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Sample records for hydraulic model study

  1. Hydraulic fracture model comparison study: Complete results

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Moschovidis, Z.; Parker, C.

    1993-02-01

    Large quantities of natural gas exist in low permeability reservoirs throughout the US. Characteristics of these reservoirs, however, make production difficult and often economic and stimulation is required. Because of the diversity of application, hydraulic fracture design models must be able to account for widely varying rock properties, reservoir properties, in situ stresses, fracturing fluids, and proppant loads. As a result, fracture simulation has emerged as a highly complex endeavor that must be able to describe many different physical processes. The objective of this study was to develop a comparative study of hydraulic-fracture simulators in order to provide stimulation engineers with the necessary information to make rational decisions on the type of models most suited for their needs. This report compares the fracture modeling results of twelve different simulators, some of them run in different modes for eight separate design cases. Comparisons of length, width, height, net pressure, maximum width at the wellbore, average width at the wellbore, and average width in the fracture have been made, both for the final geometry and as a function of time. For the models in this study, differences in fracture length, height and width are often greater than a factor of two. In addition, several comparisons of the same model with different options show a large variability in model output depending upon the options chosen. Two comparisons were made of the same model run by different companies; in both cases the agreement was good. 41 refs., 54 figs., 83 tabs.

  2. Selecting statistical model and optimum maintenance policy: a case study of hydraulic pump.

    PubMed

    Ruhi, S; Karim, M R

    2016-01-01

    Proper maintenance policy can play a vital role for effective investigation of product reliability. Every engineered object such as product, plant or infrastructure needs preventive and corrective maintenance. In this paper we look at a real case study. It deals with the maintenance of hydraulic pumps used in excavators by a mining company. We obtain the data that the owner had collected and carry out an analysis and building models for pump failures. The data consist of both failure and censored lifetimes of the hydraulic pump. Different competitive mixture models are applied to analyze a set of maintenance data of a hydraulic pump. Various characteristics of the mixture models, such as the cumulative distribution function, reliability function, mean time to failure, etc. are estimated to assess the reliability of the pump. Akaike Information Criterion, adjusted Anderson-Darling test statistic, Kolmogrov-Smirnov test statistic and root mean square error are considered to select the suitable models among a set of competitive models. The maximum likelihood estimation method via the EM algorithm is applied mainly for estimating the parameters of the models and reliability related quantities. In this study, it is found that a threefold mixture model (Weibull-Normal-Exponential) fits well for the hydraulic pump failures data set. This paper also illustrates how a suitable statistical model can be applied to estimate the optimum maintenance period at a minimum cost of a hydraulic pump.

  3. Low Freshwater Inflow Study. Chesapeake Bay Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    equilibrium required for test initiation and were a real-time test monitoring aid . Samples were taken at slack after flood at each of the 19 salinity...Hydraulics Laboratory U. S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station P. 0. Box 6.31, Vicksburg, Miss. 39180 January 1982 ’ SnAJ Report Approved For ...so designated. by other authorized documents. The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes

  4. Study on hydraulic property models for water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in MATSIRO with representation of water table dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, N.; Oki, T.

    2016-12-01

    Appropriate initial condition of soil moisture and water table depth are important factors to reduce uncertainty in hydrological simulations. Approaches to determine the initial water table depth have been developed because of difficulty to get information on global water table depth and soil moisture distributions. However, how is equilibrium soil moisture determined by climate conditions? We try to discuss this issue by using land surface model with representation of water table dynamics (MAT-GW). First, the global pattern of water table depth at equilibrium soil moisture in MAT-GW was verified. The water table depth in MAT-GW was deeper than the previous one at fundamentally arid region because the negative recharge and continuous baseflow made water table depth deeper. It indicated that the hydraulic conductivity used for estimating recharge and baseflow need to be reassessed in MAT-GW. In soil physics field, it is revealed that proper hydraulic property models for water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity should be selected for each soil type. So, the effect of selecting hydraulic property models on terrestrial soil moisture and water table depth were examined.Clapp and Hornburger equation(CH eq.) and Van Genuchten equation(VG eq.) were used as representative hydraulic property models. Those models were integrated on MAT-GW and equilibrium soil moisture and water table depth with using each model were compared. The water table depth and soil moisture at grids which reached equilibrium in both simulations were analyzed. The equilibrium water table depth were deeper in VG eq. than CH eq. in most grids due to shape of hydraulic property models. Then, total soil moisture were smaller in VG eq. than CH eq. at almost all grids which water table depth reached equilibrium. It is interesting that spatial patterns which water table depth reached equilibrium or not were basically similar in both simulations but reverse patterns were shown in east and west

  5. Air-water analogy and the study of hydraulic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supino, Giulio

    1953-01-01

    The author first sets forth some observations about the theory of models. Then he established certain general criteria for the construction of dynamically similar models in water and in air, through reference to the perfect fluid equations and to the ones pertaining to viscous flow. It is, in addition, pointed out that there are more cases in which the analogy is possible than is commonly supposed.

  6. A Hydraulic Model of Arterial System for Study the Relationship Between Blood Distribution and Frequency Characteristics of Blood Pressure Waveform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This paper was trying to find out a suitable hydraulic model for studying the frequency characteristics between blood pressure waveforms and systemic...were used as organs. We used two kinds of tubes to test the hydraulic model and tried to find out suitable material to stimulate the aorta and its

  7. Coupling large scale hydrologic-reservoir-hydraulic models for impact studies in data sparse regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Neal, Jeff; Wagener, Thorsten; Bates, Paul; Freer, Jim; Woods, Ross; Pianosi, Francesca; Sheffied, Justin

    2017-04-01

    As hydraulic modelling moves to increasingly large spatial domains it has become essential to take reservoirs and their operations into account. Large-scale hydrological models have been including reservoirs for at least the past two decades, yet they cannot explicitly model the variations in spatial extent of reservoirs, and many reservoirs operations in hydrological models are not undertaken during the run-time operation. This requires a hydraulic model, yet to-date no continental scale hydraulic model has directly simulated reservoirs and their operations. In addition to the need to include reservoirs and their operations in hydraulic models as they move to global coverage, there is also a need to link such models to large scale hydrology models or land surface schemes. This is especially true for Africa where the number of river gauges has consistently declined since the middle of the twentieth century. In this study we address these two major issues by developing: 1) a coupling methodology for the VIC large-scale hydrological model and the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model, and 2) a reservoir module for the LISFLOOD-FP model, which currently includes four sets of reservoir operating rules taken from the major large-scale hydrological models. The Volta Basin, West Africa, was chosen to demonstrate the capability of the modelling framework as it is a large river basin ( 400,000 km2) and contains the largest man-made lake in terms of area (8,482 km2), Lake Volta, created by the Akosombo dam. Lake Volta also experiences a seasonal variation in water levels of between two and six metres that creates a dynamic shoreline. In this study, we first run our coupled VIC and LISFLOOD-FP model without explicitly modelling Lake Volta and then compare these results with those from model runs where the dam operations and Lake Volta are included. The results show that we are able to obtain variation in the Lake Volta water levels and that including the dam operations and Lake Volta

  8. Using SCADA Data, Field Studies, and Real-Time Modeling to Calibrate Flint's Hydraulic Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has been providing technical assistance to the City of Flint and the State of Michigan in response to the drinking water lead contamination incident. Responders quickly recognized the need for a water distribution system hydraulic model to provide insight on flow patterns an...

  9. Model Studies of the Portugues and Bucana Rivers Channelization, Puerto Rico. Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    Two 1:30-scale physical hydraulic models of the Portugues and Bucana Rivers were used to determine the adequacy of the original designs for the flood...transmit all expected flood releases from the proposed Portugues and Cerrillos Dams. Modifications to transitions at entrances to the high-velocity

  10. Prattville intake, Lake Almanor, California, hydraulic model study on selective withdrawal modifications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeyen, T.

    1995-07-01

    Bureau of Reclamation conducted this hydraulic model study to provide Pacific Gas and Electric Company with an evaluation of several selective withdrawal structures that are being considered to reduce intake flow temperatures through the Prattville Intake at Lake Almanor, California. Release temperature control using selective withdrawal structures is being considered in an effort to improve the cold-water fishery in the North Fork of the Feather River.

  11. Study on the hydraulic characteristics of side inlet/outlet by physical model test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bo; Ye, Fei; Hu, Qiu-yue; Zhang, Jing

    2017-04-01

    The hydraulic characteristics at the side inlet/outlet of pumped storage plants were studied by physical model test. The gravity similarity rule was adopted and head loss coefficients under pumped and power conditions were given. The flow distribution under both conditions was studied. Scheme of changing the separation pier section area proportion for minimizing velocity uneven coefficient was brought forward and the cause of test error was researched. Vortex evaluation and observation were studied under the pumped condition at normal and dead reservoir water levels.

  12. Hydraulic modelling for flood mapping and prevention: the case study of Cerfone River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Silvia; Venturi, Sara; Manciola, Piergiorgio

    2016-04-01

    The research focuses on the hydraulic risk evaluation and danger estimation for different extreme flood events, in order to correctly implement mitigation measures in an anthropized basin. The Cerfone River (Tuscany, Italy), due to the several floods that have affected the neighbouring villages in recent years, is selected as case of study. A finite volume numerical model that solves the shallow water equations all over the computational domain, was used to simulate the unsteady evolution of the maximum extent of flooded areas for different scenarios. The one - dimensional approach (still widespread in engineering projects) can be inaccurate in complex flows, which are often two or three dimensional and sometimes does not manage to capture the flood spatial extents in terms of flow depth and velocity. The use of a two-dimensional numerical model seems to be the suitable instrument in terms of computational efficiency and adequacy of results. In fact it overcomes the limits of a one-dimensional modeling in terms of prediction of hydraulic variables with a less computational effort respect to a full 3d model. An accurate modeling of the river basin leads to the evaluation of the present hydraulic risk. Structural and non- structural measures are then studied, simulated and compared in order to define the optimal risk reduction plan for the area of study. At this aim, different flooding scenarios were simulated through the 2D mathematical model: i) existing state of the river and floodplain areas; ii) design of a levee to protect the most vulnerable populated areas against the flooding risk; iii) use of off - stream detention basins that strongly amplify the lamination capacity of floodplains. All these scenarios were simulated for different return periods: 50, 100, 200 and 500 years. The inputs of the hydraulic models are obtained in accordance with the legislative requirement of Tuscany Region; in particular discharge hydrographs are evaluate through the ALTo

  13. Modeling Studies to Constrain Fluid and Gas Migration Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, H.; Birdsell, D.; Lackey, G.; Karra, S.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Dempsey, D.

    2015-12-01

    The dramatic increase in the extraction of unconventional oil and gas resources using horizontal wells and hydraulic fracturing (fracking) technologies has raised concerns about potential environmental impacts. Large volumes of hydraulic fracturing fluids are injected during fracking. Incidents of stray gas occurrence in shallow aquifers overlying shale gas reservoirs have been reported; whether these are in any way related to fracking continues to be debated. Computational models serve as useful tools for evaluating potential environmental impacts. We present modeling studies of hydraulic fracturing fluid and gas migration during the various stages of well operation, production, and subsequent plugging. The fluid migration models account for overpressure in the gas reservoir, density contrast between injected fluids and brine, imbibition into partially saturated shale, and well operations. Our results highlight the importance of representing the different stages of well operation consistently. Most importantly, well suction and imbibition both play a significant role in limiting upward migration of injected fluids, even in the presence of permeable connecting pathways. In an overall assessment, our fluid migration simulations suggest very low risk to groundwater aquifers when the vertical separation from a shale gas reservoir is of the order of 1000' or more. Multi-phase models of gas migration were developed to couple flow and transport in compromised wellbores and subsurface formations. These models are useful for evaluating both short-term and long-term scenarios of stray methane release. We present simulation results to evaluate mechanisms controlling stray gas migration, and explore relationships between bradenhead pressures and the likelihood of methane release and transport.

  14. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  15. Model for polygonal hydraulic jumps.

    PubMed

    Martens, Erik A; Watanabe, Shinya; Bohr, Tomas

    2012-03-01

    We propose a phenomenological model for the polygonal hydraulic jumps discovered by Ellegaard and co-workers [Nature (London) 392, 767 (1998); Nonlinearity 12, 1 (1999); Physica B 228, 1 (1996)], based on the known flow structure for the type-II hydraulic jumps with a "roller" (separation eddy) near the free surface in the jump region. The model consists of mass conservation and radial force balance between hydrostatic pressure and viscous stresses on the roller surface. In addition, we consider the azimuthal force balance, primarily between pressure and viscosity, but also including nonhydrostatic pressure contributions from surface tension in light of recent observations by Bush and co-workers [J. Fluid Mech. 558, 33 (2006); Phys. Fluids 16, S4 (2004)]. The model can be analyzed by linearization around the circular state, resulting in a parameter relationship for nearly circular polygonal states. A truncated but fully nonlinear version of the model can be solved analytically. This simpler model gives rise to polygonal shapes that are very similar to those observed in experiments, even though surface tension is neglected, and the condition for the existence of a polygon with N corners depends only on a single dimensionless number φ. Finally, we include time-dependent terms in the model and study linear stability of the circular state. Instability occurs for sufficiently small Bond number and the most unstable wavelength is expected to be roughly proportional to the width of the roller as in the Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  16. Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, M.P.

    1994-02-01

    This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

  17. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable

  18. Airborne SAR imagery to support hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, S.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite images and airborne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery are increasingly widespread and they are effective tools for measuring the size of flood events and for assessment of damage. The Hurricane Katrina disaster and the tsunami catastrophe in Indian Ocean countries are two recent and sadly famous examples. Moreover, as well known, the inundation maps can be used as tools to calibrate and validate hydraulic model (e.g. Horritt et al., Hydrological Processes, 2007). We carry out an application of a 1D hydraulic model coupled with a high resolution DTM for predicting the flood inundation processes. The study area is a 16 km reach of the River Severn, in west-central England, for which, four maps of inundated areas, obtained through airborne SAR images, and hydrometric data are available. The inundation maps are used for the calibration/validation of a 1D hydraulic model through a comparison between airborne SAR images and the results of hydraulic simulations. The results confirm the usefulness of inundation maps as hydraulic modelling tools and, moreover, show that 1D hydraulic model can be effectively used when coupled with high resolution topographic information.

  19. A combined hydraulic and biological SBR model.

    PubMed

    Alex, J; Rönner-Holm, S G E; Hunze, M; Holm, N C

    2011-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) model was developed consisting of six continuous stirred tank reactors which describe the hydraulic flow patterns occurring in different SBR phases. The model was developed using the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation studies of an SBR reactor under a selection of dynamic operational phases. Based on the CFD results, the model structure was refined and a simplified 'driver' model to allow one to mimic the flow pattern driven by the external operational conditions (influent, aeration, mixing) was derived. The resulting model allows the modeling of biological processes, settlement and hydraulic conditions of cylindrical SBRs.

  20. Development of hydraulic fracture network propagation model in shale gas reservoirs: 2D, single-phase and 3D, multi-phase model development, parametric studies, and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Chong Hyun

    The most effective method for stimulating shale gas reservoirs is a massive hydraulic fracture treatment. Recent analysis using microseismic technology have shown that complex fracture networks are commonly created in the field as a result of the stimulation of shale wells. The interaction between pre-existing natural fractures and the propagating hydraulic fracture is a critical factor affecting the created complex fracture network; however, many existing numerical models simulate only planar hydraulic fractures without considering the pre-existing fractures in the formation. The shale formations already contain a large number of natural fractures, so an accurate fracture propagation model needs to be developed to optimize the fracturing process. In this research, we first characterized the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing and fluid flow in the shale gas reservoir. Then, a 2D, single-phase numerical model and a 3D, 2-phase coupled model were developed, which integrate dynamic fracture propagation, interactions between hydraulic fractures and pre-existing natural fractures, fracture fluid leakoff, and fluid flow in a petroleum reservoir. By using the developed model, we conducted parametric studies to quantify the effects of treatment rate, treatment size, fracture fluid viscosity, differential horizontal stress, natural fracture spacing, fracture toughness, matrix permeability, and proppant size on the geometry of the hydraulic fracture network. The findings elucidate important trends in hydraulic fracturing of shale reservoirs that are useful in improving the design of treatments for specific reservoir settings.

  1. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    The unsaturated zone plays an extremely important hydrologic role that influences water quality and quantity, ecosystem function and health, the connection between atmospheric and terrestrial processes, nutrient cycling, soil development, and natural hazards such as flooding and landslides. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is one of the main properties considered to govern flow; however it is very difficult to measure accurately. Knowledge of the highly nonlinear relationship between unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) and volumetric water content is required for widely-used models of water flow and solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments is costly and time consuming, therefore use of models that estimate this property from more easily measured bulk-physical properties is common. In hydrologic studies, calculations based on property-transfer models informed by hydraulic property databases are often used in lieu of measured data from the site of interest. Reliance on database-informed predicted values with the use of neural networks has become increasingly common. Hydraulic properties predicted using databases may be adequate in some applications, but not others. This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K. The parameters that describe the K curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  2. May We Identify The Spatial Variability of Soil Hydraulic Properties Based On Measurements With "spatial Tdr"? A) Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, E.; Becker, R.; Schädel, W.

    A dynamic system left without external disturbances, will always tend to a stable equilibrium state that is consistent with the internal physics. For natural soils such an equilibrium state is reached when the gradients of the total hydraulic potential tend to zero. This statement is still valid for heterogeneous soils, because the hydraulic po- tential is an intensive state variable and therefore continuous at discontinuities of the pore space. In contrary the soil water content is as an extensive property discontinu- ous at discontinuities of the pore space. Hence, a small scale soil moisture pattern that persists if the soil state tends to hydraulic equilibrium, reflects the lateral small scale variability of the pore space. The objectives of our study are to show a) whether and how we could use TDR observations to identify the small scale variability of the pore space. For that purpose we analyse artificial TDR measurements, taken from physi- cally based simulations of soil water dynamics in heterogeneous media. b) We want to introduce a new TDR technology which we call "Spatial TDR", that is suitable for that purposes. To produce the artificial TDR-datasets we generate random fields of soil porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity with different statistical properties based on field data in a Luvisol and simulate artificial water dynamics in this model soil based on Richards-equation. Within this model soil we define several hypothetical "Spatial TDR" clusters, that differ in the lateral spacing and the number of the probes, in the temporal resolution of the hypothetical measurements and in the assumed mea- surement accuracy. If the model soil approaches hydraulic equilibrium, the remaining soil moisture pattern will be dominated by the statistical properties of the porosity. In contrary the variability of the hydraulic conductivity will dominate the soil moisture patterns during infiltration events. The hypothetical Spatial TDR measurements within the

  3. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  4. Dynamics of Model Hydraulic Fracturing Liquid Studied by Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Kim; Kubarych, Kevin J.

    2014-06-01

    The technique of two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy is used to expose the chemical dynamics of various concentrations of polymers and their monomers in heterogeneous mixtures. An environmentally relevant heterogeneous mixture, which inspires this study, is hydraulic fracturing liquid (HFL). Hydraulic fracking is a technique used to extract natural gas from shale deposits. HFL consists of mostly water, proppant (sand), an emulsifier (guar), and other chemicals specific to the drilling site. Utilizing a metal carbonyl as a probe, we observe the spectral dynamics of the polymer, guar, and its monomer, mannose, and compare the results to see how hydration dynamics change with varying concentration. Another polymer, Ficoll, and its monomer, sucrose, are also compared to see how polymer size affects hydration dynamics. The two results are as follows: (1) Guar experiences collective hydration at high concentrations, where as mannose experiences independent hydration; (2) no collective hydration is observed for Ficoll in the same concentration range as guar, possibly due to polymer shape and size. HFL experiences extremely high pressure during natural gas removal, so future studies will focus on how increased pressure affects the hydration dynamics of polymers and monomers.

  5. Applied research on extension element model in hydraulic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Junying; Wei, Bingyang; Han, Jianhai

    2010-08-01

    This paper further researches the application of extension element model of hydraulic system. A extension element model of hydraulic system contains three parts: the prototype of a hydraulic component, the matter-element and relationelement model of hydraulic components, and the matter-element and relation-element model of hydraulic systems. The foundation building a extension element model of hydraulic system is to build its database of the prototypes of a hydraulic component. The matter-element and relation-element model of hydraulic components is a model for physical hydraulic components. The the matter-element and relation-element models of hydraulic components on a hydraulic system can describe the internal links among hydraulic components. Through analysis of the connections among the matter-element and relation-element models of hydraulic components, rings, power bond graphs, and dynamic equations will be found and gained. Thus, the performance and digital simulation for a hydraulic system will be realized and finished.

  6. Physical Hydraulic Models: Assessment of Predictive Capabilities. Report 3. Model study of Shoaling, Brunswick Harbor, Georgia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    gilsonite --to simulate estuarine sediment transport. Gilsonite is a finely ground, noncohesive asphaltic material with a specific gravity of about 1.04... gilsonite into the model. Both use a slurry of gilsonite and water. One method is to pump tho slurry into a perforated pipe running along the axis of the...injection method, the gilsonite is transported at first in suspension and then mostly near the bed until it deposits on the model bed. The injection is

  7. Numerical Modeling of a Thermal-Hydraulic Loop and Test Section Design for Heat Transfer Studies in Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Daniel

    A numerical tool for the simulation of the thermal dynamics of pipe networks with heat transfer has been developed with the novel capability of modeling supercritical fluids. The tool was developed to support the design and deployment of two thermal-hydraulic loops at Carleton University for the purpose of heat transfer studies in supercritical and near-critical fluids. First, the system was characterized based on its defining features; the characteristic length of the flow path is orders of magnitude larger than the other characteristic lengths that define the system's geometry; the behaviour of the working fluid in the supercritical thermodynamic state. An analysis of the transient thermal behaviour of the model's domains is then performed to determine the accuracy and range of validity of the modeling approach for simulating the transient thermal behaviour of a thermal-hydraulic loop. Preliminary designs of three test section geometries, for the purpose of heat transfer studies, are presented in support of the overall design of the Carleton supercritical thermal-hydraulic loops. A 7-rod-bundle, annular and tubular geometries are developed with support from the new numerical tool. Materials capable of meeting the experimental requirements while operating in supercritical water are determined. The necessary geometries to satisfy the experimental goals are then developed based on the material characteristics and predicted heat transfer behaviour from previous simulation results. An initial safety analysis is performed on the test section designs, where they are evaluated against the ASME Boiler, Pressure Vessel, and Pressure Piping Code standard, required for safe operation and certification.

  8. Management of a water distribution network by coupling GIS and hydraulic modeling: a case study of Chetouane in Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelbaki, Chérifa; Benchaib, Mohamed Mouâd; Benziada, Salim; Mahmoudi, Hacène; Goosen, Mattheus

    2017-06-01

    For more effective management of water distribution network in an arid region, Mapinfo GIS (8.0) software was coupled with a hydraulic model (EPANET 2.0) and applied to a case study region, Chetouane, situated in the north-west of Algeria. The area is characterized not only by water scarcity but also by poor water management practices. The results showed that a combination of GIS and modeling permits network operators to better analyze malfunctions with a resulting more rapid response as well as facilitating in an improved understanding of the work performed on the network. The grouping of GIS and modeling as an operating tool allows managers to diagnosis a network, to study solutions of problems and to predict future situations. The later can assist them in making informed decisions to ensure an acceptable performance level for optimal network operation.

  9. Management of a water distribution network by coupling GIS and hydraulic modeling: a case study of Chetouane in Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelbaki, Chérifa; Benchaib, Mohamed Mouâd; Benziada, Salim; Mahmoudi, Hacène; Goosen, Mattheus

    2016-04-01

    For more effective management of water distribution network in an arid region, Mapinfo GIS (8.0) software was coupled with a hydraulic model (EPANET 2.0) and applied to a case study region, Chetouane, situated in the north-west of Algeria. The area is characterized not only by water scarcity but also by poor water management practices. The results showed that a combination of GIS and modeling permits network operators to better analyze malfunctions with a resulting more rapid response as well as facilitating in an improved understanding of the work performed on the network. The grouping of GIS and modeling as an operating tool allows managers to diagnosis a network, to study solutions of problems and to predict future situations. The later can assist them in making informed decisions to ensure an acceptable performance level for optimal network operation.

  10. Soil hydraulic properties near saturation, an improved conductivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Børgesen, Christen D.; Jacobsen, Ole H.; Hansen, Søren; Schaap, Marcel G.

    2006-06-01

    The hydraulic properties near saturation can change dramatically due to the presence of macropores that are usually difficult to handle in traditional pore size models. The purpose of this study is to establish a data set on hydraulic conductivity near saturation, test the predictive capability of commonly used hydraulic conductivity models and give suggestions for improved models. Water retention and near saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured for a variety of 81 top and subsoils. The hydraulic conductivity models by van Genuchten [ van Genuchten, 1980. A closed-form equation for predicting the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 44, 892-898.] (vGM) and Brooks and Corey, modified by Jarvis [ Jarvis, 1991. MACRO—A Model of Water Movement and Solute Transport in Macroporous Soils. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Department of Soil Sciences. Reports and Dissertations 9.] were optimised to describe the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the range measured. Different optimisation procedures were tested. Using the measured saturated hydraulic conductivity in the vGM model tends to overestimate the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. Optimising a matching factor ( k0) improved the fit considerably whereas optimising the l-parameter in the vGM model improved the fit only slightly. The vGM was improved with an empirical scaling function to account for the rapid increase in conductivity near saturation. Using the improved models, it was possible to describe both the saturated and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity better than a previously published model by Jarvis. The pore size boundary of the macropores was found at a capillary pressure of -4 hPa corresponding to a circular pore diameter of 750 μm.

  11. ENHANCING HSPF MODEL CHANNEL HYDRAULIC REPRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN (HSPF) is a comprehensive watershed model, which employs depth-area-volume-flow relationships known as hydraulic function table (FTABLE) to represent stream channel cross-sections and reservoirs. An accurate FTABLE determination for a...

  12. Integrating hydraulic equivalent sections into a hydraulic geometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yanhong; Yi, Yujun; Li, Zhiwei; Wang, Zhaoyin; Zheng, Xiangmin

    2017-09-01

    Hydraulic geometry (HG) is an important geomorphic concept that has played an indispensable role in hydrological analyses, physical studies of streams, ecosystem and aquatic habitat studies, and sedimentology research. More than 60 years after Leopold and Maddock (1953) first introduced the concept of HG, researchers have still not uncovered the physical principles underlying HG behavior. One impediment is the complexity of the natural river cross section. The current study presents a new way to simplify the cross section, namely, the hydraulic equivalent section, which is generalized from the cross section in the ;gradually varied flow of an alluvial river; (GVFAR) and features hydrodynamic properties and bed-building laws similar to those of the GVFAR. Energy balance was used to derive the stage Z-discharge Q relationship in the GVFAR. The GVFAR in the Songhua River and the Yangtze River were selected as examples. The data, including measured discharge, river width, water stage, water depth, wet area, and cross section, were collected from the hydrological yearbooks of typical hydrological stations on the Songhua River and the Yangtze River from 1955 to 1987. The relationships between stage Z-discharge Q and cross-sectional area A-stage Z at various stations were analyzed, and ;at-a-station hydraulic geometry; (AHG) relationships were obtained in power-law forms. Based on derived results and observational data analysis, the Z-Q and Z-A relationships of AHG were similar to rectangular weir flows, thus the cross section of the GVFAR was generalized as a compound rectangular, hydraulic equivalent cross section. As to bed-building characteristics, the bankfull discharge method and the stage-discharge-relation method were used to calculate the dominant variables of the alluvial river. This hydraulic equivalent section has the same Z-Q relation, Z-A relation, dominant discharge, dominant river width, and dominant water depth as the cross section in the GVFAR. With the

  13. Hydraulic modeling of heat dispersion in large lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberman, E.; Stefan, H.

    1972-01-01

    Case studies of hydraulic models are described for four major generating plants, including information and maps of thermal distribution. Information is of interest to agencies involved in thermal pollution control.

  14. An analytical model for hydraulic fracturing in shallow bedrock formations.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, José Sérgio; Ballestero, Thomas Paul; Pitombeira, Ernesto da Silva

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical method is proposed to estimate post-fracturing fracture size and transmissivity, and as a test of the methodology, data collected from two wells were used for verification. This method can be employed before hydrofracturing in order to obtain estimates of the potential hydraulic benefits of hydraulic fracturing. Five different pumping test analysis methods were used to evaluate the well hydraulic data. The most effective methods were the Papadopulos-Cooper model (1967), which includes wellbore storage effects, and the Gringarten-Ramey model (1974), known as the single horizontal fracture model. The hydraulic parameters resulting from fitting these models to the field data revealed that as a result of hydraulic fracturing, the transmissivity increased more than 46 times in one well and increased 285 times in the other well. The model developed by dos Santos (2008), which considers horizontal radial fracture propagation from the hydraulically fractured well, was used to estimate potential fracture geometry after hydrofracturing. For the two studied wells, their fractures could have propagated to distances of almost 175 m or more and developed maximum apertures of about 2.20 mm and hydraulic apertures close to 0.30 mm. Fracturing at this site appears to have expanded and propagated existing fractures and not created new fractures. Hydraulic apertures calculated from pumping test analyses closely matched the results obtained from the hydraulic fracturing model. As a result of this model, post-fracturing geometry and resulting post-fracturing well yield can be estimated before the actual hydrofracturing. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  15. Hydraulic model of the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, A. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary planning for the formulation of the first year of hydraulic studies on the Chesapeake Bay model was recently completed. The primary purpose of this initial effort was to develop a study program that is both responsive to problems of immediate importance and at the same time ensure that from the very beginning of operation maximum economical use is made of the model. The formulation of this preliminary study plan involved an extensive analysis of the environmental, economic, and social aspects of a series of current problems in order to establish a priority listing of their importance. The study program that evolved is oriented towards the analysis of the effects of some of the works of man on the Chesapeake Bay estuarine environment.

  16. The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution by plant roots: a review and synthesis of empirical and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Cardon, Zoe G

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) - the movement of water from moist to dry soil through plant roots - occurs worldwide within a range of different ecosystems and plant species. The proposed ecological and hydrologic impacts of HR include increasing dry-season transpiration and photosynthetic rates, prolonging the life span of fine roots and maintaining root-soil contact in dry soils, and moving rainwater down into deeper soil layers where it does not evaporate. In this review, we compile estimates of the magnitude of HR from ecosystems around the world, using representative empirical and modeling studies from which we could extract amounts of water redistributed by plant root systems. The reported average magnitude of HR varies by nearly two orders of magnitude across ecosystems, from 0.04 to 1.3 mm H(2)O d(-1) in the empirical literature, and from 0.1 to 3.23 mm H(2)O d(-1) in the modeling literature. Using these synthesized data, along with other published studies, we examine this variation in the magnitude of upward and downward HR, considering effects of plant, soil and ecosystem characteristics, as well as effects of methodological details (in both empirical and modeling studies) on estimates of HR. We take both ecological and hydrologic perspectives. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Terrestrial Laser Scanning to Estimate Hydraulic Resistance for Floodplain Mapping and Hydraulic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    One of the primary unknown parameters in the hydraulic analyses used for floodplain studies is hydraulic resistance. A better understanding of hydraulic resistance would be highly useful for understanding future floods, improving higher dimensional flood modeling (2D+), as well as correctly calculating flood discharges for floods that are not directly measured. The relationship of measured floodplain parameters to hydraulic resistance is difficult to objectively quantify in the field, partially because resistance occurs at a variety of scales (i.e. grain, unit and reach) and because individual resistance elements, such as trees, grass and sediment grains, are inherently difficult to measure. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS, also known as Ground-based LiDAR) has shown great ability to rapidly collect high-resolution topographic datasets for geomorphic and hydrodynamic studies and can be used to objectively quantify hydraulic resistance parameters in the field. Because of its speed in data collection and remote sensing ability, TLS can be used both for pre-flood and post-flood studies that require relatively quick response in relatively dangerous settings. Using datasets collected from experimental flume runs as well as field studies of several rivers in California and post-flood rivers in Colorado, this study evaluates the use of TLS to estimate hydraulic resistance, particularly from grain-scale elements. Experimental laboratory runs with bed grain size held constant but with varying grain-scale protusion as measured by TLS have shown a nearly twenty-fold variation in measured hydraulic resistance. The ideal application of these TLS datasets would be in combination with a vegetation and bedform element resistance and aerial lidar to extrapolate resistance measurements to much larger areas for floodplain mapping and hydraulic studies.

  18. Coupling high-resolution hydraulic and hydrologic models for flash flood forecasting and inundation mapping in urban areas - A case study for the City of Fort Worth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, B.; Seo, D.; Cannon, A.

    2013-12-01

    With many diverse features such as channels, pipes, culverts, buildings, etc., hydraulic modeling in urban areas for inundation mapping poses significant challenges. Identifying the practical extent of the details to be modeled in order to obtain sufficiently accurate results in a timely manner for effective emergency management is one of them. In this study we assess the tradeoffs between model complexity vs. information content for decision making in applying high-resolution hydrologic and hydraulic models for real-time flash flood forecasting and inundation mapping in urban areas. In a large urban area such as the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex (DFW), there exists very large spatial variability in imperviousness depending on the area of interest. As such, one may expect significant sensitivity of hydraulic model results to the resolution and accuracy of hydrologic models. In this work, we present the initial results from coupling of high-resolution hydrologic and hydraulic models for two 'hot spots' within the City of Fort Worth for real-time inundation mapping.

  19. Stochastic inverse modelling of hydraulic conductivity fields taking into account independent stochastic structures: A 3D case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llopis-Albert, C.; Capilla, J. E.

    2010-09-01

    SummaryMajor factors affecting groundwater flow through fractured rocks include the geometry of each fracture, its properties and the fracture-network connectivity together with the porosity and conductivity of the rock matrix. When modelling fractured rocks this is translated into attaining a characterization of the hydraulic conductivity ( K) as adequately as possible, despite its high heterogeneity. This links with the main goal of this paper, which is to present an improvement of a stochastic inverse model, named as Gradual Conditioning (GC) method, to better characterise K in a fractured rock medium by considering different K stochastic structures, belonging to independent K statistical populations (SP) of fracture families and the rock matrix, each one with its own statistical properties. The new methodology is carried out by applying independent deformations to each SP during the conditioning process for constraining stochastic simulations to data. This allows that the statistical properties of each SPs tend to be preserved during the iterative optimization process. It is worthwhile mentioning that so far, no other stochastic inverse modelling technique, with the whole capabilities implemented in the GC method, is able to work with a domain covered by several different stochastic structures taking into account the independence of different populations. The GC method is based on a procedure that gradually changes an initial K field, which is conditioned only to K data, to approximate the reproduction of other types of information, i.e., piezometric head and solute concentration data. The approach is applied to the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden, where, since the middle nineties, many experiments have been carried out to increase confidence in alternative radionuclide transport modelling approaches. Because the description of fracture locations and the distribution of hydrodynamic parameters within them are not accurate enough, we address the

  20. Experimental model studies of a hydraulic ram with special emphasis on the velocities in the ram tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basfeld, M.

    1980-12-01

    The velocity of the ram tube to make it accessible for production in pattern flows examining human circulation was investigated. A simplified theory of the function of the hydraulic ram was developed using the Navier-Stokes equation for a square rubbing component for one dimensional flows. The influence of the valve movement on the ram efficiency is evaluated. The difference between the significance of the influences on the ram model as opposed to the technical ram is discussed.

  1. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.; Kirby, Klane

    This curriculum guide contains a course in hydraulics to train entry-level workers for automotive mechanics and other fields that utilize hydraulics. The module contains 14 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) introduction to hydraulics; (2) fundamentals of hydraulics; (3) reservoirs; (4) lines, fittings, and couplers; (5)…

  2. Injectable calcium phosphate hydraulic cement (CPHC) used for periodontal tissue regeneration: A study of a dog model.

    PubMed

    Cuisinier, F J G; Wieber, A; Tenenbaum, H; Van Landuyt, P; Lemaitre, J

    2003-01-01

    Injectable calcium phosphate hydraulic cement (CPHC) is a new bone substitute family. This study aimed to evaluate the use of CPHC in surgical periodontitis-simulating defects in a dog model. CPHC was obtained by adding powder mixtures of different calcium phosphates with different solubility. Alveolar bone was removed by drilling over the mesial and distal roots of the 2nd mandibular premolar in six dogs. The defects were randomly selected, three were untreated and six treated. The defects had a depth of 6 mm and a width of 3 mm. The animals were sacrificed after 9 months and samples prepared, with no decalcification, for histological evaluation. Seventy-nine percent of the root was covered by bone in the experimental defects, compared to 41% of the root for the control defects. Bone height was significantly higher for the experimental defects (4.9 +/- 0.9 mm) than for the control defects (1.4 +/- 0.5 mm). After 9 months, 97 +/- 6% of the CPHC was degradated and replaced by bone. This study proves the interest of this cement because of the particularly high level of periodontal bone regeneration. The ability of the cement to be easily injected and shaped in bone defects and the immediate immobilization of the teeth after hardening is notable. (Journal of Applied Biomaterials & Biomechanics 2003; 1: 186-93).

  3. John Day Tailrace MASS2 Hydraulic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2003-06-03

    Recent biological results for the Juvenile Bypass System at John Jay Lock and Dam have raised concerns about the hydraulic conditions that are created in the tailrace under different project operations. This Memorandum for Record discusses the development and application of a truncated MASS2 model in the John Day tailrace.

  4. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Nancy; And Others

    These instructional materials provide an orientation to hydraulics for use at the postsecondary level. The first of 12 sections presents an introduction to hydraulics, including discussion of principles of liquids, definitions, liquid flow, the two types of hydraulic fluids, pressure gauges, and strainers and filters. The second section identifies…

  5. ENHANCING HYDROLOGICAL SIMULATION PROGRAM - FORTRAN MODEL CHANNEL HYDRAULIC REPRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hydrological Simulation Program– FORTRAN (HSPF) is a comprehensive watershed model that employs depth-area - volume - flow relationships known as the hydraulic function table (FTABLE) to represent the hydraulic characteristics of stream channel cross-sections and reservoirs. ...

  6. Modeling multidomain hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Ryan D.; Abou Najm, Majdi R.; Rupp, David E.; Selker, John S.

    2016-10-01

    Shrink-swell soils crack and become compacted as they dry, changing properties such as bulk density and hydraulic conductivity. Multidomain models divide soil into independent realms that allow soil cracks to be incorporated into classical flow and transport models. Incongruously, most applications of multidomain models assume that the porosity distributions, bulk density, and effective saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil are constant. This study builds on a recently derived soil shrinkage model to develop a new multidomain, dual-permeability model that can accurately predict variations in soil hydraulic properties due to dynamic changes in crack size and connectivity. The model only requires estimates of soil gravimetric water content and a minimal set of parameters, all of which can be determined using laboratory and/or field measurements. We apply the model to eight clayey soils, and demonstrate its ability to quantify variations in volumetric water content (as can be determined during measurement of a soil water characteristic curve) and transient saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks (as can be measured using infiltration tests). The proposed model is able to capture observed variations in Ks of one to more than two orders of magnitude. In contrast, other dual-permeability models assume that Ks is constant, resulting in the potential for large error when predicting water movement through shrink-swell soils. Overall, the multidomain model presented here successfully quantifies fluctuations in the hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soil matrices, and are suitable for use in physical flow and transport models based on Darcy's Law, the Richards Equation, and the advection-dispersion equation.

  7. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.

    Designed for use in courses where students are expected to become proficient in the area of hydraulics, including diesel engine mechanic programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of fourteen units of instruction. Unit titles include (1) Introduction, (2) Fundamentals of Hydraulics, (3) Reservoirs, (4) Lines, Fittings, and Couplers, (5) Seals,…

  8. Development of a hydraulic model of the human systemic circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, M. K.; Dharmalingham, R. K.

    1999-01-01

    Physical and numeric models of the human circulation are constructed for a number of objectives, including studies and training in physiologic control, interpretation of clinical observations, and testing of prosthetic cardiovascular devices. For many of these purposes it is important to quantitatively validate the dynamic response of the models in terms of the input impedance (Z = oscillatory pressure/oscillatory flow). To address this need, the authors developed an improved physical model. Using a computer study, the authors first identified the configuration of lumped parameter elements in a model of the systemic circulation; the result was a good match with human aortic input impedance with a minimum number of elements. Design, construction, and testing of a hydraulic model analogous to the computer model followed. Numeric results showed that a three element model with two resistors and one compliance produced reasonable matching without undue complication. The subsequent analogous hydraulic model included adjustable resistors incorporating a sliding plate to vary the flow area through a porous material and an adjustable compliance consisting of a variable-volume air chamber. The response of the hydraulic model compared favorably with other circulation models.

  9. Development of a hydraulic model of the human systemic circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, M. K.; Dharmalingham, R. K.

    1999-01-01

    Physical and numeric models of the human circulation are constructed for a number of objectives, including studies and training in physiologic control, interpretation of clinical observations, and testing of prosthetic cardiovascular devices. For many of these purposes it is important to quantitatively validate the dynamic response of the models in terms of the input impedance (Z = oscillatory pressure/oscillatory flow). To address this need, the authors developed an improved physical model. Using a computer study, the authors first identified the configuration of lumped parameter elements in a model of the systemic circulation; the result was a good match with human aortic input impedance with a minimum number of elements. Design, construction, and testing of a hydraulic model analogous to the computer model followed. Numeric results showed that a three element model with two resistors and one compliance produced reasonable matching without undue complication. The subsequent analogous hydraulic model included adjustable resistors incorporating a sliding plate to vary the flow area through a porous material and an adjustable compliance consisting of a variable-volume air chamber. The response of the hydraulic model compared favorably with other circulation models.

  10. Review of computational thermal-hydraulic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, R.H.; Keeton, L.W.

    1995-12-31

    Corrosion of heat transfer tubing in nuclear steam generators has been a persistent problem in the power generation industry, assuming many different forms over the years depending on chemistry and operating conditions. Whatever the corrosion mechanism, a fundamental understanding of the process is essential to establish effective management strategies. To gain this fundamental understanding requires an integrated investigative approach that merges technology from many diverse scientific disciplines. An important aspect of an integrated approach is characterization of the corrosive environment at high temperature. This begins with a thorough understanding of local thermal-hydraulic conditions, since they affect deposit formation, chemical concentration, and ultimately corrosion. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can and should play an important role in characterizing the thermal-hydraulic environment and in predicting the consequences of that environment,. The evolution of CFD technology now allows accurate calculation of steam generator thermal-hydraulic conditions and the resulting sludge deposit profiles. Similar calculations are also possible for model boilers, so that tests can be designed to be prototypic of the heat exchanger environment they are supposed to simulate. This paper illustrates the utility of CFD technology by way of examples in each of these two areas. This technology can be further extended to produce more detailed local calculations of the chemical environment in support plate crevices, beneath thick deposits on tubes, and deep in tubesheet sludge piles. Knowledge of this local chemical environment will provide the foundation for development of mechanistic corrosion models, which can be used to optimize inspection and cleaning schedules and focus the search for a viable fix.

  11. Hydraulically interconnected vehicle suspension: background and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Smith, Wade A.; Jeyakumaran, Jeku

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for the frequency domain analysis of a vehicle fitted with a general hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) system. Ideally, interconnected suspensions have the capability, unique among passive systems, to provide stiffness and damping characteristics dependent on the all-wheel suspension mode in operation. A basic, lumped-mass, four-degree-of-freedom half-car model is used to illustrate the proposed methodology. The mechanical-fluid boundary condition in the double-acting cylinders is modelled as an external force on the mechanical system and a moving boundary on the fluid system. The fluid system itself is modelled using the hydraulic impedance method, in which the relationships between the dynamic fluid states, i.e. pressures and flows, at the extremities of a single fluid circuit are determined by the transfer matrix method. A set of coupled, frequency-dependent equations, which govern the dynamics of the integrated half-car system, are then derived and the application of these equations to both free and forced vibration analysis is explained. The fluid system impedance matrix for the two general wheel-pair interconnection types-anti-synchronous and anti-oppositional-is also given. To further outline the application of the proposed methodology, the paper finishes with an example using a typical anti-roll HIS system. The integrated half-car system's free vibration solutions and frequency response functions are then obtained and discussed in some detail. The presented approach provides a scientific basis for investigating the dynamic characteristics of HIS-equipped vehicles, and the results offer further confirmation that interconnected suspension schemes can provide, at least to some extent, individual control of modal stiffness and damping characteristics.

  12. Advantages of 3D FEM numerical modeling over 2D, analyzed in a case study of transient thermal-hydraulic groundwater utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchsluger, Martin; Götzl, Gregor

    2014-05-01

    In general most aquifers have a much larger lateral extent than vertical. This fact leads to the application of the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumptions to many groundwater problems, whereas a two dimensional simulation is considered sufficient. By coupling transient fluid flow modeling with heat transport the 2D aquifer approximation is in many cases insufficient as it does not consider effects of the subjacent and overlying aquitards on heat propagation as well as the impact of surface climatic effects on shallow aquifers. A shallow Holocene aquifer in Vienna served as a case study to compare different modeling approaches in two and three dimensions in order to predict the performance and impact of a thermal aquifer utilization for heating (1.3 GWh) and cooling (1.4 GWh) of a communal building. With the assumption of a 6 doublets well field, the comparison was realized in three steps: At first a two dimensional model for unconfined flow was set up, assuming a varying hydraulic conductivity as well as a varying top and bottom elevation of the aquifer (gross - thickness). The model area was chosen along constant hydraulic head at steady state conditions. A second model was made by mapping solely the aquifer in three dimensions using the same subdomain and boundary conditions as defined in step one. The third model consists of a complete three dimensional geological build-up including the aquifer as well as the overlying and subjacent layers and additionally an annually variable climatic boundary condition at the surface. The latter was calibrated with measured water temperature at a nearby water gauge. For all three models the same annual operating mode of the 6 hydraulic doublets was assumed. Furthermore a limited maximal groundwater temperature at a range between 8 and 18 °C as well as a constrained well flow rate has been given. Finally a descriptive comparison of the three models concerning the extracted thermal power, drawdown, temperature distribution and Darcy

  13. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  14. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  15. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  16. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  17. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  18. Tracing Hydraulic Connections of Aquifers By Hydrochemical Comparison To Create A Model For An Improved Groundwater Management: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rips, M.

    As the fast growing metropolitan of Cebu City faces a shortness of freshwater supply within the next 5 to 10 years, an improved groundwater management needs to be im- plemented. To reach this, better understanding of the contributions of the aquifers of three large watersheds in the adjacent mountain range and their impact on the most important coastal aquifer, the Carcar Limestone aquifer; needs to be gained. Due to the complex tectonic structure of Cebu island, standard hydrogeological methods such as tracer or pumping tests would be too costly to be carried out. After identifying the largest continuous aquifers within the watersheds, the contents of major ions and eight different trace metals in the groundwater have been analysed. These were compared to the coastal limestone water. The geologic formations of the mountain range consist primarily of volcanics and volcanogenic sandstones, which influence the hydrochem- ical composition. Especially, the contents of K, Na, Zn, Ni, Mn and V differ from the typical composition of calcareous water. In a second step, groundwater sampling along the contact zone between the Carcar Limestone and the adjoining formations has been carried out. The major ion contents are varying but they do not show a clear signal of dilution of the groundwater by the watersheds. However, the high values of Mn, V and Zn around an east-west striking fault zone in the northern part of the study area indicate an influence of volcanic water within the limestone and thus a hydraulic contact between those two aquifers. More detailed sampling throughout the dry and the rainy season would lead to an estimation of the amount of water contributed by the aquifers and thus allow higher pumping rate of the production wells below that area without the risk of saltwater intrusion from the ocean.

  19. Design, test and model of a hybrid magnetostrictive hydraulic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Wereley, Norman M.

    2009-08-01

    The basic operation of hybrid hydraulic actuators involves high frequency bi-directional operation of an active material that is converted to uni-directional motion of hydraulic fluid using valves. A hybrid actuator was developed using magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D as the driving element and hydraulic oil as the working fluid. Two different lengths of Terfenol-D rod, 51 and 102 mm, with the same diameter, 12.7 mm, were used. Tests with no load and with load were carried out to measure the performance for uni-directional motion of the output piston at different pumping frequencies. The maximum no-load flow rates were 24.8 cm3 s-1 and 22.7 cm3 s-1 with the 51 mm and 102 mm long rods respectively, and the peaks were noted around 325 Hz pumping frequency. The blocked force of the actuator was close to 89 N in both cases. A key observation was that, at these high pumping frequencies, the inertial effects of the fluid mass dominate over the viscous effects and the problem becomes unsteady in nature. In this study, we also develop a mathematical model of the hydraulic hybrid actuator in the time domain to show the basic operational principle under varying conditions and to capture phenomena affecting system performance. Governing equations for the pumping piston and output shaft were obtained from force equilibrium considerations, while compressibility of the working fluid was taken into account by incorporating the bulk modulus. Fluid inertia was represented by a lumped parameter approach to the transmission line model, giving rise to strongly coupled ordinary differential equations. The model was then used to calculate the no-load velocities of the actuator at different pumping frequencies and simulation results were compared with experimental data for model validation.

  20. Stability analysis for a delay differential equations model of a hydraulic turbine speed governor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halanay, Andrei; Safta, Carmen A.; Dragoi, Constantin; Piraianu, Vlad F.

    2017-01-01

    The paper aims to study the dynamic behavior of a speed governor for a hydraulic turbine using a mathematical model. The nonlinear mathematical model proposed consists in a system of delay differential equations (DDE) to be compared with already established mathematical models of ordinary differential equations (ODE). A new kind of nonlinearity is introduced as a time delay. The delays can characterize different running conditions of the speed governor. For example, it is considered that spool displacement of hydraulic amplifier might be blocked due to oil impurities in the oil supply system and so the hydraulic amplifier has a time delay in comparison to the time control. Numerical simulations are presented in a comparative manner. A stability analysis of the hydraulic control system is performed, too. Conclusions of the dynamic behavior using the DDE model of a hydraulic turbine speed governor are useful in modeling and controlling hydropower plants.

  1. Monitoring and modeling the soil hydraulic behavior in stony soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragonetti, Giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Comegna, Alessandro; Coppola, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Describing the soil hydrological behavior at applicative scales remains a complex task, mainly because of the spatial heterogeneity of the vadose zone. Addressing the impact of the unsaturated zone heterogeneity involves measuring and/or modeling water content evolution with fine spatial and temporal resolution. The presence of stones introduces difficulties for both the measurement of the water content and the soil hydraulic properties. In this context, the main objective of this study was to assess the role of stones on TDR-based water content measurements, as well as on the pattern of variability of simulated water contents at field-scale during water infiltration, drainage and evaporation processes. Also, the role of stones was evaluated as one possible explanation of the differences frequently observed between the measured hydraulic behavior and that estimated by using pedotransfer functions.

  2. The planetary hydraulics analysis based on a multi-resolution stereo DTMs and LISFLOOD-FP model: Case study in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Schumann, G.; Neal, J. C.; Lin, S.

    2013-12-01

    Earth is the only planet possessing an active hydrological system based on H2O circulation. However, after Mariner 9 discovered fluvial channels on Mars with similar features to Earth, it became clear that some solid planets and satellites once had water flows or pseudo hydrological systems of other liquids. After liquid water was identified as the agent of ancient martian fluvial activities, the valley and channels on the martian surface were investigated by a number of remote sensing and in-suit measurements. Among all available data sets, the stereo DTM and ortho from various successful orbital sensor, such as High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), Context Camera (CTX), and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), are being most widely used to trace the origin and consequences of martian hydrological channels. However, geomorphological analysis, with stereo DTM and ortho images over fluvial areas, has some limitations, and so a quantitative modeling method utilizing various spatial resolution DTMs is required. Thus in this study we tested the application of hydraulics analysis with multi-resolution martian DTMs, constructed in line with Kim and Muller's (2009) approach. An advanced LISFLOOD-FP model (Bates et al., 2010), which simulates in-channel dynamic wave behavior by solving 2D shallow water equations without advection, was introduced to conduct a high accuracy simulation together with 150-1.2m DTMs over test sites including Athabasca and Bahram valles. For application to a martian surface, technically the acceleration of gravity in LISFLOOD-FP was reduced to the martian value of 3.71 m s-2 and the Manning's n value (friction), the only free parameter in the model, was adjusted for martian gravity by scaling it. The approach employing multi-resolution stereo DTMs and LISFLOOD-FP was superior compared with the other research cases using a single DTM source for hydraulics analysis. HRSC DTMs, covering 50-150m resolutions was used to trace rough

  3. Pore-structure models of hydraulic conductivity for permeable pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, X.; Sansalone, J.; Ying, G.; Ranieri, V.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryPermeable pavement functions as a porous infrastructure interface allowing the infiltration and evaporation of rainfall-runoff while functioning as a relatively smooth load-bearing surface for vehicular transport. Hydraulic conductivity ( k) of permeable pavement is an important hydraulic property and is a function of the pore structure. This study examines k for a cementitious permeable pavement (CPP) through a series of pore-structure models. Measurements utilized include hydraulic head as well as total porosity, ( ϕ t), effective porosity ( ϕ e), tortuosity ( L e/ L) and pore size distribution (PSD) indices generated through X-ray tomography (XRT). XRT results indicate that the permeable pavement pore matrix is hetero-disperse, with high tortuosity and ϕ t ≠ ϕ e. Power law models of k- ϕ t and k- ϕ e relationships are developed for a CPP mix design. Results indicate that the Krüger, Fair-Hatch, Hazen, Slichter, Beyer and Terzaghi models based on simple pore-structure indices do not reproduce measured k values. The conventional Kozeny-Carman model (KCM), a more parameterized pore-structure model, did not reproduce measured k values. This study proposes a modified KCM utilizing ϕ e, specific surface area (SSA) pe and weighted tortuosity ( L e/ L) w. Results demonstrate that such permeable pavement pore-structure parameters with the modified KCM can predict k. The k results are combined with continuous simulation modeling using historical rainfall to provide nomographs examining permeable pavement as a low impact development (LID) infrastructure component.

  4. Modeling the effects of hydraulic stimulation on geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Silvia; Vilarrasa, Victor; Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Meier, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Geothermal energy represents a huge power source that can provide clean energy in potentially unlimited supply. When designing geothermal energy production from deep hot rocks, permeability is considered to control the economic efficiency of the heat extraction operations. In fact, a high permeability heat exchanger is required to achieve a cost-competitive power generation. The typical procedure entails intercepting naturally fractured rocks and enhancing their permeability by means of stimulation. Hydraulic stimulation is the most widely used method. It involves the massive injection of a large volume of water at high flow rates to increase the downhole pore pressure. This overpressure reduces the effective stresses, which tends to induce shearing along the fracture planes. In this way permeability is enhanced due to dilatancy, especially in the direction perpendicular to shear. These processes usually trigger microseismic events, which are sometimes of sufficient magnitude to be felt by the local population. This causes a negative impact on the local population and may compromise the continuation of the project. Hence, understanding the mechanisms triggering these induced micro-earthquakes is important to properly design and manage geothermal stimulation and operations so as to prevent them. We analyzed the thermo-hydro-mechanical response of a fractured deep rock mass subjected to hydraulic stimulation. Considering that seismicity is triggered when failure condition are reached, we studied the variation of the stress regime due to the hydraulic and thermal perturbations during fluid injection. Starting with a simplified model with constant permeability fault zones, more sophisticated schemes are considered to simulate the behavior of the discontinuity zones, including permeability variation associated to temperature, pressure and stress regime changes. Numerical simulations are performed using the finite element numerical code CODE_BRIGHT, which allows to solve

  5. Mathematical modeling of bent-axis hydraulic piston motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Each of the DSN 70-m antennas uses 16 bent-axis hydraulic piston motors as part of the antenna drive system. On each of the two antenna axes, four motors are used to drive the antenna and four motors provide counter torque to remove the backlash in the antenna drive train. This article presents a mathematical model for bent-axis hydraulic piston motors. The model was developed to understand the influence of the hydraulic motors on the performance of the DSN 70-m antennas' servo control system.

  6. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  7. Modeling Hydraulic Components for Automated FMEA of a Braking System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    Modeling Hydraulic Components for Automated FMEA of a Braking System Peter Struss, Alessandro Fraracci Tech. Univ. of Munich, 85748 Garching...Germany struss@in.tum.de ABSTRACT This paper presents work on model-based automation of failure-modes-and-effects analysis ( FMEA ) applied to...the hydraulic part of a vehicle braking system. We describe the FMEA task and the application problem and outline the foundations for automating the

  8. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned toward conditions usually encountered in the Marce...

  9. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned toward conditions usually encountered in the Marce...

  10. Hydraulic modeling development and application in water resources engineering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.; Yang, Chih Ted; Wang, Lawrence K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling has become widespread in water resources engineering and science to study rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal regions. For example, computer models are commonly used to forecast anthropogenic effects on the environment, and to help provide advanced mitigation measures against catastrophic events such as natural and dam-break floods. Linking hydraulic models to vegetation and habitat models has expanded their use in multidisciplinary applications to the riparian corridor. Implementation of these models in software packages on personal desktop computers has made them accessible to the general engineering community, and their use has been popularized by the need of minimal training due to intuitive graphical user interface front ends. Models are, however, complex and nontrivial, to the extent that even common terminology is sometimes ambiguous and often applied incorrectly. In fact, many efforts are currently under way in order to standardize terminology and offer guidelines for good practice, but none has yet reached unanimous acceptance. This chapter provides a view of the elements involved in modeling surface flows for the application in environmental water resources engineering. It presents the concepts and steps necessary for rational model development and use by starting with the exploration of the ideas involved in defining a model. Tangible form of those ideas is provided by the development of a mathematical and corresponding numerical hydraulic model, which is given with a substantial amount of detail. The issues of model deployment in a practical and productive work environment are also addressed. The chapter ends by presenting a few model applications highlighting the need for good quality control in model validation.

  11. Evaluating models for predicting hydraulic characteristics of layered soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavimbela, S. S. W.; van Rensburg, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    Soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K-coefficient) are critical hydraulic properties governing soil water activity on layered soils. Sustainable soil water conservation would not be possible without accurate knowledge of these hydraulic properties. Infield rainwater harvesting (IRWH) is one conservation technique adopted to improve the soil water regime of a number of clay soils found in the semi arid areas of Free State province of South Africa. Given that SWCC is much easier to measure, most soil water studies rely on SWCC information to predict in-situ K-coefficients. This work validated this practice on the Tukulu, Sepane and Swartland layered soil profiles. The measured SWCC was first described using Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980) and Kasugi (1996) parametric models. The conductivity functions of these models were then required to fit in-situ based K-coefficients derived from instantaneous profile method (IPM). The same K-coefficient was also fitted by HYDRUS 1-D using optimised SWCC parameters. Although all parametric models fitted the measured SWCC fairly well their corresponding conductivity functions could not do the same when fitting the in-situ based K-coefficients. Overestimates of more than 2 orders of magnitude especially at low soil water content (SWC) were observed. This phenomenon was pronounced among the upper horizons that overlaid a clayey horizon. However, optimized α and n parameters using HYDRUS 1-D showed remarkable agreement between fitted and in-situ K-coefficient with root sum of squares error (RMSE) recording values not exceeding unity. During this exercise the Brooks and Corey was replaced by modified van Genuchten model (Vogel and Cislerova, 1988) since it failed to produce unique inverse solutions. The models performance appeared to be soil specific with van Genuchten-Mualem (1980) performing fairly well on the Orthic and neucutanic horizons while its modified form fitted very

  12. Implementation of diverse tree hydraulics in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A.; Shevliakova, E.; Malyshev, S.; Weng, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the occurence of drought kill in forests worldwide. These mortality events are significant disruptions to the terrestrial carbon cycle, but the mechanisms required to represent drought kill are not represented in terrestrial carbon cycle models. In part, this is due to the challenge of representing the diversity of hydraulic strategies, which include stomatal sensitivity to water deficit and woody tissue vulnerability to cavitation at low water potential. In part, this is due to the challenge of representing this boundary value problem numerically, because the hydraulic components determine water potential at the leaf, but the stomatal conductance on the leaf also determines the hydraulic gradients within the plant. This poster will describe the development of a land surface model parameterization of diverse tree hydraulic strategies.

  13. Combining multiobjective optimization and Bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WöHling, Thomas; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2008-12-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multiobjective optimization and Bayesian model averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multiobjective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are postprocessed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multiobjective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  14. Influence of Elevation Data Source on 2D Hydraulic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, Krzysztof; StĘpnik, Mateusz; Kurczyński, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the influence of the source of various elevation data on hydraulic modelling in open channels. In the research, digital terrain models from different datasets were evaluated and used in two-dimensional hydraulic models. The following aerial and satellite elevation data were used to create the representation of terrain-digital terrain model: airborne laser scanning, image matching, elevation data collected in the LPIS, EuroDEM, and ASTER GDEM. From the results of five 2D hydrodynamic models with different input elevation data, the maximum depth and flow velocity of water were derived and compared with the results of the most accurate ALS data. For such an analysis a statistical evaluation and differences between hydraulic modelling results were prepared. The presented research proved the importance of the quality of elevation data in hydraulic modelling and showed that only ALS and photogrammetric data can be the most reliable elevation data source in accurate 2D hydraulic modelling.

  15. Hydraulics and mixing in the Hudson River estuary: A numerical model study of tidal variations during neap tide conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    StenströM, Petter

    2004-04-01

    Three-dimensional numerical modeling is performed to study intratidal and along-channel variability in stratification and mixing in the Hudson River estuary. The modeled fields show good agreement with observations, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Estuarine circulation dominates the mean fields, and intratidal variability is dominated by tidal straining that acts to strengthen the stratification during ebb and weaken it during flood. Mixing is mainly confined to a bottom layer during flood but occurs higher up in the water column during ebb. Mixing across the halocline shows marked along-channel variability due to bathymetric effects. During ebb, mixing occurs preferentially at an abrupt channel expansion seaward of a channel constriction at the George Washington Bridge, as predicted by [2000]. The salt flux across the halocline in this region, averaged over ebb, exceeds 5 × 10-4 kg m-2 s-1, a factor of 3 greater than the along-channel average. Increased residence time of tracers should be expected in this region due to the strong mixing but also due to observed secondary circulation [, 1997]. Mixing across the halocline during flood is small, except for early flood, before the well-mixed bottom layer is developed. Mixing is then localized to the landward slope of sills.

  16. Updating flood maps efficiently using existing hydraulic models, very-high-accuracy elevation data, and a geographic information system; a pilot study on the Nisqually River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Haluska, Tana L.; Kresch, David L.

    2001-01-01

    A method of updating flood inundation maps at a fraction of the expense of using traditional methods was piloted in Washington State as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Urban Geologic and Hydrologic Hazards Initiative. Large savings in expense may be achieved by building upon previous Flood Insurance Studies and automating the process of flood delineation with a Geographic Information System (GIS); increases in accuracy and detail result from the use of very-high-accuracy elevation data and automated delineation; and the resulting digital data sets contain valuable ancillary information such as flood depth, as well as greatly facilitating map storage and utility. The method consists of creating stage-discharge relations from the archived output of the existing hydraulic model, using these relations to create updated flood stages for recalculated flood discharges, and using a GIS to automate the map generation process. Many of the effective flood maps were created in the late 1970?s and early 1980?s, and suffer from a number of well recognized deficiencies such as out-of-date or inaccurate estimates of discharges for selected recurrence intervals, changes in basin characteristics, and relatively low quality elevation data used for flood delineation. FEMA estimates that 45 percent of effective maps are over 10 years old (FEMA, 1997). Consequently, Congress has mandated the updating and periodic review of existing maps, which have cost the Nation almost 3 billion (1997) dollars. The need to update maps and the cost of doing so were the primary motivations for piloting a more cost-effective and efficient updating method. New technologies such as Geographic Information Systems and LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation mapping are key to improving the efficiency of flood map updating, but they also improve the accuracy, detail, and usefulness of the resulting digital flood maps. GISs produce digital maps without manual estimation of inundated areas between

  17. Hydraulic well testing inversion for modeling fluid flow in fractured rocks using simulated annealing: a case study at Raymond field site, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, Julie; Karasaki, Kenzi

    2000-10-01

    Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing (SA) is an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models in fractured rocks based on the transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes element apertures for a cluster of fracture elements in order to improve the match to observed pressure transients. This inversion technique has been applied to hydraulic data collected at the Raymond field site, CA to examine the spatial characteristics of the flow properties in a fractured rock mass. Two major conductive zones have been detected by various geophysical logs, geophysical imaging techniques and hydraulic tests; one occurring near a depth of 30 m and the other near a depth of 60 m. Our inversion results show that the practical range of spatial correlation for transmissivity distribution is estimated to be approximately 5 m in the upper zone and less than 2.5 m in the lower zones. From the televiewer and other fracture imaging logs it was surmised that the lower conductive zone is associated with an anomalous single open fracture as compared to the upper zone, which is an extensive fracture zone. This would explain the difference in the estimated practical range of the spatial correlation for transmissivity.

  18. Effects of model layer simplification using composite hydraulic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Sepulveda, Nicasio; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater provides much of the fresh drinking water to more than 1.5 billion people in the world (Clarke et al., 1996) and in the United States more that 50 percent of citizens rely on groundwater for drinking water (Solley et al., 1998). As aquifer systems are developed for water supply, the hydrologic system is changed. Water pumped from the aquifer system initially can come from some combination of inducing more recharge, water permanently removed from storage, and decreased groundwater discharge. Once a new equilibrium is achieved, all of the pumpage must come from induced recharge and decreased discharge (Alley et al., 1999). Further development of groundwater resources may result in reductions of surface water runoff and base flows. Competing demands for groundwater resources require good management. Adequate data to characterize the aquifers and confining units of the system, like hydrologic boundaries, groundwater levels, streamflow, and groundwater pumping and climatic data for recharge estimation are to be collected in order to quantify the effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands, streams, and lakes. Once collected, three-dimensional (3D) groundwater flow models can be developed and calibrated and used as a tool for groundwater management. The main hydraulic parameters that comprise a regional or subregional model of an aquifer system are the hydraulic conductivity and storage properties of the aquifers and confining units (hydrogeologic units) that confine the system. Many 3D groundwater flow models used to help assess groundwater/surface-water interactions require calculating ?effective? or composite hydraulic properties of multilayered lithologic units within a hydrogeologic unit. The calculation of composite hydraulic properties stems from the need to characterize groundwater flow using coarse model layering in order to reduce simulation times while still representing the flow through the system accurately. The accuracy of flow models with

  19. Effects of model layer simplification using composite hydraulic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Nicasio; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of simplifying hydraulic property layering within an unconfined aquifer and the underlying confining unit were assessed. The hydraulic properties of lithologic units within the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were computed by analyzing the aquifer-test data using radial, axisymmetric two-dimensional (2D) flow. Time-varying recharge to the unconfined aquifer and pumping from the confined Upper Floridan aquifer (USA) were simulated using 3D flow. Conceptual flow models were developed by gradually reducing the number of lithologic units in the unconfined aquifer and confining unit by calculating composite hydraulic properties for the simplified lithologic units. Composite hydraulic properties were calculated using either thickness-weighted averages or inverse modeling using regression-based parameter estimation. No significant residuals were simulated when all lithologic units comprising the unconfined aquifer were simulated as one layer. The largest residuals occurred when the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were aggregated into a single layer (quasi-3D), with residuals over 100% for the leakage rates to the confined aquifer and the heads in the confining unit. Residuals increased with contrasts in vertical hydraulic conductivity between the unconfined aquifer and confining unit. Residuals increased when the constant-head boundary at the bottom of the Upper Floridan aquifer was replaced with a no-flow boundary.

  20. Empirical flow parameters : a tool for hydraulic model validity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Burley, Thomas E.; Cleveland, Theodore G.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) To determine and present from existing data in Texas, relations between observed stream flow, topographic slope, mean section velocity, and other hydraulic factors, to produce charts such as Figure 1 and to produce empirical distributions of the various flow parameters to provide a methodology to "check if model results are way off!"; (2) To produce a statistical regional tool to estimate mean velocity or other selected parameters for storm flows or other conditional discharges at ungauged locations (most bridge crossings) in Texas to provide a secondary way to compare such values to a conventional hydraulic modeling approach. (3.) To present ancillary values such as Froude number, stream power, Rosgen channel classification, sinuosity, and other selected characteristics (readily determinable from existing data) to provide additional information to engineers concerned with the hydraulic-soil-foundation component of transportation infrastructure.

  1. Hydraulic fracturing: insights from field, lab, and numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, S. D.; Johnson, S.; Fu, P.; Settgast, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has become an increasingly important technique in stimulating reservoirs for gas, oil, and geothermal energy production. In use commercially since the 1950's, the technique has been widely lauded, when combined with other techniques, for enabling the development of shale gas resources in the United States, providing a valuable and extensive source of domestic energy. However, the technique has also drawn a degree of notoriety from high-profile incidents involving contamination of drinking water associated with gas extraction operations in the Marcellus shale region. This work highlights some of the insights on the behavior of subsurface hydraulic fracturing operations that have been derived from field and laboratory observations as well as from numerical simulations. The sensitivity of fracture extent and orientation to parameters such as matrix material heterogeneity, presence and distribution of discontinuities, and stress orientation is of particular interest, and we discuss this in the context of knowledge derived from both observation and simulation. The limitations of these studies will also be addressed in terms of resolution, uncertainty, and assumptions as well as the balance of fidelity to cost, both in computation time (for numerical studies) and equipment / operation cost (for observational studies). We also identify a number of current knowledge gaps and propose alternatives for addressing those gaps. We especially focus on the role of numerical studies for elucidating key concepts and system sensitivities. The problem is inherently multi-scale in both space and time as well as highly coupled hydromechanically, and, in several applications, thermally as well. We will summarize the developments to date in analyzing these systems and present an approach for advancing the capabilities of our models in the short- to long-term and how these advances can help provide solutions to reduce risk and improve efficiency of hydraulic fracturing

  2. Osmotic Model to Explain Anomalous Hydraulic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marine, I. Wendell; Fritz, Steven J.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that compacted clays act as osmotic membranes when they separate aqueous solutions of unequal ionic concentration. Theoretically, osmotically induced differential hydraulic pressure in groundwater systems can be relatively high. The magnitude depends primarily upon concentration differences across the membrane, type of ions, type of clay, and pore size. In experiments, thin, compacted clay membranes commonly exhibit varying degrees of osmotic efficiency due to ion leak-age through the clay. In natural systems the membrane and the solution containers are not as distinct and well defined as they are in the laboratory. Moreover, the membrane is commonly thick, inhomogeneous, and composite. In a buried Triassic basin at the Savannah River plant near Aiken, South Carolina, it is suspected that osmosis causes the saline water in the basin center to be slightly geopressurized in relation to freshwater in the overlying coastal plain aquifer. Two wells have heads of 7.88 and 12.98 bars (114.3 and 188.3 psi) above the head in the coastal plain aquifer. The head in each of these wells approximates the osmotic equilibrium head calculated from solution concentration of water produced by each well (12,000 and 18,500 mg/l, respectively). Other wells penetrating the top and edge of the Triassic basin probably penetrate a zone where ion leakage gives rise to less saline water. Thus these wells are not geopressurized.

  3. EPA Study of Hydraulic Fracturing and Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    In its FY2010 Appropriations Committee Conference Report, Congress directed EPA to study the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water, using: • Best available science • Independent sources of information • Transparent, peer-reviewed process • Consultatio...

  4. Characteristics of Hydraulic Shock Waves in an Inclined Chute Contraction by Using Three Dimensional Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chao; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Su, Yu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    The inclined rectangular chute construction is a common structure used in hydraulic engineering for typical reasons such as the increase of bottom slope, the transition from side channel intakes to tunnel spillways, the drainage construction, and the reduction of chute width due to bridges, flood diversion structures or irrigation systems. The converging vertical sidewalls of a chute contraction deflect the supercritical flow to form hydraulic shock waves. Hydraulic shock waves have narrow and locally extreme wavy surfaces, which commonly results in the requirement of higher height of sidewalls. Therefore, predicting the possible height and position of maximum hydraulic shock wave are necessary to design the required height of sidewalls to prevent flow overtopping. In this study, we used a three-dimensional computation fluid dynamics model (i.e., FLOW-3D) to simulate the characteristics of hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction. For this purpose, the parameters of simulated hydraulic shock wave, such as the shock angle, maximum shock wave height and maximum shock wave position in various conditions are compared with those calculated by the empirical relations obtained from literatures. We showed that the simulated results are extremely close to the experimental results. The numerical results validated the applicability of these empirical relations and extend their applicability to higher approach Froude numbers from 3.51 to 7.27. Furthermore, we also applied the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel under 200-year peak flow condition to FLOW-3D model to simulate the hydraulic shock waves and validate the effect of the installation of a diversion pier in the channel on promoting the stability of flow fluid. The results revealed that a diversion pier installed in the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel is helpful for improving the stability of flow field. In summary, this study demonstrates that FLOW-3D model can be used to simulate the

  5. EPA releases progress report on hydraulic fracturing study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided a 21 December progress report on its ongoing national study about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. The agency said that a draft of the congressionally requested study will be released in 2014 for public and peer review and that its progress report does not draw conclusions about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing, often referred to as fracking.

  6. MODELING HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS USING THE CVBEM AND THE MICROCOMPUTER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Chintu; Hromadka, T.V.

    1985-01-01

    The Complex Variable Boundary Element Method (CVBEM) offers an effective and efficient means for modeling two-dimensional potential and related flow problems. The method has been applied to various hydraulic and hydrodynamic problems - surface water, ground water, and other flows - and has proven its accuracy, reliability and usefulness. The paper describes the CVBEM and its application.

  7. LVP modeling and dynamic characteristics prediction of a hydraulic power unit in deep-sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xue-peng; Ye, Min; Deng, Bin; Zhang, Cui-hong; Yu, Zu-ying

    2013-03-01

    A hydraulic power unit (HPU) is the driving "heart" of deep-sea working equipment. It is critical to predict its dynamic performances in deep-water before being immerged in the seawater, while the experimental tests by simulating deep-sea environment have many disadvantages, such as expensive cost, long test cycles, and difficult to achieve low-temperature simulation, which is only used as a supplementary means for confirmatory experiment. This paper proposes a novel theoretical approach based on the linear varying parameters (LVP) modeling to foresee the dynamic performances of the driving unit. Firstly, based on the varying environment features, dynamic expressions of the compressibility and viscosity of hydraulic oil are derived to reveal the fluid performances changing. Secondly, models of hydraulic system and electrical system are accomplished respectively through studying the control process and energy transfer, and then LVP models of the pressure and flow rate control is obtained through the electro-hydraulic models integration. Thirdly, dynamic characteristics of HPU are obtained by the model simulating within bounded closed sets of varying parameters. Finally, the developed HPU is tested in a deep-sea imitating hull, and the experimental results are well consistent with the theoretical analysis outcomes, which clearly declare that the LVP modeling is a rational way to foresee dynamic performances of HPU. The research approach and model analysis results can be applied to the predictions of working properties and product designs for other deep-sea hydraulic pump.

  8. Numerical modeling of consolidation processes in hydraulically deposited soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Nicholas Robert

    Hydraulically deposited soils are encountered in many common engineering applications including mine tailing and geotextile tube fills, though the consolidation process for such soils is highly nonlinear and requires the use of advanced numerical techniques to provide accurate predictions. Several commercially available finite element codes poses the ability to model soil consolidation, and it was the goal of this research to assess the ability of two of these codes, ABAQUS and PLAXIS, to model the large-strain, two-dimensional consolidation processes which occur in hydraulically deposited soils. A series of one- and two-dimensionally drained rectangular models were first created to assess the limitations of ABAQUS and PLAXIS when modeling consolidation of highly compressible soils. Then, geotextile tube and TSF models were created to represent actual scenarios which might be encountered in engineering practice. Several limitations were discovered, including the existence of a minimum preconsolidation stress below which numerical solutions become unstable.

  9. State of the art hydraulic turbine model test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, Violaine; Duparchy, Alexandre; Andre, Francois; Larroze, Pierre-Yves

    2016-11-01

    Model tests are essential in hydraulic turbine development and related fields. The methods and technologies used to perform these tests show constant progress and provide access to further information. In addition, due to its contractual nature, the test demand evolves continuously in terms of quantity and accuracy. Keeping in mind that the principal aim of model testing is the transposition of the model measurements to the real machine, the measurements should be performed accurately, and a critical analysis of the model test results is required to distinguish the transposable hydraulic phenomena from the test rig interactions. Although the resonances’ effects are known and described in the IEC standard, their identification is difficult. Leaning on a strong experience of model testing, we will illustrate with a few examples of how to identify the potential problems induced by the test rig. This paper contains some of our best practices to obtain the most accurate, relevant, and independent test-rig measurements.

  10. How Accurate Is A Hydraulic Model? | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Symposium paper Network hydraulic models are widely used, but their overall accuracy is often unknown. Models are developed to give utilities better insight into system hydraulic behavior, and increasingly the ability to predict the fate and transport of chemicals. Without an accessible and consistent means of validating a given model against the system it is meant to represent, the value of those supposed benefits should be questioned. Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) databases, though ubiquitous, are underused data sources for this type of task. Integrating a network model with a measurement database would offer professionals the ability to assess the model’s assumptions in an automated fashion by leveraging enormous amounts of data.

  11. How Accurate Is A Hydraulic Model? | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Symposium paper Network hydraulic models are widely used, but their overall accuracy is often unknown. Models are developed to give utilities better insight into system hydraulic behavior, and increasingly the ability to predict the fate and transport of chemicals. Without an accessible and consistent means of validating a given model against the system it is meant to represent, the value of those supposed benefits should be questioned. Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) databases, though ubiquitous, are underused data sources for this type of task. Integrating a network model with a measurement database would offer professionals the ability to assess the model’s assumptions in an automated fashion by leveraging enormous amounts of data.

  12. Stem hydraulic capacitance decreases with drought stress: implications for modelling tree hydraulics in the Mediterranean oak Quercus ilex.

    PubMed

    Salomón, Roberto L; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesús; Steppe, Kathy

    2017-02-02

    Hydraulic modelling is a primary tool to predict plant performance in future drier scenarios. However, as most tree models are validated under non-stress conditions, they may fail when water becomes limiting. To simulate tree hydraulic functioning under moist and dry conditions, the current version of a water flow and storage mechanistic model was further developed by implementing equations that describe variation in xylem hydraulic resistance (RX ) and stem hydraulic capacitance (CS ) with predawn water potential (ΨPD ). The model was applied in a Mediterranean forest experiencing intense summer drought, where six Quercus ilex trees were instrumented to monitor stem diameter variations and sap flow, concurrently with measurements of predawn and midday leaf water potential. Best model performance was observed when CS was allowed to decrease with decreasing ΨPD . Hydraulic capacitance decreased from 62 to 25 kg m(-3)  MPa(-1) across the growing season. In parallel, tree transpiration decreased to a greater extent than the capacitive water release and the contribution of stored water to transpiration increased from 2.0 to 5.1%. Our results demonstrate the importance of stored water and seasonality in CS for tree hydraulic functioning, and they suggest that CS should be considered to predict the drought response of trees with models.

  13. Transient Inverse Calibration of a Facies-Based Groundwater Flow and Transport Model Using Contaminant Concentration and Hydraulic Head Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.; Bergeron, M. P.; Vermeul, V. R.; Ward, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    A three dimensional groundwater flow and transport model was calibrated against observations of both hydraulic head and tritium plume concentrations measured in wells. Hydraulic parameters were estimated with a transient inverse process using UCODE, a universal inverse modeling code developed jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the International Groundwater Modeling Center at the Colorado School of Mines. Previous groundwater models at the site had been calibrated using hydraulic head data in the transient inverse calibration process. The resulting models were good at fitting the hydraulic head data, but did not perform well in replicating the movement of contaminant plumes over this period. A separate transient inverse calibration effort used only tritium measurements collected from wells at the site over the operational period, along with estimates of the water volume and tritium mass discharged to the aquifer, to estimate the hydraulic properties. The resulting model did a better job of replicating the overall shape and development of the tritium plume, but did not do as well in matching the hydraulic heads. Both the hydraulic head and tritium concentration data sets were used jointly in the transient inverse process for this study. These data included 47,739 measurements of hydraulic head from 543 wells and 37,802 measurements of tritium concentrations from 1,201 wells. The transient inverse process estimated hydraulic conductivity for 18 facies-based zones in the main sand and gravel units in the unconfined aquifer. A simplified weighting scheme for the hydraulic head and tritium data was developed so that the overall sum-of-squared residuals for the inverse runs were roughly equally weighted for the two data sets. Preliminary simulation results from this combined calibration dataset show a good fit for both the evolving tritium plume and hydraulic head measurements over the operational period.

  14. Using temperature modeling to investigate the temporal variability of riverbed hydraulic conductivity during storm events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutiti, Samuel; Levy, Jonathan

    2010-07-01

    SummaryUnderstanding the impact of storm events on riverbed hydraulic conductivity is crucial in assessing the efficacy of riverbank filtration as a water-treatment option. In this study, the variability of riverbed hydraulic conductivity and its correlation to river stage during storm events was investigated. Water levels and temperatures were continuously monitored in the river using creek piezometers screened beneath the riverbed, and monitoring wells located on the river bank. The range of values for water levels during the study period was from 161.3 to 163.7 m AMSL while temperatures ranged from 3.75 °C to 24 °C. During the duration of the study the Great Miami River was losing water to the underlying aquifer due to pumping in the adjacent municipal well field. Flow and heat transport were simulated in a groundwater heat and flow program VSH2D to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed. Hydraulic conductivity was estimated by using it as a calibration parameter to match simulated temperatures to observed temperatures in a monitoring well. Hydraulic heads in the aquifer responded to storm events at the same times but with dampened amplitudes compared to the river stage. The relative responses resulted in increased head gradients during the rising limb of the stage-hydrograph. Heat-flow modeling during five storm events demonstrated that a rise in head gradient alone was not sufficient to produce the temperature changes observed in the wells. Simulated temperatures were fitted to the observed data by varying both river stage (as measured in the field) and riverbed hydraulic conductivity. To produce the best fit temperatures, riverbed hydraulic conductivity consistently needed to be increased during the rising and peak stages of the storm events. The increased conductivity probably corresponds to a loss of fine sediments due to scour during high river stage. Hydraulic conductivity increases during storm events varied from a factor of two (0

  15. Nonlinear mathematical modeling and sensitivity analysis of hydraulic drive unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Yu, Bin; Quan, Lingxiao; Ba, Kaixian; Wu, Liujie

    2015-09-01

    The previous sensitivity analysis researches are not accurate enough and also have the limited reference value, because those mathematical models are relatively simple and the change of the load and the initial displacement changes of the piston are ignored, even experiment verification is not conducted. Therefore, in view of deficiencies above, a nonlinear mathematical model is established in this paper, including dynamic characteristics of servo valve, nonlinear characteristics of pressure-flow, initial displacement of servo cylinder piston and friction nonlinearity. The transfer function block diagram is built for the hydraulic drive unit closed loop position control, as well as the state equations. Through deriving the time-varying coefficient items matrix and time-varying free items matrix of sensitivity equations respectively, the expression of sensitivity equations based on the nonlinear mathematical model are obtained. According to structure parameters of hydraulic drive unit, working parameters, fluid transmission characteristics and measured friction-velocity curves, the simulation analysis of hydraulic drive unit is completed on the MATLAB/Simulink simulation platform with the displacement step 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the developed nonlinear mathematical model is sufficient by comparing the characteristic curves of experimental step response and simulation step response under different constant load. Then, the sensitivity function time-history curves of seventeen parameters are obtained, basing on each state vector time-history curve of step response characteristic. The maximum value of displacement variation percentage and the sum of displacement variation absolute values in the sampling time are both taken as sensitivity indexes. The sensitivity indexes values above are calculated and shown visually in histograms under different working conditions, and change rules are analyzed. Then the sensitivity

  16. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Podgorney, Robert Karl

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  17. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  18. Study of hydraulic air compression for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion open-cycle application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, A.; Chen, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A hydraulic air compressor, which requires no mechanical moving parts and operates in a nearly isothermal mode, can be an alternative for the noncondensible gas disposal of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power system. The compressor requires only a downward flow of water to accomplish air compression. An air compressor test loop was assembled and operated to obtain test data that would lead to the design of an OTEC hydraulic air compressor. A one dimensional, hydraulic gas compressor, computer model was employed to simulate the laboratory experiments, and it was tuned to fit the test results. A sensitivity study that shows the effects of various parameters on the applied head of the hydraulic air compression is presented.

  19. Phase-field modeling of hydraulic fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Zachary A.; Landis, Chad M.

    2016-11-01

    In this work a theoretical framework implementing the phase-field approach to fracture is used to couple the physics of flow through porous media and cracks with the mechanics of fracture. The main modeling challenge addressed in this work, which is a challenge for all diffuse crack representations, is on how to allow for the flow of fluid and the action of fluid pressure on the aggregate within the diffuse damage zone of the cracks. The theory is constructed by presenting the general physical balance laws and conducting a consistent thermodynamic analysis to constrain the constitutive relationships. Constitutive equations that reproduce the desired responses at the various limits of the phase-field parameter are proposed in order to capture Darcy-type flow in the intact porous medium and Stokes-type flow within open cracks. A finite element formulation for the solution of the governing model equations is presented and discussed. Finally, the theoretical and numerical model is shown to compare favorably to several important analytical solutions. More complex and interesting calculations are also presented to illustrate some of the advantageous features of the approach.

  20. Advanced geothermal hydraulics model -- Phase 1 final report, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    W. Zheng; J. Fu; W. C. Maurer

    1999-07-01

    An advanced geothermal well hydraulics model (GEODRIL) is being developed to accurately calculate bottom-hole conditions in these hot wells. In Phase 1, real-time monitoring and other improvements were added to GEODRIL. In Phase 2, GEODRIL will be integrated into Marconi's Intelligent Drilling Monitor (IDM) that will use artificial intelligence to detect lost circulation, fluid influxes and other circulation problems in geothermal wells. This software platform has potential for significantly reducing geothermal drilling costs.

  1. Development of a 3D Stream Network and Topography for Improved Large-Scale Hydraulic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksena, S.; Dey, S.; Merwade, V.

    2016-12-01

    Most digital elevation models (DEMs) used for hydraulic modeling do not include channel bed elevations. As a result, the DEMs are complimented with additional bathymetric data for accurate hydraulic simulations. Existing methods to acquire bathymetric information through field surveys or through conceptual models are limited to reach-scale applications. With an increasing focus on large scale hydraulic modeling of rivers, a framework to estimate and incorporate bathymetry for an entire stream network is needed. This study proposes an interpolation-based algorithm to estimate bathymetry for a stream network by modifying the reach-based empirical River Channel Morphology Model (RCMM). The effect of a 3D stream network that includes river bathymetry is then investigated by creating a 1D hydraulic model (HEC-RAS) and 2D hydrodynamic model (Integrated Channel and Pond Routing) for the Upper Wabash River Basin in Indiana, USA. Results show improved simulation of flood depths and storage in the floodplain. Similarly, the impact of river bathymetry incorporation is more significant in the 2D model as compared to the 1D model.

  2. Application study of magnetic fluid seal in hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Y.; Zhang, W.

    2012-11-01

    The waterpower resources of our country are abundant, and the hydroelectric power is developed, but at present the main shaft sealing device of hydraulic turbine is easy to wear and tear and the leakage is great. The magnetic fluid seal has the advantages of no contact, no wear, self-healing, long life and so on. In this paper, the magnetic fluid seal would be used in the main shaft of hydraulic turbine, the sealing structure was built the model, meshed the geometry, applied loads and solved by using MULTIPHYSICS in ANSYS software, the influence of the various sealing structural parameters such as tooth width, height, slot width, sealing gap on the sealing property were analyzed, the magnetic fluid sealing device suitable for large-diameter shaft and sealing water was designed, the sealing problem of the hydraulic turbine main shaft was solved effectively which will bring huge economic benefits.

  3. The EPA's Study on the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, Susan

    2013-03-01

    Natural gas plays a key role in our nation's clean energy future. The United States has vast reserves of natural gas that are commercially viable as a result of advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, which enable greater access to gas in rock formations deep underground. These advances have spurred a significant increase in the production of both natural gas and oil across the country. However, as the use of hydraulic fracturing has increased, so have concerns about its potential human health and environmental impacts, especially for drinking water. In response to public concern, the US Congress requested that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conduct scientific research to examine the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. In 2011, the EPA began research to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources, if any, and to identify the driving factors that may affect the severity and frequency of such impacts. The study is organized around the five stages of the hydraulic fracturing water cycle, from water acquisition through the mixing of chemicals and the injection of fracturing fluid to post-fracturing treatment and/or disposal of wastewater. EPA scientists are using a transdisciplinary research approach involving laboratory studies, computer modeling, toxicity assessments, and case studies to answer research questions associated with each stage of the water cycle. This talk will provide an overview of the EPA's study, including a description of the hydraulic fracturing water cycle and a summary of the ongoing research projects.

  4. Mesh convergence study for hydraulic turbine draft-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devals, C.; Vu, T. C.; Zhang, Y.; Dompierre, J.; Guibault, F.

    2016-11-01

    Computational flow analysis is an essential tool for hydraulic turbine designers. Grid generation is the first step in the flow analysis process. Grid quality and solution accuracy are strongly linked. Even though many studies have addressed the issue of mesh independence, there is still no definitive consensus on mesh best practices, and research on that topic is still needed. This paper presents a mesh convergence study for turbulence flow in hydraulic turbine draft- tubes which represents the most challenging turbine component for CFD predictions. The findings from this parametric study will be incorporated as mesh control rules in an in-house automatic mesh generator for turbine components.

  5. Studies investigate effects of hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-11-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, to enhance the retrieval of natural gas from shale has been increasing dramatically—the number of natural gas wells rose about 50% since 2000. Shale gas has been hailed as a relatively low-cost, abundant energy source that is cleaner than coal. However, fracking involves injecting large volumes of water, sand, and chemicals into deep shale gas reservoirs under high pressure to open fractures through which the gas can travel, and the process has generated much controversy. The popular press, advocacy organizations, and the documentary film Gasland by Josh Fox have helped bring this issue to a broad audience. Many have suggested that fracking has resulted in contaminated drinking water supplies, enhanced seismic activity, demands for large quantities of water that compete with other uses, and challenges in managing large volumes of resulting wastewater. As demand for expanded domestic energy production intensifies, there is potential for substantially increased use of fracking together with other recovery techniques for "unconventional gas resources," like extended horizontal drilling.

  6. Views on the future of thermal hydraulic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.

    1997-07-01

    It is essential for the U.S. NRC to sustain the highest level of the thermal-hydraulics and reactor safety research expertise and continuously improve their accident analysis capability. Such expertise should span over four different areas which are strongly related to each other. These are: (1) Reactor Safety Code Development, (2) Two-phase Flow Modeling, (3) Instrumentation and Fundamental Experimental Research, and (4) Separate Effect and Integral Test. The NRC is already considering a new effort in the area of advanced thermal-hydraulics effort. Its success largely depends on the availability of a significantly improved two-phase flow formulation and constitutive relations supported by detailed experimental data. Therefore, it is recommended that the NRC start significant research efforts in the areas of two-phase flow modeling, instrumentation, basic and separate effect experiments which should be pursued systematically and with clearly defined objectives. It is desirable that some international program is developed in this area. This paper is concentrated on those items in the thermal-hydraulic area which eventually determine the quality of future accident analysis codes.

  7. Floodplain Mapping Using Hydraulic Simulation Model in GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi, Shokoufeh; Ghanbarpour, M. Reza; Solaimani, Karim; Ahmadi, Mirkhalegh Z.

    In this research, a methodology was applied to integrate hydraulic simulation model, HEC-RAS and GIS analysis for delineation of flood extents and depths within a selected reach of Zaremroud River in Iran. Floodplain modeling is a recently new and applied method in river engineering discipline and is essential for prediction of flood hazards. It is necessary to simulate complicated hydraulic behavior of the river in a more simple way, for the purpose of managing and performing all river training practices. In this research, steady flow was simulated along 3 km end of Zaremroud River, upstream of the Tajan River in North of Iran. Floodplain zonation maps were derived using integrating of HEC-RAS and GIS analysis. Delineation of flood extents and depths within the floodplain were conducted in different return periods. Critical flooding area along the river was distinguished based on the grid layer of flood depths. The results indicated that hydraulic simulation by integrating with GIS analysis could be effective for various kinds of floodplain management and different scenarios for river training practices and flood mitigation planning.

  8. Statistical-physical model of the hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, B.; Marczewski, W.; Usowicz, J. B.; Lukowski, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    The water content in unsaturated subsurface soil layer is determined by processes of exchanging mass and energy between media of soil and atmosphere, and particular members of layered media. Generally they are non-homogeneous on different scales, considering soil porosity, soil texture including presence of vegetation elements in the root zone, and canopy above the surface, and varying biomass density of plants above the surface in clusters. That heterogeneity determines statistically effective values of particular physical properties. This work considers mainly those properties which determine the hydraulic conductivity of soil. This property is necessary for characterizing physically water transfer in the root zone and access of nutrient matter for plants, but it also the water capacity on the field scale. The temporal variability of forcing conditions and evolutionarily changing vegetation causes substantial effects of impact on the water capacity in large scales, bringing the evolution of water conditions in the entire area, spanning a possible temporal state in the range between floods and droughts. The dynamic of this evolution of water conditions is highly determined by vegetation but is hardly predictable in evaluations. Hydrological models require feeding with input data determining hydraulic properties of the porous soil which are proposed in this paper by means of the statistical-physical model of the water hydraulic conductivity. The statistical-physical model was determined for soils being typical in Euroregion Bug, Eastern Poland. The model is calibrated on the base of direct measurements in the field scales, and enables determining typical characteristics of water retention by the retention curves bounding the hydraulic conductivity to the state of water saturation of the soil. The values of the hydraulic conductivity in two reference states are used for calibrating the model. One is close to full saturation, and another is for low water content far

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics: does size matter?

    PubMed

    Tixier, Aude; Cochard, Hervé; Badel, Eric; Dusotoit-Coucaud, Anaïs; Jansen, Steven; Herbette, Stéphane

    2013-05-01

    While Arabidopsis thaliana has been proposed as a model species for wood development, the potential of this tiny herb for studying xylem hydraulics remains unexplored and anticipated by scepticism. Inflorescence stems of A. thaliana were used to measure hydraulic conductivity and cavitation resistance, whereas light and electron microscopy allowed observations of vessels. In wild-type plants, measured and theoretical conductivity showed a significant correlation (R (2) = 0.80, P < 0.01). Moreover, scaling of vessel dimensions and intervessel pit structure of A. thaliana were consistent with structure-function relationships of woody plants. The reliability and resolution of the hydraulic methods applied to measure vulnerability to cavitation were addressed by comparing plants grown under different photoperiods or different mutant lines. Sigmoid vulnerability curves of A. thaliana indicated a pressure corresponding to 50% loss of hydraulic conductance (P 50) between -3 and -2.5MPa for short-day and long-day plants, respectively. Polygalacturonase mutants showed a higher P 50 value (-2.25MPa), suggesting a role for pectins in vulnerability to cavitation. The application of A. thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics provides exciting possibilities for (1) exploring the molecular basis of xylem anatomical features and (2) understanding genetic mechanisms behind xylem functional traits such as cavitation resistance. Compared to perennial woody species, however, the lesser amount of xylem in A. thaliana has its limitations.

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics: does size matter?

    PubMed Central

    Tixier, Aude; Cochard, Hervé; Badel, Eric; Dusotoit-Coucaud, Anaïs; Jansen, Steven; Herbette, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    While Arabidopsis thaliana has been proposed as a model species for wood development, the potential of this tiny herb for studying xylem hydraulics remains unexplored and anticipated by scepticism. Inflorescence stems of A. thaliana were used to measure hydraulic conductivity and cavitation resistance, whereas light and electron microscopy allowed observations of vessels. In wild-type plants, measured and theoretical conductivity showed a significant correlation (R 2 = 0.80, P < 0.01). Moreover, scaling of vessel dimensions and intervessel pit structure of A. thaliana were consistent with structure–function relationships of woody plants. The reliability and resolution of the hydraulic methods applied to measure vulnerability to cavitation were addressed by comparing plants grown under different photoperiods or different mutant lines. Sigmoid vulnerability curves of A. thaliana indicated a pressure corresponding to 50% loss of hydraulic conductance (P 50) between –3 and –2.5MPa for short-day and long-day plants, respectively. Polygalacturonase mutants showed a higher P 50 value (–2.25MPa), suggesting a role for pectins in vulnerability to cavitation. The application of A. thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics provides exciting possibilities for (1) exploring the molecular basis of xylem anatomical features and (2) understanding genetic mechanisms behind xylem functional traits such as cavitation resistance. Compared to perennial woody species, however, the lesser amount of xylem in A. thaliana has its limitations. PMID:23547109

  11. Effect of unrepresented model errors on estimated soil hydraulic material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, Stefan; Roth, Kurt

    2017-09-01

    Unrepresented model errors influence the estimation of effective soil hydraulic material properties. As the required model complexity for a consistent description of the measurement data is application dependent and unknown a priori, we implemented a structural error analysis based on the inversion of increasingly complex models. We show that the method can indicate unrepresented model errors and quantify their effects on the resulting material properties. To this end, a complicated 2-D subsurface architecture (ASSESS) was forced with a fluctuating groundwater table while time domain reflectometry (TDR) and hydraulic potential measurement devices monitored the hydraulic state. In this work, we analyze the quantitative effect of unrepresented (i) sensor position uncertainty, (ii) small scale-heterogeneity, and (iii) 2-D flow phenomena on estimated soil hydraulic material properties with a 1-D and a 2-D study. The results of these studies demonstrate three main points: (i) the fewer sensors are available per material, the larger is the effect of unrepresented model errors on the resulting material properties. (ii) The 1-D study yields biased parameters due to unrepresented lateral flow. (iii) Representing and estimating sensor positions as well as small-scale heterogeneity decreased the mean absolute error of the volumetric water content data by more than a factor of 2 to 0. 004.

  12. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Hafzullah; Sadan Ozgur Kirca, Veysel; Burgan, Halil Ibrahim; Kellecioglu, Dorukhan

    2016-05-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses) wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS) software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  13. A STUDY ABOUT HYDRAULIC CHARACTERISTICS OF UNIONOIDA UNDER FLOWING WATER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hironori; Shimatani, Yukihiro; Kozaki, Ken; Ikematsu, Shinya; Tsujimoto, Yotaku

    Fresh water mussels (order Unionoida) have one of the important biological roles for river ecosystems. However, abundance and habitat range of Unionoida are drastically decreasing, because of environmental change based on many artificial river works, such as over riverbed excavation and loss of floodplain habitat. There are three Unionoida species in the Matsuura river, and one lentic species (Anodouta lauta) has been dominantly decreased over the past 50 years. As they have low mobility, Unionoida are strongly affected by physical environmental change of river. In this study, we focused attention on the hydraulic characteristics of Unionoida in flowing water condition, and conducted some hydraulic experiment to three Unionoida species. The result indicated that lentic species (Anodonta lauta) was easily affected by flowing water than lotic species (Unio douglasiae nipponensis, Lanceolaria grayana). And the result suggested that hydraulic characteristic of Unionoida was one of the reason that caused a decrement of lentic Unionoida species in the Matsuura river.

  14. Characteristics of concentrated flow hydraulics for rangeland ecosystems: implications for hydrologic modeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concentrated flow is often the dominant source of water erosion following disturbance on rangeland. Because of the lack of studies that explain the hydraulics of concentrated flow on rangelands, cropland-based equations have typically been used for rangeland hydrology and erosion modeling, leading t...

  15. Pen Branch Delta and Savannah River Swamp Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.

    1999-05-13

    The proposed Savannah River Site (SRS) Wetlands Restoration Project area is located in Barnwell County, South Carolina on the southwestern boundary of the SRS Reservation. The swamp covers about 40.5 km2 and is bounded to the west and south by the Savannah River and to the north and east by low bluffs at the edge of the Savannah River floodplain. Water levels within the swamp are determined by stage along the Savannah River, local drainage, groundwater seepage, and inflows from four tributaries, Beaver Dam Creek, Fourmile Branch, Pen Branch, and Steel Creek. Historic discharges of heated process water into these tributaries scoured the streambed, created deltas in the adjacent wetland, and killed native vegetation in the vicinity of the delta deposits. Future releases from these tributaries will be substantially smaller and closer to ambient temperatures. One component of the proposed restoration project will be to reestablish indigenous wetland vegetation on the Pen Branch delta that covers about 1.0 km2. Long-term predictions of water levels within the swamp are required to determine the characteristics of suitable plants. The objective of the study was to predict water levels at various locations within the proposed SRS Wetlands Restoration Project area for a range of Savannah River flows and regulated releases from Pen Branch. TABS-MD, a United States Army Corps of Engineer developed two-dimensional finite element open channel hydraulic computer code, was used to model the SRS swamp area for various flow conditions.

  16. Development of two-phase pipeline hydraulic analysis model based on Beggs-Brill correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluyo, Joko; Hermawan, Achilleus; Indarto

    2016-06-01

    The hydraulic analysis is an important stage in a reliable pipeline design. In the implementation, fluid distribution from a source to the sinks often occurs on parallel pipeline networks. The solution to the problem is complicated because of the iterative technique requirement. Regarding its solution effectiveness, there is a need for analysis related to the model and the solution method. This study aims to investigate pipeline hydraulic analysis on distributing of two-phase fluids flow. The model uses Beggs-Brill correlation to converse mass flow rates into pressure drops. In the solution technique, the Newton-Raphson iterative method is utilized. The iterative technique is solved using a computer program. The study is carried out using a certain pipeline network. The model is validated by comparing between Beggs-Brill towards Mukherjee-Brill correlation. The result reveals that the computer program enables solving of iterative calculation on the parallel pipeline hydraulic analysis. Convergence iteration is achieved by 50 iterations. The main results of the model are mass flow rate and pressure drop. The mass flow rate is obtained in the deviation up to 2.06%, between Beggs-Brill and Mukherjee-Brill correlation. On the other hand, the pressure gradient deviation is achieved on a higher deviation due to the different approach of the two correlations. The model can be further developed in the hydraulic pipeline analysis for two-phase flow.

  17. Using Hydraulic Network Models to Teach Electric Circuit Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Irvin; EERC (Engineering Education Research Center) Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Unlike other engineering disciplines, teaching electric circuit principles is difficult for some students because there isn't a visual context to rely on. So concepts such as electric potential, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance have little meaning outside of their definition and the derived mathematical relationships. As a work in progress, we are developing a tool to support teaching, learning, and research of electric circuits. The tool will allow the user to design, build, and operate electric circuits in the form of hydraulic networks. We believe that this system will promote greater learning of electric circuit principles by visually realizing the conceptual and abstract concepts of electric circuits. Furthermore, as a teaching and learning tool, the hydraulic network system can be used to teach and improve comprehension of electrical principles in K through 12 classrooms and in cross-disciplinary environments such as Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Aeronautical Engineering. As a research tool, the hydraulic network can model and simulate micro/nano bio-electro-chemical systems. Organization within the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh.

  18. Modelling of hydraulic fracture propagation in inhomogeneous poroelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykin, A. N.; Golovin, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    In the paper a model for description of a hydraulic fracture propagation in inhomogeneous poroelastic medium is proposed. Among advantages of the presented numerical algorithm, there are incorporation of the near-tip analysis into the general computational scheme, account for the rock failure criterion on the base of the cohesive zone model, possibility for analysis of fracture propagation in inhomogeneous reservoirs. The numerical convergence of the algorithm is verified and the agreement of our numerical results with known solutions is established. The influence of the inhomogeneity of the reservoir permeability to the fracture time evolution is also demonstrated.

  19. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity: Chapter 21

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K(). The parameters that describe the K() curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  20. Implementation and implications of macrophyte reconfiguration in hydraulic river modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoren, Veerle; Schoelynck, Jonas; Buis, Kerst; Meire, Dieter; Bal, Kris; Meire, Patrick; Temmerman, Stijn

    2014-05-01

    In lowland rivers, abundant macrophyte growth can often be observed. The aquatic vegetation has an impact on the flow by creating friction which results in increased water levels and decreased flow velocities. At the same time submerged macrophytes are susceptible to hydrodynamic forces of the water. Their morphology is therefore often flexible and streamlined so that it enables reconfiguration (i.e. bending of macrophytes with water flow) and decreases potential damage at high flow velocities. Knowledge of these mutual interactions is crucial in order to model water flow in vegetated rivers. A correct estimation of flow velocity and water height is indispensable for the calculation of hydraulic, ecological and geomorphological parameters. The total resistance to water flow in a river can be described by a Manning coefficient. This value is influenced by river characteristics as well as by the presence of macrophytes. In this study a simple method is developed to quantify the resistance created by macrophytes after reconfiguration of their canopy. In order to achieve this we derive model formulations and plant parameters for three different macrophyte species and compare model simulation with measured flow velocity data for two case studies. Furthermore, the effect of macrophyte reconfiguration is investigated by modeling the same case studies with and without the implementation of macrophyte reconfiguration. It was found that the local resistance created by the vegetation was overestimated when reconfiguration was not considered. This resulted in an overestimation of stream velocity adjacent to the vegetation and an underestimation of the stream velocity within and behind the vegetation. Another effect was a higher water level gradient and consequently a higher Manning coefficient in the scenario without reconfiguration compared to the scenario with reconfiguration. Reconfiguration had also an influence on ecological and geomorphological parameters. It was found

  1. Patch-scale Representation of Vegetation within Hydraulic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.; Marjoribanks, T.; Lane, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation affects flow, sediment and ecological processes within rivers. Quantifying these effects is key to understanding the hydraulics and morphodynamics of natural river systems and implementing effective river management. Despite a wealth of research into vegetated flows, the detailed flow characteristics around real plants in natural channels are still poorly understood. Here we present a new methodology for representing vegetation patches within computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of vegetated river channels. Vegetation is represented using a Mass Flux Scaling Algorithm (MFSA) and drag term within the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations, which account for the mass and momentum effects of the vegetation respectively. The model is applied using three different grid resolutions (0.2, 0.1 & 0.05 m) using time-averaged solution methods and compared to field data. The results show that the model reproduces the complex spatial flow heterogeneity within the channel and that increasing the resolution leads to enhanced model accuracy. The model is able to reproduce with accuracy, commonly used reach-scale hydraulic metrics (Manning's n) but also provides spatial flow data which can be used to infer eco-geomorphic feedbacks and long term channel evolution. Specifically, the results demonstrate that while vegetation may cause both local erosion and deposition, at the reach-scale, vegetation can increase sedimentation by 50%.

  2. An application of a hydraulic model simulator in flood risk assessment under changing climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroszkiewicz, J. M.; Romanowicz, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    The standard procedure of climate change impact assessment on future hydrological extremes consists of a chain of consecutive actions, starting from the choice of GCM driven by an assumed CO2 scenario, through downscaling of climatic forcing to a catchment scale, estimation of hydrological extreme indices using hydrological modelling tools and subsequent derivation of flood risk maps with the help of a hydraulic model. Among many possible sources of uncertainty, the main are the uncertainties related to future climate scenarios, climate models, downscaling techniques and hydrological and hydraulic models. Unfortunately, we cannot directly assess the impact of these different sources of uncertainties on flood risk in future due to lack of observations of future climate realizations. The aim of this study is an assessment of a relative impact of different sources of uncertainty on the uncertainty of flood risk maps. Due to the complexity of the processes involved, an assessment of total uncertainty of maps of inundation probability might be very computer time consuming. As a way forward we present an application of a hydraulic model simulator based on a nonlinear transfer function model for the chosen locations along the river reach. The transfer function model parameters are estimated based on the simulations of the hydraulic model at each of the model cross-sections. The study shows that the application of a simulator substantially reduces the computer requirements related to the derivation of flood risk maps under future climatic conditions. Biala Tarnowska catchment, situated in southern Poland is used as a case study. Future discharges at the input to a hydraulic model are obtained using the HBV model and climate projections obtained from the EUROCORDEX project. The study describes a cascade of uncertainty related to different stages of the process of derivation of flood risk maps under changing climate conditions. In this context it takes into account the

  3. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-12-18

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The

  4. Hydraulic Implications of Different Megaflood Canyon Incision Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, I. J.; Lamb, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Deeply incised canyons are some of the most dramatic features of landscapes carved by megafloods. The geometry of these canyons may reveal information regarding flood magnitudes during the last ice age on Earth and the volume of water flowing on early Mars. Canyons on both planets have been alternatively modeled as 'channels', where the modern topography was completely inundated with water to the elevation of the canyon rims, or as 'valleys' that were progressively incised by lesser discharges. Here we combine numerical flood simulations and sediment transport mechanics to explore the hydraulic implications that result from modeling the canyons as 'channels' versus 'valleys'. Over 300 floods were simulated for Moses Coulee, a 60 km-long canyon in the Channeled Scablands of eastern Washington, USA, using a 2D, depth-averaged hydraulic model. We simulated floods with discharges ranging from 0.1 million m3 s-1 to 6 million m3 s-1 using both the modern landscape as a topographic boundary condition and synthetic topographies that restored the canyon floor to different elevations as guided by strath terraces. For each simulation we tracked whether shear stresses on the terrace treads exceeded thresholds for sliding of basalt columns. Simulations using the modern topography indicate shear stresses were sufficiently high to erode the terraces at discharges lower than bankfull, and surprisingly, shear stresses decrease with increasing discharge at some sites due to backwater dynamics, which constrains canyon formation to moderate discharges. Simulations performed on the synthetic topography suggest the canyon could have been incised progressively by floods smaller than those required to fill the canyon to bankfull stage. These results suggest the canyons can be viewed as valleys that incised progressively, as opposed to channels filled with water, which has implications for placing bounds on paleoflood hydraulic reconstruction on Earth and Mars.

  5. Discrete modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in a complex pre-existing fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Nakagawa, S.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and stimulation of fracture networks are widely used by the energy industry (e.g., shale gas extraction, enhanced geothermal systems) to increase permeability of geological formations. Numerous analytical and numerical models have been developed to help understand and predict the behavior of hydraulically induced fractures. However, many existing models assume simple fracturing scenarios with highly idealized fracture geometries (e.g., propagation of a single fracture with assumed shapes in a homogeneous medium). Modeling hydraulic fracture propagation in the presence of natural fractures and homogeneities can be very challenging because of the complex interactions between fluid, rock matrix, and rock interfaces, as well as the interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing natural fractures. In this study, the TOUGH-RBSN code for coupled hydro-mechanical modeling is utilized to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and its interaction with pre-existing fracture networks. The simulation tool combines TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach, with the implementation of a lattice modeling approach for geomechanical and fracture-damage behavior, named Rigid-Body-Spring Network (RBSN). The discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is facilitated in the Voronoi discretization via a fully automated modeling procedure. The numerical program is verified through a simple simulation for single fracture propagation, in which the resulting fracture geometry is compared to an analytical solution for given fracture length and aperture. Subsequently, predictive simulations are conducted for planned laboratory experiments using rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed, pre-existing fracture network. The results of a preliminary simulation demonstrate selective fracturing and fluid infiltration along the pre-existing fractures, with additional fracturing in part

  6. Probabilistic flood inundation mapping at ungauged streams due to roughness coefficient uncertainty in hydraulic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, George; Vasiliades, Lampros; Loukas, Athanasios; Aronica, Giuseppe T.

    2017-04-01

    Probabilistic flood inundation mapping is performed and analysed at the ungauged Xerias stream reach, Volos, Greece. The study evaluates the uncertainty introduced by the roughness coefficient values on hydraulic models in flood inundation modelling and mapping. The well-established one-dimensional (1-D) hydraulic model, HEC-RAS is selected and linked to Monte-Carlo simulations of hydraulic roughness. Terrestrial Laser Scanner data have been used to produce a high quality DEM for input data uncertainty minimisation and to improve determination accuracy on stream channel topography required by the hydraulic model. Initial Manning's n roughness coefficient values are based on pebble count field surveys and empirical formulas. Various theoretical probability distributions are fitted and evaluated on their accuracy to represent the estimated roughness values. Finally, Latin Hypercube Sampling has been used for generation of different sets of Manning roughness values and flood inundation probability maps have been created with the use of Monte Carlo simulations. Historical flood extent data, from an extreme historical flash flood event, are used for validation of the method. The calibration process is based on a binary wet-dry reasoning with the use of Median Absolute Percentage Error evaluation metric. The results show that the proposed procedure supports probabilistic flood hazard mapping at ungauged rivers and provides water resources managers with valuable information for planning and implementing flood risk mitigation strategies.

  7. Use of hydraulic models to identify and resolve design isssues in FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strock, T.W.; Gohara, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The hydraulics within a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber involve several complex two-phase gas/liquid interactions that directly affect the scrubber pressure drop, mist elimination efficiency, and the mass transfer process of SO{sub 2} removal. Current industrial efforts to develop cost effective, high-efficiency wet FGD scrubbers are focusing, in part, on the hydraulics. The development of an experimental approach and test facility for understanding and optimizing wet scrubber flow characteristics has been completed. Hydraulic models simulate full-scale units and allow the designer to view the gas/liquid flow interactions. Modeling procedures for downsizing the wet scrubber for the laboratory have been developed and validated with field data comparisons. A one-eighth scale hydraulic model has been used to study several FGD scrubber design issues. Design changes to reduce capital and operating cost have been developed and tested. Recently, the model was used to design a commercial, uniform flow, high gas velocity absorber for the next generation of FGD systems.

  8. Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    SciTech Connect

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Wohling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  9. Modeling and Control for an Asymmetric Hydraulic Active Suspension System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Won, Sangchul

    In this paper we present a model for an automotive active suspension system which includes the dynamics of an asymmetric hydraulic actuator. In this model the force exerted by a single-rod cylinder is regarded as an internal state, and the sum of the oil flow rates through the orifice of a servo valve as the control input. We obtain a linear time-invariant (LTI) state state equation and propose a force-tracking-free one-step control method which can accept various linear control techniques. An optimal state-feedback control is applied as an example. Quarter car test rig experiment results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in modeling and control.

  10. A Bayesian inverse modeling approach to estimate soil hydraulic properties of a toposequence in southeastern Amazonia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi Boschi, Raquel; Qin, Mingming; Gimenez, Daniel; Cooper, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Modeling is an important tool for better understanding and assessing land use impacts on landscape processes. A key point for environmental modeling is the knowledge of soil hydraulic properties. However, direct determination of soil hydraulic properties is difficult and costly, particularly in vast and remote regions such as one constituting the Amazon Biome. One way to overcome this problem is to extrapolate accurately estimated data to pedologically similar sites. The van Genuchten (VG) parametric equation is the most commonly used for modeling SWRC. The use of a Bayesian approach in combination with the Markov chain Monte Carlo to estimate the VG parameters has several advantages compared to the widely used global optimization techniques. The Bayesian approach provides posterior distributions of parameters that are independent from the initial values and allow for uncertainty analyses. The main objectives of this study were: i) to estimate hydraulic parameters from data of pasture and forest sites by the Bayesian inverse modeling approach; and ii) to investigate the extrapolation of the estimated VG parameters to a nearby toposequence with pedologically similar soils to those used for its estimate. The parameters were estimated from volumetric water content and tension observations obtained after rainfall events during a 207-day period from pasture and forest sites located in the southeastern Amazon region. These data were used to run HYDRUS-1D under a Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) scheme 10,000 times, and only the last 2,500 times were used to calculate the posterior distributions of each hydraulic parameter along with 95% confidence intervals (CI) of volumetric water content and tension time series. Then, the posterior distributions were used to generate hydraulic parameters for two nearby toposequences composed by six soil profiles, three are under forest and three are under pasture. The parameters of the nearby site were accepted when

  11. Synthetic Seismic Study for Hydraulic Fracture in Shale-Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y.; Li, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Many studies have been done regarding performance of hydraulically fractured horizontal wells in the Bakken Shale Play (Wiley et. al., 2004; Mille et. al., 2008; Tabatabaei et. al., 2009). It's of great interest that whether the invaded brine causes the gas shale layer to behave differently in seismic profile due to potentially important application on reservoir monitoring and management for gas shale reservoirs. Because gas shale formations are generally much thinner than their adjacent layers (usually less than 100 meters), it's usually difficult to pick the reflection wave response of gas shale layer from in-situ seismic profile. Therefore, we have designed a workflow to investigate the effects of hydraulic fracture in gas shale reservoir by using synthetic seismic survey on simplified subsurface model. The simplified model mainly consists of several horizontally homogeneous layers of sand and shale, whereas the hydraulic fracture occurs in the middle thin gas shale formation and causes brine invasion in part of it. The goal of the synthetic seismic investigation is to see how the response of the reflection wave from this layer behaves differently due to the hydraulic fracture. Due to the thickness and complex nature of shale reservoir, the greatest challenge would be to pick the seismic response of this formation from the background noise and to study the range of thickness and the depth of burial for this layer to be seismically detectable for the purpose of hydraulic fracture study. Seismic investigation is rarely used in the reservoir monitoring of gas shale reservoir due to seismic resolution limit. Thus, this study will help to explore potential seismic applications for gas shale reservoirs and improve understanding of seismic response of hydraulic fracture on unconventional reservoirs.

  12. Study of pore pressure reaction on hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimonova, Mariia; Baryshnikov, Nikolay; Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeniy; Zenchenko, Petr

    2017-04-01

    We represent the results of the experimental study of the hydraulic fracture propagation influence on the fluid pore pressure. Initial pore pressure was induced by injection and production wells. The experiments were carried out according to scaling analysis based on the radial model of the fracture. All required geomechanical and hydrodynamical properties of a sample were derived from the scaling laws. So, gypsum was chosen as a sample material and vacuum oil as a fracturing fluid. The laboratory setup allows us to investigate the samples of cylindrical shape. It can be considered as an advantage in comparison with standard cubic samples, because we shouldn't consider the stress field inhomogeneity induced by the corners. Moreover, we can set 3D-loading by this setting. Also the sample diameter is big enough (43cm) for placing several wells: the fracturing well in the center and injection and production wells on two opposite sides of the central well. The experiment consisted of several stages: a) applying the horizontal pressure; b) applying the vertical pressure; c) water solution injection in the injection well with a constant pressure; d) the steady state obtaining; e) the oil injection in the central well with a constant rate. The pore pressure was recorded in the 15 points along bottom side of the sample during the whole experiment. We observe the pore pressure change during all the time of the experiment. First, the pore pressure changed due to water injection. Then we began to inject oil in the central well. We compared the obtained experimental data on the pore pressure changes with the solution of the 2D single-phase equation of pore-elasticity, and we found significant difference. The variation of the equation parameters couldn't help to resolve the discrepancy. After the experiment, we found that oil penetrated into the sample before and after the fracture initiation. This fact encouraged us to consider another physical process - the oil

  13. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction.

  14. Modeling hydraulic regenerative hybrid vehicles using AMESim and Matlab/Simulink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alfred; Smid, Edzko; Eshraghi, Moji; Caldwell, Niall; Woody, Dan

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the overview of the simulation modeling of a hydraulic system with regenerative braking used to improve vehicle emissions and fuel economy. Two simulation software packages were used together to enhance the simulation capability for fuel economy results and development of vehicle and hybrid control strategy. AMESim, a hydraulic simulation software package modeled the complex hydraulic circuit and component hardware and was interlinked with a Matlab/Simulink model of the vehicle, engine and the control strategy required to operate the vehicle and the hydraulic hybrid system through various North American and European drive cycles.

  15. Study on hydraulic direct-acting relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syrkin, V. V.; Balakin, P. D.; Treyer, V. A.

    2017-06-01

    Valves with elastic shut-off-and-regulating elements are increasingly applied in hydraulic systems, working in conditions of excessive vibrations. The objective of this study is to determine the dynamic characteristics of regulators with shut-off-and- regulating elements. The method of phase trajectories establishes the controller’s parameters and modes, which provide its work stability. The authors receive dynamic characteristics providing the absence of self-oscillations at the expense of additional damping of the shut-off- and-regulating element. They make a test sample of the pressure regulator with an elastic shut-off-and-regulating element. The article defines the characteristics curve of the pressure regulator (direct operated pressure relief valve) from the initial conditions. The obtained results can be used, when designing hydraulic technological machines. Keywords - oscillation damping, an elastic shut-off-and regulating element.

  16. Calibration of hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics for TOC removal modeling in biofilm reactors under different hydraulic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Soric, Audrey; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    In this study, total organic carbon (TOC) biodegradation was simulated by GPS-X software in biofilm reactors with carriers of plastic rings and glass beads under different hydraulic conditions. Hydrodynamic model by retention time distribution and biokinetic measurement by in-situ batch test served as two significant parts of model calibration. Experimental results showed that TOC removal efficiency was stable in both media due to the enough height of column, although the actual hydraulic volume changed during the variation of hydraulic condition. Simulated TOC removal efficiencies were close to experimental ones with low theil inequality coefficient values (below 0.15). Compared with glass beads, more TOC was removed in the filter with plastic rings due to the larger actual hydraulic volume and lower half saturation coefficient in spite of its lower maximum specific growth rate of biofilm, which highlighted the importance of calibrating hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  18. Hydraulic head interpolation using ANFIS—model selection and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtulus, Bedri; Flipo, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the efficiency of ANFIS (adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system) for interpolating hydraulic head in a 40-km 2 agricultural watershed of the Seine basin (France). Inputs of ANFIS are Cartesian coordinates and the elevation of the ground. Hydraulic head was measured at 73 locations during a snapshot campaign on September 2009, which characterizes low-water-flow regime in the aquifer unit. The dataset was then split into three subsets using a square-based selection method: a calibration one (55%), a training one (27%), and a test one (18%). First, a method is proposed to select the best ANFIS model, which corresponds to a sensitivity analysis of ANFIS to the type and number of membership functions (MF). Triangular, Gaussian, general bell, and spline-based MF are used with 2, 3, 4, and 5 MF per input node. Performance criteria on the test subset are used to select the 5 best ANFIS models among 16. Then each is used to interpolate the hydraulic head distribution on a (50×50)-m grid, which is compared to the soil elevation. The cells where the hydraulic head is higher than the soil elevation are counted as "error cells." The ANFIS model that exhibits the less "error cells" is selected as the best ANFIS model. The best model selection reveals that ANFIS models are very sensitive to the type and number of MF. Finally, a sensibility analysis of the best ANFIS model with four triangular MF is performed on the interpolation grid, which shows that ANFIS remains stable to error propagation with a higher sensitivity to soil elevation.

  19. 3D Numerical Modeling of the Propagation of Hydraulic Fracture at Its Intersection with Natural (Pre-existing) Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, Ali Naghi; Goshtasbi, Kamran; Ahangari, Kaveh; Jin, Yan; Bahmani, Aram

    2017-02-01

    A variety of 3D numerical models were developed based on hydraulic fracture experiments to simulate the propagation of hydraulic fracture at its intersection with natural (pre-existing) fracture. Since the interaction between hydraulic and pre-existing fractures is a key condition that causes complex fracture patterns, the extended finite element method was employed in ABAQUS software to simulate the problem. The propagation of hydraulic fracture in a fractured medium was modeled in two horizontal differential stresses (Δ σ) of 5e6 and 10e6 Pa considering different strike and dip angles of pre-existing fracture. The rate of energy release was calculated in the directions of hydraulic and pre-existing fractures (G_{{frac}} /G_{{rock}}) at their intersection point to determine the fracture behavior. Opening and crossing were two dominant fracture behaviors during the hydraulic and pre-existing fracture interaction at low and high differential stress conditions, respectively. The results of numerical studies were compared with those of experimental models, showing a good agreement between the two to validate the accuracy of the models. Besides the horizontal differential stress, strike and dip angles of the natural (pre-existing) fracture, the key finding of this research was the significant effect of the energy release rate on the propagation behavior of the hydraulic fracture. This effect was more prominent under the influence of strike and dip angles, as well as differential stress. The obtained results can be used to predict and interpret the generation of complex hydraulic fracture patterns in field conditions.

  20. Habitat hydraulic modeling for assessing changes of mesohabitat types in a Greek mountainous river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadaki, Christina; Mentzafou, Aggeliki; Ntoanidis, Lazaros; Zogaris, Stamatis; Evelpidou, Niki; Argyropoulos, Demetris; Dimitriou, Elias

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and assess changes in physical attributes of mesohabitat types in response to different flows in a Greek mountainous river. Hydraulic simulations were applied using two one-dimensional hydraulic models, MIKE 11 and HEC-RAS. The differences between the two models were analyzed by comparing their outputs against in situ measurements. A 200 m reach in Acheloos river was chosen as study site (Mesochora upstream) mainly because it is located in relatively undisturbed conditions (near reference conditions according to the Water Framework Directive) but also because there is intense interest for the construction of small hydroelectric plants in this area and in other mountainous rivers. Transects were typically placed in areas representative of the various habitat types, proportionally determined by a habitat mapping process at a larger stream segment. Each transect was permanently marked with metal rods to allow repeated measurements in time. The channel and floodplain were surveyed to create a digital elevation model (DEM) of the river. A detailed topographic survey with a GPS/GNSS Geomax - Zenith 20 was made using reference stations at geodetic control points for highest accuracy. Also, a gauging station was installed downstream of the reach in order to provide water level data in an hourly step. Hydraulic models were applied over a range of flows and river stages, based on past measurements. For selecting the control transects a thorough analysis of various parameters, such as habitat representativity, streambed slope and substrate types, was applied. In this way the habitat changes were described based on various flow scenarios over time. In a later step the results from the hydraulic models will be combined with fish habitat simulation curves (HSCs) focusing on the integration of mesohabitat and microhabitat types in the environmental flow assessment scheme.

  1. Assessing the Transferability of Hydraulic Habitat Models for Atlantic Salmon Fry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millidine, K. J.; Malcolm, I.; Fryer, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic habitat models, which are logistically and technically challenging and expensive to produce, are frequently transferred between rivers without validation. Although this is known to be associated with problems, few studies have assessed the potential consequences for model predictions. This study investigated the local (within sub-catchment) transfer of hydraulic habitat models developed for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fry. Detailed 2D hydraulic models were developed for two adjacent reaches, each containing pool, riffle, glide and run habitats where salmon fry were stocked at uniform saturated densities. Substrate and cover were characterised using transects. Generalised Additive Models (GAM's) were fitted to seasonal fry abundance data, with Froude number, dominant substrate and cover included as predictor variables. Despite attempts to select reaches with similar characteristics, the spatial distribution of Froude, dominant substrate and cover differed, with substrate and cover exhibiting the greatest inter-reach differences. Froude was the most important individual predictor of fry abundance, with the highest densities observed at moderate Froude across all seasons. When transferred between reaches, models which contained multiple predictor variables and their interactions transferred less well than models containing Froude alone potentially reflecting inter-reach differences in the distribution of substrate and cover. This study suggests that (1) habitat models should be developed at sites offering maximum environmental complexity at a local level (2) scientists and managers should avoid transferring models between locations with different environmental characteristics, especially in the absence of model validation (3) complex models should be avoided (4) the transferability of Froude only models should be further investigated, if predictions of habitat quality are to be made at new sites.

  2. Hydraulic properties of a model dike from coupled Bayesian and multi-criteria hydrogeophysical inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, J. A.; Rings, J.; Vrugt, J. A.; Sorg, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2010-01-01

    SummaryCoupled hydrogeophysical inversion aims to improve the use of geophysical data for hydrological model parameterization. Several numerical studies have illustrated the feasibility and advantages of a coupled approach. However, there is still a lack of studies that apply the coupled inversion approach to actual field data. In this paper, we test the feasibility of coupled hydrogeophysical inversion for determining the hydraulic properties of a model dike using measurements of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). Our analysis uses a two-dimensional (2D) finite element hydrological model (HYDRUS-2D) coupled to a 2.5D finite element electrical resistivity code (CRMOD), and includes explicit recognition of parameter uncertainty by using a Bayesian and multiple criteria framework with the DREAM and AMALGAM population based search algorithms. To benchmark our inversion results, soil hydraulic properties determined from ERT data are compared with those separately obtained from detailed in situ soil water content measurements using Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). Our most important results are as follows. (1) TDR and ERT data theoretically contain sufficient information to resolve most of the soil hydraulic properties, (2) the DREAM-derived posterior distributions of the hydraulic parameters are quite similar when estimated separately using TDR and ERT measurements for model calibration, (3) among all parameters, the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the dike material is best constrained, (4) the saturation exponent of the petrophysical model is well defined, and matches independently measured values, (5) measured ERT data sufficiently constrain model predictions of water table dynamics within the model dike. This finding demonstrates an innate ability of ERT data to provide accurate hydrogeophysical parameterizations for flooding events, which is of particular relevance to dike management, and (6) the AMALGAM-derived Pareto front demonstrates trade-off in the

  3. Numerical modeling for the retrofit of the hydraulic cooling subsystems in operating power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSaqoor, S.; Alahmer, A.; Al Quran, F.; Andruszkiewicz, A.; Kubas, K.; Regucki, P.; Wędrychowicz, W.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the possibility of using the numerical methods to analyze the work of hydraulic systems on the example of a cooling system of a power boiler auxiliary devices. The variety of conditions at which hydraulic system that operated in specific engineering subsystems requires an individualized approach to the model solutions that have been developed for these systems modernizing. A mathematical model of a series-parallel propagation for the cooling water was derived and iterative methods were used to solve the system of nonlinear equations. The results of numerical calculations made it possible to analyze different variants of a modernization of the studied system and to indicate its critical elements. An economic analysis of different options allows an investor to choose an optimal variant of a reconstruction of the installation.

  4. Influence of stone content on soil hydraulic properties: experimental investigation and test of existing model concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseri, Mahyar; Richter, Niels; Iden, Sascha C.; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Rock fragments in soil, in this contribution referred to as "stones", play an important role for water flow in the subsurface. To successfully model soil hydraulic processes such as evaporation, redistribution and drainage, an understanding of how stones affect soil hydraulic properties (SHP) is crucial. Past investigations on the role of stones in soil have focused on their influence on the water retention curve (WRC) and on saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks, and have led to some simple theoretical models for the influence of stones on effective SHP. However, studies that measure unsaturated SHP directly, i.e., simultaneously the WRC and hydraulic conductivity curve (HCC) are still missing. Also, studies so far were restricted to low or moderate stone contents of less than 40%. We conducted a laboratory study in which we examined the effect of stone content on effective WRC and HCC of stony soils. Mixtures of soil and stones were generated by substituting background soil with stones in weight fractions between 0% (fine material only) to 100% (pure gravel). Stone sizes were 2-5 mm and 7-15 mm, respectively, and background soils were Sand and Sandy Loam. Packed samples were fully saturated under vacuum and subsequently subjected to evaporation in the laboratory. All experiments were done in three replicates. The soil hydraulic properties were determined by the simplified evaporation method using the UMS HYPROP setup. Questions were whether the applied measurement methodology is applicable to derive the SHP of the mixtures and how the gradual increase of stone content will affect the SHP, particularly the HCC. The applied methodology was successful in identifying effective SHP with a high precision over the full moisture range. WRC and HCC were successfully obtained by HYPROP, even for pure gravel with a size of 7-15 mm. WRCs changed qualitatively in the expected manner, i.e., an increase of stone content reduced porosity and soil water content at all suctions

  5. Modelling the hydraulic and geochemical evolution of a hillslope transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, U.; Flegr, M.; Rügner, H.; Selle, B.; Grathwohl, P.

    2012-04-01

    Especially the long-term response of subsurface-surface water systems and their water quality on pressures such as diffuse pollution from agricultural activities or atmospheric deposition are not well understood at the catchment scale. The goal of this study is to quantify the factors that influence the geochemical interactions between soils and seepage water, rocks and groundwater as well the subsurface/surface water interaction in a comprehensive way. Only very recently numerical codes became available which not only couple flow and reactive transport but also unsaturated and saturated zone allowing it to follow water quality from the infiltration into the soil until discharge in a spring or river, of which the code MIN3P was used. In order to assess groundwater quality, the origin of the recharge water and its chemical evolution pathways have to be known at the catchment scale. This involves precipitation, evapotranspiration, seepage water infiltration, interflow and perched water, and finally the groundwater as well as the effluent to rivers or springs in a watershed. Water quality is affected by rainwater pH and dissolved solids, leaching of potential pollutants from top-soils, release of CO2 from organic matter oxidation / microbial respiration in the unsaturated zone and the water-rock interaction in the subsurface. A promising approach to identify the principal processes is the selection of vertical profiles along streamlines across the area of interest. That way, numerical simulations requiring only short computational time could be utilized to describe the water flow and solute transport from elevated parts of the catchment to the receiving stream. Eventually, this approach can be extended to capture a watershed in a three-dimensional model. A geologic model representative for a typical valley scenario in a triassic sequence landscape composed of of sandstones and marls was set up, consisting of a i) sand and gravel aquifer, ii) underlying and hill

  6. Mathematical Model of Hydraulic Fracturing of a Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharova, G. S.; Khramchenkov, M. G.

    2016-07-01

    A study has been made of the problem on the process of formation of a zone of higher-than-average permeability with a moving boundary in an initially low-permeability porous medium (problem on hydraulic fracturing of a bed) in a three-dimensional formulation. A characteristic feature of the three-dimensional problem was the taking into account the existence of two zones (zone with a regular permeability and the destruction zone) in the porous medium, whose contact region was determined using the condition of mass balance on the moving boundary. Special features fundamental to the process of mass transfer in such filtration-inhomogeneous porous media have been revealed and analyzed.

  7. Hydraulic Model Investigation. Libby Dam, Kootenai River, Montana. Hydraulic Model Investigations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    face of the dam and skewed to eliminate the need for corbels on the dam face. The Libby study was made to develop a similar design that also would be... corbels on the face of the dam that would contain intakes perpendicular to the sluice alignments. The intake design was similar to Plan D selected for

  8. Field study of subsurface heterogeneity with steady-state hydraulic tomography.

    PubMed

    Berg, Steven J; Illman, Walter A

    2013-01-01

    Remediation of subsurface contamination requires an understanding of the contaminant (history, source location, plume extent and concentration, etc.), and, knowledge of the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) that governs groundwater flow and solute transport. Many methods exist for characterizing K heterogeneity, but most if not all methods require the collection of a large number of small-scale data and its interpolation. In this study, we conduct a hydraulic tomography survey at a highly heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit at the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) located at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada to sequentially interpret four pumping tests using the steady-state form of the Sequential Successive Linear Estimator (SSLE) (Yeh and Liu 2000). The resulting three-dimensional (3D) K distribution (or K-tomogram) is compared against: (1) K distributions obtained through the inverse modeling of individual pumping tests using SSLE, and (2) effective hydraulic conductivity (K(eff) ) estimates obtained by automatically calibrating a groundwater flow model while treating the medium to be homogeneous. Such a K(eff) is often used for designing remediation operations, and thus is used as the basis for comparison with the K-tomogram. Our results clearly show that hydraulic tomography is superior to the inversions of single pumping tests or K(eff) estimates. This is particularly significant for contaminated sites where an accurate representation of the flow field is critical for simulating contaminant transport and injection of chemical and biological agents used for active remediation of contaminant source zones and plumes.

  9. Modelling Subduction Zone Magmatism Due to Hydraulic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, R.; Davies, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this project is to test the hypothesis that subduction zone magmatism involves hydraulic fractures propagating from the oceanic crust to the mantle wedge source region (Davies, 1999). We aim to test this hypothesis by developing a numerical model of the process, and then comparing model outputs with observations. The hypothesis proposes that the water interconnects in the slab following an earthquake. If sufficient pressure develops a hydrofracture occurs. The hydrofracture will expand in the direction of the least compressive stress and propagate in the direction of the most compressive stress, which is out into the wedge. Therefore we can calculate the hydrofracture path and end-point, given the start location on the slab and the propagation distance. We can therefore predict where water is added to the mantle wedge. To take this further we have developed a thermal model of a subduction zone. The model uses a finite difference, marker-in-cell method to solve the heat equation (Gerya, 2010). The velocity field was prescribed using the analytical expression of cornerflow (Batchelor, 1967). The markers contained within the fixed grid are used to track the different compositions and their properties. The subduction zone thermal model was benchmarked (Van Keken, 2008). We used the hydrous melting parameterization of Katz et.al., (2003) to calculate the degree of melting caused by the addition of water to the wedge. We investigate models where the hydrofractures, with properties constrained by estimated water fluxes, have random end points. The model predicts degree of melting, magma productivity, temperature of the melt and water content in the melt for different initial water fluxes. Future models will also include the buoyancy effect of the melt and residue. Batchelor, Cambridge UP, 1967. Davies, Nature, 398: 142-145, 1999. Gerya, Cambridge UP, 2010. Katz, Geochem. Geophys. Geosy, 4(9), 2003 Van Keken et.al. Phys. Earth. Planet. In., 171:187-197, 2008.

  10. Study of Dynamic Characteristics for Hydraulic System on 300MN Die-forging Press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Tan, Jianping

    2017-06-01

    The faults such as seal breakdown and pressure sensor damage occur in 300MN Die-forging press frequently. First, the fault phenomenon and harm of the hydraulic system was compiled statistics, the theoretical analysis of the hydraulic impact of hydraulic system are carried out based on the momentum theorem; Then, the co-simulation model of hydraulic system was established by AMESim and Simulink software and the correctness was verified. Finally, the dynamic characteristics of hydraulic system for the key working condition “forging stroke changing to mold collision” was analyzed, the influences rules of system parameters such as the leak gap of valve, diameter of water way pipeline, emulsion temperature and air contain act on hydraulic system are obtained. This conclusions have a theoretical guiding significance to the improvement and maintains of high pressure and large flow hydraulic system.

  11. Modeling the hydrologicEffects of Spatial Heterogeneity in Soil Hydraulic Properties in a Mountainous Watershed, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.; Jin, X.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties directly affects variations of hydrological processes at corresponding scales. Understanding spatial variation of soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture is therefore fundamental for modeling watershed ecohydrological processes. As part of the National Science Foundation of China (NSFC) funded ''Integrated Ecohydrological Research Plan of the Heihe River Watershed'', this study established an observation network that consists of sampling points, zones, and tributaries to analyze spatial variations of soil hydraulic properties in the Upper Reach of the Heihe River Watershed, a second largest inland river (terminal lake) with a drainage area of over 128,000 km2 in Northwest China. Spatial heterogeneity of soil properties was analyzed based on the large number of soil sampling and in situ observations. The spatial clustering method, Full-Order-CLK was employed to derive five soil heterogeneous zones (Configuration 97, 80, 65, 40, and 20). Subsequently, SWAT model was used to quantify the impact of the spatial heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties on hydrologic process in the study watershed. Results show the simulations by the SWAT model with the spatially clustered soil hydraulic information from the field sampling data had much better representation of the soil heterogeneity and more accurate performance than the model using the average soil property values for each soil type derived from the coarse soil datasets (Gansu Soil Handbook at 1:1,000,000 scale). Thus, incorporating detailed field sampling soil heterogeneity data greatly improves performance in hydrologic modeling.

  12. A conceptual model of the hydraulics of check dam for gully control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; Pérez, R.; Gómez, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Check dams have been long recognized as useful structures to minimize concentrated flow erosion by reducing the original gradient of the gully channel and, consequently, the erosive power of run-off (FAO, 1986). Careful attention must be paid to the design of the structures in order to avoid negative effects such as bypassing or scouring that might lead to the parcial or total collapse of the structure (Nyssen,2004). This study attempts to offer a conceptual model to explain the fundamental hydraulics of the flow regime modifications produced by these structures on rectagular-shaped gullies, before and after the filling by sediment of the small volume created by the check dam. The factors affecting the characteristics (location and amount of dissipated energy) of the hydraulic jump and the role played by the steepness of the gully on the hydraulic influence are discussed through a geometric and energetic approach. The shear stress reduction efficiency of the structure is evaluated against flow conditions (subcritical and supercritical), steepness factor, effective height and check dam spacing. HEC RAS 4.0 model (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008) has been used for validation purposes. In addition, apron protection measures (riprap stone and gabions) have been discussed in order to determine the limits of the discharge and drop height to prevent scouring. The model presented a good performance on the prediction of hydraulic variables, and especially estimating shear stress reduction by the check dam structure. Steepness factor is the key parameter defining the hydraulic influence and ultimate slope and, therefore, the efficiency of the structure. The effective control of the flow erosivity requires the selection of a steepness factor value close to or higher than 1, showing similarities with natural stabilised channels as step-pools morphologies (Abrahams, 1995). The requirements for an efficient reduction of the shear stress and for assuring the stability of the

  13. Hydraulic Fracturing and Drinking Water Resources: Update on EPA Hydraulic Fracturing Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural gas plays a key role in our nation's energy future and the process known as hydraulic fracturing (HF) is one way of accessing that resource. Over the past few years, several key technical, economic, and energy developments have spurred increased use of HF for gas extracti...

  14. Hydraulic Fracturing and Drinking Water Resources: Update on EPA Hydraulic Fracturing Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural gas plays a key role in our nation's energy future and the process known as hydraulic fracturing (HF) is one way of accessing that resource. Over the past few years, several key technical, economic, and energy developments have spurred increased use of HF for gas extracti...

  15. Elucidating hydraulic fracturing impacts on groundwater quality using a regional geospatial statistical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Burton, Taylour G; Rifai, Hanadi S; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Fontenot, Brian E; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operations have been viewed as the cause of certain environmental issues including groundwater contamination. The potential for hydraulic fracturing to induce contaminant pathways in groundwater is not well understood since gas wells are completed while isolating the water table and the gas-bearing reservoirs lay thousands of feet below the water table. Recent studies have attributed ground water contamination to poor well construction and leaks in the wellbore annulus due to ruptured wellbore casings. In this paper, a geospatial model of the Barnett Shale region was created using ArcGIS. The model was used for spatial analysis of groundwater quality data in order to determine if regional variations in groundwater quality, as indicated by various groundwater constituent concentrations, may be associated with the presence of hydraulically fractured gas wells in the region. The Barnett Shale reservoir pressure, completions data, and fracture treatment data were evaluated as predictors of groundwater quality change. Results indicated that elevated concentrations of certain groundwater constituents are likely related to natural gas production in the study area and that beryllium, in this formation, could be used as an indicator variable for evaluating fracturing impacts on regional groundwater quality. Results also indicated that gas well density and formation pressures correlate to change in regional water quality whereas proximity to gas wells, by itself, does not. The results also provided indirect evidence supporting the possibility that micro annular fissures serve as a pathway transporting fluids and chemicals from the fractured wellbore to the overlying groundwater aquifers.

  16. New concentrated flow hydraulics equations for physically-based rangeland hydrology and erosion models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We examined the hydraulics of concentrated flow using unconfined field experimental data over diverse rangeland landscapes, and developed new empirical prediction models of different rangeland concentrated flow hydraulic parameters, which can be applicable across a wide span of rangeland sites, soil...

  17. Engine Hydraulic Stability. [injector model for analyzing combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesselring, R. C.; Sprouse, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical injector model was developed specifically to analyze combustion instability coupling between the injector hydraulics and the combustion process. This digital computer dynamic injector model will, for any imposed chamber of inlet pressure profile with a frequency ranging from 100 to 3000 Hz (minimum) accurately predict/calculate the instantaneous injector flowrates. The injector system is described in terms of which flow segments enter and leave each pressure node. For each flow segment, a resistance, line lengths, and areas are required as inputs (the line lengths and areas are used in determining inertance). For each pressure node, volume and acoustic velocity are required as inputs (volume and acoustic velocity determine capacitance). The geometric criteria for determining inertances of flow segments and capacitance of pressure nodes was set. Also, a technique was developed for analytically determining time averaged steady-state pressure drops and flowrates for every flow segment in an injector when such data is not known. These pressure drops and flowrates are then used in determining the linearized flow resistance for each line segment of flow.

  18. Assessment of uncertainties of the models used in thermal-hydraulic computer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gricay, A. S.; Migrov, Yu. A.

    2015-09-01

    The article deals with matters concerned with the problem of determining the statistical characteristics of variable parameters (the variation range and distribution law) in analyzing the uncertainty and sensitivity of calculation results to uncertainty in input data. A comparative analysis of modern approaches to uncertainty in input data is presented. The need to develop an alternative method for estimating the uncertainty of model parameters used in thermal-hydraulic computer codes, in particular, in the closing correlations of the loop thermal hydraulics block, is shown. Such a method shall feature the minimal degree of subjectivism and must be based on objective quantitative assessment criteria. The method includes three sequential stages: selecting experimental data satisfying the specified criteria, identifying the key closing correlation using a sensitivity analysis, and carrying out case calculations followed by statistical processing of the results. By using the method, one can estimate the uncertainty range of a variable parameter and establish its distribution law in the above-mentioned range provided that the experimental information is sufficiently representative. Practical application of the method is demonstrated taking as an example the problem of estimating the uncertainty of a parameter appearing in the model describing transition to post-burnout heat transfer that is used in the thermal-hydraulic computer code KORSAR. The performed study revealed the need to narrow the previously established uncertainty range of this parameter and to replace the uniform distribution law in the above-mentioned range by the Gaussian distribution law. The proposed method can be applied to different thermal-hydraulic computer codes. In some cases, application of the method can make it possible to achieve a smaller degree of conservatism in the expert estimates of uncertainties pertinent to the model parameters used in computer codes.

  19. Assessing the impact of different sources of topographic data on 1-D hydraulic modelling of floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. Md; Solomatine, D. P.; Di Baldassarre, G.

    2015-01-01

    Topographic data, such as digital elevation models (DEMs), are essential input in flood inundation modelling. DEMs can be derived from several sources either through remote sensing techniques (spaceborne or airborne imagery) or from traditional methods (ground survey). The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the light detection and ranging (lidar), and topographic contour maps are some of the most commonly used sources of data for DEMs. These DEMs are characterized by different precision and accuracy. On the one hand, the spatial resolution of low-cost DEMs from satellite imagery, such as ASTER and SRTM, is rather coarse (around 30 to 90 m). On the other hand, the lidar technique is able to produce high-resolution DEMs (at around 1 m), but at a much higher cost. Lastly, contour mapping based on ground survey is time consuming, particularly for higher scales, and may not be possible for some remote areas. The use of these different sources of DEM obviously affects the results of flood inundation models. This paper shows and compares a number of 1-D hydraulic models developed using HEC-RAS as model code and the aforementioned sources of DEM as geometric input. To test model selection, the outcomes of the 1-D models were also compared, in terms of flood water levels, to the results of 2-D models (LISFLOOD-FP). The study was carried out on a reach of the Johor River, in Malaysia. The effect of the different sources of DEMs (and different resolutions) was investigated by considering the performance of the hydraulic models in simulating flood water levels as well as inundation maps. The outcomes of our study show that the use of different DEMs has serious implications to the results of hydraulic models. The outcomes also indicate that the loss of model accuracy due to re-sampling the highest resolution DEM (i.e. lidar 1 m) to lower resolution is much less than the loss of model accuracy due

  20. Compound random field models of multiple scale hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.S. ); Brannan, J.R. )

    1992-09-01

    Enormous amounts of hydrologic data are required to accurately simulate subsurface contaminant transport. Effectively supplementing measurements of hydrologic parameters such as permeability and porosity with soft'' information obtained from the interpretation of geologic cores and geophysical logs can improve the simulation of contaminant transport while reducing the measured data that are required. A method is presented herein for generating hydraulic conductivity fields comprised of several geological materials with hydraulic conductivities that can range over several orders of magnitude. This method utilizes indicator fields that are designed to allow random variation at the megascopic scale but are constrained by observations inferred from geophysical logs and geologic core data. The statistical description of random hydraulic conductivity values of distinct geological materials at the macroscopic scale may be obtained by conventional parameter estimation techniques. The combined approach can then be used to generate realizations of a hydraulic conductivity field for subsequent use in flow and transport simulations.

  1. Compound random field models of multiple scale hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.S.; Brannan, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    Enormous amounts of hydrologic data are required to accurately simulate subsurface contaminant transport. Effectively supplementing measurements of hydrologic parameters such as permeability and porosity with ``soft`` information obtained from the interpretation of geologic cores and geophysical logs can improve the simulation of contaminant transport while reducing the measured data that are required. A method is presented herein for generating hydraulic conductivity fields comprised of several geological materials with hydraulic conductivities that can range over several orders of magnitude. This method utilizes indicator fields that are designed to allow random variation at the megascopic scale but are constrained by observations inferred from geophysical logs and geologic core data. The statistical description of random hydraulic conductivity values of distinct geological materials at the macroscopic scale may be obtained by conventional parameter estimation techniques. The combined approach can then be used to generate realizations of a hydraulic conductivity field for subsequent use in flow and transport simulations.

  2. A mathematically continuous model for describing the hydraulic properties of unsaturated porous media over the entire range of matric suctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Guan, Huade

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that water flow in unsaturated porous media extends beyond the commonly known capillary-driven regime into the film regime. There is a need to develop the unsaturated hydraulic properties over the entire range of matric suctions to capture both flow regimes. In this study, Fredlund and Xing model is modified to represent the soil water retention curve from saturation to oven dryness. The new function is mathematically differentiable. The hydraulic conductivity function is composed of the capillary-driven term and film associated term, which is easy to apply. The new model has capacity to represent the bimodal hydraulic properties that are often present in structured and aggregated soils. Testing with the published data of sixteen soils shows good performance for both the water retention curve and the hydraulic conductivity function. For most soils, the new model results in a better agreement with observations than a published model. The result also indicates a possibility to improve the previously published film-associated hydraulic conductivity function.

  3. Evaluating the Risks of Surface Spills Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Activities to Groundwater Resources: a Modeling Study in the South Platte Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, C.; McLaughlin, M.; Blotevogel, J.; Benson, D. A.; Borch, T.; McCray, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has revolutionized the U.S.'s energy portfolio by making shale reservoirs productive and commercially viable. However, the public is concerned that the chemical constituents in hydraulic fracturing fluid, produced water, or natural gas itself could potentially impact groundwater or adjacent streams. Here, we conduct fate and transport simulations of surface spills, the most likely contamination pathway to occur during oil and gas production operations, to evaluate whether or not these spills pose risks to groundwater quality. We focus on the South Platte Alluvial Aquifer, which is located in the greater Denver metro area and overlaps a zone of high-density oil and gas development. The purpose of this work is to assess the mobility and persistence of chemical contaminants (e.g. biocides, friction reducers, surfactants, hydrocarbons, etc.) —based on sorption to soil, degradation potential, co-contaminant interactions, and spill conditions—and to understand the site characteristics and hydrologic conditions that would make a particular location prone to groundwater quality degradation in the event of an accidental release. We propose a coupled analytical-numerical approach that could be duplicated by environmental consultants. Results suggest that risk of groundwater pollution, based on predicted concentration at the groundwater table, is low in most areas of the South Platte system for the contaminants investigated under common spill conditions. However, substantial risk may exist in certain areas where the groundwater table is shallow. In addition, transport of certain contaminants is influenced by interactions with other constituents in produced or stimulation fluids. By helping to identify locations in the Front Range of Colorado that are at low or high risk for groundwater contamination due to a surface spill, it is our hope that this work will aid in improving prevention, mitigation, and remediation practices so that decision-makers can

  4. Study on creating hydraulic tomography for crystalline rock using frequency dependent elastic wave velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, K.; Sakashita, S.; Ando, K.; Bruines, P.; Blechschmidt, I.; Kickmaier, W.; Onishi, Y.; Nishiyama, S.

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a technique to obtain hydraulic conductivity distribution in granite rock masses using seismic tomography. We apply the characteristic that elastic wave velocity disperses in fully saturated porous media on frequency and this velocity dispersion is governed by the hydraulic conductivity - this characteristic has been confirmed in laboratory experiments. The feasibility and design of the field experiment was demonstrated in a first step with numerical simulations. In a second step we applied the technique to the fractured granite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. The emphasis of the field campaign was on the evaluation of the range of applicability of this technique. The field campaign was structured in three steps, each one corresponding to a larger spatial scale. First, the seismic tomography was applied to a small area - the two boreholes were located at a distance of 1.5 m. In the following step, we selected a larger area, in which the distance of the boreholes amounts to 10 m and the field corresponds to a more complex geology. Finally we applied the testing to a field where the borehole distance was of the order of 75 m. We also drilled a borehole to confirm hydraulic characteristic and reviewed hydraulic model in the 1.5 m cross-hole location area. The results from the field campaign are presented and their application to the various fields are discussed and evaluated. (authors)

  5. Can hydraulic-modelled rating curves reduce uncertainty in high flow data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, Ida; Lam, Norris; Lyon, Steve W.

    2017-04-01

    Flood risk assessments rely on accurate discharge data records. Establishing a reliable rating curve for calculating discharge from stage at a gauging station normally takes years of data collection efforts. Estimation of high flows is particularly difficult as high flows occur rarely and are often practically difficult to gauge. Hydraulically-modelled rating curves can be derived based on as few as two concurrent stage-discharge and water-surface slope measurements at different flow conditions. This means that a reliable rating curve can, potentially, be derived much faster than a traditional rating curve based on numerous stage-discharge gaugings. In this study we compared the uncertainty in discharge data that resulted from these two rating curve modelling approaches. We applied both methods to a Swedish catchment, accounting for uncertainties in the stage-discharge gauging and water-surface slope data for the hydraulic model and in the stage-discharge gauging data and rating-curve parameters for the traditional method. We focused our analyses on high-flow uncertainty and the factors that could reduce this uncertainty. In particular, we investigated which data uncertainties were most important, and at what flow conditions the gaugings should preferably be taken. First results show that the hydraulically-modelled rating curves were more sensitive to uncertainties in the calibration measurements of discharge than water surface slope. The uncertainty of the hydraulically-modelled rating curves were lowest within the range of the three calibration stage-discharge gaugings (i.e. between median and two-times median flow) whereas uncertainties were higher outside of this range. For instance, at the highest observed stage of the 24-year stage record, the 90% uncertainty band was -15% to +40% of the official rating curve. Additional gaugings at high flows (i.e. four to five times median flow) would likely substantially reduce those uncertainties. These first results show

  6. The application of Global Sensitivity Analysis to quantify the dominant input factors for hydraulic model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Pianosi, Francesca; Bates, Paul; Freer, Jim; Wagener, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Predicting flood inundation extents using hydraulic models is subject to a number of critical uncertainties. For a specific event, these uncertainties are known to have a large influence on model outputs and any subsequent analyses made by risk managers. Hydraulic modellers often approach such problems by applying uncertainty analysis techniques such as the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) methodology. However, these methods do not allow one to attribute which source of uncertainty has the most influence on the various model outputs that inform flood risk decision making. Another issue facing modellers is the amount of computational resource that is available to spend on modelling flood inundations that are 'fit for purpose' to the modelling objectives. Therefore a balance needs to be struck between computation time, realism and spatial resolution, and effectively characterising the uncertainty spread of predictions (for example from boundary conditions and model parameterisations). However, it is not fully understood how much of an impact each factor has on model performance, for example how much influence changing the spatial resolution of a model has on inundation predictions in comparison to other uncertainties inherent in the modelling process. Furthermore, when resampling fine scale topographic data in the form of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to coarser resolutions, there are a number of possible coarser DEMs that can be produced. Deciding which DEM is then chosen to represent the surface elevations in the model could also influence model performance. In this study we model a flood event using the hydraulic model LISFLOOD-FP and apply Sobol' Sensitivity Analysis to estimate which input factor, among the uncertainty in model boundary conditions, uncertain model parameters, the spatial resolution of the DEM and the choice of resampled DEM, have the most influence on a range of model outputs. These outputs include whole domain maximum

  7. Numerical model of massive hydraulic fracture. Final report. [SYMFRAC1

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, I.D.; Craig, H.R.; Luiskutty, C.T.

    1985-03-01

    This project has involved development of a hydraulic fracture simulator which calculates fracture height as a function of distance from the wellbore in a situation in which a payzone is bounded by two zones in which the minimum in-situ stress is higher (the fracture is vertical). The fracture must be highly elongated (length/height ratio approximately greater than 4) and variations in elastic modulus across zones are ignored. First, we describe the leakoff and spurt loss calculations employed in the modeling. Second, we discuss a revised version of the vertically symmetric simulator (bounding zone stresses equal). The addition of non-Newtonian flow and leakoff (including spurt loss) is described in detail. An illustrative result is given. Third, we describe in detail the vertically asymmetric simulator (bounding zone stresses not equal). To illustrate the last results, we present design calculations for a 30,000 gallon fracture, which was the first stimulation in the Multi-Well Experiment. The 80 ft fracture interval in the Paludal zone has at its upper edge a 520 psi stress contrast, and at its lower edge a 1195 psi contrast. Computed fracture height growth above and below the perforated interval, bottomhole pressure, and width profiles in vertical sections are displayed. Comparison is made with diagnostic measurements of fracture length, height, and bottomhole pressure. The appropriate computer codes are included in this report. 21 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Evaluation of Fish Passage at Whitewater Parks Using 2D and 3D Hydraulic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, T.; Nelson, P. A.; Kondratieff, M.; Bledsoe, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    In-stream whitewater parks (WWPs) are increasingly popular recreational amenities that typically create waves by constricting flow through a chute to increase velocities and form a hydraulic jump. However, the hydraulic conditions these structures create can limit longitudinal habitat connectivity and potentially inhibit upstream fish migration, especially of native fishes. An improved understanding of the fundamental hydraulic processes and potential environmental effects of whitewater parks is needed to inform management decisions about Recreational In-Channel Diversions (RICDs). Here, we use hydraulic models to compute a continuous and spatially explicit description of velocity and depth along potential fish swimming paths in the flow field, and the ensemble of potential paths are compared to fish swimming performance data to predict fish passage via logistic regression analysis. While 3d models have been shown to accurately predict trout movement through WWP structures, 2d methods can provide a more cost-effective and manager-friendly approach to assessing the effects of similar hydraulic structures on fish passage when 3d analysis in not feasible. Here, we use 2d models to examine the hydraulics in several WWP structures on the North Fork of the St. Vrain River at Lyons, Colorado, and we compare these model results to fish passage predictions from a 3d model. Our analysis establishes a foundation for a practical, transferable and physically-rigorous 2d modeling approach for mechanistically evaluating the effects of hydraulic structures on fish passage.

  9. Assessing the impact of different sources of topographic data on 1-D hydraulic modelling of floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. Md; Solomatine, D. P.; Di Baldassarre, G.

    2014-07-01

    Topographic data, such as digital elevation models (DEMs), are essential input in flood inundation modelling. DEMs can be derived from several sources either through remote sensing techniques (space-borne or air-borne imagery) or from traditional methods (ground survey). The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), and topographic contour maps are some of the most commonly used sources of data for DEMs. These DEMs are characterized by different precision and accuracy. On the one hand, the spatial resolution of low-cost DEMs from satellite imagery, such as ASTER and SRTM, is rather coarse (around 30-90 m). On the other hand, LiDAR technique is able to produce a high resolution DEMs (around 1m), but at a much higher cost. Lastly, contour mapping based on ground survey is time consuming, particularly for higher scales, and may not be possible for some remote areas. The use of these different sources of DEM obviously affects the results of flood inundation models. This paper shows and compares a number of hydraulic models developed using HEC-RAS as model code and the aforementioned sources of DEM as geometric input. The study was carried out on a reach of the Johor River, in Malaysia. The effect of the different sources of DEMs (and different resolutions) was investigated by considering the performance of the hydraulic models in simulating flood water levels as well as inundation maps. The outcomes of our study show that the use of different DEMs has serious implications to the results of hydraulic models. The outcomes also indicates the loss of model accuracy due to re-sampling the highest resolution DEM (i.e. LiDAR 1 m) to lower resolution are much less compared to the loss of model accuracy due to the use of low-cost DEM that have not only a lower resolution, but also a lower quality. Lastly, to better explore the sensitivity of the hydraulic models

  10. Comparison between InfoWorks hydraulic results and a physical model of an urban drainage system.

    PubMed

    Rubinato, Matteo; Shucksmith, James; Saul, Adrian J; Shepherd, Will

    2013-01-01

    Urban drainage systems are frequently analysed using hydraulic modelling software packages such as InfoWorks CS or MIKE-Urban. The use of such modelling tools allows the evaluation of sewer capacity and the likelihood and impact of pluvial flood events. Models can also be used to plan major investments such as increasing storage capacity or the implementation of sustainable urban drainage systems. In spite of their widespread use, when applied to flooding the results of hydraulic models are rarely compared with field or laboratory (i.e. physical modelling) data. This is largely due to the time and expense required to collect reliable empirical data sets. This paper describes a laboratory facility which will enable an urban flood model to be verified and generic approaches to be built. Results are presented from the first phase of testing, which compares the sub-surface hydraulic performance of a physical scale model of a sewer network in Yorkshire, UK, with downscaled results from a calibrated 1D InfoWorks hydraulic model of the site. A variety of real rainfall events measured in the catchment over a period of 15 months (April 2008-June 2009) have been both hydraulically modelled and reproduced in the physical model. In most cases a comparison of flow hydrographs generated in both hydraulic and physical models shows good agreement in terms of velocities which pass through the system.

  11. Near-real-time simulation and internet-based delivery of forecast-flood inundation maps using two-dimensional hydraulic modeling--A pilot study for the Snoqualmie River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Fulford, Janice M.; Voss, Frank D.

    2002-01-01

    A system of numerical hydraulic modeling, geographic information system processing, and Internet map serving, supported by new data sources and application automation, was developed that generates inundation maps for forecast floods in near real time and makes them available through the Internet. Forecasts for flooding are generated by the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Center (RFC); these forecasts are retrieved automatically by the system and prepared for input to a hydraulic model. The model, TrimR2D, is a new, robust, two-dimensional model capable of simulating wide varieties of discharge hydrographs and relatively long stream reaches. TrimR2D was calibrated for a 28-kilometer reach of the Snoqualmie River in Washington State, and is used to estimate flood extent, depth, arrival time, and peak time for the RFC forecast. The results of the model are processed automatically by a Geographic Information System (GIS) into maps of flood extent, depth, and arrival and peak times. These maps subsequently are processed into formats acceptable by an Internet map server (IMS). The IMS application is a user-friendly interface to access the maps over the Internet; it allows users to select what information they wish to see presented and allows the authors to define scale-dependent availability of map layers and their symbology (appearance of map features). For example, the IMS presents a background of a digital USGS 1:100,000-scale quadrangle at smaller scales, and automatically switches to an ortho-rectified aerial photograph (a digital photograph that has camera angle and tilt distortions removed) at larger scales so viewers can see ground features that help them identify their area of interest more effectively. For the user, the option exists to select either background at any scale. Similar options are provided for both the map creator and the viewer for the various flood maps. This combination of a robust model, emerging IMS software, and application

  12. Low-field NMR logging sensor for measuring hydraulic parameters of model soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucre, Oscar; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Minière, Adrien; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-08-01

    SummaryKnowing the exact hydraulic parameters of soils is very important for improving water management in agriculture and for the refinement of climate models. Up to now, however, the investigation of such parameters has required applying two techniques simultaneously which is time-consuming and invasive. Thus, the objective of this current study is to present only one technique, i.e., a new non-invasive method to measure hydraulic parameters of model soils by using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hereby, two model clay or sandy soils were respectively filled in a 2 m-long acetate column having an integrated PVC tube. After the soils were completely saturated with water, a low-field NMR sensor was moved up and down in the PVC tube to quantitatively measure along the whole column the initial water content of each soil sample. Thereafter, both columns were allowed to drain. Meanwhile, the NMR sensor was set at a certain depth to measure the water content of that soil slice. Once the hydraulic equilibrium was reached in each of the two columns, a final moisture profile was taken along the whole column. Three curves were subsequently generated accordingly: (1) the initial moisture profile, (2) the evolution curve of the moisture depletion at that particular depth, and (3) the final moisture profile. All three curves were then inverse analyzed using a MATLAB code over numerical data produced with the van Genuchten-Mualem model. Hereby, a set of values ( α, n, θr and θs) was found for the hydraulic parameters for the soils under research. Additionally, the complete decaying NMR signal could be analyzed through Inverse Laplace Transformation and averaged on the 1/ T2 space. Through measurement of the decay in pure water, the effect on the relaxation caused by the sample could be estimated from the obtained spectra. The migration of the sample-related average <1/ T2, Sample> with decreasing saturation speaks for a enhancement of the surface relaxation as

  13. Aquatic Nutrient Simulation Modules (NSMs) Developed for Hydrologic and Hydraulic Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    standardizes many aspects of data entry, facilitates an efficient display of model results, data checking, data conversion, and communication ...Developed for Hydrologic and Hydraulic Models En vi ro nm en ta l L ab or at or y Zhonglong Zhang and Billy E. Johnson February 2016 DOC POC OrgP...EL TR-16-1 February 2016 Aquatic Nutrient Simulation Modules (NSMs) Developed for Hydrologic and Hydraulic Models Zhonglong Zhang and Billy E

  14. Hydraulic Model Investigation: Functional Design of Control Structures for Oregon Inlet, North Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    REPORT HL-83-10 0 US-Army Corps .FUNCTIONAL DESIGN OF CONTROL STRUCTURES FOR OREGON INLET, NORTH CAROLINA Hydraulic Model Investigation TI. by Noel W...purpose of the functional model was to investigate flow control characteristics of the proposed jetty system. Important design parameters and other...above design considerations were investigated with a combina- tion fixed-bed and movable-bed physical hydraulic model molded to the bathymetry of the

  15. Sediment processes modelling below hydraulic mining: towards environmental impact mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalov, Sergey R.

    2010-05-01

    their nearness determines the water mass increase inside mining site. The predictive models were suggested to assess each of the mane-made processes contribution into the total sediment budget of the rivers below mining sites. The empirical data and theoretical and laboratory-derived correlations were used to obtain the predictive models for each processes of sediment supply. It was challenging to estimate specific erosion rate of washed exposed hillsides, channel incision, water supply conditions. Climatic and anthropogenic changes of water runoff also were simulated to decrease uncertainty of the proposed model. Application of the given approach to the hydraulic platinum-mining located in the Kamchatka peninsula (Koryak plateau, tributaries of the Vivenka River) gave the sediment budget of the placer-mined rivers and the total sediment yield supplied into the ocean from river basin. Polluted placer-mined rivers contribute about 30 % of the whole sediment yield of the Vivenka River. At the same time the catchment area of these rivers is less than 0,03 % from the whole Vivenka catchment area. Based on the sediment transport modeling the decision making system for controlling water pollution and stream community preservation was developed. Due to exposed hillside erosion prevention and settling pond system optimization the total decrease of sediment yield was up to 75 %.

  16. Coupled Numerical Study of Turbidity Currents, Internal Hydraulic Jump and Morphological Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, P.; Cao, Z.; He, Z.; Gareth, P.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract: The last two decades have seen intensive experimental and numerical studies of the occurrence condition of internal hydraulic jump in turbidity currents and the induced morphological signatures (Garcia and Parker 1989; Kostic and Parker 2006). Yet there are two critical issues that remain insufficiently or inappropriately addressed. First, depositional turbidity currents are imposed on steep slopes in both flume experiments and numerical cases, exclusively based on a configuration consisting of an upstream sloping portion and a downstream horizontal portion linked by a slope break. This appears physically counterintuitive as steep slope should favour self-accelerating erosional turbidity currents (Parker et al. 1986). The second issue concerns the numerical studies. There exist significant interactions among the current, sediment transport and bed topography. Due to the slope break in bed, the current may experience an internal hydraulic jump, leaving morphological signatures on the bed, which in turn affects the current evolution. Nevertheless, simplified decoupled models are exclusively employed in previous numerical investigations, in which the interactions are either partly or completely ignored without sufficient justification. The present paper aims to address the above-mentioned two issues relevant to the occurrence condition of the internal hydraulic jump and the induced morphological signatures. A recently developed well-balanced coupled numerical model for turbidity currents (Hu et al. 2012) is applied. In contrast to previous studies, erosional turbidity currents will be imposed at the upstream boundary, which is much more typical of the field. The effects of sediment size, bed slope decrease, and upstream and downstream boundary conditions are revealed in detail. In addition, the evolution of turbidity currents over a bed characterized by gradual decrease in slope is also discussed. References Garcia, M. H., and Parker, G. (1989). Experiments

  17. Hydraulic fracturing model based on the discrete fracture model and the generalized J integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Liu, Z. F.; Wang, X. H.; Zeng, B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydraulic fracturing technique is an effective stimulation for low permeability reservoirs. In fracturing models, one key point is to accurately calculate the flux across the fracture surface and the stress intensity factor. To achieve high precision, the discrete fracture model is recommended to calculate the flux. Using the generalized J integral, the present work obtains an accurate simulation of the stress intensity factor. Based on the above factors, an alternative hydraulic fracturing model is presented. Examples are included to demonstrate the reliability of the proposed model and its ability to model the fracture propagation. Subsequently, the model is used to describe the relationship between the geometry of the fracture and the fracturing equipment parameters. The numerical results indicate that the working pressure and the pump power will significantly influence the fracturing process.

  18. Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchange efficiency of open fractures: a model based on lowpass filtered apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, Amélie; Toussaint, Renaud; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2011-09-01

    Natural open joints in rocks commonly present multiscale self-affine apertures. This geometrical complexity affects fluid transport and heat exchange between the flowing fluid and the surrounding rock. In particular, long range correlations of self-affine apertures induce strong channelling of the flow which influences both mass and heat advection. A key question is to find a geometrical model of the complex aperture that describes at best the macroscopic properties (hydraulic conductivity, heat exchange) with the smallest number of parameters. Solving numerically the Stokes and heat equations with a lubrication approximation, we show that a low pass filtering of the aperture geometry provides efficient estimates of the effective hydraulic and thermal properties (apertures). A detailed study of the influence of the bandwidth of the lowpass filtering on these transport properties is also performed. For instance, keeping the information of amplitude only of the largest Fourier length scales allows us to reach already an accuracy of 9 per cent on the hydraulic and the thermal apertures.

  19. Modeling and experiments on the drive characteristics of high-strength water hydraulic artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zengmeng; Hou, Jiaoyi; Ning, Dayong; Gong, Xiaofeng; Gong, Yongjun

    2017-05-01

    Fluidic artificial muscles are popular in robotics and function as biomimetic actuators. Their pneumatic version has been widely investigated. A novel water hydraulic artificial muscle (WHAM) with high strength is developed in this study. WHAMs can be applied to underwater manipulators widely used in ocean development because of their environment-friendly characteristics, high force-to-weight ratio, and good bio-imitability. Therefore, the strength of WHAMs has been improved to fit the requirements of underwater environments and the work pressure of water hydraulic components. However, understanding the mechanical behaviors of WHAMs is necessary because WHAMs use work media and pressure control that are different from those used by pneumatic artificial muscles. This paper presents the static and dynamic characteristics of the WHAM system, including the water hydraulic pressure control circuit. A test system is designed and built to analyze the drive characteristics of the developed WHAM. The theoretical relationships among the amount of contraction, pressure, and output drawing force of the WHAM are tested and verified. A linearized transfer function is proposed, and the dynamic characteristics of the WHAM are investigated through simulation and inertia load experiments. Simulation results agree with the experimental results and show that the proposed model can be applied to the control of WHAM actuators.

  20. Hydraulic lift in a neotropical savanna: experimental manipulation and model simulations

    Treesearch

    Fabian G. Scholz; Sandra J. Bucci; William A. Hoffmann; Frederick C. Meinzer; Guillermo Goldstein

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of hydraulic lift in Brazilian savannas (Cerrado) and to test the hypothesis that hydraulic lift by herbaceous plants contributes substantially to slowing the decline of water potential and water storage in the upper soil layers during the dry season. To this effect, field observations of soil water content and...

  1. [Input impedance for studying hydraulic parameters of the vessel system].

    PubMed

    Naumov, A Iu; Sheptutsolov, K V; Balashov, S A; Mel'kumiants, A M

    2001-03-01

    Vascular input impedance can be used as an effective tool in estimating hydraulic parameters of arterial bed. These parameters may be interpreted as hydraulic resistance, elastance and inertance of particular sites of the arterial system. There is no significant difference between these parameters and those obtained through a direct measurement.

  2. Hydraulics and flow modelling of water treatment wetlands constructed on peatlands in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kløve, Bjørn

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated flow structure, effective flow area (A(eff)) and effective porosity (theta(eff)) in three peatlands using the stable isotope (18)O/(16)O ratio and tracer tests. We also applied the readily available groundwater modelling MODFLOW code for wetland flow modelling and simulated in one study site how the hydraulic performance of the wetland will be improved by changing the design of the distribution ditch. Preferential flow paths occurred in all three studied wetlands and A(eff) varied from 40% to 90% of total wetland area while theta(eff) was 0.75-0.99. Constructed flow models accurately simulated the hydraulic head across wetlands (r(2)=0.95-0.99). Similarities between the flow models and the stable isotope distributions observed in this study suggest possibilities in using MODFLOW to design peatlands. The improvement of the inlet ditch configuration (ditch length/wetland width>0.45) can prevent or reduce short-circuiting and dead zones in peatlands treating wastewater.

  3. Added value flooding products coupling hydraulic modeling and COSMO Sky-Med SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Rudari, R.; Candela, L.; Corina, A.; Boni, G.

    2012-04-01

    In this work the real time use of a simplified two dimensional hydraulic model constrained by satellite data for the simulation of flooding events is studied. The main features of such a model are computational speed and simple start-up, with no need to insert complex information but a subset of simplified boundary and initial condition. Those characteristics allow the model to be fast enough to be used in real time for the simulation of flooding events. The model fills the gap of information left by single satellite scenes of flooded area, allowing for the estimation of the maximum flooding extension and magnitude. The static information provided by earth observation (like SAR extension of flooded areas at a certain time) are interpreted in a dynamic consitent way and very useful hydraulic information (e.g., water depth, water speed and the evolution of flooded areas)are provided. The model has been applied in several flooding events occured wordwide. amongst the other activations in the mediterranean areas like Veneto (IT) (October 2010), Basilicata (IT) (March 2011) and Shkoder (January 2010 and December 2010) are considered and compared with larger types of floods like the one of Queensland in December 2010. In the past year the model has been used, by request of Department of Civil Protection, to provide previsions of scenarios to help authority involved in recent Magra flooding, using as input the predicted discharges.

  4. Evaluation of multiple hydraulic models in generating design/near-real time flood inundation extents under various geophysical settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Rajib, M. A.; Jafarzadegan, K.; Merwade, V.

    2015-12-01

    Application of land surface/hydrologic models within an operational flood forecasting system can provide probable time of occurrence and magnitude of streamflow at specific locations along a stream. Creating time-varying spatial extent of flood inundation and depth requires the use of a hydraulic or hydrodynamic model. Models differ in representing river geometry and surface roughness which can lead to different output depending on the particular model being used. The result from a single hydraulic model provides just one possible realization of the flood extent without capturing the uncertainty associated with the input or the model parameters. The objective of this study is to compare multiple hydraulic models toward generating ensemble flood inundation extents. Specifically, relative performances of four hydraulic models, including AutoRoute, HEC-RAS, HEC-RAS 2D, and LISFLOOD are evaluated under different geophysical conditions in several locations across the United States. By using streamflow output from the same hydrologic model (SWAT in this case), hydraulic simulations are conducted for three configurations: (i) hindcasting mode by using past observed weather data at daily time scale in which models are being calibrated against USGS streamflow observations, (ii) validation mode using near real-time weather data at sub-daily time scale, and (iii) design mode with extreme streamflow data having specific return periods. Model generated inundation maps for observed flood events both from hindcasting and validation modes are compared with remotely sensed images, whereas the design mode outcomes are compared with corresponding FEMA generated flood hazard maps. The comparisons presented here will give insights on probable model-specific nature of biases and their relative advantages/disadvantages as components of an operational flood forecasting system.

  5. Triaxial coreflood study of the hydraulic fracturing of Utica Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Frash, L.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the central questions in unconventional oil and gas production research is the cause of limited recovery of hydrocarbon. There are many hypotheses including: 1) inadequate penetration of fractures within the stimulated volume; 2) limited proppant delivery; 3) multiphase flow phenomena that blocks hydrocarbon migration; etc. Underlying any solution to this problem must be an understanding of the hydrologic properties of hydraulically fractured shale. In this study, we conduct triaxial coreflood experiments using a gasket sealing mechanism to characterize hydraulic fracture development and permeability of Utica Shale samples. Our approach also includes fracture propagation with proppants. The triaxial coreflood experiments were conducted with an integrated x-ray tomography system that allows direct observation of fracture development using x-ray video radiography and x-ray computed tomography at elevated pressure. A semi-circular, fracture initiation notch was cut into an end-face of the cylindrical samples (1"-diameter with lengths from 0.375 to 1"). The notch was aligned parallel with the x-ray beam to allow video radiography of fracture growth as a function of injection pressure. The proppants included tungsten powder that provided good x-ray contrast for tracing proppant delivery and distribution within the fracture system. Fractures were propagated at injection pressures in excess of the confining pressure and permeability measurements were made in samples where the fractures propagated through the length of the sample, ideally without penetrating the sample sides. Following fracture development, permeability was characterized as a function of hydrostatic pressure and injection pressure. X-ray video radioadiography was used to study changes in fracture aperture in relation to permeability and proppant embedment. X-ray tomography was collected at steady-state conditions to fully characterize fracture geometry and proppant distribution.

  6. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned towards conditions usually encountered in the Marcellus shale play in the Northeastern US at an approximate depth of 1500 m (~;;4,500 feet). Our modeling simulations indicate that when faults are present, micro-seismic events are possible, the magnitude of which is somewhat larger than the one associated with micro-seismic events originating from regular hydraulic fracturing because of the larger surface area that is available for rupture. The results of our simulations indicated fault rupture lengths of about 10 to 20 m, which, in rare cases can extend to over 100 m, depending on the fault permeability, the in situ stress field, and the fault strength properties. In addition to a single event rupture length of 10 to 20 m, repeated events and aseismic slip amounted to a total rupture length of 50 m, along with a shear offset displacement of less than 0.01 m. This indicates that the possibility of hydraulically induced fractures at great depth (thousands of meters) causing activation of faults and creation of a new flow path that can reach shallow groundwater resources (or even the surface) is remote. The expected low permeability of faults in producible shale is clearly a limiting factor for the possible rupture length and seismic magnitude. In fact, for a fault that is initially nearly-impermeable, the only possibility of larger fault slip event would be opening by hydraulic fracturing; this would allow pressure to penetrate the matrix along the fault and to reduce the frictional strength over a sufficiently large fault surface patch. However, our simulation results show that if the fault is initially impermeable, hydraulic fracturing along the fault results in numerous small micro-seismic events along with the propagation, effectively

  7. The role of 3D-hydraulics in habitat modelling of hydropeaking events.

    PubMed

    Pisaturo, Giuseppe Roberto; Righetti, Maurizio; Dumbser, Michael; Noack, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Cavedon, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    One way to study ecological implications induced by hydropeaking represents the coupling of hydrodynamic models with habitat suitability models, in which hydrodynamic parameters are typically used to describe the physical habitat of indicator species. This article discusses the differences in habitat suitability assessment between 2D and 3D CFD modelling as input for the habitat simulation tool CASiMiR. In the first part of the article, the accuracy of the hydraulic model is evaluated by comparing the model results with laboratory (model of a laboratory channel with erodible bed) and field measurements (Valsura River, Bolzano, Italy). In the second part, the habitat suitability for the Valsura River case study (affected by hydropeaking), is analyzed comparing different approaches for the reconstruction of the velocity field (depth-averaged velocities from 2D modelling, bottom velocity field reconstruction with log-law approach from 2D modelling and bottom velocity field from 3D modelling). The results show that the habitat suitability index (HSI) using 2D or 3D hydrodynamic models can be significantly different. These differences can be ascribed to a higher capability to depict the features of the flow field with highly variable and heterogeneous boundary conditions and to the possibility to simulate the near bed hydrodynamic parameters, which are relevant for certain target species. In particular, the HSI-values using 3D hydraulics lead to larger areas of highly suitable habitats compared to 2D simulations. Moreover, considering the entire flow range of hydropeaking events, the habitat simulations with bottom flow velocities from 3D modelling provide suitable habitats over the entire flow range representing the availability of stable suitable habitats, while the habitat availability of 2D modelled flow velocity is continuously decreasing with increasing flow rates.

  8. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale.

    PubMed

    Chau, Viet T; Bažant, Zdeněk P; Su, Yewang

    2016-10-13

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 10(5)-10(6) almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot's two-phase medium and Terzaghi's effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Viet T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 105–106 almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot’s two-phase medium and Terzaghi’s effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Energy and the subsurface’. PMID:27597791

  10. Thermal hydraulic characteristics study of prototype NET and CEA cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Maekawa, Ryuji

    1995-10-31

    The thermal hydraulic characteristics of low temperature helium in a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC) significantly affects the overall design and performance of the associated large scale superconducting magnet system. It is essential to understand the transient and steady state behavior of the helium in the conductor. Throughout the development of CICCs, the reduction of flow impedance has been one of the key factors to improving the overall pressure drop. The newly developed CICC for the ITER project has a hybrid cooling scheme: a central channel that is surrounded by bundles, for which the thermal hydraulic characteristics are not well understood. This thesis describes an experimental and analytical investigation of thermal hydraulic characteristics of low temperature helium in conventional and hybrid CICCS. Pressure drop measurements for both NET and CEA conductors have been conducted, using low temperature helium and liquid nitrogen to obtain a range of Reynolds numbers. The results are correlated with classical friction factor and Reynolds number analysis. The flow impedance reduction of the CEA conductor is described by measures of a developed flow model. Thermally induced flow in the CEA conductor has been studied with an inductive heating method. The induced velocity in the central channel is measured by a Pitot tube with steady state Reynolds number up to {approximately}7000. The transient pressure wave propagation has been recorded with pressure transducers placed equally along the conductor. The supercritical helium temperature in the central channel has been measured with the thermometer probe. However, the reduction of the central channel area significantly affects the overall thermal hydraulic characteristics of the conductor. The results suggest the importance of the central channel. A transient heat transfer experiment studied the.transverse heat transfer mechanism in the CEA conductor. The temperatures in the central channel and bundle region

  11. Modelling Hydraulic and Thermal Responses in a Benchmark for Deep Geothermal Heat Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbecher, E.; Oberdorfer, P.

    2012-04-01

    Geothermal heat production from deep reservoirs (5000-7000 m) is currently examined within the collaborative research program "Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling" (gebo), funded by the Ministry of Science and Culture of Lower Saxony (Germany) and Baker Hughes. The projects concern exploration and characterization of geothermal reservoirs as well as production. They are gathered in the four major topic fields: geosystem, drilling, materials, technical system. We present modelling of a benchmark set-up concerning the geothermal production itself. The benchmark model "Horstberg" was originally created by J. Löhken and is based on geological data, concerning the Horstberg site in Lower Saxony. The model region consists of a cube with a side length of 5 km, in which 13 geological layers are included. A fault zone splits the region into two parts with shifted layering. A well is implemented, reaching from the top to an optional depth crossing all layers including the fault zone. The original geological model was rebuilt and improved in COMSOL Multiphysics Version 4.2a. The heterogeneous and detailed configuration makes the model interesting for benchmarking hydrogeological and geothermal applications. It is possible to inject and pump at any level in the well and to study the hydraulic and thermal responses of the system. The hydraulic and thermal parameters can be varied, and groundwater flow can be introduced. Moreover, it is also possible to examine structural mechanical responses to changes in the stress field (which is not further examined here). The main purpose of the presented study is to examine the dynamical flow characteristics of a hydraulic high conductive zone (Detfurth) in connection to a high conductive fault. One example is the fluid injection in the Detfurth zone and production in the fault. The high conductive domains can provide a hydraulic connection between the well screens and the initiated flow circuit could be used for geothermal

  12. Modeling and analysis of a meso-hydraulic climbing robot with artificial muscle actuation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Edward M; Jenkins, Tyler E; Bryant, Matthew

    2017-07-10

    This paper presents a fully coupled electro-hydraulic model of a bio-inspired climbing robot actuated by fluidic artificial muscles (FAMs). This analysis expands upon previous FAM literature by considering not only the force and contraction characteristics of the actuator, but the complete hydraulic and electromechanical circuits as well as the dynamics of the climbing robot. This analysis allows modeling of the time-varying applied pressure, electrical current, and actuator contraction for accurate prediction of the robot motion, energy consumption, and mechanical work output. The developed model is first validated against mechanical and electrical data collected from a proof-of-concept prototype robot. The model is then employed to study the system-level sensitivities of the robot locomotion efficiency and average climbing speed to several design and operating parameters. The results of this analysis demonstrate that considering only the transduction efficiency of the FAM actuators is insufficient to maximize the efficiency of the complete robot, and that a holistic approach can lead to significant improvements in performance. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. A whole-plant hydraulic capacitance approach to modeling distributed root water uptake and actual transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, we propose a simple transpiration stream model, based on the concept of whole-plant hydraulic capacitance. The suggested algorithm is implemented in a one-dimensional soil water flow model involving vertically distributed macroscopic root water uptake. The proposed transient plant water storage approach is compared with the more conventionally used quasi- steady-state approach. Both approaches are used to simulate soil water flow and diurnal variations of transpiration at a forest site covered with Norway spruce. The key parameter of the transient storage approach - plant hydraulic capacitance - is estimated by comparing the variations of potential transpiration rate, derived from micrometeorological measurements, with observed sap flow intensities. The application of the proposed model leads to improved predictions of root water uptake and actual transpiration rates. The algorithm can be easily implemented into existing soil water flow models and used to simulate transpiration stream responses to varying atmospheric and soil moisture conditions including isohydric and anisohydric plant responses to drought stress.

  14. Final Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identif...

  15. Final Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identif...

  16. EPA Published Research Related to the Hydraulic Fracturing Study

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A list of publications that will support the draft assessment report on the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. These publications have undergone peer review through the journal where the paper has been published.

  17. Executive Summary, Hydraulic Fracturing Study - Draft Assessment 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this Executive Summary of the HF Draft report, EPA highlights the reviews of scientific literature to assess the potential for hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas to change the quality or quantity of drinking water resources.

  18. Numerical simulation of the two-phase flows in a hydraulic coupling by solving VOF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Fan, H. G.; Zhuge, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    The flow in a partially filled hydraulic coupling is essentially a gas-liquid two-phase flow, in which the distribution of two phases has significant influence on its characteristics. The interfaces between the air and the liquid, and the circulating flows inside the hydraulic coupling can be simulated by solving the VOF two-phase model. In this paper, PISO algorithm and RNG k-ɛ turbulence model were employed to simulate the phase distribution and the flow field in a hydraulic coupling with 80% liquid fill. The results indicate that the flow forms a circulating movement on the torus section with decreasing speed ratio. In the pump impeller, the air phase mostly accumulates on the suction side of the blades, while liquid on the pressure side; in turbine runner, air locates in the middle of the flow passage. Flow separations appear near the blades and the enclosing boundaries of the hydraulic coupling.

  19. Control method and system for hydraulic machines employing a dynamic joint motion model

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George [Reno, NV

    2011-11-22

    A control method and system for controlling a hydraulically actuated mechanical arm to perform a task, the mechanical arm optionally being a hydraulically actuated excavator arm. The method can include determining a dynamic model of the motion of the hydraulic arm for each hydraulic arm link by relating the input signal vector for each respective link to the output signal vector for the same link. Also the method can include determining an error signal for each link as the weighted sum of the differences between a measured position and a reference position and between the time derivatives of the measured position and the time derivatives of the reference position for each respective link. The weights used in the determination of the error signal can be determined from the constant coefficients of the dynamic model. The error signal can be applied in a closed negative feedback control loop to diminish or eliminate the error signal for each respective link.

  20. Mathematical modeling of hydraulic fracturing in coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Olovyanny, A.G.

    2005-02-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of coal seam is considered as a process of development of discontinuities in rock mass elements due to change in hydrogeomechanical situation on filtration of fluid under pressure. Failure is associated with excess of the effective stresses over the rock tension strength. The problem on filtration and failure of massif is solved by the finite-element method using the procedure of fictitious nodal forces.

  1. A novel thermo-hydraulic coupling model to investigate the crater formation in electrical discharge machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiajing; Yang, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    A novel thermo-hydraulic coupling model was proposed in this study to investigate the crater formation in electrical discharge machining (EDM). The temperature distribution of workpiece materials was included, and the crater formation process was explained from the perspective of hydrodynamic characteristics of the molten region. To better track the morphology of the crater and the movement of debris, the level-set method was introduced in this study. Simulation results showed that the crater appears shortly after the ignition of the discharge, and the molten material is removed by vaporizing in the initial stage, then by splashing at the following time. The driving force for the detachment of debris in the splashing removal stage comes from the extremely large pressure difference in the upper part of the molten region, and the morphology of the crater is also influenced by the shearing flow of molten material. It was found that the removal ratio of molten material is only about 7.63% under the studied conditions, leaving most to form the re-solidification layer on the surface of the crater. The size of the crater reaches the maximum at the end of discharge duration then experiences a slight reduction because of the reflux of molten material after the discharge. The results of single pulse discharge experiments showed that the morphologies and sizes between the simulation crater and actual crater are good at agreement, verifying the feasibility of the proposed thermo-hydraulic coupling model in explaining the mechanisms of crater formation in EDM.

  2. Modeling for Hydraulic Permeability and Kozeny-Carman Constant of Porous Nanofibers Using a Fractal Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Boqi; Tu, Xing; Ren, Wen; Wang, Zongchi

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the analytical expressions for the hydraulic permeability and Kozeny-Carman (KC) constant of porous nanofibers are derived based on fractal theory. In the present approach, the permeability is explicitly related to the porosity and the area fractal dimensions of porous nanofibers. The proposed fractal models for KC constant is also found to be a function of the microstructural parameters (porosity, area fractal dimensions). Besides, the present model clearly indicates that KC constant is not a constant and increases with porosity. However, KC constant is close to a constant value which is 18 for ϕ > 0.8. Every parameter of the proposed formulas of calculating permeability and KC constant has clear physical meaning. The model predictions are compared with the existing experimental data, and fair agreement between the model predictions and experimental data is found for different porosities.

  3. How Plant Hydraulics can Improve the Modeling of Plant and Ecosystem Responses to Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperry, J.; Anderegg, W.; Mackay, D. S.; Venturas, M.

    2016-12-01

    Stomatal regulation is an important, yet problematic component in modeling plant-environment interactions. The problem is that stomata respond to so many environmental cues via complex and uncertain mechanisms. But the assumed end result of regulation is conceptually simple: an optimization of CO2 for H2O exchange in response to changing conditions. Stomata open when photosynthetic opportunity is high and water is cheap. They close if photosynthetic opportunity is low or water is very expensive. Photosynthetic opportunity is relatively easy to model. The cost of water loss is also easy to model if it is assumed to rise with greater proximity to hydraulic failure and desiccation. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves of soil- and plant are used to estimate proximity to failure. At any given instant, a model can calculate opportunity and cost curves associated with greater stomatal opening. If stomata regulate to maximize the instantaneous difference between photosynthetic gain and hydraulic cost, then a model can predict the trajectory of stomatal responses to changes in environment across time. Results of this optimization routine extend the utility of hydraulic predecessor models, and are consistent with widely used empirical models across a wide range of vapor pressure deficit and ambient CO2 concentrations for wet soil. The advantage of the optimization approach is the absence of empirical coefficients, applicability to dry as well as wet soil, and prediction of plant hydraulic status along with gas exchange. The optimization algorithm is a trait- and process-based approach that could improve next generation land surface models.

  4. Modelling the Influence of Long-Term Hydraulic Conditions on Juvenile Salmon Habitats in AN Upland Scotish River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, L.; Malcolm, I.; Millidine, K. J.; Buddendorf, B.; Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    Wild Atlantic salmon populations in Scottish rivers constitute an important economic and recreational resource, as well as being a key component of biodiversity. Salmon have very specific habitat requirements at different life stages and their distribution is therefore strongly influenced by a complex suite of biological and physical controls. Previous research has shown that stream hydrodynamics and channel morphology have a strong influence on the distribution and density of juvenile salmon. Here, we utilise a unique 20 year data set of spatially distributed juvenile salmon densities derived from annual electro-fishing surveys in an upland Scottish river. We examine to what extent the spatial and temporal variability of in-stream hydraulics regulates the spatial and temporal variability in the performance and density of juvenile salmon. A 2-D hydraulic model (River2D) is used to simulate water velocity and water depth under different flow conditions for seven different electro-fishing sites. The selected sites represent different hydromorphological environments including plane-bed, step-pool and pool riffle reaches. The bathymetry of each site was characterised using a total station providing an accurate DTM of the bed, and hydraulic simulations were driven by 20 year stream flow records. Habitat suitability curves, based on direct observations during electro-fishing surveys, were produced for a range of hydraulic indices for juvenile salmon. The hydraulic simulations showed marked spatial differences in juvenile habitat quality both within and between reaches. They also showed marked differences both within and between years. This is most evident in extreme years with wet summers when salmon feeding opportunities may be constrained. Integration of hydraulic habitat models, with fish preference curves and the long term hydrological data allows us to assess whether long-term changes in hydroclimate may be affecting juvenile salmonid populations in the study stream

  5. Hydraulic Traits of Amazonian Canopy Tree Species: Empirical Parameterizations for Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. S.; de Guzman, M. E.; Bonal, D.; Baraloto, C.; Vogenberg, J.

    2016-12-01

    Predicting responses of tropical forests to climate change-type drought is challenging because of high diversity of species and their responses to water deficit. Yet, this is an important challenge because tropical forests store and cycle a disproportionately large amount of carbon relative to other biomes and therefore have a large bearing on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. To better predict how tropical trees will respond to increasing drought, detailed characterization of hydraulic physiology is necessary, but because these measurements are tedious and time-consuming, relatively little data is available for parameterizing Earth system models. We performed detailed measures of hydraulic conductivity, xylem vulnerability curves, sapwood pressure-volume curves, leaf cuticle conductance (gmin), and wood density on emergent branches of fourteen species of Amazonian canopy tree species in Paracou, French Guiana. Our measurements were stratified by wood density and included species with the densest and lightest wood in the plot. Our objectives were to probe the variability of hydraulic traits among dominant species, evaluate coordination among hydraulic traits to identify hydraulic strategies, and constrain trait values for inclusion in Earth system models. We found that the stem water potential at 50% maximum hydraulic conductivity (P50) varied from -1.49 to -0.13 MPa and leaf water potential at P50 varied from varied from -2.47 to -1.03 MPa, sapwood capacitance varied from 72.9 to 415.3 kg m-3 MPa-1, and gmin varied from 2.4 to 16.1 mmol m-2 s-1. Wood density was correlated with P50 and gmin, P50 and gmin were correlated and sapwood capacitance was correlated with maximum hydraulic conductivity, indicating significant coordination among hydraulic traits. Predicting values for species not measured should be possible based on relationships with easy-to-measure functional traits such as wood density for inclusion in Earth system models.

  6. Modeling, Optimization, and Detailed Design of a Hydraulic Flywheel-Accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmaier, Kyle Glenn

    Improving mobile energy storage technology is an important means of addressing concerns over fossil fuel scarcity and energy independence. Traditional hydraulic accumulator energy storage, though favorable in power density, durability, cost, and environmental impact, suffers from relatively low energy density and a pressure-dependent state of charge. The hydraulic flywheel-accumulator concept utilizes both the hydro-pneumatic and rotating kinetic energy domains by employing a rotating pressure vessel. This thesis provides an in-depth analysis of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator concept and an assessment of the advantages it offers over traditional static accumulator energy storage. After specifying a practical architecture for the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator, this thesis addresses the complex fluid phenomena and control implications associated with multi-domain energy storage. To facilitate rapid selection of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator dimensions, computationally inexpensive material stress models are developed for each component. A drive cycle simulation strategy is also developed to assess the dynamic performance of the device. The stress models and performance simulation are combined to form a toolset that facilitates computationally-efficient model-based design. The aforementioned toolset has been embedded into a multi-objective optimization algorithm that aims to minimize the mass of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator system and to minimize the losses it incurs over the course of a drive cycle. Two optimizations have been performed - one with constraints that reflect a vehicle-scale application, and one with constraints that reflect a laboratory application. At both scales, the optimization results suggest that the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator offers at least an order of magnitude improvement over traditional static accumulator energy storage, while operating at efficiencies between 75% and 93%. A particular hydraulic flywheel-accumulator design

  7. Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources (Monterey, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A summary of EPA's research relating to potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources will be presented. Background about the study plan development will be presented along with an analysis of the water cycle as it relates to hydraulic fracturing processe...

  8. Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources (Monterey, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A summary of EPA's research relating to potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources will be presented. Background about the study plan development will be presented along with an analysis of the water cycle as it relates to hydraulic fracturing processe...

  9. Improving prediction of hydraulic conductivity by constraining capillary bundle models to a maximum pore size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Sascha; Peters, Andre; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Soil hydraulic properties are required to solve the Richards equation, the most widely applied model for variably-saturated flow. While the experimental determination of the water retention curve does not pose significant challenges, the measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is time consuming and costly. The prediction of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curve from the soil water retention curve by pore-bundle models is a cost-effective and widely applied technique. A well-known problem of conductivity prediction for retention functions with wide pore-size distributions is the sharp drop in conductivity close to water saturation. This problematic behavior is well known for the van Genuchten model if the shape parameter n assumes values smaller than about 1.3. So far, the workaround for this artefact has been to introduce an explicit air-entry value into the capillary saturation function. However, this correction leads to a retention function which is not continuously differentiable and thus a discontinuous water capacity function. We present an improved parametrization of the hydraulic properties which uses the original capillary saturation function and introduces a maximum pore radius only in the pore-bundle model. Closed-form equations for the hydraulic conductivity function were derived for the unimodal and multimodal retention functions of van Genuchten and have been tested by sensitivity analysis and applied in curve fitting and inverse modeling of multistep outflow experiments. The resulting hydraulic conductivity function is smooth, increases monotonically close to saturation, and eliminates the sharp drop in conductivity close to saturation. Furthermore, the new model retains the smoothness and continuous differentiability of the water retention curve. We conclude that the resulting soil hydraulic functions are physically more reasonable than the ones predicted by previous approaches, and are thus ideally suited for numerical simulations

  10. Linear Elastic and Cohesive Fracture Analysis to Model Hydraulic Fracture in Brittle and Ductile Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao

    2012-05-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology is being widely used within the oil and gas industry for both waste injection and unconventional gas production wells. It is essential to predict the behavior of hydraulic fractures accurately based on understanding the fundamental mechanism(s). The prevailing approach for hydraulic fracture modeling continues to rely on computational methods based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, these methods give reasonable predictions for hard rock hydraulic fracture processes, but still have inherent limitations, especially when fluid injection is performed in soft rock/sand or other non-conventional formations. These methods typically give very conservative predictions on fracture geometry and inaccurate estimation of required fracture pressure. One of the reasons the LEFM-based methods fail to give accurate predictions for these materials is that the fracture process zone ahead of the crack tip and softening effect should not be neglected in ductile rock fracture analysis. A 3D pore pressure cohesive zone model has been developed and applied to predict hydraulic fracturing under fluid injection. The cohesive zone method is a numerical tool developed to model crack initiation and growth in quasi-brittle materials considering the material softening effect. The pore pressure cohesive zone model has been applied to investigate the hydraulic fracture with different rock properties. The hydraulic fracture predictions of a three-layer water injection case have been compared using the pore pressure cohesive zone model with revised parameters, LEFM-based pseudo 3D model, a Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) model, and an analytical solution. Based on the size of the fracture process zone and its effect on crack extension in ductile rock, the fundamental mechanical difference of LEFM and cohesive fracture mechanics-based methods is discussed. An effective fracture toughness method has been proposed to consider the fracture process zone

  11. Rail vehicle dynamic response to a nonlinear physical 'in-service' model of its secondary suspension hydraulic dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. L.; Zhou, Z. R.; Yu, D. S.; Qin, Q. H.; Iwnicki, S.

    2017-10-01

    A full nonlinear physical 'in-service' model was built for a rail vehicle secondary suspension hydraulic damper with shim-pack-type valves. In the modelling process, a shim pack deflection theory with an equivalent-pressure correction factor was proposed, and a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) approach was applied. Bench test results validated the damper model over its full velocity range and thus also proved that the proposed shim pack deflection theory and the FEA-based parameter identification approach are effective. The validated full damper model was subsequently incorporated into a detailed vehicle dynamics simulation to study how its key in-service parameter variations influence the secondary-suspension-related vehicle system dynamics. The obtained nonlinear physical in-service damper model and the vehicle dynamic response characteristics in this study could be used in the product design optimization and nonlinear optimal specifications of high-speed rail hydraulic dampers.

  12. 1D Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Reactive transport modeling for deep geothermal systems: A case study of Groß Schönebeck reservoir, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driba, D. L.; De Lucia, M.; Peiffer, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-rock interactions in geothermal reservoirs are driven by the state of disequilibrium that persists among solid and solutes due to changing temperature and pressure. During operation of enhanced geothermal systems, injection of cooled water back into the reservoir disturbs the initial thermodynamic equilibrium between the reservoir and its geothermal fluid, which may induce modifications in permeability through changes in porosity and pore space geometry, consequently bringing about several impairments to the overall system.Modeling of fluid-rock interactions induced by injection of cold brine into Groß Schönebeck geothermal reservoir system situated in the Rotliegend sandstone at 4200m depth have been done by coupling geochemical modeling Code Phreeqc with OpenGeoSys. Through batch modeling the re-evaluation of the measured hydrochemical composition of the brine has been done using Quintessa databases, the results from the calculation indicate that a mineral phases comprising of K-feldspar, hematite, Barite, Calcite and Dolomite was found to match the hypothesis of equilibrium with the formation fluid, Reducing conditions are presumed in the model (pe = -3.5) in order to match the amount of observed dissolved Fe and thus considered as initial state for the reactive transport modeling. based on a measured composition of formation fluids and the predominant mineralogical assemblage of the host rock, a preliminary 1D Reactive transport modeling (RTM) was run with total time set to 30 years; results obtained for the initial simulation revealed that during this period, no significant change is evident for K-feldspar. Furthermore, the precipitation of calcite along the flow path in the brine results in a drop of pH from 6.2 to a value of 5.2 noticed over the simulated period. The circulation of cooled fluid in the reservoir is predicted to affect the temperature of the reservoir within the first 100 -150m from the injection well. Examination of porosity change in

  13. Numerical study of rotor-stator interactions in a hydraulic turbine with Foam-extend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romain, Cappato; Guibault, François; Devals, Christophe; Nennemann, Bernd

    2016-11-01

    In the development of high head hydraulic turbines, vibrations are one of the critical problems. In Francis turbines, pressure fluctuations occur at the interface between the blades of the runner and guide vanes. This rotor-stator interaction can be responsible for fatigue failures and cracks. Although the flow inside the turbomachinery is complex, and the unsteadiness makes it difficult to model, the choice of an appropriate setup enables the study of this phenomenon. This study validates a numerical setup of the Foam-extend open source software for rotor-stator simulations. Pressure fluctuations results show a good correspondence with data from experiments.

  14. Mathematical modeling and simulation analysis of hydraulic fracture propagation in three-layered poro-elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, H.Y. ); Advani, S.H.; Lee, T.S. )

    1992-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing plays a pivotal role in the enhancement of oil and gas production recovery from low permeability reservoirs. The process of hydraulic fracturing entails the generation of a fracture by pumping fluids blended with special chemicals and proppants into the payzone at high injection rates and pressures to extend and wedge fractures. The mathematical modeling of hydraulically induced fractures generally incorporates coupling between the formation elasticity, fracture fluid flow, and fracture mechanics equations governing the formation structural responses, fluid pressure profile, and fracture growth. Two allied unsymmetric elliptic fracture models are developed for fracture configuration evolutions in three-layered rock formations. The first approach is based on a Lagrangian formulation incorporating pertinent energy components associated with the formation structural responses and fracture fluid flow. The second model is based on a generalized variational principle, introducing an energy rate related functional. These models initially simulate a penny-shaped fracture, which becomes elliptic if the crack tips encounters (upper and/or lower) barriers with differential reservoir properties (in situ stresses, 16 elastic moduli, and fracture toughness-contrasts and fluid leak-off characteristics). The energy rate component magnitudes are determined to interpret the governing hydraulic fracture mechanisms during fracture evolution. The variational principle is extended to study the phenomenon and consequences of fluid lag in fractures. Finally, parametric sensitivity and energy rate investigations to evaluate the roles of controllable hydraulic treatment variables and uncontrollable reservoir property characterization parameters are performed. The presented field applications demonstrate the overall capabilities of the developed models. These studies provide stimulation treatment guidelines for fracture configuration design, control, and optimization.

  15. The usefulness of ERS-2 and ENVISAT altimetry data for hydraulic model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, A.; Tarpanelli, A.; Barbetta, S.; Brocca, L.; Moramarco, T.; Castellarin, A.; Brath, A.

    2013-12-01

    The calibration of hydraulic models is traditionally based on local data collected at stream gauging stations. However, the high costs related to hydro-meteorological monitoring network set-up and maintenance in many cases represents a limit for the implementation of conventional (i.e. in-situ) gauged stations. Even in many developed countries the number of hydro-climatic stations is continuously decreasing while the quality and the reliability of measured data still not be completely ensured. In light of this context, over the last decades, the use of remote sensing has been shown to be feasible and potentially useful for several hydrological-hydraulic applications, especially in poorly-gauged areas. In this study, referring to data collected by ENVISAT and ERS satellites for a 16-year period (i.e. 1995-2011), we investigated the usefulness of remotely-sensed water surface elevation for the calibration of a quasi-bidimensional (quasi-2D) hydraulic model. The study refer to a 130 km reach of the middle-lower part of the Po River given the abundance of both traditionally (i.e. in-situ) and remotely-sensed hydrometric data and the availability of a recent topographical survey. Referring in turn to in-situ and remotely-sensed water levels we calibrated different configurations of the quasi-2D model in order to: (i) evaluate the trustworthiness and accuracy of ERS and ENVISAT altimetry data for their direct use in model calibration, replacing water surface observation in the calibration of a quasi-2D model; (ii) assess whether using remotely-sensed water surface elevation together with traditional hydrometric data can improve calibration and reduce the overall uncertainty of the model. The results of our preliminary investigation highlight that even though the accuracy of a single measurement is not particularly high and it is not currently capable of substituting in-situ observations of water level, for medium-to-large rivers and for large satellite data-sets (i

  16. Experimental study on hydraulic fracture propagation in Lacustrine Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Jiang, G.; Xie, J.; Cheng, W.; Tian, H.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has become one of the essential techniques for the stimulation of shale gas at present. Lacustrine shale in north of China, has higher clay content compared to marine shale in south of China. Thus, many problems such as high fracturing pressure have sprung up. Consequently, according to the characteristics of shale gas reservoir in Ordos Basin, it is very necessary to develop fracturing technology system for northern lacustrine shale. In order to explore the formation mechanism of the fracture network, a hydraulic fracturing experiment was conducted on the hydraulic fracturing system, which consists of large-scale triaxial module, high pressure injection pump module and AE (acoustic emission) modules. After compared the fracturing results of 13 shale specimens, how hydraulic parameters such as perforation, fracturing fluid leakoff and in-situ stresses affect the geometry of the fracture was analyzed. The results show that: The geometry of the hydraulic fracture is impacted by parameters in different extent, while the perforation is the determining factor. Fractures in the process of propagation will eventually turn to the direction of maximum stress. Low pumping output is propitious to fracturing fluid seepage in the shale specimen, which will benefit forming fracture network.

  17. Field study comparing the effect of hydraulic mixing on septic tank performance and sludge accumulation.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Fares

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of hydraulic mixing on anaerobic digestion and sludge accumulation in a septic tank. The performance of a septic tank equipped with a hydraulic mixer was compared with that of a similar standard septic tank over a period of 10 months. The study was conducted in two phases: Phase-I--from May to November 2013 (6 months); Phase-II--from January to May 2014 (4 months). Hydraulic mixing effectively reduced the effluent biological oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids, and reduced the sludge accumulation rate in the septic tank. The BOD removal efficiencies during Phase-II were 65% and 75% in the standard septic tank and a septic tank equipped with hydraulic mixer (Smart Digester™), respectively. The effect of hydraulic mixing reduced the rate of sludge accumulation from 0.64 cm/day to 0.27 cm/day, and increased the pump-out interval by a factor of 3.

  18. Simulation of Hydraulic and Natural Fracture Interaction Using a Coupled DFN-DEM Model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zhou; H. Huang; M. Deo

    2016-03-01

    The presence of natural fractures will usually result in a complex fracture network due to the interactions between hydraulic and natural fracture. The reactivation of natural fractures can generally provide additional flow paths from formation to wellbore which play a crucial role in improving the hydrocarbon recovery in these ultra-low permeability reservoir. Thus, accurate description of the geometry of discrete fractures and bedding is highly desired for accurate flow and production predictions. Compared to conventional continuum models that implicitly represent the discrete feature, Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models could realistically model the connectivity of discontinuities at both reservoir scale and well scale. In this work, a new hybrid numerical model that couples Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method (DL-DEM) is proposed to investigate the interaction between hydraulic fracture and natural fractures. Based on the proposed model, the effects of natural fracture orientation, density and injection properties on hydraulic-natural fractures interaction are investigated.

  19. Numerical modeling of the near-field hydraulics of water wells.

    PubMed

    Houben, Georg J; Hauschild, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Numerical flow models can be a useful tool for dimensioning water wells and to investigate the hydraulics in their near-field. Fully laminar flow can be assumed for all models calculated up to the screen. Therefore models can be used to predict--at least qualitatively, neglecting turbulent losses inside the well--the spatial distribution of inflow into the well and the overall hydraulic performance of different combinations of aquifer parameters and technical installations. Models for both horizontal (plan view) and vertical flow (cross section) to wells were calculated for a variety of setups. For the latter, this included variations of hydraulic conductivity of the screen, pump position, and aquifer heterogeneity. Models of suction flow control devices showed that they indeed can homogenize inflow, albeit at the cost of elevated entrance losses.

  20. In-service parametric modelling a rail vehicle's axle-box hydraulic damper for high-speed transit problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. L.; Yu, D. S.; Zhou, Z.

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high-speed operation of modern rail vehicles and severe in-service environment of their hydraulic dampers, it has become important to establish more practical and accurate damper models and apply those models in high-speed transit problem studies. An improved full parametric model with actual in-service parameters, such as variable viscous damping, comprehensive stiffness and small mounting clearance was established for a rail vehicle's axle-box hydraulic damper. A subtle variable oil property model was built and coupled to the modelling process, which included modelling of the dynamic flow losses and the relief-valve system dynamics. The experiments validated the accuracy and robustness of the established full in-service parametric model and simulation which captured the damping characteristics over an extremely wide range of excitation speeds. Further simulations were performed using the model to uncover the effects of key in-service parameter variations on the nominal damping characteristics of the damper. The obtained in-service parametric model coupled all of the main factors that had significant impacts on the damping characteristics, so that the model could be useful in more extensive parameter effects analysis, optimal specification and product design optimisation of hydraulic dampers for track-friendliness, ride comfort and other high-speed transit problems.

  1. SPATIAL-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATERBORNE INFECTIOUS DISEASE RISK USING THE HYDRAULIC MODEL AND OUTPATIENT DATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Ayako; Sakuma, Taisuke; Kazama, So

    This study evaluated waterborne infectious diseases risk and incidence rate around Phonm Penh in Cambodia. We use the hydraulic flood simulation, coliform bacterium diffusion model, dose-response model and outpatient data for quantitative analysis. The results obtained are as follows; 1. The incidence (incidence rate) of diarrhea as water borne diseases risk is 0.14 million people (9%) in the inundation area. 2. The residents in the inundation area are exposed up to 4 times as high risk as daily mean calculated by the integrated model combined in the regional scale. 3.The infectious disease risk due to floods and inundation indicated is effective as an element to explain the risk. The scenario explains 34% number of patient estimated by the outpatient data.

  2. The Effect of Soil Hydraulic Properties vs. Soil Texture in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, E. D.; Small, E. E.

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of Soil Hydraulic Property (SHP) selection on modeled surface fluxes following a rain storm in a semi-arid environment. SHPs are often defined based on a Soil Texture Class (STC). To examine the effectiveness of this approach, the Noah land surface model was run with each of 1306 soils in a large SHP database. Within most STCs, the outputs have a range of 350 W/m2 for latent and sensible heat fluxes, and 8K for surface temperature. The average difference between STC median values is only 100 W/m2 for latent and sensible heat. It is concluded that STC explains 5-15% of the variance in model outputs and should not be used to determine SHPs.

  3. Mesoscopic aspects of root water uptake modeling - Hydraulic resistances and root geometry interpretations in plant transpiration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-02-01

    In the context of soil water flow modeling, root water uptake is often evaluated based on water potential difference between the soil and the plant (the water potential gradient approach). Root water uptake rate is modulated by hydraulic resistance of both the root itself, and the soil in the root vicinity. The soil hydraulic resistance is a function of actual soil water content and can be assessed assuming radial axisymmetric water flow toward a single root (at the mesoscopic scale). In the present study, three approximate solutions of mesoscopic root water uptake - finite difference approximation, steady-state solution, and steady-rate solution - are examined regarding their ability to capture the pressure head variations in the root vicinity. Insignificance of their differences when implemented in the macroscopic soil water flow model is demonstrated using the critical root water uptake concept. Subsequently, macroscopic simulations of coupled soil water flow and root water uptake are presented for a forest site under temperate humid climate. Predicted soil water pressure heads and actual transpiration rates are compared with observed data. Scenario simulations illustrate uncertainties associated with estimates of root geometrical and hydraulic properties. Regarding the actual transpiration prediction, the correct characterization of active root system geometry and hydraulic properties seems far more important than the choice of a particular mesoscopic model.

  4. Observational techniques for constraining hydraulic and hydrologic models for use in catchment scale flood impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Gareth; Wilkinson, Mark; Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; O'Donnell, Greg

    2015-04-01

    river stem and principal tributaries, it is possible to understand in detail how floods develop and propagate, both temporally and spatially. Traditional rainfall-runoff modelling involves the calibration of model parameters to achieve a best fit against an observed flow series, typically at a single location. The modelling approach adopted here is novel in that it directly uses the nested observed information to disaggregate the outlet hydrograph in terms of the source locations. Using a combination of local evidence and expert opinion, the model can be used to assess the impacts of distributed land use management changes and NFM on floods. These studies demonstrate the power of networks of observational instrumentation for constraining hydraulic and hydrologic models for use in prediction.

  5. Inverse modeling of hydraulic tests in fractured crystalline rock based on a transition probability geostatistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessent, Daniela; Therrien, René; Lemieux, Jean-Michel

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations of a series of hydraulic interference tests conducted in crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto (Finland), a potential site for the disposal of the Finnish high-level nuclear waste. The tests are in a block of crystalline bedrock of about 0.03 km3 that contains low-transmissivity fractures. Fracture density, orientation, and fracture transmissivity are estimated from Posiva Flow Log (PFL) measurements in boreholes drilled in the rock block. On the basis of those data, a geostatistical approach relying on a transitional probability and Markov chain models is used to define a conceptual model based on stochastic fractured rock facies. Four facies are defined, from sparsely fractured bedrock to highly fractured bedrock. Using this conceptual model, three-dimensional groundwater flow is then simulated to reproduce interference pumping tests in either open or packed-off boreholes. Hydraulic conductivities of the fracture facies are estimated through automatic calibration using either hydraulic heads or both hydraulic heads and PFL flow rates as targets for calibration. The latter option produces a narrower confidence interval for the calibrated hydraulic conductivities, therefore reducing the associated uncertainty and demonstrating the usefulness of the measured PFL flow rates. Furthermore, the stochastic facies conceptual model is a suitable alternative to discrete fracture network models to simulate fluid flow in fractured geological media.

  6. 3D geostatistical modeling of fracture system in a granitic massif to characterize hydraulic properties and fracture distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Kubo, Taiki; Liu, Chunxue; Masoud, Alaa; Amano, Kenji; Kurihara, Arata; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Lanyon, Bill

    2015-10-01

    This study integrates 3D models of rock fractures from different sources and hydraulic properties aimed at identifying relationships between fractures and permeability. The Tono area in central Japan, chiefly overlain by Cretaceous granite, was examined because of the availability of a unique dataset from deep borehole data at 26 sites. A geostatistical method (GEOFRAC) that can incorporate orientations of sampled data was applied to 50,900 borehole fractures for spatial modeling of fractures over a 12 km by 8 km area, to a depth of 1.5 km. GEOFRAC produced a plausible 3D fracture model, in that the orientations of simulated fractures correspond to those of the sample data and the continuous fractures appeared near a known fault. Small-scale fracture distributions with dominant orientations were also characterized around the two shafts using fracture data from the shaft walls. By integrating the 3D model of hydraulic conductivity using sequential Gaussian simulation with the GEOFRAC fractures from the borehole data, the fracture sizes and directions that strongly affect permeable features were identified. Four fracture-related elements: lineaments from a shaded 10-m DEM, GEOFRAC fractures using the borehole and shaft data, and microcracks from SEM images, were used for correlating fracture attributes at different scales. The consistency of the semivariogram models of distribution densities was identified. Using an experimental relationship between hydraulic conductivity and fracture length, the fractures that typically affect the hydraulic properties at the drift scale were surmised to be in the range 100-200 m. These results are useful for a comprehensive understanding of rock fracture systems and their hydraulic characteristics at multiple scales in a target area.

  7. Physical Hydraulic Model of Side-Channel Spillway of Lambuk DAM, Bali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harifa, A. C.; Sholichin, M.; Othman, F. B.

    2013-12-01

    The spillway is among the most important structures of a dam project. A spillway is designed to prevent overtopping of a dam at a place that is not designed for overtopping. Side-channel spillways are commonly used to release water flow from a reservoir in places where the sides are steep and have a considerable height above the dam. Experimental results were collected with a hydraulic model of the side-channel spillway for releasing the peak overflow of Lambuk Dam. This dam is, located on the Lambuk River, which is a tributary of the Yeh Hoo River ~ 34.6 km north of Denpasar on the island of Bali. The bituminous geomembrane faced dam is 24 m in height, with a 35-m wide spillway. The length of the side channel is 35 m long, with 58 m of transition channel, 67.37 m of chuteway channel and 22.71 m of stilling basin. The capacity of the spillway is 231.91 m3/s and the outlet works capacity is 165.28 m3/s. The reservoir is designed for irrigation and water supply. The purpose of this study was to optimize the designed of the structure and to ensure its safe operation. In hydraulic model may help the decision-makers to visualize the flow field before selecting a ';suitable' design. The hydraulic model study was performed to ensure passage of the maximum discharge at maximum reservoir capacity; to study the spillway approach conditions, water surface profiles, and flow patterns in the chuteway; and to reveal potential demerits of the proposed hydraulic design of various structures and explore solutions. The model was constructed at 1 : 40 scale, Reservoir topography was modeled using concrete, the river bed using sand and some gravel, the river berm using concrete, and the spillway and channel using Plexiglas. Water was measured using Rectangular contracted weir. Design floods (with return period in year) were Q2 = 111.40 m3/s, Q5 = 136.84 m3/s, Q10 = 159.32 m3/s, Q25 = 174.61 m3/s, Q50 = 185.13 m3/s, Q100 = 198.08 m3/s, Q200 = 210.55 m3/s, Q1000 = 231.91 m3/s and the

  8. Dynamic Hydraulic Flow Stimulation on Mitigation of Trabecular Bone Loss in a Rat Functional Disuse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Minyi; Cheng, Jiqi; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2012-01-01

    Bone fluid flow (BFF) has been demonstrated as a critical regulator in mechanotransductive signaling and bone adaptation. Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and matrix strain have been identified as potential generator to regulate BFF. To elevate in vivo oscillatory BFF using ImP, a dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS) approach was developed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of DHS on mitigation of bone loss and structural alteration in a rat hindlimb suspension (HLS) functional disuse model. Sixty-one 5-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: 1) baseline control, 2) age-matched control, 3) HLS, 4) HLS + static loading, and 5) HLS + DHS. Hydraulic flow stimulation was carried out daily on a “10 min on-5min off-10min on” loading regime, 5 days/week, for total of 4 weeks in the tibial region. The metaphyseal trabecular regions of the proximal tibiae were analyzed using µCT and histomorphometry. Four weeks of HLS resulted in a significant loss of trabecular bone, leading to structural deterioration. HLS with static loading alone was not sufficient to attenuate the bone loss. Bone quantity and microarchitecture were significantly improved by applying DHS loading, resulting increase of 83% in bone volume fraction, 25% in trabecular number and mitigation of -26% in trabecular separation compared to HLS control. Histomorphometry analysis on trabecular mineralization coincided with the µCT analysis, in which DHS loading yielded increases of 34% in histomorphometric BV/TV, 121% in MS/BS, 190% in BFR/BS and 146% in BFR/BV, compared to the HLS control. Overall, the data demonstrated that dynamic hydraulic flow loading has potentials to provide regulatory signals for mitigating bone loss induced by functional disuse. This approach may provide a new alternative mechanical intervention for future clinical treatment for osteoporosis. PMID:22820398

  9. Dynamic hydraulic flow stimulation on mitigation of trabecular bone loss in a rat functional disuse model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minyi; Cheng, Jiqi; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2012-10-01

    Bone fluid flow (BFF) has been demonstrated as a critical regulator in mechanotransductive signaling and bone adaptation. Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and matrix strain have been identified as potential generators to regulate BFF. To elevate in vivo oscillatory BFF using ImP, a dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS) approach was developed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of DHS on mitigation of bone loss and structural alteration in a rat hindlimb suspension (HLS) functional disuse model. Sixty-one 5-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: 1) baseline control, 2) age-matched control, 3) HLS, 4) HLS+static loading, and 5) HLS+DHS. Hydraulic flow stimulation was carried out daily on a "10 min on-5 min off-10 min on" loading regime, 5 days/week, for a total of 4 weeks in the tibial region. The metaphyseal trabecular regions of the proximal tibiae were analyzed using μCT and histomorphometry. Four weeks of HLS resulted in a significant loss of trabecular bone, leading to structural deterioration. HLS with static loading alone was not sufficient to attenuate the bone loss. Bone quantity and microarchitecture were significantly improved by applying DHS loading, resulting increase of 83% in bone volume fraction, 25% in trabecular number and mitigation of 26% in trabecular separation compared to HLS control. Histomorphometry analysis on trabecular mineralization coincided with the μCT analysis, in which DHS loading yielded increases of 34% in histomorphometric BV/TV, 121% in MS/BS, 190% in BFR/BS and 146% in BFR/BV, compared to the HLS control. Overall, the data demonstrated that dynamic hydraulic flow loading has potentials to provide regulatory signals for mitigating bone loss induced by functional disuse. This approach may provide a new alternative mechanical intervention for future clinical treatment for osteoporosis.

  10. Estimating biozone hydraulic conductivity in wastewater soil-infiltration systems using inverse numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R; McCray, John E

    2007-06-01

    During operation of an onsite wastewater treatment system, a low-permeability biozone develops at the infiltrative surface (IS) during application of wastewater to soil. Inverse numerical-model simulations were used to estimate the biozone saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(biozone)) under variably saturated conditions for 29 wastewater infiltration test cells installed in a sandy loam field soil. Test cells employed two loading rates (4 and 8cm/day) and 3 IS designs: open chamber, gravel, and synthetic bundles. The ratio of K(biozone) to the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the natural soil (K(s)) was used to quantify the reductions in the IS hydraulic conductivity. A smaller value of K(biozone)/K(s,) reflects a greater reduction in hydraulic conductivity. The IS hydraulic conductivity was reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity was primarily influenced by wastewater loading rate and IS type and not by the K(s) of the native soil. The higher loading rate yielded greater reductions in IS hydraulic conductivity than the lower loading rate for bundle and gravel cells, but the difference was not statistically significant for chamber cells. Bundle and gravel cells exhibited a greater reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity than chamber cells at the higher loading rates, while the difference between gravel and bundle systems was not statistically significant. At the lower rate, bundle cells exhibited generally lower K(biozone)/K(s) values, but not at a statistically significant level, while gravel and chamber cells were statistically similar. Gravel cells exhibited the greatest variability in measured values, which may complicate design efforts based on K(biozone) evaluations for these systems. These results suggest that chamber systems may provide for a more robust design, particularly for high or variable wastewater infiltration rates.

  11. Upscaling hydraulic conductivity from measurement-scale to model-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnink, Jan; Stafleu, Jan; Maljers, Densie; Schokker, Jeroen

    2013-04-01

    The Geological Survey of the Netherlands systematically produces both shallow (< 500 m) and deep 3D geological models of the Netherlands. These models are predictions of geometry and properties of the subsurface, and are used in applied research. One of the geological models for the shallow subsurface (GeoTOP) consists of voxels of 100 x 100 x 0.5 m to a depth of 30-50 m below surface. For each voxel, lithostratigraphy, facies and lithological classes are modeled with geostatistical simulation techniques. These simulation techniques allow for the spatial uncertainty of the model results to be calculated. One of the parameters that is subsequently assigned to the voxels in the GeoTOP model, is hydraulic conductivity (both horizontal and vertical). Hydraulic conductivities are measured on samples taken from high-quality drillings, which are subjected to falling head hydraulic conductivity tests. Samples are taken for all combinations of lithostratigraphy, facies and lithology that are present in the GeoTOP model. The volume of the samples is orders of magnitude smaller than the volume of a voxel in the GeoTOP model. Apart from that, the heterogeneity that occurs within a voxel is not accounted for in the GeoTOP model, since every voxel gets a single lithology that is deemed representative for the entire voxel To account for both the difference in volume and the within-voxel heterogeneity, an upscaling procedure is developed to produce up-scaled hydraulic conductivities for each GeoTOP voxel. A very fine 3D grid of 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.05 m is created that covers the GeoTOP voxel size (100 x 100 x 0.5 m) plus half of the dimensions of the GeoTOP voxel to counteract undesired edge-effects. It is assumed that the scale of the samples is comparable to the voxel size of this fine grid. For each lithostratigraphy and facies combination the spatial correlation structure (variogram) of the lithological classes is used to create 50 equiprobable distributions of lithology for the

  12. Groundwater Flow Model Including Deeper Part On The Basis Of Field Data - Especially Determination Of Boundary Conditions And Hydraulic Parameters-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, I.; Itadera, K.

    2005-12-01

    The final purpose of our study is to clarify the quantitative groundwater flow including deeper part, 500-1000m depth, in the basin in caldera on the mountain. The computer simulation is one the best methods to achieve this purpose. In such a study, however, it is difficult to determine the boundary conditions and hydraulic properties of geology in deeper part, generally. For this reason, we selected Gora basin as a study area, because many hydraulic data have been stored for more than 30 years in this basin. In addition, because the volcanic thermal water is mainly formed by mixing of groundwater and thermal component, the study for deeper groundwater flow can contribute the agenda for the protection of thermal groundwater which is regards as a limited resource. Gora basin, in Hakone area is one of the most famous spa (a resort having thermal groundwater or hot springs) in Japan. The area of the basin is approximately 10 square kilometers and has more than 200 deep wells. In our study, at first, the dataset of hydraulic head was created by using the stored data to construct the conceptual model for groundwater flow. The potential distribution exhibited that the groundwater flowed downward dominant. And the geomorphology can be regarded as hydraulic boundary even in deer part, that is to say, we can regard the ridge as no flow boundary in simulation model. Next, for quantitative understanding of groundwater flow, we need to obtain not only boundary conditions but also hydraulic property of geology, for example, hydraulic conductivity, K, as one of the important parameters. Generally, such a parameter has not been measured in past survey. So, we used the belief method for calculating the hydraulic conductivity by using the data of thermal logging test, which was similar to a slug test. As results of the analysis, the close relationship between K and well depth were obtained. This result implies that the K value depends on the overburden pressure of geology. That is

  13. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken.

  14. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masashi

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  15. An Experimental Study of Measuring Oscillatory and Transient Pressures in Hydraulic Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    dynamic conditions. One of these computer programs that was of interest in this study was the Hydraulic Systems Frequency Response (HsFR). H- SFR program...reason for that failure is that the model for the hose was not accurate enough. The predicted amplitudes were much lower than measurec’ values except...the line. 6. P(%)- in line - Pclanp on x 100 ( 6 Pin line 7. Span - The distance between two clamps. The trans- ducers were located in the center of the

  16. Constrained model based control for minimum-time start of hydraulic turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesnage, Hugo; Alamir, Mazen; Perrissin-Fabert, Nicolas; Alloin, Quentin

    2016-11-01

    This paper introduces a simplified model of hydraulic turbines including the hydraulic nonlinear hill-chart and a first order model of the penstock. Based on the resulting reduced model, a graphical representation of the vector fields of the resulting controlled system is obtained under band unlimited actuator. This ideal 2D-graphical representation enables an exact evaluation of the lower bound on the minimum achievable start-time as well as the time structure of the control profile. The consequences of the use of a band-limited actuator is also analyzed enabling a close estimation of the lower bound on the start time in practical situations.

  17. [Mathematical modeling of measuring the hydraulic conductivity of roots by the relaxation method].

    PubMed

    Logvenkov, S A

    2011-01-01

    The continuum model of radial mass transfer in plant roots developed previously has been used for processing the nonstationary experiments aimed at the determination of the root hydraulic conductivity. It is shown that, in contrast to compartmental models, our model allows one to describe the shape of the relaxation curve, in particular to separate segments with different relaxation times. It has been found that, for correctly determining the hydraulic conductivity, the method of data processing should be modified. A method for estimating the extracellular to intracellular conductivity ratio has been proposed.

  18. The Benefit of Multi-Mission Altimetry Series for the Calibration of Hydraulic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; Castellarin, Attilio; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    The growing availability of satellite altimetric time series during last decades has fostered their use in many hydrological and hydraulic applications. However, the use of remotely sensed water level series still remains hampered by the limited temporal resolution that characterizes each sensor (i.e. revisit time varying from 10 to 35 days), as well as by the accuracy of different instrumentation adopted for monitoring inland water. As a consequence, each sensor is characterized by distinctive potentials and limitations that constrain its use for hydrological applications. In this study we refer to a stretch of about 140 km of the Po River (the longest Italian river) in order to investigate the performance of different altimetry series for the calibration of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic information. The usefulness of remotely sensed water surface elevation is tested using data collected by different altimetry missions (i.e., ERS-2, ENVISAT, TOPEX/Poseidon, JASON-2 and SARAL/Altika) by investigating the effect of (i) record length (i.e. number of satellite measurements provided by a given sensor at a specific satellite track) and (ii) data uncertainty (i.e. altimetry measurements errors). Since the relatively poor time resolution of satellites constrains the operational use of altimetric time series, in this study we also investigate the use of multi-mission altimetry series obtained by merging datasets sensed by different sensors over the study area. Benefits of the highest temporal frequency of multi-mission series are tested by calibrating the quasi-2d model referring in turn to original satellite series and multi-mission datasets. Jason-2 and ENVISAT outperform other sensors, ensuring the reliability on the calibration process for shorter time series. The multi-mission dataset appears particularly reliable and suitable for the calibration of hydraulic model. If short time periods are considered, the performance of the multi-mission dataset

  19. Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin dam-hydraulic system, travel time and temperature modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devkota, Bishnu; Imberger, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    SummaryTiete River System in the State of Sao Paolo, Brazil is characterized by complex hydraulics and operational problems due to series of dams and point and diffuse inflows along the river. A one dimension Lagrangian river model was developed and applied to the 313 km reach of the Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin from the Penha Dam to the head water of Bara Bonita Reservoir, a stretch of river that includes six small to medium size dams (3.4-22 m high) including the Pirapora Reservoir and 26 inflows into the river (11 tributaries, 9 diffuse source areas, and discharges of 4 cities stormwater and 2 wastewater treatment plants. The conservative tracer transport and temperature model that accounts for the short and long wave radiation and heat transfers at the free surface was included and solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The time variable catchment input to the model was the simulated output of the external hydrological model called Runoff Load Model which results were provided by CETESB. The numerical treatment of series of dams and spillway (that included uncontrolled overflow spillway, gate-controlled ogee spillway; and underflow gates and tunnels) and parameterisation of hydraulic jumps are described. Special attention was focused on the high spatial and temporal variation of flows in Tiete River Basin, a result of the large variation in catchment inflows and channel geometry due to dams and reservoirs along the river. Predicted and measured spatial and seasonal variation of flow and temperature profiles along the river show good agreement. The simulated travel time of conservative tracer is compared against the CETESB's 1982 and 1984 field study data in a 254 km reach of the Middle Tiete River that again shows good agreement. Being Lagrangian in construction, this new model is computationally efficient making it an ideal tool for long term simulation for water resource planning, management and operation decision making in a large and complex river

  20. Impact of uncertainty description on assimilating hydraulic head in the MIKE SHE distributed hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Donghua; Madsen, Henrik; Ridler, Marc E.; Refsgaard, Jens C.; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2015-12-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a popular data assimilation (DA) technique that has been extensively used in environmental sciences for combining complementary information from model predictions and observations. One of the major challenges in EnKF applications is the description of model uncertainty. In most hydrological EnKF applications, an ad hoc model uncertainty is defined with the aim of avoiding a collapse of the filter. The present work provides a systematic assessment of model uncertainty in DA applications based on combinations of forcing, model parameters, and state uncertainties. This is tested in a case where groundwater hydraulic heads are assimilated into a distributed and integrated catchment-scale model of the Karup catchment in Denmark. A series of synthetic data assimilation experiments are carried out to analyse the impact of different model uncertainty assumptions on the feasibility and efficiency of the assimilation. The synthetic data used in the assimilation study makes it possible to diagnose model uncertainty assumptions statistically. Besides the model uncertainty, other factors such as observation error, observation locations, and ensemble size are also analysed with respect to performance and sensitivity. Results show that inappropriate definition of model uncertainty can greatly degrade the assimilation performance, and an appropriate combination of different model uncertainty sources is advised.

  1. The development and calibration of a physical model to assist in optimising the hydraulic performance and design of maturation ponds.

    PubMed

    Aldana, G J; Lloyd, B J; Guganesharajah, K; Bracho, N

    2005-01-01

    A physical and a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model (HYDRO-3D) were developed to simulate the effects of novel maturation pond configurations, and critical environmental factors (wind speed and direction) on the hydraulic efficiency (HE) of full-scale maturation ponds. The aims of the study were to assess the reliability of the physical model and convergence with HYDRO-3D, as tools for assessing and predicting best hydraulic performance of ponds. The physical model of the open ponds was scaled to provide a similar nominal retention time (NRT) of 52 hours. Under natural conditions, with a variable prevailing westerly wind opposite to the inlet, a rhodamine tracer study on the full-scale prototype pond produced a mean hydraulic retention time (MHRT) of 18.5 hours (HE = 35.5%). Simulations of these wind conditions, but with constant wind speed and direction in both the physical model and HYDRO-3D, produced a higher MHRT of 21 hours in both models and an HE of 40.4%. In the absence of wind tracer studies in the open pond physical model revealed incomplete mixing with peak concentrations leaving the model in several hours, but an increase in MHRT to 24.5-28 hours (HE = 50.2-57.1%). Although wind blowing opposite to the inlet flow increases dispersion (mixing), it reduced hydraulic performance by 18-25%. Much higher HE values were achieved by baffles (67-74%) and three channel configurations (69-92%), compared with the original open pond configuration. Good agreement was achieved between the two models where key environmental and flow parameters can be controlled and set, but it is difficult to accurately simulate full-scale works conditions due to the unpredictability of natural hourly and daily fluctuation in these parameters.

  2. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, G.; Facchi, A.; Gandolfi, C.; Ortuani, B.; Horeschi, D.; van Dam, J. C.

    2010-02-01

    Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still debated. However, we may wonder how the uncertainty in soil hydraulic parameters relates to the uncertainty of the selected modelling approach. We performed an intensive monitoring study during the cropping season of a 10 ha maize field in Northern Italy. The data were used to: i) compare different methods for determining soil hydraulic parameters and ii) evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in these parameters on different variables (i.e. evapotranspiration, average water content in the root zone, flux at the bottom boundary of the root zone) simulated by two hydrological models of different complexity: SWAP, a widely used model of soil moisture dynamics in unsaturated soils based on Richards equation, and ALHyMUS, a conceptual model of the same dynamics based on a reservoir cascade scheme. We employed five direct and indirect methods to determine soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon of the experimental profile. Two methods were based on a parameter optimization of: a) laboratory measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data and b) field measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data. The remaining three methods were based on the application of widely used Pedo-Transfer Functions: c) Rawls and Brakensiek, d) HYPRES, and e) ROSETTA. Simulations were performed using meteorological, irrigation and crop data measured at the experimental site during the period June - October 2006. Results showed a wide range of soil hydraulic parameter values generated with the different methods, especially for the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat and the shape parameter α of the van Genuchten curve. This is reflected in a variability of the modeling results which is

  3. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, G.; Facchi, A.; Gandolfi, C.; Ortuani, B.; Horeschi, D.; van Dam, J. C.

    2009-06-01

    Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still debated. However, we may wonder how the uncertainty in soil hydraulic parameters relates to the uncertainty of the selected modelling approach. We performed an intensive monitoring study during the cropping season of a 10 ha maize field in Northern Italy. These data were used to: i) compare different methods for determining soil hydraulic parameters and ii) evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in these parameters on different outputs (i.e. evapotranspiration, water content in the root zone, fluxes through the bottom boundary of the root zone) of two hydrological models with different complexity: SWAP, a widely used model of soil moisture dynamics in unsaturated soils based on Richards equation, and ALHyMUS, a conceptual model of the same dynamics based on a reservoir cascade scheme. We employed five direct and indirect methods to determine soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon of the experimental field. Two methods were based on a parameter optimization of: a) laboratory measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data and b) field measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data. Three methods were based on the application of widely used Pedo-Transfer Functions: c) Rawls and Brakensiek; d) HYPRES; and e) ROSETTA. Simulations were performed using meteorological, irrigation and crop data measured at the experimental site during the period June-October 2006. Results showed a wide range of soil hydraulic parameter values evaluated with the different methods, especially for the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat and the shape parameter α of the Van Genuchten curve. This is reflected in a variability of the modeling results which is, as expected, different for

  4. Assessing the influence of the rhizosphere on soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and numerical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Keith R.; Mooney, Sacha J.; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Crout, Neil M. J.; Roose, Tiina; Tracy, Saoirse R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water distribution in soil is crucial for enhancing our knowledge of managing soil and water resources. The application of X-ray computed tomography (CT) to the plant and soil sciences is now well established. However, few studies have utilized the technique for visualizing water in soil pore spaces. Here this method is utilized to visualize the water in soil in situ and in three-dimensions at successive reductive matric potentials in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The measurements are combined with numerical modelling to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, providing a complete picture of the hydraulic properties of the soil. The technique was performed on soil cores that were sampled adjacent to established roots (rhizosphere soil) and from soil that had not been influenced by roots (bulk soil). A water release curve was obtained for the different soil types using measurements of their pore geometries derived from CT imaging and verified using conventional methods, such as pressure plates. The water, soil, and air phases from the images were segmented and quantified using image analysis. The water release characteristics obtained for the contrasting soils showed clear differences in hydraulic properties between rhizosphere and bulk soil, especially in clay soil. The data suggest that soils influenced by roots (rhizosphere soil) are less porous due to increased aggregation when compared with bulk soil. The information and insights obtained on the hydraulic properties of rhizosphere and bulk soil will enhance our understanding of rhizosphere biophysics and improve current water uptake models. PMID:25740922

  5. Power Efficient Hydraulic Systems. Volume 1. Study Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    AIRCRAFT SUBSYSTEMS TABLE 14. Baseline aircraft systems o HYDRAULIC SYSTEM o ELECTRICAL SYSTEM o 8000 PSI, 3 INDEPENDENT SYSTEMS o HVDC POWER o APU...valve (pump) HM hinge moment hp horsepower hr hour HVDC high voltage direct current Hz Hertz (cycles per second) IAP integrated actuator package I.D

  6. Variable hydraulic resistances and their impact on plant drought response modelling.

    PubMed

    Baert, Annelies; De Schepper, Veerle; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    Plant drought responses are still not fully understood. Improved knowledge on drought responses is, however, crucial to better predict their impact on individual plant and ecosystem functioning. Mechanistic models in combination with plant measurements are promising for obtaining information on plant water status and can assist us in understanding the effect of limiting soil water availability and drought stress. While existing models are reliable under sufficient soil water availability, they generally fail under dry conditions as not all appropriate mechanisms seem yet to have been implemented. We therefore aimed at identifying mechanisms underlying plant drought responses, and in particular investigated the behaviour of hydraulic resistances encountered in the soil and xylem for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.). A variable hydraulic soil-to-stem resistance was necessary to describe plant drought responses. In addition, implementation of a variable soil-to-stem hydraulic resistance enabled us to generate an in situ soil-to-stem vulnerability curve, which might be an alternative to the conventionally used vulnerability curves. Furthermore, a daily recalibration of the model revealed a drought-induced increase in radial hydraulic resistance between xylem and elastic living tissues. Accurate information on plant hydraulic resistances and simulation of plant drought responses can foster important discussions regarding the functioning of plants and ecosystems during droughts. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Modeling of laboratory experiments determining the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.

    2008-12-01

    Precise characterization and modeling of groundwater flow systems are necessary for realistic performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal. In groundwater flow modeling, the gravity potential is commonly assumed as the dominant driving force of regional groundwater flow. However, the gravity potential flow model may have a limited ability to reconstruct the excess fluid pressure distributions occasionally observed in low-permeability formations. To improve groundwater flow models, geologic processes such as compaction disequilibrium, tectonic forces and diagenetic reactions have been invoked to reconstruct excess pressures. On the other hand, chemical osmosis has recently been considered as one of the driving forces of groundwater flow and a factor causing excess pressures in clay-rich formations with vertical salinity gradients. If a formation medium acts as a semi-permeable membrane, chemical osmosis induces a fluid movement in the direction of increasing salinity. Consequently, fluid pressure could increase where salinity is high and decrease where it is low. Thus, chemical osmosis could induce a fluid flow countering the pressure-driven flow in the formation. When osmotic- and pressure-driven flows equilibrate, the net flow ceases while the fluid pressures remain in disequilibrium. This means that the direction of groundwater flow might be misinterpreted without differentiating osmotically-induced pressure from those induced by other causes. However, the formation media are not perfect membranes, as they allow solute diffusion that accord to the salinity gradients. As a result, osmotic pressure would dissipate as the solutes diffuse from high to low concentrations. That means the time period during which the osmotic pressures are held in the formation depends on hydraulic and diffusive properties other than the chemico-osmotic property of the formation media. The osmotic pressures have indeed been observed in natural formations, and the chemico

  8. Quantifying the effects of boundary condition uncertainty in nested flood modelling of complex hydraulic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Maria; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Bates, Paul D.; Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim E.; Cea, Luis; Puertas, Jeronimo

    2015-04-01

    Flood inundation models require appropriate boundary conditions to be specified at the limits of the domain, which commonly include upstream flow rate and water stage at the downstream boundary of the reach being modelled. These data are usually acquired from gauging stations of the river network, where measured water levels are converted to discharge by means of a rating curve. Although generally treated as deterministic relationships, rating curves are subject to uncertainties which can limit their accuracy and applicability to any particular event, particularly for low-frequency events, where the rating curve relationship is sparsely sampled and needs to be extrapolated. Consequently, derived streamflow records can be particularly uncertain and/or problematic for high-return period estimates. Moreover, the limited number of gauges in reach-scale studies usually requires flow to be routed from upstream gauge stations to the boundary of the model domain, which introduces additional uncertainty. This is more likely to be the case with complex modelling approaches, in which only limited areas can be simulated due to computational cost and model setup requirements. In this study, a method to incorporate the rating curve uncertainty into the predictions of a reach-scale flood inundation model is proposed. Firstly, the uncertainty in the rating curves is quantified using a non-parametric local weighted regression approach and uncertainty bounds for discharge and water elevations at gauging locations are generated. A regional simplified-physics hydraulic model is then applied to combine these uncertainties and generate an ensemble of discharge and water elevation time series at the boundaries of a local-scale high complexity hydraulic model. Finally, the impact of this uncertainty on the local model performance is evaluated using flood extent data and measured water levels within the local model area. The local-scale model is applied to 7 km of the river Severn passing

  9. Hydraulic redistribution study in two native tree species of agroforestry parklands of West African dry savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayala, Jules; Heng, Lee Kheng; van Noordwijk, Meine; Ouedraogo, Sibiri Jean

    2008-11-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) in karité ( Vitellaria paradoxa) and néré ( Parkia biglobosa) tree species was studied by monitoring the soil water potential ( ψs) using thermocouple psychrometers at four compass directions, various distances from trees and at different soil depths (max depth 80 cm) during the dry seasons of 2004 and 2005. A modified WaNuLCAS model was then used to infer the amount of water redistribued based on ψs values. Tree transpiration rate was also estimated from sap velocity using thermal dissipative probes (TDP) and sapwood area, and the contribution of hydraulically redistributed water in tree transpiration was determined. The results revealed on average that 46% of the psychrometer readings under karité and 33% under néré showed the occurrence of HR for the two years. Soil under néré displayed significantly lower fluctuations of ψs (0.16 MPa) compared to soil under karité (0.21 MPa). The results of this study indicated that the existence of HR leads to a higher ψs in the plant rhizosphere and hence is important for soil water dynamics and plant nutrition by making more accessible the soluble elements. The simulation showed that the amount of water redistributed would be approximately 73.0 L and 247.1 L per tree per day in 2005 for karité and néré, and would represent respectively 60% and 53% of the amount transpired a day. Even though the model has certainly overestimated the volume of water hydraulically redistributed by the two species, this water may play a key role in maintaining fine root viability and ensuring the well adaptation of these species to the dry areas. Therefore, knowledge of the extent of such transfers and of the seasonal patterns is required and is of paramount importance in parkland systems both for trees and associated crops.

  10. How do alternative root water uptake models affect the inverse estimation of soil hydraulic parameters and the prediction of evapotranspiration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayler, Sebastian; Salima-Sultana, Daisy; Selle, Benny; Ingwersen, Joachim; Wizemann, Hans-Dieter; Högy, Petra; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Soil water extraction by roots affects the dynamics and distribution of soil moisture and controls transpiration, which influences soil-vegetation-atmosphere feedback processes. Consequently, root water uptake requires close attention when predicting water fluxes across the land surface, e.g., in agricultural crop models or in land surface schemes of weather and climate models. The key parameters for a successful simultaneous simulation of soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration in Richards equation-based models are the soil hydraulic parameters, which describe the shapes of the soil water retention curve and the soil hydraulic conductivity curve. As measurements of these parameters are expensive and their estimation from basic soil data via pedotransfer functions is rather inaccurate, the values of the soil hydraulic parameters are frequently inversely estimated by fitting the model to measured time series of soil water content and evapotranspiration. It is common to simulate root water uptake and transpiration by simple stress functions, which describe from which soil layer water is absorbed by roots and predict when total crop transpiration is decreased in case of soil water limitations. As for most of the biogeophysical processes simulated in crop and land surface models, there exist several alternative functional relationships for simulating root water uptake and there is no clear reason for preferring one process representation over another. The error associated with alternative representations of root water uptake, however, contributes to structural model uncertainty and the choice of the root water uptake model may have a significant impact on the values of the soil hydraulic parameters estimated inversely. In this study, we use the agroecosystem model system Expert-N to simulate soil moisture dynamics and evapotranspiration at three agricultural field sites located in two contrasting regions in Southwest Germany (Kraichgau, Swabian Alb). The Richards

  11. Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

  12. Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC`s current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

  13. Bald Eagle Creek and Little Juniata River Channel Improvement Project; Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    models Little Juniata River I F. *& AC? Mee s -i revers setl N nieoesiy ad Ideatlfi’ by block nuokwr) ests were conducted on a 1:25-scale model of Bald...Chief of the Hydraulic Structures Division. The tests were conducted by Messrs. J. F. George, H. H. Allen, J. H. Riley, S. H. Head- ley II, and C

  14. Numerical and experimental study of low-frequency pressure pulsations in hydraulic units with Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, D.; Minakov, A.; Dekterev, D.; Sentyabov, A.; Dekterev, A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the numerical simulation method of three-dimensional turbulent flows in the hydraulic turbine. This technique was verified by means of experimental data obtained on a water model of the Francis turbines. An aerodynamic stand, which is a miniature copy of the real hydraulic turbine, was designed. A series of experiments have been carried out on this stand and the corresponding calculations were performed. The dependence of the velocity and pressure pulsations profiles for different operation regimes are presented.

  15. Modeling coupled nitrogen and water use strategies of plant productivity through hydraulic traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. S.; Savoy, P.; Pleban, J. R.; Tai, X.; Ewers, B. E.; Sperry, J.; Weinig, C.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in heat, nutrient, and drought stresses create novel environments that threaten the health of forests and viability of crop production. Here a trait-based conceptual model finds tradeoffs in maximum hydraulic conductance (Kmax), root to leaf area ratio (RLA) and vulnerability to cavitation (VC) based on the energy costs of acquiring water and nitrogen (N) to support gross primary production (GPP). The atmosphere supplies carbon to and demands water from plants via their stomata. The demand for water increases at higher temperatures due to increased vapor pressure deficits. The lost water is replenished by a passive wicking process that pulls water and N from the soil into roots and up water-filled xylem tubes. When water is in short supply the cost of getting it is high as measured by a decline in K and stomatal closure. Soil N dynamics also influence plant water use. When N is abundant, plants grow low VC fine roots with lower specific root length (m g-1), low Kmax, and maintain a relatively low RLA. In low N environments, N is costly and fine roots gain efficiency by building less robust (or higher VC) xylem with higher Kmax and higher RLA. What happens when the cost of acquiring water changes from high to low under low and high N costs? We incorporated the conceptual model into TREES, which couples whole plant hydraulics to carbon allocation, root-rhizosphere expansion/contraction and, also new for this study, a rhizosphere-root centric microbe-plant N dynamics. We used two experimental studies (drought, N) and two drought-prone fluxnet sites to test the conceptual model at individual plant and regional scales, respectively, and with frequent short versus infrequent long dry periods. When water was not limiting the hydraulic tradeoffs suppressed differences in GPP between the N use strategies. When water was in short supply, however, low RLA&VC plants dropped GPP early during drought because of low Kmax. Since these plants had low VC roots they also

  16. Hydrodynamic Forces on Reverse Tainter Valves; Hydraulic Model Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    FACILITY: Completion of a physical model study of the culvert valves of the Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway (Stockstill et al., in...evaluation of culvert valves at Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway. Vicksburg, MS: US Army Engineer Research and Development Center

  17. Modelling and characteristic analysis of tri-axle trucks with hydraulically interconnected suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Han, Xu; Luo, Zhen; Zhang, Nong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) system is proposed for the implementation of a resistance control for the pitch and bounce modes of tri-axle heavy trucks. A lumped-mass half-truck model is established using the free-body diagram method. The equations of motion of a mechanical and hydraulic coupled system are developed by incorporating the hydraulic strut forces into the mechanical subsystem as externally applied forces. The transfer matrix method (TMM) is used to evaluate the impedance matrix of the hydraulic subsystem consisting of models of fluid pipes, damper valves, accumulators, and three-way junctions. The TMM is further applied to find the quantitative relationships between the hydraulic strut forces and boundary flow of the mechanical-fluid interactive subsystem. The modal analysis method is employed to perform the vibration analysis between the trucks with the conventional suspension and the proposed HIS. Comparison analysis focuses on free vibration with identified eigenvalues and eigenvectors, isolation vibration capacity, and force vibration in terms of the power spectrum density responses. The obtained results show the effectiveness of the proposed HIS system in reducing the pitch motion of sprung mass and simultaneously maintaining the ride comfort. The pitch stiffness is increased while the bounce stiffness is slightly softened. The peak values of sprung mass and wheel hop motions are greatly reduced, and the vibration decay rate of sprung mass is also significantly increased.

  18. Nonlinear dynamic modeling for smart material electro-hydraulic actuator development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, John P.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2013-03-01

    Smart material electro-hydraulic actuators use hydraulic rectification by one-way check valves to amplify the motion of smart materials, such as magnetostrictives and piezoelectrics, in order to create compact, lightweight actuators. A piston pump driven by a smart material is combined with a hydraulic cylinder to form a self-contained, power-by-wire actuator that can be used in place of a conventional hydraulic system without the need for hydraulic lines and a centralized pump. The performance of an experimental actuator driven by a 12.7 mm diameter, 114 mm length Terfenol-D rod is evaluated over a range of applied input frequencies, loads, and currents. The peak performance achieved is 37 W, moving a 220 N load at a rate of 17 cm/s and producing a blocked pressure of 12.5 MPa. Additional tests are conducted to quantify the dynamic behavior of the one-way reed valves using a scanning laser vibrometer to identify the frequency response of the reeds and the effect of the valve seat and fluid mass loading. A lumped-parameter model is developed for the system that includes valve inertia and fluid response nonlinearities, and the model results are compared with the experimental data.

  19. Hydraulic modeling of mussel habitat at a bridge-replacement site, Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rogers, Megan E.; Zimmerman, Gregory F.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the statistical targets established, the hydraulic model results suggest that an additional 2428 m2 or a 30-percent increase in suitable mussel habitat could be generated at the replacement-bridge site when compared to the baseline condition associated with the existing bridge at that same location. The study did not address the influences of substrate, acid mine drainage, sediment loads from tributaries, and surface-water/ground-water exchange on mussel habitat. Future studies could include methods for quantifying (1) channel–substrate composition and distribution using tools such as hydroacoustic echosounders specifically designed and calibrated to identify bed composition and mussel populations, (2) surface-water and ground-water interactions, and (3) a high-streamflow event.

  20. Validation of hydraulic tomography in an unconfined aquifer: A controlled sandbox study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhanfeng; Illman, Walter A.; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J.; Berg, Steven J.; Mao, Deqiang

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of hydraulic tomography (HT) that considers variably saturated flow processes in mapping the heterogeneity of both the saturated and unsaturated zones in a laboratory unconfined aquifer. The successive linear estimator (SLE) developed by Mao et al. (2013c) for interpreting HT in unconfined aquifers is utilized to obtain tomograms of hydraulic conductivity (K), specific storage (Ss), and the unsaturated zone parameters (pore size parameter (α) and saturated water content (θs)) for the Gardner-Russo's model. The estimated tomograms are first evaluated by visually comparing them with stratigraphy visible in the sandbox. Results reveal that the HT analysis is able to accurately capture the location and extent of heterogeneity including high and low K layers within the saturated and unsaturated zones, as well as reasonable distribution patterns of α and θs for the Gardner-Russo's model. We then validate the estimated tomograms through predictions of drawdown responses of pumping tests not used during the inverse modeling effort. The strong agreement between simulated and observed drawdown curves obtained by pressure transducers and tensiometers demonstrates the robust performance of HT that considers variably saturated flow processes in unconfined aquifers and the unsaturated zone above it. In addition, compared to the case using the homogeneous assumption, HT results, as expected, yield significantly better predictions of drawdowns in both the saturated and unsaturated zones. This comparison further substantiates the unbiased and minimal variance of HT analysis with the SLE algorithm.

  1. Assessing the risk of groundwater contamination posed by hydraulic fracturing through the use of a fault tree assisted numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montague, J.; Pinder, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    Shale gas exploitation in the United States is an increasingly important resource, since 2007 the production of shale gas has increased at an average annual rate of 44%. The increasing importance of shale gas to U.S. energy production and energy security necessitates an appropriate risk assessment of all processes of hydraulic fracturing to ensure its continued safety. This paper seeks to address the methodology needed to develop a quantitative risk assessment of hydraulic fracturing on subsurface aquifers using a fault tree in conjunction with a numerical model. The model incorporates geologic uncertainty through the use of a Monte Carlo simulation. The workflow of the model is presented through the use of a case study site within the Marcellus Shale.

  2. Analyzing Clues in River Evolution of the Bedrock-Controlled Colorado River using Hydraulic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magirl, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    hydraulic influence on the river with increasing discharge, suggesting these debris fans are particularly long lived in geologically active watersheds. The model also demonstrates that there is an optimum stream power whereby geomorphic work on most debris fans is greatest for intermediate floods, an important finding not previously known. The analytical techniques developed for this study provide important clues when reconstructing fluvial evolution in Grand Canyon while offering innovative ways to analyze the geomorphic response and evolution of bedrock-controlled rivers elsewhere.

  3. Numerical modeling of local scour around hydraulic structure in sandy beds by dynamic mesh method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fei; Liang, Bingchen; Bai, Yuchuan; Zhu, Zhixia; Zhu, Yanjun

    2017-10-01

    Local scour, a non-negligible factor in hydraulic engineering, endangers the safety of hydraulic structures. In this work, a numerical model for simulating local scour was constructed, based on the open source code computational fluid dynamics model OpenFOAM. We consider both the bedload and suspended load sediment transport in the scour model and adopt the dynamic mesh method to simulate the evolution of the bed elevation. We use the finite area method to project data between the three-dimensional flow model and the two-dimensional (2D) scour model. We also improved the 2D sand slide method and added it to the scour model to correct the bed bathymetry when the bed slope angle exceeds the angle of repose. Moreover, to validate our scour model, we conducted and compared the results of three experiments with those of the developed model. The validation results show that our developed model can reliably simulate local scour.

  4. A novel approach to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.; Sahimi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate prediction of conductivity in partially-saturated porous media has broad applications in various phenomena in porous media, and has been studied intensively since the 1940s by petroleum, chemical and civil engineers, and hydrologists. Many of the models developed in the past are based on the bundle of capillary tubes. In addition, pore network models have also been developed for simulating multiphase fluid flow in porous media and computing the conductivity in unsaturated porous media. In this study, we propose a novel approach using concepts from the effective-medium approximation (EMA) and percolation theory to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media whose pore-size distributions exhibit power-law scaling. In our approach, the EMA, originally developed for predicting electrical conductivity of composite materials, is used to predict the effective conductivity, from complete saturation to some intermediate water content that represents a crossover point. Below the crossover water content, but still above a critical saturation (percolation threshold), a universal scaling predicted by percolation theory, a power law that expresses the dependence of the conductivity on the water content (less a critical water saturation) with an exponent of 2, is invoked to describe the effective conductivity. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the approach, experimental data were used from the literature. The predicted hydraulic conductivities for most cases are in excellent agreement with the data. In a few cases the theory underestimates the hydraulic conductivities, which correspond to porous media with very broad pore-size distribution in which the largest pore radius is more than 7 orders of magnitude greater than the smallest one. The approach is also used to predict the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity for experiments in which capillary pressure data are available. The results indicate that the universal scaling of

  5. 75 FR 36387 - Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study. The document contained an incorrect EPA Web site address in two places..., 2010, in FR doc. 2010-14897, on page 35023, in the third Column, correct the Web site addresses shown...

  6. Numerical Hydraulic Study on Seawater Cooling System of Combined Cycle Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. Y.; Park, S. M.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.

    2010-06-01

    As the rated flow and pressure increase in pumping facilities, a proper design against surges and severe cavitations in the pipeline system is required. Pressure surge due to start-up, shut-down process and operation failure causes the water hammer in upstream of the closing valve and the cavitational hammer in downstream of the valve. Typical cause of water hammer is the urgent closure of valves by breakdown of power supply and unexpected failure of pumps. The abrupt changes in the flow rate of the liquid results in high pressure surges in upstream of the valves, thus kinetic energy is transformed into potential energy which leads to the sudden increase of the pressure that is called as water hammer. Also, by the inertia, the liquid continues to flow downstream of the valve with initial speed. Accordingly, the pressure decreases and an expanding vapor bubble known as column separation are formed near the valve. In this research, the hydraulic study on the closed cooling water heat exchanger line, which is the one part of the power plant, is introduced. The whole power plant consists of 1,200 MW combined power plant and 220,000 m3/day desalination facility. Cooling water for the plant is supplied by sea water circulating system with a capacity of 29 m3/s. The primary focus is to verify the steady state hydraulic capacity of the system. The secondary is to quantify transient issues and solutions in the system. The circuit was modeled using a commercial software. The stable piping network was designed through the hydraulic studies using the simulation for the various scenarios.

  7. Combining SEBAL model and NMCGA algorithm for the estimation of effective soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y.; Mohanty, B. P.; Ines, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Remote sensing data provide valuable information in many hydrological and meteological models. In this study, NMCGA developed by Ines and Mohanty (2008, Parameter Conditioning with a Noisy Monte Carlo Genetic Algorithm for Estimating Effective Soil Hydraulic properties from Space, Water Resources Research) is combined with the SEBAL model to integrate an ET component for quantifying the effective hydraulic properties using the pixel-based soil moisture and ET datasets. Three numerical experiments are conducted for different scenarios: 1) a free-draining homogeneous soil column using ET, SM and SM+ET, 2) a homogenous column under the SM and SM+ET conditions with a shallow water table depth of -100 cm, and 3) validation of the combined NMCGA-ET at different hydroclimatic field conditions. The results of Case 1 examined under hypothetical conditions (from the UNSODA database) suggest that the combined NMCGA-ET improves the optimized solutions (theta(h) and K(h)) better than those of NMCGA alone, although K(h) will have small uncertainties, and will respond well to (deep) soil moisture dynamics in the unsaturated zone. The results in Case 2 are evident in that an ET component contributes to the reduction of uncertainties inherent in a shallow water table. In Case 3, the application of the combined NMCGA-ET is evaluated at the Walnut Creek, Iowa and Brown, Illinois, sites. The correlation (R2) and MBE under the SM+ET condition are identified as better than those of only using the SM condition at all sites. However, the results at the Brown site using the direct soil moisture estimation method (neutron probe technique) are estimated to be better than those at the WC sites. Nevertheless, the results estimated at the WC sites correspond well with the pixel-based observed values of soil moisture as well (R2 > 0.77). From these findings, it is demonstrated that the combined NMCGA-ET performs better than the NMCGA for quantifying effective soil hydraulic properties based on

  8. Hydraulic jumps in 'viscous' accretion disks. [in astronomical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed that the dissipative process necessary for rapid accretion disk evolution is driven by hydraulic jump waves on the surface of the disk. These waves are excited by the asymmetric nature of the central rotator (e.g., neutron star magnetosphere) and spiral out into the disk to form a pattern corotating with the central object. Disk matter in turn is slowed slightly at each encounter with the jump and spirals inward. In this process, the disk is heated by true turbulence produced in the jumps. Additional effects, such as a systematic misalignment of the magnetic moment of the neutron star until it is nearly orthogonal, and systematic distortion of the magnetosphere in such a way as to form an even more asymmetric central 'paddle wheel', may enhance the interaction with inflowing matter. The application to X-ray sources corresponds to the 'slow' solutions of Ghosh and Lamb, and therefore to rms magnetic fields of about 4 x 10 to the 10th gauss. Analogous phenomena have been proposed to act in the formation of galactic spiral structure.

  9. Hydraulic jumps in 'viscous' accretion disks. [in astronomical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed that the dissipative process necessary for rapid accretion disk evolution is driven by hydraulic jump waves on the surface of the disk. These waves are excited by the asymmetric nature of the central rotator (e.g., neutron star magnetosphere) and spiral out into the disk to form a pattern corotating with the central object. Disk matter in turn is slowed slightly at each encounter with the jump and spirals inward. In this process, the disk is heated by true turbulence produced in the jumps. Additional effects, such as a systematic misalignment of the magnetic moment of the neutron star until it is nearly orthogonal, and systematic distortion of the magnetosphere in such a way as to form an even more asymmetric central 'paddle wheel', may enhance the interaction with inflowing matter. The application to X-ray sources corresponds to the 'slow' solutions of Ghosh and Lamb, and therefore to rms magnetic fields of about 4 x 10 to the 10th gauss. Analogous phenomena have been proposed to act in the formation of galactic spiral structure.

  10. Modeling and control of a hydraulically actuated flexible-prismatic link robot

    SciTech Connect

    Love, L.; Kress, R.; Jansen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Most of the research related to flexible link manipulators to date has focused on single link, fixed length, single plane of vibration test beds. In addition, actuation has been predominantly based upon electromagnetic motors. Ironically, these elements are rarely found in the existing industrial long reach systems. This manuscript describes a new hydraulically actuated, long reach manipulator with a flexible prismatic link at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus is directed towards both modeling and control of hydraulic actuators as well as flexible links that have variable natural frequencies.

  11. Mathematic Modeling of Complex Hydraulic Machinery Systems When Evaluating Reliability Using Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemenkova, M. Yu; Shipovalov, A. N.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-04-01

    The main technological equipment of pipeline transport of hydrocarbons are hydraulic machines. During transportation of oil mainly used of centrifugal pumps, designed to work in the “pumping station-pipeline” system. Composition of a standard pumping station consists of several pumps, complex hydraulic piping. The authors have developed a set of models and algorithms for calculating system reliability of pumps. It is based on the theory of reliability. As an example, considered one of the estimation methods with the application of graph theory.

  12. Hydraulic modeling analysis of the Middle Rio Grande - Escondida Reach, New Mexico

    Treesearch

    Amanda K. Larsen

    2007-01-01

    Human influence on the Middle Rio Grande has resulted in major changes throughout the Middle Rio Grande region in central New Mexico, including problems with erosion and sedimentation. Hydraulic modeling analyses have been performed on the Middle Rio Grande to determine changes in channel morphology and other important parameters. Important changes occurring in the...

  13. Hydrodynamic and hydrostatic modelling of hydraulic journal bearings considering small displacement condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Yin; Chuang, Jen-Chen; Tu, Jia-Ying

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes modified coefficients for the dynamic model of hydraulic journal bearing system that integrates the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties. In recent years, design of hydraulic bearing for machine tool attracts worldwide attention, because hydraulic bearings are able to provide higher capacity and accuracy with lower friction, compared to conventional bearing systems. In order to achieve active control of the flow pressure and enhance the operation accuracy, the dynamic model of hydraulic bearings need to be developed. Modified coefficients of hydrostatic stiffness, hydrodynamic stiffness, and squeeze damping of the dynamic model are presented in this work, which are derived referring to small displacement analysis from literature. The proposed modified coefficients and model, which consider the pressure variations, relevant geometry size, and fluid properties of the journal bearings, are able to characterise the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties with better precision, thus offering the following pragmatic contribution: (1) on-line prediction of the eccentricity and the position of the shaft in the face of external force that results in vibration; (2) development of active control system to regulate the supply flow pressure and to minimize the eccentricity of the shaft. Theoretical derivation and simulation results with different vibration cases are discussed to verify the proposed techniques.

  14. Coupled hydrologic and hydraulic modeling of Upper Niger River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Ayan; Siqueira, Vinícius; Paris, Adrien; Collischonn, Walter; Paiva, Rodrigo; Gossett, Marielle; Pontes, Paulo; Calmant, Stephane; Biancamaria, Sylvain; Crétaux, Jean-François; Tanimoune, Bachir

    2017-04-01

    The Upper Niger Basin is located in Western Africa, flowing from Guinea Highlands towards the Sahel region. In this area lies the seasonally inundated Niger Inland Delta, which supports important environmental services such as habitats for wildlife, climate and flood regulation, as well as large fishery and agricultural areas. In this study, we present the application of MGB-IPH large scale hydrologic and hydrodynamic model for the Upper Niger Basin, totaling c.a. 650,000 km2 and set up until the city of Niamey in Niger. The model couples hydrological vertical balance and runoff generation with hydrodynamic flood wave propagation, by allowing infiltration from floodplains into soil column as well as representing backwater effects and floodplain storage throughout flat areas such as the Inland Delta. The model is forced with TRMM 3B42 daily precipitation and Climate Research Unit (CRU) climatology for the period 2000-2010, and was calibrated against in-situ discharge gauges and validated with in-situ water level, remotely sensed estimations of flooded areas (classification of MODIS imagery) and satellite altimetry (JASON-2 mission). Model results show good predictions for calibrated daily discharge and validated water level and altimetry at stations both upstream and downstream of the delta (Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency>0.7 for all stations), as well as for flooded areas within the delta region (ENS=0.5; r2=0.8), allowing a good representation of flooding dynamics basinwide and simulation of flooding behavior of both perennial (e.g., Niger main stem) and ephemeral rivers (e.g., Niger Red Flood tributaries in Sahel). Coupling between hydrology and hydrodynamic processes indicates an important feedback between floodplain and soil water storage that allows high evapotranspiration rates even after the flood passage around the inner delta area. Also, representation of water retention in floodplain channels and distributaries in the inner delta (e.g., Diaka river

  15. Study on Initiation Mechanisms of Hydraulic Fracture Guided by Vertical Multi-radial Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tiankui; Liu, Binyan; Qu, Zhanqing; Gong, Diguang; Xin, Lei

    2017-07-01

    The conventional hydraulic fracturing fails in the target oil development zone (remaining oil or gas, closed reservoir, etc.) which is not located in the azimuth of maximum horizontal in situ stress of available wellbores. The technology of directional propagation of hydraulic fracture guided by vertical multi-radial boreholes is innovatively developed. The effects of in situ stress, wellbore internal pressure and fracturing fluid percolation effect on geostress field distribution are taken into account, a mechanical model of two radial boreholes (basic research unit) is established, and the distribution and change rule of the maximum principal stress on the various parameters have been studied. The results show that as the radial borehole azimuth increases, the preferential rock tensile fracturing in the axial plane of radial boreholes becomes increasingly difficult. When the radial borehole azimuth increases to a certain extent, the maximum principal stress no longer appears in the azimuth of the radial boreholes, but will go to other orientations outside the axial plane of radial boreholes and the maximum horizontal stress orientation. Therefore, by reducing the ratio between the distance of the radial boreholes and increasing the diameter of the radial boreholes can enhance the guiding strength. In the axial plane of the radical boreholes, particularly in the radial hole wall, position closer to the radial boreholes is more prone to rock tensile destruction. Even in the case of large radial borehole azimuth, rock still preferentially ruptures in this position. The more the position is perpendicularly far from the axis of the wellbore, the lesser it will be affected by wellbore, and the lesser the tensile stress of each point. Meanwhile, at a certain depth, due to the decrease in the impact of the wellbore and the impact of the two radial boreholes increases accordingly, at the further position from the wellbore axis, the tensile fracture is the most prone to

  16. Initial insights from 2.5D hydraulic modeling of floods in Athabasca Valles, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.P.; Denlinger, R.P.; O'Connell, D. R. H.; Burr, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first application of a 2.5D hydraulic model to catastrophic floods on Mars. This model simulates flow over complex topography and incorporates flood dynamics that could not be modeled in the earlier 1D models. We apply this model to Athabasca Valles, the youngest outflow channel on Mars, investigating previous bank-full discharge estimates and utilizing the interpolated Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter elevation map as input. We confirm that the bank-full assumption does not fit the observed landforms. Instead, the channel appears more deeply incised near the source. Flow modeling also identifies several areas of special interest, including a dry cataract that coincides with a region of predicted high erosion. However, artifacts in the elevation data strongly impacted estimated stages and velocities in other areas. More extensive connection between the flood hydraulics and observed landforms awaits improved topographic data.

  17. Modeling thermal stress propagation during hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Gunnar; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    A large fraction of the world's water and energy resources are located in naturally fractured reservoirs within the earth's crust. Depending on the lithology and tectonic history of a formation, fracture networks can range from dense and homogeneous highly fractured networks to single large scale fractures dominating the flow behavior. Understanding the dynamics of such reservoirs in terms of flow and transport is crucial to successful application of engineered geothermal systems (also known as enhanced geothermal systems or EGS) for geothermal energy production in the future. Fractured reservoirs are considered to consist of two distinct separate media, namely the fracture and matrix space respectively. Fractures are generally thin, highly conductive containing only small amounts of fluid, whereas the matrix rock provides high fluid storage but typically has much smaller permeability. Simulation of flow and transport through fractured porous media is challenging due to the high permeability contrast between the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix. However, accurate and efficient simulation of flow through a fracture network is crucial in order to understand, optimize and engineer reservoirs. It has been a research topic for several decades and is still under active research. Accurate fluid flow simulations through field-scale fractured reservoirs are still limited by the power of current computer processing units (CPU). We present an efficient implementation of the embedded discrete fracture model, which is a promising new technique in modeling the behavior of enhanced geothermal systems. An efficient coupling strategy is determined for numerical performance of the model. We provide new insight into the coupled modeling of fluid flow, heat transport of engineered geothermal reservoirs with focus on the thermal stress changes during the stimulation process. We further investigate the interplay of thermal and poro-elastic stress changes in the reservoir

  18. Hydrologic-Hydraulic Modeling of Fluvial Sediment Transport During a Storm Event in a Highly Managed Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, F.; Mantilla, R.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment movement along the main stem of a watershed is strongly affected by the sediment supply and the channel morphology. Anthropogenic interventions tend to alter the hydraulic conveyance and consequently modify the sediment regime of the main stem. This connection between channel hydraulics and sediment transport is often overlooked in hydrologic models where simplified methods are used for flow and sediment routing. In this study, we adopt a hydrologic-hydraulic modeling approach to quantify the fluvial sediment transport along the main stem of a watershed during a storm event. The hydrologic model CUENCAS is implemented to estimate the sub-hourly hydrographs of the major tributaries of the watershed. The simulated hydrographs are used as boundary conditions for the depth-averaged two-dimensional hydraulic model FESMWS to simulate the propagation of the flood wave along the main stem. The corresponding sub-hourly, unsteady non-equilibrium sediment transport along the main stem is also simulated with FESWMS. This procedure is applied to a highly managed agricultural watershed of Iowa. The study site has a catchment area of 70 Km2 with soils that are silty clay loams. The land-use is mostly row crop, but in the past decade a large portion of the watershed was converted to native prairie. The main stem is a meandering stream with a length of 15 Km and ten major tributaries contribute to its flow. Several sections of the main stem have been heavily channelized and straightened since the 1930s. Different grain size distributions and sediment boundary conditions are investigated to discern the effects of land-use changes and channelization on the sediment regime along the main stem. The simulations are able to capture the typical hysteresis between flow and sediment transport. The results indicate that the in-stream sediment transport rate is in general higher in the channelized sections and depends, to a certain extent, on the degree of straightening.

  19. Interpretation of hydraulic model outputs in supporting ecologially-led river restoration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, E.; Moir, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    In river systems, hydrodynamic forces are a major driver for geomorphic change, and a major influence on aquatic habitat. Representative modelling of channel hydraulics is therefore an invaluable tool in ecologically-led river restoration design, enabling a quantitative and objective assessment of complex processes that are essential to achieve biophysical objectives. Hydraulic modelling can form part of an iterative design process, utilised to indicate 'design performance' through a wide range of descriptors (e.g. physical heterogeneity, hydraulic micro-habitat) afforded by each stage of the design. However, it is important that the limitations of any computational fluid dynamic approach (e.g., 2D depth-averaged simulations) are well communicated to other specialists (e.g., geomorphologists, ecologists), managers, regulators and clients. One aspect of hydraulics where this is specifically important is in the use of vorticity and coherent vortex structures as indicators of habitat suitability and the probability of regions of scour or deposition. It has long been recognised that eddies structures provide important physical and ecological function in rivers but calculating vorticity changes using hydraulic models is relatively new in river hydraulics. The use of such calculations is growing in both academia and industry, especially as restoration approaches such as engineered log jams introduce significant vorticity into the flow. However, the introduction of vorticity needs to be modelled with very high resolutions near solid boundaries, and the convected vortex structures themselves are inherently three dimensional. Neither of these is routinely captured in river hydraulic models. Specifically, the interpretation of vorticity patterns or coherent vortex structures from 2D depth averaged river models must be treated with caution, or provided with further interpretation. We present work that demonstrates how coherent vortex structures and vorticity have been used to

  20. Modeling the impacts of soil hydraulic properties on temporal stability of soil moisture under a semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiejun

    2014-11-01

    Despite the significant spatiotemporal variability of soil moisture, the phenomenon of temporal stability of soil moisture (TS SM) has been widely observed in field studies. However, the lack of understandings of the factors that control TS SM has led to some contradictory findings about TS SM. To resolve this issue, numerical models may offer an alternative way to complement field studies by quantifying different controls on TS SM. In this study, a 1-D vadose zone model was adopted to simulate daily soil moisture contents, which were used to compute the mean relative difference (MRD) and standard deviation of relative difference (SDRD) of soil moisture. Different from recent modeling studies, a soil dataset was employed with 200 samples of correlated soil hydraulic parameters for sandy soils. Compared to the results of previous modeling studies, more reasonable patterns of MRD and SDRD that resembled field observations were produced. By varying soil hydraulic parameter values, different patterns of MRD and SDRD could also be generated, implying variations in soil hydraulic properties could partly control the patterns of MRD and SDRD. More specifically, the residual soil moisture content (θr) was found to be the primary control on MRD, mainly due to the semi-arid climate that was simulated. By fixing θr, however, a highly nonlinear relationship emerged between MRD and the shape factor n in the van Genuchten model, which resulted in the positively skewed distributions of MRD widely observed for sandy soils in field experiments. Moreover, both the range and skewness of the distributions of MRD were affected by the range of n. In addition, with increasing n, a positive correlation between MRD and the shape factor l in the van Genuchten model was also found. The simulation results suggested that the control of soil hydraulic properties on MRD might weaken for areas under bare surface conditions or for regions with more humid climates due to elevated soil moisture

  1. Enhanced Bank-Stability Modeling With Coupled Geotechnical, Hydraulic and Near-Bank Groundwater Sub-Models: Development and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. E.; Simon, A.; Bankhead, N.

    2008-12-01

    Physically-based, deterministic bank-stability models have recently been developed to effectively simulate the driving and resisting forces governing streambank erosion. Significant advances have been made in the manner in which groundwater flow through variably saturated porous media, planar and circular geotechnical failures and fluvial sediment transport are simulated. However, to date, coupling these models has required tedious exporting and conversion of geometries and results and manual remeshing. In this presentation, we introduce the first fully integrated suite of models that deterministically simulate the controlling hydrologic, hydraulic and geotechnical processes that govern streambank erosion and channel-width adjustment. The model suite incorporates routines that: 1. Permit the user to enter between 5 and 23 points to describe the bank cross-sectional geometry; 2. Automatically generate a mesh by which to implicitly discretize the 2-D Richards equation utilizing finite volumes. The resulting pentadiagonal matrix is solved iteratively with Stone's Strongly Implicit Procedure (SIP). Timesteps are automatically adjusted to minimize mass balance and truncation errors; 3. Evaluate the force-equilibrium factor of safety (Fs), permitting the simulation of planar and cantilever shear failures with a horizontal slice method and planar shear failures with tension cracks with a rigorous vertical slice method. A random walk approach is adopted to search for the minimum Fs; 4. Estimate the increase in cohesion due to vegetation with a global load-sharing Fibre Bundle Model; and 5. Simulate the erosion of the bank face and bank toe with an excess shear stress approach. Management options to increase slope stability (through the addition of vegetation) and reduce channel- boundary erodibility (through the addition of natural and artificial structures) are also incorporated. We illustrate the efficacy of the modeling approach with a series of case studies in which

  2. Centrifugal slurry pump wear and hydraulic studies. Phase II report. Experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, D.; Cooper, P.; Biswas, C.; Sloteman, D.; Onuschak, A.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by Ingersoll-Rand Research, Inc., under Phase II, Experimental Studies for the contract entitled, Centrifugal Slurry Pump Wear and Hydraulic Studies. This work was carried out for the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC-82PC50035. The basic development approach pursued this phase is presented, followed by a discussion on wear relationships. The analysis, which resulted in the development of a mathematical wear model relating pump life to some of the key design and operating parameters, is presented. The results, observations, and conclusions of the experimental investigation on small scale pumps that led to the selected design features for the prototype pump are discussed. The material investigation was performed at IRRI, ORNL and Battelle. The rationale for selecting the materials for testing, the test methods and apparatus used, and the results obtained are presented followed by a discussion on materials for a prototype pump. In addition, the prototype pump test facility description, as well as the related design and equipment details, are presented. 20 references, 53 figures, 13 tables.

  3. Global river flood hazard maps: hydraulic modelling methods and appropriate uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townend, Samuel; Smith, Helen; Molloy, James

    2014-05-01

    Flood hazard is not well understood or documented in many parts of the world. Consequently, the (re-)insurance sector now needs to better understand where the potential for considerable river flooding aligns with significant exposure. For example, international manufacturing companies are often attracted to countries with emerging economies, meaning that events such as the 2011 Thailand floods have resulted in many multinational businesses with assets in these regions incurring large, unexpected losses. This contribution addresses and critically evaluates the hydraulic methods employed to develop a consistent global scale set of river flood hazard maps, used to fill the knowledge gap outlined above. The basis of the modelling approach is an innovative, bespoke 1D/2D hydraulic model (RFlow) which has been used to model a global river network of over 5.3 million kilometres. Estimated flood peaks at each of these model nodes are determined using an empirically based rainfall-runoff approach linking design rainfall to design river flood magnitudes. The hydraulic model is used to determine extents and depths of floodplain inundation following river bank overflow. From this, deterministic flood hazard maps are calculated for several design return periods between 20-years and 1,500-years. Firstly, we will discuss the rationale behind the appropriate hydraulic modelling methods and inputs chosen to produce a consistent global scaled river flood hazard map. This will highlight how a model designed to work with global datasets can be more favourable for hydraulic modelling at the global scale and why using innovative techniques customised for broad scale use are preferable to modifying existing hydraulic models. Similarly, the advantages and disadvantages of both 1D and 2D modelling will be explored and balanced against the time, computer and human resources available, particularly when using a Digital Surface Model at 30m resolution. Finally, we will suggest some

  4. Simulation of the June 11, 2010, flood along the Little Missouri River near Langley, Arkansas, using a hydrologic model coupled to a hydraulic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westerman, Drew A.; Clark, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    The results from the precipitation-runoff hydrologic model, the one-dimensional unsteady-state hydraulic model, and a separate two-dimensional model developed as part of a coincident study, each complement the other in terms of streamflow timing, water-surface elevations, and velocities propagated by the June 11, 2010, flood event. The simulated grids for water depth and stream velocity from each model were directly compared by subtracting the one-dimensional hydraulic model grid from the two-dimensional model grid. The absolute mean difference for the simulated water depth was 0.9 foot. Additionally, the absolute mean difference for the simulated stream velocity was 1.9 feet per second.

  5. SToRM: A Model for 2D environmental hydraulics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simões, Francisco J. M.

    2017-01-01

    A two-dimensional (depth-averaged) finite volume Godunov-type shallow water model developed for flow over complex topography is presented. The model, SToRM, is based on an unstructured cell-centered finite volume formulation and on nonlinear strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta time stepping schemes. The numerical discretization is founded on the classical and well established shallow water equations in hyperbolic conservative form, but the convective fluxes are calculated using auto-switching Riemann and diffusive numerical fluxes. Computational efficiency is achieved through a parallel implementation based on the OpenMP standard and the Fortran programming language. SToRM’s implementation within a graphical user interface is discussed. Field application of SToRM is illustrated by utilizing it to estimate peak flow discharges in a flooding event of the St. Vrain Creek in Colorado, U.S.A., in 2013, which reached 850 m3/s (~30,000 f3 /s) at the location of this study.

  6. Multiscale modelling of hydraulic conductivity in vuggy porous media.

    PubMed

    Daly, K R; Roose, T

    2014-02-08

    Flow in both saturated and non-saturated vuggy porous media, i.e. soil, is inherently multiscale. The complex microporous structure of the soil aggregates and the wider vugs provides a multitude of flow pathways and has received significant attention from the X-ray computed tomography (CT) community with a constant drive to image at higher resolution. Using multiscale homogenization, we derive averaged equations to study the effects of the microscale structure on the macroscopic flow. The averaged model captures the underlying geometry through a series of cell problems and is verified through direct comparison to numerical simulations of the full structure. These methods offer significant reductions in computation time and allow us to perform three-dimensional calculations with complex geometries on a desktop PC. The results show that the surface roughness of the aggregate has a significantly greater effect on the flow than the microstructure within the aggregate. Hence, this is the region in which the resolution of X-ray CT for image-based modelling has the greatest impact.

  7. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jong E.

    2005-11-01

    Earlier experiments determined that the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) core is cooled, not by an axial flow, but rather by a strong cross flow due to the thermal expansion of the coolant. To further complicate the flow field, a nitrogen-16 (N-16) pump was installed above the PSBR core to mix the exiting core buoyant thermal plume in order to delay the rapid release of radioactive N-16 to the PSBR pool surface. Thus, the interaction between the N-16 jet flow and the buoyancy driven flow complicates the analysis of the flow distribution in the PSBR pool. The main objectives of this study is to model the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the PSBR core and pool. During this study four major things were performed including the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for the PSBR pool, the stand-alone fuel rod model for a PSBR fuel rod, the velocity measurements in and around the PSBR core, and the temperature measurements in the PSBR pool. Once the flow field was predicted by the CFD model, the measurement devices were manufactured and calibrated based on the CFD results. The major contribution of this study is to understand and to explain the flow behavior in the PSBR subchannels and pool using the FLOW3D model. The stand-alone dynamic fuel rod model was developed to determine the temperature distribution inside a PSBR fuel rod. The stand-alone fuel rod model was coupled to the FLOW3D model and used to predict the temperature behavior during steady-state and pulsing. The heat transfer models in the stand-alone fuel rod code are used in order to overcome the disadvantage of the CFD code, which does not calculate the mechanical stress, the gap conductance, and the two phase heat transfer. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  8. A simple model for wide area hydraulic modelling in data sparse areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, J.; Schumann, G.; Bates, P.

    2012-04-01

    The simulation of wave propagation, level and discharge in large rivers systems at continental or global scales, for applications ranging from regional flood risk assessment to climate change impacts, requires computationally efficient hydraulic models that can be applied to locations where limited or no ground based data are available. Many existing global or large scale river routing schemes use kinematic or simpler wave models, which although computationally efficient, are unable to simulate backwatering and floodplain interactions that are key controllers of wave propagation in many large rivers. Diffusive wave models are often suggested as a more physically based alternative, however the lack of inertia in the scheme leads to long simulation times due to the very low slopes in large rivers. We present a Cartesian grid two-dimensional hydraulic model with a parameterised sub-grid scale representation of the 1D channel network that can be build entirely from remotely sensed data. For both channel and floodplain flows the model simulates a simplified shallow water wave (diffusion and inertia) using an explicit finite difference scheme, which was chosen because of its computational efficiency relative to both explicit diffusive and full shallow water wave models. The model was applied to an 800 km reach of the River Niger that includes the complex waterways and lakes of the Niger Inland Delta in Mali. This site has the advantage of having no or low vegetation cover and hence SRTM represents (close to) bare earth floodplain elevations. Floodplain elevation was defined at 1 km resolution from SRTM data to reduce pixel-to-pixel noise, while the widths of main rivers and floodplain channels were estimated from Landsat imagery. The channel bed was defined as a depth from the adjacent floodplain from hydraulic geometry principles using a power law relationship between channel width and depth. This was first approximated from empirical data from a range of other sites

  9. A mechanistic model (BCC-PSSICO) to predict changes in the hydraulic properties for bio-amended variably saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles Brangarí, Albert; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Freixa, Anna; M. Romaní, Anna; Rubol, Simonetta; Fernà ndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of biofilms in porous media is likely to influence the overall hydraulic properties and, consequently, a sound understanding of the process is required for the proper design and management of many technological applications. In order to bring some light into this phenomenon we present a mechanistic model to study the variably saturated hydraulic properties of bio-amended soils. Special emphasis is laid on the distribution of phases at pore-scale and the mechanisms to retain and let water flow through, providing valuable insights into phenomena behind bioclogging. Our approach consists in modeling the porous media as an ensemble of capillary tubes, obtained from the biofilm-free water retention curve. This methodology is extended by the incorporation of a biofilm composed of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Moreover, such a microbial consortium displays a channeled geometry that shrinks/swells with suction. Analytical equations for the volumetric water content and the relative permeability can then be derived by assuming that biomass reshapes the pore space following specific geometrical patterns. The model is discussed by using data from laboratory studies and other approaches already existing in the literature. It can reproduce (i) displacements of the retention curve toward higher saturations and (ii) permeability reductions of distinct orders of magnitude. Our findings also illustrate how even very small amounts of biofilm may lead to significant changes in the hydraulic properties. We, therefore, state the importance of accounting for the hydraulic characteristics of biofilms and for a complex/more realistic geometry of colonies at the pore-scale.

  10. Hydraulic modeling of clay ceramic water filters for point-of-use water treatment.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Ryan W; Cunningham, Jeffrey A; Mihelcic, James R

    2013-01-02

    The acceptability of ceramic filters for point-of-use water treatment depends not only on the quality of the filtered water, but also on the quantity of water the filters can produce. This paper presents two mathematical models for the hydraulic performance of ceramic water filters under typical usage. A model is developed for two common filter geometries: paraboloid- and frustum-shaped. Both models are calibrated and evaluated by comparison to experimental data. The hydraulic models are able to predict the following parameters as functions of time: water level in the filter (h), instantaneous volumetric flow rate of filtrate (Q), and cumulative volume of water produced (V). The models' utility is demonstrated by applying them to estimate how the volume of water produced depends on factors such as the filter shape and the frequency of filling. Both models predict that the volume of water produced can be increased by about 45% if users refill the filter three times per day versus only once per day. Also, the models predict that filter geometry affects the volume of water produced: for two filters with equal volume, equal wall thickness, and equal hydraulic conductivity, a filter that is tall and thin will produce as much as 25% more water than one which is shallow and wide. We suggest that the models can be used as tools to help optimize filter performance.

  11. Basics of Physical Modeling in Coastal and Hydraulic Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    by the scale factor or model scale ( NX ), which is the ratio of the prototype parameter (Xp) to the model parameter (Xm) defined as  pX m X N X...similitude are geometric (similarity of form), kinematic (similarity of motion), and dynamic (similarity of forces). In general, the ratio of quantities in...the model needs to be the same as in the prototype. For geometric similarity, the ratio of model and prototype lengths must be equal. For kinematic

  12. Using hydraulic modeling to simulate human interactions with water resources in an Omani irrigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanthopoulou, Themis; Ertsen, Maurits; Düring, Bleda; Kolen, Jan

    2017-04-01

    In the dry Southern Oman, more than a thousand years ago, a large water system that connected the mountain mass with the coastal region was constructed. Its length (up to 30 km) and the fact that the coastal region has a rich groundwater aquifer create confusion as to why the system was initially built. Nonetheless, it was abandoned a couple of centuries later only to be partially revived by small farming communities in the 17th to 18th century. The focus of our research is one of the irrigation systems that used the water conveyed from the large water system. Not much is known about these small irrigation systems functioning in the Wadi Al Jizzi of the greater Sohar region. There are no written records and we can only make guesses about the way the systems were managed based on ethnographical studies and the traditional Omani techniques. On the other hand, the good preservation state of the canals offers a great opportunity for hydraulic reconstruction of irrigation events. More than that, the material remains suggest and at the same time limit the ways in which humans interacted with the system and the water resources of the region. All irrigation activities and some daily activities had to be realized through the canal system and only if the canal system permits it these actions would have been feasible. We created a conceptual model of irrigation that includes the human agent and feedback mechanisms through hydraulics and then we simulated irrigation events using the Sobek software. Scenarios and sensibility analysis were used to address the unknown aspects of the system. Our research yielded insights about the way the farming community interacted with the larger water system, the levels of co-ordination and co-operation required for successful irrigation and the predisposition of conflict and power relations.

  13. Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Through an Orthogonal Discontinuity: A Laboratory, Analytical and Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos, Ella María; Jeffrey, Robert G.; Hillis, Richard; Zhang, Xi

    2017-08-01

    Rocks are naturally fractured, and lack of knowledge of hydraulic fracture growth through the pre-existing discontinuities in rocks has impeded enhancing hydrocarbon extraction. This paper presents experimental results from uniaxial and biaxial tests, combined with numerical and analytical modelling results to develop a criterion for predicting whether a hydraulic fracture will cross a discontinuity, represented at the laboratory by unbonded machined frictional interfaces. The experimental results provide the first evidence for the impact of viscous fluid flow on the orthogonal fracture crossing. The fracture elliptical footprint also reflects the importance of both the applied loading stress and the viscosity in fracture propagation. The hydraulic fractures extend both in the direction of maximum compressive stress and in the direction with discontinuities that are arranged to be normal to the maximum compressive stress. The modelling results of fracture growth across discontinuities are obtained for the locations of slip starting points in initiating fracture crossing. Our analysis, in contrast to previous work on the prediction of frictional crossing, includes the non-singular stresses generated by the finite pressurised hydraulic fracture. Experimental and theoretical outcomes herein suggest that hydraulic fracture growth through an orthogonal discontinuity does not depend primarily on the interface friction coefficient.

  14. Modeling Biofilm-Induced Hydraulic Changes In 3-Dimensional Prefractal Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Choi, H.; Perfect, E.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2008-12-01

    Biofilm-induced clogging is the significant phenomenon in subsurface hydrology that may affect aquifer recharge and solute transport. Modeling biofilm impact on flow and transport at pore scale should include characterization of the heterogeneity of both biofilm and medium. In this study, a numerical model of biofilm- induced hydraulic changes in porous media was developed based on the individual-based model (IbM) for the biofilm growth according to the Monod equation, and the Lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) for the water flow. The LBM was modified to consider biofilm growth in each grid cell, and IbM was synchronized with the LBM. The model behavior was first investigated for simple geometry of the prismatic void space with constant flow and concentration boundary conditions at the inflow boundary, no-gradient condition on the outflow side, and periodic boundary condition on the other sides. The mass conservation was tested by varying Peclet number and computing the solute breakthrough. The breakthrough was retarded when a solid sphere was placed in the prism, and the retardation was increasing as flow velocity was increasing. Increase in the biofilm volume surrounding solid sphere increased pressure at the windward side of sphere, and the flow velocity in the narrow passage between biofilms was increased. The biofilm grew more vigorously on the windward side compared with the leeward side of the sphere because the biofilm growth interrupted the supply of the dissolved substrate to the leeward side. Darcy relation was better to estimate hydraulic conductivity than Kozeny-Carman relation which assumes that biofilms are uniformly distributed on the surface. Finally, 3- dimensional mass and pore-solid prefractal lattices as models of heterogeneous porous media were generated by iterated function system and used as the simulation domain. The flow in these domains reached the steady state at threshold porosities (hydrostatic threshold) that were estimated to be about 0

  15. Impact of representation of hydraulic structures in modelling a Severn barrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Samuel; Ahmadian, Reza; Falconer, Roger A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, enhancements to the numerical representation of sluice gates and turbines were made to the hydro-environmental model Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), and applied to the Severn Tidal Power Group Cardiff-Weston Barrage. The extended domain of the EFDC Continental Shelf Model (CSM) allows far-field hydrodynamic impact assessment of the Severn Barrage, pre- and post-enhancement, to demonstrate the importance of accurate hydraulic structure representation. The enhancements were found to significantly affect peak water levels in the Bristol Channel, reducing levels by nearly 1 m in some areas, and even affect predictions as far-field as the West Coast of Scotland, albeit to a far lesser extent. The model was tested for sensitivity to changes in the discharge coefficient, Cd, used in calculating discharge through sluice gates and turbines. It was found that the performance of the Severn Barrage is not sensitive to changes to the Cd value, and is mitigated through the continual, rather than instantaneous, discharge across the structure. The EFDC CSM can now be said to be more accurately predicting the impacts of tidal range proposals, and the investigation of sensitivity to Cd improves the confidence in the modelling results, despite the uncertainty in this coefficient.

  16. XFEM modeling of hydraulic fracture in porous rocks with natural fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Liu, ZhanLi; Zeng, QingLei; Gao, Yue; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2017-08-01

    Hydraulic fracture (HF) in porous rocks is a complex multi-physics coupling process which involves fluid flow, diffusion and solid deformation. In this paper, the extended finite element method (XFEM) coupling with Biot theory is developed to study the HF in permeable rocks with natural fractures (NFs). In the recent XFEM based computational HF models, the fluid flow in fractures and interstitials of the porous media are mostly solved separately, which brings difficulties in dealing with complex fracture morphology. In our new model the fluid flow is solved in a unified framework by considering the fractures as a kind of special porous media and introducing Poiseuille-type flow inside them instead of Darcy-type flow. The most advantage is that it is very convenient to deal with fluid flow inside the complex fracture network, which is important in shale gas extraction. The weak formulation for the new coupled model is derived based on virtual work principle, which includes the XFEM formulation for multiple fractures and fractures intersection in porous media and finite element formulation for the unified fluid flow. Then the plane strain Kristianovic-Geertsma-de Klerk (KGD) model and the fluid flow inside the fracture network are simulated to validate the accuracy and applicability of this method. The numerical results show that large injection rate, low rock permeability and isotropic in-situ stresses tend to lead to a more uniform and productive fracture network.

  17. Engineering study of tank leaks related to hydraulic retrieval of sludge from tank 241-C-106. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.S.; Carlos, W.C.; Irwin, J.J.; Khaleel, R.; Kline, N.W.; Ludowise, J.D.; Marusich, R.M.; Rittman, P.D.

    1993-06-09

    This study evaluates hydraulic retrieval (sluicing) of the waste in single-shell tank 241-C-106 with respect to the likelihood of tank leaks, gross volumes of potential leaks, and their consequences. A description of hydraulic retrieval is developed to establish a baseline for the study. Leak models are developed based on postulated leak mechanisms to estimate the amount of waste that could potentially leak while sluicing. Transport models describe the movement of the waste constituents in the surrounding soil and groundwater after a leak occurs. Environmental impact and risk associated with tank leaks are evaluated. Transport of leaked material to the groundwater is found to be dependent on the rate of recharge of moisture in the soil for moderate-sized leaks. Providing a cover over the tank and surrounding area would eliminate the recharge. The bulk of any leaked material would remain in the vicinity of the tank for remedial action.

  18. A parametric study on hydraulic conductivity and self-healing properties of geotextile clay liners used in landfills.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Fatemeh; Hejazi, Sayyed Mahdi; Sheikhzadeh, Mohammad; Alirezazadeh, Azam

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays, the raise of excessive generation of solid wastes is considered as a major environmental concern due to the fast global population growth. The contamination of groundwater from landfill leachate compromises every living creature. Geotextile clay liner (GCL) that has a sandwich structure with two fibrous sheets and a clay core can be considered as an engineered solution to prevent hazardous pollutants from entering into groundwater. The main objective of the present study is therefore to enhance the performance of GCL structures. By changing some structural factors such as clay type (sodium vs. calcium bentonite), areal density of clay, density of geotextile, geotextile thickness, texture type (woven vs. nonwoven), and needle punching density a series of GCL samples were fabricated. Water pressure, type of cover soil and overburden pressure were the environmental variables, while the response variables were hydraulic conductivity and self-healing rate of GCL. Rigid wall constant head permeability test was conducted on all the samples. The outlet water flow was measured and evaluated at a defined time period and the hydraulic conductivity was determined for each sample. In the final stage, self-healing properties of samples were investigated and an analytical model was used to explain the results. It was found that higher Montmorillonite content of clay, overburden pressure, needle punching density and areal density of clay poses better self-healing properties and less hydraulic conductivity, meanwhile, an increase in water pressure increases the hydraulic conductivity. Moreover, the observations were aligned with the analytical model and indicated that higher fiber inclusion as a result of higher needle-punching density produces closer contact between bentonite and fibers, reduces hydraulic conductivity and increases self-healing properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prototype Data Models and Data Dictionaries for Hanford Sediment Physical and Hydraulic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Last, George V.; Middleton, Lisa A.

    2010-09-30

    The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) project, managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), has been compiling physical and hydraulic property data and parameters to support risk analyses and waste management decisions at Hanford. In FY09 the RDS project developed a strategic plan for a physical and hydraulic property database. This report documents prototype data models and dictionaries for these properties and associated parameters. Physical properties and hydraulic parameters and their distributions are required for any type of quantitative assessment of risk and uncertainty associated with predictions of contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface. The central plateau of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State contains most of the contamination at the Site and has up to {approx}100 m of unsaturated and unconsolidated or semi-consolidated sediments overlying the unconfined aquifer. These sediments contain a wide variety of contaminants ranging from organic compounds, such as carbon tetrachloride, to numerous radionuclides including technetium, plutonium, and uranium. Knowledge of the physical and hydraulic properties of the sediments and their distributions is critical for quantitative assessment of the transport of these contaminants in the subsurface, for evaluation of long-term risks and uncertainty associated with model predictions of contaminant transport and fate, and for evaluating, designing, and operating remediation alternatives. One of the goals of PNNL's RDS project is to work with the Hanford Environmental Data Manager (currently with CHPRC) to develop a protocol and schedule for incorporation of physical property and hydraulic parameter datasets currently maintained by PNNL into HEIS. This requires that the data first be reviewed to ensure quality and consistency. New data models must then be developed for HEIS that are

  20. The Effect of Loading Rate on Hydraulic Fracturing in Synthetic Granite - a Discrete Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomac, I.; Gutierrez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracture initiation and propagation from a borehole in hard synthetic rock is modeled using the two dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM). DEM uses previously established procedure for modeling the strength and deformation parameters of quasi-brittle rocks with the Bonded Particle Model (Itasca, 2004). A series of simulations of laboratory tests on granite in DEM serve as a reference for synthetic rock behavior. Fracturing is enabled by breaking parallel bonds between DEM particles as a result of the local stress state. Subsequent bond breakage induces fracture propagation during a time-stepping procedure. Hydraulic fracturing occurs when pressurized fluid induces hoop stresses around the wellbore which cause rock fracturing and serves for geo-reservoir permeability enhancement in oil, gas and geothermal industries. In DEM, a network of fluid pipes and reservoirs is used for mathematical calculation of fluid flow through narrow channels between DEM particles, where the hydro-mechanical coupling is fully enabled. The fluid flow calculation is superimposed with DEM stress-strain calculation at each time step. As a result, the fluid pressures during borehole pressurization in hydraulic fracturing, as well as, during the fracture propagation from the borehole, can be simulated. The objective of this study is to investigate numerically a hypothesis that fluid pressurization rate, or the fluid flow rate, influences upon character, shape and velocity of fracture propagation in rock. The second objective is to better understand and define constraints which are important for successful fracture propagation in quasi-brittle rock from the perspective of flow rate, fluid density, viscosity and compressibility relative to the rock physical properties. Results from this study indicate that not only too high fluid flow rates cause fracture arrest and multiple fracture branching from the borehole, but also that the relative compressibility of fracturing fluid and

  1. Investigation of approximations in thermal-hydraulic modeling of core conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Patrick L.; Hanan, Nelson A.

    2008-07-15

    Neutronics analyses for core conversions are usually fairly detailed, for example representing all 4 flats and all 4 corners of all 6 tubes of all 20 IRT-3M or -4M fuel assemblies in the core of the VVR-SM reactor in Uzbekistan. The coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analysis for safety analysis transients is usually less detailed, for example modeling only a hot and an average fuel plate and the associated coolant. Several of the approximations have been studied using the RELAP5 and PARET computer codes in order to provide assurance that the lack of full detail is not important to the safety analysis. Two specific cases studied are (1) representation of a core of same- type fuel assemblies by a hot and an average assembly each having multiple channels as well as by merely a hot and average channel and (2) modeling a core containing multiple fuel types as the sum of fractional core models for each fuel type. (author)

  2. Estuary Entrance, Umpqua River, Oregon: Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Umpqua River estuary model was of the fixed-bed type, constructed to scales of 1:30 horizontally and 1:100 vertically, and reproduced the lower...28 miles of the Umpqua River and an adjoining portion of the Pacific Ocean. The model was equipped with the necessary appurtenances for accurate

  3. Thermal hydraulic modeling of the mock fuel facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jacob

    The major focus of this thesis was to make improved three dimensional models of the Mock Fuel Facility. Three distinct experiment types run with the Mock Fuel Facility (MFF) were the main focus of this thesis. Two of the experiments were modeled and an in-depth analysis of the model results was performed to gain a better understanding of the Mock Fuel Facility. For the third experiment the process of creating a model was begun. There were multiple purposes for the work completed in this thesis. The work was done partially to gain a greater understanding of the UMass Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR). There is minimal instrumentation within the UMLRR to measure localized temperatures within the UMLRR. It is hoped that the work done in this thesis will provide a basis for future modeling work which will give insight into the temperature profiles within the UMLRR. This work is also being done to gain insight into the capabilities of the COMSOL multiphysics modelling software and evaluate its potential for future modelling work. Finally this work is also being done for its potential as an educational tool. The MFF and COMSOL have potential to be used for experimental lab work by students to learn about computer modeling and validation.

  4. A Froude-scaled model of a bedrock-alluvial channel reach: 1. Hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Rebecca A.; Hoey, Trevor B.

    2016-09-01

    The controls on hydraulics in bedrock-alluvial rivers are relatively poorly understood, despite the importance of the flow in determining rates and patterns of sediment transport and consequent erosion. To measure hydraulics within a bedrock-alluvial channel, we developed a 1:10 Froude-scaled laboratory model of an 18 × 9 m bedrock-alluvial river reach using terrestrial laser scanning and 3-D printing. In the reported experiments, water depth and velocity were recorded at 18 locations within the channel at each of five different discharges. Additional data from runs with sediment cover in the flume were used to evaluate the hydraulic impact of sediment cover; the deposition and erosion of sediment patches in these runs are analyzed in the companion paper. In our data (1) spatial variation in both flow velocity and Froude number increases with discharge; (2) bulk flow resistance and Froude number become independent of discharge at higher discharges; (3) local flow velocity and Reynolds stress are correlated to the range of local bed topography at some, but not most, discharges; (4) at lower discharges, local topography induces vertical flow structures and slower velocities, but these effects decrease at higher discharges; and (5) there is a relationship between the linear combination of bed and sediment roughness and local flow velocity. These results demonstrate the control that bedrock topography exerts over both local and reach-scale flow conditions, but spatially distributed hydraulic data from bedrock-alluvial channels with different topographies are needed to generalize these findings.

  5. Digging Soil Experiments for Micro Hydraulic Excavators based on Model Predictive Tracking Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatsu, Takumi; Nonaka, Kenichiro; Sekiguchi, Kazuma; Suzuki, Katsumasa

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the increase of burden to operators and lack of skilled operators are the issue in the work of the hydraulic excavator. These problems are expected to be improved by autonomous control. In this paper, we present experimental results of hydraulic excavators using model predictive control (MPC) which incorporates servo mechanism. MPC optimizes digging operations by the optimal control input which is calculated by predicting the future states and satisfying the constraints. However, it is difficult for MPC to cope with the reaction force from soil when a hydraulic excavator performs excavation. Servo mechanism suppresses the influence of the constant disturbance using the error integration. However, the bucket tip deviates from a specified shape by the sudden change of the disturbance. We can expect that the tracking performance is improved by combining MPC and servo mechanism. Path-tracking controls of the bucket tip are performed using the optimal control input. We apply the proposed method to the Komatsu- made micro hydraulic excavator PC01 by experiments. We show the effectiveness of the proposed method through the experiment of digging soil by comparing servo mechanism and pure MPC with the proposed method.

  6. Simulation of the hydraulic performance of highway filter drains through laboratory models and stormwater management tools.

    PubMed

    Sañudo-Fontaneda, Luis A; Jato-Espino, Daniel; Lashford, Craig; Coupe, Stephen J

    2017-05-23

    Road drainage is one of the most relevant assets in transport infrastructure due to its inherent influence on traffic management and road safety. Highway filter drains (HFDs), also known as "French Drains", are the main drainage system currently in use in the UK, throughout 7000 km of its strategic road network. Despite being a widespread technique across the whole country, little research has been completed on their design considerations and their subsequent impact on their hydraulic performance, representing a gap in the field. Laboratory experiments have been proven to be a reliable indicator for the simulation of the hydraulic performance of stormwater best management practices (BMPs). In addition to this, stormwater management tools (SMT) have been preferentially chosen as a design tool for BMPs by practitioners from all over the world. In this context, this research aims to investigate the hydraulic performance of HFDs by comparing the results from laboratory simulation and two widely used SMT such as the US EPA's stormwater management model (SWMM) and MicroDrainage®. Statistical analyses were applied to a series of rainfall scenarios simulated, showing a high level of accuracy between the results obtained in laboratory and using SMT as indicated by the high and low values of the Nash-Sutcliffe and R (2) coefficients and root-mean-square error (RMSE) reached, which validated the usefulness of SMT to determine the hydraulic performance of HFDs.

  7. Predicting Formation Damage in Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems Utilizing a Coupled Hydraulic-Thermal-Chemical Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Daniel; Regenspurg, Simona; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido; Kranz, Stefan; Saadat, Ali

    2014-05-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, large amounts of energy can be stored by injecting hot water into deep or intermediate aquifers. In a seasonal production-injection cycle, water is circulated through a system comprising the porous aquifer, a production well, a heat exchanger and an injection well. This process involves large temperature and pressure differences, which shift chemical equilibria and introduce or amplify mechanical processes. Rock-fluid interaction such as dissolution and precipitation or migration and deposition of fine particles will affect the hydraulic properties of the porous medium and may lead to irreversible formation damage. In consequence, these processes determine the long-term performance of the ATES system and need to be predicted to ensure the reliability of the system. However, high temperature and pressure gradients and dynamic feedback cycles pose challenges on predicting the influence of the relevant processes. Within this study, a reservoir model comprising a coupled hydraulic-thermal-chemical simulation was developed based on an ATES demonstration project located in the city of Berlin, Germany. The structural model was created with Petrel, based on data available from seismic cross-sections and wellbores. The reservoir simulation was realized by combining the capabilities of multiple simulation tools. For the reactive transport model, COMSOL Multiphysics (hydraulic-thermal) and PHREEQC (chemical) were combined using the novel interface COMSOL_PHREEQC, developed by Wissmeier & Barry (2011). It provides a MATLAB-based coupling interface between both programs. Compared to using COMSOL's built-in reactive transport simulator, PHREEQC additionally calculates adsorption and reaction kinetics and allows the selection of different activity coefficient models in the database. The presented simulation tool will be able to predict the most important aspects of hydraulic, thermal and chemical transport processes relevant to

  8. Combined measurement and modeling of the hydrological impact of hydraulic redistribution using CLM4.5 at eight AmeriFlux sites

    Treesearch

    Congsheng Fu; Guiling Wang; Michael L. Goulden; Russell L. Scott; Kenneth Bible; Zoe G. Cardon

    2016-01-01

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes have been demonstrated in the field, but the current generation of standard earth system models does not include a representation of HR. Though recent studies have examined the effect of incorporating HR into land surface models, few (if any) have done cross-site...

  9. Review of fluid and control technology of hydraulic wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Maolin; Wang, Yixuan; Jiao, Zongxia; Shi, Yan

    2017-09-01

    This study examines the development of the fluid and control technology of hydraulic wind turbines. The current state of hydraulic wind turbines as a new technology is described, and its basic fluid model and typical control method are expounded by comparing various study results. Finally, the advantages of hydraulic wind turbines are enumerated. Hydraulic wind turbines are expected to become the main development direction of wind turbines.

  10. Use of computer modeling to aid in hydraulic barrier design

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, W.T.; Johnson, J.A.; Seaton, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Releases of No. 6 and No. 4 fuel oil were discovered at a private boarding school. The releases impact a nearby pond with non-aqueous phase liquid hydrocarbon (NAPL), and threaten to impact an adjacent wetland. Prior to implementation of a permanent remedial solution, such as surfactant treatment and bioremediation, immediate containment of the NAPL was proposed via a barrier-gate containment system. The proposed barrier-gate containment system consisted of a high-density polyethylene barrier, horizontal wells, three flow-through gates, and downgradient infiltration galleries. Computer modeling of groundwater and NAPL flow was conducted utilizing a finite element multiphase model to evaluate the impacts to local hydrogeology associated with the barrier. These impacts included upgradient groundwater mounding and restriction of groundwater flux to the wetland. Model simulations aided in the identification of improvements to the initial barrier design and guided subsequent design modifications. Results of the simulations indicate the usefulness of computer modeling in containment system design.

  11. North Diversion Structure Albuquerque, New Mexico. Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    metal was used to construct the railroad bridge and the I beams under the bridge. 6. The coefficient of roughness of the model surface of the channel...operation to approximate the hydrograph flows and duration. 8. Water- surface elevations in the outlet channel were controlled with a broad - crested ... weir at the downstream end of the model. The elevation of the broad - crested weir was modified to reproduce various outlet channel 8 VV . .ML

  12. Hydraulic Inverse Modeling Using Total-Variation Regularization with Relaxed Variable-Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Vesselinov, V. V.; O'Malley, D.; Wohlberg, B.

    2016-12-01

    Inverse modeling seeks model parameters given a set of observed-state variables. For many practical hydrogeological problems, because the data coverage is limited, the inversion can be ill-posed and unstable. Typically, inverse analyses are applied to characterize aquifer heterogeneity where the hydraulic permeability is estimated throughout the model domain. To stabilize the inversion, regularization techniques can be employed to eliminate the ill-posedness. The most commonly used type of regularization include Tikhonov and Total-Variation (TV). The hydraulic tomographic analyses of aquifer heterogeneity with Tikhonov regularization tends to yield smoothed inversion results, while the ones with TV regularization can preserve the sharp contrast between low and high permeability regions. However, hydraulic inverse modeling with the conventional TV regularization can be computationally unstable and yield unwanted artifacts because of the non-differentiability of the TV norm. We develop a novel hydraulic inverse modeling method using a TV regularization with relaxed variable-splitting scheme to preserve sharp interfaces in piecewise-constant structures and improve the accuracy of inversion. We use an alternating-minimization algorithm to solve the minimization problem. Specifically, we decouple the original problem into two simple sub-problems: a standard inverse modeling sub-problem with the Tikhonov regularization, and a standard L2-TV sub-problem. We solve these two sub-problems using the standard linear solver and Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) iterative methods, respectively. Our new inversion algorithm is implemented in the MADS computational framework (http://mads.lanl.gov). The computational cost of our new inversion methods is comparable to those of conventional inversion approaches. Our numerical examples using synthetic data show that our new methods not only preserve sharp interfaces of subsurface permeability distribution, but also

  13. Fast Flood damage estimation coupling hydraulic modeling and Multisensor Satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Rudari, R.; Delogu, F.; Candela, L.; Corina, A.; Boni, G.

    2011-12-01

    Damage estimation requires a good representation of the Elements at risk and their vulnerability, the knowledge of the flooded area extension and the description of the hydraulic forcing. In this work the real time use of a simplified two dimensional hydraulic model constrained by satellite retrieved flooded areas is analyzed. The main features of such a model are computational speed and simple start-up, with no need to insert complex information but a subset of simplified boundary and initial condition. Those characteristics allow the model to be fast enough to be used in real time for the simulation of flooding events. The model fills the gap of information left by single satellite scenes of flooded area, allowing for the estimation of the maximum flooding extension and magnitude. The static information provided by earth observation (like SAR extension of flooded areas at a certain time) are interpreted in a dynamic consistent way and very useful hydraulic information (e.g., water depth, water speed and the evolution of flooded areas)are provided. These information are merged with satellite identification of elements exposed to risk that are characterized in terms of their vulnerability to floods in order to obtain fast estimates of Food damages. The model has been applied in several flooding events occurred worldwide. amongst the other activations in the Mediterranean areas like Veneto (IT) (October 2010), Basilicata (IT) (March 2011) and Shkoder (January 2010 and December 2010) are considered and compared with larger types of floods like the one of Queensland in December 2010.

  14. Dynamic Modeling of Hydraulic Power Steering System with Variable Ratio Rack and Pinion Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Wang, Miao

    A comprehensive mathematical model of a typical hydraulic power steering system equipped with variable ratio rack and pinion gear is developed. The steering system’s dynamic characteristics are investigated and its forced vibrations are compared with those obtained from a counterpart system with a constant ratio rack and pinion gear. The modeling details of the mechanism subsystem, hydraulic supply lines subsystem and the rotary spool valve subsystem are provided and included in the integrated steering system model. The numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of the nonlinear parametric steering system. From the comparison between simulated results and the experimental ones, it is shown that the model accurately integrates the boost characteristics of the rotary spool valve which is the key component of hydraulic power steering system. The variable ratio rack-pinion gear behaviors significantly differently from its constant ratio counterpart does. It significantly affects not only the system natural frequencies but also reduces vibrations under constant rate and ramp torque steering inputs. The developed steering model produces valid predictions of the system’s behavior and therfore could assist engineers in the design and analysis of integrated steering systems.

  15. Quantifying Uncertainty in Flood Inundation Mapping Using Streamflow Ensembles and Multiple Hydraulic Modeling Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, S. M. H.; Zarzar, C.; Gomez, M.; Siddique, R.; Smith, V.; Mejia, A.; Demir, I.

    2016-12-01

    The National Water Model (NWM) provides a platform for operationalize nationwide flood inundation forecasting and mapping. The ability to model flood inundation on a national scale will provide invaluable information to decision makers and local emergency officials. Often, forecast products use deterministic model output to provide a visual representation of a single inundation scenario, which is subject to uncertainty from various sources. While this provides a straightforward representation of the potential inundation, the inherent uncertainty associated with the model output should be considered to optimize this tool for decision making support. The goal of this study is to produce ensembles of future flood inundation conditions (i.e. extent, depth, and velocity) to spatially quantify and visually assess uncertainties associated with the predicted flood inundation maps. The setting for this study is located in a highly urbanized watershed along the Darby Creek in Pennsylvania. A forecasting framework coupling the NWM with multiple hydraulic models was developed to produce a suite ensembles of future flood inundation predictions. Time lagged ensembles from the NWM short range forecasts were used to account for uncertainty associated with the hydrologic forecasts. The forecasts from the NWM were input to iRIC and HEC-RAS two-dimensional software packages, from which water extent, depth, and flow velocity were output. Quantifying the agreement between output ensembles for each forecast grid provided the uncertainty metrics for predicted flood water inundation extent, depth, and flow velocity. For visualization, a series of flood maps that display flood extent, water depth, and flow velocity along with the underlying uncertainty associated with each of the forecasted variables were produced. The results from this study demonstrate the potential to incorporate and visualize model uncertainties in flood inundation maps in order to identify the high flood risk zones.

  16. Sequential hydraulic tests for transient and highly permeable unconfined aquifer systems - model development and field-scale implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, C.-F.; Huang, Y.-J.; Dong, J.-J.; Yeh, T.-C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The transient hydraulic tomography survey (THTS) is a conceptually improved technique that efficiently estimates detailed variations in aquifer parameters. Based on the concept of the THTS, we developed a geostatistical inverse model to characterize saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) and the specific yield (Sy) in transient and unconfined aquifer systems. In this study, a synthetic example was first used to assess the accuracy of the developed inverse model. Multiple random K and Sy realizations with different variances of natural logarithm of K (lnK) were generated and systematically compared to evaluate the effects of joint inversion on K estimations. The model was implemented in field-scale, cross-hole injection tests in a shallow and highly permeable unconfined aquifer near the middle reaches of the Wu River in central Taiwan. To assess the effect of constant head boundary conditions on the estimation results, two additional modeling domains were evaluated on the basis of the same field data from the injection tests. The results of the synthetic example showed that the proposed inverse model can effectively reproduce the predefined K patterns and magnitudes. However, slightly less detail was obtained for the Sy field based on the sampling data from sequential transient hydraulic stresses. The joint inversion by using transient head observations could slightly decrease the accuracy of K estimations. The model implementation for field-scale injection tests showed that the model can estimate K and Sy fields with detailed spatial variations. Estimation results showed a relatively homogeneous aquifer for the tested well field. Results based on the three modeling domains showed similar patterns and magnitudes of K and Sy near the well locations. These results indicated that the THTS is relatively insensitive to artificially drawn boundary conditions even under transient conditions.

  17. Investigation of wadeable and unwadeable natural hydraulic jumps by integrating high resolution field surveying, digital terrain modeling, and process measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallé, B. L.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2002-12-01

    Recent research in fluvial geomorphology has emphasized the development of three-dimensional digital terrain models (DTMs) to better understand the interrelationship between river processes and channel form. However, no attempts have previously been made to apply DTMs to bedrock-controlled boulder-bed channels. Recent advances in integrating CAD techniques with intensive and iterative field surveys has allowed for the development of high-resolution digital terrain models for the bed and water surface topographies of two wadeable hydraulic jumps in the upper South Fork American River basin, CA, and one unwadeable hydraulic jump in the Cache Creek basin, CA. Field surveys varied based on the presence of subaerial, subaqueous, and wadeable conditions, and were conducted at two discharges. For unwadeable conditions, a new high-resolution mechanical surveying system was used to sample the bed and water surface. In addition, process measurements such as air content were recorded. Average point densities ranged from 4 to 22 pts per sq. m over a 6 to 68 sq. m area. Maximum point densities ranged from 33 to 64 pts per sq. m. Bed DTMs for all sites indicate a sub-channel width control on jump formation. Water surface DTMs indicate the presence of a strong stage-dependence on water surface topography, with shifts in the nappe profile and downstream water surface slopes at higher discharges. Further, rapidly varying supercritical flows had planar or convex shapes that could be empirically related to underlying bed topography. Air content DTMs showed significant spatial and temporal variability as well as rapid air entrainment at the jump toe. Air detrainment varied considerably. Subsequently, DTMs and process data were used to test a series of simple empirical relationships not previously investigated for natural hydraulic jumps. Further study will emphasize the development and deployment of process-based instrumentation such that the complex turbulent air-water flow dynamics

  18. A multiscale approach to determine hydraulic conductivity in thick claystone aquitards using field, laboratory, and numerical modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.; Barbour, S. L.; Hendry, M. J.; Novakowski, K.; van der Kamp, G.

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the hydraulic conductivity (K) of aquitards is difficult due to technical and logistical difficulties associated with field-based methods as well as the cost and challenge of collecting representative and competent core samples for laboratory analysis. The objective of this study was to produce a multiscale comparison of vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kv and Kh, respectively) of a regionally extensive Cretaceous clay-rich aquitard in southern Saskatchewan. Ten vibrating wire pressure transducers were lowered into place at depths between 25 and 325 m, then the annular was space was filled with a cement-bentonite grout. The in situ Kh was estimated at the location of each transducer by simulating the early-time pore pressure measurements following setting of the grout using a 2-D axisymmetric, finite element, numerical model. Core samples were collected during drilling for conventional laboratory testing for Kv to compare with the transducer-determined in situ Kh. Results highlight the importance of scale and consideration of the presence of possible secondary features (e.g., fractures) in the aquitard. The proximity of the transducers to an active potash mine (˜1 km) where depressurization of an underlying aquifer resulted in drawdown through the aquitard provided a unique opportunity to model the current hydraulic head profile using both the Kh and Kv estimates. Results indicate that the transducer-determined Kh estimates would allow for the development of the current hydraulic head distribution, and that simulating the pore pressure recovery can be used to estimate moderately low in situ Kh (<10-11 m s-1).

  19. Assessing the influence of the rhizosphere on soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Daly, Keith R; Mooney, Sacha J; Bennett, Malcolm J; Crout, Neil M J; Roose, Tiina; Tracy, Saoirse R

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water distribution in soil is crucial for enhancing our knowledge of managing soil and water resources. The application of X-ray computed tomography (CT) to the plant and soil sciences is now well established. However, few studies have utilized the technique for visualizing water in soil pore spaces. Here this method is utilized to visualize the water in soil in situ and in three-dimensions at successive reductive matric potentials in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The measurements are combined with numerical modelling to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, providing a complete picture of the hydraulic properties of the soil. The technique was performed on soil cores that were sampled adjacent to established roots (rhizosphere soil) and from soil that had not been influenced by roots (bulk soil). A water release curve was obtained for the different soil types using measurements of their pore geometries derived from CT imaging and verified using conventional methods, such as pressure plates. The water, soil, and air phases from the images were segmented and quantified using image analysis. The water release characteristics obtained for the contrasting soils showed clear differences in hydraulic properties between rhizosphere and bulk soil, especially in clay soil. The data suggest that soils influenced by roots (rhizosphere soil) are less porous due to increased aggregation when compared with bulk soil. The information and insights obtained on the hydraulic properties of rhizosphere and bulk soil will enhance our understanding of rhizosphere biophysics and improve current water uptake models. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Estimating water and nitrate leaching in tree crops using inverse modelled plant and soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvreur, Valentin; Kandelous, Maziar; Mairesse, Harmony; Baram, Shahar; Moradi, Ahmad; Pope, Katrin; Hopmans, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater quality is specifically vulnerable in irrigated agricultural lands in California and many other (semi-)arid regions of the world. The routine application of nitrogen fertilizers with irrigation water in California is likely responsible for the high nitrate concentrations in groundwater, underlying much of its main agricultural areas. To optimize irrigation/fertigation practices, it is essential that irrigation and fertilizers are applied at the optimal concentration, place, and time to ensure maximum root uptake and minimize leaching losses to the groundwater. The applied irrigation water and dissolved fertilizer, root nitrate and water uptake interact with soil and root properties in a complex manner that cannot easily be resolved. It is therefore that coupled experimental-modelling studies are required to allow for unravelling of the relevant complexities that result from typical variations of crop properties, soil texture and layering across farmer-managed fields. A combined field monitoring and modelling approach was developed to quantify from simple measurements the leaching of water and nitrate below the root zone. The monitored state variables are soil water content within the root zone, soil matric potential below the root zone, and nitrate concentration in the soil solution. Plant and soil properties of incremented complexity are optimized with the software HYDRUS in an inverse modelling scheme, which allows estimating leaching under constraint of hydraulic principles. Questions of optimal irrigation and fertilization timing can then be addressed using predictive results and global optimization algorithms.

  1. Inverse modeling of a multistep outflow experiment fordetermining hysteretic hydraulic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.; Finsterle, S.; Sonnenborg, T.O.

    1998-05-01

    A new, closed-form hysteretic model of the capillary pressure-saturation and relative permeability-saturation relationship has been implemented into ITOUGH2. The hysteretic capillary pressure function is based on the van Genuchten model, with a modified version of the dependent domain model of Mualem to describe the scanning curves. Hysteresis in the relative permeability relations is considered to be mainly a result of nonwetting fluid entrap- ment. The hysteresis model was used in combination with inverse modeling techniques to examine the potential of a simple drainage- imbibition experiment to determine hysteretic hydraulic properties.

  2. Study on Flow Field Characteristics of Nozzle Water Jet in Hydraulic cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wen-tao; Deng, Xiao-yu

    2017-08-01

    Based on the theory of hydrodynamics, a mathematical model of nozzle water jet flow field in hydraulic cutting is established. By numerical simulation, the effects of nozzle convergence angle, nozzle outlet diameter and cylindrical section length on water jet flow impact is obtained, and the influence of three factors on the nozzle water jet flow field is analyzed. The optimal nozzle parameters are obtained by simulation as follows: convergence angle is 13 °, cylindrical section length is 8 mm and nozzle outlet diameter is 2 mm. Under this optimal nozzle parameters, hydraulic cutting has the best comprehensive effect.

  3. Property-Transfer Modeling to Estimate Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Deep Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Winfield, Kari A.

    2007-01-01

    The unsaturated zone at the Idaho National Laboratory is complex, comprising thick basalt flow sequences interbedded with thinner sedimentary layers. Understanding the highly nonlinear relation between water content and hydraulic conductivity within the sedimentary interbeds is one element in predicting water flow and solute transport processes in this geologically complex environment. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments is costly and time consuming, therefore use of models that estimate this property from more easily measured bulk-physical properties is desirable. A capillary bundle model was used to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for 40 samples from sedimentary interbeds using water-retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity derived from (1) laboratory measurements on core samples, and (2) site-specific property transfer regression models developed for the sedimentary interbeds. Four regression models were previously developed using bulk-physical property measurements (bulk density, the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient) as the explanatory variables. The response variables, estimated from linear combinations of the bulk physical properties, included saturated hydraulic conductivity and three parameters that define the water-retention curve. The degree to which the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves estimated from property-transfer-modeled water-retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity approximated the laboratory-measured data was evaluated using a goodness-of-fit indicator, the root-mean-square error. Because numerical models of variably saturated flow and transport require parameterized hydraulic properties as input, simulations were run to evaluate the effect of the various parameters on model results. Results show that the property transfer models based on easily measured bulk properties perform nearly as well as using curve fits to laboratory-measured water

  4. Study on adaptive PID algorithm of hydraulic turbine governing system based on fuzzy neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liangbao; Bao, Jumin

    2006-11-01

    The conventional hydraulic turbine governing system can't automatically modulate PID parameters according to the dynamic process of the system, the generator speed is unstable and the mains frequency fluctuation results in. To solve the above problem, the fuzzy neural network (FNN) and the adaptive control are combined to design an adaptive PID algorithm based on the fuzzy neural network which can effectively control the hydraulic turbine governing system. Finally, the improved mathematic model is simulated. The simulation results are compared with the conventional hydraulic turbine's. Thus the validity and superiority of the fuzzy neural network PID algorithm have been proved. The simulation results show that the algorithm not only retains the functions of fuzzy control, but also provides the ability to approach to the non-linear system. Also the dynamic process of the system can be reflected more precisely and the on-line adaptive control is implemented. The algorithm is superior to other methods in response and control effect.

  5. Method study on fuzzy-PID adaptive control of electric-hydraulic hitch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingsheng; Wang, Liubu; Liu, Jian; Ye, Jin

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, fuzzy-PID adaptive control method is applied to the control of tractor electric-hydraulic hitch system. According to the characteristics of the system, a fuzzy-PID adaptive controller is designed and the electric-hydraulic hitch system model is established. Traction control and position control performance simulation are carried out with the common PID control method. A field test rig was set up to test the electric-hydraulic hitch system. The test results showed that, after the fuzzy-PID adaptive control is adopted, when the tillage depth steps from 0.1m to 0.3m, the system transition process time is 4s, without overshoot, and when the tractive force steps from 3000N to 7000N, the system transition process time is 5s, the system overshoot is 25%.

  6. Application of a Hydrodynamic Model for Assessing the Hydraulic Capacity and Flow Field at Willamette Falls Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Cheegwan; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Divers, Arya-Behbehani

    2006-08-03

    The Willamette Falls Hydroelectric Power Dam, operated by Portland General Electric (PGE), is located on the Willamette River, Oregon. The Project site consists of T.W. Sullivan Power Plant and a 2,950-ft-long spillway located on the top of the Willamette Falls Dam. As part of the effort of protection and enhancement of environmental resources, a flow control structure at the dam was proposed to improve the flow field and enhance the downstream juvenile fish passage in the region just upstream of the forebay (pre-forebay). The flow in the pre-forebay of Willamette Falls Dam is affected by the complex geometry and bathymetry, powerhouse flow, fish ladder flow and the spillway around the dam. The expectation was that the flow would be sensitive to the proposed flow control structures and could be modified to enhance downstream migration. In this study, a three-dimensional, free-surface hydrodynamic model (EFDC) was developed for the pre-forebay region of Willamette Falls to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed alternative and its effect on the flow field in two different flow regimes (low and high river flow), as well as to assess the hydraulic capacity of flow control structures. One of the key challenges in this modeling study was to properly specify the free open boundary conditions along the 2,950-feet-long spillway. In this study, a pressure boundary condition based on hydraulic head rating curves was applied to the free spillway boundary. The numerical model was calibrated with ADP velocity measurements at 17 stations for the existing low flow condition. Good agreements between model results and measured data were obtained, indicating the successful application of pressure boundary condition on the free spillway boundary. The calibrated model was applied to simulate the flow field and free surface elevation in the high flow region near the control flow structures under different alternative conditions. The model results were used to evaluate the

  7. A mathematical model of the inline CMOS matrix sensor for investigation of particles in hydraulic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilin, DV; Kudryavtsev, IA

    2016-10-01

    One of the most effective ways to diagnose the state of hydraulic system is an investigation of the particles in their liquids. The sizes of such particles range from 2 to 200 gm and their concentration and shape reveal important information about the current state of equipment and the necessity of maintenance. In-line automatic particle counters (APC), which are built into hydraulic system, are widely used for determination of particle size and concentration. These counters are based on a single photodiode and a light emitting diode (LED); however, samples of liquid are needed for analysis using microscope or industrial video camera in order to get information about particle shapes. The act of obtaining the sample leads to contamination by other particles from the air or from the sample tube, meaning that the results are usually corrupted. Using the CMOS or CCD matrix sensor without any lens for inline APC is the solution proposed by authors. In this case the matrix sensors are put into the liquid channel of the hydraulic system and illuminated by LED. This system could be stable in arduous conditions like high pressure and the vibration of the hydraulic system; however, the image or signal from that matrix sensor needs to be processed differently in comparison with the signal from microscope or industrial video camera because of relatively short distance between LED and sensor. This paper introduces mathematical model of a sensor with CMOS and LED, which can be built into hydraulic system. It is also provided a computational algorithm and results, which can be useful for calculation of particle sizes and shapes using the signal from the CMOS matrix sensor.

  8. Mill Creek Channel, Walla Walla, Washington. Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    peak discharge of 1,730 cfs. The bed of the model was raked to simulate the scarification and regrading of existing bed material accomplished by means...downstream of each stabilizer would be more appropriate than scarification and regrading of existing bed material in Mill Creek. 18. Comparisons between

  9. Storm Water Management Model Reference Manual Volume II – Hydraulics

    EPA Science Inventory

    SWMM is a dynamic rainfall-runoff simulation model used for single event or long-term (continuous) simulation of runoff quantity and quality from primarily urban areas. The runoff component of SWMM operates on a collection of subcatchment areas that receive precipitation and gene...

  10. Hydraulic modeling for lahar hazards at cascades volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The National Weather Service flood routing model DAMBRK is able to closely replicate field-documented stages of historic and prehistoric lahars from Mt. Rainier, Washington, and Mt. Hood, Oregon. Modeled time-of-travel of flow waves are generally consistent with documented lahar travel-times from other volcanoes around the world. The model adequately replicates a range of lahars and debris flows, including the 230 million km3 Electron lahar from Mt. Rainier, as well as a 10 m3 debris flow generated in a large outdoor experimental flume. The model is used to simulate a hypothetical lahar with a volume of 50 million m3 down the East Fork Hood River from Mt. Hood, Oregon. Although a flow such as this is thought to be possible in the Hood River valley, no field evidence exists on which to base a hazards assessment. DAMBRK seems likely to be usable in many volcanic settings to estimate discharge, velocity, and inundation areas of lahars when input hydrographs and energy-loss coefficients can be reasonably estimated.

  11. Assimilation of ambient seismic noise in hydrological models allows estimation of hydraulic conductivity in unsaturated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fores, B.; Champollion, C.; Mainsant, G.; Fort, A.; Albaric, J.

    2016-12-01

    Karstic hydrosystems represent one of the main water resources in the Mediterranean area but are challenging for geophysical methods. The GEK (Geodesy in Karstic Environment) observatory has been setup in 2011 to study the unsaturated zone of a karstic system in the south of France. The unsaturated zone (the epikarst) is thick and up to 100m on the site. Since 2011, gravity, rainfall and evapotranspiration are monitored. Together, they allow precise estimation of the global water storage changes but lack depth resolution. Surface waves velocity variations, obtained from ambient seismic noise monitoring are used here to overcome this lack. Indeed, velocities depend on saturation and the depths where changes occur can be defined as surface waves are dispersive. From October 2014 to November 2015, two seismometers have been recording noise. Velocity changes at a narrow frequency band (6-8 Hz) have shown a clear annual cycle. Minimum velocity is several months late on precipitations, which is coherent with a slow infiltration and a maximum sensitivity at -40m for these frequencies and this site. Models have been made with the Hydrus-1D software which allows modeling 1D-flow in variably saturated media. With a stochastic sampling, we have researched the underground parameters that reproduce the most the different observations (gravity, evapotranspiration and rainfall, and velocity changes). We show that velocity changes clearly constrain the hydraulic conductivity of the medium. Ambient seismic noise is therefore a promising method to study unsaturated zone which are too deep or too heterogeneous for classic methods.

  12. Pedotransfer functions for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity: implications for modeling storm flow generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobieraj, J. A.; Elsenbeer, H.; Vertessy, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    We evaluated the performance of nine published pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) in modeling the stormflow generated in a rainforest catchment. Using available input data consisting of particle size distribution, bulk density, and saturated moisture content information, these empirically-based PTFs were found to be inadequate in estimating Ks for this catchment. At shallow depths (0-0.1 m), PTFs commonly underestimated Ks by variable amounts with the exception of the Jabro PTF, which either overestimated Ks or was not significantly different from measured values. At subsequent depths (0.1-0.4 m), PTFs typically overestimated Ks by variable amounts, the exception being the Campbell and Shiozawa PTF, which typically underestimated Ks. We used TOPOG_SBM to model storm flow generation by replacing measured Ks values from the 0 to 0.1 m depth interval with PTF-estimated Ks values. The simulation set using Rosetta SSC (PTF with input of % sand, silt, clay) Ks values overestimated runoff for all events, and overland flow occurred across the entire catchment for all events. Simulations using Rosetta SSC-BD (PTF with input of % sand, silt, clay, and bulk density) Ks values predicted hydrograph attributes as well as the simulations using measured Ks values, but the Rosetta SSC-BD simulation set predicted a much larger spatial frequency of overland flow across the catchment than the measured Ks simulation set. Model simulations using the Jabro PTF, which generated large estimates of Ks, produced hydrographs that overestimated total runoff and time of rise but underestimated peak runoff. This model predicted much less overland flow than other models. Currently published PTFs used in this study are inadequate in estimating Ks for the La Cuenca catchment, which in turn make them inadequate for modeling storm flow generation. Enhanced model performance could likely be achieved by utilizing PTFs that better account for the influence

  13. The effect of dynamic changes in soil bulk density on hydraulic properties: modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel

    2014-05-01

    Natural and artificial processes, like rainfall-induced soil surface sealing or mechanical compaction, disturb the soil structure and enhance dynamic changes of the related pore size distribution. These changes may influence many aspects of the soil-water-plant-atmosphere system. One of the easiest measurable variables is the soil bulk density. Approaches are suggested that could model the effect of the change in soil bulk density on soil permeability, water retention curve (WRC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function (HCF). The resulting expressions were calibrated and validated against experimental data corresponding to different soil types at various levels of compaction, and enable a relatively good prediction of the effect of bulk density on the soil hydraulic properties. These models allow estimating the impact of such changes on flow processes and on transport properties of heterogeneous soil profiles.

  14. Development of a river ice jam by a combined heat loss and hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, J.; Gröndal, G. O.

    2008-11-01

    The heat loss theory and the hydraulic theory for the analysis of the development of wide channel ice jams are discussed and shown. The heat loss theory has been used in Iceland for a long time, while the hydraulic theory largely follows the classical ice-jam build-up theories used in known CFD models. The results are combined in a new method to calculate the maximum thickness and the extent of an ice jam. The results compare favorably to the HEC-RAS model for the development of a very large ice jam in Thjorsa River in Iceland, and have been found in good agreement with historical data, collected where a hydroelectric dam project, Urridafoss, is being planned in the Thjorsa River.

  15. Development of a river ice jam by a combined heat loss and hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, J.; Orri Gröndal, G.

    2008-04-01

    This paper discusses and shows the heat loss theory and the hydraulic theory for the analysis of the development of wide channel ice jams. The heat loss theory has been used in Iceland for a long time, while the hydraulic theory largely follows the classical ice-jam build-up theories used in known CFD models. The results are combined in a new method to calculate the maximum thickness and the extent of an ice jam. The results compare favorably to the HEC-RAS model for the development of a very large ice jam in Thjorsa River in Iceland. They are also in good agreement with historical data, collected where a hydroelectric dam project, Urridafoss, is being planned in the Thjorsa River.

  16. Antiquity versus modern times in hydraulics - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroia, L.; Georgescu, S. C.; Georgescu, A. M.

    2010-08-01

    Water supply and water management in Antiquity represent more than Modern World can imagine about how people in that period used to think about, and exploit the resources they had, aiming at developing and improving their society and own lives. This paper points out examples of how they handled different situations, and how they managed to cope with the growing number of population in the urban areas, by adapting or by improving their water supply systems. The paper tries to emphasize the engineering contribution of Rome and the Roman Empire, mainly in the capital but also in the provinces, as for instance the today territory of France, by analysing some aqueducts from the point of view of modern Hydraulic Engineering. A third order polynomial regression is proposed to compute the water flow rate, based on the flow cross-sectional area measured in quinaria. This paper also emphasizes on contradictory things between what we thought we knew about Ancient Roman civilization, and what could really be proven, either by a modern engineering approach, a documentary approach, or by commonsense, where none of the above could be used. It is certain that the world we live in is the heritage of the Greco-Roman culture and therefore, we are due to acknowledge their contribution, especially taking into account the lack of knowledge of that time, and the poor resources they had.

  17. Dynamic modeling of the servovalves incorporated in the servo hydraulic system of the 70-meter DSN antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    As the pointing accuracy and service life requirements of the DSN 70 meter antenna increase, it is necessary to gain a more complete understanding of the servo hydraulic system in order to improve system designs to meet the new requirements. A mathematical model is developed for the servovalve incorporated into the hydraulic system of the 70 meter antenna and uses experimental data to verify the validity of the model and to identify the model parameters.

  18. On the Single-Layer Hydraulics Model for Flows and Ventilation over Unban Areas in Stable Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric stability has substantial effects on the flows and heat/mass transport processes. While extensive studies have been conducted for neutral and unstable stabilities, rather limited studies have been devoted to stable stratification. Major technical reason is the demanding spatio-temporal resolution required to solve the small scales in stratified turbulent flows. Instead of continuous density variation, we use the single-layer hydraulics model (analogous to shallow water equations for global dynamics), to simulate the stratified flows and turbulence structure over hypothetical urban areas. An array of identical ribs in cross flows is used to model an idealized urban surface and the aerodynamic resistance is controlled by the separation among the ribs. Two immiscible fluids (water and air) with a large density difference (three order of magnitude) are used to simulate the stratification. The key assumption is that the density in the (lower) single layer is uniform. As a result, the stratification is measured by the Froude number Fr (= U/(gH)1/2; where U is the flow speed, g the gravitational acceleration and H the single-layer depth). One of the characteristics of single-layer hydraulics model is hydraulic jump which occurs when the flows are slowing down from Fr > 1 (high-speed flows over smoother surfaces) to Fr < 1 (lower-speed flows over rougher surfaces). It is noteworthy that kinetic energy does not conserve across hydraulic jump that, unavoidably, cascades to turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). We thus hypotheses that the elevated TKE could modify the street-level ventilation mechanism in the stratified flows across an abrupt change in surface roughness entering urban areas. Large-eddy simulation and laboratory-scale water channel experiments are sought to improve our understanding of the occurrence of hydraulic jump and the associated street-level ventilation mechanism in the stratified flows over urban areas. Preliminary results, by comparing the

  19. A Comparison of Land Surface Model Soil Hydraulic Properties Estimated by Inverse Modeling and Pedotransfer Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, Ethan D.; Small, Eric E.

    2007-01-01

    Soil hydraulic properties (SHPs) regulate the movement of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land surface. At present, SHPS are commonly defined by a simple pedotransfer function from soil texture class, but SHPs vary more within a texture class than between classes. To examine the impact of using soil texture class to predict SHPS, we run the Noah land surface model for a wide variety of measured SHPs. We find that across a range of vegetation cover (5 - 80% cover) and climates (250 - 900 mm mean annual precipitation), soil texture class only explains 5% of the variance expected from the real distribution of SHPs. We then show that modifying SHPs can drastically improve model performance. We compare two methods of estimating SHPs: (1) inverse method, and (2) soil texture class. Compared to texture class, inverse modeling reduces errors between measured and modeled latent heat flux from 88 to 28 w/m(exp 2). Additionally we find that with increasing vegetation cover the importance of SHPs decreases and that the van Genuchten m parameter becomes less important, while the saturated conductivity becomes more important.

  20. A Comparison of Land Surface Model Soil Hydraulic Properties Estimated by Inverse Modeling and Pedotransfer Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, Ethan D.; Small, Eric E.

    2007-01-01

    Soil hydraulic properties (SHPs) regulate the movement of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land surface. At present, SHPS are commonly defined by a simple pedotransfer function from soil texture class, but SHPs vary more within a texture class than between classes. To examine the impact of using soil texture class to predict SHPS, we run the Noah land surface model for a wide variety of measured SHPs. We find that across a range of vegetation cover (5 - 80% cover) and climates (250 - 900 mm mean annual precipitation), soil texture class only explains 5% of the variance expected from the real distribution of SHPs. We then show that modifying SHPs can drastically improve model performance. We compare two methods of estimating SHPs: (1) inverse method, and (2) soil texture class. Compared to texture class, inverse modeling reduces errors between measured and modeled latent heat flux from 88 to 28 w/m(exp 2). Additionally we find that with increasing vegetation cover the importance of SHPs decreases and that the van Genuchten m parameter becomes less important, while the saturated conductivity becomes more important.

  1. 75 FR 35023 - Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... AGENCY Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study AGENCY: Environmental... announcing four (4) public informational meetings to explain its proposed plan to study the relationship.... EPA will provide the public with information about the Agency's preliminary plans for study scope and...

  2. The use of sediment deposition maps as auxiliary data for hydraulic model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukolwe, Micah; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2013-04-01

    One aspect of the French disaster mitigation setup is the statutory Risk Prevention Plans (PPR, Plans de Prévention des Risques); i.e. spatial identification of potential disasters and mitigation measures. The maps are categorised into three zones depicting increasing disaster severity and potential mitigation measures (RTM, 1999). Taking the example of the city of Barcelonnette, in South France (French Alps), floods have been the most frequent occurring natural hazard (Flageollet et al., 1996). Consequently, a case is put forward for the need for accurate flood extent delineation to support the decision making process. For this study, the Barcelonnette case study was considered, whereby the last devastating flooding was in June 1957 (Weber, 1994). Contrary to the recent advances in the proliferation of data to support flood inundation studies (Bates, 2012; Bates, 2004; Di Baldassarre and Uhlenbrook, 2012; Schumann et al., 2009), constraints are faced when analysing flood inundation events that occurred before the 1970's. In absence of frequent flooding, the analysis of historical flood extents may play an important role in shaping the awareness of local stakeholders and support land-use and urban planning. This study is part of a probabilistic flood mapping (e.g. Di Baldassarre et al., 2010, Horrit, 2006) of the valley carried out in a Monte-Carlo framework, while taking into account the peak flow and the parametric uncertainty. The simulations were carried out using the sub-grid channel model extension of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model (Bates et al, 2010; Neal et al., 2012). Sediment deposition maps (Lecarpentier, 1963) were used to analyse the model performance, additionally the graduation of the sediment deposition sizes showed the flood propagation and was used to analyse the model runs. However, there still remains the challenge of quantifying the uncertainty in the sediment deposition map and the actual flood extent.

  3. Libby Reregulating Dam, Kootenai River, Montana. Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    final design tailrace showing tailwater influence on skimming or plunging flow Photograph 79. Movable bed in 1:80-scale model Photograph 80...8217- lcc cc cccca , ccr-: cO \\O O a s 0%Oa, co~ o3, o~o mOOC O (7 4 𔃺 N a -a, t- 4 0000 0000 00 0 0 0 00r~4--4 00 0 C0.40 H)00 C 0C l C: DC C ; 0C0 0 C0

  4. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-01

    Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10(-10), 2.08 × 10(-9) and 6.8 × 10(-10)m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH=2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  5. Quantifying Hydraulic Conductivity and Fluid Pressures in the Alpine Fault Hanging-Wall Using DFDP-2 Data and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussens, J. P.; Woodman, N. D.; Menzies, C. D.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Sutherland, R.; Capova, L.; Cox, S.; Upton, P.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow can play an important role in fault failure, due to the influence of pore pressure on effective confining stress and through chemical and thermal alteration of the fault zone. Rocks of the Alpine Fault Zone, both exposed at the surface and recovered in cores, show evidence for significant alteration by fluids. However, the fluid flow regime in the region is poorly constrained and its relationship with the behaviour of the fault is uncertain. In 2014 the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) drilled the DFDP-2B borehole, penetrating 893 m into the hanging-wall of the Alpine Fault. Prior to drilling, a set of hydrogeological models for the Whataroa Valley region, encompassing the DFDP-2B drill site, were constructed using the modelling software FEFLOW. Models were constructed for a range of plausible hydraulic conductivity structures for the region. They predicted strongly artesian hydraulic heads of 50-150 m above surface elevation and temperatures exceeding 100 °C within 1 km depth in bedrock beneath the DFDP-2 drill site, with the exact hydraulic and thermal gradients dependent on the hydraulic conductivity structure chosen. During the drilling project hydraulic and thermal data from the borehole was collected. This included 33 slug test datasets, carried out at a range of borehole depths throughout the project. Estimates for hydraulic conductivity were obtained by analysis of slug test data. Steady state hydraulic heads for the borehole, across a range of depths, were estimated from the slug test measurements. Depth profiles of hydraulic head show rapid increases in hydraulic head with depth, in line with model predictions. Results show fluid pressures greatly exceeding hydrostatic pressure in the shallow crust, reflecting significant upward flow of groundwater beneath the Whataroa Valley. Hydraulic conductivity estimates provide constraints on the hydraulic conductivity structure of the region. All hydraulic conductivity structures modelled thus far

  6. Hydraulic Fracture Growth in a Layered Formation based on Fracturing Experiments and Discrete Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushi, Zou; Xinfang, Ma; Tong, Zhou; Ning, Li; Ming, Chen; Sihai, Li; Yinuo, Zhang; Han, Li

    2017-09-01

    Hydraulic fracture (HF) height containment tends to occur in layered formations, and it significantly influences the entire HF geometry or the stimulated reservoir volume. This study aims to explore the influence of preexisting bedding planes (BPs) on the HF height growth in layered formations. Laboratory fracturing experiments were performed to confirm the occurrence of HF height containment in natural shale that contains multiple weak and high-permeability BPs under triaxial stresses. Numerical simulations were then conducted to further illustrate the manner in which vertical stress, BP permeability, BP density(or spacing), pump rate, and fluid viscosity control HF height growth using a 3D discrete element method-based fracturing model. In this model, the rock matrix was considered transversely isotropic and multiple BPs can be explicitly represented. Experimental and numerical results show that the vertically growing HF tends to be limited by multi-high-permeability BPs, even under higher vertical stress. When the vertically growing HF intersects with the multi-high-permeability BPs, the injection pressure will be sharply reduced. If a low pumping rate or a low-viscosity fluid is used, the excess fracturing fluid leak-off into the BPs obviously decreases the rate of pressure build up, which will then limit the growth of HF. Otherwise, a higher pumping rate and/or a higher viscosity will reduce the leak-off time and fluid volume, but increase the injection pressure to drive the HF to grow and to penetrate through the BPs.

  7. Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists

  8. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN TOPOGRAPHY AND ROUGHNESS IN A 2D RASTER-BASED HYDRAULIC MODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, M.; Yu, D.; Lane, S. N.; Benito-Ferrandez, G.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of river flow using hydraulic modelling and its implications in derived environmental applications are inextricably connected with the way in which the river boundary shape is represented. This relationship is scale-dependent upon the modelling resolution which in turn determines the importance of a subscale performance of the model and the way subscale (surface and flow) processes are parameterised. This work aims to explore scaling effects associated with the parameterisation of topography and roughness (i.e. surface at different scales) and possible interactions between its components (mesh resolution, topographic content of the DEM and roughness parameterisation) within a 2D raster-based diffusion-wave model. A distributed roughness variable which is scale dependent on the mesh resolution and the surface roughness of the DEM is incorporated to the hydraulic model. The roughness parameterisation is carried out on the basis of a LiDAR-derived vegetation height model and applied in a raster based 2D diffusion wave model. Topographic models with different topographic contents and a constant mesh resolution are generated using LiDAR data and different vertical thresholds. Five DEMs are generated with different topographic contents (±Δz), (DEM±5cm, DEM±10cm, DEM±25cm, DEM±50cm) and four mesh resolutions (1, 2, 4 and 8m) are assessed. A sensitivity analysis on the model results to mesh resolution due to interpolation and resampling procedures of topographic data is performed. Interactions between topographic and roughness parameterisation are related to model results and finally, geostatistical methods are used to document scaling effects in hydraulic modelling results and model performance. This method explicitly recognises the three-way interaction between the discretised mesh resolution and the topographic content in the DEM with the roughness parameterisation. The work shows how the subscale behaviour of the 2D hydraulic model is not well

  9. Modelling cave flow hydraulics in the Notranjski Kras, Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Gabrovsek, Franci

    2015-04-01

    The Notranjski Kras region is a karst region in western Slovenia, developed in Cretaceous limestone. The region is characterised by hilly relief, with peaks reaching 1300 m elevation. Several well-developed cave systems drain the karst aquifer, providing preferential flow pathes along two sections: The Pivka River, which sinks into Postojnska Jama and reappears in Planinska Jama, and the Stržen and Cerkniščica rivers, which sink into Karlovica Jama, flow through Zelške Jama and Tkalca Jama and also reappear in Planinska Jama. Both sub-surface flow pathes merge in Planinska Jama, providing water for the Unica river. The Unica river leaves Planinska Jama via a large karst srping and passes through Planinsko Polje, disappearing again through two groups of ponors, finally emerging in the Ljubljanka Springs at around 300 m asl. The sub-surface flow path through the Postojnska Jama cave system has been monitored with 7 stations distributed along the flow path, monitoring stage and temperature. We have used the stage data to model flow through the cave system with the program package SWMM, simulating the active parts of Postojnska Jama with simplified geometry. From the comparison of stage observations and predictions, we identified key sections in the cave, which control the sub-surface flow, such as passage constrictions, sumps and by-passes. Using a formal inverse procedure, we determined the geometry of this key sections by fitting predicted to observed stages, and we achieved a very high degree of correlation.

  10. Hydraulic-fracture propagation in layered rock: experimental studies of fracture containment

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L. W.; Clark, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Fracture geometry is an important concern in the design of a massive hydraulic fracture treatment for improved natural gas recovery from tight gas sands. Possible prediction of vertical fracture growth and containment in layered rock requires an improved understanding of the parameters which may control fracture growth across layer interfaces. We have conducted laboratory hydraulic fracture experiments and elastic finite element studies which show that at least two distinct geologic conditions may inhibit or contain the vertical growth of hydraulic fractures in layered rock; (1) a weak interfacial shear strength of the layers and (2) a compressional increase in the minimum horizontal stress in the bounding layer. The second condition is more important and more likely to occur at depth. Variations in the horizontal stress can result from differences in elastic properties of individual layers in a layered rock sequence. A compressional increase in the minimum horizontal stress can occur in going from high shear modulus into low shear modulus layers.

  11. Temporal evolution modeling of hydraulic and water quality performance of permeable pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; He, Jianxun; Valeo, Caterina; Chu, Angus

    2016-02-01

    A mathematical model for predicting hydraulic and water quality performance in both the short- and long-term is proposed based on field measurements for three types of permeable pavements: porous asphalt (PA), porous concrete (PC), and permeable inter-locking concrete pavers (PICP). The model was applied to three field-scale test sites in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The model performance was assessed in terms of hydraulic parameters including time to peak, peak flow and water balance and a water quality variable (the removal rate of total suspended solids). A total of 20 simulated storm events were used for model calibration and verification processes. The proposed model can simulate the outflow hydrographs with a coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.762 to 0.907, and normalized root-mean-square deviation (NRMSD) ranging from 13.78% to 17.83%. Comparison of the time to peak flow, peak flow, runoff volume and TSS removal rates between the measured and modeled values in model verification phase had a maximum difference of 11%. The results demonstrate that the proposed model is capable of capturing the temporal dynamics of the pavement performance. Therefore, the model has great potential as a practical modeling tool for permeable pavement design and performance assessment.

  12. Hydraulic modeling of an interior channel identified inside a Martian Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratti, Emanuele; Pajola, Maurizio; Coradini, Marcello; Montanari, Alberto; Pieri, David; McBride, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Constraining the amount of water flowing on the surface of Mars during the ancient hydrological activity of the planet is one of the fundamental and crucial aspects to understand its paleohydrology. Within this work, a detailed hydraulic study of an interior channel is presented. The river reach is located in the Memnonia quadrangle between 166°0'0"w and 168°0'0"w longitude and between 8°0'0"s and 9°0'0"s latitude. The Mars Express high-resolution stereo camera digital elevation model, HRSC DEM, H31850000DA4, presents a spatial resolution of 75 m and it was used to characterize the geometry of the interior channel. Geomorphic evidences (i.e. flood terraces) were used to identify the probable bank-full level. In particular, we found out that the channel appears to be characterized by two different terracing levels. The river reach segment is 10 km long and averagely 1 km wide. The paleoriver bed presents a complex topography, characterized by significant changes in slope. We used a hydraulic model capable to perform one-dimensional water surface profile calculations for steady gradually varied flow in natural channels. At each cross section we computed the water level by solving the energy equation or, where this was not considered applicable, by using the momentum equation. The identified terracing levels were used to constrain the water discharge flowing on the surface and the roughness coefficient of the surface (the latter, as well as the energy and momentum equations, being adapted to the Martian gravity). By applying a Monte Carlo procedure, the relative frequency of the most probable discharge and roughness coefficient for both bankfull levels was derived. Hints on the grain size distribution are also presented. Regarding the lower bankfull levels, we obtained a median value of stream discharge and Manning roughness coefficient equal to 17400 m3s-1 and 0.08 m-1/3s. When considering the upper terracing levels our methodology indicated a median value of

  13. Functional linear models to test for differences in prairie wetland hydraulic gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, Mark C.; Sojda, Richard S.; Preston, Todd M.; Swayne, David A.; Yang, Wanhong; Voinov, A.A.; Rizzoli, A.; Filatova, T.

    2010-01-01

    Functional data analysis provides a framework for analyzing multiple time series measured frequently in time, treating each series as a continuous function of time. Functional linear models are used to test for effects on hydraulic gradient functional responses collected from three types of land use in Northeastern Montana at fourteen locations. Penalized regression-splines are used to estimate the underlying continuous functions based on the discretely recorded (over time) gradient measurements. Permutation methods are used to assess the statistical significance of effects. A method for accommodating missing observations in each time series is described. Hydraulic gradients may be an initial and fundamental ecosystem process that responds to climate change. We suggest other potential uses of these methods for detecting evidence of climate change.

  14. Using hydraulic modeling to address social impacts of small dam removals in southern New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Wyrick, Joshua R; Rischman, Brian A; Burke, Christopher A; McGee, Craig; Williams, Chasity

    2009-07-01

    Small relic mill dams are common in the watersheds of southern New Jersey, dotting the landscape with many small neighborhood lakes. Originally built in the late 1800s, most of these dams have become increasingly unable to handle current design storms due to increased urbanization of the watersheds. Several of these dams have also been classified as "high hazard" by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Dam Safety Division because their failure has the potential for loss of life or extensive property damage. The current private owners are generally unable to afford the high repair costs needed to rehabilitate the dams to current safety standards, and are therefore more inclined to remove them. This research analyses both the physical and social impacts of the removal of two small dams in southern New Jersey, and integrates the two seemingly disparate concepts. Using hydraulic modeling and previous case studies, it is predicted that there will be limited effects to the hydrological and biological characteristics of the stream corridor. A survey distributed to the affected homeowners that live on these lakes shows that the community, however, expects significant impacts to the bio-physical characteristics of the stream corridor, as well financial impacts to their property value and social impacts to their recreational activities. The current study exposes the widening gap between policy makers and landowners, and highlights where complete stakeholder interaction could and should occur.

  15. Advanced Hydraulic Tomography Analysis Strategies--A Numerical Study based on Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, C. M.; Yeh, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    This report presents a discussion on some of the unexplored issues pertaining to the application of hydraulic tomography to interpret pumping test data collected in the field. Using numerical experiments, we probe at a few new strategies to analyze pumping test results for multi-layer aquifers. First of all, we study the averaging of heads over packer intervals of a wellbore. How does the length of the packers reduce the resolution of the estimated hydraulic conductivity (K) field? Next we investigate the effect of using hard data (a.k.a. primary information or K measurements) conditioning on the estimated K field. Does the conditioning constrain the solution better and if so, by how much? Then we examine the effect of initial guess of K field on the inversion results. Currently, our hydraulic tomography approach (SSLE (Yeh and Liu (2000) and SimSLE (Xiang et al. (2009)) assumes a homogeneous K field as initial guess by default. What if we use a random field as initial guess? What about assigning different zones in the domain and designate different homogenous initial guess values to each of them? Finally, updating and storing the covariance matrix heavily consumes computation time during the inversion process and can sometimes be prohibiting when solving large problems. In fact, it is often the most time-consuming part of the hydraulic tomography analysis. We study the effects on the hydraulic tomography results of (1) whether updating the covariance matrix after each iteration and (2) whether storing the full matrix or diagonal terms only. The investigation outlined above will shed light on the development of more effective and reliable hydraulic tomography analysis practices and algorithms.

  16. A computationally efficient 2D hydraulic approach for global flood hazard modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begnudelli, L.; Kaheil, Y.; Sanders, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    We present a physically-based flood hazard model that incorporates two main components: a hydrologic model and a hydraulic model. For hydrology we use TOPNET, a more comprehensive version of the original TOPMODEL. To simulate flood propagation, we use a 2D Godunov-type finite volume shallow water model. Physically-based global flood hazard simulation poses enormous computational challenges stemming from the increasingly fine resolution of available topographic data which represents the key input. Parallel computing helps to distribute the computational cost, but the computationally-intensive hydraulic model must be made far faster and agile for global-scale feasibility. Here we present a novel technique for hydraulic modeling whereby the computational grid is much coarser (e.g., 5-50 times) than the available topographic data, but the coarse grid retains the storage and conveyance (cross-sectional area) of the fine resolution data. This allows the 2D hydraulic model to be run on extremely large domains (e.g. thousands km2) with a single computational processor, and opens the door to global coverage with parallel computing. The model also downscales the coarse grid results onto the high-resolution topographic data to produce fine-scale predictions of flood depths and velocities. The model achieves computational speeds typical of very coarse grids while achieving an accuracy expected of a much finer resolution. In addition, the model has potential for assimilation of remotely sensed water elevations, to define boundary conditions based on water levels or river discharges and to improve model results. The model is applied to two river basins: the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania, and the Ogeechee River in Florida. The two rivers represent different scales and span a wide range of topographic characteristics. Comparing spatial resolutions ranging between 30 m to 500 m in both river basins, the new technique was able to reduce simulation runtime by at least 25 fold

  17. Using Fully Coupled Hydro-Geomechanical Numerical Test Bed to Study Reservoir Stimulation with Low Hydraulic Pressure

    DOE Data Explorer

    Fu, Pengcheng; Johnson, Scott M.; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2012-01-31

    This paper documents our effort to use a fully coupled hydro-geomechanical numerical test bed to study using low hydraulic pressure to stimulate geothermal reservoirs with existing fracture network. In this low pressure stimulation strategy, fluid pressure is lower than the minimum in situ compressive stress, so the fractures are not completely open but permeability improvement can be achieved through shear dilation. We found that in this low pressure regime, the coupling between the fluid phase and the rock solid phase becomes very simple, and the numerical model can achieve a low computational cost. Using this modified model, we study the behavior of a single fracture and a random fracture network.

  18. Inverse modeling of soil water content to estimate the hydraulic properties of a shallow soil and the associated weathered bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourgeois, O.; Bouvier, C.; Brunet, P.; Ayral, P.-A.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling soil water flow requires the knowledge of numerous parameters associated to the water content and the soil hydraulic properties. Direct estimations of those parameters in laboratory require expensive equipment and the obtained parameters are generally not representative at the field scale because of the limitation of core sample size. Indirect methods such as inverse modeling are known to get efficient estimations and are easier to set up and process for large-scale studies. In this study, we investigated the capacity of an inverse modeling procedure to estimate the soil and the bedrock hydrodynamic properties only from in situ soil water content measurements at multiple depths under natural conditions. Multi-objective parameter optimization was performed using the HYDRUS-1D software and an external optimization procedure based on the NSGA-II algorithm. In a midslope shallow soil, water content was monitored at 3 depths, 20, 40, and 60 cm during 12 intense rainfall events, whose amounts ranged between 50 and 250 mm and duration between 1 and 5 days. The vertical profile was considered as 2 layers of soils above a third layer representing the weathered schist rock. This deep layer acted as a deep boundary condition, which features the bedrock permeability and water storage. Each layer was described trough the 6 parameters of the Mualem-van Genuchten formulation. The calibrated parameters appeared to have very low uncertainty while allowing a good modelisation of the observed water content variations. The calibrated saturated water content was close to the laboratory porosity measurements while the saturated hydraulic conductivity showed that the soil was highly permeable, as measured in the field. The inverse modeling approach allowed an estimation of the hydraulic properties of the bedrock layer where no measurement was available. The bedrock layer was found to have a low saturated hydraulic conductivity (<5 mm h-1), which means that the schist bedrock is

  19. Application of Hydraulic Tomography to Shallow Alluvial Sediments: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawad, H. J.; Yeh, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known aquifer heterogeneity can have a strong effect on aquifer response to pumping, yet it is still common for aquifers to be conceptualized as homogeneous. In this study, hydraulic tomography was applied to a shallow alluvial aquifer to delineate aquifer heterogeneity. As piezometers used for this analysis are fully screened, heterogeneous transmissivity estimates are two dimensional and represent a vertically averaged estimate at each model cell. The average saturated thickness of the alluvial aquifer under investigation increased by 46% over a 2 month period in response to a large precipitation event, therefore analysis of aquifer heterogeneity was conducted before and after the increase in saturated aquifer thickness to evaluate vertical heterogeneity. Analysis was completed using groundwater level and pumping rate information collected during normal wellfield operations thus eliminating the need to interrupt wellfield function. Initially one stable configuration of active pumping rate and groundwater level information was used to evaluate aquifer heterogeneity, and then 2 additional configurations were added in an attempt to refine the estimate. Results show that locations of likely high and low zones of transmissivity vary as saturated aquifer thickness increases. Forward simulations were then run using heterogeneous transmissivity estimates and a homogeneous transmissivity estimate from a traditional pumping test. The impact of noise in the groundwater level information associated with additional pumping configurations outweighed variation in aquifer response leading to deterioration in results from forward simulations carried out using heterogeneous transmissivity estimates. However, all groundwater level estimates generated using heterogeneous transmissivity estimates are better than estimates made using the traditional homogeneous approach. These results imply that aquifer parameter analysis can be conducted without interrupting normal

  20. Estimating Hydraulic Conductivities in a Fractured Shale Formation from Pressure Pulse Testing and 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbet, C.; DICK, P.; Lefevre, M.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.; Barnichon, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the framework of its research on the deep disposal of radioactive waste in shale formations, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a large array of in situ programs concerning the confining properties of shales in their underground research laboratory at Tournemire (SW France). One of its aims is to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling radionuclide migration through the host rock, from the disposal system to the biosphere. Past research programs carried out at Tournemire covered mechanical, hydro-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire shale as well as water chemistry and long-term behaviour of the host rock. Studies show that fluid circulations in the undisturbed matrix are very slow (hydraulic conductivity of 10-14 to 10-15 m.s-1). However, recent work related to the occurrence of small scale fractures and clay-rich fault gouges indicate that fluid circulations may have been significantly modified in the vicinity of such features. To assess the transport properties associated with such faults, IRSN designed a series of in situ and laboratory experiments to evaluate the contribution of both diffusive and advective process on water and solute flux through a clay-rich fault zone (fault core and damaged zone) and in an undisturbed shale formation. As part of these studies, Modular Mini-Packer System (MMPS) hydraulic testing was conducted in multiple boreholes to characterize hydraulic conductivities within the formation. Pressure data collected during the hydraulic tests were analyzed using the nSIGHTS (n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator) code to estimate hydraulic conductivity and formation pressures of the tested intervals. Preliminary results indicate hydraulic conductivities of 5.10-12 m.s-1 in the fault core and damaged zone and 10-14 m.s-1 in the adjacent undisturbed shale. Furthermore, when compared with neutron porosity data from borehole

  1. Temporal changes of topsoil hydraulic conductivity studied by multiple-point tension disk infiltrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipa, Vladimir; Zumr, David; Snehota, Michal; Dohnal, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity of cultivated soils is strongly affected by agrotechnical procedures, soil compaction, plant growth etc. This contribution is focused on series of measurement of topsoil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using automated multipoint tension infiltrometer developed at CTU in Prague. The apparatus consists of two triplets of minidisk infiltrometers that are supported by a light aluminum frame. Therefore it allows simultaneous measurement of six tension infiltrations at two different pressure heads. Experiments were conducted at the experimental agricultural catchment Nučice (Central Bohemia, Czech Republic) as a part of the broader research of rainfall-runoff and soil erosion processes. The soil in the catchment is classified as Cambisol with texture that is ranging from loam to clay loam and is conservatively tilled. Series of ten infiltration campaigns (56 individual infiltration experiments) were carried out on a single experimental plot during period of two years. Dataset involves measurement under various agricultural activities and crop phenophases. The hydraulic conductivities were determined using extended semiempirical estimation procedure of Zhang. Additionally, large undisturbed soil samples were analyzed with use of X-ray computed tomography to assess the soil structure morphology in detail. Results show that unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was the lowest in early spring and did increase at beginning of summer. Unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity was higher when the soil bulk density was high. During the summer and autumn the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity remained relatively unchanged. The impact of agricultural procedures was not apparent in the dataset.. The study has been supported by the Czech Science Foundation Project No. 13-20388P and by CTU in Prague funding via Student's Grant Competition SGS No. SGS14/131/OHK1/2T/11. The MultiDisk infiltrometer was developed within the framework of the project supported by the

  2. Reduced-order model based active disturbance rejection control of hydraulic servo system with singular value perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengwen; Quan, Long; Zhang, Shijie; Meng, Hongjun; Lan, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Hydraulic servomechanism is the typical mechanical/hydraulic double-dynamics coupling system with the high stiffness control and mismatched uncertainties input problems, which hinder direct applications of many advanced control approaches in the hydraulic servo fields. In this paper, by introducing the singular value perturbation theory, the original double-dynamics coupling model of the hydraulic servomechanism was reduced to a integral chain system. So that, the popular ADRC (active disturbance rejection control) technology could be directly applied to the reduced system. In addition, the high stiffness control and mismatched uncertainties input problems are avoided. The validity of the simplified model is analyzed and proven theoretically. The standard linear ADRC algorithm is then developed based on the obtained reduced-order model. Extensive comparative co-simulations and experiments are carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Impact of Model Uncertainty Description on Assimilating Hydraulic Head into the MIKE-SHE Distributed Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Madsen, H.; Ridler, M. E.; Rasmussen, J.; Refsgaard, J.; Jensen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Catchment-scale hydrological models are used as prediction tools to solve major challenges in water resources management. The reliability of hydrological model predictions is inevitably affected by the amount of information available to set up and calibrate the model. Data assimilation (DA) which combines complementary information from measurements and models has proven to be a powerful and promising tool in numerous research studies to improve model predictions. Especially, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) which is a popular sequential data assimilation technique, has been extensively studied in the earth sciences for assimilating in-situ measurements and remote sensing data. However, one of the major challenges in data assimilation to optimally combine model and measurements is the description of model uncertainty. Only few studies have been reported for defining appropriate model uncertainty in hydrological DA. Modeling uncertainties can be conceptually different in different applications. Traditionally, model uncertainty is represented by parameter uncertainty with corresponding parameter statistics determined by inverse modeling. In most hydrological DA applications, however, model uncertainty is defined by experience using simple statistical descriptions of different uncertainty sources. In this work, both the uncertainty derived from inverse modeling and from empirical knowledge are used and analyzed. A combination of parameter-based, forcing-based and state-based model error is implemented in the EnKF framework for assimilating groundwater hydraulic heads into a catchment-scale model of the Karup Catchment in Denmark using the distributed and integrated hydrological model MIKE SHE. A series of synthetic identical twin experiments are carried out to analyze the impact of different model error assumptions on the feasibility and efficiency of the assimilation. The optimality of the EnKF underlying twin test provides possibilities to diagnose model error

  4. New Conceptual Model for Soil Treatment Units: Formation of Multiple Hydraulic Zones during Unsaturated Wastewater Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Geza, Mengistu; Lowe, Kathryn S; Huntzinger, Deborah N; McCray, John E

    2013-07-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems are commonly used in the United States to reclaim domestic wastewater. A distinct biomat forms at the infiltrative surface, causing resistance to flow and decreasing soil moisture below the biomat. To simulate these conditions, previous modeling studies have used a two-layer approach: a thin biomat layer (1-5 cm thick) and the native soil layer below the biomat. However, the effect of wastewater application extends below the biomat layer. We used numerical modeling supported by experimental data to justify a new conceptual model that includes an intermediate zone (IZ) below the biomat. The conceptual model was set up using Hydrus 2D and calibrated against soil moisture and water flux measurements. The estimated hydraulic conductivity value for the IZ was between biomat and the native soil. The IZ has important implications for wastewater treatment. When the IZ was not considered, a loading rate of 5 cm d resulted in an 8.5-cm ponding. With the IZ, the same loading rate resulted in a 9.5-cm ponding. Without the IZ, up to 3.1 cm d of wastewater could be applied without ponding; with the IZ, only up to 2.8 cm d could be applied without ponding. The IZ also plays a significant role in soil moisture distribution. Without the IZ, near-saturation conditions were observed only within the biomat, whereas near-saturation conditions extended below the biomat with the IZ. Accurate prediction of ponding is important to prevent surfacing of wastewater. The degree of water and air saturation influences pollutant treatment efficiency through residence time, volatility, and biochemical reactions.

  5. Combined measurement and modeling of the hydrological impact of hydraulic redistribution using CLM4.5 at eight AmeriFlux sites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes have been demonstrated in the field, but the current generation of standard earth system models does not include a representation of HR. Though recent studies have examined the effect of incorporating ...

  6. A combined monitoring and modeling approach to quantify water and nitrate leaching using effective soil column hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvreur, V.; Kandelous, M. M.; Moradi, A. B.; Baram, S.; Mairesse, H.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    There is a worldwide growing concern for agricultural lands input to groundwater pollution. Nitrate contamination of groundwater across the Central Valley of California has been related to its diverse and intensive agricultural practices. However, there has been no study comparing leaching of nitrate in each individual agricultural land within the complex and diversely managed studied area. A combined field monitoring and modeling approach was developed to quantify from simple measurements the leaching of water and nitrate below the root zone. The monitored state variables are soil water content at several depths within the root zone, soil matric potential at two depths below the root zone, and nitrate concentration in the soil solution. In the modeling part, unsaturated water flow and solute transport are simulated with the software HYDRUS in a soil profile fragmented in up to two soil hydraulic types, whose effective hydraulic properties are optimized with an inverse modeling method. The applicability of the method will first be demonstrated "in-silico", with synthetic soil water dynamics data generated with HYDRUS, and considering the soil column as the layering of several soil types characterized in-situ. The method will then be applied to actual soil water status data from various crops in California including tomato, citrus, almond, pistachio, and walnut. Eventually, improvements of irrigation and fertilization management practices (i.e. mainly questions of quantity and frequency of application minimizing leaching under constraint of water and nutrient availability) will be investigated using coupled modeling and optimization tools.

  7. Computational simulation of thermal hydraulic processes in the model LMFBR fuel assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayaskhalanov, M. V.; Merinov, I. G.; Korsun, A. S.; Vlasov, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify a developed software module on the experimental fuel assembly with partial blockage of the flow section. The developed software module for simulation of thermal hydraulic processes in liquid metal coolant is based on theory of anisotropic porous media with specially developed integral turbulence model for coefficients determination. The finite element method is used for numerical solution. Experimental data for hexahedral assembly with electrically heated smooth cylindrical rods cooled by liquid sodium are considered. The results of calculation obtained with developed software module for a case of corner blockade are presented. The calculated distribution of coolant velocities showed the presence of the vortex flow behind the blockade. Features vortex region are in a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data. This demonstrates the efficiency of the hydrodynamic unit for developed software module. But obtained radial coolant temperature profiles differ significantly from the experimental in the vortex flow region. The possible reasons for this discrepancy were analyzed.

  8. Capturing the complex behavior of hydraulic fracture stimulation through multi-physics modeling, field-based constraints, and model reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S.; Chiaramonte, L.; Cruz, L.; Izadi, G.

    2016-12-01

    Advances in the accuracy and fidelity of numerical methods have significantly improved our understanding of coupled processes in unconventional reservoirs. However, such multi-physics models are typically characterized by many parameters and require exceptional computational resources to evaluate systems of practical importance, making these models difficult to use for field analyses or uncertainty quantification. One approach to remove these limitations is through targeted complexity reduction and field data constrained parameterization. For the latter, a variety of field data streams may be available to engineers and asset teams, including micro-seismicity from proximate sites, well logs, and 3D surveys, which can constrain possible states of the reservoir as well as the distributions of parameters. We describe one such workflow, using the Argos multi-physics code and requisite geomechanical analysis to parameterize the underlying models. We illustrate with a field study involving a constraint analysis of various field data and details of the numerical optimizations and model reduction to demonstrate how complex models can be applied to operation design in hydraulic fracturing operations, including selection of controllable completion and fluid injection design properties. The implication of this work is that numerical methods are mature and computationally tractable enough to enable complex engineering analysis and deterministic field estimates and to advance research into stochastic analyses for uncertainty quantification and value of information applications.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of hydraulic model to morphological changes and changes in flood inundation extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, J. S.; Freer, J.; Bates, P. D.; Sear, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research into modelling floodplain inundation processes is primarily concentrated on the simulation of inundation flow without considering the influences of channel morphology and sediment delivery from upstream. River channels are often represented by simplified geometry and implicitly assumed to remain unchanged. However, during and after flood episodes the river bed elevation can change quickly and in some cases drastically. Despite this, the effect of channel geometry and topographic complexity on model results has been largely unexplored. To address this issue, the impact of channel cross-section geometry, and channel long-profile variability on flood inundation extent are examined using a simplified 1D-2D hydraulic model (LISFLOOD-FP) of the Cockermouth floods of November 2009 within an uncertainty analysis framework. The Cockermouth region provides a useful test site for such study because of the availability of channel and floodplain data, the collection of post-event water and wrack marks and the presence of pre-and post-event morphological surveyed data. More importantly, in some areas the river has undergone significant course change and additionally the deposition of stones and debris on the floodplain. The use of relatively simple formulations of critical velocities in the initiation of motion formula enables the construction of a series of hypothetical bedform scenarios among cross-sections. These scenarios can be used as input to LISFLOOD-FP. Slope gradient, Manning roughness coefficients, grain size characteristic, and critical shear stress will be considered in a Monte Carlo simulation framework. The November 2009 Cockermouth flood is simulated and the results are analysed to quantify the accuracy associated with each bedform scenario and to assess how different channel long-profiles affects the performance of LISFLOOD-FP. The study will further analyse and quantify the variability and uncertainty of flood inundation extent resulting from

  10. Thermal hydraulic study of the ESPRESSO blanket for a Tandem Mirror Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Raffray, A.R.; Hoffman, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    This paper deals primarily with the thermal-hydraulic design and some critical thermomechanical aspects of the proposed ESPRESSO blanket for the Tandem Mirror Fusion Reactor. This conceptual design was based on the same physics as used in the MARS study.

  11. Uncertainty analysis of channel capacity assumptions in large scale hydraulic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alexander; Stroud, Rebecca; Willis, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Flood modelling on national or even global scales is of great interest to re/insurers, governments and other agencies. Channel bathymetry data is not available over large areas which is a major limitation to this scale of modelling. It requires expensive channel surveying and the majority of remotely sensed data cannot see through water. Furthermore, channels represented as 1D models, or as an explicit feature in the model domain is computationally demanding, and so it is often necessary to find ways to reduce computational costs. A more efficient methodology is to make assumptions concerning the capacity of the channel, and then to remove this volume from inflow hydrographs. Previous research have shown that natural channels generally conform to carry flow for a 1-in-2 year return period (QMED). This assumption is widely used in large scale modelling studies across the world. However, channels flowing through high-risk areas, such as urban environments, are often modified to increase their capacity and thus reduce flood risk. Simulated flood outlines are potentially very sensitive to assumptions made regarding these capacities. For example, under the 1-in-2 year assumption, the flooding associated with smaller events might be overestimated, with too much flow being modelled as out of bank. There are requirements to; i) quantify the impact of uncertainty in assumed channel capacity on simulated flooded areas, and ii) to develop more optimal capacity assumptions, depending on specific reach characteristics, so that the effects of channel modification can be better represented in future studies. This work will demonstrate findings from a preliminary uncertainty analysis that seeks to address the former requirement. A set of benchmark tests, using 2D hydraulic models, were undertaken where different estimated return period flows in contrasting catchments are modelled with varying channel capacity parameters. The depth and extent for each benchmark model output were

  12. Moose Creek Dam Outlet Works and Diversion Channel Chena River Lakes Project, Alaska. Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    crosses the diver- sion channel 1,090 feet downstream from the highway crossing. At the downstream end of the channel, a fixed overflow sill controls water ...adequate to maintain a satisfactory water surface gradient through the reach. Flow conditions affecting fish passage and small- craft navigation through...criteria that were studied included hydraulic losses at channel constrictions and expansions, water surface profiles, and division of flow between the

  13. Nonlinear modeling and identification of the electro-hydraulic control system of an excavator arm using BONL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Li, Bo; Guo, Gang; Zeng, Yonghua; Zhang, Meijun

    2013-11-01

    Electro-hydraulic control systems are nonlinear in nature and their mathematic models have unknown parameters. Existing research of modeling and identification of the electro-hydraulic control system is mainly based on theoretical state space model, and the parameters identification is hard due to its demand on internal states measurement. Moreover, there are also some hard-to-model nonlinearities in theoretical model, which needs to be overcome. Modeling and identification of the electro-hydraulic control system of an excavator arm based on block-oriented nonlinear(BONL) models is investigated. The nonlinear state space model of the system is built first, and field tests are carried out to reveal the nonlinear characteristics of the system. Based on the physic insight into the system, three BONL models are adopted to describe the highly nonlinear system. The Hammerstein model is composed of a two-segment polynomial nonlinearity followed by a linear dynamic subsystem. The Hammerstein-Wiener(H-W) model is represented by the Hammerstein model in cascade with another single polynomial nonlinearity. A novel Pseudo-Hammerstein-Wiener(P-H-W) model is developed by replacing the single polynomial of the H-W model by a non-smooth backlash function. The key term separation principle is applied to simplify the BONL models into linear-in-parameters structures. Then, a modified recursive least square algorithm(MRLSA) with iterative estimation of internal variables is developed to identify the all the parameters simultaneously. The identification results demonstrate that the BONL models with two-segment polynomial nonlinearities are able to capture the system behavior, and the P-H-W model has the best prediction accuracy. Comparison experiments show that the velocity prediction error of the P-H-W model is reduced by 14%, 30% and 75% to the H-W model, Hammerstein model, and extended auto-regressive (ARX) model, respectively. This research is helpful in controller design, system

  14. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  15. Modeling the Interaction Between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures Using Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Hai; Deo, Milind

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between hydraulic fractures (HF) and natural fractures (NF) will lead to complex fracture networks due to the branching and merging of natural and hydraulic fractures in unconventional reservoirs. In this paper, a newly developed hydraulic fracturing simulator based on discrete element method is used to predict the generation of complex fracture network in the presence of pre-existing natural fractures. By coupling geomechanics and reservoir flow within a dual lattice system, this simulator can effectively capture the poro-elastic effects and fluid leakoff into the formation. When HFs are intercepting single or multiple NFs, complex mechanisms such as direct crossing, arresting, dilating and branching can be simulated. Based on the model, the effects of injected fluid rate and viscosity, the orientation and permeability of NFs and stress anisotropy on the HF-NF interaction process are investigated. Combined impacts from multiple parameters are also examined in the paper. The numerical results show that large values of stress anisotropy, intercepting angle, injection rate and viscosity will impede the opening of NFs.

  16. Comparison of Measured and Modelled Hydraulic Conductivities of Fractured Sandstone Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka-Lokmane, S.; Liedl, R.; Teutsch, G.

    - A new method for characterising the detailed fracture geometry in sandstone cores is presented. This method is based on the impregnation of samples with coloured resin, without significant disturbance of the fractures. The fractures are made clearly visible by the resin, thus allowing the fracture geometry to be examined digitally. In order to model the bulk hydraulic conductivity, the samples are sectioned serially perpendicular to the flow direction. The hydraulic conductivity of individual sections is estimated by summing the contribution of the matrix and each fracture from the digital data. Finally, the hydraulic conductivity of the bulk sample is estimated by a harmonic average in series along the flow path. Results of this geometrical method are compared with actual physical conductivity values measured from fluid experiments carried out prior to sectioning. The predicted conductivity from the fracture geometry parameters (e.g., fracture aperture, fracture width, fracture length and fracture relative roughness all measured using an optical method) is in good agreement with the independent physical measurements, thereby validating the approach.

  17. Hydraulic aspects of riverbank filtration—field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Jürgen

    2002-09-01

    The Düsseldorf waterworks have been using riverbank filtration since 1870 with bank filtration as the most important source for public water supply in this densely populated and industrialised region. There have been many threats to this supply in the last few decades—e.g. poor river water quality, heavy clogging of the riverbed, accidental pollution—which had to be overcome. First field studies in the river Rhine were carried out with a diving cabin in 1953 and 1954 to investigate riverbed clogging during high loads of organic contaminants in the river water. In 1987 a second investigation of the riverbed followed in the same area during which time the water quality of the river had improved. After the Sandoz accident in 1986 a joint research project was carried out in the Lower Rhine region to improve knowledge of flow and transport phenomena of riverbank filtration and to develop numerical models for the dynamic simulation of flow and transport. The main objective of the field studies was to gain more insight into the dynamic river-aquifer interactions and the effects of fluctuating river levels. These fluctuations are not only relevant for clogging processes and the velocities and residence times in the subsoil, but can also affect the quality of the well water. Depth-orientated sampling in the adjacent aquifer was employed. One important finding was a marked age-stratification of the bank-filtered water which balances out fluctuating concentrations of dissolved compounds in the river water.

  18. Soil water balance scenario studies using predicted soil hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, A.; Wösten, J. H. M.; Bouma, J.; Várallyay, G.

    2006-03-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have become a topic drawing increasing interest within the field of soil and environmental research because they can provide important soil physical data at relatively low cost. Few studies, however, explore which contributions PTFs can make to land-use planning, in terms of examining the expected outcome of certain changes in soil and water management practices. This paper describes three scenario studies that show some aspects of how PTFs may help improve decision making about land management practices. We use an exploratory research approach using simulation modelling to explore the potential effect of alternative solutions in land management. We: (i) evaluate benefits and risks when irrigating a field, and the impact of soil heterogeneity; (ii) examine which changes can be expected (in terms of soil water balance and supply) if organic matter content is changed as a result of an alternative management system; (iii) evaluate the risk of leaching to deeper horizons in some soils of Hungary. Using this research approach, quantitative answers are provided to what if? type questions, allowing the distinction of trends and potential problems, which may contribute to the development of sustainable management systems.

  19. Non-linear dynamic modeling of an automobile hydraulic active suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, R. Ben; Levitt, J. A.; Fassois, S. D.

    1994-09-01

    Motived by the strong need for realistically describing the dynamical behaviour of automotive systems through adequate mathematical models, a computer-stimulation-suitable non-linear quarter-car model of a hydraulic active suspension system is developed. Unlike previously available linear models characterised by idealised actuator and component behaviour, the developed model accounts for the dynamics of the main system components, including the suspension bushing, pump, accumulator, power and bypass valves, and hydraulic actuator, while also incorporating preliminary versions of the system controllers. Significant system characteristics, such as non-linear pressure-flow relationships, fluid compressibility, pump and valve non-linearities, leakages, as well as Coulomb friction, are also explicitly accounted for, and the underpinning assumptions are discussed. Simulation results obtained by exercising the model provide insight into the system behavior, illustrate the importance of the actuator/component dynamics and their associated non-linearities and reveal the inadequacy of the idealised linear models in capturing the system behaviour, demonstrate specific effects of valve leakage and fluid bulk modulus, are in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements, and stress the need for proper control law design and tuning. The developed model is particularly suitable for analysis, design, control law optimisation, and diagnostic strategies development.

  20. Modelling the two-dimensional flow between an estuary and lake connected by a bi-directional hydraulic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigic, Sasha; King, Brian; Lemckert, Charles

    2005-04-01

    A method to model the influence of a hydraulic structure connecting two water bodies is presented. This method was incorporated into an existing two-dimensional (depth-averaged) hydrodynamic model. Specifically, the flow in and out of a cell (used to represent the hydraulic structure) is calculated using a broad crested weir formula and is determined from the time-varying head difference between the two systems. An example application of the method is also presented. In this example the hydraulic structure cell was used to model the flow through an automated bi-directional hydraulic structure connecting an estuary to an artificial lake system. The gates of this hydraulic structure are programmed to open four times each day (once during each semi-diurnal tidal phase) and remain open for a period of 2 hours, allowing alternative and partial exchange between the two water bodies. Hence, the model setup involved the specification of the opening and closing times of the gates and the calibration of the discharge coefficient. Tests indicated that these were the most sensitive parameters which ensured the correct volume of water exchange between the two systems. Finally, the model-predicted results were compared with available surface elevation observations at two sites within the lake. The comparison showed a good agreement (RMS error <0.09), quantifying the ability of the hydraulic structure cells to simulate the flux between the estuary and lake for each opening.

  1. Final Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources (02-24-2012)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identif...

  2. Final Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources (02-24-2012)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identif...

  3. Hydraulic model of the proposed Water Recovery and Management system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Charles E.; Bacskay, Allen S.

    1991-01-01

    A model of the Water Recovery and Management (WRM) system utilizing SINDA '85/FLUINT to determine its hydraulic operation characteristics, and to verify the design flow and pressure drop parameters is presented. The FLUINT analysis package is employed in the model to determine the flow and pressure characteristics when each of the different loop components is operational and contributing to the overall flow pattern. The water is driven in each loop by storage tanks pressurized with cabin air, and is routed through the system to the desired destination.

  4. Subchannel thermal-hydraulic modeling of an APT tungsten target rod bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.; Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    The planned target for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) neutron source consists of an array of tungsten rod bundles through which D{sub 2}O coolant flows axially. Here, a scoping analysis of flow through an APT target rod bundle was conducted to demonstrate that lateral cross-flows are important, and therefore subchannel modeling is necessary to accurately predict thermal-hydraulic behavior under boiling conditions. A local reactor assembly code, FLOWTRAN, was modified to model axial flow along the rod bundle as flow through three concentric heated annular passages.

  5. Hydraulic model of the proposed Water Recovery and Management system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Charles E.; Bacskay, Allen S.

    1991-01-01

    A model of the Water Recovery and Management (WRM) system utilizing SINDA '85/FLUINT to determine its hydraulic operation characteristics, and to verify the design flow and pressure drop parameters is presented. The FLUINT analysis package is employed in the model to determine the flow and pressure characteristics when each of the different loop components is operational and contributing to the overall flow pattern. The water is driven in each loop by storage tanks pressurized with cabin air, and is routed through the system to the desired destination.

  6. Spent nuclear fuel vacuum drying thermal-hydraulic analysis and dynamic model development status report

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.; Ogden, D.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-28

    This report summarizes preliminary thermal hydraulic scoping analysis and model development associated with the K Basin spent fuel MCO draining and vacuum drying system. The purpose of the draining and drying system is to remove all free water from the interior of the MCO, baskets, and fuel prior to back filling with inert gas and transfer to the hot conditioning process. Dominant physical processes and parameters are delineated and related quantitatively. Minimum dynamic modeling capability required to simulate the process of transporting heat to the residual water on the fuel and transport of the steam produced from the system by vacuum pumping are defined.

  7. Assessment of mean annual flood damage using simple hydraulic modeling and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubennaceur, K.; Agili, H.; Chokmani, K.; Poulin, J.; Marceau, P.

    2016-12-01

    Floods are the most frequent and the most damaging natural disaster in Canada. The issue of assessing and managing the risk related to this disaster has become increasingly crucial for both local and national authorities. Brigham, a municipality located in southern Quebec Province, is one of the heavily affected regions by this disaster because of frequent overflows of the Yamaska River reaching two to three times per year. Since Irene Hurricane which struck the region in 2011, causing considerable socio-economic damage, the implementation of mitigation measures has become a major priority for this municipality. To do this, a preliminary study to evaluate the risk to which this region is exposed is essential. Conventionally, approaches only based on the characterization of the hazard (e.g. floodplains extensive, flood depth) are generally adopted to study the risk of flooding. In order to improve the knowledge of this risk, a Monte Carlo simulation approach combining information on the hazard with vulnerability-related aspects has been developed. This approach integrates three main components: (1) hydrologic modelling aiming to establish a probability-discharge function which associate each measured discharge to its probability of occurrence (2) hydraulic modeling that aims to establish the relationship between the discharge and the water stage at each building (3) damage study that aims to assess the buildings damage using damage functions. The damage is estimated according to the water depth defined as the difference between the water level and the elevation of the building's first floor. The application of the proposed approach allows estimating the annual average cost of damage caused by floods on buildings. The obtained results will be useful for authorities to support their decisions on risk management and prevention against this disaster.

  8. Numerical simulation of pulsation processes in hydraulic turbine based on 3D model of cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, L. V.; Chirkov, D. V.; Cherny, S. G.; Pylev, I. M.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach was proposed for simulation of unsteady cavitating flow in the flow passage of a hydraulic power plant. 1D hydro-acoustics equations are solved in the penstock domain. 3D equations of turbulent flow of isothermal compressible liquid-vapor mixture are solved in the turbine domain. Cavitation is described by a transfer equation for liquid phase with a source term which is responsible for evaporation and condensation. The developed method was applied for simulation of pulsations in pressure, discharge, and total energy propagating along the flow conduit of the hydraulic power plant. Simulation results are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiment. The influence of key physical and numerical parameters like discharge, cavitation number, penstock length, time step, and vapor density on simulation results was studied.

  9. Hydraulic conductivity identification by EnKF and travel time modeling of transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crestani, E.; Camporese, M.; Salandin, P.

    2012-12-01

    Borehole ERT monitoring of saline tracer tests allows to collect time-lapse geophysical data as changes occur in an aquifer as a result of dynamical variations in the hydrological state of the subsurface, and it seems to be a promising tool for the hydrological characterization of natural aquifers. Nevertheless, ERT measurements are not directly related to the hydraulic parameters needed to predict flow and transport in porous media. The electrical conductivity field must be reconstructed by means of a geophysical inversion on the basis of current and voltage measurements, and the use of a petrophysical law (e.g., Archie's law) is required to deduce the solute concentration and the plume evolution closely linked to the distribution of the hydraulic properties. To retrieve the hydraulic properties of aquifers, e.g., the hydraulic conductivity distribution K(x), from an ERT monitored saline tracer test, and to overcome the need for the knowledge of the concentration spatio-temporal evolution, we propose a novel approach that couples travel time modeling of transport with the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) used as an inversion tool. The definition of the solute transport in terms of travel (or residence) times allows to analyze the sequence of changes in electrical resistivity deduced from a ERT survey without converting the electrical data into concentrations. Moreover, in the case of a multiple well saline tracer test, only two dimensional images of electrical conductivity defining the control planes (CP) need to be reconstructed by the geophysical inversion from current and voltage measurements, with a noticeable saving of computer resources with respect to the fully 3D case. To demonstrate the ability of the proposed approach, we consider a synthetic 3D case, where multiple control planes, each of these defined by a pair of ERT monitored boreholes, are located downstream from an injection well perpendicular to the mean flow direction. The CPs are properly

  10. Comparison of Hydraulic Methods and Tracer Experiments as Applied to the Development of Conceptual Models for Discrete Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakowski, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    The development of conceptual models for solute migration in discrete fracture networks has typically been based on a combination of core logs, borehole geophysics, and some form of single-well hydraulic test using discrete zones. More rarely, interwell hydraulic tests and interwell tracer experiments are utilised to directly explore potential transport pathways. The latter methods are less widely employed simply due to potentially significant increases in the cost and effort in site characterization. To date however there is a paucity of literature comparing the efficacy of the standard procedure with what should be more definitive identification of transport pathways using interwell methods. In the present study, a detailed comparison is conducted by developing conceptual models from three separate data sets, the first based on core logs, geology and single-well hydraulic tests, the second based on a large suite of pulse interference tests, and the third based on a series of radially-divergent and injection-withdrawal tracer experiments. The study was conducted in an array of five HQ-sized wells, 28-32 m in depth and arranged in a five star pattern, 10 m on a side. The wells penetrate the contact between a Cambrian-aged limestone, and underlying Precambrian gneiss. The core was logged for potentially open fractures using a ranking system, and 87 contiguous hydraulic tests were conducted using a 0.85-m packer spacing. A total of 57 pulse interference tests were conducted using two wells as injection points, and 11 tracer experiments were conducted using either sample collection or in-situ detection via a submersible fluorometer. The results showed very distinct conceptual models depending on the data set, with the model based on the single-well testing significantly over-predicting the number and connection of solute transport pathways. The results of the pulse interference tests also over predict the transport pathways, but to a lesser degree. Quantification of

  11. Large-scale, Two-Dimensional Hydraulic Modeling of a Braided River Using Multi-Resolution Topographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, B. F.; Schubert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Braided rivers are characterized by anastomosing channels separated by bars and islands and constantly undergo adjustments driven by erosional and depositional processes. Detailed data on the morphology of braided river channels can now be captured at varying scales and spatial resolutions using remote sensing technologies designed for topographic mapping, including interferometric synthetic aperture radar, aerial photogrammetry, and aerial and ground-based lidar. A common product of these data is a digital elevation model (DEM) which not only maps the morphological structure of the river at the time of data acquisition, but also enables analysis of the flow distribution, hydraulic geometry, and bed stresses. We present a 2D flow model of a 120 km reach of the Platte River, NE, US, parameterized with a 1 m DEM constructed from aerial lidar and channel bathymetry data. The model is motivated by the opportunity to study the flow distribution across threads of different sizes, to examine how braiding changes with increases in discharge, and to study how the distribution of flow among threads evolves with changes in stage. These results shed additional light on the hydraulic geometry of braided rivers. Additionally, the value of fine resolution data is measured by repeating this analysis with coarsened input data.

  12. The hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow: A new model and new experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, B. L.

    1996-02-01

    A new model for the hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow is presented. The equation of motion for a liquid annulus spreading out under the influence of hydrostatic pressure gradient and Frictional drag is developed. The resulting nonlinear differential equation for the liquid depth, h(r), is solved by computer simulation. The jump is assumed to begin when the laminar flow is engulfed by the underlying boundary layer liquid, as suggested recently in the literature. This complicated mixing process is crudely modeled by a drag term which slows the flow and initiates a positive feedback mechanism culminating at a new critical depth, beyond which the depth increases asymptotically to a final value. The model predicts a new relationship between the laminar flow depth just before the jump and the final depth. An experimental apparatus was built to make detailed measurements of the depth h(r), both in the region before the jump and beyond the jump. The theoretical predictions were compared to the experimental data, and gave surprisingly good agreement by suitable adjustment of the two parameters k and C of the model. The parameter k determines the growth rate of the boundary layer thickness, and C determines the drag force. The results suggest that the usual textbook assumption of zero momentum loss across the jump is not appropriate for this type of hydraulic jump. The case of a hydraulic jump in the absence of gravity is considered also and a much different behavior is predicted, which could be tested by experiment in a microgravity environment.

  13. Linking hydraulic traits to tropical forest function in a size-structured and trait-driven model (TFS v.1-Hydro)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, Bradley O.; Gloor, Manuel; Fauset, Sophie; Fyllas, Nikolaos M.; Galbraith, David R.; Baker, Timothy R.; Kruijt, Bart; Rowland, Lucy; Fisher, Rosie A.; Binks, Oliver J.; Sevanto, Sanna; Xu, Chonggang; Jansen, Steven; Choat, Brendan; Mencuccini, Maurizio; McDowell, Nate G.; Meir, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Forest ecosystem models based on heuristic water stress functions poorly predict tropical forest response to drought partly because they do not capture the diversity of hydraulic traits (including variation in tree size) observed in tropical forests. We developed a continuous porous media approach to modeling plant hydraulics in which all parameters of the constitutive equations are biologically interpretable and measurable plant hydraulic traits (e.g., turgor loss point πtlp, bulk elastic modulus ɛ, hydraulic capacitance Cft, xylem hydraulic conductivity ks,max, water potential at 50 % loss of conductivity for both xylem (P50,x) and stomata (P50,gs), and the leaf : sapwood area ratio Al : As). We embedded this plant hydraulics model within a trait forest simulator (TFS) that models light environments of individual trees and their upper boundary conditions (transpiration), as well as providing a means for parameterizing variation in hydraulic traits among individuals. We synthesized literature and existing databases to parameterize all hydraulic traits as a function of stem and leaf traits, including wood density (WD), leaf mass per area (LMA), and photosynthetic capacity (Amax), and evaluated the coupled model (called TFS v.1-Hydro) predictions, against observed diurnal and seasonal variability in stem and leaf water potential as well as stand-scaled sap flux. Our hydraulic trait synthesis revealed coordination among leaf and xylem hydraulic traits and statistically significant relationships of most hydraulic traits with more easily measured plant traits. Using the most informative empirical trait-trait relationships derived from this synthesis, TFS v.1-Hydro successfully captured individual variation in leaf and stem water potential due to increasing tree size and light environment, with model representation of hydraulic architecture and plant traits exerting primary and secondary controls, respectively, on the fidelity of model predictions. The plant

  14. Saturated hydraulic conductivity model computed from bimodal water retention curves for a range of New Zealand soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollacco, Joseph Alexander Paul; Webb, Trevor; McNeill, Stephen; Hu, Wei; Carrick, Sam; Hewitt, Allan; Lilburne, Linda

    2017-06-01

    Descriptions of soil hydraulic properties, such as the soil moisture retention curve, θ(h), and saturated hydraulic conductivities, Ks, are a prerequisite for hydrological models. Since the measurement of Ks is expensive, it is frequently derived from statistical pedotransfer functions (PTFs). Because it is usually more difficult to describe Ks than θ(h) from pedotransfer functions, Pollacco et al. (2013) developed a physical unimodal model to compute Ks solely from hydraulic parameters derived from the Kosugi θ(h). This unimodal Ks model, which is based on a unimodal Kosugi soil pore-size distribution, was developed by combining the approach of Hagen-Poiseuille with Darcy's law and by introducing three tortuosity parameters. We report here on (1) the suitability of the Pollacco unimodal Ks model to predict Ks for a range of New Zealand soils from the New Zealand soil database (S-map) and (2) further adaptations to this model to adapt it to dual-porosity structured soils by computing the soil water flux through a continuous function of an improved bimodal pore-size distribution. The improved bimodal Ks model was tested with a New Zealand data set derived from historical measurements of Ks and θ(h) for a range of soils derived from sandstone and siltstone. The Ks data were collected using a small core size of 10 cm diameter, causing large uncertainty in replicate measurements. Predictions of Ks were further improved by distinguishing topsoils from subsoil. Nevertheless, as expected, stratifying the data with soil texture only slightly improved the predictions of the physical Ks models because the Ks model is based on pore-size distribution and the calibrated parameters were obtained within the physically feasible range. The improvements made to the unimodal Ks model by using the new bimodal Ks model are modest when compared to the unimodal model, which is explained by the poor accuracy of measured total porosity. Nevertheless, the new bimodal model provides an

  15. Hydrological and hydraulic results of an integrated modelling approach in a mesoscale Chinese catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, B.; Strehmel, A.; Song, S.; Kuemmerlen, M.; Cai, Q.; Jähnig, S.; Fohrer, N.

    2012-04-01

    Catchment properties, in-stream processes and their effects on aquatic organisms are closely linked. For the assessment of key driving forces, pressures on an ecosystem, the habitat state and the effect of climate or land use changes on a habitat, DPSI (Driver-Pressure-State-Impact) approaches are used. The aim of our DFG-/NSFC project is the development of an integrated modelling approach to depict the impact of environmental changes on aquatic ecosystems in the Changjiang catchment of the Poyang lake area in China. We create a dynamic DPSI-system, integrating the models SWAT (catchment processes), HEC-RAS (in-stream processes) and BIOMOD (biological responses). The ecohydrological model SWAT simulates the water and nutrient balances of the entire catchment. The SWAT results as discharge and sediment are transferred to the hydraulic model HEC-RAS. HEC-RAS calculates in-stream parameters as flow velocity, water depths, shear stress, etc. for cross sections at selected river sections. Afterwards, both models transfer their results to the species distribution model BIOMOD, which calculates the habitat functions and occurrence probabilities for each selected species (benthic macroinvertebrates). The developed concept, the procedure of the field campaigns and the first steps and results of the ecohydrological and hydraulic modeling are presented. Catchment discharge time series of the SWAT model were used as boundary conditions to the hydraulic modelling. The HEC-RAS models were set up for ten river sections with a length of about 300 meters each. The calibration of the HEC-RAS stream flow models was carried out towards the elevation differences between adjacent cross-sections, rather than roughness values. In a sensitivity analysis this approach proved to yield very good calibration results. Among other parameters, the stream flow variables water depth, flow velocity, shear stress and stream power were calculated and analysed. The HEC-RAS model results showed that

  16. The catastrophic failures of plants hydraulic network examined trough an model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaimé, Diane; Marmottant, Philippe; Brodribb, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Plants live a dangerous game: they have to facilitate water transport in their xylem conduits while minimizing the consequence of hydraulic failure. Indeed, as water flows under negative pressure inside these conduits, cavitation bubbles can spontaneously occur. The failure dynamics of this hydraulic network is poorly studied, while it has important ecological and bioengineering implications. Here, by using dark-field transmission microscopy, we were able to directly visualize the spreading of cavitation bubbles within leaves, where the xylem conduits form a 2D and transparent network. We observe the surprising fact that the probability of cavitation increases in larger veins, where the majority of water flows. Next, in order to understand the physical mechanism of nucleation and propagation, we built artificial networks of channels made in hydrogel, where evaporation generates negative pressures. We find the hydraulic failure follows two stages: first a sudden bubble nucleation relaxing to the elastic stored of the system, and then a slow expansion driven by the flow of water in the surrounding medium. Channel constrictions slow the propagation of the bubble, similarly to the small valves that connect plants conduits. P.M. acknowledges support from the University of Tasmania for a visiting scholar grant.

  17. Inverse modeling of coastal aquifers using tidal response and hydraulic tests.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Andrés; Castro, Eduardo; Barbieri, Manuela; Carrera, Jesús; Bea, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Remediation of contaminated aquifers demands a reliable characterization of hydraulic connectivity patterns. Hydraulic diffusivity is possibly the best indicator of connectivity. It can be derived using the tidal response method (TRM), which is based on fitting observations to a closed-form solution. Unfortunately, the conventional TRM assumes homogeneity. The objective of this study was to overcome this limitation and use tidal response to identify preferential flowpaths. Additionally, the procedure requires joint inversion with hydraulic test data. These provide further information on connectivity and are needed to resolve diffusivity into transmissivity and storage coefficient. Spatial variability is characterized using the regularized pilot points method. Actual application may be complicated by the need to filter tidal effects from the response to pumping and by the need to deal with different types of data, which we have addressed using maximum likelihood methods. Application to a contaminated artificial coastal fill leads to flowpaths that are consistent with the materials used during construction and to solute transport predictions that compare well with observations. We conclude that tidal response can be used to identify connectivity patterns. As such, it should be useful when designing measures to control sea water intrusion.

  18. Clogging development and hydraulic performance of the horizontal subsurface flow stormwater constructed wetlands: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ping; Yu, Bohai; Zhou, Yongchao; Zhang, Yiping; Li, Jin

    2017-02-21

    The horizontal subsurface constructed wetland (HSSF CW) is a highly effective technique for stormwater treatment. However, progressive clogging in HSSF CW is a widespread operational problem. The aim of this study was to understand the clogging development of HSSF CWs during stormwater treatment and to assess the influence of microorganisms and vegetation on the clogging. Moreover, the hydraulic performance of HSSF CWs in the process of clogging was evaluated in a tracer experiment. The results show that the HSSF CW can be divided into two sections, section I (circa 0-35 cm) and section II (circa 35-110 cm). The clogging is induced primarily by solid entrapment in section I and development of biofilm and vegetation roots in section II, respectively. The influence of vegetation and microorganisms on the clogging appears to differ in sections I and II. The tracer experiment shows that the hydraulic efficiency (λ) and the mean hydraulic retention time (t mean) increase with the clogging development; although, the short-circuiting region (S) extends slightly. In addition, the presence of vegetation can influence the hydraulic performance of the CWs, and their impact depends on the characteristics of the roots.

  19. The perceptual trap: Experimental and modelling examples of soil moisture, hydraulic conductivity and response units in complex subsurface settings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Demand, Dominic; Allroggen, Niklas; Loritz, Ralf; Zehe, Erwin

    2017-04-01

    In order to discuss hypothesis testing in hydrology, the question of the solid foundation of such tests has to be answered. But how certain are we about our measurements of the components of the water balance and the states and dynamics of the complex systems? What implicit assumptions or bias are already embedded in our perception of the processes? How can we find light in the darkness of heterogeneity? We will contribute examples from experimental findings, modelling approaches and landscape analysis to the discussion. Example soil moisture and the soil continuum: The definition of soil moisture as fraction of water in the porous medium assumes locally well-mixed conditions. Moreover, a unique relation of soil water retention presumes instant local thermodynamic equilibrium in the pore water arrangement. We will show findings from soil moisture responses to precipitation events, from irrigation experiments, and from a model study of initial infiltration velocities. The results highlight, that the implicit assumption relating soil moisture state dynamics with actual soil water flow is biased towards the slow end of the actual velocity distribution and rather blind for preferential flow acting in a very small proportion of the pore space. Moreover, we highlight the assumption of a well-defined continuum during the extrapolation of point-scale measurements and why spatially and temporally continuous observation techniques of soil water states are essential for advancing our understanding and development of subsurface process theories. Example hydraulic conductivity: Hydraulic conductivity lies at the heart of hydrological research and modelling. Its values can range across several orders of magnitude at a single site alone. Yet, we often consider it a crisp, effective parameter. We have conducted measurements of soil hydraulic conductivity in the lab and in the field. Moreover, we assessed infiltration capacity and conducted plot-scale irrigation experiments to

  20. Elastic and Viscoelastic Modeling of Stresses Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Sone, Hiroki; Dabrowski, Marcin; Jarosinski, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is one of the most important engineering tasks in the development of an unconventional gas or oil play. Further exploitation of the reservoir is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of this process. Knowledge about the in situ stress state, and its changes is critical for successful fracturing of a reservoir. Hydraulic fracturing is usually carried out in several stages. The previous stages influence the later ones, because the induced and reactivated fractures, and the corresponding strain tend to increase the minimum horizontal stress (Shmin). This phenomena may lead to changes in the stress regime. The stress state, and fracture network changes result also in consecutive scattering of the microseismic events related to each of the stages. The goal of the present work was to investigate what happens to the stress state after each of the hydraulic fracturing stages, and how it may affect the success of whole operation. Our investigation was divided in two major parts: first we characterized the rheological behavior of the shale rocks from prospective reservoir in northern Poland, and later we incorporated the constitutive models obtained in the laboratory into numerical models of the reservoir. Laboratory testing consisted of fourteen 72-hours-long triaxial creep tests, with ultrasonic acquisition (P, S1 and S2 waves) on cylindrical rock samples from different depths of one borehole. This procedure allowed us to construct a reliable vertical profile of rheological parameters. We did not only focus on the prospective intervals, but we also collected data for the interbedded marl or limestone layers. Numerical modeling was performed with different rheological settings: we started with a simple one layer isotropic elastic material, and then we increased the complexity in steps. Finally we arrived at layered anisotropic viscoelastic material with several fracturing stages which were superimposed on each other.

  1. Modeling Atmospheric Emissions and Calculating Mortality Rates Associated with High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Alyssa

    Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are a growing pollution concern throughout the global community, as they have been linked to numerous health issues. The freight transportation sector is a large source of these emissions and is expected to continue growing as globalization persists. Within the US, the expanding development of the natural gas industry is helping to support many industries and leading to increased transportation. The process of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing (HVHF) is one of the newer advanced extraction techniques that is increasing natural gas and oil reserves dramatically within the US, however the technique is very resource intensive. HVHF requires large volumes of water and sand per well, which is primarily transported by trucks in rural areas. Trucks are also used to transport waste away from HVHF well sites. This study focused on the emissions generated from the transportation of HVHF materials to remote well sites, dispersion, and subsequent health impacts. The Geospatial Intermodal Freight Transport (GIFT) model was used in this analysis within ArcGIS to identify roadways with high volume traffic and emissions. High traffic road segments were used as emissions sources to determine the atmospheric dispersion of particulate matter using AERMOD, an EPA model that calculates geographic dispersion and concentrations of pollutants. Output from AERMOD was overlaid with census data to determine which communities may be impacted by increased emissions from HVHF transport. The anticipated number of mortalities within the impacted communities was calculated, and mortality rates from these additional emissions were computed to be 1 in 10 million people for a simulated truck fleet meeting stricter 2007 emission standards, representing a best case scenario. Mortality rates due to increased truck emissions from average, in-use vehicles, which represent a mixed age truck fleet, are expected to be higher (1 death per 341,000 people annually).

  2. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  3. Reactive transport modelling to infer changes in soil hydraulic properties induced by non-conventional water irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Abellan, Javier; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Candela, Lucila; Jacques, Diederik; Kohfahl, Claus; Tamoh, Karim

    2017-06-01

    The use of non-conventional water (e.g., treated wastewater, desalinated water) for different purposes is increasing in many water scarce regions of the world. Its use for irrigation may have potential drawbacks, because of mineral dissolution/precipitation processes, such as changes in soil physical and hydraulic properties (e.g., porosity, permeability), modifying infiltration and aquifer recharge processes or blocking root growth. Prediction of soil and groundwater impacts is essential for achieving sustainable agricultural practices. A numerical model to solve unsaturated water flow and non-isothermal multicomponent reactive transport has been modified implementing the spatio-temporal evolution of soil physical and hydraulic properties. A long-term process simulation (30 years) of agricultural irrigation with desalinated water, based on a calibrated/validated 1D numerical model in a semi-arid region, is presented. Different scenarios conditioning reactive transport (i.e., rainwater irrigation, lack of gypsum in the soil profile, and lower partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)) have also been considered. Results show that although boundary conditions and mineral soil composition highly influence the reactive processes, dissolution/precipitation of carbonate species is triggered mainly by pCO2, closely related to plant roots. Calcite dissolution occurs in the root zone, precipitation takes place under it and at the soil surface, which will lead a root growth blockage and a direct soil evaporation decrease, respectively. For the studied soil, a gypsum dissolution up to 40 cm depth is expected at long-term, with a general increase of porosity and hydraulic conductivity.

  4. Integrated remote sensing imagery and two-dimensional hydraulic modeling approach for impact evaluation of flood on crop yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huili; Liang, Zhongyao; Liu, Yong; Liang, Qiuhua; Xie, Shuguang

    2017-10-01

    The projected frequent occurrences of extreme flood events will cause significant losses to crops and will threaten food security. To reduce the potential risk and provide support for agricultural flood management, prevention, and mitigation, it is important to account for flood damage to crop production and to understand the relationship between flood characteristics and crop losses. A quantitative and effective evaluation tool is therefore essential to explore what and how flood characteristics will affect the associated crop loss, based on accurately understanding the spatiotemporal dynamics of flood evolution and crop growth. Current evaluation methods are generally integrally or qualitatively based on statistic data or ex-post survey with less diagnosis into the process and dynamics of historical flood events. Therefore, a quantitative and spatial evaluation framework is presented in this study that integrates remote sensing imagery and hydraulic model simulation to facilitate the identification of historical flood characteristics that influence crop losses. Remote sensing imagery can capture the spatial variation of crop yields and yield losses from floods on a grid scale over large areas; however, it is incapable of providing spatial information regarding flood progress. Two-dimensional hydraulic model can simulate the dynamics of surface runoff and accomplish spatial and temporal quantification of flood characteristics on a grid scale over watersheds, i.e., flow velocity and flood duration. The methodological framework developed herein includes the following: (a) Vegetation indices for the critical period of crop growth from mid-high temporal and spatial remote sensing imagery in association with agricultural statistics data were used to develop empirical models to monitor the crop yield and evaluate yield losses from flood; (b) The two-dimensional hydraulic model coupled with the SCS-CN hydrologic model was employed to simulate the flood evolution process

  5. Analysis and Prediction of Rainfall and Storm Surge Interactions in the Clear Creek Watershed using Unsteady-State HEC-RAS Hydraulic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Heather

    This study presents an unsteady-state hydraulic model analysis of hurricane storm surge and rainfall-runoff interactions in the Clear Creek Watershed, a basin draining into Galveston Bay and vulnerable to flooding from both intense local rainfalls and storm surge. Storm surge and rainfall-runoff have historically been modeled separately, and thus the linkage and interactions between the two during a hurricane are not completely understood. This study simulates the two processes simultaneously by using storm surge stage hydrographs as boundary conditions in the Hydrologic Engineering Center’s - River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) hydraulic model. Storm surge hydrographs for a severe hurricane were generated in the Advanced Circulation Model for Oceanic, Coastal, and Estuarine Waters (ADCIRC) model to predict the flooding that could be caused by a worst-case scenario. Using this scenario, zones have been identified to represent areas in the Clear Creek Watershed vulnerable to flooding from storm surge, rainfall, or both.

  6. Hydraulic Model Investigation: Walnut Creek Flood-Control Project Contra Costa County, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT HL-87-14 WALNUT CREEK FLOOD-CONTROL PROJECT CONTRA COSTA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Hydraulic Model Investigation by W. G. Davis O11C tLE...34’ : AA Ii iA e d S O a :::: SCALE IN MILES 5 0 5 10 Figure 1. Vicinity map 4~ 4.. %- . " . " %____ WALNUT CREEK FLOOD-CONTROL PROJECT CONTRA COSTA COUNTY...Pleasant Hi-1, nd Martinez, California, on its way to the Suisin Bay. All of th.e planned imcrovements are located in Contra Costa County, California

  7. Telegraph Canyon Creek Channel Improvement Project, San Diego County, California; Hydraulic Model Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    USAEWES (if pikae ) Hydraulics Laboratory CEWES-HS-L 6C. ADDRESS (Cty, Stat, and ZP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (Cty, State, and ZIP Code) PO Box 631 Vicksburg, MS...the model was modified to reproduce upstream channel improvements to sta 78+00 to reflect the change in location of the inlets to the box culverts from...being less than 1 mile* and the length about 10 miles; the total drainage area is about 7.5 square miles. Because climatic and drainage area

  8. Modeling the performance of an anaerobic baffled reactor with the variation of hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzheng; Shi, En; Antwi, Philip; Leu, Shao-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic baffled reactors (ABRs) have been widely used in engineering but very few models have been developed to simulate its performance. Based on the integration of biomass retention and liquid-gas mass transfer of biogas into the biochemical process derived in the International Water Association (IWA) Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1), a mathematical model was developed to predict volatile fatty acids (VFAs), chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) and biogas in a 4-compartment ABR operated with variable hydraulic retention time (HRT). The model was calibrated and validated with the experimental data obtained from the reactor when the HRT decreased from 2.0 to 1.0d by stages. It was found that the predicted VFAs, CODCr and biogas agreed well with the experimental data. Consequently, the developed model was a reliable tool to enhance the understanding among the mechanisms of the anaerobic digestion in ABRs, as well as to reactor's designing and operation.

  9. Assessment of hydraulic fish habitat condition using integrated toolkit: a case study of the Geum river basin, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangyoung; Kim, Jeongkon; Ko, Ick Hwan; Arthington, Angela; Jones, Gary; Yum, Kyung Taek

    2010-01-01

    Artificial changes of rivers, including construction and operation of dams, inevitably lead to physical and ecological changes throughout waterways and their floodplains. In this study, a conceptual model coupled with integrated numerical modeling is presented for hydraulic fish habitat assessment of the Geum River basin, Republic of Korea. Based on the major events which might have affected the ecological system, a conceptual model was formulated to guide desktop and field studies, modeling and scenario evaluations. The result of hydraulic fish habitat assessment indicated that the construction of the Daecheong Multipurpose Dam (DMD) in the Geum River basin has altered flow magnitudes and reduced the river's flow variability. Changes are evident in the magnitude of medium and small flows and the river experiences increased low flows during the dry season. Black shiner, an endangered fish species in Korea, was selected and analyzed to explore relationships between flow regime change by dams and changes to its preferred habitats. As a result, fewer sensitive riffle-benthic species were observed in the reaches downstream of DMD due to the reduction of suitable habitat conditions such as riffle-pool sequences. The proposed conceptual model and integrated toolkit would allow river managers to isolate the physical and biological effects associated with dam operation and could be useful for developing river management strategies.

  10. Arterial mechanics in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Mechanical properties, hydraulic conductivity, and two-phase (solid/fluid) finite element models.

    PubMed

    Gaballa, M A; Raya, T E; Simon, B R; Goldman, S

    1992-07-01

    To characterize the interaction between mechanical and fluid transport properties in hypertension, we measured in vivo elastic material constants and hydraulic conductivity in intact segments of carotid arteries in normal and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). With the use of a finite element model, the arterial wall was modeled as a large-deformation, two-phase (solid/fluid) medium, which accounts for the existence and motion of the tissue fluid. Measurements of internal diameter and transmural pressures were obtained during continuous increases in pressure from 0 to 200 mm Hg. Strain and stress components were calculated based on a pseudostrain exponential energy density function. To measure the hydraulic conductivity, segments of the carotid artery were isolated, filled with a 4% oxygenated albumin-Tyrode's solution, and connected to a capillary tube. The movement of the meniscus of the capillary tube represented the fluid filtration across the artery. To study the influence of transmural pressure on hydraulic conductivity, measurement of fluid filtration across the arterial wall was obtained at transmural pressures of 50 and 100 mm Hg. The material constants in the SHR (n = 9) were higher (p less than 0.05 for all variables) than in normal rats (n = 10): c = 1,343 +/- 96 versus 1,158 +/- 65 mm Hg, b1 = 1.84 +/- 0.24 versus 1.22 +/- 0.22, b2 = 0.769 +/- 0.114 versus 0.616 +/- 0.11, b3 = 0.017 +/- 0.005 versus 0.0065 +/- 0.002, b4 = 0.206 +/- 0.04 versus 0.083 +/- 0.03, b5 = 0.0594 +/- 0.007 versus 0.0217 +/- 0.006, and b6 = 0.22 +/- 0.09 versus 0.123 +/- 0.02, respectively. The hydraulic conductivity of the total wall, calculated from the filtration data, was lower (p less than 0.05) at both 50 and 100 mm Hg in the SHR (n = 6) compared with normal rats (n = 7): 1.12 +/- 0.31 x 10(-8) and 0.72 +/- 0.23 x 10(-8) versus 1.95 +/- 0.53 x 10(-8) and 1.35 +/- 0.47 x 10(-8) cm/(sec.mm Hg), respectively. The intergroup comparisons between 50 and 100 mm Hg in both SHR

  11. Linking Tropical Forest Function to Hydraulic Traits in a Size-Structured and Trait-Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, B. O.; Gloor, M.; Fauset, S.; Fyllas, N.; Galbraith, D.; Baker, T. R.; Rowland, L.; Fisher, R.; Binks, O.; Sevanto, S.; Xu, C.; Jansen, S.; Choat, B.; Mencuccini, M.; McDowell, N. G.; Meir, P.

    2015-12-01

    A major weakness of forest ecosystem models is their inability to capture the diversity of responses to changes in water availability, severely hampering efforts to predict the fate of tropical forests under climate change. Such models often prescribe moisture sensitivity using heuristic response functions that are uniform across all individuals and lack important knowledge about trade-offs in hydraulic traits. We address this weakness by implementing a process representation of plant hydraulics into an individual- and trait-based model (Trait Forest Simulator; TFS) intended for application at discrete sites where community-level distributions of stem and leaf trait spectra (wood density, leaf mass per area, leaf nitrogen and phosphorus content) are known. The model represents a trade-off in the safety and efficiency of water conduction in xylem tissue through hydraulic traits, while accounting for the counteracting effects of increasing hydraulic path length and xylem conduit taper on whole-plant hydraulic resistance with increasing tree size. Using existing trait databases and additional meta-analyses from the rich literature on tropical tree ecophysiology, we obtained all necessary hydraulic parameters associated with xylem conductivity, vulnerability curves, pressure-volume curves, and hydraulic architecture (e.g., leaf-to-sapwood area ratios) as a function of the aforementioned traits and tree size. Incorporating these relationships in the model greatly improved the diversity of tree response to seasonal changes in water availability as well as in response to drought, as determined by comparison with field observations and experiments. Importantly, this individual- and trait-based framework provides a testbed for identifying both critical processes and functional traits needed for inclusion in coarse-scale Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, which will lead to reduced uncertainty in the future state of tropical forests.

  12. Computational thermal-hydraulic modeling of a steam generator and a boiler simulator autoclave

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, R.H.; Keeton, L.W.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion of heat transfer tubing in nuclear steam generators has been a persistent problem in the power generation industry, assuming many different forms over the years depending on chemistry and operating conditions. Whatever the corrosion mechanism, a funding understanding of the process is essential to establish effective management strategies. To gain this fundamental understanding requires an integrated investigative approach that merges technology from many diverse scientific disciplines. An important aspect of an integrated approach is characterization of the corrosive environment at high temperature. This begins with a thorough understanding of local thermal-hydraulic conditions, since they affect deposit formation, chemical concentration, and ultimately corrosion. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can and should play an important role in characterizing the thermal-hydraulic environment and in predicting the consequences of that environment. The evolution of CFD technology now allows accurate calculation of steam generator thermal-hydraulic conditions and the resulting sludge deposit profiles. Similar calculations are also possible for model boilers, so that tests can be designed to be prototypic of the heat exchanger environment they are supposed to simulate. This paper illustrates the utility of CFD technology by way of examples in each of these two areas. This technology can be further extended to produce more detailed local calculations of the chemical environment in support plate crevices, beneath thick deposits on tubes, and deep in tubesheet sludge. Knowledge of this local chemical environment will provide the foundation for development of mechanistic corrosion models, which can be used to optimize inspection and cleaning schedules and focus the search for a viable fix.

  13. Hydraulic fracturing model featuring initiation beyond the wellbore wall for directional well in coal bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuwei; Jia, Dan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Jia; Fu, Chunkai; Yang, Xinliang; Ai, Chi

    2016-08-01

    In developing internal fracture systems in coal beds, the initiation mechanism differs greatly from that of conventional ones and initiations may be produced beyond the wellbore wall. This paper describes the features of the internal structure of coal beds and RFPA2D simulation is used to attest the possible occurrence of initiation beyond the wellbore wall in coal bed hydraulic fracturing. Using the theory of elasticity and fracture mechanics, we analyse the stress distribution in the vicinal coal rock. Then by taking into consideration the effects of the spatial relationship between coal bed cleats and the wellbore, we establish a model for calculating both tensile and shear initiation pressure that occur along cleats beyond the wellbore wall. The simulation in this paper indicates that for shear initiations that happen along coal cleats, the pressure required to initiate fracture for cleats beyond the wellbore wall is evidently lower than that on the wellbore wall, thus it is easier to initiate shear fractures for cleats beyond the wellbore wall. For tensile failure, the pressure required to initiate tensile fracture for cleats beyond the wellbore wall is obviously higher than that for cleats at the wellbore wall, thus it is easier to initiate tensile fractures for cleats at the wellbore wall. On the one hand, this paper has proved the possible occurrence of initiations beyond the wellbore wall and has changed the current assumption that hydraulic fractures can only occur at the wellbore wall. On the other hand, the established theoretical model provides a new approach to calculating the initiation pressure in hydraulic fracturing.

  14. Suitability of parametric models to describe the hydraulic properties of an unsaturated coarse sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mace, Andy; Rudolph, David L.; Kachanoski , R. Gary

    1998-01-01

    The performance of parametric models used to describe soil water retention (SWR) properties and predict unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) as a function of volumetric water content (θ) is examined using SWR and K(θ) data for coarse sand and gravel sediments. Six 70 cm long, 10 cm diameter cores of glacial outwash were instrumented at eight depths with porous cup ten-siometers and time domain reflectometry probes to measure soil water pressure head (h) and θ, respectively, for seven unsaturated and one saturated steady-state flow conditions. Forty-two θ(h) and K(θ) relationships were measured from the infiltration tests on the cores. Of the four SWR models compared in the analysis, the van Genuchten (1980) equation with parameters m and n restricted according to the Mualem (m = 1 - 1/n) criterion is best suited to describe the θ(h) relationships. The accuracy of two models that predict K(θ) using parameter values derived from the SWR models was also evaluated. The model developed by van Genuchten (1980) based on the theoretical expression of Mualem (1976) predicted K(θ) more accurately than the van Genuchten (1980) model based on the theory of Burdine (1953). A sensitivity analysis shows that more accurate predictions of K(θ) are achieved using SWR model parameters derived with residual water content (θr) specified according to independent measurements of θ at values of h where θ/h ∼ 0 rather than model-fit θr values. The accuracy of the model K(θ) function improves markedly when at least one value of unsaturated K is used to scale the K(θ) function predicted using the saturated K. The results of this investigation indicate that the hydraulic properties of coarse-grained sediments can be accurately described using the parametric models. In addition, data collection efforts should focus on measuring at least one value of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and as complete a set of SWR data as possible, particularly in the dry range.

  15. The application of Biological-Hydraulic coupled model for Tubificidae-microorganism interaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiao; Sun, Peide; Song, Yingqi; Wang, Ruyi; Fang, Zhiguo

    2010-11-01

    Based on the fully coupled activated sludge model (FCASM), the novel model Tubificidae -Fully Coupled Activated Sludge Model-hydraulic (T-FCASM-Hydro), has been developed in our previous work. T-FCASM-Hydro not only describe the interactive system between Tubificidae and functional microorganisms for the sludge reduction and nutrient removal simultaneously, but also considere the interaction between biological and hydraulic field, After calibration and validation of T-FCASM-Hydro at Zhuji Feida-hongyu Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Zhejiang province, T-FCASM-Hydro was applied for determining optimal operating condition in the WWTP. Simulation results showed that nitrogen and phosphorus could be removed efficiently, and the efficiency of NH4+-N removal enhanced with increase of DO concentration. At a certain low level of DO concentration in the aerobic stage, shortcut nitrification-denitrification dominated in the process of denitrification in the novel system. However, overhigh agitation (>6 mgṡL-1) could result in the unfavorable feeding behavior of Tubificidae because of the strong flow disturbance, which might lead to low rate of sludge reduction. High sludge reduction rate and high removal rate of nitrogen and phosphorus could be obtained in the new-style oxidation ditch when DO concentration at the aerobic stage with Tubificidae was maintained at 3.6 gṡm-3.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation in process reactors during aeration tank settling.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D; Ingildsen, P; Rasmussen, M R; Laursen, J

    2006-01-01

    Aeration tank settling is a control method allowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration tank settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plants using the present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. This paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet and outlet causing a disruption of the sludge blanket at the outlet and thereby reducing the retention of sludge in the process tank. The model has allowed us to establish a clear picture of the problems arising at the plant during aeration tank settling. Secondly, several process tank design changes have been suggested and tested by means of computational fluid dynamics modelling. The most promising design changes have been found and reported.

  17. A tracer study for assessing the interactions between hydraulic retention time and transport processes in a wetland system for nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Wanielista, Martin P

    2012-03-01

    In this study, a new-generation subsurface upflow wetland (SUW) system packed with the unique sorption media was introduced for nutrient removal. To explore the interface between hydraulic and environmental performance, a tracer study was carried out in concert with a transport model to collectively provide hydraulic retention time (7.1 days) and compelling evidence of pollutant fate and transport processes. Research findings indicate that our pollution-control media demonstrate smooth nutrient removal efficiencies across different sampling port locations given the appropriate size distribution conversant with the anticipated hydraulic patterns and layered structure among the sorption media components. The sizable capacity for nutrient removal in this bioprocess confirms that SUW is a promising substitute for an extension of traditional on-site wastewater treatment systems.

  18. Coupling hydraulic and hydrological models to simulate the streamflow of a large arctic river: The case of the Mackenzie River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshamy, M.; Pietroniro, A.; Wheater, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate simulation of river streamflow is essential for water resources management and climate change impact studies. Hydrological models often route the streamflow using simple hydrological routing techniques that does not consider the characteristics of river channels or complex morphology present in certain rivers. Yet, for large river systems, as well as for regional and global modelling, routing effects can have a very significant impact on the magnitude of flood peaks and the timing of flows to seas and oceans. In this study, an approach to couple the MESH (Modélisation Environmentale Communautaire-Surface and Hydrology) model, which embeds the Canadian land surface scheme (CLASS), with a one-dimensional river hydraulic model (River-1D) of the main Mackenzie river and the 3 of its main tributaries (Peace, Athabasca, and Slave) is reported. Of particular interest is ensuring the complexity of dealing with the large delta environment where flow reversal and overbank storage is possible and can be a significant part of the water budget. Inflows at designated locations on those rivers are generated by the MESH hydrologic model run at 0.125° spatial resolution and 30 minutes temporal resolution. The one-dimensional hydraulic model simulates the routing along the river in a one-way coupling mode with due consideration to river ice processes including freeze-up and break-up. This approach improves the accuracy of river flow simulations along the main stem of the Mackenzie and its main tributes and allows for studying sediment transport and dynamic events, such as dam breaches or ice jam release and formation events.

  19. Numerical Study of Critical Role of Rock Heterogeneity in Hydraulic Fracture Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zhou; H. Huang; M. Deo

    2016-03-01

    Log and seismic data indicate that most shale formations have strong heterogeneity. Conventional analytical and semi-analytical fracture models are not enough to simulate the complex fracture propagation in these highly heterogeneous formation. Without considering the intrinsic heterogeneity, predicted morphology of hydraulic fracture may be biased and misleading in optimizing the completion strategy. In this paper, a fully coupling fluid flow and geomechanics hydraulic fracture simulator based on dual-lattice Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to predict the hydraulic fracture propagation in heterogeneous reservoir. The heterogeneity of rock is simulated by assigning different material force constant and critical strain to different particles and is adjusted by conditioning to the measured data and observed geological features. Based on proposed model, the effects of heterogeneity at different scale on micromechanical behavior and induced macroscopic fractures are examined. From the numerical results, the microcrack will be more inclined to form at the grain weaker interface. The conventional simulator with homogeneous assumption is not applicable for highly heterogeneous shale formation.

  20. Full equations utilities (FEQUTL) model for the approximation of hydraulic characteristics of open channels and control structures during unsteady flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franz, Delbert D.; Melching, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    The Full EQuations UTiLities (FEQUTL) model is a computer program for computation of tables that list the hydraulic characteristics of open channels and control structures as a function of upstream and downstream depths; these tables facilitate the simulation of unsteady flow in a stream system with the Full Equations (FEQ) model. Simulation of unsteady flow requires many iterations for each time period computed. Thus, computation of hydraulic characteristics during the simulations is impractical, and preparation of function tables and application of table look-up procedures facilitates simulation of unsteady flow. Three general types of function tables are computed: one-dimensional tables that relate hydraulic characteristics to upstream flow depth, two-dimensional tables that relate flow through control structures to upstream and downstream flow depth, and three-dimensional tables that relate flow through gated structures to upstream and downstream flow depth and gate setting. For open-channel reaches, six types of one-dimensional function tables contain different combinations of the top width of flow, area, first moment of area with respect to the water surface, conveyance, flux coefficients, and correction coefficients for channel curvilinearity. For hydraulic control structures, one type of one-dimensional function table contains relations between flow and upstream depth, and two types of two-dimensional function tables contain relations among flow and upstream and downstream flow depths. For hydraulic control structures with gates, a three-dimensional function table lists the system of two-dimensional tables that contain the relations among flow and upstream and downstream flow depths that correspond to different gate openings. Hydraulic control structures for which function tables containing flow relations are prepared in FEQUTL include expansions, contractions, bridges, culverts, embankments, weirs, closed conduits (circular, rectangular, and pipe

  1. Estimating soil hydraulic properties from soil moisture time series by inversion of a dual-permeability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Valle, Nicolas; Wutzler, Thomas; Meyer, Stefanie; Potthast, Karin; Michalzik, Beate

    2017-04-01

    Dual-permeability type models are widely used to simulate water fluxes and solute transport in structured soils. These models contain two spatially overlapping flow domains with different parameterizations or even entirely different conceptual descriptions of flow processes. They are usually able to capture preferential flow phenomena, but a large set of parameters is needed, which are very laborious to obtain or cannot be measured at all. Therefore, model inversions are often used to derive the necessary parameters. Although these require sufficient input data themselves, they can use measurements of state variables instead, which are often easier to obtain and can be monitored by automated measurement systems. In this work we show a method to estimate soil hydraulic parameters from high frequency soil moisture time series data gathered at two different measurement depths by inversion of a simple one dimensional dual-permeability model. The model uses an advection equation based on the kinematic wave theory to describe the flow in the fracture domain and a Richards equation for the flow in the matrix domain. The soil moisture time series data were measured in mesocosms during sprinkling experiments. The inversion consists of three consecutive steps: First, the parameters of the water retention function were assessed using vertical soil moisture profiles in hydraulic equilibrium. This was done using two different exponential retention functions and the Campbell function. Second, the soil sorptivity and diffusivity functions were estimated from Boltzmann-transformed soil moisture data, which allowed the calculation of the hydraulic conductivity function. Third, the parameters governing flow in the fracture domain were determined using the whole soil moisture time series. The resulting retention functions were within the range of values predicted by pedotransfer functions apart from very dry conditions, where all retention functions predicted lower matrix potentials

  2. Assessment of Hydraulic Conditions Supporting the Recruitment of Asian Carp in the Illinois Waterway - A Case Study Using Known Spawning Events of 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, D. T.; Garcia, T.; Duncker, J.; Zhu, Z.; Butler, S.; Diana, M.; Wahl, D.

    2016-12-01

    The upstream movement of Asian carp in the Illinois Waterway poses a potential threat to the Great Lakes. If established within the Great Lakes, Asian carp may disrupt the food web and harm the ecosystems of the Great Lakes. Understanding the Asian carp reproduction, including the timing and locations of adult spawning and the transport and dispersal of eggs and larvae, is essential information for managing the Asian carp population in the Illinois Waterway. The Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator (FluEgg) model, a Lagrangian particle tracking model, has been used to study the transport and dispersal of eggs and larvae. The FluEgg model inputs are water temperature and hydraulic properties. At present, field measured or modeled hydraulics from steady-state simulations have been used in FluEgg modeling and the applications have shown useful results for evaluating Asian carp reproduction in the Illinois Waterway. However, there is a need to use data based on more representative time-variable hydraulic conditions from spawning to the time larvae reach the Gas Bladder Inflation Stage (GBI). The GBI stage is critical because that is the stage when the young fish seek nursery habitat. In June 2015, Asian carp spawning was observed at two locations along the Illinois Waterway, one below Starved Rock Lock and Dam near Utica, and the one in the La Grange Pool near Havana, Illinois. This study analyzes how hydraulic modeling can improve the predictability of the FluEgg model. An unsteady HEC-RAS hydraulic model of the Illinois Waterway from Brandon Road Lock and Dam to Grafton, Illinois was used to reproduce the June 2015 flood event. Hydraulic data from HEC-RAS modeling, including predicted spatial and temporal discharge, water depth, and shear velocity; and measured water temperature data were used as input to the FluEgg model. FluEgg simulation results illustrate the downstream drifting of eggs and larvae until reaching the GBI stage. These simulation results can be analyzed

  3. Modeling and simulation of cavitation in hydraulic pipelines based on the thermodynamic and caloric properties of liquid and steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, A.; Iben, U.; Meister, A.; Schmidt, J.

    2005-06-01

    The present paper focuses on a homogeneous cavitation model based on the thermodynamic equilibrium model of liquid and steam, which has significant importance for the development of modern hydraulic tools and injection systems. Subsequent to the derivation of the mathematical model a numerical method is described. Computations are carried out for a variety of test cases. The results are compared with analytic solutions, experimental data, and simulations obtained with a different numerical scheme. The investigation proves the ability of the method to predict cavitation in hydraulic pipelines in a reliable and successful manner. The lucidity of the procedure enables a simple extension of the model and the numerical method to higher space dimensions as well as applications in the context of complex hydraulic systems.

  4. Modular GIS Framework for National Scale Hydrologic and Hydraulic Modeling Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djokic, D.; Noman, N.; Kopp, S.

    2015-12-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) have been extensively used for pre- and post-processing of hydrologic and hydraulic models at multiple scales. An extensible GIS-based framework was developed for characterization of drainage systems (stream networks, catchments, floodplain characteristics) and model integration. The framework is implemented as a set of free, open source, Python tools and builds on core ArcGIS functionality and uses geoprocessing capabilities to ensure extensibility. Utilization of COTS GIS core capabilities allows immediate use of model results in a variety of existing online applications and integration with other data sources and applications.The poster presents the use of this framework to downscale global hydrologic models to local hydraulic scale and post process the hydraulic modeling results and generate floodplains at any local resolution. Flow forecasts from ECMWF or WRF-Hydro are downscaled and combined with other ancillary data for input into the RAPID flood routing model. RAPID model results (stream flow along each reach) are ingested into a GIS-based scale dependent stream network database for efficient flow utilization and visualization over space and time. Once the flows are known at localized reaches, the tools can be used to derive the floodplain depth and extent for each time step in the forecast at any available local resolution. If existing rating curves are available they can be used to relate the flow to the depth of flooding, or synthetic rating curves can be derived using the tools in the toolkit and some ancillary data/assumptions. The results can be published as time-enabled spatial services to be consumed by web applications that use floodplain information as an input. Some of the existing online presentation templates can be easily combined with available online demographic and infrastructure data to present the impact of the potential floods on the local community through simple, end user products. This framework

  5. Quantification of Parameter Uncertainty of a Distributed Hydraulic Model Using Ensemble Smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; McLaughlin, Dennis; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Li, Wenpeng; Dong, Xinguang

    2014-05-01

    Yanqi basin is an important agricultural region in Xinjiang, in Northwest China. The irrigated agricultural land has been increasing in the past decades and made the basin suffer from many environmental problems such as soil salinization, decreased lake level, deteriorated lake water quality, decreased surface water flow to the downstream and damaged riverine forests. A 3-dimensional distributed numerical flow and transport model is built using MIKESHE/MIKE11 which contains saturated and unsaturated zones, rivers and lakes. It allows to better understand the impacts of individual hydrological units and their interactions. Before using the model for quantifying solutions for the environmental problems, the parameter uncertainties of the complex distributed model are assessed using an Ensemble Smoother (ES). ES is a data assimilation method to improve an ensemble of prior parameters by assimilating time series of observations over the whole time period available. It is basically a stochastic calibration method. In this case study, an iterative ES is applied, called Ensemble Smoother with Multiple Data Assimilation (ESMDA) (Emerick and Reynolds, 2012). Two alternatives are considered to update parameters in each iteration. One is the Ensemble Kalman Filter with perturbed observations and the other is an Unbiased Square root filter which updates parameter means and perturbations separately. Seventeen parameters are chosen from the distributed flow and transport model to quantify their uncertainty. Fifty prior replicates of each parameter are generated using the Latin Hypercube Sampling method. The distribution of posterior parameters and outputs obtained from the alternative methods are similar. The results indicate that the uncertainty of the parameters is narrowed during the smoother updating process, reflecting the information obtained from the observations. The most sensitive parameters are the dispersion coefficient of the lakes and the hydraulic conductivity of

  6. Controls of soil hydraulic characteristics on modeling groundwater recharge under different climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.

    2015-02-01

    To meet the challenge of estimating spatially varying groundwater recharge (GR), increasing attention has been given to the use of vadose zone models (VZMs). However, the application of this approach is usually constrained by the lack of field soil hydraulic characteristics (SHCs) required by VZMs. To tackle this issue, SHCs based on the van Genuchten or Brooks-Corey model are generally estimated by pedotransfer functions or taken from texture based class averages. With the increasing use of this method, it is important to elucidate the controls of SHCs on computing GR mostly due to the high nonlinearity of the models. In this study, it is hypothesized that the nonlinear controls of SHCs on computing GR would vary with climatic conditions. To test this hypothesis, a widely used VZM along with two SHCs datasets for sand and loamy sand is used to compute GR at four sites in the continental Unites States with a significant gradient of precipitation (P). The simulation results show that the distribution patterns of mean annual GR ratios (GR ‾ / P ‾ , where GR ‾ and P ‾ are mean annual GR and P, respectively) vary considerably across the sites, largely depending on soil texture and climatic conditions at each site. It is found that GR ‾ / P ‾ is mainly controlled by the shape factor n in the van Genuchten model and the nonlinear effect of n on GR ‾ / P ‾ varies with climatic conditions. Specifically, for both soil textures, the variability in GR ‾ / P ‾ is smallest at the Andrews Forest with the highest P ‾ (191.3 cm/year) and GR ‾ / P ‾ is least sensitive to n; whereas, the variability in GR ‾ / P ‾ at the Konza Prairie (P ‾ = 84.2 cm/year) is the largest and GR ‾ / P ‾ is most sensitive to n. With further decreasing P ‾ , the nonlinear effect of n weakens at the Barta Brothers (P ‾ = 57.3 cm/year) and Sevilleta (P ‾ = 20.3 cm/year), leading to smaller GR ‾ / P ‾ variability at those two sites than at the Konza Prairie. The

  7. Megaflood erosion of the Tsangpo Gorge constrained by hydraulic modeling, geochronology, and geochemical fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turzewski, M. D.; Huntington, K. W.; LeVeque, R. J.; Feathers, J. K.; Larsen, I. J.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The role of extreme floods in long-term erosion and landscape evolution is difficult to study because these events occur infrequently on human timescales and cannot often be observed directly. We address this difficulty using the rich sedimentary record of extreme floods preserved within the Siang River valley of the Eastern Himalaya, which hosts slackwater deposits from historical landslide-dam outburst floods and prehistoric glacial lake outburst megafloods sourced upstream of the Tsangpo gorge in Tibet. Previous workers used detrital zircon U-Pb ages of modern river sediments and flood sands to suggest that megafloods more effectively focus erosion in the Tsangpo gorge than modern peak flows and the year 2000 flood; however, this finding is based on only four, undated megaflood deposits, and a thorough investigation of the history, hydraulics, and erosive impact of different magnitude flood events is lacking. To expand this record and better understand the relationship between floods, erosion, and deposition, we combined field observations and dating of flood deposits with sediment provenance constraints and numerical flood modeling. We surveyed the trim line from the 2000 flood and identified two historical and 18 ancient slackwater flood deposits. Radiocarbon dates of megaflood deposits range from 1200-1650 14C yr B.P and correlate with upstream glacial lake terraces in Tibet dated by previous workers. Single-grain infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating of feldspar from megaflood deposits produced ages of 10 to 27 ka that correlate to older glacial lake terraces in Tibet. Using reconstructed glacial and landslide-dammed lakes and modern topography, we simulated the 2000 flood and two megaflood events with GeoClaw, an open source program designed to model geophysical flows. Modeled inundation for the 2000 flood is comparable to the observed flood stage, trim line, and distribution of slackwater deposits. Inundation maps from megaflood simulations

  8. On the Development of a Model for Flood-Tidal Deltas and the Hydraulic Efficiency of Associated Tidal Inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, M.; Smith, T. L.; Giese, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    A highly energetic, rapidly changing system provides the opportunity to study the potential for linking flood-tidal deltas and tidal inlets in order to predict possible future inlet scenarios. These subtidal and intertidal sedimentary deposits are formed by flood-tidal currents and modified by ebb-tidal currents and as such can elucidate past and present hydraulic conditions. Further, within the proposed conceptual model the evolution of these features can lend insight into future system and inlet development. An ongoing study documented a feedback mechanism linking the primary flood-tidal delta with the migration of the tidal inlet in the study area on Cape Cod, Massachusetts USA. This was based on field surveys (n = 10) of intertidal bedforms, a tidal current velocity survey, and 2 dimensional analyses of aerial photographs from 1938 to the present (n = 32). Three-dimensional analysis of the flood-tidal delta and inlet was conducted using bathymetry from a 2014 vessel-based survey using Phase-Measuring Sidescan Sonar, coupled with bathymetric Lidar from 2007 and 2010. A conceptual model for this and similar systems is being developed. As seen in the study area material entrained in the longshore sediment transport system becomes incorporated into the swash platform. As a result more sediment is introduced into the harbor during flood tides increasing the size of the flood-tidal delta. If the increase in size reduces the hydraulic efficiency of the ebb-tidal flow a feedback mechanism can result. Ebb-tidal flow is restricted, channels become narrower and deeper, and this channelization leads to an increase in shallower areas in the harbor, which further increases sediment transport during flood-tidal flow. If the cycle continues the system becomes too hydraulically inefficient and a correction occurs, that can be gradual or rapid, either of which has implications for system evolution and/or management. This preliminary model was developed from field observations in

  9. Experimental and numerical study of hydraulic fracture geometry in shale formations with complex geologic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xinfang; Zhou, Tong; Zou, Yushi

    2017-05-01

    Strike-slip fault geostress and dipping laminated structures in Lujiaping shale formation typically result in difficultly predicting hydraulic fracture (HF) geometries. In this study, a novel 3D fracture propagation model based on discrete element method (DEM) is established. A series of simulations is performed to illustrate the influence of vertical stress difference (△σv = σv-σh), fluid viscosity, and injection rate, on HF growth geometry in the dipping layered formation. Results reveal that the fracturing fluid can easily infiltrate the dipping bedding plane (BP) interfaces with low net pressure for △σv = 1 MPa. HF height growth is also restricted. With increased △σv, fracture propagation in the vertical direction is enhanced, and a fracture network is formed by VF and partially opened dipping BPs. However, it is likely to create simple VF for △σv = 20 MPa. Appropriately increasing fracturing fluid viscosity and injection rate is conductive to weakening the containment effect of BPs on HF growth by increasing the fluid net pressure. However, no indication is found on whether a higher fracturing fluid viscosity is better. Higher viscosity can reduce the activation of BPs, so a stimulated reservoir volume is not necessarily increased. All these results can serve as theoretical guidance for the optimization of fracturing treatments in Lujiaping shale formation.

  10. A method to calibrate channel friction and bathymetry parameters of a Sub-Grid hydraulic model using SAR flood images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites are capable of all-weather day and night observations that can discriminate between land and smooth open water surfaces over large scales. Because of this there has been much interest in the use of SAR satellite data to improve our understanding of water processes, in particular for fluvial flood inundation mechanisms. Past studies prove that integrating SAR derived data with hydraulic models can improve simulations of flooding. However while much of this work focusses on improving model channel roughness values or inflows in ungauged catchments, improvement of model bathymetry is often overlooked. The provision of good bathymetric data is critical to the performance of hydraulic models but there are only a small number of ways to obtain bathymetry information where no direct measurements exist. Spatially distributed river depths are also rarely available. We present a methodology for calibration of model average channel depth and roughness parameters concurrently using SAR images of flood extent and a Sub-Grid model utilising hydraulic geometry concepts. The methodology uses real data from the European Space Agency's archive of ENVISAT[1] Wide Swath Mode images of the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury during flood peaks between 2007 and 2010. Historic ENVISAT WSM images are currently free and easy to access from archive but the methodology can be applied with any available SAR data. The approach makes use of the SAR image processing algorithm of Giustarini[2] et al. (2013) to generate binary flood maps. A unique feature of the calibration methodology is to also use parameter 'identifiability' to locate the parameters with higher accuracy from a pre-assigned range (adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[3] et al., 2003). [1] https://gpod.eo.esa.int/services/ [2] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote

  11. Simulating HFIR Core Thermal Hydraulics Using 3D-2D Model Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Adam R; Freels, James D; Ekici, Kivanc

    2013-01-01

    A model utilizing interdimensional variable coupling is presented for simulating the thermal hydraulic interactions of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The model s domain consists of a single, explicitly represented three-dimensional fuel plate and a simplified two-dimensional coolant channel slice. In simplifying the coolant channel, and thus the number of mesh points in which the Navier-Stokes equations must be solved, the computational cost and solution time are both greatly reduced. In order for the reduced-dimension coolant channel to interact with the explicitly represented fuel plate, however, interdimensional variable coupling must be enacted along all shared boundaries. The primary focus of this paper is in detailing the collection, storage, passage, and application of variables across this interdimensional interface. Comparisons are made showing the general speed-up associated with this simplified coupled model.

  12. Hydraulic zonation of the lagoons of Marano and Grado, Italy. A modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarin, Christian; Umgiesser, Georg; Bajo, Marco; Bellafiore, Debora; De Pascalis, Francesca; Ghezzo, Michol; Mattassi, Giorgio; Scroccaro, Isabella

    2010-05-01

    The hydraulic regime-based zonation scheme of the Lagoons of Marano and Grado (Italy) has been derived by means of numerical models. A finite element modelling system has been used to describe the water circulation taking in account different forces such as tide, wind and rivers. The model has been validated by comparing the simulation results against measured water levels, salinity and water temperature data collected in several stations inside the lagoons. The analysis of water circulation, salinity and spatial distribution of passive tracers released at the inlets, led to a physically-based division of the lagoons system into six subbasins. The derived classification scheme is of crucial value for understanding the renewal capacity and pollutants distribution patterns in the lagoon.

  13. A high resolution coupled hydrologic-hydraulic model (HiResFlood-UCI) for flash flood modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phu; Thorstensen, Andrea; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Hsu, Kuolin; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sanders, Brett; Koren, Victor; Cui, Zhengtao; Smith, Michael

    2016-10-01

    HiResFlood-UCI was developed by coupling the NWS's hydrologic model (HL-RDHM) with the hydraulic model (BreZo) for flash flood modeling at decameter resolutions. The coupled model uses HL-RDHM as a rainfall-runoff generator and replaces the routing scheme of HL-RDHM with the 2D hydraulic model (BreZo) in order to predict localized flood depths and velocities. A semi-automated technique of unstructured mesh generation was developed to cluster an adequate density of computational cells along river channels such that numerical errors are negligible compared with other sources of error, while ensuring that computational costs of the hydraulic model are kept to a bare minimum. HiResFlood-UCI was implemented for a watershed (ELDO2) in the DMIP2 experiment domain in Oklahoma. Using synthetic precipitation input, the model was tested for various components including HL-RDHM parameters (a priori versus calibrated), channel and floodplain Manning n values, DEM resolution (10 m versus 30 m) and computation mesh resolution (10 m+ versus 30 m+). Simulations with calibrated versus a priori parameters of HL-RDHM show that HiResFlood-UCI produces reasonable results with the a priori parameters from NWS. Sensitivities to hydraulic model resistance parameters, mesh resolution and DEM resolution are also identified, pointing to the importance of model calibration and validation for accurate prediction of localized flood intensities. HiResFlood-UCI performance was examined using 6 measured precipitation events as model input for model calibration and validation of the streamflow at the outlet. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) obtained ranges from 0.588 to 0.905. The model was also validated for the flooded map using USGS observed water level at an interior point. The predicted flood stage error is 0.82 m or less, based on a comparison to measured stage. Validation of stage and discharge predictions builds confidence in model predictions of flood extent and localized velocities

  14. Modeling Hydraulic Responses to Meteorological Forcing: fromCanopy to Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur

    2007-02-08

    An understanding of the hydrologic interactions amongatmosphere, land surface, and subsurface is one of the keys tounderstanding the water cycling system that supports our life system onearth. Properly modeling such interactionsis a difficult task because oftheinherent coupled processes and complex feedback structures amongsubsystems. In this paper, we present a model that simulates thelandsurface and subsurface hydrologic response to meteorological forcing.This model combines a state of the art landsurface model, the NCARCommunity Land Model version 3 (CLM3), with a variablysaturatedgroundwater model, the TOUGH2, through an internal interfacethat includes flux and state variables shared by the two submodels.Specifically, TOUGH2, in its simulation, uses infiltration, evaporation,and rootuptake rates, calculated by CLM3, as source/sink terms? CLM3, inits simulation, uses saturation and capillary pressure profiles,calculated by TOUGH2, as state variables. This new model, CLMT2,preserves the best aspects of both submodels: the state of the artmodeling capability of surface energy and hydrologic processes from CLM3and the more realistic physical process based modeling capability ofsubsurface hydrologic processes from TOUGH2. The preliminary simulationresults show that the coupled model greatly improves the predictions ofthe water table, evapotranspiration, surface temperature, and moisture inthe top 20 cm of soil at a real watershed, as evaluated from 18 years ofobserved data. The new model is also ready to be coupled with anatmospheric simulation model, representing one of the first models thatare capable to simulate hydraulic processes from top of the atmosphere todeep ground.

  15. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  16. Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Belcher; P.E. Elliott; A.L. Geldon

    2001-12-31

    The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model, were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

  17. Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, Wayne R.; Elliott, Peggy E.; Geldon, Arthur L.

    2001-01-01

    The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada, between latitudes 35? and 38?15' north and longitudes 115? and 117?45' west. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

  18. Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores with supercritical steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Oglesby

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores at various depths and with various hole sizes, tubing, fluids and rates showed theoretical feasibility. WELLFLO SIMULATIONS REPORT STEP 4: DRILLING 10,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 5: DRILLING 20,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 6: DRILLING 30,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE Mehmet Karaaslan, MSI

  19. Estimation of the hydraulic conductivities of lupine roots by inverse modelling of high-resolution measurements of root water uptake.

    PubMed

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Meunier, Félicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Cesar, Jimenez; Javaux, Mathieu; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-08-18

    Radial and axial hydraulic conductivities are key parameters for proper understanding and modelling of root water uptake. Despite their importance, there is limited experimental information on how the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities vary along roots growing in soil. Here, a new approach was introduced to estimate inversely the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. A three-dimensional model of root water uptake was used to reproduce the measured profile of root water uptake along roots of lupine plant grown in soil. The profile of fluxes was measured using a neutron radiography technique combined with injection of deuterated water as tracer. The aim was to estimate inversely the profiles of the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities along the roots. The profile of hydraulic conductivities along the taproot and the lateral roots of lupines was calculated using three flexible scenarios. For all scenarios, it was found that the radial hydraulic conductivity increases towards the root tips, while the axial conductivity decreases. Additionally, it was found that in soil with uniform water content: (1) lateral roots were the main location of root water uptake; (2) water uptake by laterals decreased towards the root tips due to the dissipation of water potential along the root; and (3) water uptake by the taproot was higher in the distal segments and was negligible in the proximal parts, which had a low radial conductivity. The proposed approach allows the estimation of the root hydraulic properties of plants growing in soil. This information can be used in an advanced model of water uptake to predict the water uptake of different root types or different root architectures under varying soil conditions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A hydraulic model is compatible with rapid changes in leaf elongation under fluctuating evaporative demand and soil water status.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Cecilio F; Bosio, Mickael; Parent, Boris; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

    2014-04-01

    Plants are constantly facing rapid changes in evaporative demand and soil water content, which affect their water status and growth. In apparent contradiction to a hydraulic hypothesis, leaf elongation rate (LER) declined in the morning and recovered upon soil rehydration considerably quicker than transpiration rate and leaf water potential (typical half-times of 30 min versus 1-2 h). The morning decline of LER began at very low light and transpiration and closely followed the stomatal opening of leaves receiving direct light, which represent a small fraction of leaf area. A simulation model in maize (Zea mays) suggests that these findings are still compatible with a hydraulic hypothesis. The small water flux linked to stomatal aperture would be sufficient to decrease water potentials of the xylem and growing tissues, thereby causing a rapid decline of simulated LER, while the simulated water potential of mature tissues declines more slowly due to a high hydraulic capacitance. The model also captured growth patterns in the evening or upon soil rehydration. Changes in plant hydraulic conductance partly counteracted those of transpiration. Root hydraulic conductivity increased continuously in the morning, consistent with the transcript abundance of Zea maize Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein aquaporins. Transgenic lines underproducing abscisic acid, with lower hydraulic conductivity and higher stomatal conductance, had a LER declining more rapidly than wild-type plants. Whole-genome transcriptome and phosphoproteome analyses suggested that the hydraulic processes proposed here might be associated with other rapidly occurring mechanisms. Overall, the mechanisms and model presented here may be an essential component of drought tolerance in naturally fluctuating evaporative demand and soil moisture.

  1. Modeled hydraulic redistribution in tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations: the implications of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Kailiang; Foster, Adrianna

    2016-04-01

    Past studies have largely focused on hydraulic redistribution (HR) in trees, shrubs, and grasses, and recognized its role in interspecies interactions. HR in plants that conduct crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), however, remains poorly investigated, as does the effect of HR on transpiration in different vegetation associations (i.e., tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations). We have developed a mechanistic model to investigate the net direction and magnitude of HR at the patch scale for tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations at the growing season to yearly timescale. The modeling results show that deep-rooted CAM plants in CAM-grass associations could perform hydraulic lift at a higher rate than trees in tree-grass associations in a relatively wet environment, as explained by a significant increase in grass transpiration rate in the shallow soil layer, balancing a lower transpiration rate by CAM plants. By comparison, trees in tree-CAM associations may perform hydraulic descent at a higher rate than those in tree-grass associations in a dry environment. Model simulations also show that hydraulic lift increases the transpiration of shallow-rooted plants, while hydraulic descent increases that of deep-rooted plants. CAM plants transpire during the night and thus perform HR during the day. Based on these model simulations, we suggest that the ability of CAM plants to perform HR at a higher rate may have different effects on the surrounding plant community than those of plants with C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathways (i.e., diurnal transpiration).

  2. Hydraulic and Vegetative Models of Historic Environmental Conditions Isolate the Role of Riparian Vegetation in Inducing Channel Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    elevation of tamarisk-dominated stands in the study reaches allowed us to temporally and spatially scale the vegetative hydraulic roughness. Flood-event hydrology and sediment rating curves were derived from nearby USGS stream gages. The two flood events, while similar in flood peak magnitude, had strikingly different geomorphic effects. The 1984 flood left extensive fine-grained deposits in the study areas, but the 2011 flood caused significant scour as well as fill, resulting in significant areas of erosion as well as deposition. One reason for this finding is the difference in flood duration. However, other observed differences appear to be a result of the temporal differences in distribution and density of tamarisk stands wherein the density of riparian vegetation increased greatly between 1984 and 2011 . Our integration of sedimentologic, topographic, and vegetation stand structure data with hydraulic modeling also makes it possible to anticipate the style and magnitude of future channel changes in response to future changes in the flow regime, sediment supply, and/or riparian vegetation communities composition.

  3. Monitoring of an hydraulic structure affected by ASR: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Patrice; Ballivy, Gerard; Gravel, Clermont; Saint-Pierre, Francois

    2010-04-15

    Relevant and effective instruments and techniques must be selected for monitoring hydraulic structures affected by Alkali-Silica Reaction ('ASR'). A program aiming at assessing the condition of a hydraulic structure affected by ASR is presented in this paper. The structure has been exhibiting signs of ASR for more than 30 years and shows various levels of damage. The program encompassed different components, consisting of: (1) stress measurement, (2) evaluation of concrete condition by nondestructive methods without drilling (seismic tomography), (3) the evaluation of the mechanical, physical and petrographic properties of the concrete determined from cores recovered from full-length boreholes. The results of this case study suggest that ASR may generate relatively little damage in structures and that the concrete mechanical properties do not seem to be significantly affected despite high expansion levels measured in this structure. A major crack was localized with the seismic tomography. The monitoring program will be used to follow the development of ASR in the structure.

  4. Cold source moderator vessel development for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: Thermal-hydraulic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.; Wendel, M.W.

    1998-07-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design, test, and install a cold neutron source facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This new cold source employs supercritical hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures both as the medium for neutron moderation and as the working fluid for removal of internally-generated nuclear heating. The competing design goals of minimizing moderator vessel mass and providing adequate structural integrity for the vessel motivated the requirement of detailed multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses of the moderator vessel as a critical design subtask. This paper provides a summary review of the HFIR cold source moderator vessel design and a description of the thermal-hydraulic studies that were carried out to support the vessel development.

  5. Surface Deformation and Direct Field Observation to Constrain Conceptual Models of Hydraulic Fracture Growth and Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, W.; Murdoch, L.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic fractures can be created in shallow soil or bedrock to promote processes that destroy or remove chemical contaminants. The form of the fracture plays an important role in how it is used in such applications. We created more than 4500 environmental hydraulic fractures at approximately 300 sites since 1990, and we measured surface deformation at many. Several of these sites subsequently were excavated to evaluate fracture form in detail. In one recent example, six hydraulic fractures were created at 1.5m depth while we measured upward displacement and tilt at 15 overlying locations. We excavated in the vicinities of two of the fractures and mapped the exposed fractures. Tilt vectors were initially symmetric about the borehole but radiated from a point that moved southwest with time. Upward displacement of as much as 2.5 cm covered a region 5m to 6m across. The maximum displacement was roughly at the center of the deformed region but was 2m southwest of the borehole, consistent with the tilt data. Excavation revealed an oblong, proppant-filled fracture over 4.2 m in length with a maximum thickness of 1 cm, so the proppant covers a region that is smaller than the uplifted area and the proppant thickness is roughly half of the uplift. The fracture was shaped like a shallow saucer with maximum dips of approximately 15o at the southwestern end. The pattern of tilt and uplift generally reflect the aperture of the underlying pressurized fracture, but the deformation extends beyond the extent of the sand proppant so a quantitative interpretation requires inversion. Inversion of the tilt data using a simple double dislocation model under-estimates the extent but correctly predicts the depth, orientation, and off-centered location. Inversion of uplift using a model that assumes the overburden deforms like a plate over-estimates the extent. Neither can characterize the curved shape. A forward model using FEM analysis capable of representing 3D shapes is capable of

  6. Phase-field modeling of fracture propagation under hydraulic stimulation in pre-fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khisamitov, Ildar; Mohseni, Seyed Ali; Meschke, Guenther

    2016-04-01

    The presentation presents the numerical analysis of hydraulic fracturing within Griffith theory of brittle damage. The phase-field method [1] is employed to model brittle fracture propagation driven by pressurized fluids within fully saturated porous rocks. The phase-field equation is coupled with the Biot-theory using the effective stress concept. The porous rock is assumed as fully saturated with incompressible fluid and deforms within elasticity theory. The hydraulic fracturing propagates under mode I crack opening in quasi-static regime with slow fluid flow in porous matrix and fracture. The phase-field approach for the modelling of brittle fracture [2] coincides with the maximum energy release rate criterion in fracture mechanics theory. The phase-field equation is approximated over entire the domain and introduces new degree of freedom (damage variable). Crack surface is represented by a smooth regularized damage distribution over the fractured area. The presented numerical investigations are characterized by different scenarios of hydraulic stimulation and the interaction of a new fracture emanating from the bore hole with pre-existing cracks. The scenarios include predefined fractures with different oriented to specific angle and spatial distribution over the entire domain. The undamaged rock matrix is modeled as an isotropic elastic material with initial porosity and isotropic matrix permeability. The flow within the undamaged region is governed by Darcy's law while the fluid flow in fractures is approximated by cubic law with the crack opening computed from the displacement solution and the damage variable distribution [3]. Initial fractures are modeled by an initial distribution of the damage variable and by special zero-thickness interface finite elements. Adaptive algorithms in conjunction with appropriately chosen refinement criteria are utilized to reduce the computational costs. References [1] M.J. Borden "A phase-field description of dynamic

  7. Control of dense collagen gel scaffolds for tissue engineering through measurement and modelling of hydraulic permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpooshan, Vahid

    Among various natural biopolymers, type I collagen gels have demonstrated the highest potential as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE). However, the successful application of collagen gels requires a greater understanding of the relationship between their microstructure and physical-mechanical properties. Therefore, a precise method to modulate collagen gel microstructure in order to attain optimal scaffold properties for diverse biomedical applications is necessary. This dissertation describes a new approach to produce collagen gels with defined microstructures, quantified by hydraulic permeability ( k), in order to optimize scaffold properties for TE applications. It was hypothesized that the measurement of k can be used to study the role of microstructure in collagen gel properties, as well as cell function and cell-scaffold interactions. Applying increasing levels of plastic compression (PC) to the highly hydrated collagen gels resulted in an increase in collagen fibrillar density, reduced Happel model derived k values, increased gel stiffness, promoted MSC metabolic activity, osteogenic differentiation, and mineral deposition, while cell-induced gel contraction diminished. Thus, collagen gels with lower k and higher stiffness values exhibited greater potential for bone tissue engineering. Correlating between collagen gel microstructure, k, and fibroblast function within collagen gels indicated that increasing the level of PC yielded a reduction in pore size and an increase in fibril bundle diameter. Decrease in k values resulted in a decrease in gel contraction and an increase in cell metabolic activity. An increase in cell density accelerated contraction. Therefore, fibroblast function within collagen gels can be optimised by a balance between the microstructure, k, and cell seeding density. Developing a micromechanical model to measure experimental k of collagen gels during confined compression revealed the formation of a dense collagen lamella

  8. Optimal hydraulic design of earth dam cross section using saturated-unsa