timely, accurate information related to the status of a given ecosystem and the species that occupy it. Recent advances in the application of the highly sensitive real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) towards identification of constituents within environmental DNA (eDNA) now allow targeted detection of the presence of species-specific biological material within a localized geographic region. However, as with all molecular techniques predicated on the specificity and sensitivity of the PCR assay, careful validation of each eDNA qPCR assay in development must be performed both under controlled laboratory conditions and when challenged with field-derived eDNA samples. Such a step-wise approach forms the basis for incorporation of innovative qPCR design features that strengthen the implementation and interpretation of the eDNA assay. This includes empirical determination that the qPCR assay is refractory to the presence of human DNA and the use of a tripartite assay approach comprised of 1) a primer set targeting plant chloroplast that evaluates the presence of amplifiable DNA from field samples to increase confidence in a negative result, 2) an animal group primer set to increase confidence in the assay result, and 3) a species-specific primer set to assess presence of DNA from the target species. To demonstrate this methodology, we generated eDNA assays specific for the North American bullfrog (Lithobates (Rana) catesbeiana) and the Rocky Mountain tailed frog (Ascaphus montanus) and characterized each with respect to detection sensitivity and specificity with demonstrated performance in a field survey scenario. The qPCR design features presented herein address specific challenges of eDNA assays thereby increasing their interpretative power. PMID:27802293

  7. Implementation of Novel Design Features for qPCR-Based eDNA Assessment.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Hobbs, Jared; Ikonomou, Georgios; Hii, Michael; Lesperance, Mary; Helbing, Caren C

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stewardship requires timely, accurate information related to the status of a given ecosystem and the species that occupy it. Recent advances in the application of the highly sensitive real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) towards identification of constituents within environmental DNA (eDNA) now allow targeted detection of the presence of species-specific biological material within a localized geographic region. However, as with all molecular techniques predicated on the specificity and sensitivity of the PCR assay, careful validation of each eDNA qPCR assay in development must be performed both under controlled laboratory conditions and when challenged with field-derived eDNA samples. Such a step-wise approach forms the basis for incorporation of innovative qPCR design features that strengthen the implementation and interpretation of the eDNA assay. This includes empirical determination that the qPCR assay is refractory to the presence of human DNA and the use of a tripartite assay approach comprised of 1) a primer set targeting plant chloroplast that evaluates the presence of amplifiable DNA from field samples to increase confidence in a negative result, 2) an animal group primer set to increase confidence in the assay result, and 3) a species-specific primer set to assess presence of DNA from the target species. To demonstrate this methodology, we generated eDNA assays specific for the North American bullfrog (Lithobates (Rana) catesbeiana) and the Rocky Mountain tailed frog (Ascaphus montanus) and characterized each with respect to detection sensitivity and specificity with demonstrated performance in a field survey scenario. The qPCR design features presented herein address specific challenges of eDNA assays thereby increasing their interpretative power.

  8. What design features are used in effective e-health interventions? A review using techniques from Critical Interpretive Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Leanne G; Yardley, Lucy; Powell, John; Michie, Susan

    2012-03-01

    The effectiveness of e-health interventions varies greatly. Despite this, there has been relatively little formal consideration of how differences in the design of an intervention (i.e., how the content is delivered) may explain why some interventions are more effective than others. This review primarily examines the use of the Internet to provide educational and self-management interventions to promote health. The article develops hypotheses about how the design of these interventions may be associated with outcomes. In total, 52 published reports from both a diversity sample and a representative sample were reviewed using techniques from Critical Interpretive Synthesis. Four core interactive design features were identified that may mediate the effects of intervention design on outcomes: Social context and support, contacts with intervention, tailoring, and self-management. A conceptual framework to summarize the design of e-health interventions delivered using the Internet is proposed. The framework provides a guide for systematic research to identify the effects of specific design features on intervention outcomes and to identify the mechanisms underlying any effects. To optimize the design of e-health interventions more work is needed to understand how and why these design features may affect intervention outcomes and to investigate the optimal implementation and dosage of each design feature.

  9. Cigarette design features in low-, middle-, and high-income countries.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Rosalie V; O'Connor, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that country income grouping is correlated with cigarette engineering. Cigarettes (N = 111 brands) were purchased during 2008-2010 from 11 low-, middle-, and high-income countries to assess physical dimensions and an array of cigarette design features. Mean ventilation varied significantly across low- (7.5%), middle- (15.3%), and high-income (26.2%) countries (P ≤ 0.001). Differences across income groups were also seen in cigarette length (P = 0.001), length of the tipping paper (P = 0.01), filter weight (P = 0.017), number of vent rows (P = 0.003), per-cigarette tobacco weight (P = 0.04), and paper porosity (P = 0.008). Stepwise linear regression showed ventilation and tobacco length as major predictors of ISO tar yields in low-income countries (P = 0.909, 0.047), while tipping paper (P < 0.001), filter length (P < 0.001), number of vent rows (P = 0.014), and per-cigarette weight (P = 0.015) were predictors of tar yields in middle-income countries. Ventilation (P < 0.001), number of vent rows (P = 0.009), per-cigarette weight (P < 0.001), and filter diameter (P = 0.004) predicted tar yields in high-income countries. Health officials must be cognizant of cigarette design issues to provide effective regulation of tobacco products.

  10. Delayed-onset muscle soreness: a pilot study to assess analgesic study design features.

    PubMed

    Singla, Neil; Desjardins, Paul J; Cosca, Evelyn B; Parulan, Cherri; Arriaga, Anne; Poole, Kelly C; Batz, Dan M; Chang, Phoebe D

    2015-06-01

    Based on a thorough review of the available literature in the delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) model, we identified multiple study design characteristics that are considered to be normative in acute pain research but have not been followed in a majority of published DOMS experiments. We designed an analgesic investigation using the DOMS model that both complied with current scientifically accepted standards for the conduct of analgesic studies and demonstrated reasonable assay sensitivity. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled within-subject study compared the efficacy of topical diclofenac sodium 1% with a matching placebo in reducing pain associated with DOMS. After exercise, subjects reporting DOMS received topical diclofenac sodium gel 1% (DSG 1%) applied to one leg and placebo to the other every 6 hours for 48 hours. Pain intensity was assessed at rest, upon standing, and when walking in the 48 hours after initial drug application (T0). The primary end point was the reduction in pain intensity (SPID 24) on walking. Subjects receiving DSG 1% had less pain while walking compared with those receiving placebo at 24 hours (SPID 24 = 34.9 [22.9] and 23.6 [19.4], respectively; P = 0.032). This investigation used experimental techniques that have been vetted in the field of exercise physiology and superimposed techniques that are considered to be best practice in the field of analgesic research. Over time and with the help of colleagues in both fields of study, similar investigations will validate design features that impact the assay sensitivity of analgesic end points in DOMS models. In addition, the study confirmed the analgesic efficacy of topical DSG 1% over placebo in subjects experiencing DOMS.

  11. Delayed-onset muscle soreness: a pilot study to assess analgesic study design features

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Neil; Desjardins, Paul J.; Cosca, Evelyn B.; Parulan, Cherri; Arriaga, Anne; Poole, Kelly C.; Batz, Dan M.; Chang, Phoebe D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Based on a thorough review of the available literature in the delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) model, we identified multiple study design characteristics that are considered to be normative in acute pain research but have not been followed in a majority of published DOMS experiments. We designed an analgesic investigation using the DOMS model that both complied with current scientifically accepted standards for the conduct of analgesic studies and demonstrated reasonable assay sensitivity. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled within-subject study compared the efficacy of topical diclofenac sodium 1% with a matching placebo in reducing pain associated with DOMS. After exercise, subjects reporting DOMS received topical diclofenac sodium gel 1% (DSG 1%) applied to one leg and placebo to the other every 6 hours for 48 hours. Pain intensity was assessed at rest, upon standing, and when walking in the 48 hours after initial drug application (T0). The primary end point was the reduction in pain intensity (SPID 24) on walking. Subjects receiving DSG 1% had less pain while walking compared with those receiving placebo at 24 hours (SPID 24 = 34.9 [22.9] and 23.6 [19.4], respectively; P = 0.032). This investigation used experimental techniques that have been vetted in the field of exercise physiology and superimposed techniques that are considered to be best practice in the field of analgesic research. Over time and with the help of colleagues in both fields of study, similar investigations will validate design features that impact the assay sensitivity of analgesic end points in DOMS models. In addition, the study confirmed the analgesic efficacy of topical DSG 1% over placebo in subjects experiencing DOMS. PMID:25633158

  12. Design Review Report for formal review of safety class features of exhauster system for rotary mode core sampling

    SciTech Connect

    JANICEK, G.P.

    2000-06-08

    Report documenting Formal Design Review conducted on portable exhausters used to support rotary mode core sampling of Hanford underground radioactive waste tanks with focus on Safety Class design features and control requirements for flammable gas environment operation and air discharge permitting compliance.

  13. The cognitive impact of interactive design features for learning complex materials in medical education

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyuksoon S.; Pusic, Martin; Nick, Michael W.; Sarpel, Umut; Plass, Jan L.; Kalet, Adina L.

    2013-01-01

    To identify the most effective way for medical students to interact with a browser-based learning module on the symptoms and neurological underpinnings of stroke syndromes, this study manipulated the way in which subjects interacted with a graphical model of the brain and examined the impact of functional changes on learning outcomes. It was hypothesized that behavioral interactions that were behaviorally more engaging and which required deeper consideration of the model would result in heightened cognitive interaction and better learning than those whose manipulation required less deliberate behavioral and cognitive processing. One hundred forty four students were randomly assigned to four conditions whose model controls incorporated features that required different levels of behavioral and cognitive interaction: Movie (low behavioral/low cognitive, n = 40), Slider (high behavioral/low cognitive, n = 36), Click (low behavioral/high cognitive, n = 30), and Drag (high behavioral/high cognitive, n = 38). Analysis of Covariates (ANCOVA) showed that students who received the treatments associated with lower cognitive interactivity (Movie and Slider) performed better on a transfer task than those receiving the module associated with high cognitive interactivity (Click and Drag, partial eta squared = .03). In addition, the students in the high cognitive interactivity conditions spent significantly more time on the stroke locator activity than other conditions (partial eta squared = .36). The results suggest that interaction with controls that were tightly coupled with the model and whose manipulation required deliberate consideration of the model’s features may have overtaxed subjects’ cognitive resources. Cognitive effort that facilitated manipulation of content, though directed at the model, may have resulted in extraneous cognitive load, impeding subjects in recognizing the deeper, global relationships in the materials. Instructional designers must, therefore

  14. Time domain responses of hydraulic bushing with two flow passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Tan; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Hydraulic bushings are commonly employed in vehicle suspension and body sub-frame systems to control motion, vibration, and structure-borne noise. Since literature on this topic is sparse, a controlled bushing prototype which accommodates a combination of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements is first designed, constructed and instrumented. Step-up and step-down responses of several typical fluid-filled bushing configurations are measured along with steady harmonic time histories of transmitted force and internal pressures. To analyze the experimental results and gain physical insights into the hydraulic bushing system, lumped system models of bushings with different design features are developed, and analytical expressions of transmitted force and internal pressure responses are derived by using the convolution method. Parametric studies are also conducted to examine the effect of hydraulic element parameters. System parameters are successfully estimated for both harmonic and step responses using theory and measurements, and the dynamic force measurements are analyzed using analytical predictions. Finally, some nonlinearities of the system are also observed, and the fluid resistance of flow passage is found to be the most nonlinear element.

  15. Evaluating the Operational Features of an Unconventional Dual-Bay U-Turn Design for Intersections

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yun; Li, Zhibin; Wang, Wei; Chen, Jingxu; Wang, Hao; Li, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Median U-turn intersection treatment (MUTIT) has been considered an alternative measure to reduce congestion and traffic conflict at intersection areas. The MUTIT is sometimes difficult to implement in the field because it requires wide median on arterials for U-turn vehicles. The objective of this study is to introduce an unconventional U-turn treatment (UUT) for intersections which requires less median space but is also effective. The UUT has a dual-bay design with different turning radiuses for small and large vehicles. The VISSIM simulation model was developed to evaluate the operational features of the UUT. The model was calibrated using data collected from intersections in China. The capacity, delay and number of stops were evaluated and compared with the direct-left-turn (DLT) for the same intersections. The results showed that the UUT significantly improved the operations at intersection areas, especially when volume/capacity ratio is small, and ratio of left-turn to through traffic is small. With the UUT, the capacity is increased by 9.81% to 10.38%, vehicle delay is decreased by 18.5% to 40.1%, and number of stops is decreased by 23.19% to 36.62%, when volume/capacity ratio is less than 0.50. The study also found that traffic efficiency could be further improved when the UUT is designed in conjunction with signal control. In the case, the UUT plus signalized control increases the capacity by 25% to 26.02%, decreases vehicle delay by 50.5% to 55.8%, and reduces number of stops by 69.5%, compared with the traditional DLT. PMID:27467127

  16. Advanced aerospace hydraulic systems and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-07-01

    The present volume discusses the development of a viable hydraulic circuit breaker, the electromodulated control of supply pressure in hydraulic systems, the flight control actuation system for the B-2 advanced technology bomber, and the B747-400 upper rudder control system with triple tandem valve. Also discussed are a total-flexibility cartridge-valve porting via innovative sealing technology, the A320 pilots' autothrust survey, an all-digital electrohydrostatic servoactuator, and a concurrent design/analysis tool for aircraft hydraulic systems. (For individual items see A93-21841 to A93-21844)

  17. Layered clustering multi-fault diagnosis for hydraulic piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jun; Wang, Shaoping; Zhang, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Efficient diagnosis is very important for improving reliability and performance of aircraft hydraulic piston pump, and it is one of the key technologies in prognostic and health management system. In practice, due to harsh working environment and heavy working loads, multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump may occur simultaneously after long time operations. However, most existing diagnosis methods can only distinguish pump faults that occur individually. Therefore, new method needs to be developed to realize effective diagnosis of simultaneous multiple faults on aircraft hydraulic pump. In this paper, a new method based on the layered clustering algorithm is proposed to diagnose multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump that occur simultaneously. The intensive failure mechanism analyses of the five main types of faults are carried out, and based on these analyses the optimal combination and layout of diagnostic sensors is attained. The three layered diagnosis reasoning engine is designed according to the faults' risk priority number and the characteristics of different fault feature extraction methods. The most serious failures are first distinguished with the individual signal processing. To the desultory faults, i.e., swash plate eccentricity and incremental clearance increases between piston and slipper, the clustering diagnosis algorithm based on the statistical average relative power difference (ARPD) is proposed. By effectively enhancing the fault features of these two faults, the ARPDs calculated from vibration signals are employed to complete the hypothesis testing. The ARPDs of the different faults follow different probability distributions. Compared with the classical fast Fourier transform-based spectrum diagnosis method, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can diagnose the multiple faults, which occur synchronously, with higher precision and reliability.

  18. Practical issues in imaging hydraulic conductivity through hydraulic tomography.

    PubMed

    Illman, Walter A; Craig, Andrew J; Liu, Xiaoyi

    2008-01-01

    Hydraulic tomography has been developed as an alternative to traditional geostatistical methods to delineate heterogeneity patterns in parameters such as hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (S(s)). During hydraulic tomography surveys, a large number of hydraulic head data are collected from a series of cross-hole tests in the subsurface. These head data are then used to interpret the spatial distribution of K and S(s) using inverse modeling. Here, we use the Sequential Successive Linear Estimator (SSLE) of Yeh and Liu (2000) to interpret synthetic pumping test data created through numerical simulations and real data generated in a laboratory sandbox aquifer to obtain the K tomograms. Here, we define "K tomogram" as an image of K distribution of the subsurface (or the inverse results) obtained via hydraulic tomography. We examine the influence of signal-to-noise ratio and biases on results using inverse modeling of synthetic and real cross-hole pumping test data. To accomplish this, we first show that the pumping rate, which affects the signal-to-noise ratio, and the order of data included into the SSLE algorithm both have large impacts on the quality of the K tomograms. We then examine the role of conditioning on the K tomogram and find that conditioning can improve the quality of the K tomogram, but can also impair it, if the data are of poor quality and conditioning data have a larger support volume than the numerical grid used to conduct the inversion. Overall, these results show that the quality of the K tomogram depends on the design of pumping tests, their conduct, the order in which they are included in the inverse code, and the quality as well as the support volume of additional data that are used in its computation.

  19. Design and experiments of a novel magneto-rheological damper featuring bifold flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyongsol; Chen, Zhaobo; Yu, Dong; Rim, Changhyon

    2016-07-01

    This study presents design and fabrication of a novel magneto-rheological (MR) damper with bifold flow mode gap to improve damping performance. The proposed MR damper is featured by inner flow mode gap connected to the outer flow mode gap through the feedback hole. A mathematical model of the damping force is established for the proposed MR damper and the magnetic circuit has been analyzed with the finite element method, which is used to validate the principle of the proposed MR damper. A conventional MR damper is fabricated with the same dimensions (radius, length) of the piston and is experimentally compared to confirm advantages of the proposed MR damper. The mechanical performance of the proposed MR damper is experimentally investigated and compared with the results by mathematical model and finite element analysis. The research results show that the controllable damping force and equivalent damping of the MR damper with bifold flow mode gap are much larger than those of the conventional MR damper.

  20. GCFR thermal-hydraulic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Dalle Donne, M.; Gat, U.; Fenech, H.; Hanson, D.; Hudina, M.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic experimental studies performed and planned for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) core assemblies are described. The experiments consist of basic studies performed to obtain correlations, and bundle experiments which provide input for code validation and design verification. These studies have been performed and are planned at European laboratories, US national laboratories, Universities in the US, and at General Atomic Company

  1. Age- and position-related changes in hydraulic versus mechanical dysfunction of xylem: inferring the design criteria for Douglas-fir wood structure.

    PubMed

    Domec, J C; Gartner, B L

    2002-02-01

    We do not know why trees exhibit changes in wood characteristics as a function of cambial age. In part, the answer may lie in the existence of a tradeoff between hydraulic properties and mechanical support. In conifers, longitudinal tracheids represent 92% of the cells comprising the wood and are involved in both water transport and mechanical support. We used three hydraulic parameters to estimate hydraulic safety factors at several vertical and radial locations in the trunk and branches: vulnerability to cavitation; variation in xylem water potential (psi); and xylem relative water content. The hydraulic safety factors for 12 and 88 percent loss of conductivity (S(H12) and S(H88), representing the hydraulic safety factors for the air entry point and full embolism point, respectively) were determined. We also estimated the mechanical safety factor for maximum tree height and for buckling. We estimated the dimensionless hydraulic and mechanical safety factors for six seedlings (4 years old), six saplings (10 years old) and six mature trees (> 110 years old) of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco). Over the natural range of psi, S(H12) decreased linearly from treetop to a minimum of 0.95 at the tree base. Young and mature trees had S(H12) values 1.4 and 1.3 times higher, respectively, at their tips (juvenile wood) than at their bases (mature wood). Modeling analyses indicated that if trees were made entirely of mature wood, S(H12) at the stem base would be only 0.7. The mechanical safety factor was 1.2 times higher for the base of the tree than for the rest of the tree. The minimum mechanical safety factor-1.6 for the critical buckling height and 2.2 for the critical buckling load-occurred at the base of the live crown. Modeling analysis indicated that if trees were made only of mature wood, these values would increase to 1.7 and 2.3, respectively. Hydraulic safety factors had values that were less than half those for mechanical safety factors

  2. Hydraulic machine with non-uniform cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haluza, M.; Pochylý, F.; Habán, V.

    2012-11-01

    In this article is introduced the sentence of an extension of operational zone of hydraulic machines. The problems of its extending is based on the design of non-uniform cascade. The non-uniform cascade is connected with other factors. The change of own frequency of the runner of a hydraulic machine and pressure pulsations. The suitable construction of non-uniform cascade is introduced on the results of computational simulation and experiment.

  3. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  4. Automatic feature design for optical character recognition using an evolutionary search procedure.

    PubMed

    Stentiford, F W

    1985-03-01

    An automatic evolutionary search is applied to the problem of feature extraction in an OCR application. A performance measure based on feature independence is used to generate features which do not appear to suffer from peaking effects [17]. Features are extracted from a training set of 30 600 machine printed 34 class alphanumeric characters derived from British mail. Classification results on the training set and a test set of 10 200 characters are reported for an increasing number of features. A 1.01 percent forced decision error rate is obtained on the test data using 316 features. The hardware implementation should be cheap and fast to operate. The performance compares favorably with current low cost OCR page readers.

  5. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken.

  6. Downhole hydraulic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Gregory, Danny L.; Hardee, Harry C.; Smallwood, David O.

    1992-01-01

    A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

  7. Mid-sized omnidirectional robot with hydraulic drive and steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Carl G.; Perry, Trent; Cook, Douglas; Maxfield, Russell; Davidson, Morgan E.

    2003-09-01

    Through funding from the US Army-Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command's (TACOM) Intelligent Mobility Program, Utah State University's (USU) Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems (CSOIS) has developed the T-series of omni-directional robots based on the USU omni-directional vehicle (ODV) technology. The ODV provides independent computer control of steering and drive in a single wheel assembly. By putting multiple omni-directional (OD) wheels on a chassis, a vehicle is capable of uncoupled translational and rotational motion. Previous robots in the series, the T1, T2, T3, ODIS, ODIS-T, and ODIS-S have all used OD wheels based on electric motors. The T4 weighs approximately 1400 lbs and features a 4-wheel drive wheel configuration. Each wheel assembly consists of a hydraulic drive motor and a hydraulic steering motor. A gasoline engine is used to power both the hydraulic and electrical systems. The paper presents an overview of the mechanical design of the vehicle as well as potential uses of this technology in fielded systems.

  8. Using borehole flow logging to optimize hydraulic-test procedures in heterogeneous fractured aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, F.L.

    1995-01-01

    Hydraulic properties of heterogeneous fractured aquifers are difficult to characterize, and such characterization usually requires equipment-intensive and time-consuming applications of hydraulic testing in situ. Conventional coring and geophysical logging techniques provide useful and reliable information on the distribution of bedding planes, fractures and solution openings along boreholes, but it is often unclear how these locally permeable features are organized into larger-scale zones of hydraulic conductivity. New boreholes flow-logging equipment provides techniques designed to identify hydraulically active fractures intersecting boreholes, and to indicate how these fractures might be connected to larger-scale flow paths in the surrounding aquifer. Potential complications in interpreting flowmeter logs include: 1) Ambient hydraulic conditions that mask the detection of hydraulically active fractures; 2) Inability to maintain quasi-steady drawdowns during aquifer tests, which causes temporal variations in flow intensity to be confused with inflows during pumping; and 3) Effects of uncontrolled background variations in hydraulic head, which also complicate the interpretation of inflows during aquifer tests. Application of these techniques is illustrated by the analysis of cross-borehole flowmeter data from an array of four bedrock boreholes in granitic schist at the Mirror Lake, New Hampshire, research site. Only two days of field operations were required to unambiguously identify the few fractures or fracture zones that contribute most inflow to boreholes in the CO borehole array during pumping. Such information was critical in the interpretation of water-quality data. This information also permitted the setting of the available string of two packers in each borehole so as to return the aquifer as close to pre-drilling conditions as possible with the available equipment.

  9. The Pedagogical, Linguistic, and Content Features of Popular English Language Learning Websites in China: A Framework for Analysis and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettle, Margaret; Yuan, Yifeng; Luke, Allan; Ewing, Robyn; Shen, Huizhong

    2012-01-01

    As increasing numbers of Chinese language learners choose to learn English online, there is a need to investigate popular websites and their language learning designs. This paper reports on the first stage of a study that analyzed the pedagogical, linguistic, and content features of 25 Chinese English Language Learning (ELL) websites ranked…

  10. Designing Online Courses: A Taxonomy to Guide Strategic Use of Features Available in Course Management Systems (CMS) in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Ganesan, Radha

    2004-01-01

    Course developers can be distracted from applying sound instructional design principles by the amount of flexibility offered through online course development resources (Kidney & Puckett, "Quarterly Review of Distance Education," 4 (2003), 203-212). Distance education course management systems (CMS) provide multiple features that can be easily…

  11. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking.

    PubMed

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R; Nickel, Eric A; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users.

  12. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Eric A.; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users. PMID:28278172

  13. Novel assist feature design to improve depth of focus in low k1 EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hoyoung

    2009-12-01

    With the expected continual progress of micro-electronics scaling, low k1 techniques may be required even with EUV lithography. One of important techniques of low k1, the off axis illumination (OAI) in combination with sub-resolution assist features (SRAF) on reticles, has been used extensively in optical lithography. Use of assist features combined with off axis illumination typically requires extremely small pattern sizes. The assist pattern enables printing dense and isolated lines simultaneous. In a low k1 region of around 0.4, assist features will increase depth of focus (DOF) of isolated and semi-isolated lines even in EUV. Since EUVL process operates at a relatively higher k1 value than that for the optical lithography, the assist feature size needed is relatively smaller. In addition, with the mask shadowing effect of EUVL, all horizontal lines should be biased thinner by a couple of nanometers, and horizontal assist features will need to do the same. Fabricating such narrow features on masks is challenging, and could potentially limit the application of SRAF in EUVL in the low k1 regime. A novel approach is proposed to create assist features with similar width as the main critical dimension features. The proposed technique creates assist patterns using thinner absorber which would have higher reflectance than normal absorber. Thinner absorber assist pattern can perform similarly with narrower assist pattern and easier to fabricate. With off axis illumination in EUVL and assist patterns, process margin of semi-isolated and isolated lines can be increased for k1 lower than 0.4.

  14. Assessment of severe accident prevention and mitigation features: BWR (boiling water reactor), Mark I containment design

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, W.T.; Eltawila, F.; Perkins, K.R.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Luckas, W.J.; Lehner, J.R.; Davis, P.

    1988-07-01

    Plant features and operator actions, which have been found to be important in either preventing or mitigating severe accidents in BWRs with Mark I containments (BWR Mark I's) have been identified. These features and actions were developed from insights derived from reviews of in-depth risk assessments performed specifically for the Peach Bottom plant and from assessment of other relevant studies. Accident sequences that dominate the core-damage frequency and those accident sequences that are of potentially high consequence were identified. Vulnerabilities of the BWR Mark I to severe accident containment loads were also identified. In addition, those features of a BWR Mark I, which are important for preventing core damage and are available for mitigating fission-product release to the environment were also identified. This report is issued to provide focus to an analyst examining an individual plant. This report calls attention to plant features and operator actions and provides a list of deterministic attributes for assessing those features and actions found to be helpful in reducing the overall risk for Peach Bottom and other Mark I plants. Thus, the guidance is offered as a resource in examining the subject plant to determine if the same, or similar, plant features and operator actions will be of value in reducing overall plant risk. This report is intended to serve solely as guidance.

  15. Review of the design and performance features of hvdc systems connected to low short circuit ratio ac systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thallam, R.S. )

    1992-10-01

    The design and performance of an HVdc system is significantly impacted by the relative strength of the ac system to which it is connected. In this paper, design and performance features of ten HVdc systems are discussed. All of these systems are connected to ac systems that are relatively weak compared to the rating of the dc system. Six of these systems are back-to-back, two are overhead lines, and two are undersea cable connections. AC and dc system interaction problems and how they are addressed in the design and specification of each of these systems, are described.

  16. The design features of the body of the portable electrocardiograph «ECG-EXPRESS»

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seryakov, V.; Khmelevsky, Yu; Mamontov, G.

    2015-10-01

    The sequence of the industrial product shaping is specified, the main modeling characteristics of the configuration and some of its parts are designated subject to the electrocardiograph design and the technologies used for the production of its body.

  17. Trends in Culturally Relevant Interface Design Features for Latino Web Site Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachau, Lori L.; Hutchinson, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of published research on designing Web-based instruction for the adult U.S. Latino population. Instructional designers need guidance on how to design culturally relevant learning environments for this audience, particularly for Latino people from Mexican heritage. The authors used content analysis to investigate the extent to which…

  18. Simulation study to determine the impact of different design features on design efficiency in discrete choice experiments

    PubMed Central

    Vanniyasingam, Thuva; Cunningham, Charles E; Foster, Gary; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are routinely used to elicit patient preferences to improve health outcomes and healthcare services. While many fractional factorial designs can be created, some are more statistically optimal than others. The objective of this simulation study was to investigate how varying the number of (1) attributes, (2) levels within attributes, (3) alternatives and (4) choice tasks per survey will improve or compromise the statistical efficiency of an experimental design. Design and methods A total of 3204 DCE designs were created to assess how relative design efficiency (d-efficiency) is influenced by varying the number of choice tasks (2–20), alternatives (2–5), attributes (2–20) and attribute levels (2–5) of a design. Choice tasks were created by randomly allocating attribute and attribute level combinations into alternatives. Outcome Relative d-efficiency was used to measure the optimality of each DCE design. Results DCE design complexity influenced statistical efficiency. Across all designs, relative d-efficiency decreased as the number of attributes and attribute levels increased. It increased for designs with more alternatives. Lastly, relative d-efficiency converges as the number of choice tasks increases, where convergence may not be at 100% statistical optimality. Conclusions Achieving 100% d-efficiency is heavily dependent on the number of attributes, attribute levels, choice tasks and alternatives. Further exploration of overlaps and block sizes are needed. This study's results are widely applicable for researchers interested in creating optimal DCE designs to elicit individual preferences on health services, programmes, policies and products. PMID:27436671

  19. Control issues for a hydraulically powered dissimilar teleoperated system

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    This paper will address two issues associated with the implementation of a hydraulically powered dissimilar master-slave teleoperated system. These issues are the overall system control architecture and the design of robust hydraulic servo controllers for the position control problem. Finally, a discussion of overall system performance on an actual teleoperated system will be presented. (Schilling`s Titan II hydraulic manipulators are the slave manipulators and the master manipulators are from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory-developed Advanced Servo Manipulator.)

  20. Hydraulic fluid generator

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.P.; Tully, L.E.

    1981-08-18

    Two sources of water with a temperature differential of say 20/sup 0/F flow alternately through heat exchanger tubes to expand and contract a working liquid that has a high coefficient of thermal expansion, the whole working cycle being carried out below the boiling point of the working liquid. With check valves preventing reverse flow, the expansion and contraction of the working liquid provides a high pressure hydraulic output which may be used to drive a hydraulic motor. To provide substantially steady output flow, four banks of heat exchangers may be operated sequentially with hydraulic accumulator means smoothing out the flow pulsations. Each bank has a four-stage operating cycle and electrical circuitry controls the four banks simultaneously to cause the four different stages to occur in certain of the four different banks in staggered relation for producing a substantially constant overall hydraulic output.

  1. Hydraulic Actuator System for Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz; Althaus, Josef

    1991-01-01

    In the last ten years, several different types of actuators were developed and fabricated for active control of rotors. A special hydraulic actuator system capable of generating high forces to rotating shafts via conventional bearings is addressed. The actively controlled hydraulic force actuator features an electrohydraulic servo valve which can produce amplitudes and forces at high frequencies necessary for influencing rotor vibrations. The mathematical description will be given in detail. The experimental results verify the theoretical model. Simulations already indicate the usefulness of this compact device for application to a real rotor system.

  2. Portable Hydraulic Powerpack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. A.; Henry, R. L.; Fedor, O. H.; Owens, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Rechargeable hydraulic powerpack functions as lightweight, compact source of mechanical energy. Self-contained hydraulic powerpack derives energy from solid chemical charge. Combustion of charge initiated by small hammer, and revolving feeder replaces charges expended. Combustion gases cool during expansion in turbine and not too hot for release to atmosphere. Unit has applications driving wheelchairs and operating drills, winches, and other equipment in remote areas. Also replaces electric motors and internal-combustion engines as source of power in explosive atmospheres.

  3. Design Features Of K = 100 Cyclotron Magnet For ISOL RIB Production

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Ah; Gad, Kh. M. M.; Chai, Jong-Seo

    2011-06-01

    K = 100 Separated Sector Cyclotron was designed in conceptual for the ISOL driver. It has 4 separated sector magnets. Two SF cyclotrons will be used as the injectors for separated sector cyclotron. RF frequency is 70 MHz, 4th harmonics. We have designed sector magnet without trim and harmonic coils. Minimum radius of the magnet is 55 cm and maximum radius is 1.8 m. Designed magnets were calculated and simulated by OPERA 3D (TOSCA) code. Ion beam dynamics calculations have been done using particle studio code to prove the focusing properties of the designed magnets.

  4. Workshop on Instructional Features and Instructor/Operator Station Design for Training Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricard, G. L., Ed.; And Others

    These 19 papers review current research and development work related to the operation of the instructor's station of training systems, with emphasis on developing functional station specifications applicable to a variety of simulation-based training situations. Topics include (1) instructional features; (2) instructor/operator station research and…

  5. The Multi-Feature Hypothesis: Connectionist Guidelines for L2 Task Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moonen, Machteld; de Graaff, Rick; Westhoff, Gerard; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of task type on the retention and ease of activation of second language (L2) vocabulary, based on the multi-feature hypothesis (Moonen, De Graaff, & Westhoff, 2006). Two tasks were compared: a writing task and a list-learning task. It was hypothesized that performing the writing task would yield higher…

  6. One Feature of Adaptive Lesson Study in Thailand: Designing a Learning Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inprasitha, Maitree

    2011-01-01

    In Thailand, the Center for Research in Mathematics Education (CRME) has been implementing Japanese Lesson Study (LS) since 2002. An adaptive feature of this implementation was the incorporation of four phases of the Open Approach as a teaching approach within the three steps of the LS process. Four phases of this open approach are: 1) Posing…

  7. No Middle Ground, but Many Mansions: Design Features of Effective Mixed Mode Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, D. D.

    2007-01-01

    In this account a model of communicative functions is used in an attempt to clarify the nature of mixed mode learning delivery. Formulated in research on communication in written mode, the model can be seen to offer insights into the nature of hypermedia communication, as well as helping to identify some key features of effective mixed mode course…

  8. Packed tower program eases calculations for diameter, hydraulics of towers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrarca, C.A.

    1986-04-14

    A packed tower program will calculate the diameter and hydraulics of a packed tower, or check the hydraulics of an existing tower for other process conditions. It is written in simple BASIC for an IBM PC and could easily be converted to other PC's. There are approximately 100 statement lines, with memory requirement of approximately 4,100 bytes. The program is presented as an aid, or tool, to reduce tedious calculations in design or revision work. Much has already been written on the specifics of design methods and calculation procedures for packed towers. This article will cover only the program's procedure and calculation method, input requirements, output data, and features. The program first transforms the raw data into consistent units. Gas flow rate in pounds per hour is calculated from the input of standard cubic feet per minute and specific gravity, or moles per hour and molecular weight. Liquid flow rate in pounds per hour is calculated from the gallons per minute and specific gravity input. Using the temperature, pressure, compressibility, and molecular weight inputs, the gas density in pounds per cubic foot is calculated from the ideal gas law equation. Liquid density is calculated directly from the specific gravity. With this data, the program then calculates the ''x'' ordinate of the generalized flooding correlation for packed towers. Using regressed design curves of X vs. Y, which somewhat parallel the flooding curve, the program calculates the Y abscissa function which relates liquid and gas densities, gas mass velocity, packing factor, gravitational constant, and liquid viscosity.

  9. Design features of first of its kind AFBC high pressure boiler for Kutch lignite fuel in Gujarat, India

    SciTech Connect

    Diwakar, K.K.; Mokashi, A.H.

    1999-11-01

    Gujarat Heavy Chemicals Limited (GHCL) in Gujarat State in India is one of the largest manufacturers of Soda Ash with modern most technology from Akzo of Neitherland. GHCL with earlier experience of firing of kind of lignite on travagrate boiler and with converted fluidized bed boiler has very clearly identified the problem areas for review and with that rich experience awarded contract to Thermax Babcock and Wilcox Limited (TBW), Pune, India a joint venture company of Thermax Limited, Pune, India and Babcock and Wilcox, USA. Accordingly, boiler has been designed to suit Kutch Lignite and Coal with AFBC Technology, Single Drum Design, top supported with underbed feeding system. Capacity of boiler is 90 Ton/Hr with design pressure of 130 kg/cm{sup 2} with superheated steam temperature of 510 C. This is the first boiler in India with such a high pressure and temperature conditions for this capacity firing lignite. Other first of its kind features include single drum boiler convection bank made with headers and tubes, riffled inbed evaporator tubes, erosion protection by surface coating and not by studs, line bed system for inert material, no soot blowers, specially designed double hinged SS supports for inbed superheater coils etc. This boiler also has a provision of over fire air arrangement for better combustion split. Other unique features include the start-up arrangement by HSD burners which can take the boiler up to 30% load, provision for flue gas recirculation system, specially designed SS air distribution nozzles, separate compartments for under feed, ash drain and air cooled distribution plate with 1:5 turndown. The paper discusses all the above design features.

  10. Two decades (1993-2012) of adult intensive care unit design: a comparative study of the physical design features of the best practice examples.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, Critical Care Nursing Quarterly published a study of the physical design features of a set of best practice example adult intensive care units (ICUs). These adult ICUs were awarded between 1993 and 2003 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, and the American Institute of Architects/Academy of Architecture for Health for their efforts to promote the critical care unit environment through design. Since 2003, several more adult ICUs were awarded by the same organizations for similar efforts. This study includes these newer ICUs along with those of the previous study to cover a period of 2 decades from 1993 to 2012. Like the 2006 study, this study conducts a systematic content analysis of the materials submitted by the award-winning adult ICUs. On the basis of the analysis, the study compares the 1993-2002 and 2003-2012 adult ICUs in relation to construction type, unit specialty, unit layout, unit size, patient room size and design, support and service area layout, and family space design. The study also compares its findings with the 2010 Guidelines for Design and Construction of Health Care Facilities of the Facility Guidelines Institute and the 2012 Guidelines for Intensive Care Unit Design of the SCCM. The study indicates that the award-winning ICUs of both decades used several design features that were associated with positive outcomes in research studies. The study also indicates that the award-winning ICUs of the second decade used more evidence-based design features than those of the first decades. In most cases, these ICUs exceeded the requirements of the Facility Guidelines Institute Guidelines to meet those of the SCCM Guidelines. Yet, the award-winning ICUs of both decades also used several features that had very little or no supporting research evidence. Since they all were able to create an optimal critical care environment for which they were awarded, having knowledge of the physical

  11. The Design and Usage of the New Data Management Features in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamidi, P. R.; Brown, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    Two new data management features are installed in the April 1984 release of NASTRAN. These two features are the Rigid Format Data Base and the READFILE capability. The Rigid Format Data Base is stored on external files in card image format and can be easily maintained and expanded by the use of standard text editors. This data base provides the user and the NASTRAN maintenance contractor with an easy means for making changes to a Rigid Format or for generating new Rigid Formats without unnecessary compilations and link editing of NASTRAN. Each Rigid Format entry in the data base contains the Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP), along with the associated restart, DMAP sequence subset and substructure control flags. The READFILE capability allows an user to reference an external secondary file from the NASTRAN primary input file and to read data from this secondary file. There is no limit to the number of external secondary files that may be referenced and read.

  12. Optimization of hydraulic turbine diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, Prokop; Hliník, Juraj; Rudolf, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic turbine diffuser recovers pressure energy from residual kinetic energy on turbine runner outlet. Efficiency of this process is especially important for high specific speed turbines, where almost 50% of available head is utilized within diffuser. Magnitude of the coefficient of pressure recovery can be significantly influenced by designing its proper shape. Present paper focuses on mathematical shape optimization method coupled with CFD. First method is based on direct search Nelder-Mead algorithm, while the second method employs adjoint solver and morphing. Results obtained with both methods are discussed and their advantages/disadvantages summarized.

  13. Concept design and alternate arrangements of orbiter mid-deck habitability features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, R. A.; Ciciora, J. A.; Porter, K. L.; Stevenson, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    The evaluations and recommendations for habitability features in the space shuttle orbiter mid-deck are summarized. The orbiter mission plans, the mid-deck dimensions and baseline arrangements along with crew compliments and typical activities were defined. Female and male anthropometric data based on zero-g operations were also defined. Evaluations of baseline and alternate feasible concepts provided several recommendations which are discussed.

  14. Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) Facilities Sprinkler System Hydraulic Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    KERSTEN, J.K.

    2003-07-11

    The attached calculations demonstrate sprinkler system operational water requirements as determined by hydraulic analysis. Hydraulic calculations for the waste storage buildings of the Central Waste Complex (CWC), T Plant, and Waste Receiving and Packaging (WRAP) facility are based upon flow testing performed by Fire Protection Engineers from the Hanford Fire Marshal's office. The calculations received peer review and approval prior to release. The hydraulic analysis program HASS Computer Program' (under license number 1609051210) is used to perform all analyses contained in this document. Hydraulic calculations demonstrate sprinkler system operability based upon each individual system design and available water supply under the most restrictive conditions.

  15. Applying Switched Reluctance Motor to Oil Hydraulic Pump Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamai, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Yuzo; Ohyama, Kazunobu

    Hydraulic pump units are widely used to operate hydraulic actuators. In a typical machine shop, conventional constant speed hydraulic pump units consume more than 20% of the total electric power necessary to operate CNC machine tools. Most of that energy are wasted to run the axial piston pump at idle. This paper describes a variable speed hydraulic pump unit using a switched reluctance motor (SRM), which saves energy drastically. SRM was selected as the most suitable motor for this application. Design and control strategy of this motor are described. Application examples to machine tools shows the effectiveness of the new hybrid pump system in saving energy and in reducing acoustic noise.

  16. A Single-Vector Force Calibration Method Featuring the Modern Design of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. A.; Morton, M.; Draper, N.; Line, W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a new concept in force balance calibration. An overview of the state-of-the-art in force balance calibration is provided with emphasis on both the load application system and the experimental design philosophy. Limitations of current systems are detailed in the areas of data quality and productivity. A unique calibration loading system integrated with formal experimental design techniques has been developed and designated as the Single-Vector Balance Calibration System (SVS). This new concept addresses the limitations of current systems. The development of a quadratic and cubic calibration design is presented. Results from experimental testing are compared and contrasted with conventional calibration systems. Analyses of data are provided that demonstrate the feasibility of this concept and provide new insights into balance calibration.

  17. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  18. Conceptual design features of the Kalimer-600 sodium cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Dohee; Kim, Yeong-Il; Kim, Seong-O; Lee, Jae-Han; Lee, Yong-Bum; Jeong, Hae-Yong

    2007-07-01

    An advanced sodium cooled fast reactor concept, KALIMER-600, has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute to satisfy the Gen-IV technology goals of sustainability, safety and reliability, economics and proliferation resistance. The concept enables an efficient utilization of uranium resources and a reduction of the radioactive waste. The core design has been developed with a strong emphasis on a proliferation resistance by adopting a single enrichment fuel without blanket assemblies. In addition, a passive residual heat removal system, shortened intermediate heat-transport system piping and seismic isolation have been realized in the reactor system design as enhancements to its safety and economics. The inherent safety characteristics of the KALIMER-600 design were verified through a safety analysis of its bounding events. The results for various unprotected events imply that the KALIMER-600 design can accommodate all the analyzed ATWS events. This self-regulation capability of the power without a scram is mainly attributed to the inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms implemented in the metal fuel core design and completely passive decay heat removal system. (authors)

  19. An insight into the features of the OAO-C thermal design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, H.; Quadrini, J.; Ollendorf, S.

    1973-01-01

    The Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO)-C was successfully launched into a 400-nautical mile circular orbit on Aug. 21, 1972. For this spacecraft, a unique sensitivity approach to the thermal design was developed which resulted in a predictable design - the merits of which should be considered for application on future spacecraft. The OAO-C is also serving as a test bed for the evaluation of thermal control hardware. To provide flight data for space program applications, experiments for a new coating and four different heat pipe designs are on this spacecraft. The data derived from OAO-C will be extremely valuable for such future programs as the Large Space Telescope (LST) and the Earth Observation Satellite (EOS).

  20. Design Features Of Microfluidic Reactor For [18F]FDG Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. H.; Lee, B. N.; Nam, K. R.; Attla, G. A.; Lee, K. C.; Cjai, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Microfluidic reactor exhibits advantages for radiopharmaceutical synthesis. Microfluidic chips can reduce the time for radiosynthesis using tiny quantities of chemical compounds. It also has a good heat transfer, performance and provides an integrated system including synthesis, separation, and purification. These advantages make FDG production. So we have designed a microreactor chip which included the whole chemical processing; water evaporation, solvent exchange, radiofluorination and so on. It was designed by using a commercial 3D CAD modeling program CATIA V5, heat transfer performance was analyzed by ANSYS, and CFX was used for analyzing fluid performance. This paper described the design of FDG synthesis system on a microchip, the relevant locations of its parts, both heat and fluid performance efficiency analysis.

  1. Designing a robust feature extraction method based on optimum allocation and principal component analysis for epileptic EEG signal classification.

    PubMed

    Siuly, Siuly; Li, Yan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to design a robust feature extraction method for the classification of multiclass EEG signals to determine valuable features from original epileptic EEG data and to discover an efficient classifier for the features. An optimum allocation based principal component analysis method named as OA_PCA is developed for the feature extraction from epileptic EEG data. As EEG data from different channels are correlated and huge in number, the optimum allocation (OA) scheme is used to discover the most favorable representatives with minimal variability from a large number of EEG data. The principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to construct uncorrelated components and also to reduce the dimensionality of the OA samples for an enhanced recognition. In order to choose a suitable classifier for the OA_PCA feature set, four popular classifiers: least square support vector machine (LS-SVM), naive bayes classifier (NB), k-nearest neighbor algorithm (KNN), and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) are applied and tested. Furthermore, our approaches are also compared with some recent research work. The experimental results show that the LS-SVM_1v1 approach yields 100% of the overall classification accuracy (OCA), improving up to 7.10% over the existing algorithms for the epileptic EEG data. The major finding of this research is that the LS-SVM with the 1v1 system is the best technique for the OA_PCA features in the epileptic EEG signal classification that outperforms all the recent reported existing methods in the literature.

  2. Design features and operational characteristics of the Langley pilot transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A fan-driven transonic cryogenic tunnel was designed, and its purging, cooldown, and warmup times were determined satisfactory. Cooling with liquid nitrogen is at the power levels required for transonic testing. Good temperature distributions are obtained by using a simple nitrogen injection system.

  3. Experimental design applied to the formulation of lipsticks with particular features.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, F; Masiello, S; Bader, S; Guarneri, M; Vojnovic, D

    1998-08-01

    In our work a non-classical experimental design was applied to obtain lipsticks endowed with particular characteristics. Our aim was to formulate lipsticks that leave a brilliant and shiny colour application and have a transparent look. The emollient substances and the waxes (consistency factors) were identified as the main variables of the system. A two phase experimental strategy was thought out: the optimal quantities of consistency factors were selected using a Doehlert experimental matrix, whereas the correct mixtures of emollients were determined using a Scheffé simplex-centroid design. These two design were combined and a set of 49 experiments was obtained. The experiments carried out allowed the definition of a zone of two phases in which the objectives were attained: the correct types and appropriate quantities of emollients and waxes were determined. To find a possible correlation between some mixtures and the lipsticks' sensorial behaviour, differential scanning calorimetry was used. These results, in addition to those obtained using the experimental design allowed us to select the best lipstick formula. (c) Rapid Science Ltd. 1998.

  4. How to Personalize Learning in K-12 Schools: Five Essential Design Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Dabae

    2014-01-01

    Personalized learning (PL) is spotlighted as a way to transform K-12 educational systems. PL customizes learning pace, instructional methods, and learning content to individual students. As much as PL sounds promising and complex, little guidance is available to educators and policymakers about how to effectively design PL. Five essential features…

  5. Design Features of a Friendly Software Environment for Novice Programmers. Technical Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenstadt, Marc

    This paper describes the results of a 6-year period of design, implementation, testing, and iterative redesign of a programming language, user aids, and curriculum materials for use by psychology students learning how to write simple computer programs. The SOLO language, which was the resulting product, is primarily a simple, database…

  6. Design approach for systems with toroidal optical elements featuring a generalized Scheimpflug condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Peter; Eckstein, Johannes; Gao, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Toroidal elements are special aspheric elements with a missing axial section. Such elements consist of several refractive and/or reflective optical surfaces which are generally tilted with respect to a base ray. This base ray replaces the optical axis in ordinary centered systems. Toroidal elements can be efficiently applied e.g. in LED illumination systems or in optical metrology systems. For these elements there is a lack of design principles, only very few approaches like the Coddington equations are known. In this paper an efficient method is presented that facilitates the design when the requirement or knowledge of the orientation of the image plane is necessary, i.e. where a generalized Scheimpflug condition is needed. In more general terms, the method results in imaging properties of second order expansion, but the method itself is linear. Therefore, the complexity of the design process is considerably reduced. Additionally it is shown how the individual surfaces of the toroidal element can be easily aspherized for sharp imaging omitting tedious optimization. The strength of the design method is demonstrated for a novel application where a complex toroidal element is required for rotationally symmetric triangulation integrated in a vision systems and for a high aperture illumination element based on TIR for LEDs.

  7. Design features of first of its kind AFBC high pressure boiler for Kutch lignite fuel in Gujarat, India

    SciTech Connect

    Mokashi, A.; Diwakar, K.W.

    1998-07-01

    Gujarat Heavy Chemicals Ltd. (GHCL) of Gujarat State in India is one of the largest manufacturers of Soda Ash with modern technology from Akzo of the Netherlands. GHCL with earlier experience in firing lignite on a travagrate boiler and with a converted fluidized bed boiler has very clearly identified the problem area for review, and with that rich experience awarded a contract to Thermax Babcock and Wilcox Ltd. (TBW), Pune, India. Accordingly, a boiler has been designed to suit Kutch Lignite and coal with AFBC technology. This paper discusses the complete design of the boiler, effects of Kutch Lignite, its composition, thermal efficiency on coal as well as lignite, various performance parameters and guarantees, sizing arrangements of pressure parts, feeding arrangement and specially designed fluidizing bed combustor, various instrumentation and control loops. This paper discusses all the above features of this high-pressure boiler which can be an ideal boiler for the Kutch lignite fuel.

  8. Design features of a low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel for transition research at low supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; King, Lyndell S.; Reda, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel is being developed at NASA-Ames to support supersonic laminar flow control research at cruise Mach numbers of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The distinctive design features of this new quiet tunnel are a low-disturbance settling chamber, laminar boundary layers along the nozzle/test section walls, and steady supersonic diffuser flow. This paper discusses these important aspects of our quiet tunnel design and the studies necessary to support this design. Experimental results from an 1/8th-scale pilot supersonic wind tunnel are presented and discussed in association with theoretical predictions. Natural laminar flow on the test section walls is demonstrated and both settling chamber and supersonic diffuser performance is examined. The full-scale wind tunnel should be commissioned by the end of 1993.

  9. Preliminary Design Feature Alternatives and Discussion of Their Feasibility for a National Education Practice File. Products 1.4. and 1.5. [Volume II].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Gregory, Jr.

    This discussion of the alternative design features being considered for the National Education Practice File presents three design configurations for each feature, demonstrating how they differ and suggesting which is the most likely candidate for the pilot test based on utility benefits, technical feasibility, adherence to Federal Information…

  10. KJRR-FAI Hydraulic Flow Testing Input Package

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; D.B. Chapman

    2013-12-01

    The INL, in cooperation with the KAERI via Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA), undertook an effort in the latter half of calendar year 2013 to produce a conceptual design for the KJRR-FAI campaign. The outcomes of this effort are documented in further detail elsewhere [5]. The KJRR-FAI was designed to be cooled by the ATR’s Primary Coolant System (PCS) with no provision for in-pile measurement or control of the hydraulic conditions in the irradiation assembly. The irradiation assembly was designed to achieve the target hydraulic conditions via engineered hydraulic losses in a throttling orifice at the outlet of the irradiation vehicle.

  11. HYDRAULIC SERVO CONTROL MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Hussey, R.B.; Gottsche, M.J. Jr.

    1963-09-17

    A hydraulic servo control mechanism of compact construction and low fluid requirements is described. The mechanism consists of a main hydraulic piston, comprising the drive output, which is connected mechanically for feedback purposes to a servo control piston. A control sleeve having control slots for the system encloses the servo piston, which acts to cover or uncover the slots as a means of controlling the operation of the system. This operation permits only a small amount of fluid to regulate the operation of the mechanism, which, as a result, is compact and relatively light. This mechanism is particuiarly adaptable to the drive and control of control rods in nuclear reactors. (auth)

  12. Housing Stakeholder Preferences for the “Soft” Features of Sustainable and Healthy Housing Design in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Prochorskaite, Agne; Couch, Chris; Malys, Naglis; Maliene, Vida

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognised that the quantity and sustainability of new homes in the UK need to increase. However, it is important that sustainable housing is regarded holistically, and not merely in environmental terms, and incorporates elements that enhance the quality of life, health and well-being of its users. This paper focuses on the “soft” features of sustainable housing, that is, the non-technological components of sustainable housing and neighbourhood design that can impact occupants’ health and well-being. Aims of the study are to ascertain the relative level of importance that key housing stakeholders attach to these features and to investigate whether the opinions of housing users and housing providers are aligned with regards to their importance. An online survey was carried out to gauge the level of importance that the key stakeholders, such as housing users, local authorities, housing associations, and developers (n = 235), attach to these features. Results revealed that while suitable indoor space was the feature regarded as most important by all stakeholders, there were also a number of disparities in opinion between housing users and housing providers (and among the different types of providers). This implies a scope for initiatives to achieve a better alignment between housing users and providers. PMID:26751465

  13. Design and implementation of a vision-based hovering and feature tracking algorithm for a quadrotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Chahl, J. S.

    2016-10-01

    This paper demonstrates an approach to the vision-based control of the unmanned quadrotors for hover and object tracking. The algorithms used the Speed Up Robust Features (SURF) algorithm to detect objects. The pose of the object in the image was then calculated in order to pass the pose information to the flight controller. Finally, the flight controller steered the quadrotor to approach the object based on the calculated pose data. The above processes was run using standard onboard resources found in the 3DR Solo quadrotor in an embedded computing environment. The obtained results showed that the algorithm behaved well during its missions, tracking and hovering, although there were significant latencies due to low CPU performance of the onboard image processing system.

  14. Microfluidic parallel circuit for measurement of hydraulic resistance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungyoung; Lee, Myung Gwon; Park, Je-Kyun

    2010-08-31

    We present a microfluidic parallel circuit that directly compares the test channel of an unknown hydraulic resistance with the reference channel with a known resistance, thereby measuring the unknown resistance without any measurement setup, such as standard pressure gauges. Many of microfluidic applications require the precise transport of fluid along a channel network with complex patterns. Therefore, it is important to accurately characterize and measure the hydraulic resistance of each channel segment, and determines whether the device principle works well. However, there is no fluidic device that includes features, such as the ability to diagnose microfluidic problems by measuring the hydraulic resistance of a microfluidic component in microscales. To address the above need, we demonstrate a simple strategy to measure an unknown hydraulic resistance, by characterizing the hydraulic resistance of microchannels with different widths and defining an equivalent linear channel of a microchannel with repeated patterns of a sudden contraction and expansion.

  15. Design features and operational characteristics of the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Experience with the Langley 0.3 meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, which is fan driven, indicated that such a tunnel presents no unusual design difficulties and is simple to operate. Purging, cooldown, and warmup times were acceptable and were predicted with good accuracy. Cooling with liquid nitrogen was practical over a wide range of operating conditions at power levels required for transonic testing, and good temperature distributions were obtained by using a simple liquid nitrogen injection system. To take full advantage of the unique Reynolds number capabilities of the 0.3 meter transonic tunnel, it was designed to accommodate test sections other than the original, octagonal, three dimensional test section. A 20- by 60-cm two dimensional test section was recently installed and is being calibrated. A two dimensional test section with self-streamlining walls and a test section incorporating a magnetic suspension and balance system are being considered.

  16. Design Features and Initial RF Performance of a Gradient Hardened 17 GHz TW Linac Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    2009-01-22

    To avoid surface erosion damage and to assist in studying RF breakdown thresholds in 17 GHz TW linac structures, a gradient hardened structure has been fabricated with high temperature brazed and machined stainless steel surfaces located in the peak E-field region of the beam apertures and the peak H-field regions of the input coupler cavity. The microwave design parameters and physical dimensions of this 22 cavity, 120 degree phase advance structure were chosen to allow the high gradient performance to be compared against a similar design all-copper structure that has been tested in a dual ring, power recirculating amplifier system. The final design parameters of the gradient hardened structure are discussed; the influence of stainless steel RF losses on the power buildup of the resonant ring and on the structure gradient distribution are described; waveforms are shown of the unique ability of the power amplifier to rapidly quench RF breakdown discharges in the linac structure by automatically sensing and redirecting the RF source power to a matched load; and preliminary test results during high power RF processing of the gradient hardened linac structure are presented.

  17. Experimental and design experience with passive safety features of liquid metal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lucoff, D.M.; Waltar, A.E.; Sackett, J.I.; Salvatores, M.; Aizawa, K.

    1992-10-01

    Liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs) have already been demonstrated to be robust machines. Many reactor designers now believe that it is possible to include in this technology sufficient passive safety that LMRs would be able to survive loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and transient overpower events, even if the plant protective system fails completely and do so without damage to the core. Early whole-core testing in Rapsodie, EBR-II. and FFTF indicate such designs may be possible. The operational safety testing program in EBR-II is demonstrating benign response of the reactor to a full range of controls failures. But additional testing is needed if transient core structural response under major accident conditions is to be properly understood. The proposed international Phase IIB passive safety tests in FFTF, being designed with a particular emphasis on providing, data to understand core bowing extremes, and further tests planned in EBR-II with processed IFR fuel should provide a substantial and unique database for validating the computer codes being used to simulate postulated accident conditions.

  18. Five features of value-based insurance design plans were associated with higher rates of medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Niteesh K; Fischer, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin F; Brill, Gregory; Girdish, Charmaine; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H

    2014-03-01

    Value-based insurance design (VBID) plans selectively lower cost sharing to increase medication adherence. Existing plans have been structured in a variety of ways, and these variations could influence the effectiveness of VBID plans. We evaluated seventy-six plans introduced by a large pharmacy benefit manager during 2007-10. We found that after we adjusted for the other features and baseline trends, VBID plans that were more generous, targeted high-risk patients, offered wellness programs, did not offer disease management programs, and made the benefit available only for medication ordered by mail had a significantly greater impact on adherence than plans without these features. The effects were as large as 4-5 percentage points. These findings can provide guidance for the structure of future VBID plans.

  19. Nonelastomeric Rod Seals for Advanced Hydraulic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hady, W. F.; Waterman, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    Advanced high temperature hydraulic system rod sealing requirements can be met by using seals made of nonelastomeric (plastic) materials in applications where elastomers do not have adequate life. Exploratory seal designs were optimized for advanced applications using machinable polyimide materials. These seals demonstrated equivalent flight hour lives of 12,500 at 350 F and 9,875 at 400 F in advanced hydraulic system simulation. Successful operation was also attained under simulated space shuttle applications; 96 reentry thermal cycles and 1,438 hours of vacuum storage. Tests of less expensive molded plastic seals indicated a need for improved materials to provide equivalent performance to the machined seals.

  20. Analysis of mobile phone design features affecting radiofrequency power absorbed in a human head phantom.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Sven; Kelsh, Michael A; Kuster, Niels; Sheppard, Asher R; Shum, Mona

    2013-09-01

    The US FCC mandates the testing of all mobile phones to demonstrate compliance with the rule requiring that the peak spatial SAR does not exceed the limit of 1.6 W/kg averaged over any 1 g of tissue. These test data, measured in phantoms with mobile phones operating at maximum antenna input power, permitted us to evaluate the variation in SARs across mobile phone design factors such as shape and antenna design, communication technology, and test date (over a 7-year period). Descriptive statistical summaries calculated for 850 MHz and 1900 MHz phones and ANOVA were used to evaluate the influence of the foregoing factors on SARs. Service technology accounted for the greatest variability in compliance test SARs that ranged from AMPS (highest) to CDMA, iDEN, TDMA, and GSM (lowest). However, the dominant factor for SARs during use is the time-averaged antenna input power, which may be much less than the maximum power used in testing. This factor is largely defined by the communication system; e.g., the GSM phone average output can be higher than CDMA by a factor of 100. Phone shape, antenna type, and orientation of a phone were found to be significant but only on the order of up to a factor of 2 (3 dB). The SAR in the tilt position was significantly smaller than for touch. The side of the head did not affect SAR levels significantly. Among the remaining factors, external antennae produced greater SARs than internal ones, and brick and clamshell phones produced greater SARs than slide phones. Assuming phone design and usage patterns do not change significantly over time, we have developed a normalization procedure and formula that permits reliable prediction of the relative SAR between various communication systems. This approach can be applied to improve exposure assessment in epidemiological research.

  1. Application of Fraunhofer diffraction theory to feature-specific detector design.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J A; Wheeless, L L

    1977-07-01

    Light scatter from epithelial cells in a slit-scan flow system is modeled using the Fraunhofer condition of scalar diffraction theory. Power spectra are calculated for successive positions of model cells in the line focus of a laser beam with a Fourier transform computer program. Using the calculated power spectra, detector configurations are designed to detect specific cell structures of interest. Detector configurations are tested in a static slit-scan scatter apparatus. Data indicating the ability to detect boundaries and cell orientation are discussed.

  2. Immunological Features of Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Caused Pneumonia—Implications for Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2017-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the causative agent for high rates of hospitalizations due to viral bronchiolitis and pneumonia worldwide. Such a disease is characterized by an infection of epithelial cells of the distal airways that leads to inflammation and subsequently to respiratory failure. Upon infection, different pattern recognition receptors recognize the virus and trigger the innate immune response against the hRSV. Further, T cell immunity plays an important role for virus clearance. Based on animal studies, it is thought that the host immune response to hRSV is based on a biased T helper (Th)-2 and Th17 T cell responses with the recruitment of T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils to the lung, causing inflammation and tissue damage. In contrast, human immunity against RSV has been shown to be more complex with no definitive T cell polarization profile. Nowadays, only a humanized monoclonal antibody, known as palivizumab, is available to protect against hRSV infection in high-risk infants. However, such treatment involves several injections at a significantly high cost. For these reasons, intense research has been focused on finding novel vaccines or therapies to prevent hRSV infection in the population. Here, we comprehensively review the recent literature relative to the immunological features during hRSV infection, as well as the new insights into preventing the disease caused by this virus. PMID:28273842

  3. Microbial effect on soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Alex; Rosenzweig, Ravid; Volk, Elazar; Rosenkranz, Hella; Iden, Sascha; Durner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Although largely ignored, the soil contains large amount of biofilms (attached microbes) that can affect many processes. While biochemical processes are studied, biophysical processes receive only little attention. Biofilms may occupy some of the pore space, and by that affect the soil hydraulic properties. This effect on unsaturated soils, however, was not intensively studied. In this research we directly measure the hydraulic properties, namely the soil's unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function and retention curve, for soils containing real biofilm. To do that we inoculate soil with biofilm-forming bacteria and incubate it with sufficient amounts of nutrient until biofilm is formed. The hydraulic properties of the incubated soil are then measured using several techniques, including multi-step outflow and evaporation method. The longer measurements (evaporation method) are conducted under refrigeration conditions to minimize microbial activity during the experiment. The results show a clear effect of the biofilm, where the biofilm-affected soil (sandy loam in our case) behaves like a much finer soil. This qualitatively makes sense as the biofilm generates an effective pore size distribution that is characterized by smaller pores. However, the effect is much more complex and needs to be studied carefully considering (for example) dual porosity models. We compare our preliminary results with other experiments, including flow-through column experiments and experiments with biofilm analogues. Clearly a better understanding of the way microbial activity alters the hydraulic properties may help designing more efficient bioremediation, irrigation, and other soil-related processes.

  4. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2. UNIT IX, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS--HYDRAULIC SYSTEM (PART I).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 25-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OIL FLOW WITHIN HYDRAULIC TRANSMISSIONS USED ON DIESEL POWERED VEHICLES. TOPICS ARE GENERAL DESCRIPTION, HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS, AND BRAKE HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT AND OPERATION. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMED TRAINING FILM "LEARNING ABOUT THE ALLISON…

  5. Integration in Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sworder, Steven C.

    This paper presents an application of integration to the field of hydraulics. An integral relation for the time required to drop the fluid contained in a cylindrical tank from one level to another using a hole in the tank wall is derived. Procedures for constructing the experimental equipment and procedures for determining the coefficient of…

  6. Small hydraulic turbine drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Turbine, driven by the fluid being pumped, requires no external controls, is completely integrated into the flow system, and has bearings which utilize the main fluid for lubrication and cooling. Torque capabilities compare favorably with those developed by positive displacement hydraulic motors.

  7. Design and experimental evaluation of a tactile display featuring magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Min; Oh, Jong-Seok; Kim, Jin-Kuy; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel type of tactile display utilizing magnetorheological (Mr) fluid which can be applied to a robotic system in minimally invasive surgery to provide a surgeon with tactile information on remote biological tissues or organs. As a first step, an actuation mechanism for tactile function is devised utilizing the Mr fluid with a pin array mechanism. Based on the force responses of a human body, the tactile display is appropriately designed and a magnetic analysis is carried out to determine the design parameters using the finite element method. After evaluating the field-dependent force characteristics of the manufactured tactile display, a feed-forward control algorithm based on fuzzy logic is formulated to obtain the desired palpation force. Control performance is demonstrated via palpation force evaluation and psychophysical evaluation. In the results, the actual repulsive forces agreed well with the desired forces and the averaged relative error was less than 1.3%. In addition, the volunteers successfully recognized tactility with a favorable rating value of 3.36 on a five-point scale.

  8. Cradle modification for hydraulic ram

    SciTech Connect

    Koons, B.M.

    1995-03-02

    The analysis of the cradle hydraulic system considers stress, weld strength, and hydraulic forces required to lift and support the cradle/pump assembly. The stress and weld strength of the cradle modifications is evaluated to ensure that they meet the requirements of the American Institute for Steel Construction (AISC 1989). The hydraulic forces are evaluated to ensure that the hydraulic system is capable of rotating the cradle and pump assembly to the vertical position (between 70{degrees} and 90{degrees}).

  9. Design and operating features of the high-level waste vitrification system for the West Valley demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Beary, M.M.; Barnes, S.M.; Berger, D.N.; Brouns, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Jones, R.M.; Peters, R.D.; Peterson, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    A liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melter system is the reference process for immobilization of the high-level liquid waste in the US and several foreign countries. This system has been under development for over ten years at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other national laboratories operated for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributed to this research through its Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and used applicable data to design and test melters and related systems using remote handling of simulated radioactive wastes. This report describes the equipment designed in support of the high-level waste vitrification program at West Valley, New York. Pacific Northwest Laboratory worked closely with West Valley Nuclear Services Company to design a liquid-fed ceramic melter, a liquid waste preparation and feed tank and pump, an off-gas treatment scrubber, and an enclosed turntable for positioning the waste canisters. Details of these designs are presented including the rationale for the design features and the alternatives considered.

  10. Hydraulic catworks system

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.

    1981-03-03

    A hydraulic catworks system is described for use on a well drilling rig for making up and breaking out a drill string which includes a hydraulic makeup piston and cylinder assembly for actuating a makeup line connected to the makeup tongs, and a breakout piston and cylinder assembly connected to a breakout line for actuating the breakout tongs. A makeup hydraulic control valve controls hydraulic fluid to first and second lines connected to the makeup assembly with the first line connected for extending the makeup line and the second line connected for retracting the makeup line. A breakout hydraulic control valve controls fluid to third and fourth lines with the third line connected for extending the breakout line and the fourth line connected for retracting the breakout line. Manual air control means are provided for selectively actuating the makeup and breakout control valves. A variable pressure control is connected to the second line for controlling the makeup torque. Preferably, the makeup and breakout assemblies are vertically connected to the legs of the drilling rig and rollers are positioned horizontally with the makeup and breakout tongs and connected to the breakout and makeup lines. Preferably, a sheave is connected to the makeup assembly and the makeup line passes over the sheave with its free end fixedly secured. A re-generative system is provided on the makeup assembly for increasing the speed of the makeup line extension. Preferably the makeup and breakout cylinders are of the same cross-sectional area with the stroke of the breakout cylinder being less than the stroke of the makeup cylinder.

  11. Design features of the solenoid magnets for the central cell of the MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlwend, J.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-10-23

    The 14 superconducting solenoid magnets which form the central cell of the MFTF-B are being designed and fabricated by General Dynamics for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each solenoid coil has a mean diameter of five meters and contains 600 turns of a proven conductor type. Structural loading resulting from credible fault events, cooldown and warmup requirements, and manufacturing processes consistent with other MFTF-B magnets have been considered in the selection of 304 LN as the structural material for the magnet. The solenoid magnets are connected by 24 intercoil beams and 20 solid struts which resist the longitudinal seismic and electromagnetic attractive forces and by 24 hanger/side supports which react magnet dead weight and seismic loads. A modular arrangement of two solenoid coils within a vacuum vessel segment allow for sequential checkout and installation.

  12. The importance of study design for detecting differentially abundant features in high-throughput experiments.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huaien; Li, Juntao; Chia, Burton Kuan Hui; Robson, Paul; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2014-12-03

    High-throughput assays, such as RNA-seq, to detect differential abundance are widely used. Variable performance across statistical tests, normalizations, and conditions leads to resource wastage and reduced sensitivity. EDDA represents a first, general design tool for RNA-seq, Nanostring, and metagenomic analysis, that rationally selects tests, predicts performance, and plans experiments to minimize resource wastage. Case studies highlight EDDA's ability to model single-cell RNA-seq, suggesting ways to reduce sequencing costs up to five-fold and improving metagenomic biomarker detection through improved test selection. EDDA's novel mode-based normalization for detecting differential abundance improves robustness by 10% to 20% and precision by up to 140%.

  13. Innovative Structural Design Features for a 10 m Solar Sail Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, G.; Moore, J.; Clayton, W.

    2004-01-01

    The successful development of sail architectures will require careful attention to a number of key issues including but not limited to material strength issues, stress conditions for the membrane, load interactions between membrane and structure, and membrane material planarity. Along with the inherent challenges of fabricating and handling very large membrane structures these issues will pose real challenges for the near-term development of practical sail technologies. SRS has developed innovative technologies that deal directly with the challenges of developing very large sail membranes. Some of these technologies include edge reinforcements and innovative reinforcement attachment techniques, production of flight durable sail materials of less than 2.5 micron thicknesses and large scale fabrication techniques. SRS has employed these technologies in several large 10 m demonstrators that have been delivered to LaRC for solar vacuum testing. Details of the design of this system will be discussed.

  14. Elucidating features that drive the design of selective antifolates using crystal structures of human dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Kristen M; G-Dayanandan, Narendran; Wright, Dennis L; Anderson, Amy C

    2013-10-15

    The pursuit of antimicrobial drugs that target dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) exploits differences in sequence and dynamics between the pathogenic and human enzymes. Here, we present five crystal structures of human DHFR bound to a new class of antimicrobial agents, the propargyl-linked antifolates (PLAs), with a range of potency (IC50 values of 0.045-1.07 μM) for human DHFR. These structures reveal that interactions between the ligands and Asn 64, Phe 31, and Phe 34 are important for increased affinity for human DHFR and that loop residues 58-64 undergo ligand-induced conformational changes. The utility of these structural studies was demonstrated through the design of three new ligands that reduce the number of contacts with Asn 64, Phe 31, and Phe 34. Synthesis and evaluation show that one of the designed inhibitors exhibits the lowest affinity for human DHFR of any of the PLAs (2.64 μM). Comparisons of structures of human and Staphylococcus aureus DHFR bound to the same PLA reveal a conformational change in the ligand that enhances interactions with residues Phe 92 (Val 115 in huDHFR) and Ile 50 (Ile 60 in huDHFR) in S. aureus DHFR, yielding selectivity. Likewise, comparisons of human and Candida glabrata DHFR bound to the same ligand show that hydrophobic interactions with residues Ile 121 and Phe 66 (Val 115 and Asn 64 in human DHFR) yield selective inhibitors. The identification of residue substitutions that are important for selectivity and the observation of active site flexibility will help guide antimicrobial antifolate development for the inhibition of pathogenic species.

  15. Performances of a balanced hydraulic motor with planetary gear train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongying; Luo, Changjie; Wang, Huimin

    2012-07-01

    The current research of a balanced hydraulic motor focuses on the characteristics of the motor with three planet gears. References of a balanced hydraulic motor with more than three planet gears are hardly found. In order to study the characteristics of a balanced hydraulic motor with planetary gear train that includes more than three planet gears, on the basis of analysis of the structure and working principle of a balanced hydraulic motor with planetary gear train, formulas are deduced for calculating the hydraulic motor's primary performance indexes such as displacement, unit volume displacement, flowrate fluctuation ratio, etc. Influences of the gears' tooth number on displacement and flowrate characteristics are analyzed. In order to guarantee the reliability of sealing capability, the necessary conditions that tooth number of the sun gear and the planet gears should satisfy are discussed. Selecting large unit volume displacement and small displacement fluctuation ratio as designing objectives, a balanced hydraulic motor with three planet gears and a common gear motor are designed under the conditions of same displacement, tooth addendum coefficien and clearance coefficient. By comparing the unit volume displacement and fluctuation ratio of the two motors, it can be seen that the balanced hydraulic motor with planetary gear train has the advantages of smaller fluctuation ratio and larger unit volume displacement. The results provide theoretical basis for choosing gear tooth-number of this kind of hydraulic motor.

  16. The Menu of Features that Define Primary MicroRNAs and Enable De Novo Design of MicroRNA Genes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenwen; Bartel, David P

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs processed from stem-loop regions of primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs), with the choice of stem loops for initial processing largely determining what becomes a miRNA. To identify sequence and structural features influencing this choice, we determined cleavage efficiencies of >50,000 variants of three human pri-miRNAs, focusing on the regions intractable to previous high-throughput analyses. Our analyses revealed a mismatched motif in the basal stem region, a preference for maintaining or improving base pairing throughout the remainder of the stem, and a narrow stem-length preference of 35 ± 1 base pairs. Incorporating these features with previously identified features, including three primary-sequence motifs, yielded a unifying model defining mammalian pri-miRNAs in which motifs help orient processing and increase efficiency, with the presence of more motifs compensating for structural defects. This model enables generation of artificial pri-miRNAs, designed de novo, without reference to any natural sequence yet processed more efficiently than natural pri-miRNAs.

  17. Design features of a proposed insecticidal sugar trap for biting midges.

    PubMed

    Cohnstaedt, Lee William; Snyder, Darren

    2016-09-30

    Insecticidal sugar baits for mosquitoes and house ies have proven e cacy to reduce insect populations and consequently, disease transmission rates. The new insecticidal sugar trap (IST) is designed speci cally for controlling biting midge disease vector populations around livestock and near larval habitats. The trap operates by combining light-emitting diode (LED) technology with insecticidal sugar baits. The positive photo attraction of Culicoides elicited by the LEDs, draws the insects to the insecticidal sugar bait, which can be made from various commercial insecticide formulations (pyrethroids, neonicotinoids, etc.) or naturally derived formulations (boric acid, garlic oil, etc.) lethal to Culicoides. Insecticidal sugar trap advantages include: customizable LED lights, they can be used with several di erent oral insecticides that have di erent modes of action to help combat the evolution of pesticide resistance, screening on the trap reduces non-target insect feeding (for example bees and butter ies), targets males and females of the species because both must feed on sugar, and low energy LEDs and a solar panel reduce trap maintenance to re lling sugar baits, rather than replacing batteries. This article discusses key components of an IST, which increase the traps e ectiveness for biting midge control.

  18. Compressed air piping, 241-SY-101 hydraulic pump retrieval trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.R.

    1994-12-12

    The following Design Analysis was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company to determine pressure losses in the compressed air piping installed on the hydraulic trailer for the 241-SY-101 pump retrieval mission.

  19. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified tritium hydride bed development, Part 2 - Experimental validation of key conceptual design features

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, K.J.; Morgan, G.A.

    2015-03-15

    The Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed is an interim replacement for the first generation (Gen1) process hydride beds currently in service in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facilities. 3 new features are implemented in the TECH Mod hydride bed prototype: internal electric cartridge heaters, porous divider plates, and copper foam discs. These modifications will enhance bed performance and reduce costs by improving bed activation and installation processes, in-bed accountability measurements, end-of-life bed removal, and He-3 recovery. A full-scale hydride bed test station was constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in order to evaluate the performance of the prototype TECH Mod hydride bed. Controlled hydrogen (H{sub 2}) absorption/ desorption experiments were conducted to validate that the conceptual design changes have no adverse effects on the gas transfer kinetics or H{sub 2} storage/release properties compared to those of the Gen1 bed. Inert gas expansions before, during, and after H{sub 2} flow tests were used to monitor changes in gas transfer rates with repeated hydriding/de-hydriding of the hydride material. The gas flow rates significantly decreased after initial hydriding of the material; however, minimal changes were observed after repeated cycling. The data presented herein confirm that the TECH Mod hydride bed would be a suitable replacement for the Gen1 bed with the added enhancements expected from the advanced design features. (authors)

  20. Towards the improved discovery and design of functional peptides: common features of diverse classes permit generalized prediction of bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Catherine; Haslam, Niall J; Pollastri, Gianluca; Shields, Denis C

    2012-01-01

    The conventional wisdom is that certain classes of bioactive peptides have specific structural features that endow their particular functions. Accordingly, predictions of bioactivity have focused on particular subgroups, such as antimicrobial peptides. We hypothesized that bioactive peptides may share more general features, and assessed this by contrasting the predictive power of existing antimicrobial predictors as well as a novel general predictor, PeptideRanker, across different classes of peptides.We observed that existing antimicrobial predictors had reasonable predictive power to identify peptides of certain other classes i.e. toxin and venom peptides. We trained two general predictors of peptide bioactivity, one focused on short peptides (4-20 amino acids) and one focused on long peptides (> 20 amino acids). These general predictors had performance that was typically as good as, or better than, that of specific predictors. We noted some striking differences in the features of short peptide and long peptide predictions, in particular, high scoring short peptides favour phenylalanine. This is consistent with the hypothesis that short and long peptides have different functional constraints, perhaps reflecting the difficulty for typical short peptides in supporting independent tertiary structure.We conclude that there are general shared features of bioactive peptides across different functional classes, indicating that computational prediction may accelerate the discovery of novel bioactive peptides and aid in the improved design of existing peptides, across many functional classes. An implementation of the predictive method, PeptideRanker, may be used to identify among a set of peptides those that may be more likely to be bioactive.

  1. An Approach to automatically optimize the Hydraulic performance of Blade System for Hydraulic Machines using Multi-objective Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xide; Chen, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xiang; Lei, Mingchuan

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an approach to automatic hydraulic optimization of hydraulic machine's blade system combining a blade geometric modeller and parametric generator with automatic CFD solution procedure and multi-objective genetic algorithm. In order to evaluate a plurality of design options and quickly estimate the blade system's hydraulic performance, the approximate model which is able to substitute for the original inside optimization loop has been employed in the hydraulic optimization of blade by using function approximation. As the approximate model is constructed through the database samples containing a set of blade geometries and their resulted hydraulic performances, it can ensure to correctly imitate the real blade's performances predicted by the original model. As hydraulic machine designers are accustomed to do design with 2D blade profiles on stream surface that are then stacked to 3D blade geometric model in the form of NURBS surfaces, geometric variables to be optimized were defined by a series profiles on stream surfaces. The approach depends on the cooperation between a genetic algorithm, a database and user defined objective functions and constraints which comprises hydraulic performances, structural and geometric constraint functions. Example covering optimization design of a mixed-flow pump impeller is presented.

  2. Energy harvesting from hydraulic pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunefare, K. A.; Skow, E. A.; Erturk, A.; Savor, J.; Verma, N.; Cacan, M. R.

    2013-02-01

    State-of-the-art hydraulic hose and piping systems employ integral sensor nodes for structural health monitoring to avoid catastrophic failures. Energy harvesting in hydraulic systems could enable self-powered wireless sensor nodes for applications such as energy-autonomous structural health monitoring and prognosis. Hydraulic systems inherently have a high energy intensity associated with the mean pressure and flow. Accompanying the mean pressure is the dynamic pressure ripple, which is caused by the action of pumps and actuators. Pressure ripple is a deterministic source with a periodic time-domain behavior conducive to energy harvesting. An energy harvester prototype was designed for generating low-power electricity from pressure ripples. The prototype employed an axially-poled off-the-shelf piezoelectric stack. A housing isolated the stack from the hydraulic fluid while maintaining a mechanical coupling allowing for dynamic-pressure-induced deflection of the stack. The prototype exhibited an off-resonance energy harvesting problem since the fundamental resonance of the piezoelectric stack was much higher than the frequency content of the pressure ripple. The prototype was designed to provide a suitable power output for powering sensors with a maximum output of 1.2 mW. This work also presents electromechanical model simulations and experimental characterization of the piezoelectric power output from the pressure ripple in terms of the force transmitted into the harvester.

  3. [Effect of water depths on hydraulic performance of pond wetlands].

    PubMed

    Guo, Chang-Qiang; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jun-Jie; Liu, Chun-Guo; Feng, Da-Peng; Liu, Fang-Ping

    2014-11-01

    Pond wetlands have been widely used in the treatment of drainage water from paddy fields. However, wetland hydraulic performance and purification effects are affected by many factors, such as water depth, flow rate, aspect ratio and vegetation distribution, and the better understanding of these factors would be helpful to improve the quality of wetland design, operation and management. This paper analyzed the effect of three different water depths (20, 40 and 60 cm) on the hydraulic performance of pond wetland through the dye tracer experiments with Rhodamine WT. The hydraulic indices, i. e., effective volume ratio, nominal serial complete mixing tanks (N), hydraulic efficiency (λ), were selected for analysis through the hydraulic residence time distribution (RTD) curve. The results showed that the effective volume rate rose from 0.421 to 0.844 and the hydraulic efficiency from 0.281 to 0.604 when the water depth declined from 60 cm to 20 cm. This indicated that the wetland hydraulic performance improved as the water depth decreased. In addition, the hydraulic performance of the first half of the wetland was significantly better than that of the second half. The flow regime of the first half approached complete mixing because of the mixing index (N) approaching 1 and its effective volume rate was above 0.9 when the water depth was relatively low (20 and 40 cm). The normalized RTD curves demonstrated a good agreement between moment analysis parameters and hydraulic parameters, and a great consistency between the hydraulic parameters and moment index which was not affected by tail truncation error. The experimental study concluded that a lower water depth was favorable to improve the hydraulic performance of pond wetlands.

  4. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  5. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  6. The hydraulic windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browing, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    An hydraulic windmill is described. It pumps pressurized oil from rotor shaft level to the ground where a motor generator produces electricity. Alternatively, the useful output may be heat. Rotor speed is governed by a flow valve. Over pressure, the result of high wind velocity, rotates the tail to move the rotor blades out-of-the-wind. Loss of oil pressure causes a brake to close as well as to swing the tail to its maximum distance from the rotor plane.

  7. Hydraulic Actuator Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    Hydraulic Actuator Project Stakeholder meeting held 7- 8 October in Los Angeles; 58 attendees representing aircraft and actuator OEMs, seal...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Research Laboratory,4555 Overlook Ave., SW ,Washington,DC,20375 8 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8 -98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Actuator JTP: Coupon Testing Substrate

  8. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  9. Roller follower hydraulic tappet

    SciTech Connect

    Buente, S.M.; Clark, D.P.

    1986-08-26

    A hydraulic lash adjusting tappet is described for use in the valve gear of an internal combustion engine comprising: (a) body means having the outer periphery thereof adapted for sliding movement in a bore provided in the engine, the bore of the type supplied by an oil passage communicating therewith; (b) roller follower means rotatably received on one end of the body means, the roller follower means adapted for rolling contact with an engine camshaft; (c) registration surface means adapted for moveable registration thereagainst comprising at least one especially configured surface formed on the body means remote from the follower means and adapted for registration thereagainst for orienting the body means in the bore for ensuring proper alignment of the roller means with the engine camshaft; (d) plunger means, including hydraulic lash adjusting means, the plunger means moveably received in a cavity formed in the body means, the plunger formed to interfit the cavity so as to form a hydraulic pressure chamber and define precision leakdown surfaces.

  10. Hydraulic friction heat generator

    SciTech Connect

    McMurtry, R.V.

    1987-08-11

    A hydraulic friction heat generator filled with hydraulic heat transfer fluid is described which consists of: a cylindrical housing with a central axis through its interior and with end plates generally normal to the central axis, the generator having an inlet conduit means and an outlet conduit means located at opposite ends of the cylindrical housing thereof; a drive shaft bearingly mounted in each of the end plates in coaxial alignment with the central axis and passing through one of the end plates to extend outwardly therefrom; an external power source joined to the extended shaft for rotating the shaft; and smooth-surfaced thin discs with outer generally annular peripheral edges closely-spaced from the inner wall of the cylindrical housing, the discs being fixedly mounted in axially spaced relationship on the drive shaft to be rotated thereby in a single direction, with no stationary elements interposed between the discs, each disc having at least two radially-oriented slits partially transecting the disc to extend inward from the disc peripheral edges, and the discs having a portion of each disc on one side of the slit feathered outward from the plane of the disc to form a vane for turbulently forcing the hydraulic fluid axially toward the outlet conduit means.

  11. Optimal design of high damping force engine mount featuring MR valve structure with both annular and radial flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper focuses on the optimal design of a compact and high damping force engine mount featuring magnetorheological fluid (MRF). In the mount, a MR valve structure with both annular and radial flows is employed to generate a high damping force. First, the configuration and working principle of the proposed MR mount is introduced. The MRF flows in the mount are then analyzed and the governing equations of the MR mount are derived based on the Bingham plastic behavior of the MRF. An optimal design of the MR mount is then performed to find the optimal structure of the MR valve to generate a maximum damping force with certain design constraints. In addition, the gap size of MRF ducts is empirically chosen considering the ‘lockup’ problem of the mount at high frequency. Performance of the optimized MR mount is then evaluated based on finite element analysis and discussions on performance results of the optimized MR mount are given. The effectiveness of the proposed MR engine mount is demonstrated via computer simulation by presenting damping force and power consumption.

  12. The Identification, Implementation, and Evaluation of Critical User Interface Design Features of Computer-Assisted Instruction Programs in Mathematics for Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, You-Jin; Woo, Honguk

    2010-01-01

    Critical user interface design features of computer-assisted instruction programs in mathematics for students with learning disabilities and corresponding implementation guidelines were identified in this study. Based on the identified features and guidelines, a multimedia computer-assisted instruction program, "Math Explorer", which delivers…

  13. Design of a Closed-Loop, Bidirectional Brain Machine Interface System With Energy Efficient Neural Feature Extraction and PID Control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2016-12-16

    This paper presents a bidirectional brain machine interface (BMI) microsystem designed for closed-loop neuroscience research, especially experiments in freely behaving animals. The system-on-chip (SoC) consists of 16-channel neural recording front-ends, neural feature extraction units, 16-channel programmable neural stimulator back-ends, in-channel programmable closed-loop controllers, global analog-digital converters (ADC), and peripheral circuits. The proposed neural feature extraction units includes 1) an ultra low-power neural energy extraction unit enabling a 64-step natural logarithmic domain frequency tuning, and 2) a current-mode action potential (AP) detection unit with time-amplitude window discriminator. A programmable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller has been integrated in each channel enabling a various of closed-loop operations. The implemented ADCs include a 10-bit voltage-mode successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for the digitization of the neural feature outputs and/or local field potential (LFP) outputs, and an 8-bit current-mode SAR ADC for the digitization of the action potential outputs. The multi-mode stimulator can be programmed to perform monopolar or bipolar, symmetrical or asymmetrical charge balanced stimulation with a maximum current of 4 mA in an arbitrary channel configuration. The chip has been fabricated in 0.18 μ m CMOS technology, occupying a silicon area of 3.7 mm (2). The chip dissipates 56 μW/ch on average. General purpose low-power microcontroller with Bluetooth module are integrated in the system to provide wireless link and SoC configuration. Methods, circuit techniques and system topology proposed in this work can be used in a wide range of relevant neurophysiology research, especially closed-loop BMI experiments.

  14. Toxicological features of maleilated polyflavonoids from Pinus radiata (D. Don.) as potential functional additives for biomaterials design.

    PubMed

    García, Danny E; Medina, Paulina A; Zúñiga, Valentina I

    2017-03-14

    Polyflavonoids from Pinus radiata (D. Don.) are an abundant natural oligomers highly desirable as renewable chemicals. However, structural modification of polyflavonoids is a viable strategy in order to use such polyphenols as macrobuilding-blocks for biomaterial design. Polyflavonoids were esterified with three five-member cyclic anhydrides (maleic, itaconic, and citraconic) at 20 °C during 24 h in order to diversify physicochemical-, and biological-properties for agricultural, and food-packaging applications. In addition, the influence of the chemical modification, as well as the chemical structure of the grafting on toxicological features was evaluated. Structural features of derivatives were analyzed by spectroscopy (FT-IR and (1)H-NMR), and the degree of substitution was calculated. Toxicological profile was assessed by using three target species in a wide range of concentration (0.01-100 mgL(-)(1)). Effect of polyflavonoids on the growth rate (Selenastrum capricornutum), mortality (Daphnia magna), and germination and radicle length (Lactuca sativa) was determined. Chemical modification affects the toxicological profile on the derivatives in a high extent. Results described remarkable differences in function of the target specie. The bioassays indicate differences of the polyflavonoids toxicological profile associated to the chemical structure of the grafting. Results allowed conclude that polyflavonoids from pine bark show slight toxic properties.

  15. Research of performance prediction to energy on hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, H.; Li, R. N.; Li, Q. F.; Han, W.; Su, Q. M.

    2012-11-01

    Refer to the low specific speed Francis turbine blade design principle and double-suction pump structure. Then, design a horizontal double-channel hydraulic turbine Francis. Through adding different guide vane airfoil and and no guide vane airfoil on the hydraulic conductivity components to predict hydraulic turbine energy and using Fluent software to numerical simulation that the operating conditions and point. The results show that the blade pressure surface and suction surface pressure is low when the hydraulic turbine installation is added standard positive curvature of the guide vane and modified positive curvature of guide vane. Therefore, the efficiency of energy recovery is low. However, the pressure of negative curvature guide vane and symmetric guide vane added on hydraulic turbine installations is larger than that of the former ones, and it is conducive to working of runner. With the decreasing of guide vane opening, increasing of inlet angle, flow state gets significantly worse. Then, others obvious phenomena are that the reflux and horizontal flow appeared in blade pressure surface. At the same time, the vortex was formed in Leaf Road, leading to the loss of energy. Through analyzing the distribution of pressure, velocity, flow lines of over-current flow in the the back hydraulic conductivity components in above programs we can known that the hydraulic turbine installation added guide vane is more reasonable than without guide vanes, it is conducive to improve efficiency of energy conversion.

  16. Correlating fracture trends and hydraulic head using semivariogram cloud analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Daniel; Nativ, Ronit; Adar, Eilon M

    2005-01-01

    Fracture trends (defined as kilometer-scale linear features interpolated between field observations of fractures along their strikes) often have a dominant orientation. Finding a correlation between this orientation and hydraulic data could shed light on their hydraulic influence. A significant correlation between head residuals from first-order regional drift and the orientation of 2- to 4-km-long fracture trends was found in a study site in the Negev, Israel, using the semivariogram cloud analysis. Correlation of head residuals rather than the head itself implies that the orientation of the fracture trends controls the anisotropy and heterogeneity at this scale, mainly because the fracture trends define the orientation of blocks, which differ in their hydraulic properties. Preferential transmissive pathways are probably shorter than the full extent of the fracture trends, causing a relatively high head difference along the trends on the 2- to 4-km scale. Fracture trend density and additional data from short-range hydraulic tests helped characterize two blocks separated by a fault zone. The identification of hydraulic features on a kilometer scale is necessary for better modeling of regional ground water flow and transport. Hydraulic tests at this scale are not feasible, thereby rendering combined analyses of head and structural data, such as the one presented here, essential.

  17. Aircraft hydraulic systems. Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Neese, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    The first nine chapters concern hydraulic components including: tubing, hoses, fittings, seals, pumps, valves, cylinders, and motors. General hydraulic system considerations are included in chapters five and nine, while pneumatic systems are covered in chapter ten. Chapters eleven through fifteen are devoted to aircraft-specific systems such as: landing gear, flight controls, brakes, etc. The material is rounded out with excerpts from the Canadair Challenger 601 training guide to illustrate the use of hydraulic systems in a specific aircraft application.

  18. Computational open-channel hydraulics for movable-bed problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Chintu; ,

    1990-01-01

    As a major branch of computational hydraulics, notable advances have been made in numerical modeling of unsteady open-channel flow since the beginning of the computer age. According to the broader definition and scope of 'computational hydraulics,' the basic concepts and technology of modeling unsteady open-channel flow have been systematically studied previously. As a natural extension, computational open-channel hydraulics for movable-bed problems are addressed in this paper. The introduction of the multimode method of characteristics (MMOC) has made the modeling of this class of unsteady flows both practical and effective. New modeling techniques are developed, thereby shedding light on several aspects of computational hydraulics. Some special features of movable-bed channel-flow simulation are discussed here in the same order as given by the author in the fixed-bed case.

  19. Design features and equilibrium flash modeling of direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchangers for use with geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Rapier, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    Baseline and preliminary tests of a 500 kW pilot plant were conducted during 1980. The DCHX evaporator, which combines an equilibrium-flash boiler with a countercurrent preheater, met and exceeded the performance of its predecessors, the volumetric and surface type boilers, although only its essential features had been installed. Additional tests to be conducted during 1981 are designed to improve overall tower performance and to create modular designs for a 20-foot diameter column, thereby replacing the plurality of DCHX units otherwise required for commercial-size (>50 MWe) installations. For the preheater-boiler combination, the recommended criterion of performance is the classical steam distillation efficiency, E/sub v/, defined as the ratio of the partial pressure actually exerted by the hydrocarbon to its saturation pressure at the vapor exit temperature. As presently installed, the 500 kW DCHX unit typically generates a working-fluid vapor composed of 5 mole % water and 95% isobutane at 415 psia and 254.2/sup 0/F bubble point. E/sub v/ is 87.6%. However, with the additional improvements planned, 95% should be attainable.

  20. Fireproof Hydraulic Brake System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    UC C C U L 77 L D-R163 542 FIREPROOF HYDRAULIC DRAKE SYSTEN(U) BOEING NILITARY 21𔃾 AIRPLANE CO SEATTLE MA 0 M NULING ET AL. OCT 85 RFURL-TR-85-2072...aFrom reference 2, Appendix A A Table 3.2 bModulus of elasticity = 28,000,000 lb/in 2 CBulk modulus = 16,000 lb/in2 118...a CRT, line printer and other peripheral equipment. Figure C.2 shows the relationships and communication links between the elements within the

  1. Hydraulic mining method

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Lester H.; Knoke, Gerald S.

    1985-08-20

    A method of hydraulically mining an underground pitched mineral vein comprising drilling a vertical borehole through the earth's lithosphere into the vein and drilling a slant borehole along the footwall of the vein to intersect the vertical borehole. Material is removed from the mineral vein by directing a high pressure water jet thereagainst. The resulting slurry of mineral fragments and water flows along the slant borehole into the lower end of the vertical borehole from where it is pumped upwardly through the vertical borehole to the surface.

  2. Development of a Seawater Hydraulic Rock Drill

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    hydraulic forces available, particu- larly at cycle rates up to 3,000 per minute. Several specific problem areas were identified. First, the poppet valves ... wear rates and frictional retarding forces. In this connection it is noted that both ends of the poppet are vented to the ambient. Thus, dirt particles...operational failure. Similarly, the wear rate of the Nitronic 60 sleeve will be high. The ADM design called for cold worked SCF stainless for both the poppet

  3. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with...) All material in a hydraulic system must be suitable for use with the hydraulic fluid used and must...

  4. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at least... material in a hydraulic system must be suitable for use with the hydraulic fluid used and must be of...

  5. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with...) All material in a hydraulic system must be suitable for use with the hydraulic fluid used and must...

  6. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at least... material in a hydraulic system must be suitable for use with the hydraulic fluid used and must be of...

  7. 110. TUBING FOR HYDRAULIC FLUID AT BACK OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. TUBING FOR HYDRAULIC FLUID AT BACK OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (109), LSB (BLDG. 770) ACCUMULATOR FOR MAST RETRACTION ON LEFT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. 128. TUBING FOR HYDRAULIC FLUID AT BACK OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    128. TUBING FOR HYDRAULIC FLUID AT BACK OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751). PUMP ON RIGHT; ACCUMULATOR FOR MAST RETRACTION ON LEFT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. A novel Compton camera design featuring a rear-panel shield for substantial noise reduction in gamma-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Fujita, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Taya, T.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Sakurai, N.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.

    2014-12-01

    After the Japanese nuclear disaster in 2011, large amounts of radioactive isotopes were released and still remain a serious problem in Japan. Consequently, various gamma cameras are being developed to help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation. The Compton camera utilizes the kinematics of Compton scattering to contract images without using a mechanical collimator, and features a wide field of view. For instance, we have developed a novel Compton camera that features a small size (13 × 14 × 15 cm3) and light weight (1.9 kg), but which also achieves high sensitivity thanks to Ce:GAGG scintillators optically coupled wiith MPPC arrays. By definition, in such a Compton camera, gamma rays are expected to scatter in the ``scatterer'' and then be fully absorbed in the ``absorber'' (in what is called a forward-scattered event). However, high energy gamma rays often interact with the detector in the opposite direction - initially scattered in the absorber and then absorbed in the scatterer - in what is called a ``back-scattered'' event. Any contamination of such back-scattered events is known to substantially degrade the quality of gamma-ray images, but determining the order of gamma-ray interaction based solely on energy deposits in the scatterer and absorber is quite difficult. For this reason, we propose a novel yet simple Compton camera design that includes a rear-panel shield (a few mm thick) consisting of W or Pb located just behind the scatterer. Since the energy of scattered gamma rays in back-scattered events is much lower than that in forward-scattered events, we can effectively discriminate and reduce back-scattered events to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the images. This paper presents our detailed optimization of the rear-panel shield using Geant4 simulation, and describes a demonstration test using our Compton camera.

  10. Containment wells to form hydraulic barriers along site boundaries.

    PubMed

    Vo, D; Ramamurthy, A S; Qu, J; Zhao, X P

    2008-12-15

    In the field, aquifer remediation methods include pump and treat procedures based on hydraulic control systems. They are used to reduce the level of residual contamination present in the soil and soil pores of aquifers. Often, physical barriers are erected along the boundaries of the target (aquifer) site to reduce the leakage of the released soil contaminant to the surrounding regions. Physical barriers are expensive to build and dismantle. Alternatively, based on simple hydraulic principles, containment wells or image wells injecting clear water can be designed and built to provide hydraulic barriers along the contaminated site boundaries. For brevity, only one pattern of containment well system that is very effective is presented in detail. The study briefly reports about the method of erecting a hydraulic barrier around a contaminated region based on the simple hydraulic principle of images. During the clean-up period, hydraulic barriers can considerably reduce the leakage of the released contaminant from the target site to surrounding pristine regions. Containment wells facilitate the formation of hydraulic barriers. Hence, they control the movement of contaminants away from the site that is being remedied. However, these wells come into play, only when the pumping operation for cleaning up the site is active. After operation, they can be filled with soil to permit the natural ground water movement. They can also be used as monitoring wells.

  11. Tractor Hydraulics. A Teaching Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Vocational Instructional Materials, Athens, GA.

    The manual was developed to help provide a better understanding of how and why hydraulic principles serve the purposes of weight reduction, increase of physical effort, and more precise control to machines of all types. The four components that are necessary to have a workable hydraulic system--a reservoir, a pump, a valve, and a motor (cylinder)…

  12. Hydraulics. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on hydraulics is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids for training in the servicing of agricultural and industrial machinery. Focus is on oil hydraulics. Materials provide basic information and illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. The twelve chapters focus…

  13. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  14. A novel family of diarylpyrimidines (DAPYs) featuring a diatomic linker: Design, synthesis and anti-HIV activities.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuang-Xi; Qiao, Heng; Zhu, Yuan-Yuan; Shu, Qi-Chao; Liu, Hui; Ju, Xiu-Lian; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2015-10-15

    To improve the conformational flexibility and positional adaptability of the traditional diarylpyrimidines (DAPYs), a family of diarylpyrimidines featuring a C-N diatomic linker between the left wing benzene ring and the central pyrimidine was firstly designed, synthesized, and evaluated for in vitro anti-HIV activity. Most of target molecules showed excellent activities against wild-type (WT) HIV-1. Among them the most potent two compounds 12h and 12r displayed extremely potent WT HIV-1 inhibitory activities with an EC50 of 2.6 nM and 3.0 nM, respectively, while their selective index (CC50/EC50) values were both over 1000. Another compound 12b (EC50 14.9 nM) was also noteworthy due to its high SI of 18,614. Moreover, all of compounds were evaluated for their WT HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activities, which shown that the newly synthesized CH2NH-DAPYs bind to HIV-1 RT and belong to the genuine NNRTIs. However, the synthesized compounds lack the activities against HIV-1 double mutant (RES056) and HIV-2 (ROD). Thus it is an upcoming objective to improve the activities against HIV-1 double mutants.

  15. Computational design of organometallic oligomers featuring 1,3-metal-carbon bonding and planar tetracoordinate carbon atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Feng; Yuan, Cai-Xia; Wang, Xiang; Li, Jia-Jia; Wu, Yan-Bo; Wang, Xiaotai

    2016-01-15

    Density functional theory computations (B3LYP) have been used to explore the chemistry of titanium-aromatic carbon "edge complexes" with 1,3-metal-carbon (1,3-MC) bonding between Ti and planar tetracoordinate Cβ . The titanium-coordinated, end-capping chlorides are replaced with OH or SH groups to afford two series of difunctional monomers that can undergo condensation to form oxide- and sulfide-bridged oligomers. The sulfide-linked oligomers have less molecular strain and are more exergonic than the corresponding oxide-linked oligomers. The HOMO-LUMO gap of the oligomers varies with their composition and decreases with growing oligomer chain. This theoretical study is intended to enrich 1,3-MC bonding and planar tetracoordinate carbon chemistry and provide interesting ideas to experimentalists. Organometallic complexes with the TiE2 (E = OH and SH) decoration on the edge of aromatic hydrocarbons have been computationally designed, which feature 1,3-metal-carbon (1,3-MC) bonding between titanium and planar tetracoordinate β-carbon. Condensation of these difunctional monomers by eliminating small molecules (H2O and H2S) produce chain-like oligomers. The HOMO-LUMO gaps of the oligomers decreases with growing oligomer chain, a trend that suggests possible semiconductor properties for oligomers with longer chains.

  16. An Experimental Investigation into the Effects of the Anisotropy of Shale on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chong; He, Jianming; Li, Xiao; Wan, Xiaole; Zheng, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a key technology in the exploitation of shale gas. Shale formations are a type of typical transverse isotropic material. The mechanisms that generate complex fracture networks during the fracturing process are of vital importance to hydraulic fracturing design. In this article, in order to analyze the effects of the anisotropic characteristics on the propagation of hydraulic fractures in shale formations, a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments were carried out with different stress conditions and injection rates. The effects of the anisotropic structure on the propagation of hydraulic fractures were revealed. The results show that the breakdown pressure increases with an increase in the injection rate of the fracturing fluid. It is suggested that the bedding plane angle of the shale formation has a great influence on the fracturing results. Additionally, as the deviator stress increases, the breakdown pressure decreases. From macroscopic observation of the fractures, different hydraulic fracture morphologies and hydraulic fracture propagation patterns were observed.

  17. A 6-DOF vibration isolation system for hydraulic hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, The; Elahinia, Mohammad; Olson, Walter W.; Fontaine, Paul

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the results of vibration isolation analysis for the pump/motor component of hydraulic hybrid vehicles (HHVs). The HHVs are designed to combine gasoline/diesel engine and hydraulic power in order to improve the fuel efficiency and reduce the pollution. Electric hybrid technology is being applied to passenger cars with small and medium engines to improve the fuel economy. However, for heavy duty vehicles such as large SUVs, trucks, and buses, which require more power, the hydraulic hybridization is a more efficient choice. In function, the hydraulic hybrid subsystem improves the fuel efficiency of the vehicle by recovering some of the energy that is otherwise wasted in friction brakes. Since the operation of the main component of HHVs involves with rotating parts and moving fluid, noise and vibration are an issue that affects both passengers (ride comfort) as well as surrounding people (drive-by noise). This study looks into the possibility of reducing the transmitted noise and vibration from the hydraulic subsystem to the vehicle's chassis by using magnetorheological (MR) fluid mounts. To this end, the hydraulic subsystem is modeled as a six degree of freedom (6-DOF) rigid body. A 6-DOF isolation system, consisting of five mounts connected to the pump/motor at five different locations, is modeled and simulated. The mounts are designed by combining regular elastomer components with MR fluids. In the simulation, the real loading and working conditions of the hydraulic subsystem are considered and the effects of both shock and vibration are analyzed. The transmissibility of the isolation system is monitored in a wide range of frequencies. The geometry of the isolation system is considered in order to sustain the weight of the hydraulic system without affecting the design of the chassis and the effectiveness of the vibration isolating ability. The simulation results shows reduction in the transmitted vibration force for different working cycles of

  18. Hydraulic Fracturing and the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahy Tafti, T.; Aminzadeh, F.; Jafarpour, B.; de Barros, F.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation, we highlight two key environmental concerns of hydraulic fracturing (HF), namely induced seismicity and groundwater contamination (GC). We examine the induced seismicity (IS) associated with different subsurface fluid injection and production (SFIP) operations and the key operational parameters of SFIP impacting it. In addition we review the key potential sources for possible water contamination. Both in the case of IS and GC we propose modeling and data analysis methods to quantify the risk factors to be used for monitoring and risk reduction. SFIP include presents a risk in hydraulic fracturing, waste water injection, enhanced oil recovery as well as geothermal energy operations. Although a recent report (NRC 2012) documents that HF is not responsible for most of the induced seismicities, we primarily focus on HF here. We look into vaious operational parameters such as volume and rate of water injection, the direction of the well versus the natural fracture network, the depth of the target and the local stress field and fault system, as well as other geological features. The latter would determine the potential for triggering tectonic related events by small induced seismicity events. We provide the building blocks for IS risk assessment and monitoring. The system we propose will involve adequate layers of complexity based on mapped seismic attributes as well as results from ANN and probabilistic predictive modeling workflows. This leads to a set of guidelines which further defines 'safe operating conditions' and 'safe operating zones' which will be a valuable reference for future SFIP operations. We also illustrate how HF can lead to groundwater aquifer contamination. The source of aquifer contamination can be the hydrocarbon gas or the chemicals used in the injected liquid in the formation. We explore possible pathways of contamination within and discuss the likelihood of contamination from each source. Many of the chemical compounds used

  19. Percolation Theory and Modern Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. Q.; Turcotte, D. L.; Rundle, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    During the past few years, we have been developing a percolation model for fracking. This model provides a powerful tool for understanding the growth and properties of the complex fracture networks generated during a modern high volume hydraulic fracture stimulations of tight shale reservoirs. The model can also be used to understand the interaction between the growing fracture network and natural reservoir features such as joint sets and faults. Additionally, the model produces a power-law distribution of bursts which can easily be compared to observed microseismicity.

  20. New hydraulic downhole pump offers several advantages

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    A self-contained, hydraulically operated plunger pump is available to replace conventional equipment in troublesome producing situations. The Soderberg pump from EMI Pump Systems uses an oscillating hydraulic fluid column to energize the plunger, thus eliminating the need for sucker rods and pump jacks or submersible motors. An advantage to the pump's design is that it will stroke only when the pump chamber has been vented of gasses and is filled with well liquids. This reduces energy consumption. Other advantages are discussed. The new pump consists of 4 basic sections including an upper subassembly that contains the pump's intelligence, a chamber to receive well fluids, a plunger and a pressurized nitrogen gas chamber that stores energy for the pump's return stroke.

  1. Development of Design Technology on Thermal-hydraulic Performance in Tight-lattice Rod Bundles: V-Estimation of Void Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kureta, Masatoshi; Tamai, Hidesada; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ohnuki, Akira; Akimoto, Hajime

    An estimation of the void fraction in a tight-lattice rod bundle was needed for the R&D of the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR). For this purpose, we measured the void fraction and studied the behaviors of boiling flow. The void fraction was measured by a neutron radiography, a quick-shut-valve technique, and an electro void fraction meter. The data were taken using the 7-, 14-, 19- and 37-rod bundle test sections with the rod gap of 1.0 or 1.3 mm under from atmospheric pressure to 7.2 MPa conditions. A spacer effect test was also carried out. The following estimations were conducted: (1) a similarity of the advanced analysis codes with the 3D void fraction data, (2) the comparisons of the TRAC-BF1 code and a drift-flux model with the 1D data. Followings were made clear: (a) The void fraction becomes lower at the peripheral and higher at the rod gap part of the lower core and at the center of the subchannel of the upper core, (b) the codes calculates the similar distribution to the data, and (c) the TRAC-BF1 and the drift-flux model tends to overestimate the void fraction at the lower quality region, on the other hand at the higher quality, those methods tend to same characteristics to the data. It was confirmed that several special features were existed in the tight-lattice rod bundle but the codes were applicable.

  2. Compound random field models of multiple scale hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.S. ); Brannan, J.R. )

    1992-09-01

    Enormous amounts of hydrologic data are required to accurately simulate subsurface contaminant transport. Effectively supplementing measurements of hydrologic parameters such as permeability and porosity with soft'' information obtained from the interpretation of geologic cores and geophysical logs can improve the simulation of contaminant transport while reducing the measured data that are required. A method is presented herein for generating hydraulic conductivity fields comprised of several geological materials with hydraulic conductivities that can range over several orders of magnitude. This method utilizes indicator fields that are designed to allow random variation at the megascopic scale but are constrained by observations inferred from geophysical logs and geologic core data. The statistical description of random hydraulic conductivity values of distinct geological materials at the macroscopic scale may be obtained by conventional parameter estimation techniques. The combined approach can then be used to generate realizations of a hydraulic conductivity field for subsequent use in flow and transport simulations.

  3. Compound random field models of multiple scale hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.S.; Brannan, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    Enormous amounts of hydrologic data are required to accurately simulate subsurface contaminant transport. Effectively supplementing measurements of hydrologic parameters such as permeability and porosity with ``soft`` information obtained from the interpretation of geologic cores and geophysical logs can improve the simulation of contaminant transport while reducing the measured data that are required. A method is presented herein for generating hydraulic conductivity fields comprised of several geological materials with hydraulic conductivities that can range over several orders of magnitude. This method utilizes indicator fields that are designed to allow random variation at the megascopic scale but are constrained by observations inferred from geophysical logs and geologic core data. The statistical description of random hydraulic conductivity values of distinct geological materials at the macroscopic scale may be obtained by conventional parameter estimation techniques. The combined approach can then be used to generate realizations of a hydraulic conductivity field for subsequent use in flow and transport simulations.

  4. Vibration evaluation and parameter optimization of hydraulic thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Zhang, Haokun

    2017-01-01

    Two difficult problems which are drilling string vibration and drilling pressure control exist in the process of drilling large displacement horizontal well. Using hydraulic thruster can not only improve the mechanical drilling speed and increase the horizontal section of footage displacement but also obtain better drill string dynamic characteristics and reduce vibration of drilling tool and prolong the life of the bottom hole assembly. By using the spring-damping model of drill string, the dynamic response of the different excitation of the drill bit is analyzed, so as to evaluate the effect of vibration reduction of hydraulic thruster. Use the three factors four levels orthogonal test method to optimize the key design parameters of hydraulic thruster. The analysis shows that the different drilling mud density should be used in the hydraulic thruster with different key parameters, in order to display its superiority.

  5. High Speed Strain Measurements Surrounding Hydraulic Fracture in Brittle Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Will; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fractures of oil and gas shales occur miles underground, below complex, layered rocks, making measurements of their dynamics, extent, or structure difficult to impossible. Rocks are heterogeneous at a wide range of length scales, and investigating how these non-uniformities affect the propagation and extent of fractures is vital to improving both the safety and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing operations. To study these effects we have developed a model system using brittle, heavily cross-linked hydrogels that we can fracture with fluids and observe with a fast camera. By embedding tracer particles within the gel and using laser sheet microscopy, we obtain three dimensional stress and strain maps of the zone surrounding a hydraulic fracture tip. Gels can also be set in layers or interfaces with tunable strengths or with designed heterogeneities, allowing us to understand the fundamental science of hydraulic fractures and investigate the dynamics of controllably complex materials.

  6. Herb Hydraulics: Inter- and Intraspecific Variation in Three Ranunculus Species.

    PubMed

    Nolf, Markus; Rosani, Andrea; Ganthaler, Andrea; Beikircher, Barbara; Mayr, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The requirements of the water transport system of small herbaceous species differ considerably from those of woody species. Despite their ecological importance for many biomes, knowledge regarding herb hydraulics remains very limited. We compared key hydraulic features (vulnerability to drought-induced hydraulic decline, pressure-volume relations, onset of cellular damage, in situ variation of water potential, and stomatal conductance) of three Ranunculus species differing in their soil humidity preferences and ecological amplitude. All species were very vulnerable to water stress (50% reduction in whole-leaf hydraulic conductance [kleaf] at -0.2 to -0.8 MPa). In species with narrow ecological amplitude, the drought-exposed Ranunculus bulbosus was less vulnerable to desiccation (analyzed via loss of kleaf and turgor loss point) than the humid-habitat Ranunculus lanuginosus Accordingly, water stress-exposed plants from the broad-amplitude Ranunculus acris revealed tendencies toward lower vulnerability to water stress (e.g. osmotic potential at full turgor, cell damage, and stomatal closure) than conspecific plants from the humid site. We show that small herbs can adjust to their habitat conditions on interspecific and intraspecific levels in various hydraulic parameters. The coordination of hydraulic thresholds (50% and 88% loss of kleaf, turgor loss point, and minimum in situ water potential) enabled the study species to avoid hydraulic failure and damage to living cells. Reversible recovery of hydraulic conductance, desiccation-tolerant seeds, or rhizomes may allow them to prioritize toward a more efficient but vulnerable water transport system while avoiding the severe effects that water stress poses on woody species.

  7. Hydraulic turbine-driven boiler circulation pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, I.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the unique technical features and performance of an advanced Russian hydraulic turbine-driven boiler circulation pump. The major task was to test the pump at the supercritical 250 MW unit located at the Southern Power Plant, Lenenergo, in St. Petersburg, Russia. The field tests demonstrated that the circulation pump operates efficiently and reliably.

  8. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  9. Stem and leaf hydraulic properties are finely coordinated in three tropical rain forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Nolf, Markus; Creek, Danielle; Duursma, Remko; Holtum, Joseph; Mayr, Stefan; Choat, Brendan

    2015-12-01

    Coordination of stem and leaf hydraulic traits allows terrestrial plants to maintain safe water status under limited water supply. Tropical rain forests, one of the world's most productive biomes, are vulnerable to drought and potentially threatened by increased aridity due to global climate change. However, the relationship of stem and leaf traits within the plant hydraulic continuum remains understudied, particularly in tropical species. We studied within-plant hydraulic coordination between stems and leaves in three tropical lowland rain forest tree species by analyses of hydraulic vulnerability [hydraulic methods and ultrasonic emission (UE) analysis], pressure-volume relations and in situ pre-dawn and midday water potentials (Ψ). We found finely coordinated stem and leaf hydraulic features, with a strategy of sacrificing leaves in favour of stems. Fifty percent of hydraulic conductivity (P50 ) was lost at -2.1 to -3.1 MPa in stems and at -1.7 to -2.2 MPa in leaves. UE analysis corresponded to hydraulic measurements. Safety margins (leaf P50 - stem P50 ) were very narrow at -0.4 to -1.4 MPa. Pressure-volume analysis and in situ Ψ indicated safe water status in stems but risk of hydraulic failure in leaves. Our study shows that stem and leaf hydraulics were finely tuned to avoid embolism formation in the xylem.

  10. Hydraulic accumulator-motor-generator energy regeneration system for a hybrid hydraulic excavator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tianliang; Wang, Qingfeng

    2012-11-01

    Though the traditional energy regeneration system(ERS) which used a hydraulic motor and a generator in hybrid excavators can regenerate part of the energy, the power of the motor and the generator should be larger and the time for regenerating energy is so short. At first, the structure of new ERS that combines the advantages of an electric and hydraulic accumulator is analyzed. The energy can be converted into both the electric energy and the hydraulic energy at the lowering of the boom and the generator can still works when the boom stops going down. Then, a method how to set the working pressure of the hydraulic accumulator is proposed. To avoid the excess loss, extra noise and shock pressure, a two-level pressure threshold method that the generator starts to work at the rising edge of the high pressure threshold and stops working at the falling edge of the low pressure threshold is presented to characterize the working mode of the generator. The control strategies on how to control the boom velocity at the lowering of the boom and how to improve the recovery efficiency when the boom stops going down are presented. The test bench of hybrid excavator with ERS is constructed, with which the studies on the influences of ERS on energy conversion efficiency and control performance are carried out. Experimental results show that the proposed ERS features better speed control performance of the boom than traditional ERS. It is also observed that an estimated 45% of the total potential energy could be regenerated at the lowering of the boom in the proposed ERS, and the power level of the generator and the hydraulic motor could be reduced by 60%. Hence, the proposed ERS has obvious advantages over the traditional ERS on the improvement of energy regeneration time, energy efficiency, control performance and economy.

  11. Development of Design Technology on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance in Tight-Lattice Rod Bundle: IV Large Paralleled Simulation by the Advanced Two-fluid Model Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Takeharu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) has been developed. For thermal design of FLWR, it is necessary to develop analytical method to predict boiling transition of FLWR. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing three-dimensional two-fluid model analysis code ACE-3D, which adopts boundary fitted coordinate system to simulate complex shape channel flow. In this paper, as a part of development of ACE-3D to apply to rod bundle analysis, introduction of parallelization to ACE-3D and assessments of ACE-3D are shown. In analysis of large-scale domain such as a rod bundle, even two-fluid model requires large number of computational cost, which exceeds upper limit of memory amount of 1 CPU. Therefore, parallelization was introduced to ACE-3D to divide data amount for analysis of large-scale domain among large number of CPUs, and it is confirmed that analysis of large-scale domain such as a rod bundle can be performed by parallel computation with keeping parallel computation performance even using large number of CPUs. ACE-3D adopts two-phase flow models, some of which are dependent upon channel geometry. Therefore, analyses in the domains, which simulate individual subchannel and 37 rod bundle, are performed, and compared with experiments. It is confirmed that the results obtained by both analyses using ACE-3D show agreement with past experimental result qualitatively.

  12. Operationally efficient propulsion system study (OEPSS) data book. Volume 7; Launch Operations Index (LOI) Design Features and Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziese, James M.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool of figure of merit was developed that allows the operability of a propulsion system design to be measured. This Launch Operations Index (LOI) relates Operations Efficiency to System Complexity. The figure of Merit can be used by conceptual designers to compare different propulsion system designs based on their impact on launch operations. The LOI will improve the design process by making sure direct launch operations experience is a necessary feedback to the design process.

  13. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic pump having no moving mechanical parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force. The electrokinetic pump, which can generate hydraulic pressures greater than 2500 psi, can be employed to compress a fluid, either liquid or gas, and manipulate fluid flow. The pump is particularly useful for capillary-base systems. By combining the electrokinetic pump with a housing having chambers separated by a flexible member, fluid flow, including high pressure fluids, is controlled by the application of an electric potential, that can vary with time.

  14. Hydraulic mechanism to limit torsional loads between the IUS and space transportation system orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, James R.

    1986-01-01

    The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) is a two-stage booster used by NASA and the Defense Department to insert payloads into geosynchronous orbit from low-Earth orbit. The hydraulic mechanism discussed here was designed to perform a specific dynamic and static interface function within the Space Transportation System's Orbiter. Requirements, configuration, and application of the hydraulic mechanism with emphasis on performance and methods of achieving zero external hydraulic leakage are discussed. The hydraulic load-leveler mechanism meets the established design requirements for operation in a low-Earth orbit. Considerable testing was conducted to demonstrate system performance and verification that external leakage had been reduced to zero. Following each flight use of an ASE, all hydraulic mechanism components are carefully inspected for leakage. The ASE, including the hydraulic mechanism, has performed without any anomalies during all IUS flights.

  15. Alluvial channel hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackers, Peter

    1988-07-01

    The development and utilisation of water resources for irrigation, hydropower and public supply can be severely affected by sediment. Where there is a mature and well vegetated landscape, sediment problems may be relatively minor; but where slopes are steep and vegetation sparse, the yield of sediment from the catchment gives high concentrations in the rivers. In utilising these resources, for whatever purpose, an understanding of the hydraulics of alluvial channels is vital. The regime of any conveyance channel in alluvium depends on the interrelationships of sediment transport, channel resistance and bank stability. The regime concept was originally based on empirical relations obtained from observations from canal systems in the Indian subcontinent, and for many years was surrounded by a certain degree of mystique and much scepticism from academics. In more recent years the unabashed empiricism of the original method has been replaced by process-based methods, which have also served as broad confirmation of the classic regime formulae, including their extension to natural channels and meandering channels. The empirical approach to the hydraulics of alluvial channels has thus been updated by physically based formulae for sediment transport and resistance, though there remains some uncertainty about the third function to complete the definition of slope and geometry. Latest thoughts in this respect are that the channel seeks a natural optimum state. Physical modelling using scaled down representations of rivers and estuaries has been used for almost a century, but it requires the correct simulation of the relevant processes. The coming of a better understanding of the physics of sediment transport and the complexity of alluvial channel roughness leads to the conclusion that only in very restricted circumstances can scale models simulate closely the full-size condition. However, the quantification of these processes has been instrumental in the development of

  16. Field measurements in unwadeable natural hydraulic jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, B.; Pasternack, G.

    2003-04-01

    Recent research in fluvial geomorphology has emphasized the development and application of digital terrain models to better understand process-form relations. However, field measurements in mountain channels have largely been restricted to low velocity or ephemeral flow conditions. To address this problem, a new high-resolution mechanical surveying system was developed at UC Davis and used to measure the 3D bed and water surface topographies of an unwadeable plunging hydraulic jump in the Cache Creek basin, CA. Labeled as the River Truss, the system is capable of making high-resolution form and process measurements over a 30 to 115 m2 area. Bed and water surface DTMs were derived from the field data using AutoCAD. River Truss precision was assessed by DTM differencing the hydraulic jump bed surface topography with a DTM developed from tacheometric survey at low base flows. Bed surface DTMs indicate significant spatial complexity of the underlying bed step in the supercritical flow region and significant downstream bed scour. Water surface DTMs indicate 3D complexity of the plunging flow surface and divergence from 1D free-fall theory. Further study will emphasize the development and deployment of process-based instrumentation such that the complex turbulent air-water flow dynamics associated with natural hydraulic jumps may be better understood. Also, a second generation River Truss that has a larger coverage area and automated data collection has been designed and is now being built.

  17. Downhole hydraulic actuated pump

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a downhole hydraulically actuated pump assembly of the type having a main housing within which an engine and pump is enclosed; a connecting rod, an engine piston, a pump plunger, means by which the engine and connecting rod reciprocate the pump plunger and thereby produces fluid; the main housing has a lower end having a formation fluid inlet; and upper end having a power fluid inlet; and, a produced fluid outlet; the plunger divides one marginal end of the housing into upper and lower production chambers; the lower end of the connecting rod is hollow and extends through the plunger into fluid communication with the formation fluid inlet to provide a source of formation fluid for the upper and lower production chambers; a traveling value assembly contained within the plunger and arranged to transfer formation fluid from the hollow rod, through the plunger, and into the upper and lower production chambers, respectively, as the plunger upstrokes and downstrokes; produced fluid valve means by which fluid flows from the upper and lower production chambers and through the produced fluid outlet.

  18. Hydraulic release oil tool

    SciTech Connect

    Mims, M.G.; Mueller, M.D.; Ehlinger, J.C.

    1992-03-11

    This patent describes a hydraulic release tool. It comprises a setting assembly; a coupling member for coupling to drill string or petroleum production components, the coupling member being a plurality of sockets for receiving the dogs in the extended position and attaching the coupling member the setting assembly; whereby the setting assembly couples to the coupling member by engagement of the dogs in the sockets of releases from and disengages the coupling member in movement of the piston from its setting to its reposition in response to a pressure in the body in exceeding the predetermined pressure; and a relief port from outside the body into its bore and means to prevent communication between the relief port and the bore of the body axially of the piston when the piston is in the setting position and to establish such communication upon movement of the piston from the setting position to the release position and reduce the pressure in the body bore axially of the piston, whereby the reduction of the pressure signals that the tool has released the coupling member.

  19. The Process of Hydraulic Fracturing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydraulic fracturing, know as fracking or hydrofracking, produces fractures in a rock formation by pumping fluids (water, proppant, and chemical additives) at high pressure down a wellbore. These fractures stimulate the flow of natural gas or oil.

  20. Diesel Fuels Hydraulic Fracturing (DFHF)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This webpage provides information on how hydraulic fracturing is regulated by the Underground Injection Control Program. It includes information about what owners and operators need to do to be in compliance and guidance for EPA Class II permit writers.

  1. Hydraulic drive system prevents backlash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acord, J. D.

    1965-01-01

    Hydraulic drive system uses a second drive motor operating at reduced torque. This exerts a relative braking action which eliminates the normal gear train backlash that is intolerable when driving certain heavy loads.

  2. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.880 Section 28.880 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at...

  3. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  4. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  5. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.880 Section 28.880 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at...

  6. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.880 Section 28.880 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at...

  7. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  8. Monitoring hydraulic fracturing with seismic emission volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, F.; Tang, Y.; Chen, H.; TAO, K.; Levander, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have made it possible to access the reservoirs that are not available for massive production in the past. Hydraulic fracturing is designed to enhance rock permeability and reservoir drainage through the creation of fracture networks. Microseismic monitoring has been proven to be an effective and valuable technology to image hydraulic fracture geometry. Based on data acquisition, seismic monitoring techniques have been divided into two categories: downhole and surface monitoring. Surface monitoring is challenging because of the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio of the raw data. We applied the techniques used in earthquake seismology and developed an integrated monitoring system for mapping hydraulic fractures. The system consists of 20 to 30 state-of-the-art broadband seismographs, which are generally about hundreds times more sensible than regular geophones. We have conducted two experiments in two basins with very different geology and formation mechanism in China. In each case, we observed clear microseismic events, which may correspond to the induced seismicity directly associated with fracturing and the triggered ones at pre-existing faults. However, the magnitude of these events is generally larger than magnitude -1, approximately one to two magnitudes larger than those detected by downhole instruments. Spectrum-frequency analysis of the continuous surface recordings indicated high seismic energy associated with injection stages. The seismic energy can be back-projected to a volume that surrounds each injection stage. Imaging seismic emission volume (SEV) appears to be an effective way to map the stimulated reservior volume, as well as natural fractures.

  9. Effect of Inquiry-Based Computer Simulation Modeling on Pre-Service Teachers' Understanding of Homeostasis and Their Perceptions of Design Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabalengula, Vivien; Fateen, Rasheta; Mumba, Frackson; Ochs, Laura Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of an inquiry-based computer simulation modeling (ICoSM) instructional approach on pre-service science teachers' understanding of homeostasis and its related concepts, and their perceived design features of the ICoSM and simulation that enhanced their conceptual understanding of these concepts. Fifty pre-service…

  10. Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

    2000-06-30

    In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

  11. Hydraulics Graphics Package. Users Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Engineering Center, Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, as the origin of the program(s). IT, i HGP -3!OO Ju ’ ŕ Dlst! 3pbo.i:, HYDRAULICS GRAPHICS...Davis, California 95616 (916) 551-1748 (FTS) 460-1748 HGP Hydraulics Graphics Package Users Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Subject Page 1 Introduction...5 2.4 Use of Disk Files ........ ................ 6 3 HGP Free Format User Input 3.1 Command Language Syntax ...... ............. 8 3.2

  12. The numerical simulation based on CFD of hydraulic turbine pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, X. H.; Kong, F. Y.; Liu, Y. Y.; Zhao, R. J.; Hu, Q. L.

    2016-05-01

    As the functions of hydraulic turbine pump including self-adjusting and compensation with each other, it is far-reaching to analyze its internal flow by the numerical simulation based on CFD, mainly including the pressure field and the velocity field in hydraulic turbine and pump.The three-dimensional models of hydraulic turbine pump are made by Pro/Engineer software;the internal flow fields in hydraulic turbine and pump are simulated numerically by CFX ANSYS software. According to the results of the numerical simulation in design condition, the pressure field and the velocity field in hydraulic turbine and pump are analyzed respectively .The findings show that the static pressure decreases systematically and the pressure gradient is obvious in flow area of hydraulic turbine; the static pressure increases gradually in pump. The flow trace is regular in suction chamber and flume without spiral trace. However, there are irregular traces in the turbine runner channels which contrary to that in flow area of impeller. Most of traces in the flow area of draft tube are spiral.

  13. Hydraulic pressure energy harvester enhanced by Helmholtz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skow, Ellen; Koontz, Zachary; Cunefare, Kenneth; Erturk, Alper

    2015-04-01

    Hydraulic pressure energy harvesters (HPEH) are devices that convert the dynamic pressure within hydraulic systems into usable electrical power through axially loaded piezoelectric stacks excited off-resonance by the fluid. Within hydraulic systems, the dominant frequency is typically a harmonic of the pump operating frequency. The pressure fluctuations coupled with the piezoelectric stack can be amplified by creating a housing design that includes a Helmholtz resonator tuned to the dominant frequency of the fluid excitation. A Helmholtz resonator is an acoustic device that consists of a cavity coupled to a fluid medium via a neck, or in this case a port connection to the fluid flow, that acts as an amplifier when within the bandwidth of its resonance. The implementation of a piezoelectric stack within the HPEH allows for a Helmholtz resonator to be included within the fluidic environment despite the significantly higher than air static pressures typical of fluid hydraulic systems (on the order of one to tens of MPa). The resistive losses within the system, such as from energy harvesting and viscous losses, can also be used to increase the bandwidth of the resonance; thus increasing the utility of the device. This paper investigates the design, modeling, and performance of hydraulic pressure energy harvesters utilizing a Helmholtz resonator design.

  14. Design and Control of a Ship Motion Simulation Platform from an Energy Efficiency Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J; Lloyd, Peter D; Rowe, John C; Pin, Francois G

    2009-01-01

    Most hydraulic servo systems are designed with little consideration for energy efficiency. Pumps are selected based upon required peak power demands, valves are chosen primarily for their rated flow, actuators for the maximum force. However, the design of a hydraulic servo system has great potential in terms of energy efficiency that has, for the most part, been ignored. This paper describes the design and control of a large-scale ship motion simulation platform that was designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Office of Naval Research. The primary reasons to incorporate energy-efficiency features into the design are cost and size reduction. A preliminary survey of proposed designs based on traditional motion simulation platform configurations (Stuart Platforms) required hydraulic power supplies approaching 1.22 MW. This manuscript describes the combined design and control effort that led to a system with the same performance requirements, however requiring a primary power supply that was less than 112 kW. The objective of this paper is to illustrate alternative design and control approaches that can significantly reduce the power requirements of hydraulic systems and improve the overall energy-efficiency of large-scale hydraulically actuated systems.

  15. Hydraulic Control Design and Modeling Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    methodologies. This report may be difficult to read for the casual reader . It is written assuming the reader has some fundamental background in control...INTERVAL DTSMP=.O0012207 STEP=. 0012207 INDEX=INDEX+i DOUT( INDEX2)=L1 A- 4 END $*OF DISCRETE SAMP 2" DERIVATIVE tarot (INDEX2 .GE. 4098) END $*OF

  16. Hydraulic Tomography: Continuity and Discontinuity of High-K and Low-K Zones.

    PubMed

    Hochstetler, David L; Barrash, Warren; Leven, Carsten; Cardiff, Michael; Chidichimo, Francesco; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic tomography is an emerging field and modeling method that provides a continuous hydraulic conductivity (K) distribution for an investigated region. Characterization approaches that rely on interpolation between one-dimensional (1D) profiles have limited ability to accurately identify high-K channels, juxtapositions of lenses with high K contrast, and breaches in layers or channels between such profiles. However, locating these features is especially important for groundwater flow and transport modeling, and for design and operation of in situ remediation in complex hydrogeologic environments. We use transient hydraulic tomography to estimate 3D K in a volume of 15-m diameter by 20-m saturated thickness in a highly heterogeneous unconfined alluvial (clay to sand-and-gravel) aquifer with a K range of approximately seven orders of magnitude at an active industrial site in Assemini, Sardinia, Italy. A modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used for geostatistical inversion to deal with the nonlinear nature of the highly heterogeneous system. The imaging results are validated with pumping tests not used in the tomographic inversion. These tests were conducted from three of five clusters of continuous multichannel tubing (CMTs) installed for observation in the tomographic testing. Locations of high-K continuity and discontinuity, juxtaposition of very high-K and very low-K lenses, and low-K "plugs" are evident in regions of the investigated volume where they likely would not have been identified with interpolation from 1D profiles at the positions of the pumping well and five CMT clusters. Quality assessment methods identified a suspect high-K feature between the tested volume and a lateral boundary of the model.

  17. From the Kinetic Energy Recovery System to the Thermo-Hydraulic Hybrid Motor Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, Corneliu; Drumea, Petrin; Guta, Dragos; Dumitrescu, Catalin

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents some theoretical and experimental results obtained by the Hydraulics and Pneumatics Research Institute INOE 2000-IHP with its partners, regarding the creating of one hydraulic system able to recovering the kinetic energy of the motor vehicles, in the braking phases, and use this recovered energy in the starting and accelerating phases. Also, in the article is presented a testing stand, which was especially designed for testing the hydraulic system for recovery the kinetic energy. Through mounting of the kinetic energy recovering hydraulic system, on one motor vehicle, this vehicle became a thermo-hydraulic hybrid vehicle. Therefore, the dynamic behavior was analyzed for the whole hybrid motor vehicle, which includes the energy recovery system. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the possible performances of the hybrid vehicle and that the kinetic energy recovery hydraulic systems are good means to increase energy efficiency of the road motor vehicles and to decrease of the fuel consumption.

  18. Personalized Integrated Educational System (PIES) for the Learner-Centered Information-Age Paradigm of Education: A Study to Improve the Design of the Functions and Features of PIES

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutta, Pratima

    2013-01-01

    The Personalized Integrated Educational System (PIES) design theory is a design recommendation regarding the function and features of Learning Managements Systems (LMS) that can support the information-age learner-centered paradigm of education. The purpose of this study was to improve the proposed functions and features of the PIES design theory…

  19. Mapping Three-Dimensional Hydraulic Heterogeneities in Fractured Granite through Transient Hydraulic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Y.; Yeh, T. C. J.; Illman, W. A.; Tanaka, T.; Bruines, P.; Onoe, H.; Saegusa, H.; Mao, D.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2005 and 2010, three independent sequential pumping tests were conducted in a fractured granite formation at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) site in central Japan. Additional pumping operations were undertaken in the course of excavation of two vertical shafts at the site. During these events, groundwater responses were monitored in multiple observation intervals in several shallow and deep boreholes. In this study, we first visually inspected these responses at all observation intervals induced by each pumping event. We found that some intervals at far-distance boreholes showed rapid, and strong responses, while intervals of boreholes near the vicinity of the pumping locations showed little responses. Moreover, the locations of the rapid and slow responses varied with pumping locations. This preliminary inspection suggested that some boreholes are likely connected via fractures and some are separated by flow barrier(s). Subsequently, these drawdown data sets were analyzed using a three-dimensional (3-D) transient hydraulic tomography (HT) code to estimate the hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss) distributions. Results of the analysis depicted several large-scale high K and low K zones and some small-scale features at the MIU site. The locations of these high and low K estimates explain the observed fast and slow groundwater responses, and corroborate with the locations of fractures and fault zones estimated based on geologic information. The HT analysis nevertheless provides a detailed description of the hydraulic characteristics of the fracture and fault zones.

  20. Proposed hydraulic pump testing for hydraulic fluid qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Melief, H.M.

    1997-12-31

    The current ASTM D-2882 hydraulic vane pump test does not provide the necessary correlation required for the prediction of the lubricating properties of a hydraulic fluid in various piston pump operations. All too often, a fluid will exhibit excellent wear properties in the Vickers V-104 vane pump used in the ASTM D-2882 test, yet produce catastrophic failure at various wear interfaces in a piston pump which may consist of different material pairs, contact loading, configuration or speed. In this paper, a new piston pump test, which is conducted under cycled pressure testing conditions, is proposed. The new test will provide an excellent assessment of the lubricating properties of a hydraulic fluid under a wide variety of wear conditions.

  1. Hydraulic Apparatus for Mechanical Testing of Nuts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Todd J.; Dean, Richard J.; Hacker, Scott C.; Harrington, Douglas W.; Salazar, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The figure depicts an apparatus for mechanical testing of nuts. In the original application for which the apparatus was developed, the nuts are of a frangible type designed for use with pyrotechnic devices in spacecraft applications in which there are requirements for rapid, one-time separations of structures that are bolted together. The apparatus can also be used to test nonfrangible nuts engaged without pyrotechnic devices. This apparatus was developed to replace prior testing systems that were extremely heavy and immobile and characterized by long setup times (of the order of an hour for each nut to be tested). This apparatus is mobile, and the setup for each test can now be completed in about five minutes. The apparatus can load a nut under test with a static axial force of as much as 6.8 x 10(exp 5) lb (3.0 MN) and a static moment of as much as 8.5 x 10(exp 4) lb in. (9.6 x 10(exp 3) N(raised dot)m) for a predetermined amount of time. In the case of a test of a frangible nut, the pyrotechnic devices can be exploded to break the nut while the load is applied, in which case the breakage of the nut relieves the load. The apparatus can be operated remotely for safety during an explosive test. The load-generating portion of the apparatus is driven by low-pressure compressed air; the remainder of the apparatus is driven by 110-Vac electricity. From its source, the compressed air is fed to the apparatus through a regulator and a manually operated valve. The regulated compressed air is fed to a pneumatically driven hydraulic pump, which pressurizes oil in a hydraulic cylinder, thereby causing a load to be applied via a hydraulic nut (not to be confused with the nut under test). During operation, the hydraulic pressure is correlated with the applied axial load, which is verified by use of a load cell. Prior to operation, one end of a test stud (which could be an ordinary threaded rod or bolt) is installed in the hydraulic nut. The other end of the test stud passes

  2. Final Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identif...

  3. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2. UNIT X, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS--HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS (PART II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 25-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO PROVIDE A SUMMARY OF MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES FOR AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS USED ON DIESEL POWERED VEHICLES. TOPICS ARE (1) CHECKING THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM, (2) SERVICING THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM, (3) EXAMINING THE RANGE CONTROL VALVE, (4) EXAMINING THE LOCK-UP AND FLOW VALVE, (5) EXAMINING THE MAIN REGULATOR…

  4. Current and anticipated uses of thermal hydraulic codes in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Doo; Chang, Won-Pyo

    1997-07-01

    In Korea, the current uses of thermal hydraulic codes are categorized into 3 areas. The first application is in designing both nuclear fuel and NSSS. The codes have usually been introduced based on the technology transfer programs agreed between KAERI and the foreign vendors. Another area is in the supporting of the plant operations and licensing by the utility. The third category is research purposes. In this area assessments and some applications to the safety issue resolutions are major activities using the best estimate thermal hydraulic codes such as RELAP5/MOD3 and CATHARE2. Recently KEPCO plans to couple thermal hydraulic codes with a neutronics code for the design of the evolutionary type reactor by 2004. KAERI also plans to develop its own best estimate thermal hydraulic code, however, application range is different from KEPCO developing code. Considering these activities, it is anticipated that use of the best estimate hydraulic analysis code developed in Korea may be possible in the area of safety evaluation within 10 years.

  5. The hydraulic limitation hypothesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael G; Phillips, Nathan; Bond, Barbara J

    2006-03-01

    We proposed the hydraulic limitation hypothesis (HLH) as a mechanism to explain universal patterns in tree height, and tree and stand biomass growth: height growth slows down as trees grow taller, maximum height is lower for trees of the same species on resource-poor sites and annual wood production declines after canopy closure for even-aged forests. Our review of 51 studies that measured one or more of the components necessary for testing the hypothesis showed that taller trees differ physiologically from shorter, younger trees. Stomatal conductance to water vapour (g(s)), photosynthesis (A) and leaf-specific hydraulic conductance (K L) are often, but not always, lower in taller trees. Additionally, leaf mass per area is often greater in taller trees, and leaf area:sapwood area ratio changes with tree height. We conclude that hydraulic limitation of gas exchange with increasing tree size is common, but not universal. Where hydraulic limitations to A do occur, no evidence supports the original expectation that hydraulic limitation of carbon assimilation is sufficient to explain observed declines in wood production. Any limit to height or height growth does not appear to be related to the so-called age-related decline in wood production of forests after canopy closure. Future work on this problem should explicitly link leaf or canopy gas exchange with tree and stand growth, and consider a more fundamental assumption: whether tree biomass growth is limited by carbon availability.

  6. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2003-06-03

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based system. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  7. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  8. Method for directional hydraulic fracturing

    DOEpatents

    Swanson, David E.; Daly, Daniel W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for directional hydraulic fracturing using borehole seals to confine pressurized fluid in planar permeable regions, comprising: placing a sealant in the hole of a structure selected from geologic or cemented formations to fill the space between a permeable planar component and the geologic or cemented formation in the vicinity of the permeable planar component; making a hydraulic connection between the permeable planar component and a pump; permitting the sealant to cure and thereby provide both mechanical and hydraulic confinement to the permeable planar component; and pumping a fluid from the pump into the permeable planar component to internally pressurize the permeable planar component to initiate a fracture in the formation, the fracture being disposed in the same orientation as the permeable planar component.

  9. Complex Fluids and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Barbati, Alexander C; Desroches, Jean; Robisson, Agathe; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-06-07

    Nearly 70 years old, hydraulic fracturing is a core technique for stimulating hydrocarbon production in a majority of oil and gas reservoirs. Complex fluids are implemented in nearly every step of the fracturing process, most significantly to generate and sustain fractures and transport and distribute proppant particles during and following fluid injection. An extremely wide range of complex fluids are used: naturally occurring polysaccharide and synthetic polymer solutions, aqueous physical and chemical gels, organic gels, micellar surfactant solutions, emulsions, and foams. These fluids are loaded over a wide range of concentrations with particles of varying sizes and aspect ratios and are subjected to extreme mechanical and environmental conditions. We describe the settings of hydraulic fracturing (framed by geology), fracturing mechanics and physics, and the critical role that non-Newtonian fluid dynamics and complex fluids play in the hydraulic fracturing process.

  10. FOREWORD: 26th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin; Wang, Zhengwei; Liu, Shuhong; Yuan, Shouqi; Luo, Xingqi; Wang, Fujun

    2012-11-01

    was molded into a polytechnic institute focusing on engineering in the nationwide restructuring of universities and colleges undertaken in 1952. At present, the university has 14 schools and 56 departments with faculties in science, engineering, humanities, law, medicine, history, philosophy, economics, management, education and art. The University now has over 25 900 students, including 13 100 undergraduates and 12 800 graduate students. As one of China's most renowned universities, Tsinghua has become an important institution for fostering talents and scientific research. The International Association of Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR) particularly promotes the advancement and exchange of knowledge through working groups, specialty symposia, congresses, and publications on water resources, river and coastal hydraulics, risk analysis, energy, environment, disaster prevention, and industrial processes. The IAHR Committee on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems deals with the advancement of technology associated with the understanding of steady and unsteady flow characteristics in hydraulic machinery and conduit systems connected to the machinery. The technology elements include the fluid behaviour within machine components, hydro-elastic behaviour of machine components, cavitation and two phase flow in turbines and pumps, hydraulic machine and plant control systems, the use of hydraulic machines to improve water quality, and even considerations to improve fish survival in their passage through hydro plants. The main emphases of the IAHR Committee on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems are to stimulate research and understanding of the technologies associated with hydraulic machinery and to promote interaction between the machine designers, machine users, the academic community, and the community as a whole. Hydraulic machinery is both cost effective and environmentally friendly. The goals of the IAHR Committee on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems are to improve

  11. Crystal structures of human CtBP in complex with substrate MTOB reveal active site features useful for inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Brendan J.; Grossman, Steven R.; Schiffer, Celia A.; Royer, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic corepressors C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) 1 and 2 harbor regulatory D-isomer specific 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase (D2-HDH) domains. 4-Methylthio 2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) exhibits substrate inhibition and can interfere with CtBP oncogenic activity in cell culture and mice. Crystal structures of human CtBP1 and CtBP2 in complex with MTOB and NAD+ revealed two key features: a conserved tryptophan that likely contributes to substrate specificity and a hydrophilic cavity that links MTOB with an NAD+ phosphate. Neither feature is present in other D2-HDH enzymes. These structures thus offer key opportunities for the development of highly selective anti-neoplastic CtBP inhibitors. PMID:24657618

  12. Electokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic system having no moving parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force and for manipulating fluids. Electro-osmotic flow is used to provide a valve and means to compress a fluid or gas in a capillary-based system. By electro-osmotically moving an electrolyte between a first position opening communication between a fluid inlet and outlet and a second position closing communication between the fluid inlet and outlet the system can be configured as a valve. The system can also be used to generate forces as large as 2500 psi that can be used to compress a fluid, either a liquid or a gas.

  13. Robust Prediction of Hydraulic Roughness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    floodplain hydraulics, in particular hydraulic roughness, is critical for flood control concerns; however, diversity of vegetation type and...or particular flood return inter- val analyses. Field Assessment. Field assessment methods refer to those that do not rely on direct mea- surement or...material (riprap) Form Roughness Calculators Brownlie ( 1983 ) Lab, Field H, S, d50, σg 0.082 < R < 55.8 ft (0.025 < R < 17 m), 2.9 × 10-4 < d50

  14. Research on One Borehole Hydraulic Coal Mining System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    XIA, Bairu; ZENG, Xiping; MAO, Zhixin

    The Borehole Hydraulic Coal Mining System (BHCMS) causes fragmentation of coal seams and removes coal slump through a drilled hole using high-pressure water jet. Then the mixture of coal and water as slurry are driven out of the borehole by hydraulic or air-lifting method, and are separated at the surface. This paper presents a case study of hydraulic borehole coal mining. The three key techniques of the BHCMS, namely, hydraulic lift of jet pump, air lift, and water jet disintegration are discussed and analyzed in this paper based on theoretical analysis and field experiments. Some useful findings have been obtained: (1) The design of jet pump, air lift system, and water jet has to be integrated appropriately in order to improve mining efficiency and coal recovery rate, and to decrease energy consumption. The design of hydraulic lift jet pump must meet the requirement of the minimum floating speed of coal particles. The optimization of nondimensional parameters and prevention of cavitation have to be considered in the design; (2) With regard to selecting the nozzle types of jet pump, center nozzle or annular nozzle can be selected according to the size of the removed particles; (3) Through air-lift and back pressure, the water head can be decreased to improve the lift capacity of jet pump and decrease the power loss. The air lift has great limitation if it is used solely to extract coal, but if it is employed in conjunction with jet pump, the lift capacity of jet pump can be increased greatly; (4) With water jets, the air lift can improve the fragmentation radius and capacity. The main factors that affect the effect of water jet are the submergible status of jet, jet pressure, and flowrate. The ideal jet of the monitor in the borehole hydraulic coal-mining system is a nonsubmergible free jet. Through air lift, the nonsubmergible free jet can be set up in the mining hole.

  15. Micromechanical Aspects of Hydraulic Fracturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-torres, S. A.; Behraftar, S.; Scheuermann, A.; Li, L.; Williams, D.

    2014-12-01

    A micromechanical model is developed to simulate the hydraulic fracturing process. The model comprises two key components. Firstly, the solid matrix, assumed as a rock mass with pre-fabricated cracks, is represented by an array of bonded particles simulated by the Discrete Element Model (DEM)[1]. The interaction is ruled by the spheropolyhedra method, which was introduced by the authors previously and has been shown to realistically represent many of the features found in fracturing and communition processes. The second component is the fluid, which is modelled by the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). It was recently coupled with the spheropolyhedra by the authors and validated. An advantage of this coupled LBM-DEM model is the control of many of the parameters of the fracturing fluid, such as its viscosity and the injection rate. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first application of such a coupled scheme for studying hydraulic fracturing[2]. In this first implementation, results are presented for a two-dimensional situation. Fig. 1 shows one snapshot of the LBM-DEM coupled simulation for the hydraulic fracturing where the elements with broken bonds can be identified and the fracture geometry quantified. The simulation involves a variation of the underground stress, particularly the difference between the two principal components of the stress tensor, to explore the effect on the fracture path. A second study focuses on the fluid viscosity to examine the effect of the time scales of different injection plans on the fracture geometry. The developed tool and the presented results have important implications for future studies of the hydraulic fracturing process and technology. references 1. Galindo-Torres, S.A., et al., Breaking processes in three-dimensional bonded granular materials with general shapes. Computer Physics Communications, 2012. 183(2): p. 266-277. 2. Galindo-Torres, S.A., A coupled Discrete Element Lattice Boltzmann Method for the

  16. Borehole Heat Exchanger Systems: Hydraulic Conductivity and Frost-Resistance of Backfill Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbergen, Hauke; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are economic solutions for both, domestic heating energy supply, as well as underground thermal energy storage (UTES). Over the past decades the technology developed to complex, advanced and highly efficient systems. For an efficient operation of the most common type of UTES, borehole heat exchanger (BHE) systems, it is necessary to design the system for a wide range of carrier fluid temperatures. During heat extraction, a cooled carrier fluid is heated up by geothermal energy. This collected thermal energy is energetically used by the heat pump. Thereby the carrier fluid temperature must have a lower temperature than the surrounding underground in order to collect heat energy. The steeper the thermal gradient, the more energy is transferred to the carrier fluid. The heat injection case works vice versa. For fast and sufficient heat extraction, even over long periods of heating (winter), it might become necessary to run the BHE with fluid temperatures below 0°C. As the heat pump runs periodically, a cyclic freezing of the pore water and corresponding ice-lens growth in the nearfield of the BHE pipes becomes possible. These so called freeze-thaw-cycles (FTC) are a critical state for the backfill material, as the sealing effect eventually decreases. From a hydrogeological point of view the vertical sealing of the BHE needs to be secured at any time (e.g. VDI 4640-2, Draft 2015). The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the BHE is influenced not only by the permeability of the grouting material itself, but by the contact area between BHE pipes and grout. In order to assess the sealing capacity of grouting materials a laboratory testing procedure was developed that measures the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the system BHE pipe and grout. The key features of the procedure are: • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity after simulation of freeze-thaw-cycle

  17. Offshore hydraulic fracturing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Meese, C.A. ); Mullen, M.E. ); Barree, R.D. )

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the frac-and-pack completion technique currently being used in the Gulf of Mexico, and elsewhere, for stimulation and sand control. The paper describes process applications and concerns that arise during implementation of the technique and discusses the completion procedure, treatment design, and execution.

  18. Mesh convergence study for hydraulic turbine draft-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devals, C.; Vu, T. C.; Zhang, Y.; Dompierre, J.; Guibault, F.

    2016-11-01

    Computational flow analysis is an essential tool for hydraulic turbine designers. Grid generation is the first step in the flow analysis process. Grid quality and solution accuracy are strongly linked. Even though many studies have addressed the issue of mesh independence, there is still no definitive consensus on mesh best practices, and research on that topic is still needed. This paper presents a mesh convergence study for turbulence flow in hydraulic turbine draft- tubes which represents the most challenging turbine component for CFD predictions. The findings from this parametric study will be incorporated as mesh control rules in an in-house automatic mesh generator for turbine components.

  19. Design Features for Linguistically-Mediated Meaning Construction: The Relative Roles of the Linguistic and Conceptual Systems in Subserving the Ideational Function of Language.

    PubMed

    Evans, Vyvyan

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in language and cognitive science proposes that the linguistic system evolved to provide an "executive" control system on the evolutionarily more ancient conceptual system (e.g., Barsalou et al., 2008; Evans, 2009, 2015a,b; Bergen, 2012). In short, the claim is that embodied representations in the linguistic system interface with non-linguistic representations in the conceptual system, facilitating rich meanings, or simulations, enabling linguistically mediated communication. In this paper I build on these proposals by examining the nature of what I identify as design features for this control system. In particular, I address how the ideational function of language-our ability to deploy linguistic symbols to convey meanings of great complexity-is facilitated. The central proposal of this paper is as follows. The linguistic system of any given language user, of any given linguistic system-spoken or signed-facilitates access to knowledge representation-concepts-in the conceptual system, which subserves this ideational function. In the most general terms, the human meaning-making capacity is underpinned by two distinct, although tightly coupled representational systems: the conceptual system and the linguistic system. Each system contributes to meaning construction in qualitatively distinct ways. This leads to the first design feature: given that the two systems are representational-they are populated by semantic representations-the nature and function of the representations are qualitatively different. This proposed design feature I term the bifurcation in semantic representation. After all, it stands to reason that if a linguistic system has a different function, vis-à-vis the conceptual system, which is of far greater evolutionary antiquity, then the semantic representations will be complementary, and as such, qualitatively different, reflecting the functional distinctions of the two systems, in collectively giving rise to meaning. I consider the

  20. Design Features for Linguistically-Mediated Meaning Construction: The Relative Roles of the Linguistic and Conceptual Systems in Subserving the Ideational Function of Language

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Vyvyan

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in language and cognitive science proposes that the linguistic system evolved to provide an “executive” control system on the evolutionarily more ancient conceptual system (e.g., Barsalou et al., 2008; Evans, 2009, 2015a,b; Bergen, 2012). In short, the claim is that embodied representations in the linguistic system interface with non-linguistic representations in the conceptual system, facilitating rich meanings, or simulations, enabling linguistically mediated communication. In this paper I build on these proposals by examining the nature of what I identify as design features for this control system. In particular, I address how the ideational function of language—our ability to deploy linguistic symbols to convey meanings of great complexity—is facilitated. The central proposal of this paper is as follows. The linguistic system of any given language user, of any given linguistic system—spoken or signed—facilitates access to knowledge representation—concepts—in the conceptual system, which subserves this ideational function. In the most general terms, the human meaning-making capacity is underpinned by two distinct, although tightly coupled representational systems: the conceptual system and the linguistic system. Each system contributes to meaning construction in qualitatively distinct ways. This leads to the first design feature: given that the two systems are representational—they are populated by semantic representations—the nature and function of the representations are qualitatively different. This proposed design feature I term the bifurcation in semantic representation. After all, it stands to reason that if a linguistic system has a different function, vis-à-vis the conceptual system, which is of far greater evolutionary antiquity, then the semantic representations will be complementary, and as such, qualitatively different, reflecting the functional distinctions of the two systems, in collectively giving rise to

  1. CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    WITTEKIND WD

    2007-10-03

    This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

  2. Pros and cons of hydraulic drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using hydraulic drilling are discussed. The low maintenance, energy efficiency, drilling speeds, and operating costs are the main advantages of the hydraulic drills. The economics and maintenance of air drills are also compared.

  3. Production of heavy oil with a hydraulic gas pump

    SciTech Connect

    Amani, M.

    1995-12-31

    The original designs of the Hydraulic Gas Pump were first presented in Society of Petroleum Engineers SPE paper 025422. This pump is still in the conceptual stage, but the technology to build it is available. This paper presents its theoretical applications for the production of heavy oil. An important advantage of the Hydraulic Gas Pump is its ability to pump liquids from deep wells. Rod pumps are limited when pumping viscous oil from deep wells because of problems with rod stress and rod fall. The Hydraulic Gas Pump can provide an alternative to rod pumps for lifting heavy oil from deep wells. Another advantage of the Hydraulic Gas Pump for the production of heavy oil is its ability to operate in gassy, sandy, and high temperature environments. Gas and steam do not affect its efficiency. This makes the pump useful for steam projects, fire-flood projects, or lifting heavy oil in gassy environments. The Hydraulic Gas Pump operates by a rotative gas compression system. This paper presents a discussion of its operation and its lift capacity.

  4. Interaction of hydraulic and buckling mechanisms in blowout fractures.

    PubMed

    Nagasao, Tomohisa; Miyamoto, Junpei; Jiang, Hua; Tamaki, Tamotsu; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi

    2010-04-01

    The etiology of blowout fractures is generally attributed to 2 mechanisms--increase in the pressure of the orbital contents (the hydraulic mechanism) and direct transmission of impacts on the orbital walls (the buckling mechanism). The present study aims to elucidate whether or not an interaction exists between these 2 mechanisms. We performed a simulation experiment using 10 Computer-Aided-Design skull models. We applied destructive energy to the orbits of the 10 models in 3 different ways. First, to simulate pure hydraulic mechanism, energy was applied solely on the internal walls of the orbit. Second, to simulate pure buckling mechanism, energy was applied solely on the inferior rim of the orbit. Third, to simulate the combined effect of the hydraulic and buckling mechanisms, energy was applied both on the internal wall of the orbit and inferior rim of the orbit. After applying the energy, we calculated the areas of the regions where fracture occurred in the models. Thereafter, we compared the areas among the 3 energy application patterns. When the hydraulic and buckling mechanisms work simultaneously, fracture occurs on wider areas of the orbital walls than when each of these mechanisms works separately. The hydraulic and buckling mechanisms interact, enhancing each other's effect. This information should be taken into consideration when we examine patients in whom blowout fracture is suspected.

  5. Modular operation of membrane bioreactors for higher hydraulic capacity utilisation.

    PubMed

    Veltmann, K; Palmowski, L M; Pinnekamp, J

    2011-01-01

    Using data from 6 full-scale municipal membrane bioreactors (MBR) in Germany the hydraulic capacity utilisation and specific energy consumption were studied and their connexion shown. The average hydraulic capacity utilisation lies between 14% and 45%. These low values are justified by the necessity to deal with intense rain events and cater for future flow increases. However, this low hydraulic capacity utilisation leads to high specific energy consumption. The optimisation of MBR operation requires a better utilisation of MBR hydraulic capacity, particularly under consideration of the energy-intensive membrane aeration. A first approach to respond to large influent flow fluctuations consists in adjusting the number of operating modules. This is practised by most MBR operators but so far mostly with variable flux and constant membrane aeration. A second approach is the real-time adjustment of membrane aeration in line with flux variations. This adjustment is not permitted under current manufacturers' warranty conditions. A further opportunity is a discontinuous operation, in which filtration takes place over short periods at high flux and energy for membrane aeration is saved during filtration pauses. The integration of a buffer volume is thereby indispensable. Overall a modular design with small units, which can be activated/ inactivated according to the influent flow and always operate under optimum conditions, enables a better utilisation of MBR hydraulic capacity and forms a solid base to reduce MBR energy demand.

  6. Transport efficiency and dynamics of hydraulic fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    Intermittent fluid pulses in the Earth's crust can explain a variety of geological phenomena, for instance the occurrence of hydraulic breccia. Fluid transport in the crust is usually modeled as continuous darcian flow, ignoring that sufficient fluid overpressure can cause hydraulic fractures as fluid pathways with very dynamic behavior. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and healing of hydraulic fractures depends on local fluid pressure, which is, in turn, largely controlled by the fracture network. We develop a crustal-scale 2D computer model designed to simulate this process. To focus on the dynamics of the process we chose a setup as simple as possible. Control factors are constant overpressure at a basal fluid source and a constant 'viscous' parameter controlling fracture-healing. Our results indicate that at large healing rates hydraulic fractures are mobile, transporting fluid in intermittent pulses to the surface and displaying a 1/fα behavior. Low healing rates result in stable networks and constant flow. The efficiency of the fluid transport is independent from the closure dynamics of veins or fractures. More important than preexisting fracture networks is the distribution of fluid pressure. A key requirement for dynamic fracture networks is the presence of a fluid pressure gradient.

  7. Development of Hydraulic Friction Brake for Railway Rolling Stock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenvisuwat, Thum; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kitagawa, Ato

    A novel hydraulic brake pressure control (BPC) valve for the railway rolling stock was proposed in the part I of this study. As a second report, this paper is concerned with the dynamic analysis and the performance evaluation of the hydraulic brake system using the BPC valve. In order to analyze the behavior of the BPC valve, a simplified transfer function and a nonlinear model of the valve are derived respectively. By use of simple linear model, it is achieved to determine the initial values of essential parameter simply. In addition, it is also achieved to investigate overall dynamic performance of brake system and to evaluate the effect of design parameters through the numerical analysis using detailed nonlinear model. The validity of mathematical models is confirmed by experiments. Finally, the performance of the hydraulic brake system using newly manufactured BPC valve is confirmed with an actual braking device of the E2 series Shinkansen railway.

  8. Application study of magnetic fluid seal in hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Y.; Zhang, W.

    2012-11-01

    The waterpower resources of our country are abundant, and the hydroelectric power is developed, but at present the main shaft sealing device of hydraulic turbine is easy to wear and tear and the leakage is great. The magnetic fluid seal has the advantages of no contact, no wear, self-healing, long life and so on. In this paper, the magnetic fluid seal would be used in the main shaft of hydraulic turbine, the sealing structure was built the model, meshed the geometry, applied loads and solved by using MULTIPHYSICS in ANSYS software, the influence of the various sealing structural parameters such as tooth width, height, slot width, sealing gap on the sealing property were analyzed, the magnetic fluid sealing device suitable for large-diameter shaft and sealing water was designed, the sealing problem of the hydraulic turbine main shaft was solved effectively which will bring huge economic benefits.

  9. Part-load flow and hydraulic stability of centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Guelich, J.F.; Egger, R. )

    1992-03-01

    Unscheduled outages and deratings caused by problems with feed pumps cost utilities an estimated $460 million in replacement power costs 1985. Vibrations and pressure pulsations caused by the flow separation at partload operation are among the leading causes of feed pump failures. To reduce or avoid such failures, the flow mechanisms responsible for hydraulic instabilities must be understood. To increase this understanding was one of the main objectives of the hydraulic investigations carried out under the present research project and described in this report. A large number of parameters influencing the hydraulic performance and the stability of the head capacity characteristics have been investigated and guidelines have been derived for the selection of design parameters for impellers, diffusers, and volutes.

  10. Review of computational thermal-hydraulic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, R.H.; Keeton, L.W.

    1995-12-31

    Corrosion of heat transfer tubing in nuclear steam generators has been a persistent problem in the power generation industry, assuming many different forms over the years depending on chemistry and operating conditions. Whatever the corrosion mechanism, a fundamental understanding of the process is essential to establish effective management strategies. To gain this fundamental understanding requires an integrated investigative approach that merges technology from many diverse scientific disciplines. An important aspect of an integrated approach is characterization of the corrosive environment at high temperature. This begins with a thorough understanding of local thermal-hydraulic conditions, since they affect deposit formation, chemical concentration, and ultimately corrosion. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can and should play an important role in characterizing the thermal-hydraulic environment and in predicting the consequences of that environment,. The evolution of CFD technology now allows accurate calculation of steam generator thermal-hydraulic conditions and the resulting sludge deposit profiles. Similar calculations are also possible for model boilers, so that tests can be designed to be prototypic of the heat exchanger environment they are supposed to simulate. This paper illustrates the utility of CFD technology by way of examples in each of these two areas. This technology can be further extended to produce more detailed local calculations of the chemical environment in support plate crevices, beneath thick deposits on tubes, and deep in tubesheet sludge piles. Knowledge of this local chemical environment will provide the foundation for development of mechanistic corrosion models, which can be used to optimize inspection and cleaning schedules and focus the search for a viable fix.

  11. Introduction to Hydraulics. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Instruction and Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide on hydraulics is part of a series of individualized instructional materials. The guide is provided to help the instructor make certain that each student gets the most benefit possible from both the student's manual and what he/she does on the job. Notes for the instructor contain suggestions on how the student should use…

  12. Manual or hydraulic gearshifting apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Kojima, Y.

    1986-04-08

    A vehicle transmission control apparatus is described which consists of: a plurality of shift members for operating a vehicle transmission; a lever adapted for linear movement into a plurality of positions, one each of the lever being operatively coupled to a different one of the shift members in each of the positions; the lever being further adapted for pivotal movement in response to which the one end of the lever actuates the operatively coupled shift member; a select actuator means comprising a select hydraulic cylinder and a select piston retained thereby, the select piston being coupled to the lever and hydraulically controlled to produce the linear movement thereof; a shift actuator means comprising a shift hydraulic cylinder and a shift piston retained thereby, the shift piston being coupled to the lever and hydraulically controlled to produce the pivotal movement thereof; a casing means retaining the lever, the select actuator means, and the shift actuator means; and a control member comprising a portion within the casing means and coupled to the lever and a manually accessible portion always disposed outside the casing means and having means adapted for manual actuation to produce either the linear or the pivotal movement of the lever.

  13. High Pressure Hydraulic Distribution System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-20

    to 500 0 F. 5 cycles. 5000 F room temperature to 50001F; 45 ______________ Icycles The tesis planned for the distribution system demonstrator were...American Society for Testing and Materials ASTM D412 - Tension Testing of Vulcanized Rubber ASTM D571 - Testing Automotive Hydraulic Brake Hose Society of

  14. Hydraulic fracturing system and method

    DOEpatents

    Ciezobka, Jordan; Salehi, Iraj

    2017-02-28

    A hydraulic fracturing system and method for enhancing effective permeability of earth formations to increase hydrocarbon production, enhance operation efficiency by reducing fluid entry friction due to tortuosity and perforation, and to open perforations that are either unopened or not effective using traditional techniques, by varying a pump rate and/or a flow rate to a wellbore.

  15. Hydraulic Properties of Unsaturated Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many agrophysical applications require knowledge of the hydraulic properties of unsaturated soils. These properties reflect the ability of a soil to retain or transmit water and its dissolved constituents. The objective of this work was to develop an entry for the Encyclopedia of Agrophysics that w...

  16. Thermal-Hydraulic-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    ELM computer program is simple computational tool for modeling steady-state thermal hydraulics of flows of propellants through fuel-element-coolant channels in nuclear thermal rockets. Evaluates various heat-transfer-coefficient and friction-factor correlations available for turbulent pipe flow with addition of heat. Comparisons possible within one program. Machine-independent program written in FORTRAN 77.

  17. Tree Hydraulics: How Sap Rises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Trees transport water from roots to crown--a height that can exceed 100 m. The physics of tree hydraulics can be conveyed with simple fluid dynamics based upon the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and Murray's law. Here the conduit structure is modelled as conical pipes and as branching pipes. The force required to lift sap is generated mostly by…

  18. Hydraulic response and nitrogen retention in bioretention mesocosms with regulated outlets: part I--hydraulic response.

    PubMed

    Lucas, William C; Greenway, Margaret

    2011-08-01

    In bioretention systems used for stormwater treatment, runoff interception improves with increased infiltration rates. However, nitrogen retention improves with increased retention time or decreasing infiltration rates. These contrasting responses were analyzed in 240-L experimental mesocosms using a variety of media treatments. The mesocosms were vegetated, except for one barren control. Dual-stage outlets were installed to extend retention time and equalize hydraulic responses. One unregulated treatment was free-draining. This part 1 paper presents the media properties and hydraulic responses. The highly aggregated media had saturated hydraulic conductivities ranging from 20.7 to 59.6 cm/h in August 2008 (austral winter), which increased to 42.8 to 110.6 cm/h in March 2009 (austral summer). The outlet regulated mesocosms provided retention over 8 times longer than the free-draining mesocosms, while still being able to capture large events. The outlets provide adaptive management for bioretention design to improve both runoff capture and nitrogen retention.

  19. Hydraulic Fracturing of Soils; A Literature Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    best case, or worst case. The study reported herein is an overview of one such test or technique, hydraulic fracturing , which is defined as the...formation of cracks, in soil by the application of hydraulic pressure greater than the minor principal stress at that point. Hydraulic fracturing , as a... hydraulic fracturing as a means for determination of lateral stresses, the technique can still be used for determining in situ total stress and permeability at a point in a cohesive soil.

  20. Eigenfrequency of Hydraulic Systems of Loading Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašina, Martin; Hružík, Lumír; Bureček, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Eigenfrequency of hydraulic systems belongs to important dynamic quantities. If the excitation frequency of a given hydraulic system is equal to the system eigenfrequency, high-amplitude pressure and flow pulsations can arise. It has a negative influence on load of hydraulic elements, system tightness etc. For this reason it is necessary to eliminate the operation of the hydraulic system at its eigenfrequency. The paper deals with experimental determination of the system eigenfrequency in various operating modes of the investigated loading device.

  1. LMR thermal hydraulics calculations in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.; Malloy, D.J.; Mohr, D.

    1987-04-27

    A wide range of thermal hydraulics computer codes have been developed by various organizations in the US. These codes cover an extensive range of purposes from within-assembly-wise pin temperature calculations to plant wide transient analysis. The codes are used for static analysis, for analysis of protected anticipated transients, and for analysis of a wide range of unprotected transients for the more recent inherently safe LMR designs. Some of these codes are plant-specific codes with properties of a specific plant built into them. Other codes are more general and can be applied to a number of plants or designs. These codes, and the purposes for which they have been used, are described.

  2. Hydraulic characterization of " Furcraea andina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Velasquez, M. F.; Fallico, C.; Molinari, A.; Santillan, P.; Salazar, M.

    2012-04-01

    The present level of pollution, increasingly involving groundwaters, constitutes a serious risk for environment and human health. Therefore the remediation of saturated and unsaturated soils, removing pollutant materials through innovative and economic bio-remediation techniques is more frequently required. Recent studies on natural fiber development have shown the effectiveness of these fibers for removal of some heavy metals, due to the lignin content in the natural fibers which plays an important role in the adsorption of metal cations (Lee et al., 2004; Troisi et al., 2008; C. Fallico, 2010). In the context of remediation techniques for unsaturated and/or saturated zone, an experimental approach for the hydraulic characterization of the "Furcraea andina" (i.e., Cabuya Blanca) fiber was carried out. This fiber is native to Andean regions and grows easily in wild or cultivated form in the valleys and hillsides of Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Fibers of "Furcraea andina" were characterized by experimental tests to determine their hydraulic conductivity or permeability and porosity in order to use this medium for bioremediation of contaminated aquifer exploiting the physical, chemical and microbial capacity of natural fiber in heavy metal adsorption. To evaluate empirically the hydraulic conductivity, laboratory tests were carried out at constant head specifically on the fibers manually extracted. For these tests we used a flow cell (used as permeameter), containing the "Furcraea andina" fibers to be characterized, suitably connected by a tygon pipe to a Marriott's bottle, which had a plastic tube that allow the adjustment of the hydraulic head for different tests to a constant value. By this experiment it was also possible to identify relationships that enable the estimation of permeability as a function of density, i.e. of the compaction degree of the fibers. Our study was carried out for three values of hydraulic head (H), namely 10, 18, and 25 cm and for each

  3. Investigation of hydraulic transmission noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klop, Richard J.

    Advanced hydrostatic transmissions and hydraulic hybrids show potential in new market segments such as commercial vehicles and passenger cars. Such new applications regard low noise generation as a high priority, thus, demanding new quiet hydrostatic transmission designs. In this thesis, the aim is to investigate noise sources of hydrostatic transmissions to discover strategies for designing compact and quiet solutions. A model has been developed to capture the interaction of a pump and motor working in a hydrostatic transmission and to predict overall noise sources. This model allows a designer to compare noise sources for various configurations and to design compact and inherently quiet solutions. The model describes dynamics of the system by coupling lumped parameter pump and motor models with a one-dimensional unsteady compressible transmission line model. The model has been verified with dynamic pressure measurements in the line over a wide operating range for several system structures. Simulation studies were performed illustrating sensitivities of several design variables and the potential of the model to design transmissions with minimal noise sources. A semi-anechoic chamber has been designed and constructed suitable for sound intensity measurements that can be used to derive sound power. Measurements proved the potential to reduce audible noise by predicting and reducing both noise sources. Sound power measurements were conducted on a series hybrid transmission test bench to validate the model and compare predicted noise sources with sound power.

  4. Identifying Effective Design Features of Technology-Infused Inquiry Learning Modules: A Two-Year Study of Students' Inquiry Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ying-Shao; Fang, Su-Chi; Zhang, Wen-Xin; Hsin-Kai, Wu; Wu, Pai-Hsing; Hwang, Fu-Kwun

    2016-01-01

    The two-year study aimed to explore how students' development of different inquiry abilities actually benefited from the design of technology-infused learning modules. Three learning modules on the topics of seasons, environmental issues and air pollution were developed to facilitate students' inquiry abilities: questioning, planning, analyzing,…

  5. Bug or Feature: The Role of "Gamestar Mechanic's" Material Dialog on the Metacognitive Game Design Strategies of Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Games, Alex

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the language and literacy practices of middle-school children as they worked toward constructing their own computer games using "Gamestar Mechanic," a game intended to teach them key ways of thinking and communicating germane to the discourse of game designers. It examines the changes that took place in what previous work…

  6. The hydraulic conductivity of chopped sorghum

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, M.H.; Reddell, D.L.; Sweeten, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity of water through chopped sweet sorghum at various packing densities and soaking times was measured using permeameters. Hydraulic conductivity decreased by two orders of magnitude as packing density increased from 400 to 897 kg/m/sup 3/. Soaking time had less effect on hydraulic conductivity, and the effect depended on packing density.

  7. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  8. Merging hydraulics with biology

    SciTech Connect

    Thorncraft, Garry; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Research staff are now working with developers in Lao PDR and Australia to ensure design criteria is optimised at time of construction. Research is presently underway on a suite of Mekong and Murray-Darling species to identify critical tolerances of shear and pressure. Work in the USA is also being expanded to lamprey and white sturgeon in an effort to increase the understanding beyond salmon species. Researchers and developers are hopeful of constructing the first fish-friendly hydro plants within the next two years. Pending favourable outcomes, the expansion of this technology to other sites and river systems is the ultimate development outcome.

  9. Tier II Interventions within the Framework of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: Essential Features for Design, Implementation, and Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cynthia M; Borgmeier, Chris

    2010-01-01

    To meet the complex social behavioral and academic needs of all students, schools benefit from having available multiple evidence-based interventions of varying intensity. School-wide positive behavior support provides a framework within which a continuum of evidence-based interventions can be implemented in a school. This framework includes three levels or tiers of intervention; Tier I (primary or universal), Tier II (secondary or targeted), and Tier III (tertiary or individualized) supports. In this paper we review the logic behind school-wide positive behavior support and then focus on Tier II interventions, as this level of support has received the least attention in the literature. We delineate the key features of Tier II interventions as implemented within school-wide positive behavior support, provide guidelines for matching Tier II interventions to school and student needs, and describe how schools plan for implementation and maintenance of selected interventions.

  10. Design of an efficient real-time algorithm using reduced feature dimension for recognition of speed limit signs.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hanmin; Han, Seungwha; Hwang, Sun-Young

    2013-01-01

    We propose a real-time algorithm for recognition of speed limit signs from a moving vehicle. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) required for classification is performed by using Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) coefficients. To reduce feature dimension in LDA, DCT coefficients are selected by a devised discriminant function derived from information obtained by training. Binarization and thinning are performed on a Region of Interest (ROI) obtained by preprocessing a detected ROI prior to DCT for further reduction of computation time in DCT. This process is performed on a sequence of image frames to increase the hit rate of recognition. Experimental results show that arithmetic operations are reduced by about 60%, while hit rates reach about 100% compared to previous works.

  11. Integrating motivational, social, and contextual work design features: a meta-analytic summary and theoretical extension of the work design literature.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Stephen E; Nahrgang, Jennifer D; Morgeson, Frederick P

    2007-09-01

    The authors developed and meta-analytically examined hypotheses designed to test and extend work design theory by integrating motivational, social, and work context characteristics. Results from a summary of 259 studies and 219,625 participants showed that 14 work characteristics explained, on average, 43% of the variance in the 19 worker attitudes and behaviors examined. For example, motivational characteristics explained 25% of the variance in subjective performance, 2% in turnover perceptions, 34% in job satisfaction, 24% in organizational commitment, and 26% in role perception outcomes. Beyond motivational characteristics, social characteristics explained incremental variances of 9% of the variance in subjective performance, 24% in turnover intentions, 17% in job satisfaction, 40% in organizational commitment, and 18% in role perception outcomes. Finally, beyond both motivational and social characteristics, work context characteristics explained incremental variances of 4% in job satisfaction and 16% in stress. The results of this study suggest numerous opportunities for the continued development of work design theory and practice.

  12. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  13. Drainage hydraulics of permeable friction courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbeneau, Randall J.; Barrett, Michael E.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes solutions to the hydraulic equations that govern flow in permeable friction courses (PFC). PFC is a layer of porous asphalt approximately 50 mm thick that is placed as an overlay on top of an existing conventional concrete or asphalt road surface to help control splash and hydroplaning, reduce noise, and enhance quality of storm water runoff. The primary objective of this manuscript is to present an analytical system of equations that can be used in design and analysis of PFC systems. The primary assumptions used in this analysis are that the flow can be modeled as one-dimensional, steady state Darcy-type flow and that slopes are sufficiently small so that the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumptions apply. Solutions are derived for cases where storm water drainage is confined to the PFC bed and for conditions where the PFC drainage capacity is exceeded and ponded sheet flow occurs across the pavement surface. The mathematical solutions provide the drainage characteristics (depth and residence time) as a function of rainfall intensity, PFC hydraulic conductivity, pavement slope, and maximum drainage path length.

  14. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MCU SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-03-19

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone., Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement or lime to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of MCU (Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit) saltstone relative to two permeating fluids. These fluids included simulated groundwater equilibrated with vault concrete and simulated saltstone pore fluid. Samples of the MCU saltstone were prepared by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and allowed to cure for twenty eight days prior to testing. These samples included two three-inch diameter by six inch long mold samples and three one-inch diameter by twelve inch long mold samples.

  15. Hydraulic fracture and toughening of a brittle layer bonded to a hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucantonio, Alessandro; Noselli, Giovanni; Trepat, Xavier; Desimone, Antonio; Arroyo, Marino

    Brittle materials fracture under tensile or shear stress. When stress attains a critical threshold, crack propagation becomes unstable and proceeds dynamically. In the presence of several precracks, a brittle material always propagates only the weakest crack, leading to catastrophic failure. Here, we show that all these features of brittle fracture are radically modified when the material susceptible to cracking is bonded to a poroelastic medium, such as a hydrogel, a common situation in biological tissues. In particular, we show that the brittle material can fracture in compression and can resist cracking in tension, thanks to the hydraulic coupling with the hydrogel. In the case of multiple cracks, we find that localized fracture occurs when the permeability of the hydrogel is high, whereas decreased permeability leads to toughening by promoting multiple cracking. Our results may contribute to the understanding of fracture in biological tissues and provide inspiration for the design of tough, biomimetic materials.

  16. Radiation design and control features of a hospital room for a low dose rate remote afterloading unit

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgow, G.P.; Corrigan, K.W.

    1995-09-01

    We have renovated, and used for four years, a small 3.4 m x 4.3 m conventional patient second floor hospital room to accommodate a low dose rate remote afterloading unit containing 13 GBq (0.35 Ci) of {sup 137}Cs. Supplemental room shielding consists of a power assisted door (536 kg, 1.7 cm thickness of lead), 1.3 cm lead wall shielding at selected wall locations and on a projector shield beneath the bed, and 0.6 cm of lead over the floor above. Radiation control features consisted of a room interior radiation detector independent of the remote afterloading unit, a redundant patient/nurse communication system, a remote control system, a door interlock system to insert and retract the radioactive pellets, and a visible and audible status indictator system located at a nearby nurses` work station. Renovation costs (in 1990 dollars) were $383 per square foot; total project costs were $187,000. Nursing personnel radiation exposure was reduced from about 6 {mu}Sv (mg Ra eq){sup -1} (0.6 mrem (mg Ra eq){sup -1}) to about 0.7 {mu}Sv (mg Ra eq){sup -1} (0.07 mrem (mg Ra eq){sup -1}), almost a tenfold reduction. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Fuel/hydraulic transfer valve improves reliability of Atlas space launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogman, M.

    1980-01-01

    The Atlas fuel hydraulic transfer valve design is described. The design satisfies primary goals such as fuel and oil isolation before launch in order to use existing ground support and airborne hardware and procedures. The valve operates only after the vehicle has been committed to launch. Hydraulic system function is maintained if the valve fails to function. Valve operation is mechanical and interfaces only with the propulsion system.

  18. Gas-to-hydraulic power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, C. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A gas piston driven hydraulic piston pump is described in which the gas cycle is of high efficiency by injecting the gas in slugs at the beginning of each power stroke. The hydraulic piston is disposed to operate inside the as piston, and the two pistons, both slidably but nonrotatably mounted, are coupled together with a rotating but non-sliding motion transfer ring extending into antifriction grooves in the sidewalls of the two pistons. To make the hydraulic piston move at a constant speed during constant hydraulic horsepower demand and thus exert a constant pressure on the hydraulic fluid, these grooves are machined with variable pitches and one is the opposite of the other, i.e., the gas piston groove increases in pitch during its power stroke while the hydraulic piston groove decreases. Any number of piston assembly sets may be used to obtain desired hydraulic horsepower.

  19. Technical features and criteria in designing fiber-reinforced composite materials: from the aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gloria, Antonio; Ronca, Dante; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Chierchia, Marianna; De Santis, Roberto; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Polymer-based composite materials are ideal for applications where high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios are required. From aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications, fiber-reinforced polymers have replaced metals, thus emerging as an interesting alternative. As widely reported, the mechanical behavior of the composite materials involves investigation on micro- and macro-scale, taking into consideration micromechanics, macromechanics and lamination theory. Clinical situations often require repairing connective tissues and the use of composite materials may be suitable for these applications because of the possibility to design tissue substitutes or implants with the required mechanical properties. Accordingly, this review aims at stressing the importance of fiber-reinforced composite materials to make advanced and biomimetic prostheses with tailored mechanical properties, starting from the basic principle design, technologies, and a brief overview of composites applications in several fields. Fiber-reinforced composite materials for artificial tendons, ligaments, and intervertebral discs, as well as for hip stems and mandible models will be reviewed, highlighting the possibility to mimic the mechanical properties of the soft and hard tissues that they replace.

  20. A decade of adult intensive care unit design: a study of the physical design features of the best-practice examples.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2006-01-01

    This article reports a study of the physical design characteristics of a set of adult intensive care units (ICUs), built between 1993 and 2003. These ICUs were recognized as the best-practice examples by the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, and the American Institute of Architects. This study is based on a systematic analysis of the materials found on these ICUs in the booklet and videos jointly published by the above organizations in 2005. The study finds that most of these examples of best-practice adult ICUs have the following negative characteristics: (1) they are built as renovation projects with more health and safety hazards during construction; (2) most of them are mixed-service units with more safety and staffing problems; (3) the overall layout and the layout of staff work areas in these ICUs do not have any common design solutions for improved patient and staff outcomes; and (4) in these ICUs, family space is often located outside the unit, and family access to the patient room is restricted, even though family presence at the bedside may be important for improved patient outcomes. Some of these negative characteristics are offset by the following positive characteristics in most ICUs: (1) they have only private patient rooms for improved patient care, safety, privacy, and comfort; (2) most patient beds are freestanding for easy access to patients from all sides; (3) they have handwashing sinks and waste disposal facilities in the patient room for improved safety; and (4) most patient rooms have natural light to help patients with circadian rhythms. The article discusses, in detail, the implications of its findings, and the role of the ICU design community in a very complicated design context.