Science.gov

Sample records for hydraulic model study

  1. Hydraulic sand-model studies of miscible-fluid flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahill, J.M.

    1973-01-01

    Hydraulic sand models are useful physical tools in the investigation of the transition zone that occurs between salt and fresh ground water in coastal aquifers. Such models are used to demonstrate the effects of transport mechanisms that influence the dynamic behavior and the shape of the transition zone. The techniques employed in obtaining in-place measurements of solute concentrations are generally the stumbling block in generating data for two-dimensional dispersion systems. Two in-place measurement techniques were used in the studies described: (1) conductivity probes when salt was used as a tracer; and (2) photoelectric cells when organic dye was used as a tracer. Results indicate that conductivity methods are more reliable; however, care must be exercised inasmuch as the probes tend to disturb the fluid flow.

  2. Air-water analogy and the study of hydraulic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supino, Giulio

    1953-01-01

    The author first sets forth some observations about the theory of models. Then he established certain general criteria for the construction of dynamically similar models in water and in air, through reference to the perfect fluid equations and to the ones pertaining to viscous flow. It is, in addition, pointed out that there are more cases in which the analogy is possible than is commonly supposed.

  3. Prattville intake, Lake Almanor, California, hydraulic model study on selective withdrawal modifications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeyen, T.

    1995-07-01

    Bureau of Reclamation conducted this hydraulic model study to provide Pacific Gas and Electric Company with an evaluation of several selective withdrawal structures that are being considered to reduce intake flow temperatures through the Prattville Intake at Lake Almanor, California. Release temperature control using selective withdrawal structures is being considered in an effort to improve the cold-water fishery in the North Fork of the Feather River.

  4. Hydraulic modelling for flood mapping and prevention: the case study of Cerfone River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Silvia; Venturi, Sara; Manciola, Piergiorgio

    2016-04-01

    The research focuses on the hydraulic risk evaluation and danger estimation for different extreme flood events, in order to correctly implement mitigation measures in an anthropized basin. The Cerfone River (Tuscany, Italy), due to the several floods that have affected the neighbouring villages in recent years, is selected as case of study. A finite volume numerical model that solves the shallow water equations all over the computational domain, was used to simulate the unsteady evolution of the maximum extent of flooded areas for different scenarios. The one - dimensional approach (still widespread in engineering projects) can be inaccurate in complex flows, which are often two or three dimensional and sometimes does not manage to capture the flood spatial extents in terms of flow depth and velocity. The use of a two-dimensional numerical model seems to be the suitable instrument in terms of computational efficiency and adequacy of results. In fact it overcomes the limits of a one-dimensional modeling in terms of prediction of hydraulic variables with a less computational effort respect to a full 3d model. An accurate modeling of the river basin leads to the evaluation of the present hydraulic risk. Structural and non- structural measures are then studied, simulated and compared in order to define the optimal risk reduction plan for the area of study. At this aim, different flooding scenarios were simulated through the 2D mathematical model: i) existing state of the river and floodplain areas; ii) design of a levee to protect the most vulnerable populated areas against the flooding risk; iii) use of off - stream detention basins that strongly amplify the lamination capacity of floodplains. All these scenarios were simulated for different return periods: 50, 100, 200 and 500 years. The inputs of the hydraulic models are obtained in accordance with the legislative requirement of Tuscany Region; in particular discharge hydrographs are evaluate through the ALTo

  5. Modeling Studies to Constrain Fluid and Gas Migration Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, H.; Birdsell, D.; Lackey, G.; Karra, S.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Dempsey, D.

    2015-12-01

    The dramatic increase in the extraction of unconventional oil and gas resources using horizontal wells and hydraulic fracturing (fracking) technologies has raised concerns about potential environmental impacts. Large volumes of hydraulic fracturing fluids are injected during fracking. Incidents of stray gas occurrence in shallow aquifers overlying shale gas reservoirs have been reported; whether these are in any way related to fracking continues to be debated. Computational models serve as useful tools for evaluating potential environmental impacts. We present modeling studies of hydraulic fracturing fluid and gas migration during the various stages of well operation, production, and subsequent plugging. The fluid migration models account for overpressure in the gas reservoir, density contrast between injected fluids and brine, imbibition into partially saturated shale, and well operations. Our results highlight the importance of representing the different stages of well operation consistently. Most importantly, well suction and imbibition both play a significant role in limiting upward migration of injected fluids, even in the presence of permeable connecting pathways. In an overall assessment, our fluid migration simulations suggest very low risk to groundwater aquifers when the vertical separation from a shale gas reservoir is of the order of 1000' or more. Multi-phase models of gas migration were developed to couple flow and transport in compromised wellbores and subsurface formations. These models are useful for evaluating both short-term and long-term scenarios of stray methane release. We present simulation results to evaluate mechanisms controlling stray gas migration, and explore relationships between bradenhead pressures and the likelihood of methane release and transport.

  6. Soil hydraulic properties and REV study using X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modelling: saturated hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Kirill; Khirevich, Siarhei; Sizonenko, Timofey; Karsanina, Marina; Umarova, Aminat; Korost, Dmitry; Matthai, Stephan; Mallants, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    To verify pore-scale modelling approach for determination of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity properties we scanned three cylindrical soil samples taken from A, Ah and B horizons using X-ray microtomography method. Resulting 3D soil images with resolutions of 15.25-20.96 μm were segmented into pores and solids and their maximum inscribed cube subvolumes were used as input data for three major pore-scale modelling methods to simulate saturated flow - lattice-Boltzmann method, finite-difference solution of the Stokes problem, and pore-network model. Provided that imaging resolution is high enough to capture the backbone of effective porosity and the main conducting pores all three methods resulted in simulated soil permeabilities close to experimental values for Ah and B samples. The resolution of A sample was not enough for an accurate modelling and we concluded that this soil requires multi-scale imaging to cover all relevant heterogeneities. We demonstrate that popular SWV method to choose segmentation threshold resulted in oversegmentation and order of magnitude higher permeability values. Careful manual thresholding combined with local segmentation algorithm provided much more accurate results. Detailed analysis of water retention curves showed that air-filled porosity at relevant pressure stages cannot be used for verification of the segmentation results. Representativity analysis by simulating flow in increasing soil volume up to 2.8 cm3 revealed no representative elementary volume (REV) within Ah sample and non-uniqueness of REV for B sample. The latter was explained by soil structure non-stationarity. We further speculate that structures soil horizons can exhibit no REV at all. We discuss numerous advantages of coupled imaging and pore-scale modelling approach and show how it can become a successor of the conventional soil coring method to parametrize large scale continuum models.

  7. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  8. Model for polygonal hydraulic jumps.

    PubMed

    Martens, Erik A; Watanabe, Shinya; Bohr, Tomas

    2012-03-01

    We propose a phenomenological model for the polygonal hydraulic jumps discovered by Ellegaard and co-workers [Nature (London) 392, 767 (1998); Nonlinearity 12, 1 (1999); Physica B 228, 1 (1996)], based on the known flow structure for the type-II hydraulic jumps with a "roller" (separation eddy) near the free surface in the jump region. The model consists of mass conservation and radial force balance between hydrostatic pressure and viscous stresses on the roller surface. In addition, we consider the azimuthal force balance, primarily between pressure and viscosity, but also including nonhydrostatic pressure contributions from surface tension in light of recent observations by Bush and co-workers [J. Fluid Mech. 558, 33 (2006); Phys. Fluids 16, S4 (2004)]. The model can be analyzed by linearization around the circular state, resulting in a parameter relationship for nearly circular polygonal states. A truncated but fully nonlinear version of the model can be solved analytically. This simpler model gives rise to polygonal shapes that are very similar to those observed in experiments, even though surface tension is neglected, and the condition for the existence of a polygon with N corners depends only on a single dimensionless number φ. Finally, we include time-dependent terms in the model and study linear stability of the circular state. Instability occurs for sufficiently small Bond number and the most unstable wavelength is expected to be roughly proportional to the width of the roller as in the Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  9. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable

  10. Incorporating Plant Hydraulics Into Phenological Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoy, P.; Mackay, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation phenology is well studied in systems where temperature is the primary driver of change, such as temperate and boreal ecosystems. In order to accurately model phenology in water-limited systems it is necessary to consider the role of water stress on mediating phenology. While it is possible to use proxies for water stress, such as vapor pressure deficit (VPD), it is preferable to have a more direct link to the effects of water stress on plant physiology. One possible approach is to incorporate the physiological responses of plants to water stress into phenological models. The goal of this study is to examine the use of plant hydraulics to help predict phenology instead of using only meteorological variables. We used an ecosystem process model that incorporates plant hydraulics, the Terrestrial Regional Ecosystem Exchange Simulator (TREES), in order to model plant phenology based on hydraulic stress. Phenology submodels implemented within TREES included both those driven purely from environmental variables as well those modulated by plant hydraulics. Results showed that the use of plant hydraulics to predict phenology, instead of using VPD as a proxy of plant water stress, performed favorably in comparison to models driven by meteorological variables alone. The need for better representation of moisture stress on phenology was particularly apparent in water-limited systems and the inclusion of plant hydraulics into phenology models improved the predictions in these systems.

  11. A combined hydraulic and biological SBR model.

    PubMed

    Alex, J; Rönner-Holm, S G E; Hunze, M; Holm, N C

    2011-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) model was developed consisting of six continuous stirred tank reactors which describe the hydraulic flow patterns occurring in different SBR phases. The model was developed using the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation studies of an SBR reactor under a selection of dynamic operational phases. Based on the CFD results, the model structure was refined and a simplified 'driver' model to allow one to mimic the flow pattern driven by the external operational conditions (influent, aeration, mixing) was derived. The resulting model allows the modeling of biological processes, settlement and hydraulic conditions of cylindrical SBRs. PMID:22214047

  12. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    The unsaturated zone plays an extremely important hydrologic role that influences water quality and quantity, ecosystem function and health, the connection between atmospheric and terrestrial processes, nutrient cycling, soil development, and natural hazards such as flooding and landslides. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is one of the main properties considered to govern flow; however it is very difficult to measure accurately. Knowledge of the highly nonlinear relationship between unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) and volumetric water content is required for widely-used models of water flow and solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments is costly and time consuming, therefore use of models that estimate this property from more easily measured bulk-physical properties is common. In hydrologic studies, calculations based on property-transfer models informed by hydraulic property databases are often used in lieu of measured data from the site of interest. Reliance on database-informed predicted values with the use of neural networks has become increasingly common. Hydraulic properties predicted using databases may be adequate in some applications, but not others. This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K. The parameters that describe the K curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  13. Dynamics of Model Hydraulic Fracturing Liquid Studied by Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Kim; Kubarych, Kevin J.

    2014-06-01

    The technique of two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy is used to expose the chemical dynamics of various concentrations of polymers and their monomers in heterogeneous mixtures. An environmentally relevant heterogeneous mixture, which inspires this study, is hydraulic fracturing liquid (HFL). Hydraulic fracking is a technique used to extract natural gas from shale deposits. HFL consists of mostly water, proppant (sand), an emulsifier (guar), and other chemicals specific to the drilling site. Utilizing a metal carbonyl as a probe, we observe the spectral dynamics of the polymer, guar, and its monomer, mannose, and compare the results to see how hydration dynamics change with varying concentration. Another polymer, Ficoll, and its monomer, sucrose, are also compared to see how polymer size affects hydration dynamics. The two results are as follows: (1) Guar experiences collective hydration at high concentrations, where as mannose experiences independent hydration; (2) no collective hydration is observed for Ficoll in the same concentration range as guar, possibly due to polymer shape and size. HFL experiences extremely high pressure during natural gas removal, so future studies will focus on how increased pressure affects the hydration dynamics of polymers and monomers.

  14. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  15. Numerical Modeling of a Thermal-Hydraulic Loop and Test Section Design for Heat Transfer Studies in Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Daniel

    A numerical tool for the simulation of the thermal dynamics of pipe networks with heat transfer has been developed with the novel capability of modeling supercritical fluids. The tool was developed to support the design and deployment of two thermal-hydraulic loops at Carleton University for the purpose of heat transfer studies in supercritical and near-critical fluids. First, the system was characterized based on its defining features; the characteristic length of the flow path is orders of magnitude larger than the other characteristic lengths that define the system's geometry; the behaviour of the working fluid in the supercritical thermodynamic state. An analysis of the transient thermal behaviour of the model's domains is then performed to determine the accuracy and range of validity of the modeling approach for simulating the transient thermal behaviour of a thermal-hydraulic loop. Preliminary designs of three test section geometries, for the purpose of heat transfer studies, are presented in support of the overall design of the Carleton supercritical thermal-hydraulic loops. A 7-rod-bundle, annular and tubular geometries are developed with support from the new numerical tool. Materials capable of meeting the experimental requirements while operating in supercritical water are determined. The necessary geometries to satisfy the experimental goals are then developed based on the material characteristics and predicted heat transfer behaviour from previous simulation results. An initial safety analysis is performed on the test section designs, where they are evaluated against the ASME Boiler, Pressure Vessel, and Pressure Piping Code standard, required for safe operation and certification.

  16. Management of a water distribution network by coupling GIS and hydraulic modeling: a case study of Chetouane in Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelbaki, Chérifa; Benchaib, Mohamed Mouâd; Benziada, Salim; Mahmoudi, Hacène; Goosen, Mattheus

    2016-04-01

    For more effective management of water distribution network in an arid region, Mapinfo GIS (8.0) software was coupled with a hydraulic model (EPANET 2.0) and applied to a case study region, Chetouane, situated in the north-west of Algeria. The area is characterized not only by water scarcity but also by poor water management practices. The results showed that a combination of GIS and modeling permits network operators to better analyze malfunctions with a resulting more rapid response as well as facilitating in an improved understanding of the work performed on the network. The grouping of GIS and modeling as an operating tool allows managers to diagnosis a network, to study solutions of problems and to predict future situations. The later can assist them in making informed decisions to ensure an acceptable performance level for optimal network operation.

  17. Studying Transonic Gases With a Hydraulic Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W.; Lepore, F.

    1986-01-01

    Water table for hydraulic-flow research yields valuable information about gas flow at transonic speeds. Used to study fuel and oxidizer flow in high-pressure rocket engines. Method applied to gas flows in such equipment as furnaces, nozzles, and chemical lasers. Especially suitable when wall contours nonuniform, discontinuous, or unusually shaped. Wall shapes changed quickly for study and evaluated on spot. Method used instead of computer simulation when computer models unavailable, inaccurate, or costly to run.

  18. ENHANCING HSPF MODEL CHANNEL HYDRAULIC REPRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN (HSPF) is a comprehensive watershed model, which employs depth-area-volume-flow relationships known as hydraulic function table (FTABLE) to represent stream channel cross-sections and reservoirs. An accurate FTABLE determination for a...

  19. The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution by plant roots: a review and synthesis of empirical and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Cardon, Zoe G

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) - the movement of water from moist to dry soil through plant roots - occurs worldwide within a range of different ecosystems and plant species. The proposed ecological and hydrologic impacts of HR include increasing dry-season transpiration and photosynthetic rates, prolonging the life span of fine roots and maintaining root-soil contact in dry soils, and moving rainwater down into deeper soil layers where it does not evaporate. In this review, we compile estimates of the magnitude of HR from ecosystems around the world, using representative empirical and modeling studies from which we could extract amounts of water redistributed by plant root systems. The reported average magnitude of HR varies by nearly two orders of magnitude across ecosystems, from 0.04 to 1.3 mm H(2)O d(-1) in the empirical literature, and from 0.1 to 3.23 mm H(2)O d(-1) in the modeling literature. Using these synthesized data, along with other published studies, we examine this variation in the magnitude of upward and downward HR, considering effects of plant, soil and ecosystem characteristics, as well as effects of methodological details (in both empirical and modeling studies) on estimates of HR. We take both ecological and hydrologic perspectives.

  20. Hydraulic model of the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, A. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary planning for the formulation of the first year of hydraulic studies on the Chesapeake Bay model was recently completed. The primary purpose of this initial effort was to develop a study program that is both responsive to problems of immediate importance and at the same time ensure that from the very beginning of operation maximum economical use is made of the model. The formulation of this preliminary study plan involved an extensive analysis of the environmental, economic, and social aspects of a series of current problems in order to establish a priority listing of their importance. The study program that evolved is oriented towards the analysis of the effects of some of the works of man on the Chesapeake Bay estuarine environment.

  1. High heat program, thermal hydraulic computer models

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, D.M.

    1998-03-05

    The purpose of this report is to describe the thermal hydraulic computer models, the computer model benchmarking and methodology to be used in performing the analysis necessary for the resolution of the high heat safety issue for Tank 241-C, -106.

  2. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.; Kirby, Klane

    This curriculum guide contains a course in hydraulics to train entry-level workers for automotive mechanics and other fields that utilize hydraulics. The module contains 14 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) introduction to hydraulics; (2) fundamentals of hydraulics; (3) reservoirs; (4) lines, fittings, and couplers; (5)…

  3. Estimating Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity: Study the Effect of Tortuosity Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, Behzad; Abbasi, Fariborz

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity is one of the key soil hydraulic properties that, in one hand, is widely used in the studies of water and solute transport in soils, and on the other hand its direct measurement is time consuming and expensive. In this research, in order to study tortuosity factor (l) in the Burdine-Brooks-Corey (BBC hereafter), 59 soil samples from the GRIZZLY database were used. Using a sensitivity analysis, sensitive parameters of this model were determined. To study tortuosity factor, its different values e.g. 2, 1, 0.5, 0, -0.5, -1 and -2 were used in the estimation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The results of sensitivity analysis showed that BBC model is more sensitive to the saturated water content and pore size distribution index. Whereas, the BBC model is less sensitive to tortuosity factor and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The calculated statistical parameter SAE in estimation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity indicated that the BBC model error with l=2 is less than other values. The results also showed that tortuosity factor is linearly correlated with the power of BCC model with goodness of fit R2=0.96. Based on this approach, tortuosity factor was removed from BCC model, and a new empirical equation was developed to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This model was verified using 33 samples of the UNSODA database. The results showed that the developed empirical equation estimated unsaturated hydraulic conductivity better than BCC model in which tortuosity factor was assumed to be equal to 2. Acknowledgments The authors are grateful to Drs. M.Th. van Genuchten and R. Haverkamp for providing the UNSODA and GRIZZLY data sets.

  4. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Nancy; And Others

    These instructional materials provide an orientation to hydraulics for use at the postsecondary level. The first of 12 sections presents an introduction to hydraulics, including discussion of principles of liquids, definitions, liquid flow, the two types of hydraulic fluids, pressure gauges, and strainers and filters. The second section identifies…

  5. ENHANCING HYDROLOGICAL SIMULATION PROGRAM - FORTRAN MODEL CHANNEL HYDRAULIC REPRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hydrological Simulation Program– FORTRAN (HSPF) is a comprehensive watershed model that employs depth-area - volume - flow relationships known as the hydraulic function table (FTABLE) to represent the hydraulic characteristics of stream channel cross-sections and reservoirs. ...

  6. Subgrid spatial variability of soil hydraulic functions for hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreye, Phillip; Meon, Günter

    2016-07-01

    State-of-the-art hydrological applications require a process-based, spatially distributed hydrological model. Runoff characteristics are demanded to be well reproduced by the model. Despite that, the model should be able to describe the processes at a subcatchment scale in a physically credible way. The objective of this study is to present a robust procedure to generate various sets of parameterisations of soil hydraulic functions for the description of soil heterogeneity on a subgrid scale. Relations between Rosetta-generated values of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and van Genuchten's parameters of soil hydraulic functions were statistically analysed. An universal function that is valid for the complete bandwidth of Ks values could not be found. After concentrating on natural texture classes, strong correlations were identified for all parameters. The obtained regression results were used to parameterise sets of hydraulic functions for each soil class. The methodology presented in this study is applicable on a wide range of spatial scales and does not need input data from field studies. The developments were implemented into a hydrological modelling system.

  7. Development of a hydraulic model of the human systemic circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, M. K.; Dharmalingham, R. K.

    1999-01-01

    Physical and numeric models of the human circulation are constructed for a number of objectives, including studies and training in physiologic control, interpretation of clinical observations, and testing of prosthetic cardiovascular devices. For many of these purposes it is important to quantitatively validate the dynamic response of the models in terms of the input impedance (Z = oscillatory pressure/oscillatory flow). To address this need, the authors developed an improved physical model. Using a computer study, the authors first identified the configuration of lumped parameter elements in a model of the systemic circulation; the result was a good match with human aortic input impedance with a minimum number of elements. Design, construction, and testing of a hydraulic model analogous to the computer model followed. Numeric results showed that a three element model with two resistors and one compliance produced reasonable matching without undue complication. The subsequent analogous hydraulic model included adjustable resistors incorporating a sliding plate to vary the flow area through a porous material and an adjustable compliance consisting of a variable-volume air chamber. The response of the hydraulic model compared favorably with other circulation models.

  8. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.

    Designed for use in courses where students are expected to become proficient in the area of hydraulics, including diesel engine mechanic programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of fourteen units of instruction. Unit titles include (1) Introduction, (2) Fundamentals of Hydraulics, (3) Reservoirs, (4) Lines, Fittings, and Couplers, (5) Seals,…

  9. Hydraulically interconnected vehicle suspension: background and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Smith, Wade A.; Jeyakumaran, Jeku

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for the frequency domain analysis of a vehicle fitted with a general hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) system. Ideally, interconnected suspensions have the capability, unique among passive systems, to provide stiffness and damping characteristics dependent on the all-wheel suspension mode in operation. A basic, lumped-mass, four-degree-of-freedom half-car model is used to illustrate the proposed methodology. The mechanical-fluid boundary condition in the double-acting cylinders is modelled as an external force on the mechanical system and a moving boundary on the fluid system. The fluid system itself is modelled using the hydraulic impedance method, in which the relationships between the dynamic fluid states, i.e. pressures and flows, at the extremities of a single fluid circuit are determined by the transfer matrix method. A set of coupled, frequency-dependent equations, which govern the dynamics of the integrated half-car system, are then derived and the application of these equations to both free and forced vibration analysis is explained. The fluid system impedance matrix for the two general wheel-pair interconnection types-anti-synchronous and anti-oppositional-is also given. To further outline the application of the proposed methodology, the paper finishes with an example using a typical anti-roll HIS system. The integrated half-car system's free vibration solutions and frequency response functions are then obtained and discussed in some detail. The presented approach provides a scientific basis for investigating the dynamic characteristics of HIS-equipped vehicles, and the results offer further confirmation that interconnected suspension schemes can provide, at least to some extent, individual control of modal stiffness and damping characteristics.

  10. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 650.111 (c) and (d) shall be summarized in environmental review documents prepared pursuant to 23 CFR... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111... BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  11. The planetary hydraulics analysis based on a multi-resolution stereo DTMs and LISFLOOD-FP model: Case study in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Schumann, G.; Neal, J. C.; Lin, S.

    2013-12-01

    Earth is the only planet possessing an active hydrological system based on H2O circulation. However, after Mariner 9 discovered fluvial channels on Mars with similar features to Earth, it became clear that some solid planets and satellites once had water flows or pseudo hydrological systems of other liquids. After liquid water was identified as the agent of ancient martian fluvial activities, the valley and channels on the martian surface were investigated by a number of remote sensing and in-suit measurements. Among all available data sets, the stereo DTM and ortho from various successful orbital sensor, such as High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), Context Camera (CTX), and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), are being most widely used to trace the origin and consequences of martian hydrological channels. However, geomorphological analysis, with stereo DTM and ortho images over fluvial areas, has some limitations, and so a quantitative modeling method utilizing various spatial resolution DTMs is required. Thus in this study we tested the application of hydraulics analysis with multi-resolution martian DTMs, constructed in line with Kim and Muller's (2009) approach. An advanced LISFLOOD-FP model (Bates et al., 2010), which simulates in-channel dynamic wave behavior by solving 2D shallow water equations without advection, was introduced to conduct a high accuracy simulation together with 150-1.2m DTMs over test sites including Athabasca and Bahram valles. For application to a martian surface, technically the acceleration of gravity in LISFLOOD-FP was reduced to the martian value of 3.71 m s-2 and the Manning's n value (friction), the only free parameter in the model, was adjusted for martian gravity by scaling it. The approach employing multi-resolution stereo DTMs and LISFLOOD-FP was superior compared with the other research cases using a single DTM source for hydraulics analysis. HRSC DTMs, covering 50-150m resolutions was used to trace rough

  12. Representing plant hydraulics in a global Earth system model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, D.; Gentine, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth system models need improvement to reproduce observed seasonal and diurnal cycles of photosynthesis and respiration. Model water stress parameterizations lag behind the plant physiology literature. A plant hydraulics model is developed and deployed in a global Earth system model (NCAR CESM 1.2.2 with CLM 4.5). Assimilation and transpiration are attenuated according to literature cavitation curves. Water stress is evaluated based on plant functional type hydraulic parameters forced by soil moisture and atmospheric conditions. Resolving the plant water status allows for modelling divergent strategies for water stress. The case of isohydric versus anisohydric species is presented, showing that including plant hydraulic traits alter modelled photosynthesis and transpiration.

  13. Design, test and model of a hybrid magnetostrictive hydraulic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Wereley, Norman M.

    2009-08-01

    The basic operation of hybrid hydraulic actuators involves high frequency bi-directional operation of an active material that is converted to uni-directional motion of hydraulic fluid using valves. A hybrid actuator was developed using magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D as the driving element and hydraulic oil as the working fluid. Two different lengths of Terfenol-D rod, 51 and 102 mm, with the same diameter, 12.7 mm, were used. Tests with no load and with load were carried out to measure the performance for uni-directional motion of the output piston at different pumping frequencies. The maximum no-load flow rates were 24.8 cm3 s-1 and 22.7 cm3 s-1 with the 51 mm and 102 mm long rods respectively, and the peaks were noted around 325 Hz pumping frequency. The blocked force of the actuator was close to 89 N in both cases. A key observation was that, at these high pumping frequencies, the inertial effects of the fluid mass dominate over the viscous effects and the problem becomes unsteady in nature. In this study, we also develop a mathematical model of the hydraulic hybrid actuator in the time domain to show the basic operational principle under varying conditions and to capture phenomena affecting system performance. Governing equations for the pumping piston and output shaft were obtained from force equilibrium considerations, while compressibility of the working fluid was taken into account by incorporating the bulk modulus. Fluid inertia was represented by a lumped parameter approach to the transmission line model, giving rise to strongly coupled ordinary differential equations. The model was then used to calculate the no-load velocities of the actuator at different pumping frequencies and simulation results were compared with experimental data for model validation.

  14. Hydraulic root water uptake models: old concerns and new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvreur, V.; Carminati, A.; Rothfuss, Y.; Meunier, F.; Vanderborght, J.; Javaux, M.

    2014-12-01

    Root water uptake (RWU) affects underground water dynamics, with consequences on plant water availability and groundwater recharge. Even though hydrological and climate models are sensitive to RWU parameters, no consensus exists on the modelling of this process. Back in the 1940ies, Van Den Honert's catenary approach was the first to investigate the use of connected hydraulic resistances to describe water flow in whole plants. However concerns such as the necessary computing when architectures get complex made this approach premature. Now that computing power increased dramatically, hydraulic RWU models are gaining popularity, notably because they naturally produce observed processes like compensatory RWU and hydraulic redistribution. Yet major concerns remain. Some are more fundamental: according to hydraulic principles, plant water potential should equilibrate with soil water potential when the plant does not transpire, which is not a general observation when using current definitions of bulk or average soil water potential. Other concerns regard the validation process: water uptake distribution is not directly measurable, which makes it hard to demonstrate whether or not hydraulic models are more accurate than other models. Eventually parameterization concerns exist: root hydraulic properties are not easily measurable, and would even fluctuate on an hourly basis due to processes like aquaporin gating. While offering opportunities to validate hydraulic RWU models, newly developed observation techniques also make us realize the increasing complexity of processes involved in soil-plant hydrodynamics, such as the change of rhizosphere hydraulic properties with soil drying. Surprisingly, once implemented into hydraulic models, these processes do not necessarily translate into more complex emerging behavior at plant scale, and might justify the use of simplified representations of the soil-plant hydraulic system.

  15. Pore-structure models of hydraulic conductivity for permeable pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, X.; Sansalone, J.; Ying, G.; Ranieri, V.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryPermeable pavement functions as a porous infrastructure interface allowing the infiltration and evaporation of rainfall-runoff while functioning as a relatively smooth load-bearing surface for vehicular transport. Hydraulic conductivity ( k) of permeable pavement is an important hydraulic property and is a function of the pore structure. This study examines k for a cementitious permeable pavement (CPP) through a series of pore-structure models. Measurements utilized include hydraulic head as well as total porosity, ( ϕ t), effective porosity ( ϕ e), tortuosity ( L e/ L) and pore size distribution (PSD) indices generated through X-ray tomography (XRT). XRT results indicate that the permeable pavement pore matrix is hetero-disperse, with high tortuosity and ϕ t ≠ ϕ e. Power law models of k- ϕ t and k- ϕ e relationships are developed for a CPP mix design. Results indicate that the Krüger, Fair-Hatch, Hazen, Slichter, Beyer and Terzaghi models based on simple pore-structure indices do not reproduce measured k values. The conventional Kozeny-Carman model (KCM), a more parameterized pore-structure model, did not reproduce measured k values. This study proposes a modified KCM utilizing ϕ e, specific surface area (SSA) pe and weighted tortuosity ( L e/ L) w. Results demonstrate that such permeable pavement pore-structure parameters with the modified KCM can predict k. The k results are combined with continuous simulation modeling using historical rainfall to provide nomographs examining permeable pavement as a low impact development (LID) infrastructure component.

  16. Modeling soil detachment capacity by rill flow using hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongdong; Wang, Zhanli; Shen, Nan; Chen, Hao

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between soil detachment capacity (Dc) by rill flow and hydraulic parameters (e.g., flow velocity, shear stress, unit stream power, stream power, and unit energy) at low flow rates is investigated to establish an accurate experimental model. Experiments are conducted using a 4 × 0.1 m rill hydraulic flume with a constant artificial roughness on the flume bed. The flow rates range from 0.22 × 10-3 m2 s-1 to 0.67 × 10-3 m2 s-1, and the slope gradients vary from 15.8% to 38.4%. Regression analysis indicates that the Dc by rill flow can be predicted using the linear equations of flow velocity, stream power, unit stream power, and unit energy. Dc by rill flow that is fitted to shear stress can be predicted with a power function equation. Predictions based on flow velocity, unit energy, and stream power are powerful, but those based on shear stress, especially on unit stream power, are relatively poor. The prediction based on flow velocity provides the best estimates of Dc by rill flow because of the simplicity and availability of its measurements. Owing to error in measuring flow velocity at low flow rates, the predictive abilities of Dc by rill flow using all hydraulic parameters are relatively lower in this study compared with the results of previous research. The measuring accuracy of experiments for flow velocity should be improved in future research.

  17. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  18. Mathematical modeling of bent-axis hydraulic piston motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Each of the DSN 70-m antennas uses 16 bent-axis hydraulic piston motors as part of the antenna drive system. On each of the two antenna axes, four motors are used to drive the antenna and four motors provide counter torque to remove the backlash in the antenna drive train. This article presents a mathematical model for bent-axis hydraulic piston motors. The model was developed to understand the influence of the hydraulic motors on the performance of the DSN 70-m antennas' servo control system.

  19. Hydraulic modeling development and application in water resources engineering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.; Yang, Chih Ted; Wang, Lawrence K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling has become widespread in water resources engineering and science to study rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal regions. For example, computer models are commonly used to forecast anthropogenic effects on the environment, and to help provide advanced mitigation measures against catastrophic events such as natural and dam-break floods. Linking hydraulic models to vegetation and habitat models has expanded their use in multidisciplinary applications to the riparian corridor. Implementation of these models in software packages on personal desktop computers has made them accessible to the general engineering community, and their use has been popularized by the need of minimal training due to intuitive graphical user interface front ends. Models are, however, complex and nontrivial, to the extent that even common terminology is sometimes ambiguous and often applied incorrectly. In fact, many efforts are currently under way in order to standardize terminology and offer guidelines for good practice, but none has yet reached unanimous acceptance. This chapter provides a view of the elements involved in modeling surface flows for the application in environmental water resources engineering. It presents the concepts and steps necessary for rational model development and use by starting with the exploration of the ideas involved in defining a model. Tangible form of those ideas is provided by the development of a mathematical and corresponding numerical hydraulic model, which is given with a substantial amount of detail. The issues of model deployment in a practical and productive work environment are also addressed. The chapter ends by presenting a few model applications highlighting the need for good quality control in model validation.

  20. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned toward conditions usually encountered in the Marce...

  1. Evaluating models for predicting hydraulic characteristics of layered soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavimbela, S. S. W.; van Rensburg, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    Soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K-coefficient) are critical hydraulic properties governing soil water activity on layered soils. Sustainable soil water conservation would not be possible without accurate knowledge of these hydraulic properties. Infield rainwater harvesting (IRWH) is one conservation technique adopted to improve the soil water regime of a number of clay soils found in the semi arid areas of Free State province of South Africa. Given that SWCC is much easier to measure, most soil water studies rely on SWCC information to predict in-situ K-coefficients. This work validated this practice on the Tukulu, Sepane and Swartland layered soil profiles. The measured SWCC was first described using Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980) and Kasugi (1996) parametric models. The conductivity functions of these models were then required to fit in-situ based K-coefficients derived from instantaneous profile method (IPM). The same K-coefficient was also fitted by HYDRUS 1-D using optimised SWCC parameters. Although all parametric models fitted the measured SWCC fairly well their corresponding conductivity functions could not do the same when fitting the in-situ based K-coefficients. Overestimates of more than 2 orders of magnitude especially at low soil water content (SWC) were observed. This phenomenon was pronounced among the upper horizons that overlaid a clayey horizon. However, optimized α and n parameters using HYDRUS 1-D showed remarkable agreement between fitted and in-situ K-coefficient with root sum of squares error (RMSE) recording values not exceeding unity. During this exercise the Brooks and Corey was replaced by modified van Genuchten model (Vogel and Cislerova, 1988) since it failed to produce unique inverse solutions. The models performance appeared to be soil specific with van Genuchten-Mualem (1980) performing fairly well on the Orthic and neucutanic horizons while its modified form fitted very

  2. Updating flood maps efficiently using existing hydraulic models, very-high-accuracy elevation data, and a geographic information system; a pilot study on the Nisqually River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Haluska, Tana L.; Kresch, David L.

    2001-01-01

    A method of updating flood inundation maps at a fraction of the expense of using traditional methods was piloted in Washington State as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Urban Geologic and Hydrologic Hazards Initiative. Large savings in expense may be achieved by building upon previous Flood Insurance Studies and automating the process of flood delineation with a Geographic Information System (GIS); increases in accuracy and detail result from the use of very-high-accuracy elevation data and automated delineation; and the resulting digital data sets contain valuable ancillary information such as flood depth, as well as greatly facilitating map storage and utility. The method consists of creating stage-discharge relations from the archived output of the existing hydraulic model, using these relations to create updated flood stages for recalculated flood discharges, and using a GIS to automate the map generation process. Many of the effective flood maps were created in the late 1970?s and early 1980?s, and suffer from a number of well recognized deficiencies such as out-of-date or inaccurate estimates of discharges for selected recurrence intervals, changes in basin characteristics, and relatively low quality elevation data used for flood delineation. FEMA estimates that 45 percent of effective maps are over 10 years old (FEMA, 1997). Consequently, Congress has mandated the updating and periodic review of existing maps, which have cost the Nation almost 3 billion (1997) dollars. The need to update maps and the cost of doing so were the primary motivations for piloting a more cost-effective and efficient updating method. New technologies such as Geographic Information Systems and LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation mapping are key to improving the efficiency of flood map updating, but they also improve the accuracy, detail, and usefulness of the resulting digital flood maps. GISs produce digital maps without manual estimation of inundated areas between

  3. Implementation of diverse tree hydraulics in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A.; Shevliakova, E.; Malyshev, S.; Weng, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the occurence of drought kill in forests worldwide. These mortality events are significant disruptions to the terrestrial carbon cycle, but the mechanisms required to represent drought kill are not represented in terrestrial carbon cycle models. In part, this is due to the challenge of representing the diversity of hydraulic strategies, which include stomatal sensitivity to water deficit and woody tissue vulnerability to cavitation at low water potential. In part, this is due to the challenge of representing this boundary value problem numerically, because the hydraulic components determine water potential at the leaf, but the stomatal conductance on the leaf also determines the hydraulic gradients within the plant. This poster will describe the development of a land surface model parameterization of diverse tree hydraulic strategies.

  4. Fluid-solid interaction model for hydraulic reciprocating O-ring seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chuanjun; Huang, Weifeng; Wang, Yuming; Suo, Shuangfu; Liu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication characteristics of hydraulic reciprocating seals have significant effects on sealing and tribology performances of hydraulic actuators, especially in high parameter hydraulic systems. Only elastic deformations of hydraulic reciprocating seals were discussed, and hydrodynamic effects were neglected in many studies. The physical process of the fluid-solid interaction effect did not be clearly presented in the existing fluid-solid interaction models for hydraulic reciprocating O-ring seals, and few of these models had been simultaneously validated through experiments. By exploring the physical process of the fluid-solid interaction effect of the hydraulic reciprocating O-ring seal, a numerical fluid-solid interaction model consisting of fluid lubrication, contact mechanics, asperity contact and elastic deformation analyses is constructed with an iterative procedure. With the SRV friction and wear tester, the experiments are performed to investigate the elastohydrodynamic lubrication characteristics of the O-ring seal. The regularity of the friction coefficient varying with the speed of reciprocating motion is obtained in the mixed lubrication condition. The experimental result is used to validate the fluid-solid interaction model. Based on the model, The elastohydrodynamic lubrication characteristics of the hydraulic reciprocating O-ring seal are presented respectively in the dry friction, mixed lubrication and full film lubrication conditions, including of the contact pressure, film thickness, friction coefficient, liquid film pressure and viscous shear stress in the sealing zone. The proposed numerical fluid-solid interaction model can be effectively used to analyze the operation characteristics of the hydraulic reciprocating O-ring seal, and can also be widely used to study other hydraulic reciprocating seals.

  5. Bayesian Model Averaging of Artificial Intelligence Models for Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiri, A.; Chitsazan, N.; Tsai, F. T.; Asghari Moghaddam, A.

    2012-12-01

    This research presents a Bayesian artificial intelligence model averaging (BAIMA) method that incorporates multiple artificial intelligence (AI) models to estimate hydraulic conductivity and evaluate estimation uncertainties. Uncertainty in the AI model outputs stems from error in model input as well as non-uniqueness in selecting different AI methods. Using one single AI model tends to bias the estimation and underestimate uncertainty. BAIMA employs Bayesian model averaging (BMA) technique to address the issue of using one single AI model for estimation. BAIMA estimates hydraulic conductivity by averaging the outputs of AI models according to their model weights. In this study, the model weights were determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) that follows the parsimony principle. BAIMA calculates the within-model variances to account for uncertainty propagation from input data to AI model output. Between-model variances are evaluated to account for uncertainty due to model non-uniqueness. We employed Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy logic (TS-FL), artificial neural network (ANN) and neurofuzzy (NF) to estimate hydraulic conductivity for the Tasuj plain aquifer, Iran. BAIMA combined three AI models and produced better fitting than individual models. While NF was expected to be the best AI model owing to its utilization of both TS-FL and ANN models, the NF model is nearly discarded by the parsimony principle. The TS-FL model and the ANN model showed equal importance although their hydraulic conductivity estimates were quite different. This resulted in significant between-model variances that are normally ignored by using one AI model.

  6. Influence of Elevation Data Source on 2D Hydraulic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, Krzysztof; Stępnik, Mateusz; Kurczyński, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the influence of the source of various elevation data on hydraulic modelling in open channels. In the research, digital terrain models from different datasets were evaluated and used in two-dimensional hydraulic models. The following aerial and satellite elevation data were used to create the representation of terrain - digital terrain model: airborne laser scanning, image matching, elevation data collected in the LPIS, EuroDEM, and ASTER GDEM. From the results of five 2D hydrodynamic models with different input elevation data, the maximum depth and flow velocity of water were derived and compared with the results of the most accurate ALS data. For such an analysis a statistical evaluation and differences between hydraulic modelling results were prepared. The presented research proved the importance of the quality of elevation data in hydraulic modelling and showed that only ALS and photogrammetric data can be the most reliable elevation data source in accurate 2D hydraulic modelling.

  7. Inverse groundwater modeling for hydraulic conductivity estimation using Bayesian model averaging and variance window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Frank T.-C.; Li, Xiaobao

    2008-09-01

    This study proposes a Bayesian model averaging (BMA) method to address parameter estimation uncertainty arising from nonuniqueness in parameterization methods. BMA is able to incorporate multiple parameterization methods for prediction through the law of total probability and to obtain an ensemble average of hydraulic conductivity estimates. Two major issues in applying BMA to hydraulic conductivity estimation are discussed. The first problem is using Occam's window in usual BMA applications to measure approximated posterior model probabilities. Occam's window only accepts models in a very narrow range, tending to single out the best method and discard other good methods. We propose a variance window to replace Occam's window to cope with this problem. The second problem is the Kashyap information criterion (KIC) in the approximated posterior model probabilities, which tends to prefer highly uncertain parameterization methods by considering the Fisher information matrix. With sufficient amounts of observation data, the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) is a good approximation and is able to avoid controversial results from using KIC. This study adopts multiple generalized parameterization (GP) methods such as the BMA models to estimate spatially correlated hydraulic conductivity. Numerical examples illustrate the issues of using KIC and Occam's window and show the advantages of using BIC and the variance window in BMA application. Finally, we apply BMA to the hydraulic conductivity estimation of the "1500-foot" sand in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana.

  8. Effects of model layer simplification using composite hydraulic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Sepulveda, Nicasio; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater provides much of the fresh drinking water to more than 1.5 billion people in the world (Clarke et al., 1996) and in the United States more that 50 percent of citizens rely on groundwater for drinking water (Solley et al., 1998). As aquifer systems are developed for water supply, the hydrologic system is changed. Water pumped from the aquifer system initially can come from some combination of inducing more recharge, water permanently removed from storage, and decreased groundwater discharge. Once a new equilibrium is achieved, all of the pumpage must come from induced recharge and decreased discharge (Alley et al., 1999). Further development of groundwater resources may result in reductions of surface water runoff and base flows. Competing demands for groundwater resources require good management. Adequate data to characterize the aquifers and confining units of the system, like hydrologic boundaries, groundwater levels, streamflow, and groundwater pumping and climatic data for recharge estimation are to be collected in order to quantify the effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands, streams, and lakes. Once collected, three-dimensional (3D) groundwater flow models can be developed and calibrated and used as a tool for groundwater management. The main hydraulic parameters that comprise a regional or subregional model of an aquifer system are the hydraulic conductivity and storage properties of the aquifers and confining units (hydrogeologic units) that confine the system. Many 3D groundwater flow models used to help assess groundwater/surface-water interactions require calculating ?effective? or composite hydraulic properties of multilayered lithologic units within a hydrogeologic unit. The calculation of composite hydraulic properties stems from the need to characterize groundwater flow using coarse model layering in order to reduce simulation times while still representing the flow through the system accurately. The accuracy of flow models with

  9. Empirical flow parameters : a tool for hydraulic model validity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Burley, Thomas E.; Cleveland, Theodore G.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) To determine and present from existing data in Texas, relations between observed stream flow, topographic slope, mean section velocity, and other hydraulic factors, to produce charts such as Figure 1 and to produce empirical distributions of the various flow parameters to provide a methodology to "check if model results are way off!"; (2) To produce a statistical regional tool to estimate mean velocity or other selected parameters for storm flows or other conditional discharges at ungauged locations (most bridge crossings) in Texas to provide a secondary way to compare such values to a conventional hydraulic modeling approach. (3.) To present ancillary values such as Froude number, stream power, Rosgen channel classification, sinuosity, and other selected characteristics (readily determinable from existing data) to provide additional information to engineers concerned with the hydraulic-soil-foundation component of transportation infrastructure.

  10. Effects of model layer simplification using composite hydraulic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Nicasio; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of simplifying hydraulic property layering within an unconfined aquifer and the underlying confining unit were assessed. The hydraulic properties of lithologic units within the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were computed by analyzing the aquifer-test data using radial, axisymmetric two-dimensional (2D) flow. Time-varying recharge to the unconfined aquifer and pumping from the confined Upper Floridan aquifer (USA) were simulated using 3D flow. Conceptual flow models were developed by gradually reducing the number of lithologic units in the unconfined aquifer and confining unit by calculating composite hydraulic properties for the simplified lithologic units. Composite hydraulic properties were calculated using either thickness-weighted averages or inverse modeling using regression-based parameter estimation. No significant residuals were simulated when all lithologic units comprising the unconfined aquifer were simulated as one layer. The largest residuals occurred when the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were aggregated into a single layer (quasi-3D), with residuals over 100% for the leakage rates to the confined aquifer and the heads in the confining unit. Residuals increased with contrasts in vertical hydraulic conductivity between the unconfined aquifer and confining unit. Residuals increased when the constant-head boundary at the bottom of the Upper Floridan aquifer was replaced with a no-flow boundary.

  11. EPA Study of Hydraulic Fracturing and Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    In its FY2010 Appropriations Committee Conference Report, Congress directed EPA to study the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water, using: • Best available science • Independent sources of information • Transparent, peer-reviewed process • Consultatio...

  12. Osmotic Model to Explain Anomalous Hydraulic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marine, I. Wendell; Fritz, Steven J.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that compacted clays act as osmotic membranes when they separate aqueous solutions of unequal ionic concentration. Theoretically, osmotically induced differential hydraulic pressure in groundwater systems can be relatively high. The magnitude depends primarily upon concentration differences across the membrane, type of ions, type of clay, and pore size. In experiments, thin, compacted clay membranes commonly exhibit varying degrees of osmotic efficiency due to ion leak-age through the clay. In natural systems the membrane and the solution containers are not as distinct and well defined as they are in the laboratory. Moreover, the membrane is commonly thick, inhomogeneous, and composite. In a buried Triassic basin at the Savannah River plant near Aiken, South Carolina, it is suspected that osmosis causes the saline water in the basin center to be slightly geopressurized in relation to freshwater in the overlying coastal plain aquifer. Two wells have heads of 7.88 and 12.98 bars (114.3 and 188.3 psi) above the head in the coastal plain aquifer. The head in each of these wells approximates the osmotic equilibrium head calculated from solution concentration of water produced by each well (12,000 and 18,500 mg/l, respectively). Other wells penetrating the top and edge of the Triassic basin probably penetrate a zone where ion leakage gives rise to less saline water. Thus these wells are not geopressurized.

  13. Influence of Rock Fabric on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation: Laboratory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchits, S. A.; Desroches, J.; Burghardt, J.; Surdi, A.; Whitney, N.

    2014-12-01

    Massive hydraulic fracturing is required for commercial gas production from unconventional reservoirs. These reservoirs are often highly fractured and heterogeneous, which may cause significant fracture complexity and also arrest propagation of hydraulic fractures, leading to production decrease. One of the goals of our study was to investigate the influence of rock fabric features on near-wellbore fracture geometry and complexity. We performed a series of laboratory tests on Niobrara outcrop shale blocks with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 36 inches in a true-triaxial loading frame. Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was applied to monitor hydraulic fracture initiation and dynamics of fracture propagation. After the tests, the shape of the created hydraulic fracture was mapped by goniometry technique. To estimate fracture aperture, particles of different sizes were injected with fracturing fluid. In all tests, AE analysis indicated hydraulic fracture initiation prior to breakdown or the maximum of wellbore pressure. In most tests, AE analysis revealed asymmetrical hydraulic fracture shapes. Post-test analysis demonstrated good correspondence of AE results with the actual 3D shape of the fracture surface map. AE analysis confirmed that in some of these tests, the hydraulic fracture approached one face of the block before the maximum wellbore pressure had been reached. We have found that in such cases the propagation of hydraulic fracture in the opposite direction was arrested by the presence of mineralized interfaces. Mapping the distribution of injected particles confirmed the creation of a narrow-width aperture in the vicinity of pre-existing interfaces, restricting fracture conductivity. Based on the results of our study, we concluded that the presence of planes of weakness, such as mineralized natural fractures, can result in the arrest of hydraulic fracture propagation, or in poor fracture geometries with limited aperture, that in turn could lead to high net pressure

  14. EPA releases progress report on hydraulic fracturing study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided a 21 December progress report on its ongoing national study about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. The agency said that a draft of the congressionally requested study will be released in 2014 for public and peer review and that its progress report does not draw conclusions about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing, often referred to as fracking.

  15. Characteristics of Hydraulic Shock Waves in an Inclined Chute Contraction by Using Three Dimensional Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chao; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Su, Yu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    The inclined rectangular chute construction is a common structure used in hydraulic engineering for typical reasons such as the increase of bottom slope, the transition from side channel intakes to tunnel spillways, the drainage construction, and the reduction of chute width due to bridges, flood diversion structures or irrigation systems. The converging vertical sidewalls of a chute contraction deflect the supercritical flow to form hydraulic shock waves. Hydraulic shock waves have narrow and locally extreme wavy surfaces, which commonly results in the requirement of higher height of sidewalls. Therefore, predicting the possible height and position of maximum hydraulic shock wave are necessary to design the required height of sidewalls to prevent flow overtopping. In this study, we used a three-dimensional computation fluid dynamics model (i.e., FLOW-3D) to simulate the characteristics of hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction. For this purpose, the parameters of simulated hydraulic shock wave, such as the shock angle, maximum shock wave height and maximum shock wave position in various conditions are compared with those calculated by the empirical relations obtained from literatures. We showed that the simulated results are extremely close to the experimental results. The numerical results validated the applicability of these empirical relations and extend their applicability to higher approach Froude numbers from 3.51 to 7.27. Furthermore, we also applied the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel under 200-year peak flow condition to FLOW-3D model to simulate the hydraulic shock waves and validate the effect of the installation of a diversion pier in the channel on promoting the stability of flow fluid. The results revealed that a diversion pier installed in the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel is helpful for improving the stability of flow field. In summary, this study demonstrates that FLOW-3D model can be used to simulate the

  16. LVP modeling and dynamic characteristics prediction of a hydraulic power unit in deep-sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xue-peng; Ye, Min; Deng, Bin; Zhang, Cui-hong; Yu, Zu-ying

    2013-03-01

    A hydraulic power unit (HPU) is the driving "heart" of deep-sea working equipment. It is critical to predict its dynamic performances in deep-water before being immerged in the seawater, while the experimental tests by simulating deep-sea environment have many disadvantages, such as expensive cost, long test cycles, and difficult to achieve low-temperature simulation, which is only used as a supplementary means for confirmatory experiment. This paper proposes a novel theoretical approach based on the linear varying parameters (LVP) modeling to foresee the dynamic performances of the driving unit. Firstly, based on the varying environment features, dynamic expressions of the compressibility and viscosity of hydraulic oil are derived to reveal the fluid performances changing. Secondly, models of hydraulic system and electrical system are accomplished respectively through studying the control process and energy transfer, and then LVP models of the pressure and flow rate control is obtained through the electro-hydraulic models integration. Thirdly, dynamic characteristics of HPU are obtained by the model simulating within bounded closed sets of varying parameters. Finally, the developed HPU is tested in a deep-sea imitating hull, and the experimental results are well consistent with the theoretical analysis outcomes, which clearly declare that the LVP modeling is a rational way to foresee dynamic performances of HPU. The research approach and model analysis results can be applied to the predictions of working properties and product designs for other deep-sea hydraulic pump.

  17. Thermal hydraulics modeling of the US Geological Survey TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkaabi, Ahmed K.

    The Geological Survey TRIGA reactor (GSTR) is a 1 MW Mark I TRIGA reactor located in Lakewood, Colorado. Single channel GSTR thermal hydraulics models built using RELAP5/MOD3.3, RELAP5-3D, TRACE, and COMSOL Multiphysics predict the fuel, outer clad, and coolant temperatures as a function of position in the core. The results from the RELAP5/MOD3.3, RELAP5-3D, and COMSOL models are similar. The TRACE model predicts significantly higher temperatures, potentially resulting from inappropriate convection correlations. To more accurately study the complex fluid flow patterns within the core, this research develops detailed RELAP5/MOD3.3 and COMSOL multichannel models of the GSTR core. The multichannel models predict lower fuel, outer clad, and coolant temperatures compared to the single channel models by up to 16.7°C, 4.8°C, and 9.6°C, respectively, as a result of the higher mass flow rates predicted by these models. The single channel models and the RELAP5/MOD3.3 multichannel model predict that the coolant temperatures in all fuel rings rise axially with core height, as the coolant in these models flows predominantly in the axial direction. The coolant temperatures predicted by the COMSOL multichannel model rise with core height in the B-, C-, and D-rings and peak and then decrease in the E-, F-, and G-rings, as the coolant tends to flow from the bottom sides of the core to the center of the core in this model. Experiments at the GSTR measured coolant temperatures in the GSTR core to validate the developed models. The axial temperature profiles measured in the GSTR show that the flow patterns predicted by the COMSOL multichannel model are consistent with the actual conditions in the core. Adjusting the RELAP5/MOD3.3 single and multichannel models by modifying the axial and cross-flow areas allow them to better predict the GSTR coolant temperatures; however, the adjusted models still fail to predict accurate axial temperature profiles in the E-, F-, and G-rings.

  18. Phase-field modeling of hydraulic fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Zachary A.; Landis, Chad M.

    2016-11-01

    In this work a theoretical framework implementing the phase-field approach to fracture is used to couple the physics of flow through porous media and cracks with the mechanics of fracture. The main modeling challenge addressed in this work, which is a challenge for all diffuse crack representations, is on how to allow for the flow of fluid and the action of fluid pressure on the aggregate within the diffuse damage zone of the cracks. The theory is constructed by presenting the general physical balance laws and conducting a consistent thermodynamic analysis to constrain the constitutive relationships. Constitutive equations that reproduce the desired responses at the various limits of the phase-field parameter are proposed in order to capture Darcy-type flow in the intact porous medium and Stokes-type flow within open cracks. A finite element formulation for the solution of the governing model equations is presented and discussed. Finally, the theoretical and numerical model is shown to compare favorably to several important analytical solutions. More complex and interesting calculations are also presented to illustrate some of the advantageous features of the approach.

  19. Nonlinear mathematical modeling and sensitivity analysis of hydraulic drive unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Yu, Bin; Quan, Lingxiao; Ba, Kaixian; Wu, Liujie

    2015-09-01

    The previous sensitivity analysis researches are not accurate enough and also have the limited reference value, because those mathematical models are relatively simple and the change of the load and the initial displacement changes of the piston are ignored, even experiment verification is not conducted. Therefore, in view of deficiencies above, a nonlinear mathematical model is established in this paper, including dynamic characteristics of servo valve, nonlinear characteristics of pressure-flow, initial displacement of servo cylinder piston and friction nonlinearity. The transfer function block diagram is built for the hydraulic drive unit closed loop position control, as well as the state equations. Through deriving the time-varying coefficient items matrix and time-varying free items matrix of sensitivity equations respectively, the expression of sensitivity equations based on the nonlinear mathematical model are obtained. According to structure parameters of hydraulic drive unit, working parameters, fluid transmission characteristics and measured friction-velocity curves, the simulation analysis of hydraulic drive unit is completed on the MATLAB/Simulink simulation platform with the displacement step 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the developed nonlinear mathematical model is sufficient by comparing the characteristic curves of experimental step response and simulation step response under different constant load. Then, the sensitivity function time-history curves of seventeen parameters are obtained, basing on each state vector time-history curve of step response characteristic. The maximum value of displacement variation percentage and the sum of displacement variation absolute values in the sampling time are both taken as sensitivity indexes. The sensitivity indexes values above are calculated and shown visually in histograms under different working conditions, and change rules are analyzed. Then the sensitivity

  20. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Podgorney, Robert Karl

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  1. Study of hydraulic air compression for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion open-cycle application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, A.; Chen, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A hydraulic air compressor, which requires no mechanical moving parts and operates in a nearly isothermal mode, can be an alternative for the noncondensible gas disposal of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power system. The compressor requires only a downward flow of water to accomplish air compression. An air compressor test loop was assembled and operated to obtain test data that would lead to the design of an OTEC hydraulic air compressor. A one dimensional, hydraulic gas compressor, computer model was employed to simulate the laboratory experiments, and it was tuned to fit the test results. A sensitivity study that shows the effects of various parameters on the applied head of the hydraulic air compression is presented.

  2. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  3. Application study of magnetic fluid seal in hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Y.; Zhang, W.

    2012-11-01

    The waterpower resources of our country are abundant, and the hydroelectric power is developed, but at present the main shaft sealing device of hydraulic turbine is easy to wear and tear and the leakage is great. The magnetic fluid seal has the advantages of no contact, no wear, self-healing, long life and so on. In this paper, the magnetic fluid seal would be used in the main shaft of hydraulic turbine, the sealing structure was built the model, meshed the geometry, applied loads and solved by using MULTIPHYSICS in ANSYS software, the influence of the various sealing structural parameters such as tooth width, height, slot width, sealing gap on the sealing property were analyzed, the magnetic fluid sealing device suitable for large-diameter shaft and sealing water was designed, the sealing problem of the hydraulic turbine main shaft was solved effectively which will bring huge economic benefits.

  4. Studies investigate effects of hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-11-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, to enhance the retrieval of natural gas from shale has been increasing dramatically—the number of natural gas wells rose about 50% since 2000. Shale gas has been hailed as a relatively low-cost, abundant energy source that is cleaner than coal. However, fracking involves injecting large volumes of water, sand, and chemicals into deep shale gas reservoirs under high pressure to open fractures through which the gas can travel, and the process has generated much controversy. The popular press, advocacy organizations, and the documentary film Gasland by Josh Fox have helped bring this issue to a broad audience. Many have suggested that fracking has resulted in contaminated drinking water supplies, enhanced seismic activity, demands for large quantities of water that compete with other uses, and challenges in managing large volumes of resulting wastewater. As demand for expanded domestic energy production intensifies, there is potential for substantially increased use of fracking together with other recovery techniques for "unconventional gas resources," like extended horizontal drilling.

  5. Modeling Reactor Coolant Systems Thermal-Hydraulic Transients

    1999-10-05

    RELAP5/MOD3.2* is used to model reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transients without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal-hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to allow modeling of themore » plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems.« less

  6. Project W-320 thermal hydraulic model benchmarking and baselining

    SciTech Connect

    Sathyanarayana, K.

    1998-09-28

    Project W-320 will be retrieving waste from Tank 241-C-106 and transferring the waste to Tank 241-AY-102. Waste in both tanks must be maintained below applicable thermal limits during and following the waste transfer. Thermal hydraulic process control models will be used for process control of the thermal limits. This report documents the process control models and presents a benchmarking of the models with data from Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Revision 1 of this report will provide a baselining of the models in preparation for the initiation of sluicing.

  7. The EPA's Study on the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, Susan

    2013-03-01

    Natural gas plays a key role in our nation's clean energy future. The United States has vast reserves of natural gas that are commercially viable as a result of advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, which enable greater access to gas in rock formations deep underground. These advances have spurred a significant increase in the production of both natural gas and oil across the country. However, as the use of hydraulic fracturing has increased, so have concerns about its potential human health and environmental impacts, especially for drinking water. In response to public concern, the US Congress requested that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conduct scientific research to examine the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. In 2011, the EPA began research to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources, if any, and to identify the driving factors that may affect the severity and frequency of such impacts. The study is organized around the five stages of the hydraulic fracturing water cycle, from water acquisition through the mixing of chemicals and the injection of fracturing fluid to post-fracturing treatment and/or disposal of wastewater. EPA scientists are using a transdisciplinary research approach involving laboratory studies, computer modeling, toxicity assessments, and case studies to answer research questions associated with each stage of the water cycle. This talk will provide an overview of the EPA's study, including a description of the hydraulic fracturing water cycle and a summary of the ongoing research projects.

  8. Advanced geothermal hydraulics model -- Phase 1 final report, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    W. Zheng; J. Fu; W. C. Maurer

    1999-07-01

    An advanced geothermal well hydraulics model (GEODRIL) is being developed to accurately calculate bottom-hole conditions in these hot wells. In Phase 1, real-time monitoring and other improvements were added to GEODRIL. In Phase 2, GEODRIL will be integrated into Marconi's Intelligent Drilling Monitor (IDM) that will use artificial intelligence to detect lost circulation, fluid influxes and other circulation problems in geothermal wells. This software platform has potential for significantly reducing geothermal drilling costs.

  9. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Hafzullah; Sadan Ozgur Kirca, Veysel; Burgan, Halil Ibrahim; Kellecioglu, Dorukhan

    2016-05-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses) wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS) software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  10. Views on the future of thermal hydraulic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.

    1997-07-01

    It is essential for the U.S. NRC to sustain the highest level of the thermal-hydraulics and reactor safety research expertise and continuously improve their accident analysis capability. Such expertise should span over four different areas which are strongly related to each other. These are: (1) Reactor Safety Code Development, (2) Two-phase Flow Modeling, (3) Instrumentation and Fundamental Experimental Research, and (4) Separate Effect and Integral Test. The NRC is already considering a new effort in the area of advanced thermal-hydraulics effort. Its success largely depends on the availability of a significantly improved two-phase flow formulation and constitutive relations supported by detailed experimental data. Therefore, it is recommended that the NRC start significant research efforts in the areas of two-phase flow modeling, instrumentation, basic and separate effect experiments which should be pursued systematically and with clearly defined objectives. It is desirable that some international program is developed in this area. This paper is concentrated on those items in the thermal-hydraulic area which eventually determine the quality of future accident analysis codes.

  11. Capillary bundle model of hydraulic conductivity for frozen soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kunio; Flury, Markus

    2008-12-01

    We developed a capillary bundle model to describe water flow in frozen soil. We assume that the soil can be represented as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries. We consider that the freezing point in the capillaries is depressed according to the Gibbs-Thomson effect and that when stable ice forms in a capillary, the ice forms in the center of the capillaries, leaving a circular annulus open for liquid water flow. We use the model to demonstrate how the hydraulic conductivity changes as a function of temperature for both saturated and unsaturated soils, using a sand and two silt loam soils as examples. As temperature decreases, more and more ice forms, and the water flux consequently decreases. In frozen soil near 0°C, water predominantly flows through ice-free capillaries, so that the hydraulic conductivity of frozen soil is similar to that of an unfrozen soil with a water content equal to the unfrozen water content of the frozen soil. At low temperatures, however, ice forms in almost all capillaries, and the hydraulic conductivity of frozen soil is greater than that of unfrozen soil with the same water potential.

  12. Generalized hydromechanical model for stomatal responses to hydraulic perturbations.

    PubMed

    Kwon, H W; Choi, M Y

    2014-01-01

    Stomata respond in a common pattern to various hydraulic perturbations on any part of the 'soil-plant-air' system: initial transient 'wrong-way' responses and final stationary 'right-way' responses. In order to describe this pattern on the basis of statistical physics, we propose a simple model where turgor pressure of a cell is taken to be a power function of its volume, and obtain results in qualitative agreement with experimental data for responses to a variety of hydraulic perturbations: Firstly, stationary stomatal conductance as a function of the vapor pressure deficit divides into three regimes characterized by sensitivities of the stomatal conductance and the transpiration rate with respect to vapor pressure deficit; secondly, for every hydraulic perturbation, the initial transient 'wrong-way' responses always appear; thirdly, on condition that water is supplied insufficiently, stomatal oscillations are often observed; finally, stomatal responses following leaf excision exhibit, after the initial transient wrong-way responses, slow relaxation to stomatal closing. In particular, comparison of areoles having different numbers of stomata demonstrates that areoles with small numbers of stomata tend to provoke lack of water in the soil as well as in the plant. In addition, our model also describes well dependence of the stomatal conductance on temperature. It may be extended further to describe stomatal responses to other environmental factors such as carbon dioxide, light, and temperature.

  13. Statistical-physical model of the hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, B.; Marczewski, W.; Usowicz, J. B.; Lukowski, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    The water content in unsaturated subsurface soil layer is determined by processes of exchanging mass and energy between media of soil and atmosphere, and particular members of layered media. Generally they are non-homogeneous on different scales, considering soil porosity, soil texture including presence of vegetation elements in the root zone, and canopy above the surface, and varying biomass density of plants above the surface in clusters. That heterogeneity determines statistically effective values of particular physical properties. This work considers mainly those properties which determine the hydraulic conductivity of soil. This property is necessary for characterizing physically water transfer in the root zone and access of nutrient matter for plants, but it also the water capacity on the field scale. The temporal variability of forcing conditions and evolutionarily changing vegetation causes substantial effects of impact on the water capacity in large scales, bringing the evolution of water conditions in the entire area, spanning a possible temporal state in the range between floods and droughts. The dynamic of this evolution of water conditions is highly determined by vegetation but is hardly predictable in evaluations. Hydrological models require feeding with input data determining hydraulic properties of the porous soil which are proposed in this paper by means of the statistical-physical model of the water hydraulic conductivity. The statistical-physical model was determined for soils being typical in Euroregion Bug, Eastern Poland. The model is calibrated on the base of direct measurements in the field scales, and enables determining typical characteristics of water retention by the retention curves bounding the hydraulic conductivity to the state of water saturation of the soil. The values of the hydraulic conductivity in two reference states are used for calibrating the model. One is close to full saturation, and another is for low water content far

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics: does size matter?

    PubMed

    Tixier, Aude; Cochard, Hervé; Badel, Eric; Dusotoit-Coucaud, Anaïs; Jansen, Steven; Herbette, Stéphane

    2013-05-01

    While Arabidopsis thaliana has been proposed as a model species for wood development, the potential of this tiny herb for studying xylem hydraulics remains unexplored and anticipated by scepticism. Inflorescence stems of A. thaliana were used to measure hydraulic conductivity and cavitation resistance, whereas light and electron microscopy allowed observations of vessels. In wild-type plants, measured and theoretical conductivity showed a significant correlation (R (2) = 0.80, P < 0.01). Moreover, scaling of vessel dimensions and intervessel pit structure of A. thaliana were consistent with structure-function relationships of woody plants. The reliability and resolution of the hydraulic methods applied to measure vulnerability to cavitation were addressed by comparing plants grown under different photoperiods or different mutant lines. Sigmoid vulnerability curves of A. thaliana indicated a pressure corresponding to 50% loss of hydraulic conductance (P 50) between -3 and -2.5MPa for short-day and long-day plants, respectively. Polygalacturonase mutants showed a higher P 50 value (-2.25MPa), suggesting a role for pectins in vulnerability to cavitation. The application of A. thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics provides exciting possibilities for (1) exploring the molecular basis of xylem anatomical features and (2) understanding genetic mechanisms behind xylem functional traits such as cavitation resistance. Compared to perennial woody species, however, the lesser amount of xylem in A. thaliana has its limitations.

  15. Pen Branch Delta and Savannah River Swamp Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.

    1999-05-13

    The proposed Savannah River Site (SRS) Wetlands Restoration Project area is located in Barnwell County, South Carolina on the southwestern boundary of the SRS Reservation. The swamp covers about 40.5 km2 and is bounded to the west and south by the Savannah River and to the north and east by low bluffs at the edge of the Savannah River floodplain. Water levels within the swamp are determined by stage along the Savannah River, local drainage, groundwater seepage, and inflows from four tributaries, Beaver Dam Creek, Fourmile Branch, Pen Branch, and Steel Creek. Historic discharges of heated process water into these tributaries scoured the streambed, created deltas in the adjacent wetland, and killed native vegetation in the vicinity of the delta deposits. Future releases from these tributaries will be substantially smaller and closer to ambient temperatures. One component of the proposed restoration project will be to reestablish indigenous wetland vegetation on the Pen Branch delta that covers about 1.0 km2. Long-term predictions of water levels within the swamp are required to determine the characteristics of suitable plants. The objective of the study was to predict water levels at various locations within the proposed SRS Wetlands Restoration Project area for a range of Savannah River flows and regulated releases from Pen Branch. TABS-MD, a United States Army Corps of Engineer developed two-dimensional finite element open channel hydraulic computer code, was used to model the SRS swamp area for various flow conditions.

  16. Modeling biofilm dynamics and hydraulic properties in variably saturated soils using a channel network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, Ravid; Furman, Alex; Dosoretz, Carlos; Shavit, Uri

    2014-07-01

    Biofilm effects on water flow in unsaturated environments have largely been ignored in the past. However, intensive engineered systems that involve elevated organic loads such as wastewater irrigation, effluent recharge, and bioremediation processes make understanding how biofilms affect flow highly important. In the current work, we present a channel-network model that incorporates water flow, substrate transport, and biofilm dynamics to simulate the alteration of soil hydraulic properties, namely water retention and conductivity. The change in hydraulic properties due to biofilm growth is not trivial and depends highly on the spatial distribution of the biofilm development. Our results indicate that the substrate mass transfer coefficient across the water-biofilm interface dominates the spatiotemporal distribution of biofilm. High mass transfer coefficients lead to uncontrolled biofilm growth close to the substrate source, resulting in preferential clogging of the soil. Low mass transfer coefficients, on the other hand, lead to a more uniform biofilm distribution. The first scenario leads to a dramatic reduction of the hydraulic conductivity with almost no change in water retention, whereas the second scenario has a smaller effect on conductivity but a larger influence on retention. The current modeling approach identifies key factors that still need to be studied and opens the way for simulation and optimization of processes involving significant biological activity in unsaturated soils.

  17. Development of two-phase pipeline hydraulic analysis model based on Beggs-Brill correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluyo, Joko; Hermawan, Achilleus; Indarto

    2016-06-01

    The hydraulic analysis is an important stage in a reliable pipeline design. In the implementation, fluid distribution from a source to the sinks often occurs on parallel pipeline networks. The solution to the problem is complicated because of the iterative technique requirement. Regarding its solution effectiveness, there is a need for analysis related to the model and the solution method. This study aims to investigate pipeline hydraulic analysis on distributing of two-phase fluids flow. The model uses Beggs-Brill correlation to converse mass flow rates into pressure drops. In the solution technique, the Newton-Raphson iterative method is utilized. The iterative technique is solved using a computer program. The study is carried out using a certain pipeline network. The model is validated by comparing between Beggs-Brill towards Mukherjee-Brill correlation. The result reveals that the computer program enables solving of iterative calculation on the parallel pipeline hydraulic analysis. Convergence iteration is achieved by 50 iterations. The main results of the model are mass flow rate and pressure drop. The mass flow rate is obtained in the deviation up to 2.06%, between Beggs-Brill and Mukherjee-Brill correlation. On the other hand, the pressure gradient deviation is achieved on a higher deviation due to the different approach of the two correlations. The model can be further developed in the hydraulic pipeline analysis for two-phase flow.

  18. Using Hydraulic Network Models to Teach Electric Circuit Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Irvin; EERC (Engineering Education Research Center) Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Unlike other engineering disciplines, teaching electric circuit principles is difficult for some students because there isn't a visual context to rely on. So concepts such as electric potential, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance have little meaning outside of their definition and the derived mathematical relationships. As a work in progress, we are developing a tool to support teaching, learning, and research of electric circuits. The tool will allow the user to design, build, and operate electric circuits in the form of hydraulic networks. We believe that this system will promote greater learning of electric circuit principles by visually realizing the conceptual and abstract concepts of electric circuits. Furthermore, as a teaching and learning tool, the hydraulic network system can be used to teach and improve comprehension of electrical principles in K through 12 classrooms and in cross-disciplinary environments such as Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Aeronautical Engineering. As a research tool, the hydraulic network can model and simulate micro/nano bio-electro-chemical systems. Organization within the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh.

  19. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity: Chapter 21

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K(). The parameters that describe the K() curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  20. Modelling of hydraulic fracture propagation in inhomogeneous poroelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykin, A. N.; Golovin, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    In the paper a model for description of a hydraulic fracture propagation in inhomogeneous poroelastic medium is proposed. Among advantages of the presented numerical algorithm, there are incorporation of the near-tip analysis into the general computational scheme, account for the rock failure criterion on the base of the cohesive zone model, possibility for analysis of fracture propagation in inhomogeneous reservoirs. The numerical convergence of the algorithm is verified and the agreement of our numerical results with known solutions is established. The influence of the inhomogeneity of the reservoir permeability to the fracture time evolution is also demonstrated.

  1. Calibration of hydraulic models: effects of rating-curve uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Castellarin, Attilio; Brath, Armando

    2010-05-01

    This research focuses on the uncertainty of rating-curves and how this uncertainty propagates to Manning's roughness coefficient during the calibration of numerical hydraulic models. Rating-curves, relating stage and flow discharge, are traditionally used for describing boundary conditions. The uncertainty associated with rating-curves is often neglected, and generally considered to be less important than other factors (see e.g., Di Baldassarre and Montanari, HESS, 2009). We performed a series of simulation experiments aimed at: (1) quantitatively assessing the uncertainty of the curves; (2) investigating its effects on the calibration of Manning's roughness coefficient. We used a quasi-bidimensional (quasi-2D) model of the middle-lower reach of the River Po (Northern Italy) to simulate 10 different historical flood events for the hydrometric river cross-section located in Cremona. Using the simulated data, we mimicked 15 measurement campaigns for each flood event and we corrupted the discharge data values according to the indications on measurement campaigns and errors reported in the literature (i.e., EU. ISO EN 748, 1997). We then constructed the 90% confidence interval for the synthetic curves. Then, we performed an additional set of model runs downstream of the Cremona's cross-section to assess how the uncertainty of rating curves affects the estimated Manning coefficients during the calibration phase. The results of the study show that the variation of Manning's roughness coefficient resulting from the rating-curve uncertainty is significant. This variation is analysed and discussed relative to the variability of Manning's coefficient reported in the literature for different channel conditions characterising lower reaches of large natural streams.

  2. Hydraulic Implications of Different Megaflood Canyon Incision Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, I. J.; Lamb, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Deeply incised canyons are some of the most dramatic features of landscapes carved by megafloods. The geometry of these canyons may reveal information regarding flood magnitudes during the last ice age on Earth and the volume of water flowing on early Mars. Canyons on both planets have been alternatively modeled as 'channels', where the modern topography was completely inundated with water to the elevation of the canyon rims, or as 'valleys' that were progressively incised by lesser discharges. Here we combine numerical flood simulations and sediment transport mechanics to explore the hydraulic implications that result from modeling the canyons as 'channels' versus 'valleys'. Over 300 floods were simulated for Moses Coulee, a 60 km-long canyon in the Channeled Scablands of eastern Washington, USA, using a 2D, depth-averaged hydraulic model. We simulated floods with discharges ranging from 0.1 million m3 s-1 to 6 million m3 s-1 using both the modern landscape as a topographic boundary condition and synthetic topographies that restored the canyon floor to different elevations as guided by strath terraces. For each simulation we tracked whether shear stresses on the terrace treads exceeded thresholds for sliding of basalt columns. Simulations using the modern topography indicate shear stresses were sufficiently high to erode the terraces at discharges lower than bankfull, and surprisingly, shear stresses decrease with increasing discharge at some sites due to backwater dynamics, which constrains canyon formation to moderate discharges. Simulations performed on the synthetic topography suggest the canyon could have been incised progressively by floods smaller than those required to fill the canyon to bankfull stage. These results suggest the canyons can be viewed as valleys that incised progressively, as opposed to channels filled with water, which has implications for placing bounds on paleoflood hydraulic reconstruction on Earth and Mars.

  3. Discrete modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in a complex pre-existing fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Nakagawa, S.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and stimulation of fracture networks are widely used by the energy industry (e.g., shale gas extraction, enhanced geothermal systems) to increase permeability of geological formations. Numerous analytical and numerical models have been developed to help understand and predict the behavior of hydraulically induced fractures. However, many existing models assume simple fracturing scenarios with highly idealized fracture geometries (e.g., propagation of a single fracture with assumed shapes in a homogeneous medium). Modeling hydraulic fracture propagation in the presence of natural fractures and homogeneities can be very challenging because of the complex interactions between fluid, rock matrix, and rock interfaces, as well as the interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing natural fractures. In this study, the TOUGH-RBSN code for coupled hydro-mechanical modeling is utilized to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and its interaction with pre-existing fracture networks. The simulation tool combines TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach, with the implementation of a lattice modeling approach for geomechanical and fracture-damage behavior, named Rigid-Body-Spring Network (RBSN). The discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is facilitated in the Voronoi discretization via a fully automated modeling procedure. The numerical program is verified through a simple simulation for single fracture propagation, in which the resulting fracture geometry is compared to an analytical solution for given fracture length and aperture. Subsequently, predictive simulations are conducted for planned laboratory experiments using rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed, pre-existing fracture network. The results of a preliminary simulation demonstrate selective fracturing and fluid infiltration along the pre-existing fractures, with additional fracturing in part

  4. Use of hydraulic models to identify and resolve design isssues in FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strock, T.W.; Gohara, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The hydraulics within a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber involve several complex two-phase gas/liquid interactions that directly affect the scrubber pressure drop, mist elimination efficiency, and the mass transfer process of SO{sub 2} removal. Current industrial efforts to develop cost effective, high-efficiency wet FGD scrubbers are focusing, in part, on the hydraulics. The development of an experimental approach and test facility for understanding and optimizing wet scrubber flow characteristics has been completed. Hydraulic models simulate full-scale units and allow the designer to view the gas/liquid flow interactions. Modeling procedures for downsizing the wet scrubber for the laboratory have been developed and validated with field data comparisons. A one-eighth scale hydraulic model has been used to study several FGD scrubber design issues. Design changes to reduce capital and operating cost have been developed and tested. Recently, the model was used to design a commercial, uniform flow, high gas velocity absorber for the next generation of FGD systems.

  5. Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    SciTech Connect

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Wohling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  6. A theoretical study of structural acoustic silencers for hydraulic systems.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Grosh, Karl; Dodson, John M

    2002-05-01

    Theoretical studies show that the introduction of an in-line structural acoustic silencer into a hydraulic system can achieve broadband quieting (i.e., high transmission loss). Strategies for using structural acoustic filters for simultaneously reducing reflection and transmission by tailoring the material properties are studied. A structural acoustic silencer consists of a flexible layer inserted into nominally rigid hydraulic piping. Transmission loss is achieved by two mechanisms--reflection of energy due to an impedance mismatch, and coupling of the incoming acoustic fluctuations to structural vibrations thereby allowing for the extraction of energy through losses in the structure. Structural acoustic finite element simulations are used to determine the transmission loss and evaluate designs. Results based on the interaction of orthotropic and isotropic plates with variable geometry, operating in heavy fluids like water and oil, are presented.

  7. A Bayesian inverse modeling approach to estimate soil hydraulic properties of a toposequence in southeastern Amazonia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi Boschi, Raquel; Qin, Mingming; Gimenez, Daniel; Cooper, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Modeling is an important tool for better understanding and assessing land use impacts on landscape processes. A key point for environmental modeling is the knowledge of soil hydraulic properties. However, direct determination of soil hydraulic properties is difficult and costly, particularly in vast and remote regions such as one constituting the Amazon Biome. One way to overcome this problem is to extrapolate accurately estimated data to pedologically similar sites. The van Genuchten (VG) parametric equation is the most commonly used for modeling SWRC. The use of a Bayesian approach in combination with the Markov chain Monte Carlo to estimate the VG parameters has several advantages compared to the widely used global optimization techniques. The Bayesian approach provides posterior distributions of parameters that are independent from the initial values and allow for uncertainty analyses. The main objectives of this study were: i) to estimate hydraulic parameters from data of pasture and forest sites by the Bayesian inverse modeling approach; and ii) to investigate the extrapolation of the estimated VG parameters to a nearby toposequence with pedologically similar soils to those used for its estimate. The parameters were estimated from volumetric water content and tension observations obtained after rainfall events during a 207-day period from pasture and forest sites located in the southeastern Amazon region. These data were used to run HYDRUS-1D under a Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) scheme 10,000 times, and only the last 2,500 times were used to calculate the posterior distributions of each hydraulic parameter along with 95% confidence intervals (CI) of volumetric water content and tension time series. Then, the posterior distributions were used to generate hydraulic parameters for two nearby toposequences composed by six soil profiles, three are under forest and three are under pasture. The parameters of the nearby site were accepted when

  8. Modeling of aquifer movement due to seismic and hydraulic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Aiguo

    A mathematical description of aquifer movement due to inertial and viscous forces is formulated by applying fundamental physical principles such as mass balance and momentum balance to a saturated aquifer system. An explicit interaction term in the momentum balance equation for the water phase sharing the same mathematical space with the solid phase introduced in the derivation of the governing equation system of aquifer movement distinguishes the development in this study from those of others such as Li's and that of Zienkiewicz and Bettess. The solid matrix is assumed to be a Helm-Li material which deforms as a highly non-linear viscous fluid rather than as the conventional poroelastic material. The finite element method is applied to solve three simplified situations: (a) negligible relative acceleration; (b) negligible acceleration of water; and (c) negligible bulk acceleration. Helm's bulk flux concept is applied in the simplifications. A computer code called Aquivis3d is developed in order to calculate the velocity and displacement of aquifer movement due to both inertial and viscous forces. Evaluation of the numerical model is accomplished by applying the code to different cases which include: standard laboratory consolidation tests; one dimensional radial movement of a Theis-Thiem aquifer; and a disturbance propagation. Simulation results favorably fit laboratory measurements for selected consolidation tests. Simulation results of one dimensional radial movement of a Theis-Thiem aquifer based in this study on poroviscosity are similar in general features to Helm's analytical results based on poroelasticity. Frequency dispersion and intensity attenuation of a disturbance propagation are fully simulated without any additional ad hoc damping assumption for dynamic aquifer movement. Sensitivity analyses are made for the viscous constitutive parameters and the hydraulic parameters in the consolidation and the one dimensional radial movement of a Theis

  9. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction.

  10. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction. PMID:26807634

  11. Stochastic analysis of the hydraulic conductivity estimated for a heterogeneous aquifer via numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Zhang, Y.; Shu, L.; Chen, X.; Chen, S.; Li, S.; Wang, G.; Li, J.

    2015-05-01

    The paper aims to evaluate the impacts of the average hydraulic conductivity of the heterogeneous aquifer on the estimated hydraulic conductivity using the observations from pumping tests. The results of aquifer tests conducted at a karst aquifer are first introduced. A MODFLOW groundwater flow model was developed to perform numerical pumping tests, and the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) field was generated using the Monte Carlo method. The K was estimated by the Theis solution for an unconfined aquifer. The effective hydraulic conductivity (Ke) was calculated to represent the hydraulic conductivity of a heterogeneous aquifer. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that Ke increase with the mean of hydraulic conductivity (EK), and decrease with the coefficient of variation of the hydraulic conductivity (Cv). The impact of spatial variability of K on the estimated Ke at two observation wells with smaller EK is less significant compared to the cases with larger EK.

  12. 75 FR 35023 - Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... AGENCY Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study AGENCY: Environmental... between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water. The meetings are open to all interested parties and will... Hydraulic Fracturing Study informational meetings are as follows: July 8, 2010, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.,...

  13. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems. PMID:27288672

  14. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  15. Calibration of hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics for TOC removal modeling in biofilm reactors under different hydraulic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Soric, Audrey; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    In this study, total organic carbon (TOC) biodegradation was simulated by GPS-X software in biofilm reactors with carriers of plastic rings and glass beads under different hydraulic conditions. Hydrodynamic model by retention time distribution and biokinetic measurement by in-situ batch test served as two significant parts of model calibration. Experimental results showed that TOC removal efficiency was stable in both media due to the enough height of column, although the actual hydraulic volume changed during the variation of hydraulic condition. Simulated TOC removal efficiencies were close to experimental ones with low theil inequality coefficient values (below 0.15). Compared with glass beads, more TOC was removed in the filter with plastic rings due to the larger actual hydraulic volume and lower half saturation coefficient in spite of its lower maximum specific growth rate of biofilm, which highlighted the importance of calibrating hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics.

  16. Assessing the Transferability of Hydraulic Habitat Models for Atlantic Salmon Fry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millidine, K. J.; Malcolm, I.; Fryer, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic habitat models, which are logistically and technically challenging and expensive to produce, are frequently transferred between rivers without validation. Although this is known to be associated with problems, few studies have assessed the potential consequences for model predictions. This study investigated the local (within sub-catchment) transfer of hydraulic habitat models developed for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fry. Detailed 2D hydraulic models were developed for two adjacent reaches, each containing pool, riffle, glide and run habitats where salmon fry were stocked at uniform saturated densities. Substrate and cover were characterised using transects. Generalised Additive Models (GAM's) were fitted to seasonal fry abundance data, with Froude number, dominant substrate and cover included as predictor variables. Despite attempts to select reaches with similar characteristics, the spatial distribution of Froude, dominant substrate and cover differed, with substrate and cover exhibiting the greatest inter-reach differences. Froude was the most important individual predictor of fry abundance, with the highest densities observed at moderate Froude across all seasons. When transferred between reaches, models which contained multiple predictor variables and their interactions transferred less well than models containing Froude alone potentially reflecting inter-reach differences in the distribution of substrate and cover. This study suggests that (1) habitat models should be developed at sites offering maximum environmental complexity at a local level (2) scientists and managers should avoid transferring models between locations with different environmental characteristics, especially in the absence of model validation (3) complex models should be avoided (4) the transferability of Froude only models should be further investigated, if predictions of habitat quality are to be made at new sites.

  17. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains § 650... § 650.111 (c) and (d) shall be summarized in environmental review documents prepared pursuant to 23...

  18. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains § 650... § 650.111 (c) and (d) shall be summarized in environmental review documents prepared pursuant to 23...

  19. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains § 650... § 650.111 (c) and (d) shall be summarized in environmental review documents prepared pursuant to 23...

  20. A Bayesian Chance-Constrained Method for Hydraulic Barrier Design Under Model Structure Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitsazan, N.; Pham, H. V.; Tsai, F. T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The groundwater community has widely recognized the model structure uncertainty as the major source of model uncertainty in groundwater modeling. Previous studies in the aquifer remediation design, however, rarely discuss the impact of the model structure uncertainty. This study combines the chance-constrained (CC) programming with the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) as a BMA-CC framework to assess the effect of model structure uncertainty in the remediation design. To investigate the impact of the model structure uncertainty on the remediation design, we compare the BMA-CC method with the traditional CC programming that only considers the model parameter uncertainty. The BMA-CC method is employed to design a hydraulic barrier to protect public supply wells of the Government St. pump station from saltwater intrusion in the "1,500-foot" sand and the "1-700-foot" sand of the Baton Rouge area, southeastern Louisiana. To address the model structure uncertainty, we develop three conceptual groundwater models based on three different hydrostratigraphy structures. The results show that using the traditional CC programming overestimates design reliability. The results also show that at least five additional connector wells are needed to achieve more than 90% design reliability level. The total amount of injected water from connector wells is higher than the total pumpage of the protected public supply wells. While reducing injection rate can be achieved by reducing reliability level, the study finds that the hydraulic barrier design to protect the Government St. pump station is not economically attractive.

  1. Mathematical Model of Hydraulic Fracturing of a Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharova, G. S.; Khramchenkov, M. G.

    2016-07-01

    A study has been made of the problem on the process of formation of a zone of higher-than-average permeability with a moving boundary in an initially low-permeability porous medium (problem on hydraulic fracturing of a bed) in a three-dimensional formulation. A characteristic feature of the three-dimensional problem was the taking into account the existence of two zones (zone with a regular permeability and the destruction zone) in the porous medium, whose contact region was determined using the condition of mass balance on the moving boundary. Special features fundamental to the process of mass transfer in such filtration-inhomogeneous porous media have been revealed and analyzed.

  2. Field study of subsurface heterogeneity with steady-state hydraulic tomography.

    PubMed

    Berg, Steven J; Illman, Walter A

    2013-01-01

    Remediation of subsurface contamination requires an understanding of the contaminant (history, source location, plume extent and concentration, etc.), and, knowledge of the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) that governs groundwater flow and solute transport. Many methods exist for characterizing K heterogeneity, but most if not all methods require the collection of a large number of small-scale data and its interpolation. In this study, we conduct a hydraulic tomography survey at a highly heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit at the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) located at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada to sequentially interpret four pumping tests using the steady-state form of the Sequential Successive Linear Estimator (SSLE) (Yeh and Liu 2000). The resulting three-dimensional (3D) K distribution (or K-tomogram) is compared against: (1) K distributions obtained through the inverse modeling of individual pumping tests using SSLE, and (2) effective hydraulic conductivity (K(eff) ) estimates obtained by automatically calibrating a groundwater flow model while treating the medium to be homogeneous. Such a K(eff) is often used for designing remediation operations, and thus is used as the basis for comparison with the K-tomogram. Our results clearly show that hydraulic tomography is superior to the inversions of single pumping tests or K(eff) estimates. This is particularly significant for contaminated sites where an accurate representation of the flow field is critical for simulating contaminant transport and injection of chemical and biological agents used for active remediation of contaminant source zones and plumes.

  3. Evaluating the Risks of Surface Spills Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Activities to Groundwater Resources: a Modeling Study in the South Platte Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, C.; McLaughlin, M.; Blotevogel, J.; Benson, D. A.; Borch, T.; McCray, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has revolutionized the U.S.'s energy portfolio by making shale reservoirs productive and commercially viable. However, the public is concerned that the chemical constituents in hydraulic fracturing fluid, produced water, or natural gas itself could potentially impact groundwater or adjacent streams. Here, we conduct fate and transport simulations of surface spills, the most likely contamination pathway to occur during oil and gas production operations, to evaluate whether or not these spills pose risks to groundwater quality. We focus on the South Platte Alluvial Aquifer, which is located in the greater Denver metro area and overlaps a zone of high-density oil and gas development. The purpose of this work is to assess the mobility and persistence of chemical contaminants (e.g. biocides, friction reducers, surfactants, hydrocarbons, etc.) —based on sorption to soil, degradation potential, co-contaminant interactions, and spill conditions—and to understand the site characteristics and hydrologic conditions that would make a particular location prone to groundwater quality degradation in the event of an accidental release. We propose a coupled analytical-numerical approach that could be duplicated by environmental consultants. Results suggest that risk of groundwater pollution, based on predicted concentration at the groundwater table, is low in most areas of the South Platte system for the contaminants investigated under common spill conditions. However, substantial risk may exist in certain areas where the groundwater table is shallow. In addition, transport of certain contaminants is influenced by interactions with other constituents in produced or stimulation fluids. By helping to identify locations in the Front Range of Colorado that are at low or high risk for groundwater contamination due to a surface spill, it is our hope that this work will aid in improving prevention, mitigation, and remediation practices so that decision-makers can

  4. Modelling of of hydraulic fractures trajectories in inhomogeneous stress field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. A.; Galybin, A.

    2013-05-01

    The paper examines an actual problem of oil and gas production -- modelling of the hydro-fracture trajectories depending on ihomogeneous distributions of pore pressure. The results could serve for improvement of the design of hydraulic fracturing in the oil/gas fields. The methods of the plane elasticity theory and fracture mechanics are employed. It is assumed, that in addition to the homogeneous field of natural stress the reservoir is also subjected to additional stresses caused by technological reasons, which makes the total stress field to be inhomogeneous. Therefore, the objective is to model a curvilinear crack path in an elastic inhomogeneous-loaded plane depending on the different mechanical parameters that control the stress state of the reservoir. For the simulation of the trajectory of a crack the method of boundary integral equation is used. The algorithms of step-by-step determination of the crack's trajectory development using the criterion of maximum tensile stresses at the end of the cracks have been developed. For the numerical realization of the solution we used a special modification of the method of mechanical quadratures providing effective and fast solution of the corresponding system of singular integral equation. The solution for the hydro-fracture path have been simulated for the case of inhomogeneous stress field due to presence of injection well for several physical models.

  5. Hydraulic Fracturing and Drinking Water Resources: Update on EPA Hydraulic Fracturing Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural gas plays a key role in our nation's energy future and the process known as hydraulic fracturing (HF) is one way of accessing that resource. Over the past few years, several key technical, economic, and energy developments have spurred increased use of HF for gas extracti...

  6. Elucidating hydraulic fracturing impacts on groundwater quality using a regional geospatial statistical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Burton, Taylour G; Rifai, Hanadi S; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Fontenot, Brian E; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operations have been viewed as the cause of certain environmental issues including groundwater contamination. The potential for hydraulic fracturing to induce contaminant pathways in groundwater is not well understood since gas wells are completed while isolating the water table and the gas-bearing reservoirs lay thousands of feet below the water table. Recent studies have attributed ground water contamination to poor well construction and leaks in the wellbore annulus due to ruptured wellbore casings. In this paper, a geospatial model of the Barnett Shale region was created using ArcGIS. The model was used for spatial analysis of groundwater quality data in order to determine if regional variations in groundwater quality, as indicated by various groundwater constituent concentrations, may be associated with the presence of hydraulically fractured gas wells in the region. The Barnett Shale reservoir pressure, completions data, and fracture treatment data were evaluated as predictors of groundwater quality change. Results indicated that elevated concentrations of certain groundwater constituents are likely related to natural gas production in the study area and that beryllium, in this formation, could be used as an indicator variable for evaluating fracturing impacts on regional groundwater quality. Results also indicated that gas well density and formation pressures correlate to change in regional water quality whereas proximity to gas wells, by itself, does not. The results also provided indirect evidence supporting the possibility that micro annular fissures serve as a pathway transporting fluids and chemicals from the fractured wellbore to the overlying groundwater aquifers. PMID:26745299

  7. Elucidating hydraulic fracturing impacts on groundwater quality using a regional geospatial statistical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Burton, Taylour G; Rifai, Hanadi S; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Fontenot, Brian E; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operations have been viewed as the cause of certain environmental issues including groundwater contamination. The potential for hydraulic fracturing to induce contaminant pathways in groundwater is not well understood since gas wells are completed while isolating the water table and the gas-bearing reservoirs lay thousands of feet below the water table. Recent studies have attributed ground water contamination to poor well construction and leaks in the wellbore annulus due to ruptured wellbore casings. In this paper, a geospatial model of the Barnett Shale region was created using ArcGIS. The model was used for spatial analysis of groundwater quality data in order to determine if regional variations in groundwater quality, as indicated by various groundwater constituent concentrations, may be associated with the presence of hydraulically fractured gas wells in the region. The Barnett Shale reservoir pressure, completions data, and fracture treatment data were evaluated as predictors of groundwater quality change. Results indicated that elevated concentrations of certain groundwater constituents are likely related to natural gas production in the study area and that beryllium, in this formation, could be used as an indicator variable for evaluating fracturing impacts on regional groundwater quality. Results also indicated that gas well density and formation pressures correlate to change in regional water quality whereas proximity to gas wells, by itself, does not. The results also provided indirect evidence supporting the possibility that micro annular fissures serve as a pathway transporting fluids and chemicals from the fractured wellbore to the overlying groundwater aquifers.

  8. Engine Hydraulic Stability. [injector model for analyzing combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesselring, R. C.; Sprouse, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical injector model was developed specifically to analyze combustion instability coupling between the injector hydraulics and the combustion process. This digital computer dynamic injector model will, for any imposed chamber of inlet pressure profile with a frequency ranging from 100 to 3000 Hz (minimum) accurately predict/calculate the instantaneous injector flowrates. The injector system is described in terms of which flow segments enter and leave each pressure node. For each flow segment, a resistance, line lengths, and areas are required as inputs (the line lengths and areas are used in determining inertance). For each pressure node, volume and acoustic velocity are required as inputs (volume and acoustic velocity determine capacitance). The geometric criteria for determining inertances of flow segments and capacitance of pressure nodes was set. Also, a technique was developed for analytically determining time averaged steady-state pressure drops and flowrates for every flow segment in an injector when such data is not known. These pressure drops and flowrates are then used in determining the linearized flow resistance for each line segment of flow.

  9. Implicit level set algorithms for modelling hydraulic fracture propagation.

    PubMed

    Peirce, A

    2016-10-13

    Hydraulic fractures are tensile cracks that propagate in pre-stressed solid media due to the injection of a viscous fluid. Developing numerical schemes to model the propagation of these fractures is particularly challenging due to the degenerate, hypersingular nature of the coupled integro-partial differential equations. These equations typically involve a singular free boundary whose velocity can only be determined by evaluating a distinguished limit. This review paper describes a class of numerical schemes that have been developed to use the multiscale asymptotic behaviour typically encountered near the fracture boundary as multiple physical processes compete to determine the evolution of the fracture. The fundamental concepts of locating the free boundary using the tip asymptotics and imposing the tip asymptotic behaviour in a weak form are illustrated in two quite different formulations of the governing equations. These formulations are the displacement discontinuity boundary integral method and the extended finite-element method. Practical issues are also discussed, including new models for proppant transport able to capture 'tip screen-out'; efficient numerical schemes to solve the coupled nonlinear equations; and fast methods to solve resulting linear systems. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the performance of the numerical schemes. We conclude the paper with open questions for further research. This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597787

  10. Implicit level set algorithms for modelling hydraulic fracture propagation.

    PubMed

    Peirce, A

    2016-10-13

    Hydraulic fractures are tensile cracks that propagate in pre-stressed solid media due to the injection of a viscous fluid. Developing numerical schemes to model the propagation of these fractures is particularly challenging due to the degenerate, hypersingular nature of the coupled integro-partial differential equations. These equations typically involve a singular free boundary whose velocity can only be determined by evaluating a distinguished limit. This review paper describes a class of numerical schemes that have been developed to use the multiscale asymptotic behaviour typically encountered near the fracture boundary as multiple physical processes compete to determine the evolution of the fracture. The fundamental concepts of locating the free boundary using the tip asymptotics and imposing the tip asymptotic behaviour in a weak form are illustrated in two quite different formulations of the governing equations. These formulations are the displacement discontinuity boundary integral method and the extended finite-element method. Practical issues are also discussed, including new models for proppant transport able to capture 'tip screen-out'; efficient numerical schemes to solve the coupled nonlinear equations; and fast methods to solve resulting linear systems. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the performance of the numerical schemes. We conclude the paper with open questions for further research. This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'.

  11. Assessing the impact of different sources of topographic data on 1-D hydraulic modelling of floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. Md; Solomatine, D. P.; Di Baldassarre, G.

    2015-01-01

    Topographic data, such as digital elevation models (DEMs), are essential input in flood inundation modelling. DEMs can be derived from several sources either through remote sensing techniques (spaceborne or airborne imagery) or from traditional methods (ground survey). The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the light detection and ranging (lidar), and topographic contour maps are some of the most commonly used sources of data for DEMs. These DEMs are characterized by different precision and accuracy. On the one hand, the spatial resolution of low-cost DEMs from satellite imagery, such as ASTER and SRTM, is rather coarse (around 30 to 90 m). On the other hand, the lidar technique is able to produce high-resolution DEMs (at around 1 m), but at a much higher cost. Lastly, contour mapping based on ground survey is time consuming, particularly for higher scales, and may not be possible for some remote areas. The use of these different sources of DEM obviously affects the results of flood inundation models. This paper shows and compares a number of 1-D hydraulic models developed using HEC-RAS as model code and the aforementioned sources of DEM as geometric input. To test model selection, the outcomes of the 1-D models were also compared, in terms of flood water levels, to the results of 2-D models (LISFLOOD-FP). The study was carried out on a reach of the Johor River, in Malaysia. The effect of the different sources of DEMs (and different resolutions) was investigated by considering the performance of the hydraulic models in simulating flood water levels as well as inundation maps. The outcomes of our study show that the use of different DEMs has serious implications to the results of hydraulic models. The outcomes also indicate that the loss of model accuracy due to re-sampling the highest resolution DEM (i.e. lidar 1 m) to lower resolution is much less than the loss of model accuracy due

  12. Near-real-time simulation and internet-based delivery of forecast-flood inundation maps using two-dimensional hydraulic modeling--A pilot study for the Snoqualmie River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Fulford, Janice M.; Voss, Frank D.

    2002-01-01

    A system of numerical hydraulic modeling, geographic information system processing, and Internet map serving, supported by new data sources and application automation, was developed that generates inundation maps for forecast floods in near real time and makes them available through the Internet. Forecasts for flooding are generated by the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Center (RFC); these forecasts are retrieved automatically by the system and prepared for input to a hydraulic model. The model, TrimR2D, is a new, robust, two-dimensional model capable of simulating wide varieties of discharge hydrographs and relatively long stream reaches. TrimR2D was calibrated for a 28-kilometer reach of the Snoqualmie River in Washington State, and is used to estimate flood extent, depth, arrival time, and peak time for the RFC forecast. The results of the model are processed automatically by a Geographic Information System (GIS) into maps of flood extent, depth, and arrival and peak times. These maps subsequently are processed into formats acceptable by an Internet map server (IMS). The IMS application is a user-friendly interface to access the maps over the Internet; it allows users to select what information they wish to see presented and allows the authors to define scale-dependent availability of map layers and their symbology (appearance of map features). For example, the IMS presents a background of a digital USGS 1:100,000-scale quadrangle at smaller scales, and automatically switches to an ortho-rectified aerial photograph (a digital photograph that has camera angle and tilt distortions removed) at larger scales so viewers can see ground features that help them identify their area of interest more effectively. For the user, the option exists to select either background at any scale. Similar options are provided for both the map creator and the viewer for the various flood maps. This combination of a robust model, emerging IMS software, and application

  13. Assessment of uncertainties of the models used in thermal-hydraulic computer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gricay, A. S.; Migrov, Yu. A.

    2015-09-01

    The article deals with matters concerned with the problem of determining the statistical characteristics of variable parameters (the variation range and distribution law) in analyzing the uncertainty and sensitivity of calculation results to uncertainty in input data. A comparative analysis of modern approaches to uncertainty in input data is presented. The need to develop an alternative method for estimating the uncertainty of model parameters used in thermal-hydraulic computer codes, in particular, in the closing correlations of the loop thermal hydraulics block, is shown. Such a method shall feature the minimal degree of subjectivism and must be based on objective quantitative assessment criteria. The method includes three sequential stages: selecting experimental data satisfying the specified criteria, identifying the key closing correlation using a sensitivity analysis, and carrying out case calculations followed by statistical processing of the results. By using the method, one can estimate the uncertainty range of a variable parameter and establish its distribution law in the above-mentioned range provided that the experimental information is sufficiently representative. Practical application of the method is demonstrated taking as an example the problem of estimating the uncertainty of a parameter appearing in the model describing transition to post-burnout heat transfer that is used in the thermal-hydraulic computer code KORSAR. The performed study revealed the need to narrow the previously established uncertainty range of this parameter and to replace the uniform distribution law in the above-mentioned range by the Gaussian distribution law. The proposed method can be applied to different thermal-hydraulic computer codes. In some cases, application of the method can make it possible to achieve a smaller degree of conservatism in the expert estimates of uncertainties pertinent to the model parameters used in computer codes.

  14. Study on creating hydraulic tomography for crystalline rock using frequency dependent elastic wave velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, K.; Sakashita, S.; Ando, K.; Bruines, P.; Blechschmidt, I.; Kickmaier, W.; Onishi, Y.; Nishiyama, S.

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a technique to obtain hydraulic conductivity distribution in granite rock masses using seismic tomography. We apply the characteristic that elastic wave velocity disperses in fully saturated porous media on frequency and this velocity dispersion is governed by the hydraulic conductivity - this characteristic has been confirmed in laboratory experiments. The feasibility and design of the field experiment was demonstrated in a first step with numerical simulations. In a second step we applied the technique to the fractured granite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. The emphasis of the field campaign was on the evaluation of the range of applicability of this technique. The field campaign was structured in three steps, each one corresponding to a larger spatial scale. First, the seismic tomography was applied to a small area - the two boreholes were located at a distance of 1.5 m. In the following step, we selected a larger area, in which the distance of the boreholes amounts to 10 m and the field corresponds to a more complex geology. Finally we applied the testing to a field where the borehole distance was of the order of 75 m. We also drilled a borehole to confirm hydraulic characteristic and reviewed hydraulic model in the 1.5 m cross-hole location area. The results from the field campaign are presented and their application to the various fields are discussed and evaluated. (authors)

  15. Assessing the impact of different sources of topographic data on 1-D hydraulic modelling of floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. Md; Solomatine, D. P.; Di Baldassarre, G.

    2014-07-01

    Topographic data, such as digital elevation models (DEMs), are essential input in flood inundation modelling. DEMs can be derived from several sources either through remote sensing techniques (space-borne or air-borne imagery) or from traditional methods (ground survey). The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), and topographic contour maps are some of the most commonly used sources of data for DEMs. These DEMs are characterized by different precision and accuracy. On the one hand, the spatial resolution of low-cost DEMs from satellite imagery, such as ASTER and SRTM, is rather coarse (around 30-90 m). On the other hand, LiDAR technique is able to produce a high resolution DEMs (around 1m), but at a much higher cost. Lastly, contour mapping based on ground survey is time consuming, particularly for higher scales, and may not be possible for some remote areas. The use of these different sources of DEM obviously affects the results of flood inundation models. This paper shows and compares a number of hydraulic models developed using HEC-RAS as model code and the aforementioned sources of DEM as geometric input. The study was carried out on a reach of the Johor River, in Malaysia. The effect of the different sources of DEMs (and different resolutions) was investigated by considering the performance of the hydraulic models in simulating flood water levels as well as inundation maps. The outcomes of our study show that the use of different DEMs has serious implications to the results of hydraulic models. The outcomes also indicates the loss of model accuracy due to re-sampling the highest resolution DEM (i.e. LiDAR 1 m) to lower resolution are much less compared to the loss of model accuracy due to the use of low-cost DEM that have not only a lower resolution, but also a lower quality. Lastly, to better explore the sensitivity of the hydraulic models

  16. Hydraulic fracturing model based on the discrete fracture model and the generalized J integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Liu, Z. F.; Wang, X. H.; Zeng, B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydraulic fracturing technique is an effective stimulation for low permeability reservoirs. In fracturing models, one key point is to accurately calculate the flux across the fracture surface and the stress intensity factor. To achieve high precision, the discrete fracture model is recommended to calculate the flux. Using the generalized J integral, the present work obtains an accurate simulation of the stress intensity factor. Based on the above factors, an alternative hydraulic fracturing model is presented. Examples are included to demonstrate the reliability of the proposed model and its ability to model the fracture propagation. Subsequently, the model is used to describe the relationship between the geometry of the fracture and the fracturing equipment parameters. The numerical results indicate that the working pressure and the pump power will significantly influence the fracturing process.

  17. Coupled Numerical Study of Turbidity Currents, Internal Hydraulic Jump and Morphological Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, P.; Cao, Z.; He, Z.; Gareth, P.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract: The last two decades have seen intensive experimental and numerical studies of the occurrence condition of internal hydraulic jump in turbidity currents and the induced morphological signatures (Garcia and Parker 1989; Kostic and Parker 2006). Yet there are two critical issues that remain insufficiently or inappropriately addressed. First, depositional turbidity currents are imposed on steep slopes in both flume experiments and numerical cases, exclusively based on a configuration consisting of an upstream sloping portion and a downstream horizontal portion linked by a slope break. This appears physically counterintuitive as steep slope should favour self-accelerating erosional turbidity currents (Parker et al. 1986). The second issue concerns the numerical studies. There exist significant interactions among the current, sediment transport and bed topography. Due to the slope break in bed, the current may experience an internal hydraulic jump, leaving morphological signatures on the bed, which in turn affects the current evolution. Nevertheless, simplified decoupled models are exclusively employed in previous numerical investigations, in which the interactions are either partly or completely ignored without sufficient justification. The present paper aims to address the above-mentioned two issues relevant to the occurrence condition of the internal hydraulic jump and the induced morphological signatures. A recently developed well-balanced coupled numerical model for turbidity currents (Hu et al. 2012) is applied. In contrast to previous studies, erosional turbidity currents will be imposed at the upstream boundary, which is much more typical of the field. The effects of sediment size, bed slope decrease, and upstream and downstream boundary conditions are revealed in detail. In addition, the evolution of turbidity currents over a bed characterized by gradual decrease in slope is also discussed. References Garcia, M. H., and Parker, G. (1989). Experiments

  18. Experimental identification and study of hydraulic resonance test rig with Francis turbine operating at partial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favrel, A.; Landry, C.; Müller, A.; Avellan, F.

    2012-11-01

    Resonance in hydraulic systems is characterized by pressure fluctuations of high amplitude which can lead to undesirable and dangerous effects, such as noise, vibration and structural failure. For a Francis turbine operating at partial load, the cavitating vortex rope developing at the outlet of the runner induces pressure fluctuations which can excite the hydraulic system resonance, leading to undesirable large torque and power fluctuations. At resonant operating points, the prediction of amplitude pressure fluctuations by hydro-acoustic models breaks down and gives unreliable results. A more detailed knowledge of the eigenmodes and a better understanding of phenomenon occurring at resonance could allow improving the hydro-acoustic models prediction.This paper presents an experimental identification of a resonance observed in a close-looped hydraulic system with a Francis turbine reduced scale model operating at partial load. The resonance is excited matching one of the test rig eigenfrequencies with the vortex rope precession frequency. At this point, the hydro-acoustic response of the test rig is studied more precisely and used finally to reproduce the shape of the excited eigenmode.

  19. Evaluation of multiple hydraulic models in generating design/near-real time flood inundation extents under various geophysical settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Rajib, M. A.; Jafarzadegan, K.; Merwade, V.

    2015-12-01

    Application of land surface/hydrologic models within an operational flood forecasting system can provide probable time of occurrence and magnitude of streamflow at specific locations along a stream. Creating time-varying spatial extent of flood inundation and depth requires the use of a hydraulic or hydrodynamic model. Models differ in representing river geometry and surface roughness which can lead to different output depending on the particular model being used. The result from a single hydraulic model provides just one possible realization of the flood extent without capturing the uncertainty associated with the input or the model parameters. The objective of this study is to compare multiple hydraulic models toward generating ensemble flood inundation extents. Specifically, relative performances of four hydraulic models, including AutoRoute, HEC-RAS, HEC-RAS 2D, and LISFLOOD are evaluated under different geophysical conditions in several locations across the United States. By using streamflow output from the same hydrologic model (SWAT in this case), hydraulic simulations are conducted for three configurations: (i) hindcasting mode by using past observed weather data at daily time scale in which models are being calibrated against USGS streamflow observations, (ii) validation mode using near real-time weather data at sub-daily time scale, and (iii) design mode with extreme streamflow data having specific return periods. Model generated inundation maps for observed flood events both from hindcasting and validation modes are compared with remotely sensed images, whereas the design mode outcomes are compared with corresponding FEMA generated flood hazard maps. The comparisons presented here will give insights on probable model-specific nature of biases and their relative advantages/disadvantages as components of an operational flood forecasting system.

  20. Thermal hydraulic characteristics study of prototype NET and CEA cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Maekawa, Ryuji

    1995-10-31

    The thermal hydraulic characteristics of low temperature helium in a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC) significantly affects the overall design and performance of the associated large scale superconducting magnet system. It is essential to understand the transient and steady state behavior of the helium in the conductor. Throughout the development of CICCs, the reduction of flow impedance has been one of the key factors to improving the overall pressure drop. The newly developed CICC for the ITER project has a hybrid cooling scheme: a central channel that is surrounded by bundles, for which the thermal hydraulic characteristics are not well understood. This thesis describes an experimental and analytical investigation of thermal hydraulic characteristics of low temperature helium in conventional and hybrid CICCS. Pressure drop measurements for both NET and CEA conductors have been conducted, using low temperature helium and liquid nitrogen to obtain a range of Reynolds numbers. The results are correlated with classical friction factor and Reynolds number analysis. The flow impedance reduction of the CEA conductor is described by measures of a developed flow model. Thermally induced flow in the CEA conductor has been studied with an inductive heating method. The induced velocity in the central channel is measured by a Pitot tube with steady state Reynolds number up to {approximately}7000. The transient pressure wave propagation has been recorded with pressure transducers placed equally along the conductor. The supercritical helium temperature in the central channel has been measured with the thermometer probe. However, the reduction of the central channel area significantly affects the overall thermal hydraulic characteristics of the conductor. The results suggest the importance of the central channel. A transient heat transfer experiment studied the.transverse heat transfer mechanism in the CEA conductor. The temperatures in the central channel and bundle region

  1. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned towards conditions usually encountered in the Marcellus shale play in the Northeastern US at an approximate depth of 1500 m (~;;4,500 feet). Our modeling simulations indicate that when faults are present, micro-seismic events are possible, the magnitude of which is somewhat larger than the one associated with micro-seismic events originating from regular hydraulic fracturing because of the larger surface area that is available for rupture. The results of our simulations indicated fault rupture lengths of about 10 to 20 m, which, in rare cases can extend to over 100 m, depending on the fault permeability, the in situ stress field, and the fault strength properties. In addition to a single event rupture length of 10 to 20 m, repeated events and aseismic slip amounted to a total rupture length of 50 m, along with a shear offset displacement of less than 0.01 m. This indicates that the possibility of hydraulically induced fractures at great depth (thousands of meters) causing activation of faults and creation of a new flow path that can reach shallow groundwater resources (or even the surface) is remote. The expected low permeability of faults in producible shale is clearly a limiting factor for the possible rupture length and seismic magnitude. In fact, for a fault that is initially nearly-impermeable, the only possibility of larger fault slip event would be opening by hydraulic fracturing; this would allow pressure to penetrate the matrix along the fault and to reduce the frictional strength over a sufficiently large fault surface patch. However, our simulation results show that if the fault is initially impermeable, hydraulic fracturing along the fault results in numerous small micro-seismic events along with the propagation, effectively

  2. Biofilm effect on hydraulic properties of unsaturated soils: experimental study and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, Ravid; Volk, Elazar; Furman, Alex; Iden, Sascha; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    While it is well known that biofilm in saturated systems can cause significant reduction of the hydraulic conductivity, very limited attention has been given to the hydraulic properties under unsaturated conditions. Following preliminary experiments with a biofilm proxy and pore-network analysis, we use here direct measurements of soil hydraulic properties in substrates with real biofilms to investigate and quantify the biofilm effect on hydraulic properties of unsaturated soils, namely hydraulic conductivity function and retention curve. We show that biofilms can significantly alter the soil hydraulic properties under unsaturated conditions. Measurements of the soil's unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function and water retention curve were performed by using the multi-step outflow and evaporation methods. The measurements with a longer duration (evaporation method) were conducted under refrigeration conditions to minimize microbial activity during the experiment. Data were analyzed by the standard simplified evaporation method and by inverse numerical simulation, using a flexible, but time-invariant, model of hydraulic properties. First results show that the hydraulic properties of the biofilm-affected soils differ from those of the clean soils. Those differences depend on the biofilm amount, growing conditions and substrate concentrations.

  3. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale.

    PubMed

    Chau, Viet T; Bažant, Zdeněk P; Su, Yewang

    2016-10-13

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 10(5)-10(6) almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot's two-phase medium and Terzaghi's effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597791

  4. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale.

    PubMed

    Chau, Viet T; Bažant, Zdeněk P; Su, Yewang

    2016-10-13

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 10(5)-10(6) almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot's two-phase medium and Terzaghi's effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'.

  5. Hydrological-hydraulic model cascading for pan-European flood hazard mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfieri, Lorenzo; Salamon, Peter; Bianchi, Alessandra; Pappenberger, Florian; Wetterhall, Fredrik

    2013-04-01

    Flood hazard maps at trans-national and continental scale have potential for a large number of applications ranging from climate change studies, aid to emergency planning for major flood crisis, early damage assessment and urban development, among others. However, such maps are usually available at rather coarse resolution, which limits their applications to rough assessments. At finer resolution, maps are often limited to country boundaries, due to limited data sharing and specific cooperation programs at trans-national level. The European Floods Directive 2007/60/EC requires EU Member States to map the potential flood extent for all water courses by the end of 2013. In this work we derive a pan-European flood hazard map at 100 m resolution, covering most of the European territory. The proposed approach is based on expanding the cascade model presented by Barredo et al. (2007). First, a pan-European distributed rainfall-runoff model with a resolution of 5x5km is set up and calibrated using discharge observations at 481 gauging sites. Then, by using 21-year meteorological climatology we derived a long term discharge simulation. A generalized extreme value fitting is applied to estimate flood peaks with 100-year return period for each river pixel in the model. This data is downscaled to the river network at 100 m resolution and design flood hydrographs are derived for 100-year return period event along the entire pan-European river network. Design flood hydrographs are then used to perform small-scale floodplain hydraulic simulations every 5 km along the river network using a two-dimensional hydraulic model. Finally, output maps of more than 35000 hydraulic simulations are merged into a pan-European flood hazard map. The quality of this map is evaluated for selected areas against the flood hazard maps provided by national/regional authorities. Finally, limitations of the approach and future directions of research are discussed.

  6. Modelling Hydraulic and Thermal Responses in a Benchmark for Deep Geothermal Heat Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbecher, E.; Oberdorfer, P.

    2012-04-01

    Geothermal heat production from deep reservoirs (5000-7000 m) is currently examined within the collaborative research program "Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling" (gebo), funded by the Ministry of Science and Culture of Lower Saxony (Germany) and Baker Hughes. The projects concern exploration and characterization of geothermal reservoirs as well as production. They are gathered in the four major topic fields: geosystem, drilling, materials, technical system. We present modelling of a benchmark set-up concerning the geothermal production itself. The benchmark model "Horstberg" was originally created by J. Löhken and is based on geological data, concerning the Horstberg site in Lower Saxony. The model region consists of a cube with a side length of 5 km, in which 13 geological layers are included. A fault zone splits the region into two parts with shifted layering. A well is implemented, reaching from the top to an optional depth crossing all layers including the fault zone. The original geological model was rebuilt and improved in COMSOL Multiphysics Version 4.2a. The heterogeneous and detailed configuration makes the model interesting for benchmarking hydrogeological and geothermal applications. It is possible to inject and pump at any level in the well and to study the hydraulic and thermal responses of the system. The hydraulic and thermal parameters can be varied, and groundwater flow can be introduced. Moreover, it is also possible to examine structural mechanical responses to changes in the stress field (which is not further examined here). The main purpose of the presented study is to examine the dynamical flow characteristics of a hydraulic high conductive zone (Detfurth) in connection to a high conductive fault. One example is the fluid injection in the Detfurth zone and production in the fault. The high conductive domains can provide a hydraulic connection between the well screens and the initiated flow circuit could be used for geothermal

  7. 1D Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Reactive transport modeling for deep geothermal systems: A case study of Groß Schönebeck reservoir, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driba, D. L.; De Lucia, M.; Peiffer, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-rock interactions in geothermal reservoirs are driven by the state of disequilibrium that persists among solid and solutes due to changing temperature and pressure. During operation of enhanced geothermal systems, injection of cooled water back into the reservoir disturbs the initial thermodynamic equilibrium between the reservoir and its geothermal fluid, which may induce modifications in permeability through changes in porosity and pore space geometry, consequently bringing about several impairments to the overall system.Modeling of fluid-rock interactions induced by injection of cold brine into Groß Schönebeck geothermal reservoir system situated in the Rotliegend sandstone at 4200m depth have been done by coupling geochemical modeling Code Phreeqc with OpenGeoSys. Through batch modeling the re-evaluation of the measured hydrochemical composition of the brine has been done using Quintessa databases, the results from the calculation indicate that a mineral phases comprising of K-feldspar, hematite, Barite, Calcite and Dolomite was found to match the hypothesis of equilibrium with the formation fluid, Reducing conditions are presumed in the model (pe = -3.5) in order to match the amount of observed dissolved Fe and thus considered as initial state for the reactive transport modeling. based on a measured composition of formation fluids and the predominant mineralogical assemblage of the host rock, a preliminary 1D Reactive transport modeling (RTM) was run with total time set to 30 years; results obtained for the initial simulation revealed that during this period, no significant change is evident for K-feldspar. Furthermore, the precipitation of calcite along the flow path in the brine results in a drop of pH from 6.2 to a value of 5.2 noticed over the simulated period. The circulation of cooled fluid in the reservoir is predicted to affect the temperature of the reservoir within the first 100 -150m from the injection well. Examination of porosity change in

  8. Final Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identif...

  9. 75 FR 36387 - Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ..., 2010, in FR doc. 2010-14897, on page 35023, in the third Column, correct the Web site addresses shown... AGENCY Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study; Correction AGENCY... Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study. The document contained an incorrect EPA Web site address in two...

  10. Control method and system for hydraulic machines employing a dynamic joint motion model

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George

    2011-11-22

    A control method and system for controlling a hydraulically actuated mechanical arm to perform a task, the mechanical arm optionally being a hydraulically actuated excavator arm. The method can include determining a dynamic model of the motion of the hydraulic arm for each hydraulic arm link by relating the input signal vector for each respective link to the output signal vector for the same link. Also the method can include determining an error signal for each link as the weighted sum of the differences between a measured position and a reference position and between the time derivatives of the measured position and the time derivatives of the reference position for each respective link. The weights used in the determination of the error signal can be determined from the constant coefficients of the dynamic model. The error signal can be applied in a closed negative feedback control loop to diminish or eliminate the error signal for each respective link.

  11. Mathematical modeling of hydraulic fracturing in coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Olovyanny, A.G.

    2005-02-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of coal seam is considered as a process of development of discontinuities in rock mass elements due to change in hydrogeomechanical situation on filtration of fluid under pressure. Failure is associated with excess of the effective stresses over the rock tension strength. The problem on filtration and failure of massif is solved by the finite-element method using the procedure of fictitious nodal forces.

  12. Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources (Monterey, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A summary of EPA's research relating to potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources will be presented. Background about the study plan development will be presented along with an analysis of the water cycle as it relates to hydraulic fracturing processe...

  13. Modelling the Influence of Long-Term Hydraulic Conditions on Juvenile Salmon Habitats in AN Upland Scotish River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, L.; Malcolm, I.; Millidine, K. J.; Buddendorf, B.; Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    Wild Atlantic salmon populations in Scottish rivers constitute an important economic and recreational resource, as well as being a key component of biodiversity. Salmon have very specific habitat requirements at different life stages and their distribution is therefore strongly influenced by a complex suite of biological and physical controls. Previous research has shown that stream hydrodynamics and channel morphology have a strong influence on the distribution and density of juvenile salmon. Here, we utilise a unique 20 year data set of spatially distributed juvenile salmon densities derived from annual electro-fishing surveys in an upland Scottish river. We examine to what extent the spatial and temporal variability of in-stream hydraulics regulates the spatial and temporal variability in the performance and density of juvenile salmon. A 2-D hydraulic model (River2D) is used to simulate water velocity and water depth under different flow conditions for seven different electro-fishing sites. The selected sites represent different hydromorphological environments including plane-bed, step-pool and pool riffle reaches. The bathymetry of each site was characterised using a total station providing an accurate DTM of the bed, and hydraulic simulations were driven by 20 year stream flow records. Habitat suitability curves, based on direct observations during electro-fishing surveys, were produced for a range of hydraulic indices for juvenile salmon. The hydraulic simulations showed marked spatial differences in juvenile habitat quality both within and between reaches. They also showed marked differences both within and between years. This is most evident in extreme years with wet summers when salmon feeding opportunities may be constrained. Integration of hydraulic habitat models, with fish preference curves and the long term hydrological data allows us to assess whether long-term changes in hydroclimate may be affecting juvenile salmonid populations in the study stream

  14. Studies and projections of hydraulic conductivity of Devonian Plavinu and Daugava carbonate aquifers in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkone, E.; Delina, A.; Saks, T.; Raga, B.; Jātnieks, J.; Klints, I.; Popovs, K.; Babre, A.; Bikše, J.; Kalvāns, A.; Retike, I.; Ukass, J.

    2012-04-01

    very important to take into account the fact that groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers is often almost entirely dependent on jointing and concomitant joint enlargement by dissolution. In this study pumping test results provide a wide range of hydraulic conductivity values, for example in Pļaviņu aquifer hydraulic conductivity varies from 0,03 - 266 m/day but in Daugava aquifer values range from 0,06 - 735 m/day. Pumping test results is provided by Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre. Studying average values of hydraulic conductivity there exists a correlation between K and aquifer flat depth - Daugava aquifer, which in geological structure, is located above the Pļaviņu aquifer has higher average K value - 32 m/day, in Pļaviņu aquifer - 27 m/day. Correlative study of the depth and hydraulic conductivity allowed to characterize the mean values as function of the aquifer depth for the regional groundwater flow modelling. This study is supported by the European Social Fund project No. 2009/0212/1DP/1.1.1.2.0/09/APIA/VIAA/060

  15. Field study comparing the effect of hydraulic mixing on septic tank performance and sludge accumulation.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Fares

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of hydraulic mixing on anaerobic digestion and sludge accumulation in a septic tank. The performance of a septic tank equipped with a hydraulic mixer was compared with that of a similar standard septic tank over a period of 10 months. The study was conducted in two phases: Phase-I--from May to November 2013 (6 months); Phase-II--from January to May 2014 (4 months). Hydraulic mixing effectively reduced the effluent biological oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids, and reduced the sludge accumulation rate in the septic tank. The BOD removal efficiencies during Phase-II were 65% and 75% in the standard septic tank and a septic tank equipped with hydraulic mixer (Smart Digester™), respectively. The effect of hydraulic mixing reduced the rate of sludge accumulation from 0.64 cm/day to 0.27 cm/day, and increased the pump-out interval by a factor of 3. PMID:26208182

  16. Field study comparing the effect of hydraulic mixing on septic tank performance and sludge accumulation.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Fares

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of hydraulic mixing on anaerobic digestion and sludge accumulation in a septic tank. The performance of a septic tank equipped with a hydraulic mixer was compared with that of a similar standard septic tank over a period of 10 months. The study was conducted in two phases: Phase-I--from May to November 2013 (6 months); Phase-II--from January to May 2014 (4 months). Hydraulic mixing effectively reduced the effluent biological oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids, and reduced the sludge accumulation rate in the septic tank. The BOD removal efficiencies during Phase-II were 65% and 75% in the standard septic tank and a septic tank equipped with hydraulic mixer (Smart Digester™), respectively. The effect of hydraulic mixing reduced the rate of sludge accumulation from 0.64 cm/day to 0.27 cm/day, and increased the pump-out interval by a factor of 3.

  17. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis of hydraulic fracture propagation in three-layered poro-elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, H.Y. ); Advani, S.H.; Lee, T.S. )

    1992-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing plays a pivotal role in the enhancement of oil and gas production recovery from low permeability reservoirs. The process of hydraulic fracturing entails the generation of a fracture by pumping fluids blended with special chemicals and proppants into the payzone at high injection rates and pressures to extend and wedge fractures. The mathematical modeling of hydraulically induced fractures generally incorporates coupling between the formation elasticity, fracture fluid flow, and fracture mechanics equations governing the formation structural responses, fluid pressure profile, and fracture growth. Two allied unsymmetric elliptic fracture models are developed for fracture configuration evolutions in three-layered rock formations. The first approach is based on a Lagrangian formulation incorporating pertinent energy components associated with the formation structural responses and fracture fluid flow. The second model is based on a generalized variational principle, introducing an energy rate related functional. These models initially simulate a penny-shaped fracture, which becomes elliptic if the crack tips encounters (upper and/or lower) barriers with differential reservoir properties (in situ stresses, 16 elastic moduli, and fracture toughness-contrasts and fluid leak-off characteristics). The energy rate component magnitudes are determined to interpret the governing hydraulic fracture mechanisms during fracture evolution. The variational principle is extended to study the phenomenon and consequences of fluid lag in fractures. Finally, parametric sensitivity and energy rate investigations to evaluate the roles of controllable hydraulic treatment variables and uncontrollable reservoir property characterization parameters are performed. The presented field applications demonstrate the overall capabilities of the developed models. These studies provide stimulation treatment guidelines for fracture configuration design, control, and optimization.

  18. The Effect of Soil Hydraulic Properties vs. Soil Texture in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, E. D.; Small, E. E.

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of Soil Hydraulic Property (SHP) selection on modeled surface fluxes following a rain storm in a semi-arid environment. SHPs are often defined based on a Soil Texture Class (STC). To examine the effectiveness of this approach, the Noah land surface model was run with each of 1306 soils in a large SHP database. Within most STCs, the outputs have a range of 350 W/m2 for latent and sensible heat fluxes, and 8K for surface temperature. The average difference between STC median values is only 100 W/m2 for latent and sensible heat. It is concluded that STC explains 5-15% of the variance in model outputs and should not be used to determine SHPs.

  19. SPATIAL-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATERBORNE INFECTIOUS DISEASE RISK USING THE HYDRAULIC MODEL AND OUTPATIENT DATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Ayako; Sakuma, Taisuke; Kazama, So

    This study evaluated waterborne infectious diseases risk and incidence rate around Phonm Penh in Cambodia. We use the hydraulic flood simulation, coliform bacterium diffusion model, dose-response model and outpatient data for quantitative analysis. The results obtained are as follows; 1. The incidence (incidence rate) of diarrhea as water borne diseases risk is 0.14 million people (9%) in the inundation area. 2. The residents in the inundation area are exposed up to 4 times as high risk as daily mean calculated by the integrated model combined in the regional scale. 3.The infectious disease risk due to floods and inundation indicated is effective as an element to explain the risk. The scenario explains 34% number of patient estimated by the outpatient data.

  20. In-service parametric modelling a rail vehicle's axle-box hydraulic damper for high-speed transit problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. L.; Yu, D. S.; Zhou, Z.

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high-speed operation of modern rail vehicles and severe in-service environment of their hydraulic dampers, it has become important to establish more practical and accurate damper models and apply those models in high-speed transit problem studies. An improved full parametric model with actual in-service parameters, such as variable viscous damping, comprehensive stiffness and small mounting clearance was established for a rail vehicle's axle-box hydraulic damper. A subtle variable oil property model was built and coupled to the modelling process, which included modelling of the dynamic flow losses and the relief-valve system dynamics. The experiments validated the accuracy and robustness of the established full in-service parametric model and simulation which captured the damping characteristics over an extremely wide range of excitation speeds. Further simulations were performed using the model to uncover the effects of key in-service parameter variations on the nominal damping characteristics of the damper. The obtained in-service parametric model coupled all of the main factors that had significant impacts on the damping characteristics, so that the model could be useful in more extensive parameter effects analysis, optimal specification and product design optimisation of hydraulic dampers for track-friendliness, ride comfort and other high-speed transit problems.

  1. Modelling of liquid flow after a hydraulic jump on a rotating disk prior to centrifugal atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Dowson, A. L.; Jacobs, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a simplified numerical model which is used to calculate the height distribution, and the radial and tangential velocities of a liquid on a rotating disk after a hydraulic jump and prior to centrifugal atomization. The results obtained from this numerical model are compared with predictions made using previously derived `hydraulic jump' and `analytical' models. Calculations, in conjunction with experimental measurements relating to the trajectory of liquid flow on the atomizing disk, have shown that the numerical model can not only give a reasonable prediction of the hydraulic jump location, but also yields more accurate information regarding the variations in liquid height, and radial and tangential velocities. The model is ideally suited for engineering applications.

  2. Observational techniques for constraining hydraulic and hydrologic models for use in catchment scale flood impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Gareth; Wilkinson, Mark; Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; O'Donnell, Greg

    2015-04-01

    river stem and principal tributaries, it is possible to understand in detail how floods develop and propagate, both temporally and spatially. Traditional rainfall-runoff modelling involves the calibration of model parameters to achieve a best fit against an observed flow series, typically at a single location. The modelling approach adopted here is novel in that it directly uses the nested observed information to disaggregate the outlet hydrograph in terms of the source locations. Using a combination of local evidence and expert opinion, the model can be used to assess the impacts of distributed land use management changes and NFM on floods. These studies demonstrate the power of networks of observational instrumentation for constraining hydraulic and hydrologic models for use in prediction.

  3. Mesoscopic aspects of root water uptake modeling - Hydraulic resistances and root geometry interpretations in plant transpiration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-02-01

    In the context of soil water flow modeling, root water uptake is often evaluated based on water potential difference between the soil and the plant (the water potential gradient approach). Root water uptake rate is modulated by hydraulic resistance of both the root itself, and the soil in the root vicinity. The soil hydraulic resistance is a function of actual soil water content and can be assessed assuming radial axisymmetric water flow toward a single root (at the mesoscopic scale). In the present study, three approximate solutions of mesoscopic root water uptake - finite difference approximation, steady-state solution, and steady-rate solution - are examined regarding their ability to capture the pressure head variations in the root vicinity. Insignificance of their differences when implemented in the macroscopic soil water flow model is demonstrated using the critical root water uptake concept. Subsequently, macroscopic simulations of coupled soil water flow and root water uptake are presented for a forest site under temperate humid climate. Predicted soil water pressure heads and actual transpiration rates are compared with observed data. Scenario simulations illustrate uncertainties associated with estimates of root geometrical and hydraulic properties. Regarding the actual transpiration prediction, the correct characterization of active root system geometry and hydraulic properties seems far more important than the choice of a particular mesoscopic model.

  4. Physical Hydraulic Model of Side-Channel Spillway of Lambuk DAM, Bali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harifa, A. C.; Sholichin, M.; Othman, F. B.

    2013-12-01

    The spillway is among the most important structures of a dam project. A spillway is designed to prevent overtopping of a dam at a place that is not designed for overtopping. Side-channel spillways are commonly used to release water flow from a reservoir in places where the sides are steep and have a considerable height above the dam. Experimental results were collected with a hydraulic model of the side-channel spillway for releasing the peak overflow of Lambuk Dam. This dam is, located on the Lambuk River, which is a tributary of the Yeh Hoo River ~ 34.6 km north of Denpasar on the island of Bali. The bituminous geomembrane faced dam is 24 m in height, with a 35-m wide spillway. The length of the side channel is 35 m long, with 58 m of transition channel, 67.37 m of chuteway channel and 22.71 m of stilling basin. The capacity of the spillway is 231.91 m3/s and the outlet works capacity is 165.28 m3/s. The reservoir is designed for irrigation and water supply. The purpose of this study was to optimize the designed of the structure and to ensure its safe operation. In hydraulic model may help the decision-makers to visualize the flow field before selecting a ';suitable' design. The hydraulic model study was performed to ensure passage of the maximum discharge at maximum reservoir capacity; to study the spillway approach conditions, water surface profiles, and flow patterns in the chuteway; and to reveal potential demerits of the proposed hydraulic design of various structures and explore solutions. The model was constructed at 1 : 40 scale, Reservoir topography was modeled using concrete, the river bed using sand and some gravel, the river berm using concrete, and the spillway and channel using Plexiglas. Water was measured using Rectangular contracted weir. Design floods (with return period in year) were Q2 = 111.40 m3/s, Q5 = 136.84 m3/s, Q10 = 159.32 m3/s, Q25 = 174.61 m3/s, Q50 = 185.13 m3/s, Q100 = 198.08 m3/s, Q200 = 210.55 m3/s, Q1000 = 231.91 m3/s and the

  5. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masashi

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  6. Dynamic Hydraulic Flow Stimulation on Mitigation of Trabecular Bone Loss in a Rat Functional Disuse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Minyi; Cheng, Jiqi; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2012-01-01

    Bone fluid flow (BFF) has been demonstrated as a critical regulator in mechanotransductive signaling and bone adaptation. Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and matrix strain have been identified as potential generator to regulate BFF. To elevate in vivo oscillatory BFF using ImP, a dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS) approach was developed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of DHS on mitigation of bone loss and structural alteration in a rat hindlimb suspension (HLS) functional disuse model. Sixty-one 5-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: 1) baseline control, 2) age-matched control, 3) HLS, 4) HLS + static loading, and 5) HLS + DHS. Hydraulic flow stimulation was carried out daily on a “10 min on-5min off-10min on” loading regime, 5 days/week, for total of 4 weeks in the tibial region. The metaphyseal trabecular regions of the proximal tibiae were analyzed using µCT and histomorphometry. Four weeks of HLS resulted in a significant loss of trabecular bone, leading to structural deterioration. HLS with static loading alone was not sufficient to attenuate the bone loss. Bone quantity and microarchitecture were significantly improved by applying DHS loading, resulting increase of 83% in bone volume fraction, 25% in trabecular number and mitigation of -26% in trabecular separation compared to HLS control. Histomorphometry analysis on trabecular mineralization coincided with the µCT analysis, in which DHS loading yielded increases of 34% in histomorphometric BV/TV, 121% in MS/BS, 190% in BFR/BS and 146% in BFR/BV, compared to the HLS control. Overall, the data demonstrated that dynamic hydraulic flow loading has potentials to provide regulatory signals for mitigating bone loss induced by functional disuse. This approach may provide a new alternative mechanical intervention for future clinical treatment for osteoporosis. PMID:22820398

  7. Inverse modeling of hydraulic tests in fractured crystalline rock based on a transition probability geostatistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessent, Daniela; Therrien, René; Lemieux, Jean-Michel

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations of a series of hydraulic interference tests conducted in crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto (Finland), a potential site for the disposal of the Finnish high-level nuclear waste. The tests are in a block of crystalline bedrock of about 0.03 km3 that contains low-transmissivity fractures. Fracture density, orientation, and fracture transmissivity are estimated from Posiva Flow Log (PFL) measurements in boreholes drilled in the rock block. On the basis of those data, a geostatistical approach relying on a transitional probability and Markov chain models is used to define a conceptual model based on stochastic fractured rock facies. Four facies are defined, from sparsely fractured bedrock to highly fractured bedrock. Using this conceptual model, three-dimensional groundwater flow is then simulated to reproduce interference pumping tests in either open or packed-off boreholes. Hydraulic conductivities of the fracture facies are estimated through automatic calibration using either hydraulic heads or both hydraulic heads and PFL flow rates as targets for calibration. The latter option produces a narrower confidence interval for the calibrated hydraulic conductivities, therefore reducing the associated uncertainty and demonstrating the usefulness of the measured PFL flow rates. Furthermore, the stochastic facies conceptual model is a suitable alternative to discrete fracture network models to simulate fluid flow in fractured geological media.

  8. Should hydraulic tomography data be interpreted using geostatistical inverse modeling? A laboratory sandbox investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illman, Walter A.; Berg, Steven J.; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2015-05-01

    The robust performance of hydraulic tomography (HT) based on geostatistics has been demonstrated through numerous synthetic, laboratory, and field studies. While geostatistical inverse methods offer many advantages, one key disadvantage is its highly parameterized nature, which renders it computationally intensive for large-scale problems. Another issue is that geostatistics-based HT may produce overly smooth images of subsurface heterogeneity when there are few monitoring interval data. Therefore, some may question the utility of the geostatistical inversion approach in certain situations and seek alternative approaches. To investigate these issues, we simultaneously calibrated different groundwater models with varying subsurface conceptualizations and parameter resolutions using a laboratory sandbox aquifer. The compared models included: (1) isotropic and anisotropic effective parameter models; (2) a heterogeneous model that faithfully represents the geological features; and (3) a heterogeneous model based on geostatistical inverse modeling. The performance of these models was assessed by quantitatively examining the results from model calibration and validation. Calibration data consisted of steady state drawdown data from eight pumping tests and validation data consisted of data from 16 separate pumping tests not used in the calibration effort. Results revealed that the geostatistical inversion approach performed the best among the approaches compared, although the geological model that faithfully represented stratigraphy came a close second. In addition, when the number of pumping tests available for inverse modeling was small, the geological modeling approach yielded more robust validation results. This suggests that better knowledge of stratigraphy obtained via geophysics or other means may contribute to improved results for HT.

  9. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken.

  10. Copper River hydraulic study at Million Dollar Bridge, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Stanley H.; Barber, William F.

    1980-01-01

    The Copper River hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of the Million-Dollar Bridge, Alaska, at the outlet to Miles Lake are described. The water discharge, lake and river bed profiles, bathymetry, velocity, and direction of flow are presented. (Kosco-USGS)

  11. Improving prediction of hydraulic conductivity by constraining capillary bundle models to a maximum pore size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Sascha C.; Peters, Andre; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    The prediction of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the soil water retention curve by pore-bundle models is a cost-effective and widely applied technique. One problem for conductivity predictions from retention functions with continuous derivatives, i.e. continuous water capacity functions, is that the hydraulic conductivity curve exhibits a sharp drop close to water saturation if the pore-size distribution is wide. So far this artifact has been ignored or removed by introducing an explicit air-entry value into the capillary saturation function. However, this correction leads to a retention function which is not continuously differentiable. We present a new parameterization of the hydraulic properties which uses the original saturation function (e.g. of van Genuchten) and introduces a maximum pore radius only in the pore-bundle model. In contrast to models using an explicit air entry, the resulting conductivity function is smooth and increases monotonically close to saturation. The model concept can easily be applied to any combination of retention curve and pore-bundle model. We derive closed-form expressions for the unimodal and multimodal van Genuchten-Mualem models and apply the model concept to curve fitting and inverse modeling of a transient outflow experiment. Since the new model retains the smoothness and continuous differentiability of the retention model and eliminates the sharp drop in conductivity close to saturation, the resulting hydraulic functions are physically more reasonable and ideal for numerical simulations with the Richards equation or multiphase flow models.

  12. Groundwater Flow Model Including Deeper Part On The Basis Of Field Data - Especially Determination Of Boundary Conditions And Hydraulic Parameters-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, I.; Itadera, K.

    2005-12-01

    The final purpose of our study is to clarify the quantitative groundwater flow including deeper part, 500-1000m depth, in the basin in caldera on the mountain. The computer simulation is one the best methods to achieve this purpose. In such a study, however, it is difficult to determine the boundary conditions and hydraulic properties of geology in deeper part, generally. For this reason, we selected Gora basin as a study area, because many hydraulic data have been stored for more than 30 years in this basin. In addition, because the volcanic thermal water is mainly formed by mixing of groundwater and thermal component, the study for deeper groundwater flow can contribute the agenda for the protection of thermal groundwater which is regards as a limited resource. Gora basin, in Hakone area is one of the most famous spa (a resort having thermal groundwater or hot springs) in Japan. The area of the basin is approximately 10 square kilometers and has more than 200 deep wells. In our study, at first, the dataset of hydraulic head was created by using the stored data to construct the conceptual model for groundwater flow. The potential distribution exhibited that the groundwater flowed downward dominant. And the geomorphology can be regarded as hydraulic boundary even in deer part, that is to say, we can regard the ridge as no flow boundary in simulation model. Next, for quantitative understanding of groundwater flow, we need to obtain not only boundary conditions but also hydraulic property of geology, for example, hydraulic conductivity, K, as one of the important parameters. Generally, such a parameter has not been measured in past survey. So, we used the belief method for calculating the hydraulic conductivity by using the data of thermal logging test, which was similar to a slug test. As results of the analysis, the close relationship between K and well depth were obtained. This result implies that the K value depends on the overburden pressure of geology. That is

  13. The Benefit of Multi-Mission Altimetry Series for the Calibration of Hydraulic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; Castellarin, Attilio; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    The growing availability of satellite altimetric time series during last decades has fostered their use in many hydrological and hydraulic applications. However, the use of remotely sensed water level series still remains hampered by the limited temporal resolution that characterizes each sensor (i.e. revisit time varying from 10 to 35 days), as well as by the accuracy of different instrumentation adopted for monitoring inland water. As a consequence, each sensor is characterized by distinctive potentials and limitations that constrain its use for hydrological applications. In this study we refer to a stretch of about 140 km of the Po River (the longest Italian river) in order to investigate the performance of different altimetry series for the calibration of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic information. The usefulness of remotely sensed water surface elevation is tested using data collected by different altimetry missions (i.e., ERS-2, ENVISAT, TOPEX/Poseidon, JASON-2 and SARAL/Altika) by investigating the effect of (i) record length (i.e. number of satellite measurements provided by a given sensor at a specific satellite track) and (ii) data uncertainty (i.e. altimetry measurements errors). Since the relatively poor time resolution of satellites constrains the operational use of altimetric time series, in this study we also investigate the use of multi-mission altimetry series obtained by merging datasets sensed by different sensors over the study area. Benefits of the highest temporal frequency of multi-mission series are tested by calibrating the quasi-2d model referring in turn to original satellite series and multi-mission datasets. Jason-2 and ENVISAT outperform other sensors, ensuring the reliability on the calibration process for shorter time series. The multi-mission dataset appears particularly reliable and suitable for the calibration of hydraulic model. If short time periods are considered, the performance of the multi-mission dataset

  14. Numerical Simulation Study on the Hydraulic Behavior in Closed Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Shu, L.; Wen, Z.; Wu, G.; Zhang, X.; Hu, B. X.

    2015-12-01

    As the main repositories for groundwater in karst systems, fractures involve the movement and storage of groundwater. Fundamentally, Navier-Stokes (NS) Equations is used to describe flow in fractures. However, due to the complexity of Navier-Stokes Equations, it is rarely applied to solve fracture flow problems. Thus, based on some simplifications, Stokes equations, Reynolds equations and Cubic Law (CL) are derived to describe fracture flow. The validity of the three simplified equations were extensively studies. Among the three simplified equations of NS, CL is the simplest and used to describe flow in open, smooth and paralleled fractures. In the previous work, most researchers focused on the open fractures. But it's the closed fractures exist widely in the field not the open fractures. The objective of this paper aims to check the validity of CL in closed fractures with different apertures and widths of fracture. After comparing the experimental results and simulations results from the COMSOL Multiphysics (FEM), this software was applied to solve the 3D or 2D NS equations in the closed fractures. The results obtained from NS simulation results and calculation results from CL were compared to indicate the degree of the validity of CL in application. A critical velocity was proposed to illustrate the validity of CL in closed fractures. Furthermore, the impacts of aperture size, width of fracture size, and velocity magnitude on both the hydraulic conductivity and velocity profile were also analyzed. The results showed the CL was capable of describing flow in closed fractures when the velocity was less than the critical velocity varying from 0.02 to 30.08cm/s. The ratio of NS results and CL results was between 0.9 and 2, with velocity varying from 0 to 40cm/s. The discrepancy between NS equation and CL increased with Reynolds number, increased with aperture size and decreased with width of fracture.

  15. Estimating biozone hydraulic conductivity in wastewater soil-infiltration systems using inverse numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R; McCray, John E

    2007-06-01

    During operation of an onsite wastewater treatment system, a low-permeability biozone develops at the infiltrative surface (IS) during application of wastewater to soil. Inverse numerical-model simulations were used to estimate the biozone saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(biozone)) under variably saturated conditions for 29 wastewater infiltration test cells installed in a sandy loam field soil. Test cells employed two loading rates (4 and 8cm/day) and 3 IS designs: open chamber, gravel, and synthetic bundles. The ratio of K(biozone) to the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the natural soil (K(s)) was used to quantify the reductions in the IS hydraulic conductivity. A smaller value of K(biozone)/K(s,) reflects a greater reduction in hydraulic conductivity. The IS hydraulic conductivity was reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity was primarily influenced by wastewater loading rate and IS type and not by the K(s) of the native soil. The higher loading rate yielded greater reductions in IS hydraulic conductivity than the lower loading rate for bundle and gravel cells, but the difference was not statistically significant for chamber cells. Bundle and gravel cells exhibited a greater reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity than chamber cells at the higher loading rates, while the difference between gravel and bundle systems was not statistically significant. At the lower rate, bundle cells exhibited generally lower K(biozone)/K(s) values, but not at a statistically significant level, while gravel and chamber cells were statistically similar. Gravel cells exhibited the greatest variability in measured values, which may complicate design efforts based on K(biozone) evaluations for these systems. These results suggest that chamber systems may provide for a more robust design, particularly for high or variable wastewater infiltration rates.

  16. Estimating biozone hydraulic conductivity in wastewater soil-infiltration systems using inverse numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R; McCray, John E

    2007-06-01

    During operation of an onsite wastewater treatment system, a low-permeability biozone develops at the infiltrative surface (IS) during application of wastewater to soil. Inverse numerical-model simulations were used to estimate the biozone saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(biozone)) under variably saturated conditions for 29 wastewater infiltration test cells installed in a sandy loam field soil. Test cells employed two loading rates (4 and 8cm/day) and 3 IS designs: open chamber, gravel, and synthetic bundles. The ratio of K(biozone) to the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the natural soil (K(s)) was used to quantify the reductions in the IS hydraulic conductivity. A smaller value of K(biozone)/K(s,) reflects a greater reduction in hydraulic conductivity. The IS hydraulic conductivity was reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity was primarily influenced by wastewater loading rate and IS type and not by the K(s) of the native soil. The higher loading rate yielded greater reductions in IS hydraulic conductivity than the lower loading rate for bundle and gravel cells, but the difference was not statistically significant for chamber cells. Bundle and gravel cells exhibited a greater reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity than chamber cells at the higher loading rates, while the difference between gravel and bundle systems was not statistically significant. At the lower rate, bundle cells exhibited generally lower K(biozone)/K(s) values, but not at a statistically significant level, while gravel and chamber cells were statistically similar. Gravel cells exhibited the greatest variability in measured values, which may complicate design efforts based on K(biozone) evaluations for these systems. These results suggest that chamber systems may provide for a more robust design, particularly for high or variable wastewater infiltration rates. PMID:17449084

  17. Position and torque tracking: series elastic actuation versus model-based-controlled hydraulic actuation.

    PubMed

    Otten, Alexander; van Vuuren, Wieke; Stienen, Arno; van Asseldonk, Edwin; Schouten, Alfred; van der Kooij, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Robotics used for diagnostic measurements on, e.g. stroke survivors, require actuators that are both stiff and compliant. Stiffness is required for identification purposes, and compliance to compensate for the robots dynamics, so that the subject can move freely while using the robot. A hydraulic actuator can act as a position (stiff) or a torque (compliant) actuator. The drawback of a hydraulic actuator is that it behaves nonlinear. This article examines two methods for controlling a nonlinear hydraulic actuator. The first method that is often applied uses an elastic element (i.e. spring) connected in series with the hydraulic actuator so that the torque can be measured as the deflection of the spring. This torque measurement is used for proportional integral control. The second method of control uses the inverse of the model of the actuator as a linearizing controller. Both methods are compared using simulation results. The controller designed for the series elastic hydraulic actuator is faster to implement, but only shows good performance for the working range for which the controller is designed due to the systems nonlinear behavior. The elastic element is a limiting factor when designing a position controller due to its low torsional stiffness. The model-based controller linearizes the nonlinear system and shows good performance when used for torque and position control. Implementing the model-based controller does require building and validating of the detailed model. PMID:22275654

  18. Hydraulic redistribution study in two native tree species of agroforestry parklands of West African dry savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayala, Jules; Heng, Lee Kheng; van Noordwijk, Meine; Ouedraogo, Sibiri Jean

    2008-11-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) in karité ( Vitellaria paradoxa) and néré ( Parkia biglobosa) tree species was studied by monitoring the soil water potential ( ψs) using thermocouple psychrometers at four compass directions, various distances from trees and at different soil depths (max depth 80 cm) during the dry seasons of 2004 and 2005. A modified WaNuLCAS model was then used to infer the amount of water redistribued based on ψs values. Tree transpiration rate was also estimated from sap velocity using thermal dissipative probes (TDP) and sapwood area, and the contribution of hydraulically redistributed water in tree transpiration was determined. The results revealed on average that 46% of the psychrometer readings under karité and 33% under néré showed the occurrence of HR for the two years. Soil under néré displayed significantly lower fluctuations of ψs (0.16 MPa) compared to soil under karité (0.21 MPa). The results of this study indicated that the existence of HR leads to a higher ψs in the plant rhizosphere and hence is important for soil water dynamics and plant nutrition by making more accessible the soluble elements. The simulation showed that the amount of water redistributed would be approximately 73.0 L and 247.1 L per tree per day in 2005 for karité and néré, and would represent respectively 60% and 53% of the amount transpired a day. Even though the model has certainly overestimated the volume of water hydraulically redistributed by the two species, this water may play a key role in maintaining fine root viability and ensuring the well adaptation of these species to the dry areas. Therefore, knowledge of the extent of such transfers and of the seasonal patterns is required and is of paramount importance in parkland systems both for trees and associated crops.

  19. Quantifying the effects of boundary condition uncertainty in nested flood modelling of complex hydraulic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Maria; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Bates, Paul D.; Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim E.; Cea, Luis; Puertas, Jeronimo

    2015-04-01

    Flood inundation models require appropriate boundary conditions to be specified at the limits of the domain, which commonly include upstream flow rate and water stage at the downstream boundary of the reach being modelled. These data are usually acquired from gauging stations of the river network, where measured water levels are converted to discharge by means of a rating curve. Although generally treated as deterministic relationships, rating curves are subject to uncertainties which can limit their accuracy and applicability to any particular event, particularly for low-frequency events, where the rating curve relationship is sparsely sampled and needs to be extrapolated. Consequently, derived streamflow records can be particularly uncertain and/or problematic for high-return period estimates. Moreover, the limited number of gauges in reach-scale studies usually requires flow to be routed from upstream gauge stations to the boundary of the model domain, which introduces additional uncertainty. This is more likely to be the case with complex modelling approaches, in which only limited areas can be simulated due to computational cost and model setup requirements. In this study, a method to incorporate the rating curve uncertainty into the predictions of a reach-scale flood inundation model is proposed. Firstly, the uncertainty in the rating curves is quantified using a non-parametric local weighted regression approach and uncertainty bounds for discharge and water elevations at gauging locations are generated. A regional simplified-physics hydraulic model is then applied to combine these uncertainties and generate an ensemble of discharge and water elevation time series at the boundaries of a local-scale high complexity hydraulic model. Finally, the impact of this uncertainty on the local model performance is evaluated using flood extent data and measured water levels within the local model area. The local-scale model is applied to 7 km of the river Severn passing

  20. Assessing the influence of the rhizosphere on soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and numerical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Keith R.; Mooney, Sacha J.; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Crout, Neil M. J.; Roose, Tiina; Tracy, Saoirse R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water distribution in soil is crucial for enhancing our knowledge of managing soil and water resources. The application of X-ray computed tomography (CT) to the plant and soil sciences is now well established. However, few studies have utilized the technique for visualizing water in soil pore spaces. Here this method is utilized to visualize the water in soil in situ and in three-dimensions at successive reductive matric potentials in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The measurements are combined with numerical modelling to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, providing a complete picture of the hydraulic properties of the soil. The technique was performed on soil cores that were sampled adjacent to established roots (rhizosphere soil) and from soil that had not been influenced by roots (bulk soil). A water release curve was obtained for the different soil types using measurements of their pore geometries derived from CT imaging and verified using conventional methods, such as pressure plates. The water, soil, and air phases from the images were segmented and quantified using image analysis. The water release characteristics obtained for the contrasting soils showed clear differences in hydraulic properties between rhizosphere and bulk soil, especially in clay soil. The data suggest that soils influenced by roots (rhizosphere soil) are less porous due to increased aggregation when compared with bulk soil. The information and insights obtained on the hydraulic properties of rhizosphere and bulk soil will enhance our understanding of rhizosphere biophysics and improve current water uptake models. PMID:25740922

  1. Assessing the influence of the rhizosphere on soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Daly, Keith R; Mooney, Sacha J; Bennett, Malcolm J; Crout, Neil M J; Roose, Tiina; Tracy, Saoirse R

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water distribution in soil is crucial for enhancing our knowledge of managing soil and water resources. The application of X-ray computed tomography (CT) to the plant and soil sciences is now well established. However, few studies have utilized the technique for visualizing water in soil pore spaces. Here this method is utilized to visualize the water in soil in situ and in three-dimensions at successive reductive matric potentials in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The measurements are combined with numerical modelling to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, providing a complete picture of the hydraulic properties of the soil. The technique was performed on soil cores that were sampled adjacent to established roots (rhizosphere soil) and from soil that had not been influenced by roots (bulk soil). A water release curve was obtained for the different soil types using measurements of their pore geometries derived from CT imaging and verified using conventional methods, such as pressure plates. The water, soil, and air phases from the images were segmented and quantified using image analysis. The water release characteristics obtained for the contrasting soils showed clear differences in hydraulic properties between rhizosphere and bulk soil, especially in clay soil. The data suggest that soils influenced by roots (rhizosphere soil) are less porous due to increased aggregation when compared with bulk soil. The information and insights obtained on the hydraulic properties of rhizosphere and bulk soil will enhance our understanding of rhizosphere biophysics and improve current water uptake models. PMID:25740922

  2. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, G.; Facchi, A.; Gandolfi, C.; Ortuani, B.; Horeschi, D.; van Dam, J. C.

    2010-02-01

    Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still debated. However, we may wonder how the uncertainty in soil hydraulic parameters relates to the uncertainty of the selected modelling approach. We performed an intensive monitoring study during the cropping season of a 10 ha maize field in Northern Italy. The data were used to: i) compare different methods for determining soil hydraulic parameters and ii) evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in these parameters on different variables (i.e. evapotranspiration, average water content in the root zone, flux at the bottom boundary of the root zone) simulated by two hydrological models of different complexity: SWAP, a widely used model of soil moisture dynamics in unsaturated soils based on Richards equation, and ALHyMUS, a conceptual model of the same dynamics based on a reservoir cascade scheme. We employed five direct and indirect methods to determine soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon of the experimental profile. Two methods were based on a parameter optimization of: a) laboratory measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data and b) field measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data. The remaining three methods were based on the application of widely used Pedo-Transfer Functions: c) Rawls and Brakensiek, d) HYPRES, and e) ROSETTA. Simulations were performed using meteorological, irrigation and crop data measured at the experimental site during the period June - October 2006. Results showed a wide range of soil hydraulic parameter values generated with the different methods, especially for the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat and the shape parameter α of the van Genuchten curve. This is reflected in a variability of the modeling results which is

  3. Variable hydraulic resistances and their impact on plant drought response modelling.

    PubMed

    Baert, Annelies; De Schepper, Veerle; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    Plant drought responses are still not fully understood. Improved knowledge on drought responses is, however, crucial to better predict their impact on individual plant and ecosystem functioning. Mechanistic models in combination with plant measurements are promising for obtaining information on plant water status and can assist us in understanding the effect of limiting soil water availability and drought stress. While existing models are reliable under sufficient soil water availability, they generally fail under dry conditions as not all appropriate mechanisms seem yet to have been implemented. We therefore aimed at identifying mechanisms underlying plant drought responses, and in particular investigated the behaviour of hydraulic resistances encountered in the soil and xylem for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.). A variable hydraulic soil-to-stem resistance was necessary to describe plant drought responses. In addition, implementation of a variable soil-to-stem hydraulic resistance enabled us to generate an in situ soil-to-stem vulnerability curve, which might be an alternative to the conventionally used vulnerability curves. Furthermore, a daily recalibration of the model revealed a drought-induced increase in radial hydraulic resistance between xylem and elastic living tissues. Accurate information on plant hydraulic resistances and simulation of plant drought responses can foster important discussions regarding the functioning of plants and ecosystems during droughts.

  4. Modeling of laboratory experiments determining the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.

    2008-12-01

    Precise characterization and modeling of groundwater flow systems are necessary for realistic performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal. In groundwater flow modeling, the gravity potential is commonly assumed as the dominant driving force of regional groundwater flow. However, the gravity potential flow model may have a limited ability to reconstruct the excess fluid pressure distributions occasionally observed in low-permeability formations. To improve groundwater flow models, geologic processes such as compaction disequilibrium, tectonic forces and diagenetic reactions have been invoked to reconstruct excess pressures. On the other hand, chemical osmosis has recently been considered as one of the driving forces of groundwater flow and a factor causing excess pressures in clay-rich formations with vertical salinity gradients. If a formation medium acts as a semi-permeable membrane, chemical osmosis induces a fluid movement in the direction of increasing salinity. Consequently, fluid pressure could increase where salinity is high and decrease where it is low. Thus, chemical osmosis could induce a fluid flow countering the pressure-driven flow in the formation. When osmotic- and pressure-driven flows equilibrate, the net flow ceases while the fluid pressures remain in disequilibrium. This means that the direction of groundwater flow might be misinterpreted without differentiating osmotically-induced pressure from those induced by other causes. However, the formation media are not perfect membranes, as they allow solute diffusion that accord to the salinity gradients. As a result, osmotic pressure would dissipate as the solutes diffuse from high to low concentrations. That means the time period during which the osmotic pressures are held in the formation depends on hydraulic and diffusive properties other than the chemico-osmotic property of the formation media. The osmotic pressures have indeed been observed in natural formations, and the chemico

  5. Validation of hydraulic tomography in an unconfined aquifer: A controlled sandbox study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhanfeng; Illman, Walter A.; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J.; Berg, Steven J.; Mao, Deqiang

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of hydraulic tomography (HT) that considers variably saturated flow processes in mapping the heterogeneity of both the saturated and unsaturated zones in a laboratory unconfined aquifer. The successive linear estimator (SLE) developed by Mao et al. (2013c) for interpreting HT in unconfined aquifers is utilized to obtain tomograms of hydraulic conductivity (K), specific storage (Ss), and the unsaturated zone parameters (pore size parameter (α) and saturated water content (θs)) for the Gardner-Russo's model. The estimated tomograms are first evaluated by visually comparing them with stratigraphy visible in the sandbox. Results reveal that the HT analysis is able to accurately capture the location and extent of heterogeneity including high and low K layers within the saturated and unsaturated zones, as well as reasonable distribution patterns of α and θs for the Gardner-Russo's model. We then validate the estimated tomograms through predictions of drawdown responses of pumping tests not used during the inverse modeling effort. The strong agreement between simulated and observed drawdown curves obtained by pressure transducers and tensiometers demonstrates the robust performance of HT that considers variably saturated flow processes in unconfined aquifers and the unsaturated zone above it. In addition, compared to the case using the homogeneous assumption, HT results, as expected, yield significantly better predictions of drawdowns in both the saturated and unsaturated zones. This comparison further substantiates the unbiased and minimal variance of HT analysis with the SLE algorithm.

  6. How do alternative root water uptake models affect the inverse estimation of soil hydraulic parameters and the prediction of evapotranspiration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayler, Sebastian; Salima-Sultana, Daisy; Selle, Benny; Ingwersen, Joachim; Wizemann, Hans-Dieter; Högy, Petra; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Soil water extraction by roots affects the dynamics and distribution of soil moisture and controls transpiration, which influences soil-vegetation-atmosphere feedback processes. Consequently, root water uptake requires close attention when predicting water fluxes across the land surface, e.g., in agricultural crop models or in land surface schemes of weather and climate models. The key parameters for a successful simultaneous simulation of soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration in Richards equation-based models are the soil hydraulic parameters, which describe the shapes of the soil water retention curve and the soil hydraulic conductivity curve. As measurements of these parameters are expensive and their estimation from basic soil data via pedotransfer functions is rather inaccurate, the values of the soil hydraulic parameters are frequently inversely estimated by fitting the model to measured time series of soil water content and evapotranspiration. It is common to simulate root water uptake and transpiration by simple stress functions, which describe from which soil layer water is absorbed by roots and predict when total crop transpiration is decreased in case of soil water limitations. As for most of the biogeophysical processes simulated in crop and land surface models, there exist several alternative functional relationships for simulating root water uptake and there is no clear reason for preferring one process representation over another. The error associated with alternative representations of root water uptake, however, contributes to structural model uncertainty and the choice of the root water uptake model may have a significant impact on the values of the soil hydraulic parameters estimated inversely. In this study, we use the agroecosystem model system Expert-N to simulate soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration at three agricultural field sites located in two contrasting regions in Southwest Germany (Kraichgau, Swabian Alb). The Richards

  7. Effect of mineral reactions on the hydraulic properties of unsaturated soils: Model development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmeier, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-08-01

    The selective radius shift model was used to relate changes in mineral volume due to precipitation/dissolution reactions to changes in hydraulic properties affecting flow in porous media. The model accounts for (i) precipitation/dissolution taking place only in the water-filled part of the pore space and further that (ii) the amount of mineral precipitation/dissolution within a pore depends on the local pore volume. The pore bundle concept was used to connect pore-scale changes to macroscopic soil hydraulic properties. Precipitation/dissolution induces changes in the pore radii of water-filled pores and, consequently, in the effective porosity. In a time step of the numerical model, mineral reactions lead to a discontinuous pore-size distribution because only the water-filled pores are affected. The pore-size distribution is converted back to a soil moisture characteristic function to which a new water retention curve is fitted under physically plausible constraints. The model equations were derived for the commonly used van Genuchten/Mualem hydraulic properties. Together with a mixed-form solution of Richards' equation for aqueous phase flow, the model was implemented into the geochemical modelling framework PHREEQC, thereby making available PHREEQC's comprehensive geochemical reactions. Example applications include kinetic halite dissolution and calcite precipitation as a consequence of cation exchange. These applications showed marked changes in the soil's hydraulic properties due to mineral precipitation/dissolution and the dependency of these changes on water contents. The simulations also revealed the strong influence of the degree of saturation on the development of the saturated hydraulic conductivity through its quadratic dependency on the van Genuchten parameter α. Furthermore, it was shown that the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at fixed reduced water content can even increase during precipitation due to changes in the pore-size distribution.

  8. Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

  9. Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC`s current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

  10. Hydraulic modeling of mussel habitat at a bridge-replacement site, Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rogers, Megan E.; Zimmerman, Gregory F.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the statistical targets established, the hydraulic model results suggest that an additional 2428 m2 or a 30-percent increase in suitable mussel habitat could be generated at the replacement-bridge site when compared to the baseline condition associated with the existing bridge at that same location. The study did not address the influences of substrate, acid mine drainage, sediment loads from tributaries, and surface-water/ground-water exchange on mussel habitat. Future studies could include methods for quantifying (1) channel–substrate composition and distribution using tools such as hydroacoustic echosounders specifically designed and calibrated to identify bed composition and mussel populations, (2) surface-water and ground-water interactions, and (3) a high-streamflow event.

  11. A novel approach to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.; Sahimi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate prediction of conductivity in partially-saturated porous media has broad applications in various phenomena in porous media, and has been studied intensively since the 1940s by petroleum, chemical and civil engineers, and hydrologists. Many of the models developed in the past are based on the bundle of capillary tubes. In addition, pore network models have also been developed for simulating multiphase fluid flow in porous media and computing the conductivity in unsaturated porous media. In this study, we propose a novel approach using concepts from the effective-medium approximation (EMA) and percolation theory to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media whose pore-size distributions exhibit power-law scaling. In our approach, the EMA, originally developed for predicting electrical conductivity of composite materials, is used to predict the effective conductivity, from complete saturation to some intermediate water content that represents a crossover point. Below the crossover water content, but still above a critical saturation (percolation threshold), a universal scaling predicted by percolation theory, a power law that expresses the dependence of the conductivity on the water content (less a critical water saturation) with an exponent of 2, is invoked to describe the effective conductivity. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the approach, experimental data were used from the literature. The predicted hydraulic conductivities for most cases are in excellent agreement with the data. In a few cases the theory underestimates the hydraulic conductivities, which correspond to porous media with very broad pore-size distribution in which the largest pore radius is more than 7 orders of magnitude greater than the smallest one. The approach is also used to predict the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity for experiments in which capillary pressure data are available. The results indicate that the universal scaling of

  12. Modelling and characteristic analysis of tri-axle trucks with hydraulically interconnected suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Han, Xu; Luo, Zhen; Zhang, Nong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) system is proposed for the implementation of a resistance control for the pitch and bounce modes of tri-axle heavy trucks. A lumped-mass half-truck model is established using the free-body diagram method. The equations of motion of a mechanical and hydraulic coupled system are developed by incorporating the hydraulic strut forces into the mechanical subsystem as externally applied forces. The transfer matrix method (TMM) is used to evaluate the impedance matrix of the hydraulic subsystem consisting of models of fluid pipes, damper valves, accumulators, and three-way junctions. The TMM is further applied to find the quantitative relationships between the hydraulic strut forces and boundary flow of the mechanical-fluid interactive subsystem. The modal analysis method is employed to perform the vibration analysis between the trucks with the conventional suspension and the proposed HIS. Comparison analysis focuses on free vibration with identified eigenvalues and eigenvectors, isolation vibration capacity, and force vibration in terms of the power spectrum density responses. The obtained results show the effectiveness of the proposed HIS system in reducing the pitch motion of sprung mass and simultaneously maintaining the ride comfort. The pitch stiffness is increased while the bounce stiffness is slightly softened. The peak values of sprung mass and wheel hop motions are greatly reduced, and the vibration decay rate of sprung mass is also significantly increased.

  13. Nonlinear dynamic modeling for smart material electro-hydraulic actuator development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, John P.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2013-03-01

    Smart material electro-hydraulic actuators use hydraulic rectification by one-way check valves to amplify the motion of smart materials, such as magnetostrictives and piezoelectrics, in order to create compact, lightweight actuators. A piston pump driven by a smart material is combined with a hydraulic cylinder to form a self-contained, power-by-wire actuator that can be used in place of a conventional hydraulic system without the need for hydraulic lines and a centralized pump. The performance of an experimental actuator driven by a 12.7 mm diameter, 114 mm length Terfenol-D rod is evaluated over a range of applied input frequencies, loads, and currents. The peak performance achieved is 37 W, moving a 220 N load at a rate of 17 cm/s and producing a blocked pressure of 12.5 MPa. Additional tests are conducted to quantify the dynamic behavior of the one-way reed valves using a scanning laser vibrometer to identify the frequency response of the reeds and the effect of the valve seat and fluid mass loading. A lumped-parameter model is developed for the system that includes valve inertia and fluid response nonlinearities, and the model results are compared with the experimental data.

  14. Hydraulic head applications of flow logs in the study of heterogeneous aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.

    2001-01-01

    Permeability profiles derived from high-resolution flow logs in heterogeneous aquifers provide a limited sample of the most permeable beds or fractures determining the hydraulic properties of those aquifers. This paper demonstrates that flow logs can also be used to infer the large-scale properties of aquifers surrounding boreholes. The analysis is based on the interpretation of the hydraulic head values estimated from the flow log analysis. Pairs of quasi-steady flow profiles obtained under ambient conditions and while either pumping or injecting are used to estimate the hydraulic head in each water-producing zone. Although the analysis yields localized estimates of transmissivity for a few water-producing zones, the hydraulic head estimates apply to the farfield aquifers to which these zones are connected. The hydraulic head data are combined with information from other sources to identify the large-scale structure of heterogeneous aquifers. More complicated cross-borehole flow experiments are used to characterize the pattern of connection between large-scale aquifer units inferred from the hydraulic head estimates. The interpretation of hydraulic heads in situ under steady and transient conditions is illustrated by several case studies, including an example with heterogeneous permeable beds in an unconsolidated aquifer, and four examples with heterogeneous distributions of bedding planes and/or fractures in bedrock aquifers.

  15. Modeling the Changes in Unsaturated Hydraulic Properties of Subsurface Media due to Chemical Reactions: A Film Depositional Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, V. L.; Bacon, D. H.; Saripalli, K. P.; Meyer, P. D.

    2001-12-01

    Precipitation and dissolution of minerals in the subsurface can cause a significant reduction in porosity and permeability by plugging pore throats in aquifer and reservoir media. Changes in these two basic properties of the medium also result in significant changes in the remaining 'derived properties' (i.e., relative permeability, fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfacial areas, pore and particle size distributions) and the constitutive relationships among these properties. Very few published works on modeling the influence of chemical reactions and fluid flow on porosity and permeability account for the spatial and temporal changes in the hydrologic properties on flow and transport. This study reports on the development of a methodology for modeling changes in permeability of unsaturated sub-surface media due to glass and mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions using a film depositional modeling approach. The model is based on the assumption that the mineral precipitate is deposited on the pore walls as a continuous film, causing a reduction in permeability. In this study, the film depositional model is developed for a discrete pore-size distribution, which is determined using the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the porous medium. This facilitates the process of dynamically updating the unsaturated hydraulic parameters used to describe fluid flow through the media. The resulting algorithms are implemented in the multiphase, multicomponent reactive transport code STORM (Sub-surface Transport over Reactive Multiphases). The modeling approach is tested using the Hanford's Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) repository, where the low-level waste from fuel fabrication activities is being vitrified and emplaced in the sub-surface. Results from simulation of the simultaneous dissolution of low-level glassified waste and secondary mineral precipitation show that the film depositional model based on the Mualem approach reasonably predicts permeability changes

  16. Combining SEBAL model and NMCGA algorithm for the estimation of effective soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y.; Mohanty, B. P.; Ines, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Remote sensing data provide valuable information in many hydrological and meteological models. In this study, NMCGA developed by Ines and Mohanty (2008, Parameter Conditioning with a Noisy Monte Carlo Genetic Algorithm for Estimating Effective Soil Hydraulic properties from Space, Water Resources Research) is combined with the SEBAL model to integrate an ET component for quantifying the effective hydraulic properties using the pixel-based soil moisture and ET datasets. Three numerical experiments are conducted for different scenarios: 1) a free-draining homogeneous soil column using ET, SM and SM+ET, 2) a homogenous column under the SM and SM+ET conditions with a shallow water table depth of -100 cm, and 3) validation of the combined NMCGA-ET at different hydroclimatic field conditions. The results of Case 1 examined under hypothetical conditions (from the UNSODA database) suggest that the combined NMCGA-ET improves the optimized solutions (theta(h) and K(h)) better than those of NMCGA alone, although K(h) will have small uncertainties, and will respond well to (deep) soil moisture dynamics in the unsaturated zone. The results in Case 2 are evident in that an ET component contributes to the reduction of uncertainties inherent in a shallow water table. In Case 3, the application of the combined NMCGA-ET is evaluated at the Walnut Creek, Iowa and Brown, Illinois, sites. The correlation (R2) and MBE under the SM+ET condition are identified as better than those of only using the SM condition at all sites. However, the results at the Brown site using the direct soil moisture estimation method (neutron probe technique) are estimated to be better than those at the WC sites. Nevertheless, the results estimated at the WC sites correspond well with the pixel-based observed values of soil moisture as well (R2 > 0.77). From these findings, it is demonstrated that the combined NMCGA-ET performs better than the NMCGA for quantifying effective soil hydraulic properties based on

  17. A Model for Hydraulic Properties Based on Angular Pores with Lognormal Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durner, W.; Diamantopoulos, E.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves are mandatory for modeling water flow in soils. It is a common approach to measure few points of the water retention curve and to calculate the hydraulic conductivity curve by assuming that the soil can be represented as a bundle of capillary tubes. Both curves are then used to predict water flow at larger spatial scales. However, the predictive power of these curves is often very limited. This can be very easily illustrated if we measure the soil hydraulic properties (SHPs) for a drainage experiment and then use these properties to predict the water flow in the case of imbibition. Further complications arise from the incomplete wetting of water at the solid matrix which results in finite values of the contact angles between the solid-water-air interfaces. To address these problems we present a physically-based model for hysteretic SHPs. This model is based on bundles of angular pores. Hysteresis for individual pores is caused by (i) different snap-off pressures during filling and emptying of single angular pores and (ii) by different advancing and receding contact angles for fluids that are not perfectly wettable. We derive a model of hydraulic conductivity as a function of contact angle by assuming flow perpendicular to pore cross sections and present closed-form expressions for both the sample scale water retention and hydraulic conductivity function by assuming a log-normal statistical distribution of pore size. We tested the new model against drainage and imbibition experiments for various sandy materials which were conducted with various liquids of differing wettability. The model described both imbibition and drainage experiments very well by assuming a unique pore size distribution of the sample and a zero contact angle for the perfectly wetting liquid. Eventually, we see the possibility to relate the particle size distribution with a model which describes the SHPs.

  18. Modeling and control of a hydraulically actuated flexible-prismatic link robot

    SciTech Connect

    Love, L.; Kress, R.; Jansen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Most of the research related to flexible link manipulators to date has focused on single link, fixed length, single plane of vibration test beds. In addition, actuation has been predominantly based upon electromagnetic motors. Ironically, these elements are rarely found in the existing industrial long reach systems. This manuscript describes a new hydraulically actuated, long reach manipulator with a flexible prismatic link at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus is directed towards both modeling and control of hydraulic actuators as well as flexible links that have variable natural frequencies.

  19. Mathematic Modeling of Complex Hydraulic Machinery Systems When Evaluating Reliability Using Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemenkova, M. Yu; Shipovalov, A. N.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-04-01

    The main technological equipment of pipeline transport of hydrocarbons are hydraulic machines. During transportation of oil mainly used of centrifugal pumps, designed to work in the “pumping station-pipeline” system. Composition of a standard pumping station consists of several pumps, complex hydraulic piping. The authors have developed a set of models and algorithms for calculating system reliability of pumps. It is based on the theory of reliability. As an example, considered one of the estimation methods with the application of graph theory.

  20. Hydrodynamic and hydrostatic modelling of hydraulic journal bearings considering small displacement condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Yin; Chuang, Jen-Chen; Tu, Jia-Ying

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes modified coefficients for the dynamic model of hydraulic journal bearing system that integrates the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties. In recent years, design of hydraulic bearing for machine tool attracts worldwide attention, because hydraulic bearings are able to provide higher capacity and accuracy with lower friction, compared to conventional bearing systems. In order to achieve active control of the flow pressure and enhance the operation accuracy, the dynamic model of hydraulic bearings need to be developed. Modified coefficients of hydrostatic stiffness, hydrodynamic stiffness, and squeeze damping of the dynamic model are presented in this work, which are derived referring to small displacement analysis from literature. The proposed modified coefficients and model, which consider the pressure variations, relevant geometry size, and fluid properties of the journal bearings, are able to characterise the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties with better precision, thus offering the following pragmatic contribution: (1) on-line prediction of the eccentricity and the position of the shaft in the face of external force that results in vibration; (2) development of active control system to regulate the supply flow pressure and to minimize the eccentricity of the shaft. Theoretical derivation and simulation results with different vibration cases are discussed to verify the proposed techniques.

  1. Initial insights from 2.5D hydraulic modeling of floods in Athabasca Valles, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.P.; Denlinger, R.P.; O'Connell, D. R. H.; Burr, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first application of a 2.5D hydraulic model to catastrophic floods on Mars. This model simulates flow over complex topography and incorporates flood dynamics that could not be modeled in the earlier 1D models. We apply this model to Athabasca Valles, the youngest outflow channel on Mars, investigating previous bank-full discharge estimates and utilizing the interpolated Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter elevation map as input. We confirm that the bank-full assumption does not fit the observed landforms. Instead, the channel appears more deeply incised near the source. Flow modeling also identifies several areas of special interest, including a dry cataract that coincides with a region of predicted high erosion. However, artifacts in the elevation data strongly impacted estimated stages and velocities in other areas. More extensive connection between the flood hydraulics and observed landforms awaits improved topographic data.

  2. Simulation of the June 11, 2010, flood along the Little Missouri River near Langley, Arkansas, using a hydrologic model coupled to a hydraulic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westerman, Drew A.; Clark, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    The results from the precipitation-runoff hydrologic model, the one-dimensional unsteady-state hydraulic model, and a separate two-dimensional model developed as part of a coincident study, each complement the other in terms of streamflow timing, water-surface elevations, and velocities propagated by the June 11, 2010, flood event. The simulated grids for water depth and stream velocity from each model were directly compared by subtracting the one-dimensional hydraulic model grid from the two-dimensional model grid. The absolute mean difference for the simulated water depth was 0.9 foot. Additionally, the absolute mean difference for the simulated stream velocity was 1.9 feet per second.

  3. Multiscale modelling of hydraulic conductivity in vuggy porous media

    PubMed Central

    Daly, K. R.; Roose, T.

    2014-01-01

    Flow in both saturated and non-saturated vuggy porous media, i.e. soil, is inherently multiscale. The complex microporous structure of the soil aggregates and the wider vugs provides a multitude of flow pathways and has received significant attention from the X-ray computed tomography (CT) community with a constant drive to image at higher resolution. Using multiscale homogenization, we derive averaged equations to study the effects of the microscale structure on the macroscopic flow. The averaged model captures the underlying geometry through a series of cell problems and is verified through direct comparison to numerical simulations of the full structure. These methods offer significant reductions in computation time and allow us to perform three-dimensional calculations with complex geometries on a desktop PC. The results show that the surface roughness of the aggregate has a significantly greater effect on the flow than the microstructure within the aggregate. Hence, this is the region in which the resolution of X-ray CT for image-based modelling has the greatest impact. PMID:24511248

  4. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jong E.

    2005-11-01

    Earlier experiments determined that the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) core is cooled, not by an axial flow, but rather by a strong cross flow due to the thermal expansion of the coolant. To further complicate the flow field, a nitrogen-16 (N-16) pump was installed above the PSBR core to mix the exiting core buoyant thermal plume in order to delay the rapid release of radioactive N-16 to the PSBR pool surface. Thus, the interaction between the N-16 jet flow and the buoyancy driven flow complicates the analysis of the flow distribution in the PSBR pool. The main objectives of this study is to model the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the PSBR core and pool. During this study four major things were performed including the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for the PSBR pool, the stand-alone fuel rod model for a PSBR fuel rod, the velocity measurements in and around the PSBR core, and the temperature measurements in the PSBR pool. Once the flow field was predicted by the CFD model, the measurement devices were manufactured and calibrated based on the CFD results. The major contribution of this study is to understand and to explain the flow behavior in the PSBR subchannels and pool using the FLOW3D model. The stand-alone dynamic fuel rod model was developed to determine the temperature distribution inside a PSBR fuel rod. The stand-alone fuel rod model was coupled to the FLOW3D model and used to predict the temperature behavior during steady-state and pulsing. The heat transfer models in the stand-alone fuel rod code are used in order to overcome the disadvantage of the CFD code, which does not calculate the mechanical stress, the gap conductance, and the two phase heat transfer. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. An anisotropic numerical model for thermal hydraulic analyses: application to liquid metal flow in fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitillo, F.; Vitale Di Maio, D.; Galati, C.; Caruso, G.

    2015-11-01

    A CFD analysis has been carried out to study the thermal-hydraulic behavior of liquid metal coolant in a fuel assembly of triangular lattice. In order to obtain fast and accurate results, the isotropic two-equation RANS approach is often used in nuclear engineering applications. A different approach is provided by Non-Linear Eddy Viscosity Models (NLEVM), which try to take into account anisotropic effects by a nonlinear formulation of the Reynolds stress tensor. This approach is very promising, as it results in a very good numerical behavior and in a potentially better fluid flow description than classical isotropic models. An Anisotropic Shear Stress Transport (ASST) model, implemented into a commercial software, has been applied in previous studies, showing very trustful results for a large variety of flows and applications. In the paper, the ASST model has been used to perform an analysis of the fluid flow inside the fuel assembly of the ALFRED lead cooled fast reactor. Then, a comparison between the results of wall-resolved conjugated heat transfer computations and the results of a decoupled analysis using a suitable thermal wall-function previously implemented into the solver has been performed and presented.

  6. Towards the sequential assimilation of SAR-derived water stages into hydraulic models using the Particle Filter: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matgen, P.; Montanari, M.; Hostache, R.; Pfister, L.; Hoffmann, L.; Plaza, D.; Pauwels, V. R. N.; de Lannoy, G. J. M.; de Keyser, R.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2010-09-01

    With the onset of new satellite radar constellations (e.g. Sentinel-1) and advances in computational science (e.g. grid computing) enabling the supply and processing of multi-mission satellite data at a temporal frequency that is compatible with real-time flood forecasting requirements, this study presents a new concept for the sequential assimilation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)-derived water stages into coupled hydrologic-hydraulic models. The proposed methodology consists of adjusting storages and fluxes simulated by a coupled hydrologic-hydraulic model using a Particle Filter-based data assimilation scheme. Synthetic observations of water levels, representing satellite measurements, are assimilated into the coupled model in order to investigate the performance of the proposed assimilation scheme as a function of both accuracy and frequency of water level observations. The use of the Particle Filter provides flexibility regarding the form of the probability densities of both model simulations and remote sensing observations. We illustrate the potential of the proposed methodology using a twin experiment over a widely studied river reach located in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. The study demonstrates that the Particle Filter algorithm leads to significant uncertainty reduction of water level and discharge at the time step of assimilation. However, updating the storages of the model only improves the model forecast over a very short time horizon. A more effective way of updating thus consists in adjusting both states and inputs. The proposed methodology, which consists in updating the biased forcing of the hydraulic model using information on model errors that is inferred from satellite observations, enables persistent model improvement. The present schedule of satellite radar missions is such that it is likely that there will be continuity for SAR-based operational water management services. This research contributes to evolve reactive flood management into

  7. Global river flood hazard maps: hydraulic modelling methods and appropriate uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townend, Samuel; Smith, Helen; Molloy, James

    2014-05-01

    Flood hazard is not well understood or documented in many parts of the world. Consequently, the (re-)insurance sector now needs to better understand where the potential for considerable river flooding aligns with significant exposure. For example, international manufacturing companies are often attracted to countries with emerging economies, meaning that events such as the 2011 Thailand floods have resulted in many multinational businesses with assets in these regions incurring large, unexpected losses. This contribution addresses and critically evaluates the hydraulic methods employed to develop a consistent global scale set of river flood hazard maps, used to fill the knowledge gap outlined above. The basis of the modelling approach is an innovative, bespoke 1D/2D hydraulic model (RFlow) which has been used to model a global river network of over 5.3 million kilometres. Estimated flood peaks at each of these model nodes are determined using an empirically based rainfall-runoff approach linking design rainfall to design river flood magnitudes. The hydraulic model is used to determine extents and depths of floodplain inundation following river bank overflow. From this, deterministic flood hazard maps are calculated for several design return periods between 20-years and 1,500-years. Firstly, we will discuss the rationale behind the appropriate hydraulic modelling methods and inputs chosen to produce a consistent global scaled river flood hazard map. This will highlight how a model designed to work with global datasets can be more favourable for hydraulic modelling at the global scale and why using innovative techniques customised for broad scale use are preferable to modifying existing hydraulic models. Similarly, the advantages and disadvantages of both 1D and 2D modelling will be explored and balanced against the time, computer and human resources available, particularly when using a Digital Surface Model at 30m resolution. Finally, we will suggest some

  8. Engineering study of tank leaks related to hydraulic retrieval of sludge from tank 241-C-106. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.S.; Carlos, W.C.; Irwin, J.J.; Khaleel, R.; Kline, N.W.; Ludowise, J.D.; Marusich, R.M.; Rittman, P.D.

    1993-06-09

    This study evaluates hydraulic retrieval (sluicing) of the waste in single-shell tank 241-C-106 with respect to the likelihood of tank leaks, gross volumes of potential leaks, and their consequences. A description of hydraulic retrieval is developed to establish a baseline for the study. Leak models are developed based on postulated leak mechanisms to estimate the amount of waste that could potentially leak while sluicing. Transport models describe the movement of the waste constituents in the surrounding soil and groundwater after a leak occurs. Environmental impact and risk associated with tank leaks are evaluated. Transport of leaked material to the groundwater is found to be dependent on the rate of recharge of moisture in the soil for moderate-sized leaks. Providing a cover over the tank and surrounding area would eliminate the recharge. The bulk of any leaked material would remain in the vicinity of the tank for remedial action.

  9. The Effect of Loading Rate on Hydraulic Fracturing in Synthetic Granite - a Discrete Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomac, I.; Gutierrez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracture initiation and propagation from a borehole in hard synthetic rock is modeled using the two dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM). DEM uses previously established procedure for modeling the strength and deformation parameters of quasi-brittle rocks with the Bonded Particle Model (Itasca, 2004). A series of simulations of laboratory tests on granite in DEM serve as a reference for synthetic rock behavior. Fracturing is enabled by breaking parallel bonds between DEM particles as a result of the local stress state. Subsequent bond breakage induces fracture propagation during a time-stepping procedure. Hydraulic fracturing occurs when pressurized fluid induces hoop stresses around the wellbore which cause rock fracturing and serves for geo-reservoir permeability enhancement in oil, gas and geothermal industries. In DEM, a network of fluid pipes and reservoirs is used for mathematical calculation of fluid flow through narrow channels between DEM particles, where the hydro-mechanical coupling is fully enabled. The fluid flow calculation is superimposed with DEM stress-strain calculation at each time step. As a result, the fluid pressures during borehole pressurization in hydraulic fracturing, as well as, during the fracture propagation from the borehole, can be simulated. The objective of this study is to investigate numerically a hypothesis that fluid pressurization rate, or the fluid flow rate, influences upon character, shape and velocity of fracture propagation in rock. The second objective is to better understand and define constraints which are important for successful fracture propagation in quasi-brittle rock from the perspective of flow rate, fluid density, viscosity and compressibility relative to the rock physical properties. Results from this study indicate that not only too high fluid flow rates cause fracture arrest and multiple fracture branching from the borehole, but also that the relative compressibility of fracturing fluid and

  10. Impact of representation of hydraulic structures in modelling a Severn barrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Samuel; Ahmadian, Reza; Falconer, Roger A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, enhancements to the numerical representation of sluice gates and turbines were made to the hydro-environmental model Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), and applied to the Severn Tidal Power Group Cardiff-Weston Barrage. The extended domain of the EFDC Continental Shelf Model (CSM) allows far-field hydrodynamic impact assessment of the Severn Barrage, pre- and post-enhancement, to demonstrate the importance of accurate hydraulic structure representation. The enhancements were found to significantly affect peak water levels in the Bristol Channel, reducing levels by nearly 1 m in some areas, and even affect predictions as far-field as the West Coast of Scotland, albeit to a far lesser extent. The model was tested for sensitivity to changes in the discharge coefficient, Cd, used in calculating discharge through sluice gates and turbines. It was found that the performance of the Severn Barrage is not sensitive to changes to the Cd value, and is mitigated through the continual, rather than instantaneous, discharge across the structure. The EFDC CSM can now be said to be more accurately predicting the impacts of tidal range proposals, and the investigation of sensitivity to Cd improves the confidence in the modelling results, despite the uncertainty in this coefficient.

  11. Thermal hydraulic modeling of the mock fuel facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jacob

    The major focus of this thesis was to make improved three dimensional models of the Mock Fuel Facility. Three distinct experiment types run with the Mock Fuel Facility (MFF) were the main focus of this thesis. Two of the experiments were modeled and an in-depth analysis of the model results was performed to gain a better understanding of the Mock Fuel Facility. For the third experiment the process of creating a model was begun. There were multiple purposes for the work completed in this thesis. The work was done partially to gain a greater understanding of the UMass Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR). There is minimal instrumentation within the UMLRR to measure localized temperatures within the UMLRR. It is hoped that the work done in this thesis will provide a basis for future modeling work which will give insight into the temperature profiles within the UMLRR. This work is also being done to gain insight into the capabilities of the COMSOL multiphysics modelling software and evaluate its potential for future modelling work. Finally this work is also being done for its potential as an educational tool. The MFF and COMSOL have potential to be used for experimental lab work by students to learn about computer modeling and validation.

  12. Hydraulic description of a flood event with optical remote sensors: a constructive constraint on modelling uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stéphanie; Allenbach, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    The exceptional characteristics of the December 2003 Rhône flood event (particularly high water flows, extent of the affected area, important damages especially in the region of Arles) make it be considered as a reference flood episode of this French river and a very well-known event. During the crisis, the International Charter "Space and Major Disasters" was triggered by the French Civil Protection for the rapid mapping of the flooding using Earth Observation imagery in order to facilitate crisis operations. As a result, more than 60 satellite images covering the flood were acquired over a 10 days period following the peak flow. Using the opportunity provided by this incomparable data coverage, the French Ministry of the Environment ordered a study on the evaluation of remote sensing's potential benefits for flood management. One of the questions asked by the risk managers was: what type of flood information can be provided by the different remote sensing platforms? Elements of response were delivered mainly in the form of a comprehensive compilation of maps and illustrations, displaying the main hydraulic elements (static ones as well as dynamic ones), initially listed and requested by hydrologists (more precisely, by a regional engineering society specialised in hydraulics and hydrology and in charge of a field campaign during the event), observed on different optical images of the flood event having affected the plain between Tarascon (upstream) and Arles (downstream). It is seen that a careful mapping of all flood traces visible on remote sensing event imagery - apparent water, moisture traces, breaches, overflows, stream directions, impermeable boundaries … - delivers a valuable vision of the flood's occurrence combining accuracy and comprehensiveness. In fact, optical imagery offers a detailed vision of the event : moisture traces complete flood traces extent; the observation of draw-off directions through waterproof barriers reveals hydraulic

  13. Prototype Data Models and Data Dictionaries for Hanford Sediment Physical and Hydraulic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Last, George V.; Middleton, Lisa A.

    2010-09-30

    The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) project, managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), has been compiling physical and hydraulic property data and parameters to support risk analyses and waste management decisions at Hanford. In FY09 the RDS project developed a strategic plan for a physical and hydraulic property database. This report documents prototype data models and dictionaries for these properties and associated parameters. Physical properties and hydraulic parameters and their distributions are required for any type of quantitative assessment of risk and uncertainty associated with predictions of contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface. The central plateau of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State contains most of the contamination at the Site and has up to {approx}100 m of unsaturated and unconsolidated or semi-consolidated sediments overlying the unconfined aquifer. These sediments contain a wide variety of contaminants ranging from organic compounds, such as carbon tetrachloride, to numerous radionuclides including technetium, plutonium, and uranium. Knowledge of the physical and hydraulic properties of the sediments and their distributions is critical for quantitative assessment of the transport of these contaminants in the subsurface, for evaluation of long-term risks and uncertainty associated with model predictions of contaminant transport and fate, and for evaluating, designing, and operating remediation alternatives. One of the goals of PNNL's RDS project is to work with the Hanford Environmental Data Manager (currently with CHPRC) to develop a protocol and schedule for incorporation of physical property and hydraulic parameter datasets currently maintained by PNNL into HEIS. This requires that the data first be reviewed to ensure quality and consistency. New data models must then be developed for HEIS that are

  14. Predicting Formation Damage in Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems Utilizing a Coupled Hydraulic-Thermal-Chemical Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Daniel; Regenspurg, Simona; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido; Kranz, Stefan; Saadat, Ali

    2014-05-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, large amounts of energy can be stored by injecting hot water into deep or intermediate aquifers. In a seasonal production-injection cycle, water is circulated through a system comprising the porous aquifer, a production well, a heat exchanger and an injection well. This process involves large temperature and pressure differences, which shift chemical equilibria and introduce or amplify mechanical processes. Rock-fluid interaction such as dissolution and precipitation or migration and deposition of fine particles will affect the hydraulic properties of the porous medium and may lead to irreversible formation damage. In consequence, these processes determine the long-term performance of the ATES system and need to be predicted to ensure the reliability of the system. However, high temperature and pressure gradients and dynamic feedback cycles pose challenges on predicting the influence of the relevant processes. Within this study, a reservoir model comprising a coupled hydraulic-thermal-chemical simulation was developed based on an ATES demonstration project located in the city of Berlin, Germany. The structural model was created with Petrel, based on data available from seismic cross-sections and wellbores. The reservoir simulation was realized by combining the capabilities of multiple simulation tools. For the reactive transport model, COMSOL Multiphysics (hydraulic-thermal) and PHREEQC (chemical) were combined using the novel interface COMSOL_PHREEQC, developed by Wissmeier & Barry (2011). It provides a MATLAB-based coupling interface between both programs. Compared to using COMSOL's built-in reactive transport simulator, PHREEQC additionally calculates adsorption and reaction kinetics and allows the selection of different activity coefficient models in the database. The presented simulation tool will be able to predict the most important aspects of hydraulic, thermal and chemical transport processes relevant to

  15. Digging Soil Experiments for Micro Hydraulic Excavators based on Model Predictive Tracking Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatsu, Takumi; Nonaka, Kenichiro; Sekiguchi, Kazuma; Suzuki, Katsumasa

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the increase of burden to operators and lack of skilled operators are the issue in the work of the hydraulic excavator. These problems are expected to be improved by autonomous control. In this paper, we present experimental results of hydraulic excavators using model predictive control (MPC) which incorporates servo mechanism. MPC optimizes digging operations by the optimal control input which is calculated by predicting the future states and satisfying the constraints. However, it is difficult for MPC to cope with the reaction force from soil when a hydraulic excavator performs excavation. Servo mechanism suppresses the influence of the constant disturbance using the error integration. However, the bucket tip deviates from a specified shape by the sudden change of the disturbance. We can expect that the tracking performance is improved by combining MPC and servo mechanism. Path-tracking controls of the bucket tip are performed using the optimal control input. We apply the proposed method to the Komatsu- made micro hydraulic excavator PC01 by experiments. We show the effectiveness of the proposed method through the experiment of digging soil by comparing servo mechanism and pure MPC with the proposed method.

  16. A Froude-scaled model of a bedrock-alluvial channel reach: 1. Hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Rebecca A.; Hoey, Trevor B.

    2016-09-01

    The controls on hydraulics in bedrock-alluvial rivers are relatively poorly understood, despite the importance of the flow in determining rates and patterns of sediment transport and consequent erosion. To measure hydraulics within a bedrock-alluvial channel, we developed a 1:10 Froude-scaled laboratory model of an 18 × 9 m bedrock-alluvial river reach using terrestrial laser scanning and 3-D printing. In the reported experiments, water depth and velocity were recorded at 18 locations within the channel at each of five different discharges. Additional data from runs with sediment cover in the flume were used to evaluate the hydraulic impact of sediment cover; the deposition and erosion of sediment patches in these runs are analyzed in the companion paper. In our data (1) spatial variation in both flow velocity and Froude number increases with discharge; (2) bulk flow resistance and Froude number become independent of discharge at higher discharges; (3) local flow velocity and Reynolds stress are correlated to the range of local bed topography at some, but not most, discharges; (4) at lower discharges, local topography induces vertical flow structures and slower velocities, but these effects decrease at higher discharges; and (5) there is a relationship between the linear combination of bed and sediment roughness and local flow velocity. These results demonstrate the control that bedrock topography exerts over both local and reach-scale flow conditions, but spatially distributed hydraulic data from bedrock-alluvial channels with different topographies are needed to generalize these findings.

  17. Estimating water and nitrate leaching in tree crops using inverse modelled plant and soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvreur, Valentin; Kandelous, Maziar; Mairesse, Harmony; Baram, Shahar; Moradi, Ahmad; Pope, Katrin; Hopmans, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater quality is specifically vulnerable in irrigated agricultural lands in California and many other (semi-)arid regions of the world. The routine application of nitrogen fertilizers with irrigation water in California is likely responsible for the high nitrate concentrations in groundwater, underlying much of its main agricultural areas. To optimize irrigation/fertigation practices, it is essential that irrigation and fertilizers are applied at the optimal concentration, place, and time to ensure maximum root uptake and minimize leaching losses to the groundwater. The applied irrigation water and dissolved fertilizer, root nitrate and water uptake interact with soil and root properties in a complex manner that cannot easily be resolved. It is therefore that coupled experimental-modelling studies are required to allow for unravelling of the relevant complexities that result from typical variations of crop properties, soil texture and layering across farmer-managed fields. A combined field monitoring and modelling approach was developed to quantify from simple measurements the leaching of water and nitrate below the root zone. The monitored state variables are soil water content within the root zone, soil matric potential below the root zone, and nitrate concentration in the soil solution. Plant and soil properties of incremented complexity are optimized with the software HYDRUS in an inverse modelling scheme, which allows estimating leaching under constraint of hydraulic principles. Questions of optimal irrigation and fertilization timing can then be addressed using predictive results and global optimization algorithms.

  18. Model and analysis of a cylindrical in-line hydraulic suppressor with a solid compressible liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, K. A.; Earnhart, N. E.; Cunefare, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    An in-line hydraulic noise suppressor with a lossy, compressible liner made of foamed polyurethane liner is introduced which is intended to provide an alternative to current in-line silencing devices using compressed nitrogen gas volumes. The liner is engineered to be compressible at elevated pressures, such that it can provide effective noise abatement for practical hydraulic systems. In support of such work, a multimodal model is developed to characterize the device and the liner material. Because the hydraulic system is pressurized after insertion of the liner, the model must address liner compression and the corresponding small gaps introduced in the expansion volume; additionally, both compression and shear wave propagation must be considered in the liner. Several mode matching solutions are investigated, and a pseudoinverse mode matching method is found to provide good convergence characteristics. The multimodal model is validated against a finite element model, and also used in an optimization algorithm to estimate the material properties of a prototype liner using experimental transmission loss data. Experimental results show broadband transmission loss performance at 2.8 MPa system pressure; transmission loss decreases with increasing system pressure, and data at 4.1 MPa system pressure produces about 4 dB less transmission loss than a similarly sized commercial device. The multimodal model with estimated material properties at 2.8 MPa achieves a root mean squared error of 1.7 dB or less for two different length devices over a frequency range of 50-2000 Hz.

  19. A Statistical Model for Predicting Unsaturated Hydraulic Properties of Deep Sediments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfield, K. A.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2003-12-01

    The development and application of property-transfer functions is an important approach for predicting unsaturated hydraulic properties from more easily measured bulk properties. At the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the unsaturated zone is comprised of thick basalt flow sequences interbedded with thinner sedimentary layers. Buried hazardous waste in the surficial soil is a possible source of contamination to the underlying Snake River Plain aquifer, which can be as deep as 200 m below land surface. Determining the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the sedimentary layers is one step in understanding water flow and solute transport processes through this complex unsaturated system. This study uses multiple linear regression analysis to construct simple property-transfer functions for estimating the water retention curve for deep sediments at the INEEL. The regression models were developed using laboratory measurements on 109 sediment core samples collected at depths of 9 m to 175 m at two facilities within the southwestern portion of the INEEL. These data included water retention measurements, the curve fit parameters for which are the dependent variables of the property-transfer functions, and bulk properties (such as bulk density and various representations of the particle-size distribution), which are the potential independent variables. The Rossi-Nimmo junction model was used to represent the water retention measurements. Three parameters define this retention curve model: 1) saturated water content (θ sat), 2) a scaling parameter for matric pressure (ψ o), and 3) a curve shape parameter (λ ). The bulk property data and optimized hydraulic parameter values were used to develop a separate regression model for each parameter. The predicted parameters were then used to calculate the water retention curve from saturation to oven dryness. A selection process for the independent variables, referred to as "all possible subsets

  20. Antiquity versus modern times in hydraulics - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroia, L.; Georgescu, S. C.; Georgescu, A. M.

    2010-08-01

    Water supply and water management in Antiquity represent more than Modern World can imagine about how people in that period used to think about, and exploit the resources they had, aiming at developing and improving their society and own lives. This paper points out examples of how they handled different situations, and how they managed to cope with the growing number of population in the urban areas, by adapting or by improving their water supply systems. The paper tries to emphasize the engineering contribution of Rome and the Roman Empire, mainly in the capital but also in the provinces, as for instance the today territory of France, by analysing some aqueducts from the point of view of modern Hydraulic Engineering. A third order polynomial regression is proposed to compute the water flow rate, based on the flow cross-sectional area measured in quinaria. This paper also emphasizes on contradictory things between what we thought we knew about Ancient Roman civilization, and what could really be proven, either by a modern engineering approach, a documentary approach, or by commonsense, where none of the above could be used. It is certain that the world we live in is the heritage of the Greco-Roman culture and therefore, we are due to acknowledge their contribution, especially taking into account the lack of knowledge of that time, and the poor resources they had.

  1. Pedotransfer functions for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity: implications for modeling storm flow generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobieraj, J. A.; Elsenbeer, H.; Vertessy, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    We evaluated the performance of nine published pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity ( Ks) in modeling the stormflow generated in a rainforest catchment. Using available input data consisting of particle size distribution, bulk density, and saturated moisture content information, these empirically-based PTFs were found to be inadequate in estimating Ks for this catchment. At shallow depths (0-0.1 m), PTFs commonly underestimated Ks by variable amounts with the exception of the Jabro PTF, which either overestimated Ks or was not significantly different from measured values. At subsequent depths (0.1-0.4 m), PTFs typically overestimated Ks by variable amounts, the exception being the Campbell and Shiozawa PTF, which typically underestimated Ks. We used TOPOG_SBM to model storm flow generation by replacing measured Ks values from the 0 to 0.1 m depth interval with PTF-estimated Ks values. The simulation set using Rosetta SSC (PTF with input of % sand, silt, clay) Ks values overestimated runoff for all events, and overland flow occurred across the entire catchment for all events. Simulations using Rosetta SSC-BD (PTF with input of % sand, silt, clay, and bulk density) Ks values predicted hydrograph attributes as well as the simulations using measured Ks values, but the Rosetta SSC-BD simulation set predicted a much larger spatial frequency of overland flow across the catchment than the measured Ks simulation set. Model simulations using the Jabro PTF, which generated large estimates of Ks, produced hydrographs that overestimated total runoff and time of rise but underestimated peak runoff. This model predicted much less overland flow than other models. Currently published PTFs used in this study are inadequate in estimating Ks for the La Cuenca catchment, which in turn make them inadequate for modeling storm flow generation. Enhanced model performance could likely be achieved by utilizing PTFs that better account for the

  2. A multiscale approach to determine hydraulic conductivity in thick claystone aquitards using field, laboratory, and numerical modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.; Barbour, S. L.; Hendry, M. J.; Novakowski, K.; van der Kamp, G.

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the hydraulic conductivity (K) of aquitards is difficult due to technical and logistical difficulties associated with field-based methods as well as the cost and challenge of collecting representative and competent core samples for laboratory analysis. The objective of this study was to produce a multiscale comparison of vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kv and Kh, respectively) of a regionally extensive Cretaceous clay-rich aquitard in southern Saskatchewan. Ten vibrating wire pressure transducers were lowered into place at depths between 25 and 325 m, then the annular was space was filled with a cement-bentonite grout. The in situ Kh was estimated at the location of each transducer by simulating the early-time pore pressure measurements following setting of the grout using a 2-D axisymmetric, finite element, numerical model. Core samples were collected during drilling for conventional laboratory testing for Kv to compare with the transducer-determined in situ Kh. Results highlight the importance of scale and consideration of the presence of possible secondary features (e.g., fractures) in the aquitard. The proximity of the transducers to an active potash mine (˜1 km) where depressurization of an underlying aquifer resulted in drawdown through the aquitard provided a unique opportunity to model the current hydraulic head profile using both the Kh and Kv estimates. Results indicate that the transducer-determined Kh estimates would allow for the development of the current hydraulic head distribution, and that simulating the pore pressure recovery can be used to estimate moderately low in situ Kh (<10-11 m s-1).

  3. A Comparison of Land Surface Model Soil Hydraulic Properties Estimated by Inverse Modeling and Pedotransfer Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, Ethan D.; Small, Eric E.

    2007-01-01

    Soil hydraulic properties (SHPs) regulate the movement of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land surface. At present, SHPS are commonly defined by a simple pedotransfer function from soil texture class, but SHPs vary more within a texture class than between classes. To examine the impact of using soil texture class to predict SHPS, we run the Noah land surface model for a wide variety of measured SHPs. We find that across a range of vegetation cover (5 - 80% cover) and climates (250 - 900 mm mean annual precipitation), soil texture class only explains 5% of the variance expected from the real distribution of SHPs. We then show that modifying SHPs can drastically improve model performance. We compare two methods of estimating SHPs: (1) inverse method, and (2) soil texture class. Compared to texture class, inverse modeling reduces errors between measured and modeled latent heat flux from 88 to 28 w/m(exp 2). Additionally we find that with increasing vegetation cover the importance of SHPs decreases and that the van Genuchten m parameter becomes less important, while the saturated conductivity becomes more important.

  4. The use of sediment deposition maps as auxiliary data for hydraulic model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukolwe, Micah; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2013-04-01

    One aspect of the French disaster mitigation setup is the statutory Risk Prevention Plans (PPR, Plans de Prévention des Risques); i.e. spatial identification of potential disasters and mitigation measures. The maps are categorised into three zones depicting increasing disaster severity and potential mitigation measures (RTM, 1999). Taking the example of the city of Barcelonnette, in South France (French Alps), floods have been the most frequent occurring natural hazard (Flageollet et al., 1996). Consequently, a case is put forward for the need for accurate flood extent delineation to support the decision making process. For this study, the Barcelonnette case study was considered, whereby the last devastating flooding was in June 1957 (Weber, 1994). Contrary to the recent advances in the proliferation of data to support flood inundation studies (Bates, 2012; Bates, 2004; Di Baldassarre and Uhlenbrook, 2012; Schumann et al., 2009), constraints are faced when analysing flood inundation events that occurred before the 1970's. In absence of frequent flooding, the analysis of historical flood extents may play an important role in shaping the awareness of local stakeholders and support land-use and urban planning. This study is part of a probabilistic flood mapping (e.g. Di Baldassarre et al., 2010, Horrit, 2006) of the valley carried out in a Monte-Carlo framework, while taking into account the peak flow and the parametric uncertainty. The simulations were carried out using the sub-grid channel model extension of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model (Bates et al, 2010; Neal et al., 2012). Sediment deposition maps (Lecarpentier, 1963) were used to analyse the model performance, additionally the graduation of the sediment deposition sizes showed the flood propagation and was used to analyse the model runs. However, there still remains the challenge of quantifying the uncertainty in the sediment deposition map and the actual flood extent.

  5. Property-Transfer Modeling to Estimate Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Deep Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Winfield, Kari A.

    2007-01-01

    The unsaturated zone at the Idaho National Laboratory is complex, comprising thick basalt flow sequences interbedded with thinner sedimentary layers. Understanding the highly nonlinear relation between water content and hydraulic conductivity within the sedimentary interbeds is one element in predicting water flow and solute transport processes in this geologically complex environment. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments is costly and time consuming, therefore use of models that estimate this property from more easily measured bulk-physical properties is desirable. A capillary bundle model was used to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for 40 samples from sedimentary interbeds using water-retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity derived from (1) laboratory measurements on core samples, and (2) site-specific property transfer regression models developed for the sedimentary interbeds. Four regression models were previously developed using bulk-physical property measurements (bulk density, the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient) as the explanatory variables. The response variables, estimated from linear combinations of the bulk physical properties, included saturated hydraulic conductivity and three parameters that define the water-retention curve. The degree to which the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves estimated from property-transfer-modeled water-retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity approximated the laboratory-measured data was evaluated using a goodness-of-fit indicator, the root-mean-square error. Because numerical models of variably saturated flow and transport require parameterized hydraulic properties as input, simulations were run to evaluate the effect of the various parameters on model results. Results show that the property transfer models based on easily measured bulk properties perform nearly as well as using curve fits to laboratory-measured water

  6. The effect of dynamic changes in soil bulk density on hydraulic properties: modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel

    2014-05-01

    Natural and artificial processes, like rainfall-induced soil surface sealing or mechanical compaction, disturb the soil structure and enhance dynamic changes of the related pore size distribution. These changes may influence many aspects of the soil-water-plant-atmosphere system. One of the easiest measurable variables is the soil bulk density. Approaches are suggested that could model the effect of the change in soil bulk density on soil permeability, water retention curve (WRC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function (HCF). The resulting expressions were calibrated and validated against experimental data corresponding to different soil types at various levels of compaction, and enable a relatively good prediction of the effect of bulk density on the soil hydraulic properties. These models allow estimating the impact of such changes on flow processes and on transport properties of heterogeneous soil profiles.

  7. An integrated statistical and hydraulic modelling approach for collective flood risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Rob; Keef, Caroline; Tawn, Jonathan A.; Hankin, Barry; Dunning, Paul

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for assessing collective flood risk based on a combination of two innovative models. The first is a multivariate statistical model for extremes of river flow or sea level, based on the conditional exceedance approach of Heffernan and Tawn (2004) and Keef et al (2009). This model is analogous to a generalised form of copula function in that it separates the joint distribution of a variable into its marginal characteristics and its dependence structure. The dependence structure is flexible in its description of the joint extremes, which has advantages for representing spatial dependence in data such as river flows. The second part of the methodology is a two-dimensional (2D) hydraulic floodplain inundation model that is applied using parallel processing technology to provide high resolution gridded flood depth data over large regions (Lamb et al., 2009). These depth grids can then be combined with a model for economic losses. We present an overview of the methodology and demonstrate through simulation studies how it can be applied to estimate the distribution function of the spatially aggregated economic losses from flooding over regions up to the scale of England and Wales, or greater. The results are also placed in the context of hydrological assessment of the probability and severity of notable historical flood events experiences in the British Isles. Heffernan J. E. and Tawn J. A. (2004) A conditional approach for multivariate extreme values (with discussion) J. R. Statist. Soc. B, 66 497-546 Keef, C., J. Tawn, and C. Svensson. (2009). Spatial risk assessment for extreme river flows. Applied Statistics 58,(5) pp 601-618 Lamb, R., Crossley, A., Waller, S. (2009) A fast 2D floodplain inundation model, Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Water Management, 162, doi: 10.1680/wama.2009.162.1.1

  8. Urban micro-scale flood risk estimation with parsimonious hydraulic modelling and census data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrighi, C.; Brugioni, M.; Castelli, F.; Franceschini, S.; Mazzanti, B.

    2013-05-01

    The adoption of 2007/60/EC Directive requires European countries to implement flood hazard and flood risk maps by the end of 2013. Flood risk is the product of flood hazard, vulnerability and exposure, all three to be estimated with comparable level of accuracy. The route to flood risk assessment is consequently much more than hydraulic modelling of inundation, that is hazard mapping. While hazard maps have already been implemented in many countries, quantitative damage and risk maps are still at a preliminary level. A parsimonious quasi-2-D hydraulic model is here adopted, having many advantages in terms of easy set-up. It is here evaluated as being accurate in flood depth estimation in urban areas with a high-resolution and up-to-date Digital Surface Model (DSM). The accuracy, estimated by comparison with marble-plate records of a historic flood in the city of Florence, is characterized in the downtown's most flooded area by a bias of a very few centimetres and a determination coefficient of 0.73. The average risk is found to be about 14 € m-2 yr-1, corresponding to about 8.3% of residents' income. The spatial distribution of estimated risk highlights a complex interaction between the flood pattern and the building characteristics. As a final example application, the estimated risk values have been used to compare different retrofitting measures. Proceeding through the risk estimation steps, a new micro-scale potential damage assessment method is proposed. This is based on the georeferenced census system as the optimal compromise between spatial detail and open availability of socio-economic data. The results of flood risk assessment at the census section scale resolve most of the risk spatial variability, and they can be easily aggregated to whatever upper scale is needed given that they are geographically defined as contiguous polygons. Damage is calculated through stage-damage curves, starting from census data on building type and function, for the main

  9. On the Single-Layer Hydraulics Model for Flows and Ventilation over Unban Areas in Stable Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric stability has substantial effects on the flows and heat/mass transport processes. While extensive studies have been conducted for neutral and unstable stabilities, rather limited studies have been devoted to stable stratification. Major technical reason is the demanding spatio-temporal resolution required to solve the small scales in stratified turbulent flows. Instead of continuous density variation, we use the single-layer hydraulics model (analogous to shallow water equations for global dynamics), to simulate the stratified flows and turbulence structure over hypothetical urban areas. An array of identical ribs in cross flows is used to model an idealized urban surface and the aerodynamic resistance is controlled by the separation among the ribs. Two immiscible fluids (water and air) with a large density difference (three order of magnitude) are used to simulate the stratification. The key assumption is that the density in the (lower) single layer is uniform. As a result, the stratification is measured by the Froude number Fr (= U/(gH)1/2; where U is the flow speed, g the gravitational acceleration and H the single-layer depth). One of the characteristics of single-layer hydraulics model is hydraulic jump which occurs when the flows are slowing down from Fr > 1 (high-speed flows over smoother surfaces) to Fr < 1 (lower-speed flows over rougher surfaces). It is noteworthy that kinetic energy does not conserve across hydraulic jump that, unavoidably, cascades to turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). We thus hypotheses that the elevated TKE could modify the street-level ventilation mechanism in the stratified flows across an abrupt change in surface roughness entering urban areas. Large-eddy simulation and laboratory-scale water channel experiments are sought to improve our understanding of the occurrence of hydraulic jump and the associated street-level ventilation mechanism in the stratified flows over urban areas. Preliminary results, by comparing the

  10. Modeling the hydraulics of root growth in three dimensions with phloem water sources.

    PubMed

    Wiegers, Brandy S; Cheer, Angela Y; Silk, Wendy K

    2009-08-01

    Primary growth is characterized by cell expansion facilitated by water uptake generating hydrostatic (turgor) pressure to inflate the cell, stretching the rigid cell walls. The multiple source theory of root growth hypothesizes that root growth involves transport of water both from the soil surrounding the growth zone and from the mature tissue higher in the root via phloem and protophloem. Here, protophloem water sources are used as boundary conditions in a classical, three-dimensional model of growth-sustaining water potentials in primary roots. The model predicts small radial gradients in water potential, with a significant longitudinal gradient. The results improve the agreement of theory with empirical studies for water potential in the primary growth zone of roots of maize (Zea mays). A sensitivity analysis quantifies the functional importance of apical phloem differentiation in permitting growth and reveals that the presence of phloem water sources makes the growth-sustaining water relations of the root relatively insensitive to changes in root radius and hydraulic conductivity. Adaptation to drought and other environmental stresses is predicted to involve more apical differentiation of phloem and/or higher phloem delivery rates to the growth zone. PMID:19542299

  11. Dynamic modeling of the servovalves incorporated in the servo hydraulic system of the 70-meter DSN antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    As the pointing accuracy and service life requirements of the DSN 70 meter antenna increase, it is necessary to gain a more complete understanding of the servo hydraulic system in order to improve system designs to meet the new requirements. A mathematical model is developed for the servovalve incorporated into the hydraulic system of the 70 meter antenna and uses experimental data to verify the validity of the model and to identify the model parameters.

  12. Drift trajectories of a floating human body simulated in a hydraulic model of Puget Sound.

    PubMed

    Ebbesmeyer, C C; Haglund, W D

    1994-01-01

    After a young man jumped off a 221-foot (67 meters) high bridge, the drift of the body that beached 20 miles (32 km) away at Alki Point in Seattle, Washington was simulated with a hydraulic model. Simulations for the appropriate time period were performed using a small floating bead to represent the body in the hydraulic model at the University of Washington. Bead movements were videotaped and transferred to Computer Aided Drafting (AutoCAD) charts on a personal computer. Because of strong tidal currents in the narrow passage under the bridge (The Narrows near Tacoma, WA), small changes in the time of the jump (+/- 30 minutes) made large differences in the distance the body traveled (30 miles; 48 km). Hydraulic and other types of oceanographic models may be located by contacting technical experts known as physical oceanographers at local universities, and can be utilized to demonstrate trajectories of floating objects and the time required to arrive at selected locations. Potential applications for forensic death investigators include: to be able to set geographic and time limits for searches; determine potential origin of remains found floating or beached; and confirm and correlate information regarding entry into the water and sightings of remains. PMID:8113703

  13. Drift trajectories of a floating human body simulated in a hydraulic model of Puget Sound.

    PubMed

    Ebbesmeyer, C C; Haglund, W D

    1994-01-01

    After a young man jumped off a 221-foot (67 meters) high bridge, the drift of the body that beached 20 miles (32 km) away at Alki Point in Seattle, Washington was simulated with a hydraulic model. Simulations for the appropriate time period were performed using a small floating bead to represent the body in the hydraulic model at the University of Washington. Bead movements were videotaped and transferred to Computer Aided Drafting (AutoCAD) charts on a personal computer. Because of strong tidal currents in the narrow passage under the bridge (The Narrows near Tacoma, WA), small changes in the time of the jump (+/- 30 minutes) made large differences in the distance the body traveled (30 miles; 48 km). Hydraulic and other types of oceanographic models may be located by contacting technical experts known as physical oceanographers at local universities, and can be utilized to demonstrate trajectories of floating objects and the time required to arrive at selected locations. Potential applications for forensic death investigators include: to be able to set geographic and time limits for searches; determine potential origin of remains found floating or beached; and confirm and correlate information regarding entry into the water and sightings of remains.

  14. Hydraulic-fracture propagation in layered rock: experimental studies of fracture containment

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L. W.; Clark, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Fracture geometry is an important concern in the design of a massive hydraulic fracture treatment for improved natural gas recovery from tight gas sands. Possible prediction of vertical fracture growth and containment in layered rock requires an improved understanding of the parameters which may control fracture growth across layer interfaces. We have conducted laboratory hydraulic fracture experiments and elastic finite element studies which show that at least two distinct geologic conditions may inhibit or contain the vertical growth of hydraulic fractures in layered rock; (1) a weak interfacial shear strength of the layers and (2) a compressional increase in the minimum horizontal stress in the bounding layer. The second condition is more important and more likely to occur at depth. Variations in the horizontal stress can result from differences in elastic properties of individual layers in a layered rock sequence. A compressional increase in the minimum horizontal stress can occur in going from high shear modulus into low shear modulus layers.

  15. Impact of Model Uncertainty Description on Assimilating Hydraulic Head into the MIKE-SHE Distributed Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Madsen, H.; Ridler, M. E.; Rasmussen, J.; Refsgaard, J.; Jensen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Catchment-scale hydrological models are used as prediction tools to solve major challenges in water resources management. The reliability of hydrological model predictions is inevitably affected by the amount of information available to set up and calibrate the model. Data assimilation (DA) which combines complementary information from measurements and models has proven to be a powerful and promising tool in numerous research studies to improve model predictions. Especially, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) which is a popular sequential data assimilation technique, has been extensively studied in the earth sciences for assimilating in-situ measurements and remote sensing data. However, one of the major challenges in data assimilation to optimally combine model and measurements is the description of model uncertainty. Only few studies have been reported for defining appropriate model uncertainty in hydrological DA. Modeling uncertainties can be conceptually different in different applications. Traditionally, model uncertainty is represented by parameter uncertainty with corresponding parameter statistics determined by inverse modeling. In most hydrological DA applications, however, model uncertainty is defined by experience using simple statistical descriptions of different uncertainty sources. In this work, both the uncertainty derived from inverse modeling and from empirical knowledge are used and analyzed. A combination of parameter-based, forcing-based and state-based model error is implemented in the EnKF framework for assimilating groundwater hydraulic heads into a catchment-scale model of the Karup Catchment in Denmark using the distributed and integrated hydrological model MIKE SHE. A series of synthetic identical twin experiments are carried out to analyze the impact of different model error assumptions on the feasibility and efficiency of the assimilation. The optimality of the EnKF underlying twin test provides possibilities to diagnose model error

  16. Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists

  17. Forward induced seismic hazard assessment: application to a synthetic seismicity catalogue from hydraulic stimulation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakimhashemi, Amir Hossein; Yoon, Jeoung Seok; Heidbach, Oliver; Zang, Arno; Grünthal, Gottfried

    2014-07-01

    The M w 3.2-induced seismic event in 2006 due to fluid injection at the Basel geothermal site in Switzerland was the starting point for an ongoing discussion in Europe on the potential risk of hydraulic stimulation in general. In particular, further development of mitigation strategies of induced seismic events of economic concern became a hot topic in geosciences and geoengineering. Here, we present a workflow to assess the hazard of induced seismicity in terms of occurrence rate of induced seismic events. The workflow is called Forward Induced Seismic Hazard Assessment (FISHA) as it combines the results of forward hydromechanical-numerical models with methods of time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. To exemplify FISHA, we use simulations of four different fluid injection types with various injection parameters, i.e. injection rate, duration and style of injection. The hydromechanical-numerical model applied in this study represents a geothermal reservoir with preexisting fractures where a routine of viscous fluid flow in porous media is implemented from which flow and pressure driven failures of rock matrix and preexisting fractures are simulated, and corresponding seismic moment magnitudes are computed. The resulting synthetic catalogues of induced seismicity, including event location, occurrence time and magnitude, are used to calibrate the magnitude completeness M c and the parameters a and b of the frequency-magnitude relation. These are used to estimate the time-dependent occurrence rate of induced seismic events for each fluid injection scenario. In contrast to other mitigation strategies that rely on real-time data or already obtained catalogues, we can perform various synthetic experiments with the same initial conditions. Thus, the advantage of FISHA is that it can quantify hazard from numerical experiments and recommend a priori a stimulation type that lowers the occurrence rate of induced seismic events. The FISHA workflow is rather

  18. Temporal evolution modeling of hydraulic and water quality performance of permeable pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; He, Jianxun; Valeo, Caterina; Chu, Angus

    2016-02-01

    A mathematical model for predicting hydraulic and water quality performance in both the short- and long-term is proposed based on field measurements for three types of permeable pavements: porous asphalt (PA), porous concrete (PC), and permeable inter-locking concrete pavers (PICP). The model was applied to three field-scale test sites in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The model performance was assessed in terms of hydraulic parameters including time to peak, peak flow and water balance and a water quality variable (the removal rate of total suspended solids). A total of 20 simulated storm events were used for model calibration and verification processes. The proposed model can simulate the outflow hydrographs with a coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.762 to 0.907, and normalized root-mean-square deviation (NRMSD) ranging from 13.78% to 17.83%. Comparison of the time to peak flow, peak flow, runoff volume and TSS removal rates between the measured and modeled values in model verification phase had a maximum difference of 11%. The results demonstrate that the proposed model is capable of capturing the temporal dynamics of the pavement performance. Therefore, the model has great potential as a practical modeling tool for permeable pavement design and performance assessment.

  19. Quantifying Hydraulic Conductivity and Fluid Pressures in the Alpine Fault Hanging-Wall Using DFDP-2 Data and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussens, J. P.; Woodman, N. D.; Menzies, C. D.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Sutherland, R.; Capova, L.; Cox, S.; Upton, P.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow can play an important role in fault failure, due to the influence of pore pressure on effective confining stress and through chemical and thermal alteration of the fault zone. Rocks of the Alpine Fault Zone, both exposed at the surface and recovered in cores, show evidence for significant alteration by fluids. However, the fluid flow regime in the region is poorly constrained and its relationship with the behaviour of the fault is uncertain. In 2014 the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) drilled the DFDP-2B borehole, penetrating 893 m into the hanging-wall of the Alpine Fault. Prior to drilling, a set of hydrogeological models for the Whataroa Valley region, encompassing the DFDP-2B drill site, were constructed using the modelling software FEFLOW. Models were constructed for a range of plausible hydraulic conductivity structures for the region. They predicted strongly artesian hydraulic heads of 50-150 m above surface elevation and temperatures exceeding 100 °C within 1 km depth in bedrock beneath the DFDP-2 drill site, with the exact hydraulic and thermal gradients dependent on the hydraulic conductivity structure chosen. During the drilling project hydraulic and thermal data from the borehole was collected. This included 33 slug test datasets, carried out at a range of borehole depths throughout the project. Estimates for hydraulic conductivity were obtained by analysis of slug test data. Steady state hydraulic heads for the borehole, across a range of depths, were estimated from the slug test measurements. Depth profiles of hydraulic head show rapid increases in hydraulic head with depth, in line with model predictions. Results show fluid pressures greatly exceeding hydrostatic pressure in the shallow crust, reflecting significant upward flow of groundwater beneath the Whataroa Valley. Hydraulic conductivity estimates provide constraints on the hydraulic conductivity structure of the region. All hydraulic conductivity structures modelled thus far

  20. Using hydraulic modeling to address social impacts of small dam removals in southern New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Wyrick, Joshua R; Rischman, Brian A; Burke, Christopher A; McGee, Craig; Williams, Chasity

    2009-07-01

    Small relic mill dams are common in the watersheds of southern New Jersey, dotting the landscape with many small neighborhood lakes. Originally built in the late 1800s, most of these dams have become increasingly unable to handle current design storms due to increased urbanization of the watersheds. Several of these dams have also been classified as "high hazard" by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Dam Safety Division because their failure has the potential for loss of life or extensive property damage. The current private owners are generally unable to afford the high repair costs needed to rehabilitate the dams to current safety standards, and are therefore more inclined to remove them. This research analyses both the physical and social impacts of the removal of two small dams in southern New Jersey, and integrates the two seemingly disparate concepts. Using hydraulic modeling and previous case studies, it is predicted that there will be limited effects to the hydrological and biological characteristics of the stream corridor. A survey distributed to the affected homeowners that live on these lakes shows that the community, however, expects significant impacts to the bio-physical characteristics of the stream corridor, as well financial impacts to their property value and social impacts to their recreational activities. The current study exposes the widening gap between policy makers and landowners, and highlights where complete stakeholder interaction could and should occur.

  1. Advanced Hydraulic Tomography Analysis Strategies--A Numerical Study based on Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, C. M.; Yeh, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    This report presents a discussion on some of the unexplored issues pertaining to the application of hydraulic tomography to interpret pumping test data collected in the field. Using numerical experiments, we probe at a few new strategies to analyze pumping test results for multi-layer aquifers. First of all, we study the averaging of heads over packer intervals of a wellbore. How does the length of the packers reduce the resolution of the estimated hydraulic conductivity (K) field? Next we investigate the effect of using hard data (a.k.a. primary information or K measurements) conditioning on the estimated K field. Does the conditioning constrain the solution better and if so, by how much? Then we examine the effect of initial guess of K field on the inversion results. Currently, our hydraulic tomography approach (SSLE (Yeh and Liu (2000) and SimSLE (Xiang et al. (2009)) assumes a homogeneous K field as initial guess by default. What if we use a random field as initial guess? What about assigning different zones in the domain and designate different homogenous initial guess values to each of them? Finally, updating and storing the covariance matrix heavily consumes computation time during the inversion process and can sometimes be prohibiting when solving large problems. In fact, it is often the most time-consuming part of the hydraulic tomography analysis. We study the effects on the hydraulic tomography results of (1) whether updating the covariance matrix after each iteration and (2) whether storing the full matrix or diagonal terms only. The investigation outlined above will shed light on the development of more effective and reliable hydraulic tomography analysis practices and algorithms.

  2. Functional linear models to test for differences in prairie wetland hydraulic gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, Mark C.; Sojda, Richard S.; Preston, Todd M.; Swayne, David A.; Yang, Wanhong; Voinov, A.A.; Rizzoli, A.; Filatova, T.

    2010-01-01

    Functional data analysis provides a framework for analyzing multiple time series measured frequently in time, treating each series as a continuous function of time. Functional linear models are used to test for effects on hydraulic gradient functional responses collected from three types of land use in Northeastern Montana at fourteen locations. Penalized regression-splines are used to estimate the underlying continuous functions based on the discretely recorded (over time) gradient measurements. Permutation methods are used to assess the statistical significance of effects. A method for accommodating missing observations in each time series is described. Hydraulic gradients may be an initial and fundamental ecosystem process that responds to climate change. We suggest other potential uses of these methods for detecting evidence of climate change.

  3. Streaming potential modeling in fractured rock: Insights into the identification of hydraulically active fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubinet, D.; Linde, N.; Jougnot, D.; Irving, J.

    2016-05-01

    Numerous field experiments suggest that the self-potential (SP) geophysical method may allow for the detection of hydraulically active fractures and provide information about fracture properties. However, a lack of suitable numerical tools for modeling streaming potentials in fractured media prevents quantitative interpretation and limits our understanding of how the SP method can be used in this regard. To address this issue, we present a highly efficient two-dimensional discrete-dual-porosity approach for solving the fluid flow and associated self-potential problems in fractured rock. Our approach is specifically designed for complex fracture networks that cannot be investigated using standard numerical methods. We then simulate SP signals associated with pumping conditions for a number of examples to show that (i) accounting for matrix fluid flow is essential for accurate SP modeling and (ii) the sensitivity of SP to hydraulically active fractures is intimately linked with fracture-matrix fluid interactions. This implies that fractures associated with strong SP amplitudes are likely to be hydraulically conductive, attracting fluid flow from the surrounding matrix.

  4. Estimating hydraulic properties using a moving-model approach and multiple aquifer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, K.J.; Yobbi, D.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for characterizing geohydrologic columns that extended >600 m deep at sites with as many as six discrete aquifers. This method was applied at 12 sites within the Southwest Florida Water Management District. Sites typically were equipped with multiple production wells, one for each aquifer and one or more observation wells per aquifer. The average hydraulic properties of the aquifers and confining units within radii of 30 to >300 m were characterized at each site. Aquifers were pumped individually and water levels were monitored in stressed and adjacent aquifers during each pumping event. Drawdowns at a site were interpreted using a radial numerical model that extended from land surface to the base of the geohydrologic column and simulated all pumping events. Conceptually, the radial model moves between stress periods and recenters on the production well during each test. Hydraulic conductivity was assumed homogeneous and isotropic within each aquifer and confining unit. Hydraulic property estimates for all of the aquifers and confining units were consistent and reasonable because results from multiple aquifers and pumping events were analyzed simultaneously. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  5. Temporal changes of topsoil hydraulic conductivity studied by multiple-point tension disk infiltrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipa, Vladimir; Zumr, David; Snehota, Michal; Dohnal, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity of cultivated soils is strongly affected by agrotechnical procedures, soil compaction, plant growth etc. This contribution is focused on series of measurement of topsoil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using automated multipoint tension infiltrometer developed at CTU in Prague. The apparatus consists of two triplets of minidisk infiltrometers that are supported by a light aluminum frame. Therefore it allows simultaneous measurement of six tension infiltrations at two different pressure heads. Experiments were conducted at the experimental agricultural catchment Nučice (Central Bohemia, Czech Republic) as a part of the broader research of rainfall-runoff and soil erosion processes. The soil in the catchment is classified as Cambisol with texture that is ranging from loam to clay loam and is conservatively tilled. Series of ten infiltration campaigns (56 individual infiltration experiments) were carried out on a single experimental plot during period of two years. Dataset involves measurement under various agricultural activities and crop phenophases. The hydraulic conductivities were determined using extended semiempirical estimation procedure of Zhang. Additionally, large undisturbed soil samples were analyzed with use of X-ray computed tomography to assess the soil structure morphology in detail. Results show that unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was the lowest in early spring and did increase at beginning of summer. Unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity was higher when the soil bulk density was high. During the summer and autumn the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity remained relatively unchanged. The impact of agricultural procedures was not apparent in the dataset.. The study has been supported by the Czech Science Foundation Project No. 13-20388P and by CTU in Prague funding via Student's Grant Competition SGS No. SGS14/131/OHK1/2T/11. The MultiDisk infiltrometer was developed within the framework of the project supported by the

  6. Experimental study of bedrock channel alluviation under varied sediment supply and hydraulic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatanantavet, Phairot; Parker, Gary

    2008-12-01

    Channel incision into bedrock plays a critical role in mountain landscape evolution. A bed that is completely alluviated cannot undergo incision. As a result, incision driven by the collision of bedload grains and bedrock requires transport at below-capacity conditions (for example, where the bed is partially covered by alluvium). In a mechanistic model of bedrock incision, it is important to have a formula describing the relationship between the bedload transport rate and the degree to which the bed is covered by sediment. The purpose of this work is to understand the mechanisms underlying the degree of bed exposure in bedrock rivers by means of an experimental study. A number of experiments with various hydraulic and morphological bed conditions were performed in order to characterize this model. Here we focus on planar bedrock beds with some roughness. The results suggest that the sediment supply, channel slope, hydraulic bed roughness, the degree of areal coverage, and thickness of antecedent gravel in the channel, as well as the presence of boulders in the channel are major factors controlling bedrock exposure. For sufficiently low ratios of sediment supply to transport capacity, it was found that bedrock roughness can play a role in determining the degree of bedrock exposure. For higher sediment ratios, on the other hand, the composite roughness associated with grain roughness, bars, and/or antidunes dominates, so that the underlying bedrock roughness no longer affects the degree of exposure of the bed. For lower bed slopes (i.e., less than 0.015, based on our experimental setting), bedrock exposure decreases more or less linearly with increasing values of the ratio of sediment supply rate to capacity rate. For higher bed slopes (i.e., more than 0.015), there is a range of lower values of the ratio of sediment supply rate to capacity rate where a bedrock surface becomes fully exposed without any alluvial deposit. For a given bedrock roughness, this range

  7. Nonlinear modeling and identification of the electro-hydraulic control system of an excavator arm using BONL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Li, Bo; Guo, Gang; Zeng, Yonghua; Zhang, Meijun

    2013-11-01

    Electro-hydraulic control systems are nonlinear in nature and their mathematic models have unknown parameters. Existing research of modeling and identification of the electro-hydraulic control system is mainly based on theoretical state space model, and the parameters identification is hard due to its demand on internal states measurement. Moreover, there are also some hard-to-model nonlinearities in theoretical model, which needs to be overcome. Modeling and identification of the electro-hydraulic control system of an excavator arm based on block-oriented nonlinear(BONL) models is investigated. The nonlinear state space model of the system is built first, and field tests are carried out to reveal the nonlinear characteristics of the system. Based on the physic insight into the system, three BONL models are adopted to describe the highly nonlinear system. The Hammerstein model is composed of a two-segment polynomial nonlinearity followed by a linear dynamic subsystem. The Hammerstein-Wiener(H-W) model is represented by the Hammerstein model in cascade with another single polynomial nonlinearity. A novel Pseudo-Hammerstein-Wiener(P-H-W) model is developed by replacing the single polynomial of the H-W model by a non-smooth backlash function. The key term separation principle is applied to simplify the BONL models into linear-in-parameters structures. Then, a modified recursive least square algorithm(MRLSA) with iterative estimation of internal variables is developed to identify the all the parameters simultaneously. The identification results demonstrate that the BONL models with two-segment polynomial nonlinearities are able to capture the system behavior, and the P-H-W model has the best prediction accuracy. Comparison experiments show that the velocity prediction error of the P-H-W model is reduced by 14%, 30% and 75% to the H-W model, Hammerstein model, and extended auto-regressive (ARX) model, respectively. This research is helpful in controller design, system

  8. Thermal hydraulic study of the ESPRESSO blanket for a Tandem Mirror Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Raffray, A.R.; Hoffman, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    This paper deals primarily with the thermal-hydraulic design and some critical thermomechanical aspects of the proposed ESPRESSO blanket for the Tandem Mirror Fusion Reactor. This conceptual design was based on the same physics as used in the MARS study.

  9. Estimating the impact of SWOT observations on the predictability of large-scale hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, G. J.; Andreadis, K.

    2012-12-01

    The proposed NASA/CNES Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission would provide unprecedented measurements of hydraulic variables globally. This paper investigates the impact of different SWOT-like observations on the capability to model and predict hydrodynamics over large scales. In order to achieve this, the Ensemble Sensitivity (ET) method was adopted, examining the cost functional between two 'models' run on a 40,000 km2 area of the Ohio basin. The ET method is similar to the adjoint method but uses an ensemble of model perturbations to calculate the sensitivity to observations. The experiment consists of two configurations of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model. The first (baseline) simulation represents a calibrated 'best effort' model based on a sub-grid channel structure using observations for parameters and boundary conditions, whereas the second (background) simulation consists of estimated parameters and SRTM-based boundary conditions. Using accurate SWOT-like observations such as water level, water surface width and slope in an Ensemble Sensitivity framework allowed us to assess the true impact of SWOT observables over different temporal and spatial scales on our current capabilities to model and predict hydrodynamic characteristics at a potentially global scale. Estimating the model sensitivity to observations could also allow the identification of errors in the model structure and parameterizations, as well as facilitate the derivation of a SWOT data product with optimal characteristics (e.g. reach-averaging).

  10. VIPRE-01. a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for reactor cores. Volume 1. Mathematical modeling. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Cuta, J.M.; Koontz, A.S.; Kelly, J.M.; Basehore, K.L.; George, T.L.; Rowe, D.S.

    1983-04-01

    VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI) has been developed for nuclear power utility thermal-hydraulic analysis applications. It is designed to help evaluate nuclear reactor core safety limits including minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR), critical power ratio (CPR), fuel and clad temperatures, and coolant state in normal operation and assumed accident conditions. This volume (Volume 1: Mathematical Modeling) explains the major thermal hydraulic models and supporting correlations in detail.

  11. Dynamic thermal-hydraulic modeling and stack flow pattern analysis for all-vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhongbao; Zhao, Jiyun; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Xiong, Binyu

    2014-08-01

    The present study focuses on dynamic thermal-hydraulic modeling for the all-vanadium flow battery and investigations on the impact of stack flow patterns on battery performance. The inhomogeneity of flow rate distribution and reversible entropic heat are included in the thermal-hydraulic model. The electrolyte temperature in tanks is modeled with the finite element modeling (FEM) technique considering the possible non-uniform distribution of electrolyte temperature. Results show that the established model predicts electrolyte temperature accurately under various ambient temperatures and current densities. Significant temperature gradients exist in the battery system at extremely low flow rates, while the electrolyte temperature tends to be the same in different components under relatively high flow rates. Three stack flow patterns including flow without distribution channels and two cases of flow with distribution channels are compared to investigate their effects on battery performance. It is found that the flow rates are not uniformly distributed in cells especially when the stack is not well designed, while adding distribution channels alleviates the inhomogeneous phenomenon. By comparing the three flow patterns, it is found that the serpentine-parallel pattern is preferable and effectively controls the uniformity of flow rates, pressure drop and electrolyte temperature all at expected levels.

  12. A combined monitoring and modeling approach to quantify water and nitrate leaching using effective soil column hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvreur, V.; Kandelous, M. M.; Moradi, A. B.; Baram, S.; Mairesse, H.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    There is a worldwide growing concern for agricultural lands input to groundwater pollution. Nitrate contamination of groundwater across the Central Valley of California has been related to its diverse and intensive agricultural practices. However, there has been no study comparing leaching of nitrate in each individual agricultural land within the complex and diversely managed studied area. A combined field monitoring and modeling approach was developed to quantify from simple measurements the leaching of water and nitrate below the root zone. The monitored state variables are soil water content at several depths within the root zone, soil matric potential at two depths below the root zone, and nitrate concentration in the soil solution. In the modeling part, unsaturated water flow and solute transport are simulated with the software HYDRUS in a soil profile fragmented in up to two soil hydraulic types, whose effective hydraulic properties are optimized with an inverse modeling method. The applicability of the method will first be demonstrated "in-silico", with synthetic soil water dynamics data generated with HYDRUS, and considering the soil column as the layering of several soil types characterized in-situ. The method will then be applied to actual soil water status data from various crops in California including tomato, citrus, almond, pistachio, and walnut. Eventually, improvements of irrigation and fertilization management practices (i.e. mainly questions of quantity and frequency of application minimizing leaching under constraint of water and nutrient availability) will be investigated using coupled modeling and optimization tools.

  13. Combined measurement and modeling of the hydrological impact of hydraulic redistribution using CLM4.5 at eight AmeriFlux sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes have been demonstrated in the field, but the current generation of standard earth system models does not include a representation of HR. Though recent studies have examined the effect of incorporating ...

  14. Estimating Hydraulic Conductivities in a Fractured Shale Formation from Pressure Pulse Testing and 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbet, C.; DICK, P.; Lefevre, M.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.; Barnichon, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the framework of its research on the deep disposal of radioactive waste in shale formations, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a large array of in situ programs concerning the confining properties of shales in their underground research laboratory at Tournemire (SW France). One of its aims is to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling radionuclide migration through the host rock, from the disposal system to the biosphere. Past research programs carried out at Tournemire covered mechanical, hydro-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire shale as well as water chemistry and long-term behaviour of the host rock. Studies show that fluid circulations in the undisturbed matrix are very slow (hydraulic conductivity of 10-14 to 10-15 m.s-1). However, recent work related to the occurrence of small scale fractures and clay-rich fault gouges indicate that fluid circulations may have been significantly modified in the vicinity of such features. To assess the transport properties associated with such faults, IRSN designed a series of in situ and laboratory experiments to evaluate the contribution of both diffusive and advective process on water and solute flux through a clay-rich fault zone (fault core and damaged zone) and in an undisturbed shale formation. As part of these studies, Modular Mini-Packer System (MMPS) hydraulic testing was conducted in multiple boreholes to characterize hydraulic conductivities within the formation. Pressure data collected during the hydraulic tests were analyzed using the nSIGHTS (n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator) code to estimate hydraulic conductivity and formation pressures of the tested intervals. Preliminary results indicate hydraulic conductivities of 5.10-12 m.s-1 in the fault core and damaged zone and 10-14 m.s-1 in the adjacent undisturbed shale. Furthermore, when compared with neutron porosity data from borehole

  15. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  16. Final Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources (02-24-2012)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identif...

  17. Non-linear dynamic modeling of an automobile hydraulic active suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, R. Ben; Levitt, J. A.; Fassois, S. D.

    1994-09-01

    Motived by the strong need for realistically describing the dynamical behaviour of automotive systems through adequate mathematical models, a computer-stimulation-suitable non-linear quarter-car model of a hydraulic active suspension system is developed. Unlike previously available linear models characterised by idealised actuator and component behaviour, the developed model accounts for the dynamics of the main system components, including the suspension bushing, pump, accumulator, power and bypass valves, and hydraulic actuator, while also incorporating preliminary versions of the system controllers. Significant system characteristics, such as non-linear pressure-flow relationships, fluid compressibility, pump and valve non-linearities, leakages, as well as Coulomb friction, are also explicitly accounted for, and the underpinning assumptions are discussed. Simulation results obtained by exercising the model provide insight into the system behavior, illustrate the importance of the actuator/component dynamics and their associated non-linearities and reveal the inadequacy of the idealised linear models in capturing the system behaviour, demonstrate specific effects of valve leakage and fluid bulk modulus, are in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements, and stress the need for proper control law design and tuning. The developed model is particularly suitable for analysis, design, control law optimisation, and diagnostic strategies development.

  18. Modeling the Interaction Between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures Using Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Hai; Deo, Milind

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between hydraulic fractures (HF) and natural fractures (NF) will lead to complex fracture networks due to the branching and merging of natural and hydraulic fractures in unconventional reservoirs. In this paper, a newly developed hydraulic fracturing simulator based on discrete element method is used to predict the generation of complex fracture network in the presence of pre-existing natural fractures. By coupling geomechanics and reservoir flow within a dual lattice system, this simulator can effectively capture the poro-elastic effects and fluid leakoff into the formation. When HFs are intercepting single or multiple NFs, complex mechanisms such as direct crossing, arresting, dilating and branching can be simulated. Based on the model, the effects of injected fluid rate and viscosity, the orientation and permeability of NFs and stress anisotropy on the HF-NF interaction process are investigated. Combined impacts from multiple parameters are also examined in the paper. The numerical results show that large values of stress anisotropy, intercepting angle, injection rate and viscosity will impede the opening of NFs.

  19. Towards the sequential assimilation of SAR-derived water stages into hydraulic models using the Particle Filter: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matgen, P.; Montanari, M.; Hostache, R.; Pfister, L.; Hoffmann, L.; Plaza, D.; Pauwels, V. R. N.; de Lannoy, G. J. M.; de Keyser, R.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2010-03-01

    With the onset of new satellite radar constellations (e.g. Sentinel-1) and advances in computational science (e.g. grid computing) enabling the supply and processing of multi-mission satellite data at a temporal frequency that is compatible with real-time flood forecasting requirements, this study presents a new concept for the sequential assimilation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)-derived water stages into coupled hydrologic-hydraulic models. The proposed methodology consists of adjusting storages and fluxes simulated by a coupled hydrologic-hydraulic model using a Particle Filter-based data assimilation scheme. Synthetic observations of water levels, representing satellite measurements, are assimilated into the coupled model in order to investigate the performance of the proposed assimilation scheme as a function of both accuracy and frequency of water level observations. The use of the Particle Filter provides flexibility regarding the form of the probability densities of both model simulations and remote sensing observations. We illustrate the potential of the proposed methodology using a twin experiment over a widely studied river reach located in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. The study demonstrates that the Particle Filter algorithm leads to significant uncertainty reduction of water level and discharge at the time step of assimilation. However, updating the storages of the model only improves the model forecast over a very short time horizon. A more effective way of updating thus consists in adjusting both states and inputs. The proposed methodology, which consists in updating the biased forcing of the hydrodynamic model using information on model errors that is inferred from satellite observations, enables persistent model improvement. The present schedule of satellite radar missions is such that it is likely that there will be continuity for SAR-based operational water management services. This research contributes to evolve reactive flood management

  20. Hydraulic model of the proposed Water Recovery and Management system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Charles E.; Bacskay, Allen S.

    1991-01-01

    A model of the Water Recovery and Management (WRM) system utilizing SINDA '85/FLUINT to determine its hydraulic operation characteristics, and to verify the design flow and pressure drop parameters is presented. The FLUINT analysis package is employed in the model to determine the flow and pressure characteristics when each of the different loop components is operational and contributing to the overall flow pattern. The water is driven in each loop by storage tanks pressurized with cabin air, and is routed through the system to the desired destination.

  1. Harmonic amplitude dependent dynamic stiffness of hydraulic bushings: Alternate nonlinear models and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredette, Luke; Dreyer, Jason T.; Rook, Todd E.; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic stiffness properties of automotive hydraulic bushings exhibit significant amplitude sensitivity which cannot be captured by linear time-invariant models. Quasi-linear and nonlinear models are therefore proposed with focus on the amplitude sensitivity in magnitude and loss angle spectra (up to 50 Hz). Since production bushing model parameters are unknown, dynamic stiffness tests and laboratory experiments are utilized to extract model parameters. Nonlinear compliance and resistance elements are incorporated, including their interactions in order to improve amplitude sensitive predictions. New solution approximations for the new nonlinear system equations refine the multi-term harmonic balance term method. Quasi-linear models yield excellent accuracy but cannot predict trends in amplitude sensitivity since they rely on available dynamic stiffness measurements. Nonlinear models containing both nonlinear resistance and compliance elements yield superior predictions to those of prior models (with a single nonlinearity) while also providing more physical insight. Suggestion for further work is briefly mentioned.

  2. Effect of biofilm on soil hydraulic properties: laboratory studies using xanthan as surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenkranz, H.; Iden, S. C.; Durner, W.

    2012-04-01

    Many soil bacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in which they are embedded while residing in the porous matrix. EPS are often attached as a biofilm to both the bacteria cell and the soil particles. As a consequence, their influence on water flow through variably saturated porous media often cannot be neglected. While the influence of attached microbial biomass and EPS on saturated water flow has been studied extensively, its investigation for unsaturated flow in soils has found significantly less attention. The objective of this study was the quantification of the effect of biofilms on the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties. We determined the soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity functions of biofilm-affected soils by using xanthan as an EPS surrogate. Evaporation experiments were conducted on two sandy soil materials. The amount of added xanthan was varied in 6 stages from zero to 0.25 %. Additional measurements of soil water retention using the dewpoint method closed the remaining gap from the evaporation method to air-dryness. The experimental data were evaluated by the simplified evaporation method of Schindler. The results show that the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is reduced markedly by added xanthan and the shape of the soil water retention curve is alterated significantly for all stages of xanthan addition. The reduction in hydraulic conductivity is high enough to fully suppress stage-one evaporation for xanthan-sand mixtures. The water-holding capacity of the xanthan and the alteration of the effective pore size distribution explain these results.

  3. A high-frequency first-principle model of a shock absorber and servo-hydraulic tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czop, Piotr; SŁawik, Damian

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the model of a complete system, consisting of a variable damping shock absorber and a specialized servo-hydraulic tester, used to evaluate the vibration levels produced by a shock absorber. This kind of evaluation is used within the automotive industry to investigate shock absorbers, as an alternative to vehicle-level tests. The purpose of such testing is to quantify a shock absorber's ability to transfer the mid- and high-frequency content of the vibrations passing from the road profile, through the suspension, to the vehicle body. The first-principle non-linear model formulated, derived and validated in this paper allows laboratory test conditions to be reproduced. It also provides an understanding of structural vibrations in regard to the dynamical interactions between the shock absorber, its basic components (e.g. valve systems), mounting elements, and the hydraulic actuator. The model is capable of capturing important dynamical properties over a wide operating range, yet is only moderately complex. The model has proved to be qualitatively suitable and quantitatively accurate based on validation work performed for the entire frequency range of interest, i.e. 0-700 Hz. The application scope of this study covers the engineering need to develop a simulation tool for high-frequency shock absorber design optimization.

  4. Comparison of Hydraulic Methods and Tracer Experiments as Applied to the Development of Conceptual Models for Discrete Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakowski, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    The development of conceptual models for solute migration in discrete fracture networks has typically been based on a combination of core logs, borehole geophysics, and some form of single-well hydraulic test using discrete zones. More rarely, interwell hydraulic tests and interwell tracer experiments are utilised to directly explore potential transport pathways. The latter methods are less widely employed simply due to potentially significant increases in the cost and effort in site characterization. To date however there is a paucity of literature comparing the efficacy of the standard procedure with what should be more definitive identification of transport pathways using interwell methods. In the present study, a detailed comparison is conducted by developing conceptual models from three separate data sets, the first based on core logs, geology and single-well hydraulic tests, the second based on a large suite of pulse interference tests, and the third based on a series of radially-divergent and injection-withdrawal tracer experiments. The study was conducted in an array of five HQ-sized wells, 28-32 m in depth and arranged in a five star pattern, 10 m on a side. The wells penetrate the contact between a Cambrian-aged limestone, and underlying Precambrian gneiss. The core was logged for potentially open fractures using a ranking system, and 87 contiguous hydraulic tests were conducted using a 0.85-m packer spacing. A total of 57 pulse interference tests were conducted using two wells as injection points, and 11 tracer experiments were conducted using either sample collection or in-situ detection via a submersible fluorometer. The results showed very distinct conceptual models depending on the data set, with the model based on the single-well testing significantly over-predicting the number and connection of solute transport pathways. The results of the pulse interference tests also over predict the transport pathways, but to a lesser degree. Quantification of

  5. The hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow: A new model and new experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, B. L.

    1996-02-01

    A new model for the hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow is presented. The equation of motion for a liquid annulus spreading out under the influence of hydrostatic pressure gradient and Frictional drag is developed. The resulting nonlinear differential equation for the liquid depth, h(r), is solved by computer simulation. The jump is assumed to begin when the laminar flow is engulfed by the underlying boundary layer liquid, as suggested recently in the literature. This complicated mixing process is crudely modeled by a drag term which slows the flow and initiates a positive feedback mechanism culminating at a new critical depth, beyond which the depth increases asymptotically to a final value. The model predicts a new relationship between the laminar flow depth just before the jump and the final depth. An experimental apparatus was built to make detailed measurements of the depth h(r), both in the region before the jump and beyond the jump. The theoretical predictions were compared to the experimental data, and gave surprisingly good agreement by suitable adjustment of the two parameters k and C of the model. The parameter k determines the growth rate of the boundary layer thickness, and C determines the drag force. The results suggest that the usual textbook assumption of zero momentum loss across the jump is not appropriate for this type of hydraulic jump. The case of a hydraulic jump in the absence of gravity is considered also and a much different behavior is predicted, which could be tested by experiment in a microgravity environment.

  6. Assessment of hydraulic fish habitat condition using integrated toolkit: a case study of the Geum river basin, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangyoung; Kim, Jeongkon; Ko, Ick Hwan; Arthington, Angela; Jones, Gary; Yum, Kyung Taek

    2010-01-01

    Artificial changes of rivers, including construction and operation of dams, inevitably lead to physical and ecological changes throughout waterways and their floodplains. In this study, a conceptual model coupled with integrated numerical modeling is presented for hydraulic fish habitat assessment of the Geum River basin, Republic of Korea. Based on the major events which might have affected the ecological system, a conceptual model was formulated to guide desktop and field studies, modeling and scenario evaluations. The result of hydraulic fish habitat assessment indicated that the construction of the Daecheong Multipurpose Dam (DMD) in the Geum River basin has altered flow magnitudes and reduced the river's flow variability. Changes are evident in the magnitude of medium and small flows and the river experiences increased low flows during the dry season. Black shiner, an endangered fish species in Korea, was selected and analyzed to explore relationships between flow regime change by dams and changes to its preferred habitats. As a result, fewer sensitive riffle-benthic species were observed in the reaches downstream of DMD due to the reduction of suitable habitat conditions such as riffle-pool sequences. The proposed conceptual model and integrated toolkit would allow river managers to isolate the physical and biological effects associated with dam operation and could be useful for developing river management strategies.

  7. The catastrophic failures of plants hydraulic network examined trough an model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaimé, Diane; Marmottant, Philippe; Brodribb, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Plants live a dangerous game: they have to facilitate water transport in their xylem conduits while minimizing the consequence of hydraulic failure. Indeed, as water flows under negative pressure inside these conduits, cavitation bubbles can spontaneously occur. The failure dynamics of this hydraulic network is poorly studied, while it has important ecological and bioengineering implications. Here, by using dark-field transmission microscopy, we were able to directly visualize the spreading of cavitation bubbles within leaves, where the xylem conduits form a 2D and transparent network. We observe the surprising fact that the probability of cavitation increases in larger veins, where the majority of water flows. Next, in order to understand the physical mechanism of nucleation and propagation, we built artificial networks of channels made in hydrogel, where evaporation generates negative pressures. We find the hydraulic failure follows two stages: first a sudden bubble nucleation relaxing to the elastic stored of the system, and then a slow expansion driven by the flow of water in the surrounding medium. Channel constrictions slow the propagation of the bubble, similarly to the small valves that connect plants conduits. P.M. acknowledges support from the University of Tasmania for a visiting scholar grant.

  8. Modeling Atmospheric Emissions and Calculating Mortality Rates Associated with High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Alyssa

    Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are a growing pollution concern throughout the global community, as they have been linked to numerous health issues. The freight transportation sector is a large source of these emissions and is expected to continue growing as globalization persists. Within the US, the expanding development of the natural gas industry is helping to support many industries and leading to increased transportation. The process of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing (HVHF) is one of the newer advanced extraction techniques that is increasing natural gas and oil reserves dramatically within the US, however the technique is very resource intensive. HVHF requires large volumes of water and sand per well, which is primarily transported by trucks in rural areas. Trucks are also used to transport waste away from HVHF well sites. This study focused on the emissions generated from the transportation of HVHF materials to remote well sites, dispersion, and subsequent health impacts. The Geospatial Intermodal Freight Transport (GIFT) model was used in this analysis within ArcGIS to identify roadways with high volume traffic and emissions. High traffic road segments were used as emissions sources to determine the atmospheric dispersion of particulate matter using AERMOD, an EPA model that calculates geographic dispersion and concentrations of pollutants. Output from AERMOD was overlaid with census data to determine which communities may be impacted by increased emissions from HVHF transport. The anticipated number of mortalities within the impacted communities was calculated, and mortality rates from these additional emissions were computed to be 1 in 10 million people for a simulated truck fleet meeting stricter 2007 emission standards, representing a best case scenario. Mortality rates due to increased truck emissions from average, in-use vehicles, which represent a mixed age truck fleet, are expected to be higher (1 death per 341,000 people annually).

  9. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  10. Modeling the performance of an anaerobic baffled reactor with the variation of hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzheng; Shi, En; Antwi, Philip; Leu, Shao-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic baffled reactors (ABRs) have been widely used in engineering but very few models have been developed to simulate its performance. Based on the integration of biomass retention and liquid-gas mass transfer of biogas into the biochemical process derived in the International Water Association (IWA) Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1), a mathematical model was developed to predict volatile fatty acids (VFAs), chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) and biogas in a 4-compartment ABR operated with variable hydraulic retention time (HRT). The model was calibrated and validated with the experimental data obtained from the reactor when the HRT decreased from 2.0 to 1.0d by stages. It was found that the predicted VFAs, CODCr and biogas agreed well with the experimental data. Consequently, the developed model was a reliable tool to enhance the understanding among the mechanisms of the anaerobic digestion in ABRs, as well as to reactor's designing and operation. PMID:27174615

  11. Determining Transit Times and Hydraulic Response of Saturated Hillslope Flow Using a Low-Cost Chloride Sensor System and Groundwater Modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smettem, Keith; Harris, Nick; Cranny, Andy; Klaus, Julian; Pfister, Laurent; Iffly, Jean; Gourdol, Laurent; Juilleret, Jerome; Gorelick, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Subsurface saturated flow from hillslopes is a major pathway for delivery of water to riparian zones, particularly in humid climates. Tracer studies can aid in estimation of water transit times and flow pathways but widespread application of such techniques is hampered by lack of available sensors to continuously record solute transport processes at short timescales over dense spatial networks. The objective of this work is to investigate the hillslope - riparian zone connection in an upland catchment using groundwater modelling of steady-state hydraulic response and direct measurement of transit times using a low cost chloride sensor system in observation bores installed in rows downslope from a cross-slope line of injection bores. We establish a steady-state hydraulic flux at the injection bores, followed by a chloride pulse and subsequent flushing with fresh water to determine transit times and downslope hydraulic connection. Groundwater modelling results show that the observed hydraulic heads in the hillslope bores can only be maintained if the riparian zone soils are highly permeable and allow rapid transport of water to occur down-valley. Tracer studies confirm that transit times from the hillslope are in the order of minutes over a distance of 5 m and indicate the need for short timescale measurement and modelling in order to capture the hillslope response to injected water.

  12. Hydraulic fracturing model featuring initiation beyond the wellbore wall for directional well in coal bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuwei; Jia, Dan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Jia; Fu, Chunkai; Yang, Xinliang; Ai, Chi

    2016-08-01

    In developing internal fracture systems in coal beds, the initiation mechanism differs greatly from that of conventional ones and initiations may be produced beyond the wellbore wall. This paper describes the features of the internal structure of coal beds and RFPA2D simulation is used to attest the possible occurrence of initiation beyond the wellbore wall in coal bed hydraulic fracturing. Using the theory of elasticity and fracture mechanics, we analyse the stress distribution in the vicinal coal rock. Then by taking into consideration the effects of the spatial relationship between coal bed cleats and the wellbore, we establish a model for calculating both tensile and shear initiation pressure that occur along cleats beyond the wellbore wall. The simulation in this paper indicates that for shear initiations that happen along coal cleats, the pressure required to initiate fracture for cleats beyond the wellbore wall is evidently lower than that on the wellbore wall, thus it is easier to initiate shear fractures for cleats beyond the wellbore wall. For tensile failure, the pressure required to initiate tensile fracture for cleats beyond the wellbore wall is obviously higher than that for cleats at the wellbore wall, thus it is easier to initiate tensile fractures for cleats at the wellbore wall. On the one hand, this paper has proved the possible occurrence of initiations beyond the wellbore wall and has changed the current assumption that hydraulic fractures can only occur at the wellbore wall. On the other hand, the established theoretical model provides a new approach to calculating the initiation pressure in hydraulic fracturing.

  13. Simulating runoff from an area covered by soil contour ridges using a hydraulic cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slah, Nasri

    2015-04-01

    Runoff agriculture and rainwater harvesting are well known farming techniques that have guaranteed crop production in the arid zone of Tunisia since ancient times. At present, soil contour ridges (banquettes) are the main water and soil conservation used. Actually about one million ha farming land were protected by this technique. Usually, soil contour ridges are designed for a 10-year return period to reduce runoff and erosion in hill-slope catchments. However, the detailed hydraulic function of this technique is still to a major extent unknown. For this purpose a runoff model was developed to simulate the discharge from an upstream system of several soil contour ridges. The model was validated using experimental runoff. The simulated runoff agreed well with observed discharge. The validated model was used to simulate runoff from a system of one to several soil contour ridges in a cascade from a 10-year rainfall event. Practical conclusions are drawn by discussing the spacing and design of the soil contour ridges. Key words: Soil surface management, soil contour ridge, discharge, hydraulic cascade.

  14. Experimental Testing of Water Disinfection Models under Varying Hydraulic and Kinetic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Edmilson C; Rauen, William B; Fonseca, Ismênia; Figueiredo, Iene

    2016-06-01

    The concomitant effects of hydraulics and reaction kinetics on the disinfection efficiency (DE) of Chlorine Contact Tank (CCT) setups were experimentally assessed, to test the predictive-ability of first order kinetics models: Chick-Watson (C-W), C-t rule and Wehner-Wilhelm (W-W). Prototype tests were conducted using river water characterised for quality parameters, chlorine demand and inactivation rates of total and thermotolerant coliform. Poor, average and superior CCT baffling conditions were assessed by tracer experimentation and for their DE under three chlorine dosages. The models' DE predictive-ability was comparable and high for superior baffling, but decreased differently with the hydraulic efficiency (maximum errors of +15.3% with W-W, +26.0% with C-W and -36.6% with C-t). The positive bias shown by W-W renders it unsafe for CCT design, so the results favoured the C-t rule as the preferred analytical tool of comparable complexity. Potential refinements to these models that could lead to operational savings are identified. PMID:26773311

  15. The application of Biological-Hydraulic coupled model for Tubificidae-microorganism interaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiao; Sun, Peide; Song, Yingqi; Wang, Ruyi; Fang, Zhiguo

    2010-11-01

    Based on the fully coupled activated sludge model (FCASM), the novel model Tubificidae -Fully Coupled Activated Sludge Model-hydraulic (T-FCASM-Hydro), has been developed in our previous work. T-FCASM-Hydro not only describe the interactive system between Tubificidae and functional microorganisms for the sludge reduction and nutrient removal simultaneously, but also considere the interaction between biological and hydraulic field, After calibration and validation of T-FCASM-Hydro at Zhuji Feida-hongyu Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Zhejiang province, T-FCASM-Hydro was applied for determining optimal operating condition in the WWTP. Simulation results showed that nitrogen and phosphorus could be removed efficiently, and the efficiency of NH4+-N removal enhanced with increase of DO concentration. At a certain low level of DO concentration in the aerobic stage, shortcut nitrification-denitrification dominated in the process of denitrification in the novel system. However, overhigh agitation (>6 mgṡL-1) could result in the unfavorable feeding behavior of Tubificidae because of the strong flow disturbance, which might lead to low rate of sludge reduction. High sludge reduction rate and high removal rate of nitrogen and phosphorus could be obtained in the new-style oxidation ditch when DO concentration at the aerobic stage with Tubificidae was maintained at 3.6 gṡm-3.

  16. Integrating Multiple Scales of Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements in Training Image-Based Stochastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, K.; Mariethoz, G.; Baker, A.

    2013-12-01

    It has been widely demonstrated that the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer increases with a larger portion of the aquifer tested. This poses a challenge when different hydraulic conductivity measurements coexist in a field study and have to be integrated simultaneously (e.g. core analysis, slug tests and well tests). While the scaling of hydraulic conductivity can be analytically derived in multiGaussian media, there is no general methodology to simultaneously integrate hydraulic conductivity measurements taken at different scales in highly heterogeneous media. Here we address this issue in the context of multiple-point statistics simulations (MPS). In MPS, the spatial continuity is based on a training image (TI) that contains the variability, connectivity, and structural properties of the medium. The key principle of our methodology is to consider the different scales of hydraulic conductivity as joint variables which are simulated together. Based on a TI that represents the fine-scale spatial variability, we use a classical upscaling method to obtain a series of upscaled TIs that correspond to the different scales at which measurements are available. In our case, the renormalization method is used for this upscaling step, but any upscaling method could be employed. Considered together, the different scales obtained are considered a single multi-scale representation of the initial TI, in a similar fashion as the multiscale pyramids used in image processing. We then use recent MPS simulation methods that allow dealing with multivariate TIs to generate conditional realizations of the different scales together. One characteristic of these realizations is that the possible non-linear relationships between the different simulated scales are statistically similar to the relationships observed in the multiscale TI. Therefore these relationships are considered a reasonable approximation of the renormalization results that were used on the TI. Another characteristic of

  17. Linking Tropical Forest Function to Hydraulic Traits in a Size-Structured and Trait-Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, B. O.; Gloor, M.; Fauset, S.; Fyllas, N.; Galbraith, D.; Baker, T. R.; Rowland, L.; Fisher, R.; Binks, O.; Sevanto, S.; Xu, C.; Jansen, S.; Choat, B.; Mencuccini, M.; McDowell, N. G.; Meir, P.

    2015-12-01

    A major weakness of forest ecosystem models is their inability to capture the diversity of responses to changes in water availability, severely hampering efforts to predict the fate of tropical forests under climate change. Such models often prescribe moisture sensitivity using heuristic response functions that are uniform across all individuals and lack important knowledge about trade-offs in hydraulic traits. We address this weakness by implementing a process representation of plant hydraulics into an individual- and trait-based model (Trait Forest Simulator; TFS) intended for application at discrete sites where community-level distributions of stem and leaf trait spectra (wood density, leaf mass per area, leaf nitrogen and phosphorus content) are known. The model represents a trade-off in the safety and efficiency of water conduction in xylem tissue through hydraulic traits, while accounting for the counteracting effects of increasing hydraulic path length and xylem conduit taper on whole-plant hydraulic resistance with increasing tree size. Using existing trait databases and additional meta-analyses from the rich literature on tropical tree ecophysiology, we obtained all necessary hydraulic parameters associated with xylem conductivity, vulnerability curves, pressure-volume curves, and hydraulic architecture (e.g., leaf-to-sapwood area ratios) as a function of the aforementioned traits and tree size. Incorporating these relationships in the model greatly improved the diversity of tree response to seasonal changes in water availability as well as in response to drought, as determined by comparison with field observations and experiments. Importantly, this individual- and trait-based framework provides a testbed for identifying both critical processes and functional traits needed for inclusion in coarse-scale Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, which will lead to reduced uncertainty in the future state of tropical forests.

  18. Experimental study on thermal performance of heat sinks: the effect of hydraulic diameter and geometric shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzougui, M.; Hammami, M.; Maad, R. Ben

    2016-10-01

    The main purpose of this study is focused on experimental investigation of cooling performance of various minichannel designs. The hydraulic dimension of one of the heat sink is 3 mm while that of the other is 2 mm. Deionised water was used as the coolant for studies conducted in both the heat sinks. Tests were done for a wide range of flow rates (0.7 l-9 l h-1) and heat inputs (5-40 kW/m2). Irrespective of the hydraulic diameter and the geometric configuration, profits and boundaries of each channel shape are analyzed and discussed in the clarity of experimental data. The total thermal resistance and the average heat transfer coefficient are compared for the various channels inspected.

  19. Full equations utilities (FEQUTL) model for the approximation of hydraulic characteristics of open channels and control structures during unsteady flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franz, Delbert D.; Melching, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    The Full EQuations UTiLities (FEQUTL) model is a computer program for computation of tables that list the hydraulic characteristics of open channels and control structures as a function of upstream and downstream depths; these tables facilitate the simulation of unsteady flow in a stream system with the Full Equations (FEQ) model. Simulation of unsteady flow requires many iterations for each time period computed. Thus, computation of hydraulic characteristics during the simulations is impractical, and preparation of function tables and application of table look-up procedures facilitates simulation of unsteady flow. Three general types of function tables are computed: one-dimensional tables that relate hydraulic characteristics to upstream flow depth, two-dimensional tables that relate flow through control structures to upstream and downstream flow depth, and three-dimensional tables that relate flow through gated structures to upstream and downstream flow depth and gate setting. For open-channel reaches, six types of one-dimensional function tables contain different combinations of the top width of flow, area, first moment of area with respect to the water surface, conveyance, flux coefficients, and correction coefficients for channel curvilinearity. For hydraulic control structures, one type of one-dimensional function table contains relations between flow and upstream depth, and two types of two-dimensional function tables contain relations among flow and upstream and downstream flow depths. For hydraulic control structures with gates, a three-dimensional function table lists the system of two-dimensional tables that contain the relations among flow and upstream and downstream flow depths that correspond to different gate openings. Hydraulic control structures for which function tables containing flow relations are prepared in FEQUTL include expansions, contractions, bridges, culverts, embankments, weirs, closed conduits (circular, rectangular, and pipe

  20. Megaflood erosion of the Tsangpo Gorge constrained by hydraulic modeling, geochronology, and geochemical fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turzewski, M. D.; Huntington, K. W.; LeVeque, R. J.; Feathers, J. K.; Larsen, I. J.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The role of extreme floods in long-term erosion and landscape evolution is difficult to study because these events occur infrequently on human timescales and cannot often be observed directly. We address this difficulty using the rich sedimentary record of extreme floods preserved within the Siang River valley of the Eastern Himalaya, which hosts slackwater deposits from historical landslide-dam outburst floods and prehistoric glacial lake outburst megafloods sourced upstream of the Tsangpo gorge in Tibet. Previous workers used detrital zircon U-Pb ages of modern river sediments and flood sands to suggest that megafloods more effectively focus erosion in the Tsangpo gorge than modern peak flows and the year 2000 flood; however, this finding is based on only four, undated megaflood deposits, and a thorough investigation of the history, hydraulics, and erosive impact of different magnitude flood events is lacking. To expand this record and better understand the relationship between floods, erosion, and deposition, we combined field observations and dating of flood deposits with sediment provenance constraints and numerical flood modeling. We surveyed the trim line from the 2000 flood and identified two historical and 18 ancient slackwater flood deposits. Radiocarbon dates of megaflood deposits range from 1200-1650 14C yr B.P and correlate with upstream glacial lake terraces in Tibet dated by previous workers. Single-grain infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating of feldspar from megaflood deposits produced ages of 10 to 27 ka that correlate to older glacial lake terraces in Tibet. Using reconstructed glacial and landslide-dammed lakes and modern topography, we simulated the 2000 flood and two megaflood events with GeoClaw, an open source program designed to model geophysical flows. Modeled inundation for the 2000 flood is comparable to the observed flood stage, trim line, and distribution of slackwater deposits. Inundation maps from megaflood simulations

  1. Quantification of Parameter Uncertainty of a Distributed Hydraulic Model Using Ensemble Smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; McLaughlin, Dennis; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Li, Wenpeng; Dong, Xinguang

    2014-05-01

    Yanqi basin is an important agricultural region in Xinjiang, in Northwest China. The irrigated agricultural land has been increasing in the past decades and made the basin suffer from many environmental problems such as soil salinization, decreased lake level, deteriorated lake water quality, decreased surface water flow to the downstream and damaged riverine forests. A 3-dimensional distributed numerical flow and transport model is built using MIKESHE/MIKE11 which contains saturated and unsaturated zones, rivers and lakes. It allows to better understand the impacts of individual hydrological units and their interactions. Before using the model for quantifying solutions for the environmental problems, the parameter uncertainties of the complex distributed model are assessed using an Ensemble Smoother (ES). ES is a data assimilation method to improve an ensemble of prior parameters by assimilating time series of observations over the whole time period available. It is basically a stochastic calibration method. In this case study, an iterative ES is applied, called Ensemble Smoother with Multiple Data Assimilation (ESMDA) (Emerick and Reynolds, 2012). Two alternatives are considered to update parameters in each iteration. One is the Ensemble Kalman Filter with perturbed observations and the other is an Unbiased Square root filter which updates parameter means and perturbations separately. Seventeen parameters are chosen from the distributed flow and transport model to quantify their uncertainty. Fifty prior replicates of each parameter are generated using the Latin Hypercube Sampling method. The distribution of posterior parameters and outputs obtained from the alternative methods are similar. The results indicate that the uncertainty of the parameters is narrowed during the smoother updating process, reflecting the information obtained from the observations. The most sensitive parameters are the dispersion coefficient of the lakes and the hydraulic conductivity of

  2. Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores with supercritical steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ken Oglesby

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores at various depths and with various hole sizes, tubing, fluids and rates showed theoretical feasibility. WELLFLO SIMULATIONS REPORT STEP 4: DRILLING 10,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 5: DRILLING 20,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 6: DRILLING 30,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE Mehmet Karaaslan, MSI

  3. Modular GIS Framework for National Scale Hydrologic and Hydraulic Modeling Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djokic, D.; Noman, N.; Kopp, S.

    2015-12-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) have been extensively used for pre- and post-processing of hydrologic and hydraulic models at multiple scales. An extensible GIS-based framework was developed for characterization of drainage systems (stream networks, catchments, floodplain characteristics) and model integration. The framework is implemented as a set of free, open source, Python tools and builds on core ArcGIS functionality and uses geoprocessing capabilities to ensure extensibility. Utilization of COTS GIS core capabilities allows immediate use of model results in a variety of existing online applications and integration with other data sources and applications.The poster presents the use of this framework to downscale global hydrologic models to local hydraulic scale and post process the hydraulic modeling results and generate floodplains at any local resolution. Flow forecasts from ECMWF or WRF-Hydro are downscaled and combined with other ancillary data for input into the RAPID flood routing model. RAPID model results (stream flow along each reach) are ingested into a GIS-based scale dependent stream network database for efficient flow utilization and visualization over space and time. Once the flows are known at localized reaches, the tools can be used to derive the floodplain depth and extent for each time step in the forecast at any available local resolution. If existing rating curves are available they can be used to relate the flow to the depth of flooding, or synthetic rating curves can be derived using the tools in the toolkit and some ancillary data/assumptions. The results can be published as time-enabled spatial services to be consumed by web applications that use floodplain information as an input. Some of the existing online presentation templates can be easily combined with available online demographic and infrastructure data to present the impact of the potential floods on the local community through simple, end user products. This framework

  4. A method to calibrate channel friction and bathymetry parameters of a Sub-Grid hydraulic model using SAR flood images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites are capable of all-weather day and night observations that can discriminate between land and smooth open water surfaces over large scales. Because of this there has been much interest in the use of SAR satellite data to improve our understanding of water processes, in particular for fluvial flood inundation mechanisms. Past studies prove that integrating SAR derived data with hydraulic models can improve simulations of flooding. However while much of this work focusses on improving model channel roughness values or inflows in ungauged catchments, improvement of model bathymetry is often overlooked. The provision of good bathymetric data is critical to the performance of hydraulic models but there are only a small number of ways to obtain bathymetry information where no direct measurements exist. Spatially distributed river depths are also rarely available. We present a methodology for calibration of model average channel depth and roughness parameters concurrently using SAR images of flood extent and a Sub-Grid model utilising hydraulic geometry concepts. The methodology uses real data from the European Space Agency's archive of ENVISAT[1] Wide Swath Mode images of the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury during flood peaks between 2007 and 2010. Historic ENVISAT WSM images are currently free and easy to access from archive but the methodology can be applied with any available SAR data. The approach makes use of the SAR image processing algorithm of Giustarini[2] et al. (2013) to generate binary flood maps. A unique feature of the calibration methodology is to also use parameter 'identifiability' to locate the parameters with higher accuracy from a pre-assigned range (adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[3] et al., 2003). [1] https://gpod.eo.esa.int/services/ [2] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote

  5. Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Belcher; P.E. Elliott; A.L. Geldon

    2001-12-31

    The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model, were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

  6. Cold source moderator vessel development for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: Thermal-hydraulic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.; Wendel, M.W.

    1998-07-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design, test, and install a cold neutron source facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This new cold source employs supercritical hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures both as the medium for neutron moderation and as the working fluid for removal of internally-generated nuclear heating. The competing design goals of minimizing moderator vessel mass and providing adequate structural integrity for the vessel motivated the requirement of detailed multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses of the moderator vessel as a critical design subtask. This paper provides a summary review of the HFIR cold source moderator vessel design and a description of the thermal-hydraulic studies that were carried out to support the vessel development.

  7. Feasibility Study on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance of Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR)

    SciTech Connect

    Akira, Ohnuki; Kazuyuki, Takase; Masatoshi, Kureta; Hiroyuki, Yoshida; Hidesada, Tamai; Wei, Liu; Toru, Nakatsuka; Takeharu, Misawa; Hajime, Akimoto

    2006-07-01

    R and D project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles of Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) is started at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in collaboration with power company, reactor vendors, universities since 2002. The FLWR can attain the favorable characteristics such as effective utilization of uranium resources, multiple recycling of plutonium, high burn-up and long operation cycle, based on matured LWR technologies. MOX fuel assemblies with tight lattice arrangement are used to increase the conversion ratio by reducing the moderation of neutron. Increasing the in-core void fraction also contributes to the reduction of neutron moderation. The confirmation of thermal-hydraulic feasibility is one of the most important R and D items for the FLWR because of the tight lattice configuration. In this paper, we will show the R and D plan and summarize experimental studies. The experimental study is performed mainly using large-scale (37-rod bundle) test facility. Most important objective of the large-scale test is to resolve a fundamental subject whether the core cooling under a tight-lattice configuration is feasible. The characteristics of critical power and flow behavior are investigated under different geometrical configuration and boundary conditions. The configuration parameter is the gap between rods (FY2004) and the rod bowing (FY2005). We have confirmed the thermal-hydraulic feasibility from the experimental results. (authors)

  8. Modeled hydraulic redistribution in tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations: the implications of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Kailiang; Foster, Adrianna

    2016-04-01

    Past studies have largely focused on hydraulic redistribution (HR) in trees, shrubs, and grasses, and recognized its role in interspecies interactions. HR in plants that conduct crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), however, remains poorly investigated, as does the effect of HR on transpiration in different vegetation associations (i.e., tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations). We have developed a mechanistic model to investigate the net direction and magnitude of HR at the patch scale for tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations at the growing season to yearly timescale. The modeling results show that deep-rooted CAM plants in CAM-grass associations could perform hydraulic lift at a higher rate than trees in tree-grass associations in a relatively wet environment, as explained by a significant increase in grass transpiration rate in the shallow soil layer, balancing a lower transpiration rate by CAM plants. By comparison, trees in tree-CAM associations may perform hydraulic descent at a higher rate than those in tree-grass associations in a dry environment. Model simulations also show that hydraulic lift increases the transpiration of shallow-rooted plants, while hydraulic descent increases that of deep-rooted plants. CAM plants transpire during the night and thus perform HR during the day. Based on these model simulations, we suggest that the ability of CAM plants to perform HR at a higher rate may have different effects on the surrounding plant community than those of plants with C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathways (i.e., diurnal transpiration).

  9. Modeled hydraulic redistribution in tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations: the implications of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Kailiang; Foster, Adrianna

    2016-04-01

    Past studies have largely focused on hydraulic redistribution (HR) in trees, shrubs, and grasses, and recognized its role in interspecies interactions. HR in plants that conduct crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), however, remains poorly investigated, as does the effect of HR on transpiration in different vegetation associations (i.e., tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations). We have developed a mechanistic model to investigate the net direction and magnitude of HR at the patch scale for tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations at the growing season to yearly timescale. The modeling results show that deep-rooted CAM plants in CAM-grass associations could perform hydraulic lift at a higher rate than trees in tree-grass associations in a relatively wet environment, as explained by a significant increase in grass transpiration rate in the shallow soil layer, balancing a lower transpiration rate by CAM plants. By comparison, trees in tree-CAM associations may perform hydraulic descent at a higher rate than those in tree-grass associations in a dry environment. Model simulations also show that hydraulic lift increases the transpiration of shallow-rooted plants, while hydraulic descent increases that of deep-rooted plants. CAM plants transpire during the night and thus perform HR during the day. Based on these model simulations, we suggest that the ability of CAM plants to perform HR at a higher rate may have different effects on the surrounding plant community than those of plants with C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathways (i.e., diurnal transpiration). PMID:26712135

  10. Phase-field modeling of fracture propagation under hydraulic stimulation in pre-fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khisamitov, Ildar; Mohseni, Seyed Ali; Meschke, Guenther

    2016-04-01

    The presentation presents the numerical analysis of hydraulic fracturing within Griffith theory of brittle damage. The phase-field method [1] is employed to model brittle fracture propagation driven by pressurized fluids within fully saturated porous rocks. The phase-field equation is coupled with the Biot-theory using the effective stress concept. The porous rock is assumed as fully saturated with incompressible fluid and deforms within elasticity theory. The hydraulic fracturing propagates under mode I crack opening in quasi-static regime with slow fluid flow in porous matrix and fracture. The phase-field approach for the modelling of brittle fracture [2] coincides with the maximum energy release rate criterion in fracture mechanics theory. The phase-field equation is approximated over entire the domain and introduces new degree of freedom (damage variable). Crack surface is represented by a smooth regularized damage distribution over the fractured area. The presented numerical investigations are characterized by different scenarios of hydraulic stimulation and the interaction of a new fracture emanating from the bore hole with pre-existing cracks. The scenarios include predefined fractures with different oriented to specific angle and spatial distribution over the entire domain. The undamaged rock matrix is modeled as an isotropic elastic material with initial porosity and isotropic matrix permeability. The flow within the undamaged region is governed by Darcy's law while the fluid flow in fractures is approximated by cubic law with the crack opening computed from the displacement solution and the damage variable distribution [3]. Initial fractures are modeled by an initial distribution of the damage variable and by special zero-thickness interface finite elements. Adaptive algorithms in conjunction with appropriately chosen refinement criteria are utilized to reduce the computational costs. References [1] M.J. Borden "A phase-field description of dynamic

  11. A hydraulic model is compatible with rapid changes in leaf elongation under fluctuating evaporative demand and soil water status.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Cecilio F; Bosio, Mickael; Parent, Boris; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

    2014-04-01

    Plants are constantly facing rapid changes in evaporative demand and soil water content, which affect their water status and growth. In apparent contradiction to a hydraulic hypothesis, leaf elongation rate (LER) declined in the morning and recovered upon soil rehydration considerably quicker than transpiration rate and leaf water potential (typical half-times of 30 min versus 1-2 h). The morning decline of LER began at very low light and transpiration and closely followed the stomatal opening of leaves receiving direct light, which represent a small fraction of leaf area. A simulation model in maize (Zea mays) suggests that these findings are still compatible with a hydraulic hypothesis. The small water flux linked to stomatal aperture would be sufficient to decrease water potentials of the xylem and growing tissues, thereby causing a rapid decline of simulated LER, while the simulated water potential of mature tissues declines more slowly due to a high hydraulic capacitance. The model also captured growth patterns in the evening or upon soil rehydration. Changes in plant hydraulic conductance partly counteracted those of transpiration. Root hydraulic conductivity increased continuously in the morning, consistent with the transcript abundance of Zea maize Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein aquaporins. Transgenic lines underproducing abscisic acid, with lower hydraulic conductivity and higher stomatal conductance, had a LER declining more rapidly than wild-type plants. Whole-genome transcriptome and phosphoproteome analyses suggested that the hydraulic processes proposed here might be associated with other rapidly occurring mechanisms. Overall, the mechanisms and model presented here may be an essential component of drought tolerance in naturally fluctuating evaporative demand and soil moisture.

  12. Temperature dependence of hydraulic properties of Upper Rhine Graben rocks at conditions modelling deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Castañeda, Mariela Carolina; Renner, Joerg; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of reservoir rocks' hydraulic properties critically affects the operation and long term sustainability of geothermal and petroleum reservoirs. Mechanical and chemical effects modify the permeability and the storage capacity of a reservoir, whose time characteristics have remained poorly constrained up to now. The permeability (k) and specific storage capacity (s) of the rocks constituting the geothermal reservoir are important parameters controlling the extent of the space-time characteristics of the pressure drawdown (or buildup at the reinjection site). To study the evolution of permeability and specific storage capacity as a function of pressure, temperature, and time, we performed oscillatory pore pressure tests. Experiments were performed using samples collected at surface outcrops representing the lithological sequence of the Upper Rhine Graben reservoir in southern Germany, i.e. sandstone and limestone, as well as Padang granite, representing a homogeneous, crystalline reservoir rock. Experiments were run at temperatures between 20 and 200 ° C, confining pressures between 20 and 110 MPa, and a fixed fluid pressure of 10 MPa, modeling characteristic conditions of deep geothermal reservoirs. Intact samples of granite, limestone and sandstone yield permeability and specific storage capacity of about 10‑18, 10‑15, and 10‑14 m2, and 10‑10, 10‑11 and 10‑8 Pa‑1, respectively, with modest dependence on temperature and effective pressure. In addition, longitudinally fractured samples were prepared by simple splitting or cutting and grinding. Grinding was performed with sandpaper of different ISO grits designations (P100, P600, and P1200) to systematically vary the surfaces' roughness. Fractures cause an increase in room-temperature permeability up to 3 and 2 orders of magnitudes for samples of granite and limestone, respectively. Their pressure dependence corresponds to a reduction in permeability modulus by about one order of magnitude

  13. Temperature dependence of hydraulic properties of Upper Rhine Graben rocks at conditions modelling deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Castañeda, Mariela Carolina; Renner, Joerg; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of reservoir rocks' hydraulic properties critically affects the operation and long term sustainability of geothermal and petroleum reservoirs. Mechanical and chemical effects modify the permeability and the storage capacity of a reservoir, whose time characteristics have remained poorly constrained up to now. The permeability (k) and specific storage capacity (s) of the rocks constituting the geothermal reservoir are important parameters controlling the extent of the space-time characteristics of the pressure drawdown (or buildup at the reinjection site). To study the evolution of permeability and specific storage capacity as a function of pressure, temperature, and time, we performed oscillatory pore pressure tests. Experiments were performed using samples collected at surface outcrops representing the lithological sequence of the Upper Rhine Graben reservoir in southern Germany, i.e. sandstone and limestone, as well as Padang granite, representing a homogeneous, crystalline reservoir rock. Experiments were run at temperatures between 20 and 200 ° C, confining pressures between 20 and 110 MPa, and a fixed fluid pressure of 10 MPa, modeling characteristic conditions of deep geothermal reservoirs. Intact samples of granite, limestone and sandstone yield permeability and specific storage capacity of about 10-18, 10-15, and 10-14 m2, and 10-10, 10-11 and 10-8 Pa-1, respectively, with modest dependence on temperature and effective pressure. In addition, longitudinally fractured samples were prepared by simple splitting or cutting and grinding. Grinding was performed with sandpaper of different ISO grits designations (P100, P600, and P1200) to systematically vary the surfaces' roughness. Fractures cause an increase in room-temperature permeability up to 3 and 2 orders of magnitudes for samples of granite and limestone, respectively. Their pressure dependence corresponds to a reduction in permeability modulus by about one order of magnitude. However, the

  14. Case studies for solving the Saint-Venant equations using the method of characteristics: pipeline hydraulic transients and discharge propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, R. M.; Tiago Filho, G. L.; dos Santos, I. F. S.; da Silva, F. G. B.

    2014-03-01

    Hydraulic transients occur during a change from one equilibrium state to another, for example, in flows. The pipeline project should provide the head and discharge in any operating states, e.g., sudden valve opening or closure. Among the various numerical approaches for the calculation of pipeline transients, the method of characteristics (MOC) is advantageous This study aims to present a hydraulic transitory study as MOC applications for solving the Saint- Venant equations in two case studies: 1) in a penstock of a small hydropower system as a simple pipeline in the case of valve-closure in the downstream boundary with a reservoir in the upstream boundary; and 2) for discharge propagation into a channel by velocity and depth of the flow channel along space evaluation. The main data for the first case study consisted of a design head that is 182 meters, a turbine discharge of 13.82 m3/s, a diameter of 4 meters and length pipe (penstock) of 2,152.50 meters. Regarding the second case study, the entry hydrogram was given to a rectangular channel with a width of 6.1 meters, length of 3,048 meters, slope of 0.0016 meters, and exhibited uniform flow with nominal depth of 2.44 meters. The characteristic curve of the discharge in the downstream extremity is Q = 158.(y - 3.25)32. The proposed methodology by Chaudry [5] concerning the development of hydrodynamic models was used. The obtained results for first case study showed that the simulated values for valve pressure while varying turning the valve between 4 and 12 seconds results in maximum values of pressures that oscillated between 219.97mca and 212.39 mca (4s) and 196.42mca and 190.86mca (12s). For the second case study, the values of discharge, velocity, and depth for x=0 and elapsed time of 850s were, respectively, 127.70m3/s, 3.87m/s, and 5.36m. For x=0 and an elapsed time of 1,230s, the values were 87.92m3/s, 4.49m/s, and 3.21m. Therefore, the MOC numerical approach has been confirmed to be useful for several

  15. Hydraulic fracturing fluid migration in the subsurface: A review and expanded modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsell, Daniel T.; Rajaram, Harihar; Dempsey, David; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the transport of hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid that is injected into the deep subsurface for shale gas extraction is important to ensure that shallow drinking water aquifers are not contaminated. Topographically driven flow, overpressured shale reservoirs, permeable pathways such as faults or leaky wellbores, the increased formation pressure due to HF fluid injection, and the density contrast of the HF fluid to the surrounding brine can encourage upward HF fluid migration. In contrast, the very low shale permeability and capillary imbibition of water into partially saturated shale may sequester much of the HF fluid, and well production will remove HF fluid from the subsurface. We review the literature on important aspects of HF fluid migration. Single-phase flow and transport simulations are performed to quantify how much HF fluid is removed via the wellbore with flowback and produced water, how much reaches overlying aquifers, and how much is permanently sequestered by capillary imbibition, which is treated as a sink term based on a semianalytical, one-dimensional solution for two-phase flow. These simulations include all of the important aspects of HF fluid migration identified in the literature review and are performed in five stages to faithfully represent the typical operation of a hydraulically fractured well. No fracturing fluid reaches the aquifer without a permeable pathway. In the presence of a permeable pathway, 10 times more fracturing fluid reaches the aquifer if well production and capillary imbibition are not included in the model.

  16. Modeling an irrigation ditch opens up the world. Hydrology and hydraulics of an ancient irrigation system in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertsen, Maurits W.; van der Spek, Joanne

    Ancient Peruvian irrigation systems have been studied extensively, but much remains unknown about technical and hydrological aspects of these irrigation systems. The Pampa de Chaparrí irrigation system in Peru is used as an example to show how modeling approaches for hydrological and hydraulic features of irrigation can yield results to improve our understanding of irrigation in the area. Analysis focuses on water availability compared demand, the way available water may have been applied to crops and whether the water needed could be delivered through the canal system. Results suggest that on the Pampa some 2500 hectares may have been cultivated within certain security limits for acceptable yields. The rhythm with which the irrigation requirement was applied to crops most likely influenced yields and thus food security. Furthermore, the influence of groundwater on crop growth may have been considerable. The hydraulic behavior of the irrigation system suggests that it should not be taken for granted that theoretically required water flows could actually be diverted and/or distributed to water users. The many questions coming out of the results define important items for a joint research agenda of archeologists and irrigation scientists.

  17. Hydraulic modeling of unsteady debris-flow surges with solid-fluid interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Interactions of solid and fluid constituents produce the unique style of motion that typifies debris flows. To simulate this motion, a new hydraulic model represents debris flows as deforming masses of granular solids variably liquefied by viscous pore fluid. The momentum equation of the model describes how internal and boundary forces change as coarse-grained surge heads dominated by grain-contact friction grade into muddy debris-flow bodies more strongly influenced by fluid viscosity and pressure. Scaling analysis reveals that pore-pressure variations can cause flow resistance in surge heads to surpass that in debris-flow bodies by orders of magnitude. Numerical solutions of the coupled momentum and continuity equations provide good predictions of unsteady, nonuniform motion of experimental debris flows from initiation through deposition.

  18. An approach to the field study of hydraulic gradients in variable- salinity ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    A field study approach is proposed for reliably estimating hydraulic gradients in subregions within a region of variable-salinity ground water. It is based upon Hubbert's concept about the kind of density distributions that are required for ground water to have a potential. The approach consists of dividing a region of variable-salinity ground water into subregions with constant density, subregions with only vertical variations in density, and subregions with vertical and lateral variations in density before determining magnitude and direction of hydraulic gradients. The approach was applied to an unconfined coastal aquifer and also to a confined and layered coastal aquifer that is used for sub-surface injection. As the two applications show, the analysis of water levels and pressures from subregions with constant or approximately constant density and the analysis of pressures from subregions with only vertical variations in density provide simple and direct means for deducing the characteristics of hydraulic gradients within a region of variable-salinity ground water. -from Author

  19. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic properties and evaluation of property-transfer models for deep sedimentary interbeds, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kimberlie; Johnson, Brittany D.; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2014-01-01

    During 2013–14, the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, focused on further characterization of the sedimentary interbeds below the future site of the proposed Remote Handled Low-Level Waste (RHLLW) facility, which is intended for the long-term storage of low-level radioactive waste. Twelve core samples from the sedimentary interbeds from a borehole near the proposed facility were collected for laboratory analysis of hydraulic properties, which also allowed further testing of the property-transfer modeling approach. For each core sample, the steady-state centrifuge method was used to measure relations between matric potential, saturation, and conductivity. These laboratory measurements were compared to water-retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity parameters estimated using the established property-transfer models. For each core sample obtained, the agreement between measured and estimated hydraulic parameters was evaluated quantitatively using the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The highest correlation is for saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) with an r value of 0.922. The saturated water content (qsat) also exhibits a strong linear correlation with an r value of 0.892. The curve shape parameter (λ) has a value of 0.731, whereas the curve scaling parameter (yo) has the lowest r value of 0.528. The r values demonstrate that model predictions correspond well to the laboratory measured properties for most parameters, which supports the value of extending this approach for quantifying unsaturated hydraulic properties at various sites throughout INL.

  20. Scalable Generalization of Hydraulic Conductivity in Quaternary Strata for Use in a Regional Groundwater Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatnieks, J.; Popovs, K.; Klints, I.; Timuhins, A.; Kalvans, A.; Delina, A.; Saks, T.

    2012-04-01

    The cover of Quaternary sediments especially in formerly glaciated territories usually is the most complex part of the sedimentary sequences. In regional hydro-geological models it is often assumed as a single layer with uniform or calibrated properties (Valner 2003). However, the properties and structure of Quaternary sediments control the groundwater recharge: it can either direct the groundwater flow horizontally towards discharge in topographic lows or vertically, recharging groundwater in the bedrock. This work aims to present calibration results and detail our experience while integrating a scalable generalization of hydraulic conductivity for Quaternary strata in the regional groundwater modelling system for the Baltic artesian basin - MOSYS V1. We also present a method for solving boundary transitions between spatial clusters of lithologically similar structure. In this study the main unit of generalization is the spatial cluster. Clusters are obtained from distance calculations combining the Normalized Compression Distance (NCD) metric, calculated by the CompLearn parameter-free machine learning toolkit, with normalized Euclidean distance measures for coordinates of the borehole log data. A hierarchical clustering solution is used for obtaining cluster membership identifier for each borehole. Using boreholes as generator points for Voronoi tessellation and dissolving resulting polygons according to their cluster membership attribute, allows us to obtain spatial regions representing a certain degree of similarity in lithological structure. This degree of similarity and the spatial heterogeneity of the cluster polygons can be varied by different flattening of the hierarchical cluster model into variable number of clusters. This provides a scalable generalization solution which can be adapted according to model calibration performance. Using the dissimilarity matrix of the NCD metric, a borehole most similar to all the others from the lithological structure

  1. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Adam R

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  2. Development of a hybrid (numerical-hydraulic) circulatory model: prototype testing and its response to IABP assistance.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Kozarski, M; De Lazzari, C; Górczyńska, K; Tosti, G; Darowski, M

    2005-07-01

    Merging numerical and physical models of the circulation makes it possible to develop a new class of circulatory models defined as hybrid. This solution reduces the costs, enhances the flexibility and opens the way to many applications ranging from research to education and heart assist devices testing. In the prototype described in this paper, a hydraulic model of systemic arterial tree is connected to a lumped parameters numerical model including pulmonary circulation and the remaining parts of systemic circulation. The hydraulic model consists of a characteristic resistance, of a silicon rubber tube to allow the insertion of an Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) and of a lumped parameters compliance. Two electro-hydraulic interfaces, realized by means of gear pumps driven by DC motors, connect the numerical section with both terminals of the hydraulic section. The lumped parameters numerical model and the control system (including analog to digital and digital to analog converters)are developed in LabVIEW environment. The behavior of the model is analyzed by means of the ventricular pressure-volume loops and the time courses of arterial and ventricular pressures and flows in different circulatory conditions. A simulated pathological condition was set to test the IABP and verify the response of the system to this type of mechanical circulatory assistance. The results show that the model can represent hemodynamic relationships in different ventricular and circulatory conditions and is able to react to the IABP assistance.

  3. Quantitative Hydraulic Models Of Early Land Plants Provide Insight Into Middle Paleozoic Terrestrial Paleoenvironmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. P.; Fischer, W. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fossil plants provide useful proxies of Earth’s climate because plants are closely connected, through physiology and morphology, to the environments in which they lived. Recent advances in quantitative hydraulic models of plant water transport provide new insight into the history of climate by allowing fossils to speak directly to environmental conditions based on preserved internal anatomy. We report results of a quantitative hydraulic model applied to one of the earliest terrestrial plants preserved in three dimensions, the ~396 million-year-old vascular plant Asteroxylon mackei. This model combines equations describing the rate of fluid flow through plant tissues with detailed observations of plant anatomy; this allows quantitative estimates of two critical aspects of plant function. First and foremost, results from these models quantify the supply of water to evaporative surfaces; second, results describe the ability of plant vascular systems to resist tensile damage from extreme environmental events, such as drought or frost. This approach permits quantitative comparisons of functional aspects of Asteroxylon with other extinct and extant plants, informs the quality of plant-based environmental proxies, and provides concrete data that can be input into climate models. Results indicate that despite their small size, water transport cells in Asteroxylon could supply a large volume of water to the plant's leaves--even greater than cells from some later-evolved seed plants. The smallest Asteroxylon tracheids have conductivities exceeding 0.015 m^2 / MPa * s, whereas Paleozoic conifer tracheids do not reach this threshold until they are three times wider. However, this increase in conductivity came at the cost of little to no adaptations for transport safety, placing the plant’s vegetative organs in jeopardy during drought events. Analysis of the thickness-to-span ratio of Asteroxylon’s tracheids suggests that environmental conditions of reduced relative

  4. Hydraulic fracture design optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Soo; Advani, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    This research and development investigation, sponsored by US DOE and the oil and gas industry, extends previously developed hydraulic fracture geometry models and applied energy related characteristic time concepts towards the optimal design and control of hydraulic fracture geometries. The primary objective of this program is to develop rational criteria, by examining the associated energy rate components during the hydraulic fracture evolution, for the formulation of stimulation treatment design along with real-time fracture configuration interpretation and control.

  5. Hydraulic fracture design optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Soo; Advani, S.H.

    1992-06-01

    This research and development investigation, sponsored by US DOE and the oil and gas industry, extends previously developed hydraulic fracture geometry models and applied energy related characteristic time concepts towards the optimal design and control of hydraulic fracture geometries. The primary objective of this program is to develop rational criteria, by examining the associated energy rate components during the hydraulic fracture evolution, for the formulation of stimulation treatment design along with real-time fracture configuration interpretation and control.

  6. Is it important to characterize complex patterns of riverbed hydraulic conductivities for assessing river-aquifer exchange fluxes? An evaluation with an integrated fully coupled hydrological model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qi; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Schilling, Oliver; Brunner, Philip; Vereecken, Harry; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan

    2016-04-01

    Riverbed hydraulic conductivity is a critical parameter for the prediction of exchange fluxes between groundwater and surface water bodies. It was found in previous studies that it is important to characterize heterogeneity of riverbed hydraulic conductivity. In this context, we also investigated in the past whether the heterogeneity pattern of riverbed hydraulic conductivities (i.e., multiGaussian, different types of non-multiGaussian patterns) plays an important role. It was found that the heterogeneity pattern does not matter so much. However, these past studies were conducted with the subsurface hydrological model SPRING which only considers one way coupling and only vertical fluxes through the river-aquifer interface. In this study, the role of patterns was further explored using the fully coupled hydrological model HydroGeoSphere. A synthetic 3-D river-aquifer model was set up with a heterogeneous riverbed showing non-multiGaussian patterns in the form of meandering channels as the reference field. Data assimilation experiments were carried out with help of the Ensemble Kalman Filter to characterize the heterogeneous riverbed. The data assimilation experiments were conducted for four types of riverbed hydraulic conductivity (K) fields: (i) spatially homogeneous, (ii) heterogeneous with multiGaussian distribution, (iii) heterogeneous with non-multiGaussian distribution (channelized structures) and (iv) heterogeneous with non-multiGaussian distribution (elliptic structures). For all the data assimilation scenarios, state variables and riverbed K were updated by assimilating piezometric heads. The experiments were repeated for ten reference fields. Results show that for all prior geostatistical models data assimilation was able to reduce the difference between simulated and measured hydraulic heads, and to improve the characterization of riverbed hydraulic conductivities and river-aquifer exchange fluxes. Results were slightly better for non-multiGaussian fields

  7. Comparison of empirical, semi-empirical and physically based models of soil hydraulic functions derived for bi-modal soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutílek, M.; Jendele, L.; Krejča, M.

    2009-02-01

    The accelerated flow in soil pores is responsible for a rapid transport of pollutants from the soil surface to deeper layers up to groundwater. The term preferential flow is used for this type of transport. Our study was aimed at the preferential flow realized in the structural porous domain in bi-modal soils. We compared equations describing the soil water retention function h( θ) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity K( h), eventually K( θ) modified for bi-modal soils, where θ is the soil water content and h is the pressure head. The analytical description of a curve passing experimental data sets of the soil hydraulic function is typical for the empirical equation characterized by fitting parameters only. If the measured data are described by the equation derived by the physical model without using fitting parameters, we speak about a physically based model. There exist several transitional subtypes between empirical and physically based models. They are denoted as semi-empirical, or semi-physical. We tested 3 models of soil water retention function and 3 models of unsaturated conductivity using experimental data sets of sand, silt, silt loam and loam. All used soils are typical by their bi-modality of the soil porous system. The model efficiency was estimated by RMSE (Root mean square error) and by RSE (Relative square error). The semi-empirical equation of the soil water retention function had the lowest values of RMSE and RSE and was qualified as "optimal" for the formal description of the shape of the water retention function. With this equation, the fit of the modelled data to experiments was the closest one. The fitting parameters smoothed the difference between the model and the physical reality of the soil porous media. The physical equation based upon the model of the pore size distribution did not allow exact fitting of the modelled data to the experimental data due to the rigidity and simplicity of the physical model when compared to the real soil

  8. Comparison of empirical, semi-empirical and physically based models of soil hydraulic functions derived for bi-modal soils.

    PubMed

    Kutílek, M; Jendele, L; Krejca, M

    2009-02-16

    The accelerated flow in soil pores is responsible for a rapid transport of pollutants from the soil surface to deeper layers up to groundwater. The term preferential flow is used for this type of transport. Our study was aimed at the preferential flow realized in the structural porous domain in bi-modal soils. We compared equations describing the soil water retention function h(theta) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity K(h), eventually K(theta) modified for bi-modal soils, where theta is the soil water content and h is the pressure head. The analytical description of a curve passing experimental data sets of the soil hydraulic function is typical for the empirical equation characterized by fitting parameters only. If the measured data are described by the equation derived by the physical model without using fitting parameters, we speak about a physically based model. There exist several transitional subtypes between empirical and physically based models. They are denoted as semi-empirical, or semi-physical. We tested 3 models of soil water retention function and 3 models of unsaturated conductivity using experimental data sets of sand, silt, silt loam and loam. All used soils are typical by their bi-modality of the soil porous system. The model efficiency was estimated by RMSE (Root mean square error) and by RSE (Relative square error). The semi-empirical equation of the soil water retention function had the lowest values of RMSE and RSE and was qualified as "optimal" for the formal description of the shape of the water retention function. With this equation, the fit of the modelled data to experiments was the closest one. The fitting parameters smoothed the difference between the model and the physical reality of the soil porous media. The physical equation based upon the model of the pore size distribution did not allow exact fitting of the modelled data to the experimental data due to the rigidity and simplicity of the physical model when compared to the

  9. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, Roman; Makarashvili, Vakho; Heltemes, Thad; Sun, Zaijing; Wardle, Kent E.; Bailey, James; Quigley, Kevin; Stepinski, Dominique; Vandegrift, George

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  10. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismicmore » moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.« less

  11. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismic moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.

  12. Hydraulic development of high specific-speed pump-turbines by means of an inverse design method, numerical flow-simulation (CFD) and model testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschberger, P.; Gehrer, A.

    2010-08-01

    In recent years an increased interest in pump-turbines has been recognized in the market. The rapid availability of pumped storage schemes and the benefits to the power system by peak lopping, providing reserve and rapid response for frequency control are becoming of growing advantage. In that context it is requested to develop pump-turbines that reliably stand dynamic operation modes, fast changes of the discharge rate by adjusting the variable diffuser vanes as well as fast changes from pump to turbine operation. Within the present study various flow patterns linked to the operation of a pump-turbine system are discussed. In that context pump and turbine mode are presented separately and different load cases at both operation modes are shown. In order to achieve modern, competitive pump-turbine designs it is further explained which design challenges should be considered during the geometry definition of a pump-turbine impeller. Within the present study a runner-blade profile for a low head pump-turbine has been developed. For the initial hydraulic runner-blade design, an inverse design method has been applied. Within this design procedure, a first blade geometry is generated by imposing the pressure loading-distribution and by means of an inverse 3D potential-flow-solution. The hydraulic behavior of both, pump-mode and turbine-mode is then evaluated by solving the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations in combination with a robust turbulence model. Based on this initial design the blade profile has been further optimized and redesigned considering various hydraulic pump-turbine requirements. Finally, the progress in hydraulic design is demonstrated by model test results which show a significant improvement in hydraulic performance compared to an existing reference design.

  13. Measuring and modeling the hydraulic effect of hydrokinetic energy extraction in the Tanana River, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgerly, Elan

    During September of 2014 and July of 2015, a 1.93 m diameter, open-center style, hydrokinetic device was deployed in the Tanana River (Alaska). River velocity was roughly 1.7 m/s and 2 m/s at the deployment site during September 2014 and July 2015 respectively. Using acoustic instruments, velocity and turbulence were measured in the vicinity of the turbine deployment location -- with and without a turbine deployed -- in order to characterize the impact of the turbine on river hydraulics and turbulence (including turbulent kinetic energy, turbulence intensity, and spectra). In addition, river hydraulics -- with and without a turbine deployed -- were modeled using a version of the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code modified by Sandia National Labs to represent hydrokinetic devices. Measured and modeled velocity in the device's wake (5.2 meters downstream of the device) indicated a 0.38 m/s and a 0.18 m/s reduction in velocity, respectively. The Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) field measurements indicate that velocity is 97.5% recovered at 15.5 turbine diameters, while the model shows 97.5% recovery at 20.2 turbine diameters downstream. Likewise, field Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) measurements from a separate testing day showed velocities being 97.5% recovered within 15.5 turbine diameters and fully recovered within 20.7 turbine diameters. ADV measurements indicate a 520% increase in turbulence intensity (TI), which appears to resolve within 20.7 turbine diameters. The effects on the sedimentary environment of a running turbine appear to be minimal. However there is a slight reduction in turbidity in the near field wake of the turbine.

  14. Rapid setup of the high resolution interactive hydrological / hydraulic model for flood forecasting at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, G.; Haag, A.; Winsemius, H.; Baart, F.; Hut, R.; Drost, N.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid predictions of flood using high resolution process-based numerical models applied at global scale is a useful tool for flood forecasting. Usually it requires days or even months to create such a model for a specific area and in most cases the process assumes a lot of manual work. Our goal is to significantly decrease the time required for this process by means of software integration of data processing tools, numerical models and global data sets. The methodology is based on the use of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB to identify the potential flood areas. An automated set of tools will be applied to generate a coupled hydrological / hydraulic model using a high resolution input data based on free global data sets such as SRTM, HydroSHEDS, CORINE, and OpenStreetMaps. This information should be sufficient to generate high resolution input for distributed rainfall-runoff and shallow water flow models. For the detection of potential flood areas, and generation of the unstructured model grid required by the D-Flow FM hydrodynamic model, we will use Height Above the Nearest Drainage (HAND) dataset derived from SRTM. For coupling the distributed hydrological and shallow water models we will use the Basic Model Interface (BMI). BMI is a lightweight API that enables communication with numerical models at runtime. We will validate benefits of the algorithm by applying it to the San Francisco bay area. The models and data processing tools will be integrated into an interactive user interface that will enable data exploration and will allow generation of new models based on user request or automatic rules. Using our approach we expect to make significant steps towards realizing our goal of global availability of flood forecasting models.

  15. Predictive permeability model of faults in crystalline rocks; verification by joint hydraulic factor (JH) obtained from water pressure tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barani, Hamidreza Rostami; Lashkaripour, Gholamreza; Ghafoori, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, a new model is proposed to predict the permeability per fracture in the fault zones by a new parameter named joint hydraulic factor (JH). JH is obtained from Water Pressure Test (WPT) and modified by the degree of fracturing. The results of JH correspond with quantitative fault zone descriptions, qualitative fracture, and fault rock properties. In this respect, a case study was done based on the data collected from Seyahoo dam site located in the east of Iran to provide the permeability prediction model of fault zone structures. Datasets including scan-lines, drill cores, and water pressure tests in the terrain of Andesite and Basalt rocks were used to analyse the variability of in-site relative permeability of a range from fault zones to host rocks. The rock mass joint permeability quality, therefore, is defined by the JH. JH data analysis showed that the background sub-zone had commonly <3 Lu (less of 5 ×10-5 m 3/s) per fracture, whereas the fault core had permeability characteristics nearly as low as the outer damage zone, represented by 8 Lu (1.3 ×10-4 m 3/s) per fracture, with occasional peaks towards 12 Lu (2 ×10-4 m 3/s) per fracture. The maximum JH value belongs to the inner damage zone, marginal to the fault core, with 14-22 Lu (2.3 ×10-4-3.6 ×10-4 m 3/s) per fracture, locally exceeding 25 Lu (4.1 ×10-4 m 3/s) per fracture. This gives a proportional relationship for JH approximately 1:4:2 between the fault core, inner damage zone, and outer damage zone of extensional fault zones in crystalline rocks. The results of the verification exercise revealed that the new approach would be efficient and that the JH parameter is a reliable scale for the fracture permeability change. It can be concluded that using short duration hydraulic tests (WPTs) and fracture frequency (FF) to calculate the JH parameter provides a possibility to describe a complex situation and compare, discuss, and weigh the hydraulic quality to make predictions as to

  16. Effect of biocrust: study of mechanical and hydraulic properties and erodibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavík, Martin; Bruthans, Jiří; Schweigstillová, Jana

    2016-04-01

    It is well-known that lichens and other organisms forming crust on soil or rock surface play important role in weathering but may also protect underlying material from fast erosion. So far, there have been only few measurements comparing mechanical or hydraulic properties of biocrust with its subsurface on locked sand and friable sandstones, so the overall effect of the biocrust is not well-understood. Objective of our study is to quantify the effect of the biocrust on mechanical and hydraulic properties of friable sandstone and locked sand of Cretaceous age in six different localities with varying aspect and inclination and age of exposure in sandpit Strelec (Czech Rep.). On the artificial exposures, biocrust developed within last 10-30 years. Beside measurements of mechanical and hydraulic properties, SEM and mercury intrusion porosimetry in crust and subsurface was performed. Drilling resistance technique was found an excellent method to distinguish the biocrust from its subsurface (~3 mm thick biocrust has up to 12 times higher drilling resistance than underlying material). Surface zone with the biocrust has 3 - 25 times higher tensile strength than the subsurface material (1 - 25 kPa). In comparison with the subsurface, the biocrust is considerably less erodible (based on water jet testing). Biocrust saturated hydraulic conductivity is 15 - 240 times lower than the subsurface (6*10 -5 - 1*10 -4 m/s) and its permeability for water vapor is 4 - 9 times lower than subsurface. Presence of the biocrust slows down capillary absorption of water 4 - 25 times. The biocrust is thus forming firm surface which protects underlying material from rain and flowing water erosion and which considerably modifies its hydraulic properties. Material with crust exposed to calcination, leaching by concentrated peroxide and experiments with zymoliase enzyme strongly indicate that major contribution to crust hardening is provided by organic matter. Based on DNA sequencing the crust is

  17. Constraining soil hydraulic parameter and output uncertainty of the distributed hydrological MIKE SHE model using the GLUE framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiaens, K.; Feyen, J.

    2002-02-01

    Both calibration and uncertainty assessment are mandatory steps in today's modelling process. The former considers both the inputs (input variables and parameters) as well as model results. An exploratory investigation of the applicable parameter space results in a wide spectrum of values for a specific model output. By retaining only those model realizations that mimic reality in a sufficient way, inputs and associated response can be constrained, thereby quantifying the uncertainty involved. The generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) framework provides a structured methodology for this purpose.The study presented focuses on the applicability of the GLUE framework within the context of the distributed hydrological model MIKE SHE. Even though all significant processes involved are incorporated within the model, the problems of calibration and uncertainty assessment cannot be avoided. This has resulted in a quest for well-delineated effective parameters crucial for sound mechanistic model application. Being a complex model, the number of possible realizations using MIKE SHE is fairly small due to computing time, and an in-depth exploratory approach is impossible. On the other hand, several output variables are available aside from the hydrological river response, like water content in the soil profile or ground water level, which can be used for retaining realistic parameter sets.This study presents some preliminary results on the applicability of the GLUE-MIKE SHE framework and associated constrained preliminary parameter and output uncertainty values. Focus was given to the influence of soil hydraulic parameters on the hydrological behaviour of a small study basin. The soil hydraulic parameters were predicted using various pedo-transfer-function approaches and moisture retention measurements in the laboratory, and these distributions were then confronted with ranges of the constrained effective parameters. For the latter, the restrictions that were

  18. Testing the skill of numerical hydraulic modeling to simulate spatiotemporal flooding patterns in the Logone floodplain, Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Alfonso; Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Durand, Michael; Mark, Bryan G.; Moritz, Mark; Jung, Hahn Chul; Neal, Jeffrey; Shastry, Apoorva; Laborde, Sarah; Phang, Sui Chian; Hamilton, Ian M.; Xiao, Ningchuan

    2016-08-01

    Recent innovations in hydraulic modeling have enabled global simulation of rivers, including simulation of their coupled wetlands and floodplains. Accurate simulations of floodplains using these approaches may imply tremendous advances in global hydrologic studies and in biogeochemical cycling. One such innovation is to explicitly treat sub-grid channels within two-dimensional models, given only remotely sensed data in areas with limited data availability. However, predicting inundated area in floodplains using a sub-grid model has not been rigorously validated. In this study, we applied the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model using a sub-grid channel parameterization to simulate inundation dynamics on the Logone River floodplain, in northern Cameroon, from 2001 to 2007. Our goal was to determine whether floodplain dynamics could be simulated with sufficient accuracy to understand human and natural contributions to current and future inundation patterns. Model inputs in this data-sparse region include in situ river discharge, satellite-derived rainfall, and the shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) floodplain elevation. We found that the model accurately simulated total floodplain inundation, with a Pearson correlation coefficient greater than 0.9, and RMSE less than 700 km2, compared to peak inundation greater than 6000 km2. Predicted discharge downstream of the floodplain matched measurements (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.81), and indicated that net flow from the channel to the floodplain was modeled accurately. However, the spatial pattern of inundation was not well simulated, apparently due to uncertainties in SRTM elevations. We evaluated model results at 250, 500 and 1000-m spatial resolutions, and found that results are insensitive to spatial resolution. We also compared the model output against results from a run of LISFLOOD-FP in which the sub-grid channel parameterization was disabled, finding that the sub-grid parameterization simulated more realistic

  19. Variation in reach-scale hydraulic conductivity of streambeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewardson, M. J.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Pella, H.; Thommeret, N.; Valette, L.; Grant, S. B.

    2016-04-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity is an important control on flow within the hyporheic zone, affecting hydrological, ecological, and biogeochemical processes essential to river ecosystem function. Despite many published field measurements, few empirical studies examine the drivers of spatial and temporal variations in streambed hydraulic conductivity. Reach-averaged hydraulic conductivity estimated for 119 surveys in 83 stream reaches across continental France, even of coarse bed streams, are shown to be characteristic of sand and finer sediments. This supports a model where processes leading to the accumulation of finer sediments within streambeds largely control hydraulic conductivity rather than the size of the coarse bed sediment fraction. After describing a conceptual model of relevant processes, we fit an empirical model relating hydraulic conductivity to candidate geomorphic and hydraulic drivers. The fitted model explains 72% of the deviance in hydraulic conductivity (and 30% using an external cross-validation). Reach hydraulic conductivity increases with the amplitude of bedforms within the reach, the bankfull channel width-depth ratio, stream power and upstream catchment erodibility but reduces with time since the last streambed disturbance. The correlation between hydraulic conductivity and time since a streambed mobilisation event is likely a consequence of clogging processes. Streams with a predominantly suspended load and less frequent streambed disturbances are expected to have a lower streambed hydraulic conductivity and reduced hyporheic fluxes. This study suggests a close link between streambed sediment transport dynamics and connectivity between surface water and the hyporheic zone.

  20. A Mathematical Model for Predicting Moisture Flow in an Unsaturated Soil Under Hydraulic and Temperature Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakshanamurthy, V.; Fredlund, D. G.

    1981-06-01

    A theoretical model is presented to predict the moisture flow in an unsaturated soil as the result of hydraulic and temperature gradients. A partial differential heat flow equation (for above-freezing conditions) and the two partial differential transient flow equations (one for the water phase and the other for the air phase), are derived in this paper and solved using a finite difference technique. Darcy's law is used to describe the flow in the water phase, while Pick's law is used for the air phase. The constitutive equations proposed by Fredlund and Morgenstern are used to define the volume change of an unsaturated soil. The simultaneous solution of the partial differential equations gives the temperature, the pore water pressure, and the pore air pressure distribution with space and time in an unsaturated soil. The pressure changes can, in turn, be used to compute the quantity of moisture flow.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL HYDRAULICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thermal, chemical, and biological quality of water in rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and near coastal areas is inseparable from a consideration of hydraulic engineering principles: therefore, the term environmental hydraulics. In this chapter we discuss the basic principles of w...

  2. Remote Sensing-Derived Water Extent and Level to Constrain Hydraulic Flood Forecasting Models: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, Stefania; Li, Yuan; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Walker, Jeffrey P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate, precise and timely forecasts of flood wave arrival time, depth and velocity at each point of the floodplain are essential to reduce damage and save lives. Current computational capabilities support hydraulic models of increasing complexity over extended catchments. Yet a number of sources of uncertainty (e.g., input and boundary conditions, implementation data) may hinder the delivery of accurate predictions. Field gauging data of water levels and discharge have traditionally been used for hydraulic model calibration, validation and real-time constraint. However, the discrete spatial distribution of field data impedes the testing of the model skill at the two-dimensional scale. The increasing availability of spatially distributed remote sensing (RS) observations of flood extent and water level offers the opportunity for a comprehensive analysis of the predictive capability of hydraulic models. The adequate use of the large amount of information offered by RS observations triggers a series of challenging questions on the resolution, accuracy and frequency of acquisition of RS observations; on RS data processing algorithms; and on calibration, validation and data assimilation protocols. This paper presents a review of the availability of RS observations of flood extent and levels, and their use for calibration, validation and real-time constraint of hydraulic flood forecasting models. A number of conclusions and recommendations for future research are drawn with the aim of harmonising the pace of technological developments and their applications.

  3. A model for estimating the hydraulic conductivity of granular material based on grain shape, grain size, and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Sperry, J.M.; Peirce, J.J.

    1995-11-01

    Particle shape is an important parameter in numerous civil, environmental, and petroleum engineering applications. In ground-water flow, the shape of individual particles comprising the soil affects the soil`s pore size distribution and, hence, the important flow characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity and headloss. A model for delineating the relative importance of particle size, particle shape, and porosity, (and their interactions), in explaining the variability of hydraulic conductivity of a granular porous medium is developed and tested. Three types of porous media are considered in this work: spherical glass beads; granular sand; and irregularly shaped, shredded glass particles. A reliable method for quantifying the three-dimensional shape and packing of large samples of irregular particles based on their angle of repose is presented. The results of column experiments indicate that in the size range examined (i.e., 149 {micro}m to 2,380 {micro}m), the single most important predictor of hydraulic conductivity is seen to be particle size, explaining 69% of the variability. Porous media comprising irregular particles exhibit lower hydraulic conductivity only for the larger (707 to 841 {micro}m) particles. For the smaller (149 to 177 {micro}m) particles, particle shape has no observable influence on hydraulic conductivity. The results of the regression analysis reveal the importance off the interaction between particle size and porosity, indicating that similar pore configurations for a given type of particle are not achieved at different sizes. This empirical model seems to provide better estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of granular porous media comprising irregular particles than selected models based solely on grain size, including Hazen, Kozeny-Carman, and more recently Alyamani and Sen.

  4. Study of thermal and hydraulic performances of circular and square ribbed rough microchannels using LBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, M. A.; Kim, H. D.; Lee, Y. W.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of roughness geometries and relative roughness height at the slip flow regime to investigate the thermal and hydraulic performances of microchannel have been considered in the present article using a thermal Lattice Boltzmann Method (TLBM). A two dimensional 9-bit (D2Q9) single relaxation time (SRT) model is used to simulate this problem. In micro-flows, the local density variation is still relatively small, but the total density changes, therefore, in order to account this density variation and its effect on the kinematic viscosity v, a new relaxation time proposed by Niu et al.[13] is used. The roughness geometry is modeled as a series of square and circular riblets with a relative roughness height from 0% to 10% of the channel height. The friction coefficients in terms of Poiseuille number (Pn) and the dimensionless heat transfer rate in terms of Nusselt number (Nu) have been discussed in order to analyze the roughness effects. The thermal-hydraulic performance ( η) is calculated considering the simultaneous effects of thermal and fluid friction (pressure drop) at the slip flow regime at Knudsen number, Kn, ranging from 0.01 to 0.10 with other controlling parameters for both kind of geometries. The results have been compared with previous published works and it is found to be in very good agreement.

  5. Simulation-optimization model for water management in hydraulic fracturing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, E. A.; Uddameri, V.

    2015-09-01

    A combined simulation-optimization model was developed to minimize the freshwater footprint at multi-well hydraulic fracturing sites. The model seeks to reduce freshwater use by blending it with brackish groundwater and recovered water. Time-varying water quality and quantity mass balance expressions and drawdown calculations using the Theis solution along with the superposition principle were embedded into the optimization model and solved using genetic algorithms. The model was parameterized for representative conditions in the Permian Basin oil and gas play region with the Dockum Formation serving as the brackish water source (Texas, USA). The results indicate that freshwater use can be reduced by 25-30 % by blending. Recovered water accounted for 2-3 % of the total blend or 10-15 % of total water recovered on-site. The concentration requirements of sulfate and magnesium limited blending. The evaporation in the frac pit constrained the amount blended during summer, while well yield of the brackish (Dockum) aquifer constrained the blending during winter. The Edwards-Trinity aquifer provided the best quality water compared to the Ogallala and Pecos Valley aquifers. However, the aquifer has low diffusivity causing the drawdown impacts to be felt over large areas. Speciation calculations carried out using PHREEQC indicated that precipitation of barium and strontium minerals is unlikely in the blended water. Conversely, the potential for precipitation of iron minerals is high. The developed simulation-optimization modeling framework is flexible and easily adapted for water management at other fracturing sites.

  6. Modeling Hydraulic Properties and Hydrologic Processes in Shrink-swell Clay Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, R. D.; Rupp, D. E.; Abou Najm, M. R.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recognizing the need for tractable models that accurately describe the hydrologic behaviors of shrink-swell soils, we propose a new conceptual model that identifies up to five porosity domains based on morphological and hydrological distinctions. We provide governing equations that predict the porosity distribution as a function of soil water content and six additional parameters, all of which can be determined using laboratory measurements conducted on individual soil samples. We next derive new expressions for the hydraulic properties of such soils, which can be used to model infiltration at the plot scale. Finally, we incorporate these expressions into new models that can be used to predict and quantify surface runoff (i.e., overland flow) thresholds, and which may be used to reveal the dominant mechanisms by which water moves through clayey soils. Altogether, these models successfully link small-scale shrinkage/swelling behaviors with large-scale processes, and can be applied to such practical applications as converting measurements between gravimetric and volumetric water contents, as well as to predicting field-scale processes such as the sealing of individual cracks.

  7. Modeling the influence of varying hydraulic conditions on aerobic respiration and denitrification in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Exchange of water and solutes across the stream-sediment interface is an important control for biogeochemical transformations in the hyporheic zone (HZ) with measurable impacts on nutrient cycling and solute attenuation in fluvial systems. Here we investigate the interplay between turbulent stream flow and HZ flow under various hydraulic conditions applied to two cases: a) three-dimensional generic pool-riffle sequences with different morphological properties, and b) a real mid-stream gravel-bar. Stream flow is simulated by the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM which provides the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed. It is sequentially coupled to the top of the groundwater model code MIN3P, simulating flow, solute transport, aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. Flow in the HZ is directly influenced by the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed surface and the ambient groundwater flow. Three reactive transport scenarios are considered: 1) stream water as the primary source of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 2) upwelling groundwater as an additionally source of NO3, and 3) upwelling groundwater as an additional source of DO in various concentrations. Results show an increase in hyporheic exchange flow for increasing stream discharge with a concurrent decrease in residence time. The fraction of circulating stream water through the HZ is in the range of 1x10-5 to 1x10-6 per unit stream length, decreasing with increasing discharge. Ambient groundwater flow in both the up- and downwelling direction diminishes significantly the hyporheic exchange flow and extent. Biogeochemical processes in the HZ are strongly controlled by ambient groundwater flow, even more so than by changes in stream discharge. AR and DN efficiencies of the HZ are significantly reduced by up- and downwelling groundwater and are positively correlated with median residence times. AR occurs in

  8. Study on Dynamical Simulation of Railway Vehicle Bogie Parameters Test-bench Electro-hydraulic Servo System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhikun; Su, Jian; Xu, Guan; Cao, Xiaoning

    Dynamical mathematical model was established for accurately positioning, fast response and real-time tracing of electro-hydraulic servo control system in railway vehicle bog ie parameters test system with elastic load. The model could precisely control the output of position and force of the hydraulic cylinders. Induction method was proposed in the paper. Dynamical simulation verified the mathematical model by SIMULINK software. Meanwhile the key factors affecting the dynamical characteristics of the system were discussed in detail. Through the simulation results, high precision is obtained in application and the need of real-time control on the railway vehicle bogie parameters test-bench is realized.

  9. A combined use of Archie and van Genuchten models for predicting hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated pyroclastic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, Rosa; Piegari, Ester; Todero, Giovanna; Fabbrocino, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogeophysics has been developing in recent years to improve characterization and monitoring of saturated/unsaturated aquifers, through the combination of geophysical and hydrogeological methods. To exploit the potential benefits of this integration, definition of petrophysical relationships that allow the translation of geophysical data into hydrogeological parameters (and vice versa) is essential. In this paper, Archie's and van Genuchten's models, which relate electrical resistivity and hydraulic conductivity to the degree of saturation, are combined to obtain a closed-form link between hydraulic conductivity and electrical resistivity. Such an expression is used to characterize pyroclastic deposits covering Sarno Mountains (southern Italy), which are often affected by landslide phenomena. As expected, an inverse relationship is found between hydraulic conductivity and electrical resistivity due to predominance of the electrolytic component over the interfacial component of the electrical conductivity. The variability of the hydraulic conductivity marks out the texture of the investigated pyroclastic horizons. Finally, a hydraulic conductivity-matric suction relationship is retrieved by using an empirical correlation between electrical resistivity and matric suction.

  10. The development of a hydrologic-hydraulic representation of an urbanscape: the case study of Nashville, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlar, F.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Shao, J.; Narayan, U.; Nardi, F.; Adams, T. E.; Merwade, V.; Wright, D. B.; Kim, J.; Fatichi, S.; Rakhmatulina, E.

    2013-12-01

    Incorporating elevation data into coupled hydraulic and hydrologic models with the use of triangulated irregular networks (TINs) provides a detailed and highly customizable representation of the original domain. Until recently the resolution of such digital elevation models was 1 or 1/3 arc second (10-30 meters). Aided by the use of LiDAR, digital elevation models are now available at the 1/9 arc second resolution (1-3 meters). With elevation data at this level of resolution watershed details that are overlooked at a 10-30 meter resolution can now be resolved and incorporated into the TIN. For urban flood modeling this implies that street level features can be resolved. However to provide a useful picture of the flooding as a whole, this data would need to be integrated across a citywide scale. To prove the feasibility, process, and capabilities of generating such a detailed and large scale TIN, we present a case study of Nashville, TN, USA, during the May 1-2, 2010 flooding, a 1,000 year storm event. With the use of ArcGIS, HEC-RAS, Triangle, and additionally developed processing methodologies, an approach is developed to generate a hydrologically relevant and detailed TIN of the entire urbanscape of Nashville. This TIN incorporates three separate aspects; the watershed, the floodplain, and the city. The watershed component contains the elevation data for the delineated watershed, roughly 1,000 km2 at 1-3 meter resolution. The floodplain encompasses over 300 channel cross sections of the Cumberland River and a delineated floodplain. The city element comprises over 500,000 buildings and all major roadways within the watershed. Once generated, the resulting triangulation of the TIN is optimized with the Triangle software for input to the coupled hydraulic and hydrological model, tRIBS-OFM. Hydrologically relevant areas such as the floodplain are densified and constraints are set on the minimum triangle area for the entire TIN. Upon running the coupled hydraulic and

  11. Eco-hydrologic model cascades: Simulating land use and climate change impacts on hydrology, hydraulics and habitats for fish and macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Guse, Björn; Kail, Jochem; Radinger, Johannes; Schröder, Maria; Kiesel, Jens; Hering, Daniel; Wolter, Christian; Fohrer, Nicola

    2015-11-15

    Climate and land use changes affect the hydro- and biosphere at different spatial scales. These changes alter hydrological processes at the catchment scale, which impact hydrodynamics and habitat conditions for biota at the river reach scale. In order to investigate the impact of large-scale changes on biota, a cascade of models at different scales is required. Using scenario simulations, the impact of climate and land use change can be compared along the model cascade. Such a cascade of consecutively coupled models was applied in this study. Discharge and water quality are predicted with a hydrological model at the catchment scale. The hydraulic flow conditions are predicted by hydrodynamic models. The habitat suitability under these hydraulic and water quality conditions is assessed based on habitat models for fish and macroinvertebrates. This modelling cascade was applied to predict and compare the impacts of climate- and land use changes at different scales to finally assess their effects on fish and macroinvertebrates. Model simulations revealed that magnitude and direction of change differed along the modelling cascade. Whilst the hydrological model predicted a relevant decrease of discharge due to climate change, the hydraulic conditions changed less. Generally, the habitat suitability for fish decreased but this was strongly species-specific and suitability even increased for some species. In contrast to climate change, the effect of land use change on discharge was negligible. However, land use change had a stronger impact on the modelled nitrate concentrations affecting the abundances of macroinvertebrates. The scenario simulations for the two organism groups illustrated that direction and intensity of changes in habitat suitability are highly species-dependent. Thus, a joined model analysis of different organism groups combined with the results of hydrological and hydrodynamic models is recommended to assess the impact of climate and land use changes on

  12. Eco-hydrologic model cascades: Simulating land use and climate change impacts on hydrology, hydraulics and habitats for fish and macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Guse, Björn; Kail, Jochem; Radinger, Johannes; Schröder, Maria; Kiesel, Jens; Hering, Daniel; Wolter, Christian; Fohrer, Nicola

    2015-11-15

    Climate and land use changes affect the hydro- and biosphere at different spatial scales. These changes alter hydrological processes at the catchment scale, which impact hydrodynamics and habitat conditions for biota at the river reach scale. In order to investigate the impact of large-scale changes on biota, a cascade of models at different scales is required. Using scenario simulations, the impact of climate and land use change can be compared along the model cascade. Such a cascade of consecutively coupled models was applied in this study. Discharge and water quality are predicted with a hydrological model at the catchment scale. The hydraulic flow conditions are predicted by hydrodynamic models. The habitat suitability under these hydraulic and water quality conditions is assessed based on habitat models for fish and macroinvertebrates. This modelling cascade was applied to predict and compare the impacts of climate- and land use changes at different scales to finally assess their effects on fish and macroinvertebrates. Model simulations revealed that magnitude and direction of change differed along the modelling cascade. Whilst the hydrological model predicted a relevant decrease of discharge due to climate change, the hydraulic conditions changed less. Generally, the habitat suitability for fish decreased but this was strongly species-specific and suitability even increased for some species. In contrast to climate change, the effect of land use change on discharge was negligible. However, land use change had a stronger impact on the modelled nitrate concentrations affecting the abundances of macroinvertebrates. The scenario simulations for the two organism groups illustrated that direction and intensity of changes in habitat suitability are highly species-dependent. Thus, a joined model analysis of different organism groups combined with the results of hydrological and hydrodynamic models is recommended to assess the impact of climate and land use changes on

  13. Incorporating Artificial Neural Networks in the dynamic thermal-hydraulic model of a controlled cryogenic circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, S.; Bonifetto, R.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2015-09-01

    A model based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) is developed for the heated line portion of a cryogenic circuit, where supercritical helium (SHe) flows and that also includes a cold circulator, valves, pipes/cryolines and heat exchangers between the main loop and a saturated liquid helium (LHe) bath. The heated line mimics the heat load coming from the superconducting magnets to their cryogenic cooling circuits during the operation of a tokamak fusion reactor. An ANN is trained, using the output from simulations of the circuit performed with the 4C thermal-hydraulic (TH) code, to reproduce the dynamic behavior of the heated line, including for the first time also scenarios where different types of controls act on the circuit. The ANN is then implemented in the 4C circuit model as a new component, which substitutes the original 4C heated line model. For different operational scenarios and control strategies, a good agreement is shown between the simplified ANN model results and the original 4C results, as well as with experimental data from the HELIOS facility confirming the suitability of this new approach which, extended to an entire magnet systems, can lead to real-time control of the cooling loops and fast assessment of control strategies for heat load smoothing to the cryoplant.

  14. Modified kinetic-hydraulic UASB reactor model for treatment of wastewater containing biodegradable organic substrates.

    PubMed

    El-Seddik, Mostafa M; Galal, Mona M; Radwan, A G; Abdel-Halim, Hisham S

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a modified kinetic-hydraulic model for up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor aimed to treat wastewater of biodegradable organic substrates as acetic acid based on Van der Meer model incorporated with biological granules inclusion. This dynamic model illustrates the biomass kinetic reaction rate for both direct and indirect growth of microorganisms coupled with the amount of biogas produced by methanogenic bacteria in bed and blanket zones of reactor. Moreover, the pH value required for substrate degradation at the peak specific growth rate of bacteria is discussed for Andrews' kinetics. The sensitivity analyses of biomass concentration with respect to fraction of volume of reactor occupied by granules and up-flow velocity are also demonstrated. Furthermore, the modified mass balance equations of reactor are applied during steady state using Newton Raphson technique to obtain a suitable degree of freedom for the modified model matching with the measured results of UASB Sanhour wastewater treatment plant in Fayoum, Egypt. PMID:27054727

  15. Modified kinetic-hydraulic UASB reactor model for treatment of wastewater containing biodegradable organic substrates.

    PubMed

    El-Seddik, Mostafa M; Galal, Mona M; Radwan, A G; Abdel-Halim, Hisham S

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a modified kinetic-hydraulic model for up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor aimed to treat wastewater of biodegradable organic substrates as acetic acid based on Van der Meer model incorporated with biological granules inclusion. This dynamic model illustrates the biomass kinetic reaction rate for both direct and indirect growth of microorganisms coupled with the amount of biogas produced by methanogenic bacteria in bed and blanket zones of reactor. Moreover, the pH value required for substrate degradation at the peak specific growth rate of bacteria is discussed for Andrews' kinetics. The sensitivity analyses of biomass concentration with respect to fraction of volume of reactor occupied by granules and up-flow velocity are also demonstrated. Furthermore, the modified mass balance equations of reactor are applied during steady state using Newton Raphson technique to obtain a suitable degree of freedom for the modified model matching with the measured results of UASB Sanhour wastewater treatment plant in Fayoum, Egypt.

  16. Interdependence of chronic hydraulic dysfunction and canopy processes can improve integrated models of tree response to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. Scott; Roberts, David E.; Ewers, Brent E.; Sperry, John S.; McDowell, Nathan G.; Pockman, William T.

    2015-08-01

    Hydraulic systems of plants have evolved in the context of carbon allocation and fitness trade-offs of maximizing carbon gain and water transport in the face of short and long-term fluctuations in environmental conditions. The resulting diversity of traits include a continuum of isohydry-anisohydry or high to low relative stomatal closure during drought, shedding of canopy foliage or disconnecting roots from soil to survive drought, and adjusting root areas to efficiently manage canopy water costs associated with photosynthesis. These traits are examined within TREES, an integrated model that explicitly couples photosynthesis and carbon allocation to soil-plant hydraulics and canopy processes. Key advances of the model are its ability to account for differences in soil and xylem cavitation, transience of hydraulic impairment associated with delayed or no refilling of xylem, and carbon allocation to plant structures based on photosynthetic uptake of carbon and hydraulic limitations to water transport. The model was used to examine hydraulic traits of cooccurring isohydric (piñon pine) and anisohydric (one-seed juniper) trees from a field-based experimental drought. Model predictions of both transpiration and leaf water potential were improved when there was no refilling of xylem over simulations where xylem was able refill in response to soil water recharge. Model experiments with alternative root-to-leaf area ratios (RR/L) showed the RR/L that supports maximum cumulative water use is not beneficial for supporting maximum carbon gain during extended drought, illustrating how a process model reveals trade-offs in plant traits.

  17. Mechanics and hydraulics of unsaturated soils: what makes interfaces an indispensable part of a physically-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikooee, E.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The foundations of the current theories for hydraulics and mechanics of unsaturated soils have been mainly based on the empirically introduced equations. There are various characteristics of unsaturated soils for which lots of different empirical equations have been proposed such as hydraulic conductivity, water retention curve, and effective stress parameter. One of the remarkable challenges which all current models face is hysteresis, i.e., for a certain matric suction, values of saturation, hydraulic conductivity and effective stress parameter in drying state and wetting are different. Conventional models of hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils try to account for the hysteresis phenomenon by means of different empirical equations for each hydraulic path. Hassanizadeh and Gray (1993) claimed that the hysteresis in capillary pressure-saturation curves can be modelled through the inclusion of air-water interfaces as a new independent variable [1]. It has recently been stated that the same conjecture can be made for suction stress [2]. Therefore, it seems to better portray hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils, interfaces are required as an indispensable part of the framework [3, 4]. This presentation aims at introducing the drawbacks of current theories of hydraulics and mechanics of unsaturated soils. For this purpose, the role of interfaces in the mechanics and hydraulics of unsaturated soils is explained and different possibilities to account for the contribution of interfaces are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future research directions are set forth. References[1] Hassanizadeh, S.M. & Gray, W.G.: Thermodynamic basis of capillary pressure in porous media. Water Resour.Res. 29(1993), 3389-3405.[2] Nikooee, E., Habibagahi, G., Hassanizadeh, S.M. & Ghahramani, A.: Effective Stress in unsaturated Soils: a thermodynamic approach based on the interfacial energy and hydromechanical coupling. Transport porous Med. 96

  18. Hydraulic Modeling of Alluvial Fans along the Truckee Canal using the 2-Dimensional Model SRH2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J.; Kallio, R.; Sankovich, V.

    2013-12-01

    Alluvial fans are gently sloping, fan-shaped landforms created by sediment deposition at the ends of mountain valleys. Their gentle slopes and scenic vistas are attractive to developers. Unfortunately, alluvial fans are highly flood-prone, and the flow paths of flood events are highly variable, thereby placing human developments at risk. Many studies have been performed on alluvial fans in the arid west because of the uncertainty of their flow paths and flood extents. Most of these studies have been focused on flood elevations and mitigation. This study is not focused on the flood elevations. Rather, it is focused on the attenuation effects of alluvial fans on floods entering and potentially failing a Reclamation canal. The Truckee Canal diverts water from the Truckee River to Lahontan Reservoir. The drainage areas along the canal are alluvial fans with complex distributary channel networks . Ideally, in nature, the sediment grain-size distribution along the alluvial fan flow paths would provide enough infiltration and subsurface storage to attenuate floods entering the canal and reduce risk to low levels. Human development, however, can prevent the natural losses from occurring due to concentrated flows within the alluvial fan. While the concentrated flows might mitigate flood risk inside the fan, they do not lower the flood risk of the canal. A 2-dimensional hydraulic model, SRH-2D, was coupled to a 1-dimensional rainfall-runoff model to estimate the flood attenuation effects of the alluvial fan network surrounding an 11 mile stretch of the Truckee Canal near Fernley, Nevada. Floods having annual exceedance probabilities ranging from 1/10 to 1/100 were computed and analyzed. SRH-2D uses a zonal approach for modeling river systems, allowing areas to be divided into separate zones based on physical parameters such as surface roughness and infiltration. One of the major features of SRH-2D is the adoption of an unstructured hybrid mixed element mesh, which is based

  19. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  20. A field-scale infiltration model accounting for spatial heterogeneity of rainfall and soil saturated hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Renato; Corradini, Corrado; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2006-04-01

    This study first explores the role of spatial heterogeneity, in both the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and rainfall intensity r, on the integrated hydrological response of a natural slope. On this basis, a mathematical model for estimating the expected areal-average infiltration is then formulated. Both Ks and r are considered as random variables with assessed probability density functions. The model relies upon a semi-analytical component, which describes the directly infiltrated rainfall, and an empirical component, which accounts further for the infiltration of surface water running downslope into pervious soils (the run-on effect). Monte Carlo simulations over a clay loam soil and a sandy loam soil were performed for constructing the ensemble averages of field-scale infiltration used for model validation. The model produced very accurate estimates of the expected field-scale infiltration rate, as well as of the outflow generated by significant rainfall events. Furthermore, the two model components were found to interact appropriately for different weights of the two infiltration mechanisms involved.

  1. Determinants of modelling choices for 1-D free-surface flow and morphodynamics in hydrology and hydraulics: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheviron, Bruno; Moussa, Roger

    2016-09-01

    This review paper investigates the determinants of modelling choices, for numerous applications of 1-D free-surface flow and morphodynamic equations in hydrology and hydraulics, across multiple spatiotemporal scales. We aim to characterize each case study by its signature composed of model refinement (Navier-Stokes: NS; Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes: RANS; Saint-Venant: SV; or approximations to Saint-Venant: ASV), spatiotemporal scales and subscales (domain length: L from 1 cm to 1000 km; temporal scale: T from 1 s to 1 year; flow depth: H from 1 mm to 10 m; spatial step for modelling: δL; temporal step: δT), flow typology (Overland: O; High gradient: Hg; Bedforms: B; Fluvial: F), and dimensionless numbers (dimensionless time period T*, Reynolds number Re, Froude number Fr, slope S, inundation ratio Λz, Shields number θ). The determinants of modelling choices are therefore sought in the interplay between flow characteristics and cross-scale and scale-independent views. The influence of spatiotemporal scales on modelling choices is first quantified through the expected correlation between increasing scales and decreasing model refinements (though modelling objectives also show through the chosen spatial and temporal subscales). Then flow typology appears a secondary but important determinant in the choice of model refinement. This finding is confirmed by the discriminating values of several dimensionless numbers, which prove preferential associations between model refinements and flow typologies. This review is intended to help modellers in positioning their choices with respect to the most frequent practices, within a generic, normative procedure possibly enriched by the community for a larger, comprehensive and updated image of modelling strategies.

  2. A finite-element model for simulating hydraulic interchange of surface and ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    A model was developed to be useful for predicting changes in streamflow as a result of groundwater pumping. The stream aquifer model is especially useful for simulating streams that flow intermittently owing to leakage to the aquifer or diversion for irrigation or streams that become perched owing to declining hydraulic head in the aquifer. The model couples the equation of two-dimensional groundwater flow with the kinematic equations of one-dimensional open-channel flow. Darcy 's law for vertical flow through a semipermeable streambed is used to couple the groundwater flow and streamflow equations. The equations of flow are approximated numerically by the finite-element method. A listing of the Fortran program that solves the equations of flow , and a description of data-input formats are given in the report. The program can simulate a variety of hydrologic characteristics including perched streams, streamflow diversions , springs, recharge from irrigated acreage, and evapotranspiration from the water table and phreatophytes. Time-dependent boundary conditions can be simulated. The program can be modified easily to simulate unconfined aquifers and aquifers with variable directions of anisotropy. (USGS)

  3. Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.; Basher, A.M.H.

    1996-09-01

    To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical

  4. Thermal-hydraulic studies of the Advanced Neutron Source cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was to be a user-oriented neutron research facility producing the most intense steady-state flux of thermal and cold neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the production of cold neutrons was a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410-mm-diam sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design were performed with heat conduction simulations of the vessel walls and multidimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This report presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that were planned to verify the final design.

  5. Hydraulic Modeling and Evolutionary Optimization for Enhanced Real-Time Decision Support of Combined Sewer Overflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, A. L.; Minsker, B. S.; Schmidt, A. R.; Ostfeld, A.

    2011-12-01

    Real-time mitigation of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) requires evaluation of multiple operational strategies during rapidly changing rainfall events. Simulation models for hydraulically complex systems can effectively provide decision support for short time intervals when coupled with efficient optimization. This work seeks to reduce CSOs for a test case roughly based on the North Branch of the Chicago Tunnel and Reservoir Plan (TARP), which is operated by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). The North Branch tunnel flows to a junction with the main TARP system. The Chicago combined sewer system alleviates potential CSOs by directing high interceptor flows through sluice gates and dropshafts to a deep tunnel. Decision variables to control CSOs consist of sluice gate positions that control water flow to the tunnel as well as a treatment plant pumping rate that lowers interceptor water levels. A physics-based numerical model is used to simulate the hydraulic effects of changes in the decision variables. The numerical model is step-wise steady and conserves water mass and momentum at each time step by iterating through a series of look-up tables. The look-up tables are constructed offline to avoid extensive real-time calculations, and describe conduit storage and water elevations as a function of flow. A genetic algorithm (GA) is used to minimize CSOs at each time interval within a moving horizon framework. Decision variables are coded at 15-minute increments and GA solutions are two hours in duration. At each 15-minute interval, the algorithm identifies a good solution for a two-hour rainfall forecast. Three GA modifications help reduce optimization time. The first adjustment reduces the search alphabet by eliminating sluice gate positions that do not influence overflow volume. The second GA retains knowledge of the best decision at the previous interval by shifting the genes in the best previous sequence to initialize search at

  6. Geo-mechanical modeling and selection of suitable layer for hydraulic fracturing operation in an oil reservoir (south west of Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvish, Hoda; Nouri-Taleghani, Morteza; Shokrollahi, Amin; Tatar, Afshin

    2015-11-01

    According to the growth of demands to oil resources, increasing the rate of oil production seems necessary. However, oil production declines with time as a result of pressure drop in reservoir as well as sealing of microscopic cracks and pores in the reservoir rock. Hydraulic fracturing is one of the common methods with high performance, which is widely applied to oil and gas reservoirs. In this study, wells in three sections of east, center, and west sides of a field are compared regarding the suitable layer for hydraulic fracturing operation. Firstly, elastic modulus were obtained in both dynamic and static conditions, then uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), type of shear and tensile failures, the most accurate model of failure in wells, safe and stable mud window, the best zone and layers, and finally reference pressures are determined as nominates for hydraulic fracturing. Types of shear failure in minimum, and maximum range of model and in tensile model were determined to be "Shear failure wide breakout (SWBO)", "Shear narrow breakout (SNBO)", and "Tensile vertical failure (TVER)", respectively. The range of safe mud window (SMW) in the studied wells was almost in the same range as it was in every three spots of the field. This range was determined between 5200-8800psi and 5800-10100psi for Ilam and Sarvak zones, respectively. Initial fracture pressure ranges for selected layers were determined 11,759-14,722, 11,910-14,164, and 11,848-14,953psi for the eastern, central, and western wells. Thus, western wells have the best situation for Hydraulic fracturing operation. Finally, it was concluded that the operation is more economic in Sarvak zone and western wells.

  7. Modelling of a hydraulic engine mount with fluid-structure interaction finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2004-08-01

    Hydraulic engine mount (HEM) is now widely used as a highly effective vibration isolator in automotive powertrain. A lumped parameter (LP) model is a traditional model for modelling the dynamic characteristics of HEM, in which the system parameters are usually obtained by experiments. In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) finite element analysis (FEA) method and a non-linear FEA technology are used to determine the system parameters, and a fully coupled FSI model is developed for modelling the static and lower-frequency performance of an HEM. A FSI FEA technique is used to estimate the parameters of volumetric compliances, equivalent piston area, inertia and resistance of the fluid in the inertia track and the decoupler of an HEM. A non-linear FEA method is applied to determine the dynamic stiffness of rubber spring of the HEM. The system parameters predicated by FEA are compared favorably with experimental data and/or analytical solutions. A numerical simulation for an HEM with an inertia track and a free decoupler is performed based on the FSI model and the LP model along with the estimated system parameters, and again the simulation results are compared with experimental data. The calculated time histories of some variables in the model, such as the pressure in the upper chamber, the displacement of the free decoupler and the volume flow through the inertia track and the decoupler, under different excitations, elucidate the working mechanism of the HEM. The pressure distribution calculated with the FSI model in the chambers of the HEM validates the assumption that the pressure distribution in the upper and lower chamber is uniform in the LP model. The work conducted in the paper demonstrates that the methods for estimating the system parameters in the LP model and the FSI model for modelling HEM are effective, with which the dynamic characteristic analysis and design optimization of an HEM can be performed before its prototype development, and this

  8. Numerical modeling of the hydraulic signatures of horizontal and inclined faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafini, Silvain; Larocque, Marie

    2012-03-01

    Pumping tests in discontinuous media are commonly interpreted using radial/non-radial flow analytical models, which do not account for a large range of multistage real signatures that combine both flow types. The term radial is employed in Barker's sense, referring to the cross-flow area growth with a flow dimension ( n) equal to 2, while multistage refers to a flow response of several time periods with successive n values. Synthetic domains are used to numerically investigate the flow behaviour of faulted media, specifically the effect of fault inclination on multistage signatures. Simulations are performed using single faults surrounded by a permeable matrix to characterize drawdown series and to identify hydrodynamic scenarios associated with some diagnostic multistage n sequences. The n sequence 2 - < 2 - 2 results from interactions between the matrix and a horizontal to weakly inclined fault, while 2 - 1.5 - 2 corresponds to a higher fault inclination and is a combination of the generalized horizontally and vertically faulted models. These results improve the interpretation of ambiguous drawdown series from long-term pumping tests. This provides a better hydraulic characterization of faulted environments, allowing assessment of fault and matrix properties such as fault inclination. The approach is successfully tested on real datasets.

  9. An approach towards a parameterised model for risk assessment of hydraulic fracturing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gläser, Dennis; Class, Holger; Kissinger, Alexander; Beck, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The main ambition of the recently started research project FracRisk (funded within the EU Horizon 2020 programme) is the development of a comprehensive knowledge base and the formulation of scientific recommendations, which can contribute to efforts aimed at minimising the environmental footprint of shale gas production while addressing scientific and public concerns. Forward numerical modelling linked to a detailed risk and uncertainty assessment is applied for estimating the mechanical, hydromechanical, and geochemical consequences resulting from hydraulic fracturing. To capture a broad range of environmental risks, six exemplary scenarios focussing on different physical processes on different spatial and temporal scales are investigated. An approach regarding sources, pathways and targets is used for the quantification of the environmental impacts. A fundamental understanding of the potential risks is achieved by allowing for mutual feedback between the scenarios, identifying key parameters and processes. The coupling of the scenarios to a Polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) paves the way to an abstracted and parameterised model for risk assessment to be used both by regulators and contractors. This contribution at an early stage of the project will elaborate on the general workflow of implementing focussed scenarios into a PCE-based Monte-Carlo approach to parameter sensitivities, that will eventually be embedded into a FEP-based (features, events, processes) evaluation of risk and counteractive measures.

  10. Formation of damage zone and seismic velocity variations during hydraulic stimulation: numerical modelling and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Calò, Marco; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    During hydraulic stimulations, a complex interaction is observed between the injected flux and pressure, number and magnitude of induced seismic events, and changes in seismic velocities. In this paper, we model formation and propagation of damage zones and seismicity patterns induced by wellbore fluid injection. The model includes the coupling of poroelastic deformation and groundwater flow with damage evolution (weakening and healing) and its effect on the elastic and hydrologic parameters of crystalline rocks. Results show that three subsequent interactions occur during stimulation. (1) Injected flux-pressure interaction: typically, after a flux increase, the wellbore pressure also rises to satisfy the flux conditions. Thereafter, the elevated pore pressure triggers damage accumulation and seismic activity, that is, accompanied by permeability increase. As a result, wellbore pressure decreases retaining the target injected flux. (2) Wellbore pressure-seismicity interaction: damage processes create an elongated damage zone in the direction close to the main principal stress. The rocks within the damage zone go through partial healing and remain in a medium damage state. Damage that originates around the injection well propagates within the damage zone away from the well, raising the damage state of the already damaged rocks, and is followed by compaction and fast partial healing back to a medium damage state. This `damage wave' behaviour is associated with the injected flux changes only in early stages while fracture's height (h) is larger than its length (l). The ratio h/l controls the deformation process that is responsible for several key features of the damage zone. (3) Stress- and damage-induced variations of the seismic P-wave velocities (Vp). Vp gradually decreases as damage is accumulated and increases after rock failure as the shear stress is released and healing and compaction are dominant. Typically, Vp decreases within the damage zone and increases in

  11. A New Physics-Based Modeling of Multiple Non-Planar Hydraulic Fractures Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Hai; Deo, Milind; Jiang, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Because of the low permeability in shale plays, closely spaced hydraulic fractures and multilateral horizontal wells are generally required to improve production. Therefore, understanding the potential fracture interaction and stress evolution is critical in optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multi-stage horizontal wells. In this paper, a novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple non-planar fractures propagation. The numerical model from Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to simulate the mechanics of fracture propagations and interactions, while a conjugate irregular lattice network is generated to represent fluid flow in both fractures and formation. The fluid flow in the formation is controlled by Darcy’s law, but within fractures it is simulated by using cubic law for laminar flow through parallel plates. Initiation, growth and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. We investigate the fracture propagation path in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs using the simulator developed. Stress shadow caused by the transverse fracture will change the orientation of principal stress in the fracture neighborhood, which may inhibit or alter the growth direction of nearby fracture clusters. However, the initial in-situ stress anisotropy often helps overcome this phenomenon. Under large in-situ stress anisotropy, the hydraulic fractures are more likely to propagate in a direction that is perpendicular to the minimum horizontal stress. Under small in-situ stress anisotropy, there is a greater chance for fractures from nearby clusters to merge with each other. Then, we examine the differences in fracture geometry caused by fracturing in cemented or uncemented wellbore. Moreover, the impact of

  12. Hydraulic Characteristics of the San Gregorio Creek Drainage Basin, California: a Preliminary Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. R.; Snow, M. K.; Pestrong, R.; Sklar, L. S.; Vavro, M.; Sawachi, A.; Talapian, E.; Bailey, E.

    2004-12-01

    Population pressures within the greater San Francisco Bay Area are forcing development into nearby rural communities, and are impacting local environments. This study of the San Gregorio Creek Watershed is designed as a baseline for evaluating the effect increasing development within the drainage basin has on its river system. We hope to provide evidence for that impact through laboratory and field studies that provide a snap-shot of this drainage basin's current characteristics. The San Gregorio Creek watershed, in the Coast Ranges, is located in the southwestern portion of San Mateo County, California. It drains the western slopes of the Santa Cruz Mountains, in the Coast Ranges into the Pacific Ocean at the town of San Gregorio. Most of its fingertip tributaries flow into the trunk from the north and west, with elevations as high as 2050 feet. The watershed includes an area of approximately 51.6 square miles and San Gregorio Creek, the trunk stream, is roughly 12 miles long. San Gregorio Creek is a fourth order perennial stream. It is fed by a number of major tributaries, the largest of which are Alpine, Mindego, and La Honda creeks. The U.S. Geological Survey maintains a stream gauging station for San Gregorio Creek at the town of San Gregorio, where it has been monitoring stream flows for more than 30 years through its Water Resources Department. The resulting data indicate a mean discharge of 36.4 cfs. Map studies of hydraulic geometry for the drainage basin reveal geometric characteristics for San Gregorio Creek that coincide with similar streams in comparable climatic and environmental settings. Stream table studies are used to further investigate fundamental stream processes. Field studies at selected reaches throughout the drainage basin will document hydraulic characteristics. The results of this study will contribute to more comprehensive studies demonstrateing channel response to changing environmental conditions.

  13. Frontiers of Hydraulic Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmann, Raphael G.

    It is an impossible task for one person to review the proceedings of a major conference that consists of 141 different papers (including 26 one-page summaries of poster sessions). The papers are arranged into 35 technical sessions including Cohesive and Non-Cohesive Sediment Dynamics, Cold Regions Hydraulics, Computational Hydraulics, Groundwater Quality Modeling, Mixing Processes in Stratified Environments, Probablistic Approach to Hydraulics, and Surface Water Hydrology. The subject matter of many of the papers was familiar to the writer, specifically those concerned with groundwater and the hydrology, and hydraulics, of surface water. In addition, such topics as coastal dynamics, mixing processes in stratified environments, cohesive sediment dynamics (?), sediment resuspension and transport, and the hydraulic effects of ice cover are all to found in this volume. The writer refrains from comment on these papers except to say that although some of the papers were comprehensible, his experience is not basis enough for evaluation.

  14. HYDRAULIC SERVO

    DOEpatents

    Wiegand, D.E.

    1962-05-01

    A hydraulic servo is designed in which a small pressure difference produced at two orifices by an electrically operated flapper arm in a constantly flowing hydraulic loop is hydraulically amplified by two constant flow pumps, two additional orifices, and three unconnected ball pistons. Two of the pistons are of one size and operate against the additional orifices, and the third piston is of a different size and operates between and against the first two pistons. (AEC)

  15. Adaptive Control System of Hydraulic Pressure Based on The Mathematical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, A. V.; Pilipenko, A. P.; Kanatnikov, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the authors highlight the problem of replacing an old heavy industrial equipment, and offer the replacement of obsolete control systems on the modern adaptive control system, which takes into account changes in the hydraulic system of the press and compensates them with a corrective action. The proposed system can reduce a water hammer and thereby increase the durability of the hydraulic system and tools.

  16. Linking Tropical Forest Function to Hydraulic Traits in a Size-Structured and Trait-Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, B. O.; Gloor, E. U.; Fauset, S.; Fyllas, N.; Galbraith, D.; Baker, T. R.; Rowland, L.; Fisher, R.; Binks, O.; Mencuccini, M.; Malhi, Y.; Stahl, C.; Wagner, F. H.; Bonal, D.; da Costa, A. C. L.; Ferreira, L.; Meir, P.

    2014-12-01

    A major weakness of forest ecosystem models applied to Amazonia is their inability to capture the diversity of responses to changes in water availability commonly observed within and across forest communities, severely hampering efforts to predict the fate of Amazon forests under climate change. Such models often prescribe moisture sensitivity using heuristic response functions which are uniform across all individuals and lack important knowledge about trade-offs in hydraulic traits. We address this weakness by implementing a process representation of plant hydraulics into an individual- and trait-based model (Trait Forest Simulator; TFS) intended for application at discrete sites across Amazonia. The model represents a trade-off in the safety and efficiency of water conduction in xylem tissue through hydraulic traits, which then lead to variation in plant water use and growth dynamics. The model accounts for the buffering effects of leaf and stem capacitance on leaf water potential at short time scales, and cavitation-induced reductions in whole-plant conductance over longer periods of water stress. We explore multiple possible links between this hydraulic trait spectrum and other whole-plant traits, such as maximum photosynthetic capacity and wood density. The model is shown to greatly improve the diversity of tree response to seasonal changes in water availability as well as response to drought, as determined by comparison with sap flux and stem dendrometry measurements. Importantly, this individual- and trait-based framework provides a testbed for identifying both critical processes and functional traits needed for inclusion in coarse-scale Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, which will lead to reduced uncertainty in the future state of Amazon tropical forests.

  17. Modeling the hydraulical behavior of a fissured-karstic aquifer in exploitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debieche, T. H.; Guglielmi, Y.; Mudry, J.

    2002-02-01

    A 5-year daily measurement of the dynamic level in a borehole was plotted versus cumulative yield since the beginning of exploitation. Eighty percent of the experimental curve is explained by a linear function ( h= aQc+ h0) by intervals. Only floods, which follow heavy storms and non-pumping cannot be taken into account. The slopes of the straight lines are spread around two constant values of the slope: a r=+0.35×10 -3 m m -3, which characterizes the part which is controlled by recharge, and a p=-0.14× 10 -3 m m -3, which characterizes the draining part of the aquifer fractures. This linear fitting demonstrates that the borehole-aquifer system can be considered as an equivalent continuous medium, where the linear relationship between dynamic head and pumped yield are defined by the values of ar and ap. Thus the hydraulic behavior of the aquifer differs according to the pumping rate: equivalent continuous medium for a low rate, dual permeability for a high one. This work demonstrates that the long-term behavior of an exploited fissured aquifer can be described by a simple model, if the duration of the aquifer test is long enough (1-3 months). It also shows that the production phase must include repetitive head measurements in order to refine the exploitation yield and the management conditions.

  18. Educating students and stakeholders about shale gas production using a physical model of hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, M.; Garten, L.

    2013-12-01

    Natural gas from shale gas deposits in the United States can potentially help reduce the dependency on foreign energy sources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve economic development in currently depressed regions of the country. However, the hydraulic fracturing process (';fracking') employed to release natural gas from formation such as the Marcellus Shale in New York State and Pennsylvania carries significant environmental risks, in particular for local and regional water resources. The current polarized discussion of the topic needs to be informed by sound data and a better understanding of the technical, scientific, social, and economic aspects of hydrofracking. We developed, built and tested an interactive portable physical model of the gas production by hydrofracking that can be used in class rooms and at public events to visualize the procedures and associated risks including the dynamics of water, gas and fracking fluids. Dyes are used to identify shale, fracking fluids and backflow and can be traced in the adjacent groundwater system. Gas production is visualized by a CO2 producing acid/bicarbonate solution reaction. The tank was shown to considerably improve knowledge of environmental issues related to unconventional gas production by hydrofracking in an advanced undergraduate course.

  19. Measurement of flow diverter hydraulic resistance to model flow modification in and around intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Szikora, István; Paál, György

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters (FDs) have been successfully applied in the recent decade to the treatment of intracranial aneurysms by impairing the communication between the flows in the parent artery and the aneurysm and, thus, the blood within the aneurysm sac. It would be desirable to have a simple and accurate computational method to follow the changes in the peri- and intraaneurysmal flow caused by the presence of FDs. The detailed flow simulation around the intricate wire structure of the FDs has three disadvantages: need for high amount of computational resources and highly skilled professionals to prepare the computational grid, and also the lack of validation that makes the invested effort questionable. In this paper, we propose a porous layer method to model the hydraulic resistance (HR) of one or several layers of the FDs. The basis of this proposal is twofold: first, from an application point of view, the only interesting parameter regarding the function of the FD is its HR; second, we have developed a method to measure the HR with a simple apparatus. We present the results of these measurements and demonstrate their utility in numerical simulations of patient-specific aneurysm simulations. PMID:24936307

  20. Global dynamic modeling of electro-hydraulic 3-UPS/S parallel stabilized platform by bond graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijie; Guo, Fei; Li, Yongquan; Lu, Wenjuan

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic modeling of a parallel manipulator(PM) is an important issue. A complete PM system is actually composed of multiple physical domains. As PMs are widely used in various fields, the importance of modeling the global dynamic model of the PM system becomes increasingly prominent. Currently there lacks further research in global dynamic modeling. A unified modeling approach for the multi-energy domains PM system is proposed based on bond graph and a global dynamic model of the 3-UPS/S parallel stabilized platform involving mechanical and electrical-hydraulic elements is built. Firstly, the screw bond graph theory is improved based on the screw theory, the modular joint model is modeled and the normalized dynamic model of the mechanism is established. Secondly, combined with the electro-hydraulic servo system model built by traditional bond graph, the global dynamic model of the system is obtained, and then the motion, force and power of any element can be obtained directly. Lastly, the experiments and simulations of the driving forces, pressure and flow are performed, and the results show that, the theoretical calculation results of the driving forces are in accord with the experimental ones, and the pressure and flow of the first limb and the third limb are symmetry with each other. The results are reasonable and verify the correctness and effectiveness of the model and the method. The proposed dynamic modeling method provides a reference for modeling of other multi-energy domains system which contains complex PM.

  1. Streambed Hydraulic Conductivity Structures: Enhanced Hyporheic Exchange and Contaminant Removal in Model and Constructed Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, S.; Higgins, C. P.; McCray, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Urban- and agriculturally-impacted streams face widespread water quality challenges from excess nutrients, metals, and pathogens from nonpoint sources, which the hyporheic zone (HZ) can capture and treat. However, flow through the HZ is typically small relative to stream flow and thus water quality contributions from the HZ are practically insignificant. Hyporheic exchange is a prominent topic in stream biogeochemistry, but growing understanding of HZ processes has not been translated into practical applications. In particular, existing HZ restoration structures (i.e. cross-vanes) do not exchange water efficiently nor control the residence time (RT) of downwelling streamwater. Here we present subsurface modifications to streambed hydraulic conductivity (K) to drive efficient hyporheic exchange and control RT, thereby enhancing the effectiveness of the HZ. Coordinated high K (i.e. gravel) and low K (i.e. concrete, clay) modifications are termed Biohydrochemical Enhancement structures for Streamwater Treatment (BEST). BEST can simply use native sediments or may also incorporate reactive geomedia to enhance reactions. The contaminant mitigation potentials of BEST were estimated based on hyporheic flow and RT outputs from MODFLOW and MODPATH models and reported nutrient, metal, and pathogen removal rate constants from literature for specific porous media. Reactions of interest include denitrification and removal of phosphate, metals, and E. coli. Simulations showed that BEST structures in series can substantially improve water quality in small streams along reaches of tens of meters. The model results are compared to observed data in tank and constructed stream experiments. Preliminary results with BEST incorporating woodchip geomedia demonstrate rapid denitrification exceeding model predictions. These experiments should establish BEST as a novel stream restoration structure or Best Management Practice (BMP) option to help practitioners achieve stormwater compliance.

  2. Reduction of the uncertainties in the water level-discharge relation of a 1D hydraulic model in the context of operational flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habert, J.; Ricci, S.; Le Pape, E.; Thual, O.; Piacentini, A.; Goutal, N.; Jonville, G.; Rochoux, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a data-driven hydrodynamic simulator based on the 1-D hydraulic solver dedicated to flood forecasting with lead time of an hour up to 24 h. The goal of the study is to reduce uncertainties in the hydraulic model and thus provide more reliable simulations and forecasts in real time for operational use by the national hydrometeorological flood forecasting center in France. Previous studies have shown that sequential assimilation of water level or discharge data allows to adjust the inflows to the hydraulic network resulting in a significant improvement of the discharge while leaving the water level state imperfect. Two strategies are proposed here to improve the water level-discharge relation in the model. At first, a modeling strategy consists in improving the description of the river bed geometry using topographic and bathymetric measurements. Secondly, an inverse modeling strategy proposes to locally correct friction coefficients in the river bed and the flood plain through the assimilation of in situ water level measurements. This approach is based on an Extended Kalman filter algorithm that sequentially assimilates data to infer the upstream and lateral inflows at first and then the friction coefficients. It provides a time varying correction of the hydrological boundary conditions and hydraulic parameters. The merits of both strategies are demonstrated on the Marne catchment in France for eight validation flood events and the January 2004 flood event is used as an illustrative example throughout the paper. The Nash-Sutcliffe criterion for water level is improved from 0.135 to 0.832 for a 12-h forecast lead time with the data assimilation strategy. These developments have been implemented at the SAMA SPC (local flood forecasting service in the Haute-Marne French department) and used for operational forecast since 2013. They were shown to provide an efficient tool for evaluating flood risk and to improve the flood early warning system

  3. Physico-chemical characterization of mortars as a tool in studying specific hydraulic components: application to the study of ancient Naxos aqueduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, P.; Galanos, A.; Doganis, I.; Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.

    2011-07-01

    Mortars and plasters from the ancient aqueduct on the island of Naxos, Greece, were studied with regard to mineralogical and chemical composition, grain size distribution, raw materials and hydraulic properties, in order to assess their characteristics and design compatible repair mortars. The authentic materials contained lime, crushed-brick, siliceous and calcitic aggregates, in different proportions according to mortar type. Crushed-bricks fired at low temperatures and lightweight volcanic aggregates contained amorphous phases, which upon reaction with lime yielded hydraulic components capable of protecting the construction from the continuous presence of water. Hydraulic calcium silicate/aluminate hydrates, the proportions and the perfect packing of the raw materials, along with the diligent application justify the longevity and durability of the studied samples. The hydraulic properties of samples were pointed out through (a) the well-established CO2/H2O ratio derived from the thermogravimetric analysis and (b) by introducing two powerful indices issued from the chemical analysis, namely CaOhydr and soluble SiO2 hydr. These indices improved the clustering of hydraulic mortars and provided better correlation between mortars, plasters and their binders. By comparing grain size distribution and hydraulicity indices it was possible to distinguish among the construction phases. Based on this study, repair mortars were formulated by hydraulic lime, siliceous sand, calcareous and crushed-brick aggregates, with the optimal water content, ensuring optimum workability and compatible appearance with the authentic ones.

  4. Toward a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity in climate models: Simulation of rapid groundwater fluctuations in Northern California

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2015-12-31

    Preferential flow through weathered bedrock leads to rapid rise of the water table after the first rainstorms and significant water storage (also known as ‘‘rock moisture’’) in the fractures. We present a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that captures the preferential flow and is easy to implement in global climate models. To mimic the naturally varying heterogeneity with depth in the subsurface, the model represents the hydraulic conductivity as a product of the effective saturation and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a lognormal distribution. The mean of the background Kbkg decreases monotonically with depth, while its variance reducesmore » with the effective saturation. Model parameters are derived by assimilating into Richards’ equation 6 years of 30 min observations of precipitation (mm) and water table depths (m), from seven wells along a steep hillslope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California. The results show that the observed rapid penetration of precipitation and the fast rise of the water table from the well locations, after the first winter rains, are well captured with the new stochastic approach in contrast to the standard van Genuchten model of hydraulic conductivity, which requires significantly higher levels of saturated soils to produce the same results. ‘‘Rock moisture,’’ the moisture between the soil mantle and the water table, comprises 30% of the moisture because of the great depth of the weathered bedrock layer and could be a potential source of moisture to sustain trees through extended dry periods. Moreover, storage of moisture in the soil mantle is smaller, implying less surface runoff and less evaporation, with the proposed new model.« less

  5. Toward a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity in climate models: Simulation of rapid groundwater fluctuations in Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2015-12-31

    Preferential flow through weathered bedrock leads to rapid rise of the water table after the first rainstorms and significant water storage (also known as ‘‘rock moisture’’) in the fractures. We present a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that captures the preferential flow and is easy to implement in global climate models. To mimic the naturally varying heterogeneity with depth in the subsurface, the model represents the hydraulic conductivity as a product of the effective saturation and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a lognormal distribution. The mean of the background Kbkg decreases monotonically with depth, while its variance reduces with the effective saturation. Model parameters are derived by assimilating into Richards’ equation 6 years of 30 min observations of precipitation (mm) and water table depths (m), from seven wells along a steep hillslope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California. The results show that the observed rapid penetration of precipitation and the fast rise of the water table from the well locations, after the first winter rains, are well captured with the new stochastic approach in contrast to the standard van Genuchten model of hydraulic conductivity, which requires significantly higher levels of saturated soils to produce the same results. ‘‘Rock moisture,’’ the moisture between the soil mantle and the water table, comprises 30% of the moisture because of the great depth of the weathered bedrock layer and could be a potential source of moisture to sustain trees through extended dry periods. Moreover, storage of moisture in the soil mantle is smaller, implying less surface runoff and less evaporation, with the proposed new model.

  6. Toward a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity in climate models: Simulation of rapid groundwater fluctuations in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2015-12-01

    Preferential flow through weathered bedrock leads to rapid rise of the water table after the first rainstorms and significant water storage (also known as "rock moisture") in the fractures. We present a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that captures the preferential flow and is easy to implement in global climate models. To mimic the naturally varying heterogeneity with depth in the subsurface, the model represents the hydraulic conductivity as a product of the effective saturation and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a lognormal distribution. The mean of the background Kbkg decreases monotonically with depth, while its variance reduces with the effective saturation. Model parameters are derived by assimilating into Richards' equation 6 years of 30 min observations of precipitation (mm) and water table depths (m), from seven wells along a steep hillslope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California. The results show that the observed rapid penetration of precipitation and the fast rise of the water table from the well locations, after the first winter rains, are well captured with the new stochastic approach in contrast to the standard van Genuchten model of hydraulic conductivity, which requires significantly higher levels of saturated soils to produce the same results. "Rock moisture," the moisture between the soil mantle and the water table, comprises 30% of the moisture because of the great depth of the weathered bedrock layer and could be a potential source of moisture to sustain trees through extended dry periods. Furthermore, storage of moisture in the soil mantle is smaller, implying less surface runoff and less evaporation, with the proposed new model.

  7. Hydraulic performance of biofilters for stormwater management: first lessons from both laboratory and field studies.

    PubMed

    Le Coustumer, S; Fletcher, T D; Deletic, A; Barraud, S

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve knowledge on stormwater biofiltration systems, the Facility for Advancing Water Biofiltration (FAWB) was created at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. One of the aims of FAWB is to improve hydraulic performance of biofilters, given that there are numerous cases of infiltration devices failing after a few years of operation. Experiments were conducted in the field to evaluate the performance of existing systems, and in the lab to understand the factors that influence hydraulic behavior over time. The field experiments show that 43% of tested systems are below nominal Australian guidelines for hydraulic conductivity. The preliminary lab results show a decrease in hydraulic conductivity during the first weeks of operation (mu=66% reduction), although most remain within acceptable limits. Influences of the size of the biofilter relative to its catchment and the importance of the type of media, on the evolution of hydraulic conductivity, are examined. PMID:18048981

  8. RELAP5 model to simulate the thermal-hydraulic effects of grid spacers and cladding rupture during reflood

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianandan, C.K.; Klingenfus, J.A.; Reilly, S.S.

    1995-09-01

    Droplet breakup at spacer grids and a cladding swelled and ruptured locations plays an important role in the cooling of nuclear fuel rods during the reflooding period of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the reflood phase, a spacer grid affects the thermal-hydraulic system behavior through increased turbulence, droplet breakup due to impact on grid straps, grid rewetting, and liquid holdup due to grid form losses. Recently, models to simulate spacer grid effects and blockage and rupture effects on system thermal hydraulics were added to the B&W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) version of the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. Several FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood tests, CCTF Tests C1-19 and C2-6, SCTF Test S3-15, and G2 Test 561 were simulated using RELAP5/MOD2-B&W to verify the applicability of the model at the cladding swelled and rupture locations. The results demonstrate the importance of modeling the thermal-hydraulic effects due to grids, and clad swelling and rupture to correctly predict the clad temperature response during the reflood phase of large break LOCA. The RELAP5 models and the test results are described in this paper.

  9. Development of roughness updating based on artificial neural network in a river hydraulic model for flash flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, J. C.; Hsu, M. H.; Duann, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Flood is the worst weather-related hazard in Taiwan because of steep terrain and storm. The tropical storm often results in disastrous flash flood. To provide reliable forecast of water stages in rivers is indispensable for proper actions in the emergency response during flood. The river hydraulic model based on dynamic wave theory using an implicit finite-difference method is developed with river roughness updating for flash flood forecast. The artificial neural network (ANN) is employed to update the roughness of rivers in accordance with the observed river stages at each time-step of the flood routing process. Several typhoon events at Tamsui River are utilized to evaluate the accuracy of flood forecasting. The results present the adaptive n-values of roughness for river hydraulic model that can provide a better flow state for subsequent forecasting at significant locations and longitudinal profiles along rivers.

  10. Modeling the Impact of Hydraulic Redistribution on Carbon Cycles Using CLM4.5 at Eight AmeriFlux Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C.; Wang, G.; Cardon, Z. G.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) has significant impacts on the terrestrial hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes. Accurate modeling of HR and its impact on vegetation growth and ecosystem carbon dynamics is important for accurate simulation of regional and global carbon cycles. However, how HR influences plant, soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics remains poorly understood. In this study, we incorporate a simple HR scheme into the Community Land Model Version 4.5 (CLM4.5) including the biogeochemical model BGC. We use the modified CLM4.5-BGC model to investigate the impact of HR on the terrestrial carbon cycle at eight AmeriFlux sites where HR was detected from soil moisture measurements: a Douglas-fir site (US-Wrc) in Washington State with a Mediterranean climate, a savanna site (US-SRM) in Arizona with a semi-arid climate, and six sites along the Southern California Climate Gradient with a Mediterranean climate, with coverage of coastal sage (US-SCs), grassland (US-SCg), oak/pine forest (US-SCf), pinyon and juniper woodland (US-SCw), desert chaparral (US-SCc), and desert perennials and annuals (US-SCd). Monitored net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) at the US-Wrc, US-SRM, and US-SCf sites, is used in model calibration and HR sensitivity analysis. Preliminary results from the model indicate that HR tends to increase net primary production (NPP) during dry periods and increase leaf area index (LAI) throughout the year at the US-Wrc site, while HR increased NPP and LAI during growing season and reduced NPP and LAI during dry periods at the US-SCs and US-SCg sites, with corresponding modifications to carbon storage in soil layers and in plant leaf, stem, and root carbon pools. The biogeochemical processes leading to these effects will be analyzed and presented.

  11. A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application to crack propagation at glacier beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Victor C.; Rice, James R.

    2010-09-01

    Glaciological observations of under-flooding suggest that fluid-induced hydraulic fracture of an ice sheet from its bed sometimes occurs quickly, possibly driven by turbulently flowing water in a broad sheet flow. Taking the approximation of a fully turbulent flow into an elastic ice medium with small fracture toughness, we derive an approximate expression for the crack-tip speed, opening displacement and pressure profile. We accomplish this by first showing that a Manning-Strickler channel model for resistance to turbulent flow leads to a mathematical structure somewhat similar to that for resistance to laminar flow of a power law viscous fluid. We then adapt the plane-strain asymptotic crack solution of Desroches et al. (1994) and the power law self-similar solution of Adachi and Detournay (2002) for that case to calculate the desired quantities. The speed of crack growth is shown to scale as the overpressure (in excess of ice overburden) to the power 7/6, inversely as ice elastic modulus to the power 2/3, and as the ratio of crack length to wall roughness scale to the power 1/6. We tentatively apply our model by choosing parameter values thought appropriate for a basal crack driven by the rapid drainage of a surface meltwater lake near the margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Making various approximations perhaps relevant to this setting, we estimate fluid inflow rate to the basal fracture and vertical and horizontal surface displacements and find order-of-magnitude agreement with observations by Das et al. (2008) associated with lake drainage. Finally, we discuss how these preliminary estimates could be improved.

  12. Geo-radar scanning and GIS mapping of an old water utility network in Paphos district area in Cyprus under the project: 'Upgrade of the hydraulics laboratory for the modeling of water supply networks and design and operation optimization study'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Agapiou, Athos; Papachristodoulou, Andreas; Evlogimenos, Ploutarchos; Theodorou, Maria; Sotiropoulos, Pavlos; Maroulakis, Spyros; Karaolides, Charalambos; Hadjimitsis, Marinos G.; Onoufriou, Toula; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2013-08-01

    This work is part of a research project named as `HYDROGIS LAB'. A preliminary underground survey using the newly acquired ground penetrated radar is presented. This technology provides accurate scanning and 3D spatial representation of the underground piping network. The main aim is to refine the digital imprint of the water supply network under consideration. Work has also been initiated in the development of a GIS platform for managing all information (maps, satellite imaging, 3D scans, network system components etc). The geo-radar scanning is required to support the modeling of water supply network, design and operation.

  13. Land-use effects on flood generation - considering soil hydraulic measurements in modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahren, A.; Feger, K.-H.; Schwärzel, K.; Münch, A.

    2009-08-01

    The investigation in the catchment of the Mulde (51°0'55" N, 13°15'54" E Saxony, Germany) researches the effect of afforestation measures on the soil hydraulic properties. The concept of a "false chronosequence" was used to quantify the time-dependent dynamical character of the forest impact. Four adjacent plots were identified at a test location with comparable pedological start conditions and a set of tree stands of different age: (1) arable field (initial state); (2) 6-year-old afforestation; (3) 50-year-old afforestation; (4) ancient natural forest ("target" stocking). Water retention curves and unsaturated conductivities were analysed in the lab. In the field, the undisturbed infiltration capacities were measured quantitatively (hood infiltrometer) and qualitatively (brilliant blue tracer). Pronounced differences between all 4 plots were detected. The afforestation causes an increased infiltration and soil water retention potential. Especially the topsoil layers showed a distinct increase in conductivity and portion of coarse/middle pores. The influence of these changes on rainfall-runoff calculations at the test location was analysed in this study.

  14. Modelling of diffusion-limited retardation of contaminants in hydraulically and lithologically nonuniform media.

    PubMed

    Liedl, Rudolf; Ptak, Thomas

    2003-11-01

    A new reactive transport modelling approach and examples of its application are presented, dealing with the impact of sorption/desorption kinetics on the spreading of solutes, e.g. organic contaminants, in groundwater. Slow sorption/desorption is known from the literature to be strongly responsible for the retardation of organic contaminants. The modelling concept applied in this paper quantifies sorption/desorption kinetics by an intra-particle diffusion approach. According to this idea, solute uptake by or release from the aquifer material is modelled at small scale by a "slow" diffusion process where the diffusion coefficient is reduced as compared to the aqueous diffusion coefficient due to (i) the size and shape of intra-particle pores and (ii) retarded transport of solutes within intra-particle pores governed by a nonlinear sorption isotherm. This process-based concept has the advantage of requiring only measurable model parameters, thus avoiding fitting parameters like first-order rate coefficients. In addition, the approach presented here allows for modelling of slow sorption/desorption in lithologically nonuniform media. Therefore, it accounts for well-known experimental findings indicating that sorptive properties depend on (i) the grain size distribution of the aquifer material and (ii) the lithological composition (e.g. percentage of quartz, sandstone, limestone, etc.) of each grain size fraction. The small-scale physico-chemical model describing sorption/desorption is coupled to a large-scale model of groundwater flow and solute transport. Consequently, hydraulic heterogeneities may also be considered by the overall model. This coupling is regarded as an essential prerequisite for simulating field-scale scenarios which will be addressed by a forthcoming publication. This paper focuses on mathematical model formulation, implementation of the numerical code and lab-scale model applications highlighting the sorption and desorption behavior of an organic

  15. Application of Advanced Thermal Hydraulic TRACG Model to Preserve Operating Margins in BWRs at Extended Power Up-rate Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens G. M.; Casillas, Jose L.; Shiralkar, Bharat S.

    2006-07-01

    GE has developed TRACG, a customized BWR version of the TRAC model, for application to BWR analyses. This model was initially applied to special BWR challenges and for benchmarking the official simplified thermal-hydraulic design models. However, in past years extensive additional model development, qualification and application studies have been completed. This development has followed the CSAU methodology, where extensive model evaluation and qualification have been performed to demonstrate the applicability of the model and to quantify the uncertainty in the model parameters as well as in plant parameters and initial conditions. This has then been combined with a statistically based application methodology following the CSAU approach to generate tolerance limits for the critical safety and design parameters. This effort has resulted in application processes that have been reviewed and approved by the US NRC to enable routine application of the TRACG model to the design and licensing analyses and utilize the improved operating margin to optimize the fuel cycle design. These applications have been supported by development of programs that construct specific plant and problem base-decks that utilize BWR plant characteristics and system databases to standardize and streamline the application to several plants. The application of the TRACG model in Transient and LOCA analyses has assisted in allowing similar power peaking at higher power density conditions for BWRs. Also, the application of the TRACG model in Stability analyses has assisted in preserving the setpoints of stability monitoring systems to avoid margin loss for high power density applications. TRACG is being used for analysis of ATWS events. It has been used to support the development of emergency procedure guidelines, and it is currently being used to demonstrate that the suppression pool temperature limits can be met for up-rated conditions. Finally, the application of the TRACG model in Faulted Load

  16. Natural attenuation of fuel hydrocarbon contaminants: Hydraulic conductivity dependency of biodegradation rates in a field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-07-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  17. Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbon Contaminants: Correlation of Biodegradation with Hydraulic Conductivity in a Field Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-10-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, USA. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  18. Application of a new hydraulic conductivity model to simulate rapid groundwater fluctuations in the Eel River watershed in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrettas, M. D.; Fung, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    High-frequency multi-year observations of the water table at several wells in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve in the Eel River Watershed in northern California show rapid fluctuations, where the water table, some 10-15 meters below the surface, rises by as much as 1 meter in a day or two after the first storms of the rain season. The observations highlight preferential flow through weathered bedrock, which can store as much as 30% of the moisture in the column ("rock moisture"). This rapid transfer of moisture and storage at depth could have a significant impact on ecosystem dynamics and the water and energy budgets of the atmosphere on various time scales. Despite its high importance, preferential flow through weather bedrock is not routinely captured in most climate models. This work presents a new hydraulic conductivity parameterization that captures the preferential flow, with straightforward implementation into current global climate models. The hydraulic conductivity is represented as a product of the effective saturation (normalized water content) and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a depth dependent lognormal distribution. A unique feature of the parameterization is that the variance of hydraulic conductivity is large when there is little rock moisture, and decreases with increasing saturation, mimicking flow through fractures. The new method is applied to seven wells locations on a steep (35 degrees) hill-slope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California, for the duration of six years and estimates of the model parameters are provided by assimilating, into Richards' equation, measurements of precipitation [mm] and water table depths [m] at 30-minute time intervals. The simulation results show that the new approach yields a good agreement of the rapid rise of the observed water table at the tested well locations. Furthermore, the water stored in the weathered bedrock is estimated to be in the range between 32% and 41%, which could

  19. Laboratory-Measured and Property-Transfer Modeled Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Snake River Plain Aquifer Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.

    2008-01-01

    Sediments are believed to comprise as much as 50 percent of the Snake River Plain aquifer thickness in some locations within the Idaho National Laboratory. However, the hydraulic properties of these deep sediments have not been well characterized and they are not represented explicitly in the current conceptual model of subregional scale ground-water flow. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the nature of the sedimentary material within the aquifer and to test the applicability of a site-specific property-transfer model developed for the sedimentary interbeds of the unsaturated zone. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) was measured for 10 core samples from sedimentary interbeds within the Snake River Plain aquifer and also estimated using the property-transfer model. The property-transfer model for predicting Ksat was previously developed using a multiple linear-regression technique with bulk physical-property measurements (bulk density [pbulk], the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient) as the explanatory variables. The model systematically underestimates Ksat,typically by about a factor of 10, which likely is due to higher bulk-density values for the aquifer samples compared to the samples from the unsaturated zone upon which the model was developed. Linear relations between the logarithm of Ksat and pbulk also were explored for comparison.

  20. Calibration of 2D Hydraulic Inundation Models with SAR Imagery in the Floodplain Region of the Lower Tagus River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestana, Rita; Matias, Magda; Canelas, Ricardo; Roque, Dora; Araujo, Amelia; Van Zeller, Emilia; Trigo-Teixeira, Antonio; Ferreira, Rui; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Heleno, Sandra; Falcão, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Alexandre B.

    2014-05-01

    Floods account for 40% of all natural hazards worldwide and were responsible for the loss of about 100 thousand human lives and affected more than 1,4 million people in the last decade of the 20th century alone. Floods have been the deadliest natural hazard in Portugal in the last 100 years. In terms of inundated area, the largest floods in Portugal occur in the Lower Tagus (LT) River. On average, the river overflows every 2.5 years, at times blocking roads and causing important agricultural damages. The economical relevance of the area and the high frequency of the relevant flood events make the LT floodplain a good pilot region to conduct a data-driven, systematic calibration work of flood hydraulic models. This paper focus on the calibration of 2D-horizontal flood simulation models for the floods of 1997, 2001 and 2006 on a 70-km stretch of the LT River, between Tramagal and Omnias, using the software Tuflow. This computational engine provides 2D solutions based on the Stelling finite-difference, alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme that solves the full 2D free surface shallow-water flow equations and allowed the introduction of structures that constrain water flow. The models were based on a digital terrain model (DTM) acquired in 2008 by radar techniques (5m of spatial resolution) and on in situ measurements of water elevation in Omnias (downstream boundary condition) and discharge in Tramagal and Zezere (upstream boundary conditions). Due to the relevancy of several dykes on this stretch of the LT River, non-existent on the available DTM, five of them were introduced in the models. All models have the same boundaries and were simulated using steady-state flow initial conditions. The resolution of the 2D grid mesh was 30m. Land cover data for the study area was retrieved from Corine Land Cover 2006 (CO-ordination of INformation on the Environment) with spatial resolution of 100m, and combined with estimated manning coefficients obtained in literature

  1. Investigating the Effect of Hydraulic Data and Heterogeneity on Stochastic Inversion of a Physically Based Groundwater Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    This research explores the interactions between data quantity, data quality and heterogeneity resolution on stochastic inversion of a physically based model. To further investigate aquifer heterogeneity, simulations are used to examine the impact of geostatistical models on inversion quality, as well as the spatial sensitivity to heterogeneity using local and global methods. The model domain is a two-dimensional steady-state confined aquifer with lateral flows through two hydrofacies with alternating patterns.To examine general effects, the control variable method was adopted to reveal the impact of three factors on estimated hydraulic conductivity (K) and hydraulic head boundary conditions (BCs): (1) data availability, (2) data error, and (3) characterization of heterogeneity. Results show that fewer data increase model sensitivity to measurement error and heterogeneity. Extremely large data errors can cause severe model deterioration, regardless of sufficient data availability or high resolution representation of heterogeneity. Smaller data errors can alleviate the bias caused by the limited observations. For heterogeneity resolution, once general patterns of geological structures are captured, its influence is minimal compared to the other factors.Next, two geostatistical models (spherical and exponential variograms), were used to explore the representation of heterogeneity under the same nugget effects. The results show that stochastic inversion based on the exponential variogram improves both the precision and accuracy of the inverse model, as compared to the spherical variogram. This difference is particularly important for determining accurate BCs through stochastic inversion.Last, sensitivity analysis was conducted to further investigate the effect of varying the K of each hydrofacies on model inversion. Results from the partial local method show that the inversion is more sensitive to perturbations of K in regions with high heterogeneity. Using the

  2. Numerical simulations of hydraulic redistribution across climates: The role of the root hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Juan C.; Kumar, Praveen

    2015-10-01

    Hydraulic redistribution, a process by which vegetation roots redistribute soil moisture, has been recognized as an important mechanism impacting several processes that regulate plant water uptake, energy and water partitioning, and biogeochemical cycling. We analyze how the magnitude of hydraulic redistribution varies across ecosystems that are exposed to different climates and seasonal patterns of incoming shortwave radiation and precipitation. Numerical simulation studies are performed over 10 Ameriflux sites, which show that hydraulic redistribution predictions are significantly influenced by the specified root hydraulic conductivities. We performed sensitivity analyses by considering expected ranges of root conductivities based on previous experimental studies, and found contrasting patterns in energy-limited and water-limited ecosystems. In energy-limited ecosystems, there is a threshold above which high root conductivities enhance hydraulic redistribution with no increase in transpiration, while in water-limited ecosystems increase in root conductivities was always associated with enhancements in both transpiration and hydraulic redistribution. Further we found differences in the magnitude and seasonality of hydraulic redistribution and transpiration across different climates, regulated by interplay between precipitation and transpiration. The annual hydraulic redistribution to transpiration flux ratio (HR/Tr) was significant in Mediterranean climates (HR/Tr ≈ 30%), and in the tropical humid climates (HR/Tr ≈ 15%). However, in the continental climates hydraulic redistribution occurs only during sporadic precipitation events throughout the summer resulting in lower annual magnitudes (HR/Tr < 5%). These results provide more insights for suitable implementation of numerical models to capture belowground processes in eco-hydrology, and enhance our understanding about the variability of hydraulic redistribution across different climates.

  3. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

  4. An exact explicit solution for one-dimensional, transient, nonlinear Richards' equation for modeling infiltration with special hydraulic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    This work develops a simple exact and explicit solution of the one-dimensional transient and nonlinear Richards' equation for soils in a special case of exponential water retention curve and power law hydraulic conductivity. The exact solution is obtained as traveling wave based on the approach proposed by Philip (1957, 1967) and adopted by Zlotnik et al. (2007). The obtained solution is novel, and it expresses explicitly the water content as function of the depth and time. It can be useful to model infiltration into semi-infinite soils with time-dependent boundary conditions and infiltration with constant boundary condition but space-dependent initial condition. A complete analytical inverse procedure based on the proposed analytical solution is presented which allows the estimation of hydraulic parameters. The proposed exact solution is also important for the verification of numerical schemes as well as for checking the implementation of time-dependent boundary conditions.

  5. Estimating the Potential Toxicity of Chemicals Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Operations Using Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Modeling.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Stanek, John; DeWoskin, Robert S; Burgoon, Lyle D

    2016-07-19

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identified 1173 chemicals associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids, flowback, or produced water, of which 1026 (87%) lack chronic oral toxicity values for human health assessments. To facilitate the ranking and prioritization of chemicals that lack toxicity values, it may be useful to employ toxicity estimates from quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. Here we describe an approach for applying the results of a QSAR model from the TOPKAT program suite, which provides estimates of the rat chronic oral lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL). Of the 1173 chemicals, TOPKAT was able to generate LOAEL estimates for 515 (44%). To address the uncertainty associated with these estimates, we assigned qualitative confidence scores (high, medium, or low) to each TOPKAT LOAEL estimate, and found 481 to be high-confidence. For 48 chemicals that had both a high-confidence TOPKAT LOAEL estimate and a chronic oral reference dose from EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database, Spearman rank correlation identified 68% agreement between the two values (permutation p-value =1 × 10(-11)). These results provide support for the use of TOPKAT LOAEL estimates in identifying and prioritizing potentially hazardous chemicals. High-confidence TOPKAT LOAEL estimates were available for 389 of 1026 hydraulic fracturing-related chemicals that lack chronic oral RfVs and OSFs from EPA-identified sources, including a subset of chemicals that are frequently used in hydraulic fracturing fluids. PMID:27172125

  6. Estimating the Potential Toxicity of Chemicals Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Operations Using Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Modeling.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Stanek, John; DeWoskin, Robert S; Burgoon, Lyle D

    2016-07-19

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identified 1173 chemicals associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids, flowback, or produced water, of which 1026 (87%) lack chronic oral toxicity values for human health assessments. To facilitate the ranking and prioritization of chemicals that lack toxicity values, it may be useful to employ toxicity estimates from quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. Here we describe an approach for applying the results of a QSAR model from the TOPKAT program suite, which provides estimates of the rat chronic oral lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL). Of the 1173 chemicals, TOPKAT was able to generate LOAEL estimates for 515 (44%). To address the uncertainty associated with these estimates, we assigned qualitative confidence scores (high, medium, or low) to each TOPKAT LOAEL estimate, and found 481 to be high-confidence. For 48 chemicals that had both a high-confidence TOPKAT LOAEL estimate and a chronic oral reference dose from EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database, Spearman rank correlation identified 68% agreement between the two values (permutation p-value =1 × 10(-11)). These results provide support for the use of TOPKAT LOAEL estimates in identifying and prioritizing potentially hazardous chemicals. High-confidence TOPKAT LOAEL estimates were available for 389 of 1026 hydraulic fracturing-related chemicals that lack chronic oral RfVs and OSFs from EPA-identified sources, including a subset of chemicals that are frequently used in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

  7. EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CAPTURE DUE TO CHANGING FLOW PATTERNS USING MAPPING AND MODELING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    SPILIOTOPOULOS AA; SWANSON LC; SHANNON R; TONKIN MJ

    2011-04-07

    Robust performance evaluation represents one of the most challenging aspects of groundwater pump-and-treat (P&T) remedy implementation. In most cases, the primary goal of the P&T system is hydraulic containment, and ultimately recovery, of contaminants to protect downgradient receptors. Estimating the extent of hydraulic containment is particularly challenging under changing flow patterns due to variable pumping, boundaries and/or other conditions. We present a systematic approach to estimate hydraulic containment using multiple lines of evidence based on (a) water-level mapping and (b) groundwater modeling. Capture Frequency Maps (CFMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-level maps developed for each available water level data set using universal kriging. In a similar manner, Capture Efficiency Maps (CEMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-levels calculated using a transient groundwater flow model: tracking is undertaken independently for each stress period using a very low effective porosity, depicting the 'instantaneous' fate of each particle each stress period. Although conceptually similar, the two methods differ in their underlying assumptions and their limitations: their use together identifies areas where containment may be reliable (i.e., where the methods are in agreement) and where containment is uncertain (typically, where the methods disagree). A field-scale example is presented to illustrate these concepts.

  8. Development of property-transfer models for estimating the hydraulic properties of deep sediments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winfield, Kari A.

    2005-01-01

    estimated from the appropriate regression equation and used to calculate an estimated water-retention curve. The degree to which the estimated curve approximated the measured curve was quantified using a goodness-of-fit indicator, the root-mean-square error. Comparison of the root-mean-square-error distributions for each alternative particle-size model showed that the estimated water-retention curves were insensitive to the way the particle-size distribution was represented. Bulk density, the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient were chosen as input parameters for the final models. The property-transfer models developed in this study allow easy determination of hydraulic properties without need for their direct measurement. Additionally, the models provide the basis for development of theoretical models that rely on physical relationships between the pore-size distribution and the bulk-physical properties of the media. With this adaptation, the property-transfer models should have greater application throughout the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and other geographic locations.

  9. IN-SERVICE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF GCLS IN LANDFILL COVERS - LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments using multi-species inorganic solutions (containing calcium and sodium) were conducted on specimens of a new geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) containing sodium bentonite to determine how cation exchange and desiccation affected the hydraulic conductivity. Calc...

  10. Hydraulic testing plan for the Bear Creek Valley Treatability Study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study is intended to provide site-specific data defining potential treatability technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. The ultimate goal of this effort is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium, technetium, nitrate, and several metals from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. This project directly supports the BCV Feasibility Study. Part of the Treatability Study, Phase II Hydraulic Performance Testing, will produce hydraulic and treatment performance data required to design a long-term treatment system. This effort consists of the installation and testing of two groundwater collection systems: a trench in the vicinity of GW-835 and an angled pumping well adjacent to NT-1. Pumping tests and evaluations of gradients under ambient conditions will provide data for full-scale design of treatment systems. In addition to hydraulic performance, in situ treatment chemistry data will be obtained from monitoring wells installed in the reactive media section of the trench. The in situ treatment work is not part of this test plan. This Hydraulic Testing Plan describes the location and installation of the trench and NT-1 wells, the locations and purpose of the monitoring wells, and the procedures for the pumping tests of the trench and NT-1 wells.

  11. Hydraulics of high-yield orchard trees: a case study of three Malus domestica cultivars.

    PubMed

    Beikircher, Barbara; De Cesare, Chiara; Mayr, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    The drought tolerance of three economically important apple cultivars, Golden Delicious, Braeburn and Red Delicious, was analysed. The work offers insights into the hydraulics of these high-yield trees and indicates a possible hydraulic limitation of carbon gain. The hydraulic safety and efficiency of branch xylem and leaves were quantified, drought tolerance of living tissues was measured and stomatal regulation, turgor-loss point and osmotic potential at full turgor were analysed. Physiological measurements were correlated with anatomical parameters, such as conduit diameter, cell-wall reinforcement, stomatal density and stomatal pore length. Hydraulic safety differed considerably between the three cultivars with Golden Delicious being significantly less vulnerable to drought-induced embolism than Braeburn and Red Delicious. In Golden Delicious, leaves were less resistant than branch xylem, while in the other cultivars leaves were more resistant than branch xylem. Hydraulic efficiency and xylem anatomical measurements indicate differences in pit properties, which may also be responsible for variations in hydraulic safety. In all three cultivars, full stomatal closure occurred at water potentials where turgor had already been lost and severe loss of hydraulic conductivity as well as damage to living cells had been induced. The consequential negative safety margins pose a risk for hydraulic failure but facilitate carbon gain, which is further improved by the observed high stomatal conductance. Maximal stomatal conductance was clearly seen to be related to stomatal density and size. Based on our results, these three high-yield Malus domestica Borkh. cultivars span a wide range of drought tolerances, appear optimized for maximal carbon gain and, thus, all perform best under well-managed growing conditions. PMID:24319028

  12. Hydraulics of high-yield orchard trees: a case study of three Malus domestica cultivars.

    PubMed

    Beikircher, Barbara; De Cesare, Chiara; Mayr, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    The drought tolerance of three economically important apple cultivars, Golden Delicious, Braeburn and Red Delicious, was analysed. The work offers insights into the hydraulics of these high-yield trees and indicates a possible hydraulic limitation of carbon gain. The hydraulic safety and efficiency of branch xylem and leaves were quantified, drought tolerance of living tissues was measured and stomatal regulation, turgor-loss point and osmotic potential at full turgor were analysed. Physiological measurements were correlated with anatomical parameters, such as conduit diameter, cell-wall reinforcement, stomatal density and stomatal pore length. Hydraulic safety differed considerably between the three cultivars with Golden Delicious being significantly less vulnerable to drought-induced embolism than Braeburn and Red Delicious. In Golden Delicious, leaves were less resistant than branch xylem, while in the other cultivars leaves were more resistant than branch xylem. Hydraulic efficiency and xylem anatomical measurements indicate differences in pit properties, which may also be responsible for variations in hydraulic safety. In all three cultivars, full stomatal closure occurred at water potentials where turgor had already been lost and severe loss of hydraulic conductivity as well as damage to living cells had been induced. The consequential negative safety margins pose a risk for hydraulic failure but facilitate carbon gain, which is further improved by the observed high stomatal conductance. Maximal stomatal conductance was clearly seen to be related to stomatal density and size. Based on our results, these three high-yield Malus domestica Borkh. cultivars span a wide range of drought tolerances, appear optimized for maximal carbon gain and, thus, all perform best under well-managed growing conditions.

  13. Effect of physical property of supporting media and variable hydraulic loading on hydraulic characteristics of advanced onsite wastewater treatment system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meena Kumari; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory-scale study was carried out to investigate the effects of physical properties of the supporting media and variable hydraulic shock loads on the hydraulic characteristics of an advanced onsite wastewater treatment system. The system consisted of two upflow anaerobic reactors (a septic tank and an anaerobic filter) accommodated within a single unit. The study was divided into three phases on the basis of three different supporting media (Aqwise carriers, corrugated ring and baked clay) used in the anaerobic filter. Hydraulic loadings were based on peak flow factor (PFF), varying from one to six, to simulate the actual conditions during onsite wastewater treatment. Hydraulic characteristics of the system were identified on the basis of residence time distribution analyses. The system showed a very good hydraulic efficiency, between 0.86 and 0.93, with the media of highest porosity at the hydraulic loading of PFF≤4. At the higher hydraulic loading of PFF 6 also, an appreciable hydraulic efficiency of 0.74 was observed. The system also showed good chemical oxygen demand and total suspended solids removal efficiency of 80.5% and 82.3%, respectively at the higher hydraulic loading of PFF 6. Plug-flow dispersion model was found to be the most appropriate one to describe the mixing pattern of the system, with different supporting media at variable loading, during the tracer study.

  14. Effect of physical property of supporting media and variable hydraulic loading on hydraulic characteristics of advanced onsite wastewater treatment system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meena Kumari; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory-scale study was carried out to investigate the effects of physical properties of the supporting media and variable hydraulic shock loads on the hydraulic characteristics of an advanced onsite wastewater treatment system. The system consisted of two upflow anaerobic reactors (a septic tank and an anaerobic filter) accommodated within a single unit. The study was divided into three phases on the basis of three different supporting media (Aqwise carriers, corrugated ring and baked clay) used in the anaerobic filter. Hydraulic loadings were based on peak flow factor (PFF), varying from one to six, to simulate the actual conditions during onsite wastewater treatment. Hydraulic characteristics of the system were identified on the basis of residence time distribution analyses. The system showed a very good hydraulic efficiency, between 0.86 and 0.93, with the media of highest porosity at the hydraulic loading of PFF≤4. At the higher hydraulic loading of PFF 6 also, an appreciable hydraulic efficiency of 0.74 was observed. The system also showed good chemical oxygen demand and total suspended solids removal efficiency of 80.5% and 82.3%, respectively at the higher hydraulic loading of PFF 6. Plug-flow dispersion model was found to be the most appropriate one to describe the mixing pattern of the system, with different supporting media at variable loading, during the tracer study. PMID:25428652

  15. Hydraulic model studies on bulb turbine intakes. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    Intakes for bulb and rim generator turbines are very large in relation to their runner diameters. Because the water velocity is low in the intake area, the losses are small. This report describes research on the effect that simplifying the intake design has on energy losses and flow distribution. Using straight surfaces in place of curved bellmouth entrances and shortening the length of the intake could significantly reduce construction costs. In addition, reducing the intake size would reduce the size of trashracks, gates, and associated operating equipment.

  16. A coupled carbon and plant hydraulic model to predict ecosystem carbon and water flux responses to disturbance and environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. S.; Ewers, B. E.; Roberts, D. E.; McDowell, N. G.; Pendall, E.; Frank, J. M.; Reed, D. E.; Massman, W. J.; Mitra, B.

    2011-12-01

    Changing climate drivers including temperature, humidity, precipitation, and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations directly control land surface exchanges of CO2 and water. In a profound way these responses are modulated by disturbances that are driven by or exacerbated by climate change. Predicting these changes is challenging given that the feedbacks between environmental controls, disturbances, and fluxes are complex. Flux data in areas of bark beetle outbreaks in the western U.S.A. show differential declines in carbon and water flux in response to the occlusion of xylem by associated fungi. For example, bark beetle infestation at the GLEES AmeriFlux site manifested in a decline in summer water use efficiency to 60% in the year after peak infestation compared to previous years, and no recovery of carbon uptake following a period of high vapor pressure deficit. This points to complex feedbacks between disturbance and differential ecosystem reaction and relaxation responses. Theory based on plant hydraulics and extending to include links to carbon storage and exhaustion has potential for explaining these dynamics with simple, yet rigorous models. In this spirit we developed a coupled model that combines an existing model of canopy water and carbon flow, TREES [e.g., Loranty et al., 2010], with the Sperry et al., [1998] plant hydraulic model. The new model simultaneously solves carbon uptake and losses along with plant hydraulics, and allows for testing specific hypotheses on feedbacks between xylem dysfunction, stomatal and non-stomatal controls on photosynthesis and carbon allocation, and autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. These are constrained through gas exchange, root vulnerability to cavitation, sap flux, and eddy covariance data in a novel model complexity-testing framework. Our analysis focuses on an ecosystem gradient spanning sagebrush to subalpine forests. Our modeling results support hypotheses on feedbacks between hydraulic dysfunction and 1) non

  17. Tree level hydrodynamic approach for resolving aboveground water storage and stomatal conductance and modeling the effects of tree hydraulic strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirfenderesgi, Golnazalsadat; Bohrer, Gil; Matheny, Ashley M.; Fatichi, Simone; Moraes Frasson, Renato Prata; Schäfer, Karina V. R.

    2016-07-01

    The finite difference ecosystem-scale tree crown hydrodynamics model version 2 (FETCH2) is a tree-scale hydrodynamic model of transpiration. The FETCH2 model employs a finite difference numerical methodology and a simplified single-beam conduit system to explicitly resolve xylem water potentials throughout the vertical extent of a tree. Empirical equations relate water potential within the stem to stomatal conductance of the leaves at each height throughout the crown. While highly simplified, this approach brings additional realism to the simulation of transpiration by linking stomatal responses to stem water potential rather than directly to soil moisture, as is currently the case in the majority of land surface models. FETCH2 accounts for plant hydraulic traits, such as the degree of anisohydric/isohydric response of stomata, maximal xylem conductivity, vertical distribution of leaf area, and maximal and minimal xylem water content. We used FETCH2 along with sap flow and eddy covariance data sets collected from a mixed plot of two genera (oak/pine) in Silas Little Experimental Forest, NJ, USA, to conduct an analysis of the intergeneric variation of hydraulic strategies and their effects on diurnal and seasonal transpiration dynamics. We define these strategies through the parameters that describe the genus level transpiration and xylem conductivity responses to changes in stem water potential. Our evaluation revealed that FETCH2 considerably improved the simulation of ecosystem transpiration and latent heat flux in comparison to more conventional models. A virtual experiment showed that the model was able to capture the effect of hydraulic strategies such as isohydric/anisohydric behavior on stomatal conductance under different soil-water availability conditions.

  18. Experimental design for estimating unknown hydraulic conductivity in an aquifer using a genetic algorithm and reduced order model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushijima, Timothy T.; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2015-12-01

    We develop an experimental design algorithm to select locations for a network of observation wells that provide the maximum robust information about unknown hydraulic conductivity in a confined, anisotropic aquifer. Since the information that a design provides is dependent on an aquifer's hydraulic conductivity, a robust design is one that provides the maximum information in the worst-case scenario. The design can be formulated as a max-min optimization problem. The problem is generally non-convex, non-differentiable, and contains integer variables. We use a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to perform the combinatorial search. We employ proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to reduce the dimension of the groundwater model, thereby reducing the computational burden posed by employing a GA. The GA algorithm exhaustively searches for the robust design across a set of hydraulic conductivities and finds an approximate design (called the High Frequency Observation Well Design) through a Monte Carlo-type search. The results from a small-scale 1-D test case validate the proposed methodology. We then apply the methodology to a realistically-scaled 2-D test case.

  19. Experimental Study of Liquid Jet Impingement in Microgravity: The Hydraulic Jump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avedisian, C. T.; Zhao, Z.

    1996-01-01

    A preliminary study of the Circular Hydraulic Jump (CHJ) in microgravity is reported using water as the working fluid. The evolution of the CHJ radius was measured during a sudden transition from normal to microgravity in a drop tower. The downstream height of the CHJ was controlled by submerging the target plate in a tank filled with water to the desired depth, and the measurements are compared with an existing theory for the location of the CHJ. Results showed that the CHJ diameter was larger in microgravity than normal gravity. The adjustment of the CHJ diameter to a sudden change in gravity occurred over a period of about 200 ms for the conditions of the present study, and remained constant thereafter. For flow conditions that a CHJ was not first established at normal gravity but which later appeared during the transition to microgravity, the CHJ diameter was not constant during the period of microgravity but continually changed. Good agreement between the measured and predicted CHJ diameter was found for the normal gravity data, but comparatively poorer agreement was observed for the microgravity measurements.

  20. Effective application of LIDAR data in two-dimensional hydraulic modelling. (Polish Title: Efektywne wykorzystanie danych LIDAR w dwuwymiarowym modelowaniu hydraulicznym)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, K.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents aspects of ALS data usage in two-dimensional hydraulic modelling including generation of high-precision digital terrain models, their effective processing which is a compromise between the resolution and the accuracy of the processed data, as well as information about the roughness of the land cover providing information that could compete with information from topographic databases and orthophotomaps. Still evolving ALS technology makes it possible to collect the data with constantly increasing spatial resolution that guarantees correct representation of the terrain shape and height. It also provides a reliable description of the land cover. However, the size of generated files may cause problems in their effective usage in the 2D hydraulic modeling where Saint-Venant's equations are implemented. High-resolution elevation models make it impossible or prolong the duration of the calculations for large areas in complex algorithms defining a model of the water movement, which is directly related to the cost of the hydraulic analysis. As far as an effective usage of voluminous datasets is concerned, the data reduction is recommended. Such a process should reduce the size of the data files, maintain their accuracy and keep the appropriate structure to allow their further application in the hydraulic modelling. An application of only a few percent of unprocessed datasets, selected with the use of specified filtering algorithms and spatial analysis tools, can give the same result of the hydraulic modeling obtained in a significantly shorter time than the result of the comparable operation on unprocessed datasets. Such an approach, however, is not commonly used, which means the most reliable hydraulic models are applied only in small areas in the largest cities. Another application of ALS data is its potential usage in digital roughness model creation for 2D hydraulic models. There are many possibilities of roughness coefficient estimation in hydraulic

  1. Coupling hydrologic and hydraulic modelling for reliable flood risk mitigation activities in the Upper-Medium Tiber River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, N.; Brocca, L.; Giustarini, L.; Pandolfo, C.; Stelluti, M.; Melone, F.; Moramarco, T.

    2009-04-01

    In view of the recent and serious flood events occurred in latest years in Italy, the interest towards accurate methodology for the evaluation of flood prone areas is continually increasing. In particular, this issue is related to urbanization planning activities, civil protection actions (e.g. hydraulic risk warning systems), and the assessment of hydraulic engineering structures behaviour during severe hydrometeorological conditions. In Italy, following the publishing in the late 90's of many laws and regulations concerning hydraulic risk assessment matters, a widespread flooding areas mapping have been carried out (Italian Basin Authorities "PAI" plans). In case of limited availability of historical peak flow data, the flood prone areas estimation was based on the application of hydrologic and hydraulic modelling separately. Moreover, the recent directive 2007/60/EC on the assessment and management of flood risks requires from each member state: preliminary flood risk assessment (within December 2011), flood hazard maps and flood risk maps (within December 2013), flood risk management plans (within December 2015). In order to prevent and control flood events in medium-small river basins (e.g. Upper Tiber River basin, Central Italy), the use of hydrologic models coupled with hydraulic ones can be a valuable tool also for real time applications, such as flood risk mitigation and warning activities of the Italian National Warning System Network (composed by regional "Functional Centres" coordinated by the National Civil Protection Department). In this context, two significant flood events occurred in November 2005 and December 2008 in the Umbria Region territory were considered. In this area a hydrometeorological network, characterized by a high temporal and spatial resolution, is operating in real time. Different coupled models were considered to reproduce the selected events, in order to test and compare their reliability and efficiency. Specifically, two semi

  2. Regression models for hydraulic conductivity and field test of borehole permeameter

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Daniel B.; Watson, David B; Lambert, Kevin

    1987-12-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity K{sub s} of sediments in the vadose zone is an important parameter in predicting the seepage rates of water and contaminants. The borehole permeameter is an in situ technique to test a relatively large sample size at any depth. Solutions are presented which account for the effects of unsaturated flow. These solutions are derived from a regression analysis of results of numerical simulations in which unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is represented by one or two parameters. The results of a borehole permeameter test in a uniform sand are compared with field ponding tests and air entry permeameter tests. The regression-based solutions for the borehole permeameter which account for capillarity provide very good agreement with other permeameter results. Depending upon the approach used to solve the borehole problem K{sub s} values determined by methods which neglected and included capillary effects varied by a factor of only about two for the soil tested.

  3. Regression models for hydraulic conductivity and field test of the borehole permeameter

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D.B.; Lambert, K.; Watson, D.

    1987-12-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity K/sub s/ of sediments in the vadose zone is an important parameter in predicting the seepage rates of water and contaminants. The borehole permeameter is an in situ technique to test a relatively large sample size at any depth. Solutions are presented which account for the effects of unsaturated flow. These solutions are derived from a regression analysis of results of numerical simulations in which unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is represented by one or two parameters. The results of a borehole permeameter test in a uniform sand are compared with field ponding tests and air entry permeameter tests. The regression-based solutions for the borehole permeameter which account for capillarity provide very good agreement with other permeameter results. Depending upon the approach used to solve the borehole problem K/sub s/ values determined by methods which neglected and included capillary effects varied by a factor of only about two for the soil test.

  4. Modeling and Measuring the Interaction between Hydrokinetic Devices and the Hydraulic and Sedimentary Environment of the Tanana River, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravens, T. M.; Kartezhnikova, M.; Edgerly, E.; Opsahl, B.; Hansen, N.; Kasper, J.; Schmid, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report on our efforts to model and measure the interaction between hydrokinetic (HK) devices and the hydraulic and sedimentary environment of the Tanana River, by Nenana Alaska. The Tanana River, by Nenana Alaska, has an open-water median flow rate of about 1325 m3/s, a width of about 200 m, a maximum depth of about 9 m, peak flow velocities of about 2.5 m/s, and suspended sediment concentrations as high as 2 g/L. Preliminary modeling of the hydraulic impact of a 45 KW cross-flow-style HK turbine using SNL-EFDC software found that the device raised water levels upstream of the device by about 0.5 cm. It also led to reductions in velocity of about 0.05 m and enhancements of about 0.01 m/s. In this paper, we will report on ongoing efforts to model the corresponding sedimentary impacts of HK devices at this location. In late August of 2014, a 15 KW open-center-style hydrokinetic turbine (manufactured by Oceana Energy Corporation) was deployed for a three week period at the Tanana River site. Device performance (e.g., power generation and angular frequency (rpm's)) were monitored along with environmental parameters including: velocity as a function of depth upstream and downstream of the device, turbulence at "hub elevation" upstream and downstream of the device, suspended sediment concentration upstream and downstream of the device, and sediment bed elevation before and after testing. In this paper, we will report on all of these data as well as data on the abrasion of device components. Further, we will present data on the dependence of device coefficient of performance and turbulence intensity. Finally, we will compare modeled and measured hydraulic and sedimentary impacts of the HK device.

  5. A study on the optimal hydraulic loading rate and plant ratios in recirculation aquaponic system.

    PubMed

    Endut, Azizah; Jusoh, A; Ali, N; Wan Nik, W B; Hassan, A

    2010-03-01

    The growths of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were evaluated in recirculation aquaponic system (RAS). Fish production performance, plant growth and nutrient removal were measured and their dependence on hydraulic loading rate (HLR) was assessed. Fish production did not differ significantly between hydraulic loading rates. In contrast to the fish production, the water spinach yield was significantly higher in the lower hydraulic loading rate. Fish production, plant growth and percentage nutrient removal were highest at hydraulic loading rate of 1.28 m/day. The ratio of fish to plant production has been calculated to balance nutrient generation from fish with nutrient removal by plants and the optimum ratio was 15-42 gram of fish feed/m(2) of plant growing area. Each unit in RAS was evaluated in terms of oxygen demand. Using specified feeding regime, mass balance equations were applied to quantify the waste discharges from rearing tanks and treatment units. The waste discharged was found to be strongly dependent on hydraulic loading rate.

  6. A study on the optimal hydraulic loading rate and plant ratios in recirculation aquaponic system.

    PubMed

    Endut, Azizah; Jusoh, A; Ali, N; Wan Nik, W B; Hassan, A

    2010-03-01

    The growths of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were evaluated in recirculation aquaponic system (RAS). Fish production performance, plant growth and nutrient removal were measured and their dependence on hydraulic loading rate (HLR) was assessed. Fish production did not differ significantly between hydraulic loading rates. In contrast to the fish production, the water spinach yield was significantly higher in the lower hydraulic loading rate. Fish production, plant growth and percentage nutrient removal were highest at hydraulic loading rate of 1.28 m/day. The ratio of fish to plant production has been calculated to balance nutrient generation from fish with nutrient removal by plants and the optimum ratio was 15-42 gram of fish feed/m(2) of plant growing area. Each unit in RAS was evaluated in terms of oxygen demand. Using specified feeding regime, mass balance equations were applied to quantify the waste discharges from rearing tanks and treatment units. The waste discharged was found to be strongly dependent on hydraulic loading rate. PMID:19819130

  7. Simulation on hydraulic scale model of sand and silt transport in the lower Mississippi River

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, S.; Laukhuff, R.L. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Since many years river sediment transport of sand and silt has been successfully reproduced on scale models by using light density materials. Compared to geometric distortion of the model scales where the secondary currents are not correctly reproduced, the sediment density distortion enables a more precise simulation of total sediment transport process (bed load and suspended load). The paper discussed among other model studies carried out with light density material the model study of the old River Control outflow channel improvement and bank stabilization studies using a 1 to 100 scale physical model. Some of the aspects of the channel bed and bank evolution could not have been simulated if the model bed material behaved always as bed load. Because in a river or channel carrying sand and silt, depending on the flow turbulence the same material at times my represent the bed load and at another time the suspended load. On a scale model only certain type of light density material is capable of such representation. Various model studies to date enables us to confirm that, 1 to 100 scale model using treated sawdust of given grain size distribution and specific weight, reproduces correctly the river sand and silt transport in the Old River Control area of the Lower Mississippi River. The paper also discusses the use of a midget echosounder system for quick and precise hydroelectric survey of the model bed and bank morphology variations and evaluation of scour and deposit volumes after running a given flood hydrograph.

  8. Use of laser flow visualization techniques in reactor component thermal-hydraulic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    To properly design reactor components, an understanding of the various thermal hydraulic phenomena, i.e., thermal stratification flow channeling, recirculation regions, shear layers, etc., is necessary. In the liquid metal breeder reactor program, water is commonly used to replace sodium in experimental testing to facilitate the investigations, (i.e., reduce cost and allow fluid velocity measurement or flow pattern study). After water testing, limited sodium tests can be conducted to validate the extrapolation of the water results to sodium. This paper describes a novel laser flow visualization technique being utilized at ANL together with various examples of its use and plans for further development. A 3-watt argon-ion laser, in conjunction with a cylindrical opticallens, has been used to create a thin (approx. 1-mm) intense plane of laser light for the illuminiation of various flow tracers in precisely defined regions of interest within a test article having windows. Both fluorescing dyes tuned to the wavelength of the laser light (to maximize brightness and sharpness of flow image) and small (< 0.038-mm, 0.0015-in. dia.) opaque, nearly neutrally buoyant polystyrene spheres (to ensure that the particles trace out the fluid motion) have been used as flow tracers.

  9. GROUT HOPPER MODELING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-08-30

    The Saltstone facility has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The dry feeds and the salt solution are already mixed in the mixer prior to being transferred to the hopper tank. The hopper modeling study through this work will focus on fluid stirring and agitation, instead of traditional mixing in the literature, in order to keep the tank contents in motion during their residence time so that they will not be upset or solidified prior to transferring the grout to the Saltstone disposal facility. The primary objective of the work is to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady

  10. Fully Coupled Geomechanics and Discrete Flow Network Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Hao, Y; Carrigan, C R

    2011-01-18

    The primary objective of our current research is to develop a computational test bed for evaluating borehole techniques to enhance fluid flow and heat transfer in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Simulating processes resulting in hydraulic fracturing and/or the remobilization of existing fractures, especially the interaction between propagating fractures and existing fractures, represents a critical goal of our project. To this end, we are continuing to develop a hydraulic fracturing simulation capability within the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC), a combined FEM/DEM analysis code with explicit solid-fluid mechanics coupling. LDEC simulations start from an initial fracture distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other modifications to the fracture system. The output is transferred to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to capture heat transfer and flow at the reservoir scale. This approach is intended to offer flexibility in the types of analyses we can perform, including evaluating the effects of different system heterogeneities on the heat extraction rate as well as seismicity associated with geothermal operations. This paper details the basic methodology of our approach. Two numerical examples showing the capability and effectiveness of our simulator are also presented.

  11. Towards real-time flood forecasting in hydraulics: merits of in situ discharge and water level data assimilation for the modeling of the Marne catchment in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, S. M.; Habert, J.; Le Pape, E.; Piacentini, A.; Jonville, G.; Thual, O.; Zaoui, F.

    2011-12-01

    The present study describes the assimilation of river flow and water level observations and the resulting improvement in flood forecasting. The Kalman Filter algorithm was built on top of the one-dimensional hydraulic model, MASCARET, [1] which describes the Saint-Venant equations. The assimilation algorithm folds in two steps: the first one was based on the assumption that the upstream flow can be adjusted using a three-parameter correction; the second one consisted of directly correcting the hydraulic state. This procedure was previously applied on the Adour Maritime Catchment using water level observations [2]. On average, it was shown that the data assimilation procedure enables an improvement of 80% in the simulated water level over the reanalysis period, 60 % in the forecast water level at a one-hour lead time, and 25% at a twelve-hour lead time. The procedure was then applied on the Marne Catchment, which includes karstic tributaries, located East of the Paris basin, characterized by long flooding periods and strong sensitivity to local precipitations. The objective was to geographically extend and improve the existing model used by the flood forecasting service located in Chalons-en-Champagne. A hydrological study first enabled the specification of boundary conditions (upstream flow or lateral inflow), then the hydraulic model was calibrated using in situ discharge data (adjustment of Strickler coefficients or cross sectional geometry). The assimilation of water level data enabled the reduction of the uncertainty in the hydrological boundary conditions and led to significant improvement of the simulated water level in re-analysis and forecast modes. Still, because of errors in the Strickler coefficients or cross section geometry, the improvement of the simulated water level sometimes resulted in a degradation of discharge values. This problem was overcome by controlling the correction of the hydrological boundary conditions by directly assimilating

  12. Potential of high resolution satellite imagery, remote weather data and 1D hydraulic modeling to evaluate flood areas in Gonaives, Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozza, Andrea; Durand, Arnaud; Allenbach, Bernard; Confortola, Gabriele; Bocchiola, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    We present a feasibility study to explore potential of high-resolution imagery, coupled with hydraulic flood modeling to predict flooding risks, applied to the case study of Gonaives basins (585 km²), Haiti. We propose a methodology working at different scales, providing accurate results and a faster intervention during extreme flood events. The 'Hispaniola' island, in the Caribbean tropical zone, is often affected by extreme floods events. Floods are caused by tropical springs and hurricanes, and may lead to several damages, including cholera epidemics, as recently occurred, in the wake of the earthquake upon January 12th 2010 (magnitude 7.0). Floods studies based upon hydrological and hydraulic modeling are hampered by almost complete lack of ground data. Thenceforth, and given the noticeable cost involved in the organization of field measurement campaigns, the need for exploitation of remote sensing images data. HEC-RAS 1D modeling is carried out under different scenarios of available Digital Elevation Models. The DEMs are generated using optical remote sensing satellite (WorldView-1) and SRTM, combined with information from an open source database (Open Street Map). We study two recent flood episodes, where flood maps from remote sensing were available. Flood extent and land use have been assessed by way of data from SPOT-5 satellite, after hurricane Jeanne in 2004 and hurricane Hanna in 2008. A semi-distributed, DEM based hydrological model is used to simulate flood flows during the hurricanes. Precipitation input is taken from daily rainfall data derived from TRMM satellite, plus proper downscaling. The hydraulic model is calibrated using floodplain friction as tuning parameters against the observed flooded area. We compare different scenarios of flood simulation, and the predictive power of model calibration. The method provide acceptable results in depicting flooded areas, especially considering the tremendous lack of ground data, and show the potential of

  13. Evaluating hydraulic and disinfection efficiencies of a full-scale ozone contactor using a RANS-based modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Tejada-Martínez, Andrés E; Zhang, Qiong; Lei, Hongxia

    2014-04-01

    The capability of predicting hydraulic and disinfection efficiencies of ozone disinfection contactors is essential for evaluating existing contactors and improving future designs. Previous attempts based on ideal and non-ideal models for the hydraulics and simplified mechanisms for chemical reaction modeling have resulted in low accuracy and are restricted to contactors with simple geometries. This manuscript develops a modeling framework for the ozonation process by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a kinetics-based reaction modeling for the first time. This computational framework has been applied to the full-scale ozone contactor operated by the City of Tampa Water Department. Flow fields, residence time distribution, ozone concentration distribution, and concentration-contact time (CT) distribution within the contactor have been predicted via the computational framework. The predictions of ozone and bromate concentrations at sample points agree well with physical experimental data measured in the contactor. The predicted CT values at the contactor outlet demonstrate that the disinfection performance of the ozone contactor operated by the City of Tampa Water Department is sufficient to meet regulation requirements. The impact of seasonal flow rate change on disinfection performance is found to be significant and deserves attention during the management and operation of a water treatment plant.

  14. Evaluating hydraulic and disinfection efficiencies of a full-scale ozone contactor using a RANS-based modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Tejada-Martínez, Andrés E; Zhang, Qiong; Lei, Hongxia

    2014-04-01

    The capability of predicting hydraulic and disinfection efficiencies of ozone disinfection contactors is essential for evaluating existing contactors and improving future designs. Previous attempts based on ideal and non-ideal models for the hydraulics and simplified mechanisms for chemical reaction modeling have resulted in low accuracy and are restricted to contactors with simple geometries. This manuscript develops a modeling framework for the ozonation process by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a kinetics-based reaction modeling for the first time. This computational framework has been applied to the full-scale ozone contactor operated by the City of Tampa Water Department. Flow fields, residence time distribution, ozone concentration distribution, and concentration-contact time (CT) distribution within the contactor have been predicted via the computational framework. The predictions of ozone and bromate concentrations at sample points agree well with physical experimental data measured in the contactor. The predicted CT values at the contactor outlet demonstrate that the disinfection performance of the ozone contactor operated by the City of Tampa Water Department is sufficient to meet regulation requirements. The impact of seasonal flow rate change on disinfection performance is found to be significant and deserves attention during the management and operation of a water treatment plant. PMID:24468426

  15. Development and application of an atmospheric-hydrologic-hydraulic flood forecasting model driven by TIGGE ensemble forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hongjun; Zhao, Linna

    2012-02-01

    A coupled atmospheric-hydrologic-hydraulic ensemble flood forecasting model, driven by The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Interactive Grand Global Ensemble (TIGGE) data, has been developed for flood forecasting over the Huaihe River. The incorporation of numerical weather prediction (NWP) information into flood forecasting systems may increase forecast lead time from a few hours to a few days. A single NWP model forecast from a single forecast center, however, is insufficient as it involves considerable non-predictable uncertainties and leads to a high number of false alarms. The availability of global ensemble NWP systems through TIGGE offers a new opportunity for flood forecast. The Xinanjiang model used for hydrological rainfall-runoff modeling and the one-dimensional unsteady flow model applied to channel flood routing are coupled with ensemble weather predictions based on the TIGGE data from the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC), the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the UK Met Office (UKMO), and the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The developed ensemble flood forecasting model is applied to flood forecasting of the 2007 flood season as a test case. The test case is chosen over the upper reaches of the Huaihe River above Lutaizi station with flood diversion and retarding areas. The input flood discharge hydrograph from the main channel to the flood diversion area is estimated with the fixed split ratio of the main channel discharge. The flood flow inside the flood retarding area is calculated as a reservoir with the water balance method. The Muskingum method is used for flood routing in the flood diversion area. A probabilistic discharge and flood inundation forecast is provided as the end product to study the potential benefits of using the TIGGE ensemble forecasts. The results demonstrate satisfactory flood forecasting with clear signals of probability of floods up to a

  16. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  17. Mathematical model for calculation of the heat-hydraulic modes of heating points of heat-supplying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaginova, Z. I.

    2016-03-01

    The mathematical model and calculation method of the thermal-hydraulic modes of heat points, based on the theory of hydraulic circuits, being developed at the Melentiev Energy Systems Institute are presented. The redundant circuit of the heat point was developed, in which all possible connecting circuits (CC) of the heat engineering equipment and the places of possible installation of control valve were inserted. It allows simulating the operating modes both at central heat points (CHP) and individual heat points (IHP). The configuration of the desired circuit is carried out automatically by removing the unnecessary links. The following circuits connecting the heating systems (HS) are considered: the dependent circuit (direct and through mixing elevator) and independent one (through the heater). The following connecting circuits of the load of hot water supply (HWS) were considered: open CC (direct water pumping from pipelines of heat networks) and a closed CC with connecting the HWS heaters on single-level (serial and parallel) and two-level (sequential and combined) circuits. The following connecting circuits of the ventilation systems (VS) were also considered: dependent circuit and independent one through a common heat exchanger with HS load. In the heat points, water temperature regulators for the hot water supply and ventilation and flow regulators for the heating system, as well as to the inlet as a whole, are possible. According to the accepted decomposition, the model of the heat point is an integral part of the overall heat-hydraulic model of the heat-supplying system having intermediate control stages (CHP and IHP), which allows to consider the operating modes of the heat networks of different levels connected with each other through CHP as well as connected through IHP of consumers with various connecting circuits of local systems of heat consumption: heating, ventilation and hot water supply. The model is implemented in the Angara data

  18. Amazon flood wave hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Bates, Paul D.; Horritt, Matthew S.; Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Forsberg, Bruce R.; Vega, Maria C.

    2009-07-01

    SummaryA bathymetric survey of 575 km of the central Amazon River and one of its tributaries, the Purus, are combined with gauged data to characterise the Amazon flood wave, and for hydraulic modelling of the main channel for the period June 1995-March 1997 with the LISFLOOD-FP and HEC-RAS hydraulic models. Our investigations show that the Amazon flood wave is subcritical and diffusive in character and, due to shallow bed slopes, backwater conditions control significant reach lengths and are present for low and high water states. Comparison of the different models shows that it is necessary to include at least the diffusion term in any model, and the RMSE error in predicted water elevation at all cross sections introduced by ignoring the acceleration and advection terms is of the order of 0.02-0.03 m. The use of a wide rectangular channel approximation introduces an error of 0.10-0.15 m on the predicted water levels. Reducing the bathymetry to a simple bed slope and with mean cross section only, introduces an error in the order of 0.5 m. These results show that when compared to the mean annual amplitude of the Amazon flood wave of 11-12 m, water levels are relatively insensitive to the bathymetry of the channel model. The implication for remote sensing studies of the central Amazon channel, such as those proposed with the Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT), is that even relatively crude assumptions regarding the channel bathymetry will be valid in order to derive discharge from water surface slope of the main channel, as long as the mean channel area is approximately correct.

  19. Review of thermal-hydraulic calculations for Calvert Cliffs and H. B. Robinson PTS study. [Pressurized thermal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J.H.; Yuelys-Miksis, C.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic transient calculations performed by LANL using the TRAC-PF1 code and by INEL using the RELAP5 code for the USNRC pressurized thermal shock (PTS) study of the Calvert Cliffs and H.B. Robinson Nuclear Power Plants have been reviewed at BNL including the input decks and steady state calculations. Furthermore, six transients for each plant have been selected for the in-depth review. Simple hand calculations based on the mass and energy balances of the entire reactor system, have been performed to predict the temperature and pressure of the reactor system, and the results have been compared with those obtained by the code calculation. In general, the temperatures and pressures of the primary system calculated by the codes have been very reasonable. The secondary pressures calculated by TRAC appear to indicate that the codes have some difficulty with the condensation model and further work is needed to assess the code calculation of the U-tube steam generator pressure when the cold auxiliary feedwater is introduced to the steam generator. However, it is not expected that this uncertainty would affect the transient calculations significantly.

  20. Mineralogical study and leaching behavior of a stabilized harbor sediment with hydraulic binder.

    PubMed

    Chatain, Vincent; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Loustau Cazalet, Marie; Bouzahzah, Hassan; Delolme, Cécile; Gautier, Mathieu; Blanc, Denise; de Brauer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The environmental assessment of potential effects of contaminated harbor sediments stabilized with hydraulic binders and the determination of remediation endpoints require the determination of pollutants leaching potentials. Moreover, little information about the speciation and mobility of inorganic contaminants in these specific solid matrices is available in the literature. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship between mineralogy and leachability of contaminants (copper, lead, and zinc) present in a French harbor sediment stabilized with quicklime and Portland cement. Batch equilibrium leaching tests at various pH, chemical analysis of leachates, and mineralogical studies (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform) have been combined in the present investigation. The acid neutralization capacity of the stabilized matrix studied is first controlled by the dissolution of portlandite (pH ~12), followed by the dissolution of C-S-H (pH ~11) and the dissolution of ettringite (pH ~10). Finally, a very high buffering capacity of this stabilized sediment is observed for pH values around 6. This equilibrium is mainly controlled by the dissolution of iron sulfides and carbonate minerals. Consequently, the mobilization of inorganic contaminants as a function of pH remains very low (<0.1 wt%) for pH values above 6 and significantly increases for pH below these values. This research confirms the importance of a combined methodology for the intrinsic characterization of potential mobilization of contaminants in a stabilized sediment and for a better understanding of geochemical processes that affect contaminant fate, transformation, and transport in the subsurface environment.

  1. The Effects of Spatial Resolution and Dimensionality on Modeling Braided River Hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenau, E. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Braided rivers are challenging features to quantify due to their dynamic morphology and dominance in remote locations. Advances in hydrodynamic modeling and remote sensing over the past few decades offer opportunities to explore braided river processes at finer resolutions with increased efficiency. These methods allow us to address questions such as: What model structure is necessary to accurately reproduce inundation extent and water surface elevations in a braided river? What effects do the smaller channels within a braided river have on simulating wave propagation and slope? How much accuracy is lost as model resolution and dimension are decreased? Here, we use the raster-based hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP to simulate water surface elevations, inundation extent, and slope at various resolutions and dimensions over a ~90 km reach of the Tanana River, Alaska. Model input and validation data were collected during two field campaigns in the summers of 2013 and 2015. Field data included water surface elevation, discharge, velocity, slope, and bathymetric measurements. Six models are run to simulate flood waves across the study reach over a two-month timespan. The model structures vary in complexity from a full 2D model at 10 m resolution to a coupled 1D/2D model at 100 m resolution where the channel is represented in 1D by an effective centerline within a 2D floodplain grid. Results from the different models are compared to assess the effects on inundation extent, wave celerity, water elevations and slope. Digital elevation model (DEM) quality and resolution have major effects on inundation extent and water surface elevations, while model dimensionality has a larger effect on wave celerity and slope. Future work will compare model outputs with AirSWOT data, an airborne analog for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which aims to provide high-resolution measurements of terrestrial and ocean water surface elevations globally.

  2. Using observed postconstruction peak discharges to evaluate a hydrologic and hydraulic design model, Boneyard Creek, Champaign and Urbana, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Over, Thomas M.; Soong, David T.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Boneyard Creek—which drains an urbanized watershed in the cities of Champaign and Urbana, Illinois, including part of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) campus—has historically been prone to flooding. Using the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM), a hydrologic and hydraulic model of Boneyard Creek was developed for the design of the projects making up the first phase of a long-term plan for flood control on Boneyard Creek, and the construction of the projects was completed in May 2003. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Cities of Champaign and Urbana and UIUC, installed and operated stream and rain gages in order to obtain data for evaluation of the design-model simulations. In this study, design-model simulations were evaluated by using observed postconstruction precipitation and peak-discharge data. Between May 2003 and September 2008, five high-flow events on Boneyard Creek satisfied the study criterion. The five events were simulated with the design model by using observed precipitation. The simulations were run with two different values of the parameter controlling the soil moisture at the beginning of the storms and two different ways of spatially distributing the precipitation, making a total of four simulation scenarios. The simulated and observed peak discharges and stages were compared at gaged locations along the Creek. The discharge at one of these locations was deemed to be critical for evaluating the design model. The uncertainty of the measured peak discharge was also estimated at the critical location with a method based on linear regression of the stage and discharge relation, an estimate of the uncertainty of the acoustic Doppler velocity meter measurements, and the uncertainty of the stage measurements. For four of the five events, the simulated peak discharges lie within the 95-percent confidence interval of the observed peak discharges at the critical location; the fifth was just outside the upper end of

  3. Coupling atmospheric, hydrological and hydraulic models to develop a catalogue of worst-case scenarios for extreme flooding in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Gómez-Navarro, Juan; Felder, Guido; Raible, Christoph C.; Martius, Olivia; Rössler, Ole

    2015-04-01

    Extreme flooding are a natural threat that leads to great economical cost, especially in densely populated areas such as Switzerland. However, the study of such extremes is difficult due to the fact they are, by definition, very rare, whereas the instrumental period is relatively short. This hampers the study of events with large return periods, which are precisely those more relevant from the impact point of view. Thus, new methodologies have to be developed that provide a deeper understanding of such disastrous situations and their driving mechanisms. This study employs a chain of models that allow the study of the frequency and severity of such situations and to analyse their driving physical mechanisms. First, a long climate simulation (a control simulation spanning more than 500 years) with the comprehensive Global Circulation Model (GCM) CESM1 is used as test-bed for producing a dataset of several centuries of physically consistent climate. This data is then used to filter out a number of case studies corresponding to extreme situations, which are selected as candidates for further analysis. However, although the physical consistency of this simulation ensures that the synoptic circulation leading to the selected events is plausible, the global model employs a coarse spatial resolution (1 degree) that precludes the accurate simulation of the precipitation in areas of complex topography such as Switzerland. Hence, once the dates of the candidate cases are selected within the GCM run, this dataset is downscaled with the Regional Climate Model (RCM) WRF. The RCM implements a spatial resolution of 2 km over the entire alpine area, which allows it to reproduce more accurately the precipitation induced by interactions between the large-scale forcing and the orography. The results show that WRF is able to improve the simulation of precipitation compared to the GCM alone. Although the large-scale flow and the location of the precipitation maxima is very similar in

  4. Determining sources of elevated salinity in pre-hydraulic fracturing water quality data using a multivariate discriminant analysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautz, L. K.; Hoke, G. D.; Lu, Z.; Siegel, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has the potential to introduce saline water into the environment due to migration of deep formation water to shallow aquifers and/or discharge of flowback water to the environment during transport and disposal. It is challenging to definitively identify whether elevated salinity is associated with hydraulic fracturing, in part, due to the real possibility of other anthropogenic sources of salinity in the human-impacted watersheds in which drilling is taking place and some formation water present naturally in shallow groundwater aquifers. We combined new and published chemistry data for private drinking water wells sampled across five southern New York (NY) counties overlying the Marcellus Shale (Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Steuben, and Tioga). Measurements include Cl, Na, Br, I, Ca, Mg, Ba, SO4, and Sr. We compared this baseline groundwater quality data in NY, now under a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, with published chemistry data for 6 different potential sources of elevated salinity in shallow groundwater, including Appalachian Basin formation water, road salt runoff, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, and water softeners. A multivariate random number generator was used to create a synthetic, low salinity (< 20 mg/L Cl) groundwater data set (n=1000) based on the statistical properties of the observed low salinity groundwater. The synthetic, low salinity groundwater was then artificially mixed with variable proportions of different potential sources of salinity to explore chemical differences between groundwater impacted by formation water, road salt runoff, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, and water softeners. We then trained a multivariate, discriminant analysis model on the resulting data set to classify observed high salinity groundwater (> 20 mg/L Cl) as being affected by formation water, road salt, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, or water softeners. Single elements or pairs of

  5. The hydraulic capacity of deteriorating sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Pollert, J; Ugarelli, R; Saegrov, S; Schilling, W; Di Federico, V

    2005-01-01

    Sewer and wastewater systems suffer from insufficient capacity, construction flaws and pipe deterioration. Consequences are structural failures, local floods, surface erosion and pollution of receiving waters bodies. European cities spend in the order of five billion Euro per year for wastewater network rehabilitation. This amount is estimated to increase due to network ageing. The project CARE-S (Computer Aided RE-habilitation of Sewer Networks) deals with sewer and storm water networks. The final project goal is to develop integrated software, which provides the most cost-efficient system of maintenance, repair and rehabilitation of sewer networks. Decisions on investments in rehabilitation often have to be made with uncertain information about the structural condition and the hydraulic performance of a sewer system. Because of this, decision-making involves considerable risks. This paper presents the results of research focused on the study of hydraulic effects caused by failures due to temporal decline of sewer systems. Hydraulic simulations are usually carried out by running commercial models that apply, as input, default values of parameters that strongly influence results. Using CCTV inspections information as dataset to catalogue principal types of failures affecting pipes, a 3D model was used to evaluate their hydraulic consequences. The translation of failures effects in parameters values producing the same hydraulic conditions caused by failures was carried out through the comparison of laboratory experiences and 3D simulations results. Those parameters could be the input of 1D commercial models instead of the default values commonly inserted. PMID:16477988

  6. Quantitative flood risk assessment in historic cities: sensitivity to hydraulic modeling and open socio-economic data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Castelli, Fabio; Brugioni, Marcello; Franceschini, Serena; Mazzanti, Bernardo

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of flood risk in urban areas is considered nowadays a crucial issue to be addressed by technicians and public authorities and requires the estimation of hazard, vulnerability and exposure. Each step of the risk assessment brings its uncertainties to the final result, thus the analysis of the sensitivity to the different contributors is required. Since the damages are generally evaluated through stage-damage functions one of the most important contribution is the estimated value of the water depth. Water depth is the outcome of hydraulic models that can be implemented with different modeling approaches and levels of spatial detail, thus providing flood depth maps that may differ in the extension of the inundated area and in the flood depth value. It is generally argued that 2D models are the most suitable to describe flood behavior in the urban environment although most of applications are carried out in small and sparse urban areas. In the historic cities a 2D model provides reliable results if the grid size is small enough to describe the street/building pattern, implying long simulation runs. Another contribution is given by monetary values assigned to the damage categories that may come from different proxy variables and may oscillate according to the real estate quotations. The risk assessment here presented is made possible thanks to a methodology based on the open data, both socio-economic and territorial, that are available in the web. In this work the risk assessment procedure and the sensitivity analysis are applied to the main cities located along the Arno river, Pisa and Florence (Italy) that are usually considered of broad interest for the importance of urban and cultural heritage. The risk is estimated accounting for structures, household contents, commercial and tertiary sectors which are the most representative of the studied areas. The evaluation and mapping of micro-scale flood risk is carried out in a GIS environment using open data

  7. GHGfrack: An Open-Source Model for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Combustion of Fuel during Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Vafi, Kourosh; Brandt, Adam

    2016-07-19

    This paper introduces GHGfrack, an open-source engineering-based model that estimates energy consumption and associated GHG emissions from drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations. We describe verification and calibration of GHGfrack against field data for energy and fuel consumption. We run GHGfrack using data from 6927 wells in Eagle Ford and 4431 wells in Bakken oil fields. The average estimated energy consumption in Eagle Ford wells using lateral hole diameters of 8 (3)/4 and 6 (1)/8 in. are 2.25 and 2.73 TJ/well, respectively. The average estimated energy consumption in Bakken wells using hole diameters of 6 in. for horizontal section is 2.16 TJ/well. We estimate average greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 419 and 510 tonne of equivalent CO2 per well (tonne of CO2 eq/well) for the two aforementioned assumed geometries in Eagle Ford, respectively, and 417 tonne of CO2 eq/well for the case of Bakken. These estimates are limited only to GHG emissions from combustion of diesel fuel to supply energy only for rotation of drill string, drilling mud circulation, and fracturing pumps. Sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the top three key variables in driving energy intensity in drilling are the lateral hole diameter, drill pipe internal diameter, and mud flow rate. In hydraulic fracturing, the top three are lateral casing diameter, fracturing fluid volume, and length of the lateral. PMID:27341087

  8. GHGfrack: An Open-Source Model for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Combustion of Fuel during Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Vafi, Kourosh; Brandt, Adam

    2016-07-19

    This paper introduces GHGfrack, an open-source engineering-based model that estimates energy consumption and associated GHG emissions from drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations. We describe verification and calibration of GHGfrack against field data for energy and fuel consumption. We run GHGfrack using data from 6927 wells in Eagle Ford and 4431 wells in Bakken oil fields. The average estimated energy consumption in Eagle Ford wells using lateral hole diameters of 8 (3)/4 and 6 (1)/8 in. are 2.25 and 2.73 TJ/well, respectively. The average estimated energy consumption in Bakken wells using hole diameters of 6 in. for horizontal section is 2.16 TJ/well. We estimate average greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 419 and 510 tonne of equivalent CO2 per well (tonne of CO2 eq/well) for the two aforementioned assumed geometries in Eagle Ford, respectively, and 417 tonne of CO2 eq/well for the case of Bakken. These estimates are limited only to GHG emissions from combustion of diesel fuel to supply energy only for rotation of drill string, drilling mud circulation, and fracturing pumps. Sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the top three key variables in driving energy intensity in drilling are the lateral hole diameter, drill pipe internal diameter, and mud flow rate. In hydraulic fracturing, the top three are lateral casing diameter, fracturing fluid volume, and length of the lateral.

  9. Geologically based model of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity in an alluvial setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, Graham E.; Noyes, Charles D.; Carle, Steven F.

    Information on sediment texture and spatial continuity are inherent to sedimentary depositional facies descriptions, which are therefore potentially good predictors of spatially varying hydraulic conductivity (K). Analysis of complex alluvial heterogeneity in Livermore Valley, California, USA, using relatively abundant core descriptions and field pumping-test data, demonstrates a depositional-facies approach to characterization of subsurface heterogeneity. Conventional textural classifications of the core show a poor correlation with K; however, further refinement of the textural classifications into channel, levee, debris-flow, and flood-plain depositional facies reveals a systematic framework for spatial modeling of K. This geologic framework shows that most of the system is composed of very low-K flood-plain materials, and that the K measurements predominantly represent the other, higher-K facies. Joint interpretation of both the K and geologic data shows that spatial distribution of K in this system could not be adequately modeled without geologic data and analysis. Furthermore, it appears that K should not be assumed to be log-normally distributed, except perhaps within each facies. Markov chain modeling of transition probability, representing spatial correlation within and among the facies, captures the relevant geologic features while highlighting a new approach for statistical characterization of hydrofacies spatial variability. The presence of fining-upward facies sequences, cross correlation between facies, as well as other geologic attributes captured by the Markov chains provoke questions about the suitability of conventional geostatistical approaches based on variograms or covariances for modeling geologic heterogeneity. Résumé Les informations sur la texture des sédiments et leur continuité spatiale font partie des descriptions de faciès sédimentaires de dépôt. Par conséquent, ces descriptions sont d'excellents prédicteurs potentiels des

  10. Hydraulic fracture model and diagnostics verification at GRI/DOE multi-site projects and tight gas sand program support. Final report, July 28, 1993--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over twenty years. Early production experiments included nuclear stimulations and massive hydraulic fracture treatments. This work culminated in the US Department of Energy (DOE)`s Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory designed to study the reservoir and production characteristics of low permeability sands. A key feature of MWX was an infrastructure which included several closely spaced wells that allowed detailed characterization of the reservoir through log and core analysis, and well testing. Interference and tracer tests, as well as the use of fracture diagnostics gave further information on stimulation and production characteristics. Thus, the Multiwell Experiment provided a unique opportunity for identifying the factors affecting production from tight gas sand reservoirs. The purpose of this operation was to support the gathering of field data that may be used to resolve the number of unknowns associated with measuring and modeling the dimensions of hydraulic fractures. Using the close-well infrastructure at the Multiwell Site near Rifle, Colorado, this operation focused primarily on the field design and execution of experiments. The data derived from the experiments were gathered and analyzed by DOE team contractors.

  11. Comparison of hydraulic and chemical methods for determining hydraulic conductivity and leakage rates in argillaceous aquitards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Cook, Peter G.; Harrington, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of argillaceous aquitards to effectively separate fresh water aquifers from lower quality waters has been widely studied for several decades using both hydraulic and chemical methods. Hydraulic methods, namely laboratory, field and regional groundwater flow modelling, are used to estimate hydraulic conductivity (K), whereas chemical methods, namely aquitard porewater and aquifer groundwater chemistry, are used to estimate either leakage rates or porewater velocity (V). We reviewed a total of 40 formations where either K or V (or both) have been estimated. Typical vertical hydraulic conductivity (KZ) values in argillaceous materials estimated using hydraulic methods are 10-12-10-9 m s-1. Usual V values, estimated using chemical methods, ranges between 0.01 and 1 mm y-1, although the range is as wide as 10-4-103 mm y-1, when inferred from hydraulic KZ measurements. Based on a Péclet number of 1, we calculated the lower limits of porewater velocity that can be reliably identified for different tracers, in most cases ranging from <1 mm y-1 for 2H, 18O and Cl- to >100 mm y-1 for temperature. Despite the limited number of sites where both methods were applied, comparison between hydraulic and chemical-derived values showed a reasonable correlation, although the range of KZ and V estimated using hydraulic methods is larger than that obtained using chemical methods. Methods applied to the whole aquitard thickness (some field hydraulic methods, regional groundwater flow modelling, aquitard porewater and aquifer chemistry) consistently result in lower KZ values, most probably indicating the presence of very low KZ layers within the aquitard, likely to be missed while using field hydraulic methods that test only a section of the entire thickness. KZ was observed to decrease with depth, presumably due to an increase in consolidation resulting in loss of porosity and smaller aperture of fractures and joints. Multi-disciplinary studies involving the use of

  12. Integrating deterministic lithostratigraphic models in stochastic realizations of subsurface heterogeneity. Impact on predictions of lithology, hydraulic heads and groundwater fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marco; Kearsey, Timothy; Kingdon, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Realistic representations of geological complexity are important to address several engineering and environmental challenges. The spatial distribution of properties controlling physical and geochemical processes can be effectively described by the geological structure of the subsurface. In this work, we present an approach to account for geological structure in geostatistical simulations of categorical variables. The approach is based on the extraction of information from a deterministic conceptualization of the subsurface, which is then used in the geostatistical analysis for the development of models of spatial correlation and as soft conditioning data. The approach was tested to simulate the distribution of four lithofacies in highly heterolithic Quaternary deposits. A transition probability-based stochastic model was implemented using hard borehole data and soft data extracted from a 3-D deterministic lithostratigraphic model. Simulated lithofacies distributions were also used as input in a flow model for numerical simulation of hydraulic head and groundwater flux. The outputs from these models were compared to corresponding values from models based exclusively on borehole data. Results show that soft lithostratigraphic information increases the accuracy and reduces the uncertainty of these predictions. The representation of the geological structure also allows a more precise definition of the spatial distribution of prediction uncertainty, here quantified with a metric based on Shannon information entropy. Correlations between prediction uncertainties for lithofacies, hydraulic heads and groundwater fluxes were also investigated. The results from this analysis provide useful insights about the incorporation of soft geological data into stochastic realizations of subsurface heterogeneity, and emphasize the critical importance of this type of information for reducing the uncertainty of simulations considering flux-dependent processes.

  13. Comparison of alternative representations of hydraulic-conductivity anisotropy in folded fractured-sedimentary rock: Modeling groundwater flow in the Shenandoah Valley (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, R.M.; Voss, C.I.; Southworth, S.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical representation that explicitly represents the generalized three-dimensional anisotropy of folded fractured-sedimentary rocks in a groundwater model best reproduces the salient features of the flow system in the Shenandoah Valley, USA. This conclusion results from a comparison of four alternative representations of anisotropy in which the hydraulic-conductivity tensor represents the bedrock structure as (model A) anisotropic with variable strikes and dips, (model B) horizontally anisotropic with a uniform strike, (model C) horizontally anisotropic with variable strikes, and (model D) isotropic. Simulations using the US Geological Survey groundwater flow and transport model SUTRA are based on a representation of hydraulic conductivity that conforms to bedding planes in a three-dimensional structural model of the valley that duplicates the pattern of folded sedimentary rocks. In the most general representation, (model A), the directions of maximum and medium hydraulic conductivity conform to the strike and dip of bedding, respectively, while the minimum hydraulic-conductivity direction is perpendicular to bedding. Model A produced a physically realistic flow system that reflects the underlying bedrock structure, with a flow field that is significantly different from those produced by the other three models. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  14. Contesting Technologies in the Networked Society: A Case Study of Hydraulic Fracturing and Shale Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopke, Jill E.

    In this dissertation, I study the network structure and content of a transnational movement against hydraulic fracturing and shale development, Global Frackdown. I apply a relational perspective to the study of role of digital technologies in transnational political organizing. I examine the structure of the social movement through analysis of hyperlinking patterns and qualitative analysis of the content of the ties in one strand of the movement. I explicate three actor types: coordinator, broker, and hyper-local. This research intervenes in the paradigm that considers international actors as the key nodes to understanding transnational advocacy networks. I argue this focus on the international scale obscures the role of globally minded local groups in mediating global issues back to the hyper-local scale. While international NGOs play a coordinating role, local groups with a global worldview can connect transnational movements to the hyper-local scale by networking with groups that are too small to appear in a transnational network. I also examine the movement's messaging on the social media platform Twitter. Findings show that Global Frackdown tweeters engage in framing practices of: movement convergence and solidarity, declarative and targeted engagement, prefabricated messaging, and multilingual tweeting. The episodic, loosely-coordinated and often personalized, transnational framing practices of Global Frackdown tweeters support core organizers' goal of promoting the globalness of activism to ban fracking. Global Frackdown activists use Twitter as a tool to advance the movement and to bolster its moral authority, as well as to forge linkages between localized groups on a transnational scale. Lastly, I study the relative prominence of negative messaging about shale development in relation to pro-shale messaging on Twitter across five hashtags (#fracking, #globalfrackdown, #natgas, #shale, and #shalegas). I analyze the top actors tweeting using the #fracking

  15. Hydraulic properties comparison in the calibration of CropSyst, SWAP and MACRO models in simulating soil water content for 3 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfante, A.; Fragnito, F.; Manna, P.; Orefice, N.; Pastori, M.; Perego, A.

    2009-04-01

    The quantification of the water balance components within soil-crop-climate system is strictly required to derive proper management conditions for plant growth and environmental protection. Numerical models are currently accepted as helpful tools to gain into the processes occurring in the soil-crop-climate system and to extrapolate data. A large number of available models solves, at field scale, the water balance components by the well known Richard's equation. Despite their common basis of the representation of water flow in the unsaturated zone, it is possible that with the same pedological, climatic and agronomic management conditions, apparently similar hydrological models give different answers. Therefore, to test the capability of a model to represent reality, model simulation must be compared with experimental data and with simulations by other models. The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare the performances of three well known models (SWAP, MACRO and CropSyst based on the solution of the Richard's equation). Main attention was focussed on the effects of the calibration of the three models on the soil hydraulic properties parameterization. The performance of SWAP, MACRO and CropSyst is compared using field data collected from a structured fine soil (Vertic Calciustepts located in Cerese, Mantova, Italy) cropped to maize. The models are tested and compared on the basis of their ability to predict in situ the measured soil water content at different depths during the years 2002-2004. Water contents was measured with a TDR equipment at 5 depth, where possible with daily frequency. All three models produce acceptable predictions, as evidence by an average root mean square error (RMSE) within ± 0.031 and an average coefficient of residual mass (CRM) within ± 0.66. The SWAP and CropSyst models produces the better performance, but in absolute none of the models is consistently more accurate than the others. In any case the different

  16. Overview of EPA's Approach to Developing Prospective Case Studies Technical Workshop: Case Studies to Assess Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    One component of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) study of the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources is prospective case studies, which are being conducted to more fully understand and assess if and how site specific hydrau...

  17. Modelling the effect of rock fragment on soil saturated hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Sergio; Costanza Andrenelli, Maria; Vignozzi, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    Stoniness may be a key factor in determining the soil hydrological properties. Nevertheless, how coarse fraction takes part in some important processes (e.g., runoff, infiltration and percolation) is not univocally recognized, mainly because of the difficulties in obtaining reliable experimental data and, secondarily, for the employment of different approaches to evaluate the role of the coarse fraction. With that regard, equations developed by hydrogeologists to account for water fluxes in porous media, consider permeability as mere function of grain size distribution (particles >2 mm included), with permeability values increasing when passing from sand to gravel. Conversely, soil scientists consider the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) of soil exclusively as function of the fine-earth fraction and attribute a contrasting effect to the coarse fraction, both in relation to the decrease of porosity and to the increase of flow path tortuosity. Nevertheless, the Soil Survey Handbook includes all fragmental soils (gravel content ≥35% by weight) into the highest class of soil hydraulic conductivity, and this partly disagrees with the mostly adopted soil scientists' approaches. At the same time, lab- experiments carried out by engineers on particle mixture point out that the addition of increasing amounts of coarse material to finer grains progressively reduces the overall porosity until a critical threshold is reached; beyond this level, the void proportion rises again. In relation to the engineers' results, the present paper attempts to conceptually approach the dual effects of rock fragment content on Ksat by considering a decay of the water transmission properties of the fine-earth fraction at low gravel contents and, conversely, a drastic improvement of the conductivity whenever the porosity increases. For that purpose a data set of 50 soils of different textural classes is used to define the procedure by virtually increasing the rock fragment fraction (SK

  18. Improving flash flood forecasting through coupling of a distributed hydrologic rainfall-runoff model (HL-RDHM) with a hydraulic model (BreZo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, P.; Sorooshian, S.; Hsu, K.; AghaKouchak, A.; Sanders, B. F.; Smith, M. B.; Koren, V.

    2012-12-01

    Flash floods can be the most devastating events causing heavy life and economic losses. Improving flash flood warning in regions prone to hydrologic extremes is one highest priority of watershed managers. In this study, a distributed flash flood modeling system is presented. This system consists of advantages of a distributed hydrologic model (HL-RDHM) and the appropriate level of physical representation of channel flow through a high-resolution hydraulic model (BreZo). HL-RDHM is employed as a rainfall-runoff generator for runoff flow simulation, while the output from HL-RDHM is then used as input for the BreZo model, which simulates fine resolution flow in the river/channel system. The surface runoff generated from HL-RDHM is zoned to sub-catchment outlets and each outlet is considered as a point source to the channels. Multiple point sources are then simulated within BreZo to produce flash flood simulations in spatial and temporal distribution for the particular river/channel system and/or floodplain. A case study was carried out for ELDO2 catchment in Oklahoma. ArcGIS Terrain Processing tools were used to divide ELDO2 (10m resolution) into sub-catchments with outlets. The surface flow from HL-RDHM was re-gridded to 10m resolution, then zoned to the 57 sub-catchments. The results obtained are very promising not only for better simulating the total discharge at the watershed outlet, but also for capturing the spatial distribution of flooded area in the floodplains. Flooded map of ELDO2 (in meters) during the extreme event starting at 06/21/2000 10:00:00

  19. Diagnostic Study of Hydraulic and Water Serviceability Functions to Rehabilitate Irrigation Canal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miharu, Koichi; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Mukai, Akie; Taruya, Hiroyuki; Naka, Tatsuo

    In recent years, a technique for the functional diagnosis of various structures and a verification approach have been developed in order to increase the life-span of agricultural irrigation facilities. This permits visual inspections to understand structural conditions of deteriorated hydraulic structures and to assess their soundness indices. To update or upgrade an agricultural irrigation canal on the other hand, it is necessary to establish performance-based design of the system. In addition to structural performance, this performance-based design system should include the evaluation of hydraulic performance and water serviceability. This report targets the irrigation canal system in an irrigation district consisting of paddy fields. It provides examples of the generation of a diagnosis chart for irrigation canal systems that can be effective as an investigation method involving functional diagnosis. This report also discusses a diagnosis example to evaluate the problem examination priority.

  20. Thermal hydraulic simulations, error estimation and parameter sensitivity studies in Drekar::CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Thomas Michael; Shadid, John N.; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Cyr, Eric C.; Wildey, Timothy Michael

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work directed towards completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) CFD Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P7.05 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Nuclear Hub effort. The focus of this milestone was to demonstrate the thermal hydraulics and adjoint based error estimation and parameter sensitivity capabilities in the CFD code called Drekar::CFD. This milestone builds upon the capabilities demonstrated in three earlier milestones; THM.CFD.P4.02 [12], completed March, 31, 2012, THM.CFD.P5.01 [15] completed June 30, 2012 and THM.CFD.P5.01 [11] completed on October 31, 2012.

  1. Hydraulic fracturing model based on a three-dimensional closed form

    SciTech Connect

    Bouteca, M.J. )

    1988-11-01

    The numerical model described in this paper was designed to provide a realistic three-dimensional (3D) solution for fracture propagation in minimal computation time. Comparisons with available results show good concordance for a wide range of data. The results of a parametric study are compared with the Nolte analysis of the propagation pressure.

  2. Computational open-channel hydraulics for movable-bed problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Chintu; ,

    1990-01-01

    As a major branch of computational hydraulics, notable advances have been made in numerical modeling of unsteady open-channel flow since the beginning of the computer age. According to the broader definition and scope of 'computational hydraulics,' the basic concepts and technology of modeling unsteady open-channel flow have been systematically studied previously. As a natural extension, computational open-channel hydraulics for movable-bed problems are addressed in this paper. The introduction of the multimode method of characteristics (MMOC) has made the modeling of this class of unsteady flows both practical and effective. New modeling techniques are developed, thereby shedding light on several aspects of computational hydraulics. Some special features of movable-bed channel-flow simulation are discussed here in the same order as given by the author in the fixed-bed case.

  3. Microbial effect on soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Alex; Rosenzweig, Ravid; Volk, Elazar; Rosenkranz, Hella; Iden, Sascha; Durner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Although largely ignored, the soil contains large amount of biofilms (attached microbes) that can affect many processes. While biochemical processes are studied, biophysical processes receive only little attention. Biofilms may occupy some of the pore space, and by that affect the soil hydraulic properties. This effect on unsaturated soils, however, was not intensively studied. In this research we directly measure the hydraulic properties, namely the soil's unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function and retention curve, for soils containing real biofilm. To do that we inoculate soil with biofilm-forming bacteria and incubate it with sufficient amounts of nutrient until biofilm is formed. The hydraulic properties of the incubated soil are then measured using several techniques, including multi-step outflow and evaporation method. The longer measurements (evaporation method) are conducted under refrigeration conditions to minimize microbial activity during the experiment. The results show a clear effect of the biofilm, where the biofilm-affected soil (sandy loam in our case) behaves like a much finer soil. This qualitatively makes sense as the biofilm generates an effective pore size distribution that is characterized by smaller pores. However, the effect is much more complex and needs to be studied carefully considering (for example) dual porosity models. We compare our preliminary results with other experiments, including flow-through column experiments and experiments with biofilm analogues. Clearly a better understanding of the way microbial activity alters the hydraulic properties may help designing more efficient bioremediation, irrigation, and other soil-related processes.

  4. Development of models for the sodium version of the two-phase three-dimensional thermal hydraulics code THERMIT. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1980-05-01

    Several different models and correlations were developed and incorporated in the sodium version of THERMIT, a thermal-hydraulics code written at MIT for the purpose of analyzing transients under LMFBR conditions. This includes: a mechanism for the inclusion of radial heat conduction in the sodium coolant as well as radial heat loss to the structure surrounding the test section. The fuel rod conduction scheme was modified to allow for more flexibility in modelling the gas plenum regions and fuel restructuring. The formulas for mass and momentum exchange between the liquid and vapor phases were improved. The single phase and two phase friction factors were replaced by correlations more appropriate to LMFBR assembly geometry.

  5. Geologically based model of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity in an alluvial setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, Graham E.; Noyes, Charles D.; Carle, Steven F.

    Information on sediment texture and spatial continuity are inherent to sedimentary depositional facies descriptions, which are therefore potentially good predictors of spatially varying hydraulic conductivity (K). Analysis of complex alluvial heterogeneity in Livermore Valley, California, USA, using relatively abundant core descriptions and field pumping-test data, demonstrates a depositional-facies approach to characterization of subsurface heterogeneity. Conventional textural classifications of the core show a poor correlation with K; however, further refinement of the textural classifications into channel, levee, debris-flow, and flood-plain depositional facies reveals a systematic framework for spatial modeling of K. This geologic framework shows that most of the system is composed of very low-K flood-plain materials, and that the K measurements predominantly represent the other, higher-K facies. Joint interpretation of both the K and geologic data shows that spatial distribution of K in this system could not be adequately modeled without geologic data and analysis. Furthermore, it appears that K should not be assumed to be log-normally distributed, except perhaps within each facies. Markov chain modeling of transition probability, representing spatial correlation within and among the facies, captures the relevant geologic features while highlighting a new approach for statistical characterization of hydrofacies spatial variability. The presence of fining-upward facies sequences, cross correlation between facies, as well as other geologic attributes captured by the Markov chains provoke questions about the suitability of conventional geostatistical approaches based on variograms or covariances for modeling geologic heterogeneity. Résumé Les informations sur la texture des sédiments et leur continuité spatiale font partie des descriptions de faciès sédimentaires de dépôt. Par conséquent, ces descriptions sont d'excellents prédicteurs potentiels des

  6. Complementary hydro-mechanical coupled finite/discrete element and microseismic modelling to predict hydraulic fracture propagation in tight shale reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profit, Matthew; Dutko, Martin; Yu, Jianguo; Cole, Sarah; Angus, Doug; Baird, Alan

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to predict the propagation of hydraulic fractures in tight shale reservoirs. Many hydraulic fracture modelling schemes assume that the fracture direction is pre-seeded in the problem domain discretisation. This is a severe limitation as the reservoir often contains large numbers of pre-existing fractures that strongly influence the direction of the propagating fracture. To circumvent these shortcomings, a new fracture modelling treatment is proposed where the introduction of discrete fracture surfaces is based on new and dynamically updated geometrical entities rather than the topology of the underlying spatial discretisation. Hydraulic fracturing is an inherently coupled engineering problem with interactions between fluid flow and fracturing when the stress state of the reservoir rock attains a failure criterion. This work follows a staggered hydro-mechanical coupled finite/discrete element approach to capture the key interplay between fluid pressure and fracture growth. In field practice, the fracture growth is hidden from the design engineer and microseismicity is often used to infer hydraulic fracture lengths and directions. Microseismic output can also be computed from changes of the effective stress in the geomechanical model and compared against field microseismicity. A number of hydraulic fracture numerical examples are presented to illustrate the new technology.

  7. Model development and calibration for the coupled thermal, hydraulic and mechanical phenomena of the bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Börgesson, Lenart; Fujita, Tomoo; Jussila, Petri; Nguyen, Son; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jing, Lanru

    2009-05-01

    In the international DECOVALEX-THMC project, five research teams study the influence of thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupling on the safety of a hypothetical geological repository for spent fuel. In order to improve the analyses, the teams calibrated their bentonite models with results from laboratory experiments, including swelling pressure tests, water uptake tests, thermally gradient tests, and the CEA mock-up THM experiment. This paper describes the mathematical models used by the teams, and compares the results of their calibrations with the experimental data.

  8. Model development and calibration for the coupled thermal, hydraulic and mechanical phenomena of the bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Chijimatsu, M.; Borgesson, L.; Fujita, T.; Jussila, P.; Nguyen, S.; Rutqvist, J.; Jing, L.; Hernelind, J.

    2009-02-01

    In Task A of the international DECOVALEX-THMC project, five research teams study the influence of thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupling on the safety of a hypothetical geological repository for spent fuel. In order to improve the analyses, the teams calibrated their bentonite models with results from laboratory experiments, including swelling pressure tests, water uptake tests, thermally gradient tests, and the CEA mock-up THM experiment. This paper describes the mathematical models used by the teams, and compares the results of their calibrations with the experimental data.

  9. Evaluating recharge to an ephemeral dryland stream using a hydraulic model and water, chloride and isotope mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogramaci, Shawan; Firmani, Giovanni; Hedley, Paul; Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Grierson, Pauline F.

    2015-02-01

    Dewatering associated with mining below water table to achieve dry mining conditions may exert significant pressure on water balance in terms of lowering the water table and change in the dynamics of interactions between surface water and groundwater. The discharge of surplus mine water into ephemeral streams may also affect the water balance, by elevating groundwater levels and altering the exchange rate between streams and underlying aquifers. However, it is unclear whether volumes and recharge processes are within the range of natural variability. Here, we present a case study of an ephemeral creek in the semi-arid Hamersley Basin of northwest Australia that has received continuous mine discharge for more than six years. We used a numerical model coupled with repeated measurements of water levels, chloride concentrations and the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) to estimate longitudinal evapotranspiration and recharge rates along a 27 km length of Weeli Wolli Creek. We found that chloride increased from 73 to 120 mg/L across this length, while δ18O increased from -8.2‰ to -7.00‰. Groundwater is directly connected to the creek for the first 13 km and recharge rates are negligible. Below this point, the creek flows over a highly permeable aquifer and water loss by recharge increases to a maximum rate of 4.4 mm/d, which accounts for ∼65% of the total water discharged to the creek. Evapotranspiration losses account for the remaining ∼35%. The calculated recharge from continuous flow due to surplus water discharge is similar to that measured for rainfall-driven flood events along the creek. Groundwater under the disconnected section of the creek is characterised by a much lower Cl concentration and more depleted δ18O value than mining discharge water but is similar to flood water generated by large episodic rainfall events. Our results suggest that the impact of recharge from continuous flow on the water balance of the creek

  10. Relationship between Anisotropy in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. Fred

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is saturation-dependent. Accurate characterization of soil anisotropy is very important in simulating flow and contaminant (e.g., radioactive nuclides in Hanford) transport. A recently developed tensorial connectivity-tortuosity (TCT) concept describes the hydraulic conductivity tensor of the unsaturated anisotropic soils as the product of a scalar variable, the symmetric connectivity tortuosity tensor, and the hydraulic conductivity tensor at saturation. In this study, the TCT model is used to quantify soil anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The TCT model can describe different types of soil anisotropy; e.g., the anisotropy coefficient, C, can be monotonically increase or decrease with saturation and can vary from greater than unity to less than unity and vice versa. Soil anisotropy is independent of soil water retention properties and can be characterized by the ratio of the saturated hydraulic conductivities and the difference of the tortuosity-connectivity coefficients in two directions. ln(C) is linearly proportional to ln(Se) with Se being the effective saturation. The log-linear relationship between C and Se allows the saturation-dependent anisotropy to be determined using linear regression with the measurements of the directional hydraulic conductivities at a minimum of two water content levels, of which one may be at full saturation. The model was tested using measurements of directional hydraulic conductivities.

  11. Advanced Multiphysics Thermal-Hydraulics Models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Prashant K; Freels, James D

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design studies to determine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This work is part of an effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Conversion Program. HFIR is a very high flux pressurized light-water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type research reactor. HFIR s current missions are to support neutron scattering experiments, isotope production, and materials irradiation, including neutron activation analysis. Advanced three-dimensional multiphysics models of HFIR fuel were developed in COMSOL software for safety basis (worst case) operating conditions. Several types of physics including multilayer heat conduction, conjugate heat transfer, turbulent flows (RANS model) and structural mechanics were combined and solved for HFIR s inner and outer fuel elements. Alternate design features of the new LEU fuel were evaluated using these multiphysics models. This work led to a new, preliminary reference LEU design that combines a permanent absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, a burnable absorber in the inner element side plates, and a relocated and reshaped (but still radially contoured) fuel zone. Preliminary results of estimated thermal safety margins are presented. Fuel design studies and model enhancement continue.

  12. Simulating the Osceola Mudflow Lahar Event in the Pacific Northwest using a GPU Based 2-Dimensional Hydraulic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, B. G.; Eppert, S.; Lohmann, D.; Li, S.; Goteti, G.; Kaheil, Y. H.

    2011-12-01

    At 4,400 meters, Mount Rainer has been the point of origin for several major lahar events. The largest event, termed the "Osceola Mudflow," occurred 5,500 years ago and covered an area of approximately 550km2 with a total volume of deposited material from 2 to 4km3. Particularly deadly, large lahars are estimated to have maximum flow velocities in of 100km/h with a density often described as "Flowing Concrete." While rare, these events typically cause total destruction within a lahar inundation zone. It is estimated that approximately 150,000 people live on top of previous deposits left by lahars which can be triggered by anything from earthquakes to glacial and chemical erosion of volcanic bedrock over time to liquefaction caused by extreme rainfall events. A novel methodology utilizing a 2 dimensional hydraulic model has been implemented allowing for high resolution (30m) lahar inundation maps to be generated. The utility of this model above or in addition to other methodologies such as that of Iverson (1998), lies in its portability to other lahar zones as well as its ability to model any total volume specified by the user. The process for generating lahar flood plains requires few inputs including: a Digital Terrain Map of any resolution (DTM), a mask defining the locations for lahar genesis, a raster of friction coefficients, and a time series depicting uniform material accumulation over the genesis mask which is allowed to flow down-slope. Finally, a significant improvement in speed has been made for solving the two dimensional model by utilizing the latest in graphics processing unit (GPU) technology which has resulted in a greater than 200 times speed up in model run time over previous CPU-based methods. The model runs for the Osceola Mudflow compare favorably with USGS derived inundation regions as derived using field measurements and GIS based approaches such as the LAHARZ program suit. Overall gradation of low to high risk match well, however the new

  13. Improving the use of the fallout radionuclide 7Be as a sediment tracer by incorporating the hydraulic conductivity in the conversion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryken, Nick; Al-Barri, Bashar; Blake, Will; Taylor, Alex; Boeckx, Pascal; Verdoodt, Ann

    2016-04-01

    There is growing interest in the application of the natural fallout radionuclide 7Be as a soil erosion and sediment tracer. Development of robust datasets is, however, hampered by unquantified spatial variability in its distribution within the surface soil. Models that convert 7Be inventory measurements to soil erosion estimates are all based on the observed depth distribution of 7Be, described by the relaxation mass depth (h0) parameter. Previous work, however, has not considered potential spatial variation in h0 linked to variability in soil physical properties, which could have major implications for the reliability of soil erosion estimates. This work addresses the close relation between infiltration rate and the 7Be depth distribution. During a laboratory rainfall simulation experiment, water spiked with stable 9Be was used to study the variability in 9Be depth distribution for eight compacted and eight non-compacted natural undisturbed soil cores, whereby 9Be was used as a substitute for 7Be. X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) scans were used to characterize the porosity of both groups, showing significant lower, strongly horizontally oriented, total porosity of the compacted soil cores. The average saturated hydraulic conductivity (ksat) of the different groups was 0.89 m day-1 and 17 m day-1 for the compacted and the non-compacted samples respectively. This physical compaction resulted in a clear distinction in 9Be depth distribution between both groups. With an average h0 of 4.66 ± 1.1 kg m-2, 9Be penetrated deeper in the non-compacted soil cores, while the compacted cores showed an average h0 of 2.42 ± 0.26 kg m-2. The reported h0 values at the former site were also characterized by a larger coefficient of variation (24%) than those at the latter site (11%), similar to the variations in soil structure observed by the CT-scans. Furthermore, the correlation between the hydraulic conductivity and the 9Be depth distribution is under investigation by

  14. Remote sensing of stream depths with hydraulically assisted bathymetry (HAB) models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, Mark A.; Marcus, W. Andrew

    2005-12-01

    This article introduces a technique for using a combination of remote sensing imagery and open-channel flow principles to estimate depths for each pixel in an imaged river. This technique, which we term hydraulically assisted bathymetry (HAB), uses a combination of local stream gage information on discharge, image brightness data, and Manning-based estimates of stream resistance to calculate water depth. The HAB technique does not require ground-truth depth information at the time of flight. HAB can be accomplished with multispectral or hyperspectral data, and therefore can be applied over entire watersheds using standard high spatial resolution satellite or aerial images. HAB also has the potential to be applied retroactively to historic imagery, allowing researchers to map temporal changes in depth. We present two versions of the technique, HAB-1 and HAB-2. HAB-1 is based primarily on the geometry, discharge and velocity relationships of river channels. Manning's equation (assuming average depth approximates the hydraulic radius), the discharge equation, and the assumption that the frequency distribution of depths within a cross-section approximates that of a triangle are combined with discharge data from a local station, width measurements from imagery, and slope measurements from maps to estimate minimum, average and maximum depths at a multiple cross-sections. These depths are assigned to pixels of maximum, average, and minimum brightness within the cross-sections to develop a brightness-depth relation to estimate depths throughout the remainder of the river. HAB-2 is similar to HAB-1 in operation, but the assumption that the distribution of depths approximates that of a triangle is replaced by an optical Beer-Lambert law of light absorbance. In this case, the flow equations and the optical equations are used to iteratively scale the river pixel values until their depths produce a discharge that matches that of a nearby gage. R2 values for measured depths

  15. Modeling the impact of hydraulic redistribution on the carbon flux and storages using CLM4.5 at four AmeriFlux Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C.; Wang, G.; Cardon, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on the hydrological cycle and ecosystem dynamics have been demonstrated in the field, but few modeling studies have compared HR's influences on the carbon cycle in different ecosystems and climate regions. The soil moisture changes associated with HR could influence plant carbon gain via two mechanisms: (1) improved plant water status supporting stomatal opening, and/or (2) enhanced nutrient availability to plants caused by enhanced soil microbial activity. In this study, using a modified version of the Community Land Model with Century-based soil carbon pool kinetics that includes the "Ryel et al. 2002" scheme for hydraulic redistribution (HR), the influence of HR on the carbon flux and storage is investigated at four Ameriflux sites where HR was detected from soil moisture measurements. The study sites include a Douglas-fir site (US-Wrc) in Washington State with a mediterranean climate, a savanna site (US-SRM) in Arizona with a semi-arid climate, an oak/pine forest site (US-SCf) in Southern California with a mediterranean climate, and an evergreen broadleaf forest site (BR-Sa1) with tropical monsoon climate. Simulations revealed that HR tended to enhance plant growth at all four sites, and incorporating HR into CLM4.5 reduces the temporal fluctuation of soil carbon storage at all four sites. Simulations with HR can capture the net carbon exchange between ecosystem and the atmosphere (NEE) at the US-Wrc, US-SRM, and BR-Sa1 sites over the annual cycle. Incorporation of HR into CLM4.5 clearly improved the weekly and sub-daily NEE simulation during dry periods at US-SCf and BR-Sa1 site. HR-induced increase in Net Primary Productivity (NPP) at the US-Wrc and US-SRM sites was driven approximately equally by the two distinct mechanisms we investigated: increased stomatal conductance and increased nutrient availability to plants.

  16. Hydraulic modeling of stream channels and structures in Harbor and Crow Hollow Brooks, Meriden, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, Lawrence A.; Sears, Michael P.; Cervione, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of urbanization have increased the frequency and size of floods along certain reaches of Harbor Brook and Crow Hollow Brook in Meriden, Conn. A floodprofile-modeling study was conducted to model the effects of selected channel and structural modifications on flood elevations and inundated areas. The study covered the reach of Harbor Brook downstream from Interstate 691 and the reach of Crow Hollow Brook downstream from Johnson Avenue. Proposed modifications, which include changes to bank heights, channel geometry, structural geometry, and streambed armoring on Harbor Brook and changes to bank heights on Crow Hollow Brook, significantly lower flood elevations. Results of the modeling indicate a significant reduction of flood elevations for the 10-year, 25-year, 35-year, 50-year, and 100-year flood frequencies using proposed modifications to (1 ) bank heights between Harbor Brook Towers and Interstate 691 on Harbor Brook, and between Centennial Avenue and Johnson Avenue on Crow Hollow Brook; (2) channel geometry between Coe Avenue and Interstate 69 1 on Harbor Brook; (3) bridge and culvert opening geometry between Harbor Brook Towers and Interstate 691 on Harbor Brook; and (4) channel streambed armoring between Harbor Brook Towers and Interstate 691 on Harbor Brook. The proposed modifications were developed without consideration of cost-benefit ratios.

  17. COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 1, Mathematical models and solution method

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1986-11-01

    COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations: however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume describes the finite-volume equations and the method used to solve these equations. It is directed toward the user who is interested in gaining a more complete understanding of these methods.

  18. Hydraulic modeling and scour analysis for the San Francisco - Oakland Bay Bridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelden, J.G.; Smith, E.D.; Sheppard, D.M.; Odeh, M.

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine potential maximum scour depths for the foundations of the replacement east span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, as part of the ongoing structural design. This effort presented unique challenges as strong tidal currents, large depths, and cohesive bottom sediments characterize the site. The authors met these challenges with a multi-faceted approach to the problem. First, design current velocities were determined using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of San Francisco Bay in conjunction with ADCP hydrographic surveys. Analytical scour calculations were performed and live-bed flume tests of the proposed foundations were also conducted. Finally, two separate methodologies were used to interpret the physical model tests in order to calculate potential scour depths around the foundations. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  19. Integrated Modeling and Experiments to Characterize Coupled Thermo-hydro-geomechanical-chemical processes in Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, H. S.; Carey, J. W.; Karra, S.; Porter, M. L.; Rougier, E.; Kang, Q.; Makedonska, N.; Hyman, J.; Jimenez Martinez, J.; Frash, L.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing phenomena involve fluid-solid interactions embedded within coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes over scales from microns to tens of meters. Feedbacks between processes result in complex dynamics that must be unraveled if one is to predict and, in the case of unconventional resources, facilitate fracture propagation, fluid flow, and interfacial transport processes. The proposed work is part of a broader class of complex systems involving coupled fluid flow and fractures that are critical to subsurface energy issues, such as shale oil, geothermal, carbon sequestration, and nuclear waste disposal. We use unique LANL microfluidic and triaxial core flood experiments integrated with state-of-the-art numerical simulation to reveal the fundamental dynamics of fracture-fluid interactions to characterize the key coupled processes that impact hydrocarbon production. We are also comparing CO2-based fracturing and aqueous fluids to enhance production, greatly reduce waste water, while simultaneously sequestering CO2. We will show pore, core and reservoir scale simulations/experiments that investigate the contolling mechanisms that control hydrocarbon production.

  20. Laboratory Studies to Examine the Impact of Polyacrylamide (PAM) on Soil Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, E. A.; Young, M. H.; Yu, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) is a long-chain synthetic polymer made of the monomer acrylamide (AMD). PAM has numerous uses ranging from food processing to drilling to wastewater treatment. More recently it has been proposed as a canal sealant in the western US to improve water conservation. To support a larger field-based experimental program being implemented in Grand Junction, CO, soil column experiments are being conducted to evaluate the mechanisms of how, and to what extent, PAM reduces soil hydraulic conductivity. The goal of the experiments is to find the optimum concentration and application method of PAM that reduces hydraulic conductivity to the greatest extent. Column tests were conducted, in triplicate, using a constant head method in acrylic columns of 15 cm length and 6.4 cm diameter. An unbalanced multi-factorial design was used with experimental variables including soil type (medium silica sand, locally-derived sand, and locally-derived loam), PAM concentration (11, 22, 44, 88 kg/canal-ha), turbidity (0, 100, 350 NTU), and application method (hydrated PAM on dry soil and powdered PAM applied to water column above saturated soil). Non-crosslinked anionic PAM with a molecular weight of 12 to 24 Mg/mol was used for all experiments. Additional experiments were conducted in graduated cylinders to evaluate interactions between PAM, turbidity and water chemistry. Results of the laboratory tests will be presented and discussed in the context of water conservation in the western US.

  1. Experimental Design for Estimating Unknown Hydraulic Conductivity in a Confined Aquifer using a Genetic Algorithm and a Reduced Order Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushijima, T.; Yeh, W.

    2013-12-01

    An optimal experimental design algorithm is developed to select locations for a network of observation wells that provides the maximum information about unknown hydraulic conductivity in a confined, anisotropic aquifer. The design employs a ma