Science.gov

Sample records for hydraulic model study

  1. Air-water analogy and the study of hydraulic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supino, Giulio

    1953-01-01

    The author first sets forth some observations about the theory of models. Then he established certain general criteria for the construction of dynamically similar models in water and in air, through reference to the perfect fluid equations and to the ones pertaining to viscous flow. It is, in addition, pointed out that there are more cases in which the analogy is possible than is commonly supposed.

  2. A Hydraulic Model of Arterial System for Study the Relationship Between Blood Distribution and Frequency Characteristics of Blood Pressure Waveform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This paper was trying to find out a suitable hydraulic model for studying the frequency characteristics between blood pressure waveforms and systemic...were used as organs. We used two kinds of tubes to test the hydraulic model and tried to find out suitable material to stimulate the aorta and its

  3. Model Studies of the Portugues and Bucana Rivers Channelization, Puerto Rico. Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    Two 1:30-scale physical hydraulic models of the Portugues and Bucana Rivers were used to determine the adequacy of the original designs for the flood...transmit all expected flood releases from the proposed Portugues and Cerrillos Dams. Modifications to transitions at entrances to the high-velocity

  4. Prattville intake, Lake Almanor, California, hydraulic model study on selective withdrawal modifications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeyen, T.

    1995-07-01

    Bureau of Reclamation conducted this hydraulic model study to provide Pacific Gas and Electric Company with an evaluation of several selective withdrawal structures that are being considered to reduce intake flow temperatures through the Prattville Intake at Lake Almanor, California. Release temperature control using selective withdrawal structures is being considered in an effort to improve the cold-water fishery in the North Fork of the Feather River.

  5. Hydraulic modelling for flood mapping and prevention: the case study of Cerfone River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Silvia; Venturi, Sara; Manciola, Piergiorgio

    2016-04-01

    The research focuses on the hydraulic risk evaluation and danger estimation for different extreme flood events, in order to correctly implement mitigation measures in an anthropized basin. The Cerfone River (Tuscany, Italy), due to the several floods that have affected the neighbouring villages in recent years, is selected as case of study. A finite volume numerical model that solves the shallow water equations all over the computational domain, was used to simulate the unsteady evolution of the maximum extent of flooded areas for different scenarios. The one - dimensional approach (still widespread in engineering projects) can be inaccurate in complex flows, which are often two or three dimensional and sometimes does not manage to capture the flood spatial extents in terms of flow depth and velocity. The use of a two-dimensional numerical model seems to be the suitable instrument in terms of computational efficiency and adequacy of results. In fact it overcomes the limits of a one-dimensional modeling in terms of prediction of hydraulic variables with a less computational effort respect to a full 3d model. An accurate modeling of the river basin leads to the evaluation of the present hydraulic risk. Structural and non- structural measures are then studied, simulated and compared in order to define the optimal risk reduction plan for the area of study. At this aim, different flooding scenarios were simulated through the 2D mathematical model: i) existing state of the river and floodplain areas; ii) design of a levee to protect the most vulnerable populated areas against the flooding risk; iii) use of off - stream detention basins that strongly amplify the lamination capacity of floodplains. All these scenarios were simulated for different return periods: 50, 100, 200 and 500 years. The inputs of the hydraulic models are obtained in accordance with the legislative requirement of Tuscany Region; in particular discharge hydrographs are evaluate through the ALTo

  6. Modeling Studies to Constrain Fluid and Gas Migration Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, H.; Birdsell, D.; Lackey, G.; Karra, S.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Dempsey, D.

    2015-12-01

    The dramatic increase in the extraction of unconventional oil and gas resources using horizontal wells and hydraulic fracturing (fracking) technologies has raised concerns about potential environmental impacts. Large volumes of hydraulic fracturing fluids are injected during fracking. Incidents of stray gas occurrence in shallow aquifers overlying shale gas reservoirs have been reported; whether these are in any way related to fracking continues to be debated. Computational models serve as useful tools for evaluating potential environmental impacts. We present modeling studies of hydraulic fracturing fluid and gas migration during the various stages of well operation, production, and subsequent plugging. The fluid migration models account for overpressure in the gas reservoir, density contrast between injected fluids and brine, imbibition into partially saturated shale, and well operations. Our results highlight the importance of representing the different stages of well operation consistently. Most importantly, well suction and imbibition both play a significant role in limiting upward migration of injected fluids, even in the presence of permeable connecting pathways. In an overall assessment, our fluid migration simulations suggest very low risk to groundwater aquifers when the vertical separation from a shale gas reservoir is of the order of 1000' or more. Multi-phase models of gas migration were developed to couple flow and transport in compromised wellbores and subsurface formations. These models are useful for evaluating both short-term and long-term scenarios of stray methane release. We present simulation results to evaluate mechanisms controlling stray gas migration, and explore relationships between bradenhead pressures and the likelihood of methane release and transport.

  7. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  8. Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, M.P.

    1994-02-01

    This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

  9. Model for polygonal hydraulic jumps.

    PubMed

    Martens, Erik A; Watanabe, Shinya; Bohr, Tomas

    2012-03-01

    We propose a phenomenological model for the polygonal hydraulic jumps discovered by Ellegaard and co-workers [Nature (London) 392, 767 (1998); Nonlinearity 12, 1 (1999); Physica B 228, 1 (1996)], based on the known flow structure for the type-II hydraulic jumps with a "roller" (separation eddy) near the free surface in the jump region. The model consists of mass conservation and radial force balance between hydrostatic pressure and viscous stresses on the roller surface. In addition, we consider the azimuthal force balance, primarily between pressure and viscosity, but also including nonhydrostatic pressure contributions from surface tension in light of recent observations by Bush and co-workers [J. Fluid Mech. 558, 33 (2006); Phys. Fluids 16, S4 (2004)]. The model can be analyzed by linearization around the circular state, resulting in a parameter relationship for nearly circular polygonal states. A truncated but fully nonlinear version of the model can be solved analytically. This simpler model gives rise to polygonal shapes that are very similar to those observed in experiments, even though surface tension is neglected, and the condition for the existence of a polygon with N corners depends only on a single dimensionless number φ. Finally, we include time-dependent terms in the model and study linear stability of the circular state. Instability occurs for sufficiently small Bond number and the most unstable wavelength is expected to be roughly proportional to the width of the roller as in the Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  10. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable

  11. A combined hydraulic and biological SBR model.

    PubMed

    Alex, J; Rönner-Holm, S G E; Hunze, M; Holm, N C

    2011-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) model was developed consisting of six continuous stirred tank reactors which describe the hydraulic flow patterns occurring in different SBR phases. The model was developed using the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation studies of an SBR reactor under a selection of dynamic operational phases. Based on the CFD results, the model structure was refined and a simplified 'driver' model to allow one to mimic the flow pattern driven by the external operational conditions (influent, aeration, mixing) was derived. The resulting model allows the modeling of biological processes, settlement and hydraulic conditions of cylindrical SBRs.

  12. Airborne SAR imagery to support hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, S.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite images and airborne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery are increasingly widespread and they are effective tools for measuring the size of flood events and for assessment of damage. The Hurricane Katrina disaster and the tsunami catastrophe in Indian Ocean countries are two recent and sadly famous examples. Moreover, as well known, the inundation maps can be used as tools to calibrate and validate hydraulic model (e.g. Horritt et al., Hydrological Processes, 2007). We carry out an application of a 1D hydraulic model coupled with a high resolution DTM for predicting the flood inundation processes. The study area is a 16 km reach of the River Severn, in west-central England, for which, four maps of inundated areas, obtained through airborne SAR images, and hydrometric data are available. The inundation maps are used for the calibration/validation of a 1D hydraulic model through a comparison between airborne SAR images and the results of hydraulic simulations. The results confirm the usefulness of inundation maps as hydraulic modelling tools and, moreover, show that 1D hydraulic model can be effectively used when coupled with high resolution topographic information.

  13. Development of hydraulic fracture network propagation model in shale gas reservoirs: 2D, single-phase and 3D, multi-phase model development, parametric studies, and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Chong Hyun

    The most effective method for stimulating shale gas reservoirs is a massive hydraulic fracture treatment. Recent analysis using microseismic technology have shown that complex fracture networks are commonly created in the field as a result of the stimulation of shale wells. The interaction between pre-existing natural fractures and the propagating hydraulic fracture is a critical factor affecting the created complex fracture network; however, many existing numerical models simulate only planar hydraulic fractures without considering the pre-existing fractures in the formation. The shale formations already contain a large number of natural fractures, so an accurate fracture propagation model needs to be developed to optimize the fracturing process. In this research, we first characterized the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing and fluid flow in the shale gas reservoir. Then, a 2D, single-phase numerical model and a 3D, 2-phase coupled model were developed, which integrate dynamic fracture propagation, interactions between hydraulic fractures and pre-existing natural fractures, fracture fluid leakoff, and fluid flow in a petroleum reservoir. By using the developed model, we conducted parametric studies to quantify the effects of treatment rate, treatment size, fracture fluid viscosity, differential horizontal stress, natural fracture spacing, fracture toughness, matrix permeability, and proppant size on the geometry of the hydraulic fracture network. The findings elucidate important trends in hydraulic fracturing of shale reservoirs that are useful in improving the design of treatments for specific reservoir settings.

  14. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    The unsaturated zone plays an extremely important hydrologic role that influences water quality and quantity, ecosystem function and health, the connection between atmospheric and terrestrial processes, nutrient cycling, soil development, and natural hazards such as flooding and landslides. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is one of the main properties considered to govern flow; however it is very difficult to measure accurately. Knowledge of the highly nonlinear relationship between unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) and volumetric water content is required for widely-used models of water flow and solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments is costly and time consuming, therefore use of models that estimate this property from more easily measured bulk-physical properties is common. In hydrologic studies, calculations based on property-transfer models informed by hydraulic property databases are often used in lieu of measured data from the site of interest. Reliance on database-informed predicted values with the use of neural networks has become increasingly common. Hydraulic properties predicted using databases may be adequate in some applications, but not others. This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K. The parameters that describe the K curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  15. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  16. Dynamics of Model Hydraulic Fracturing Liquid Studied by Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Kim; Kubarych, Kevin J.

    2014-06-01

    The technique of two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy is used to expose the chemical dynamics of various concentrations of polymers and their monomers in heterogeneous mixtures. An environmentally relevant heterogeneous mixture, which inspires this study, is hydraulic fracturing liquid (HFL). Hydraulic fracking is a technique used to extract natural gas from shale deposits. HFL consists of mostly water, proppant (sand), an emulsifier (guar), and other chemicals specific to the drilling site. Utilizing a metal carbonyl as a probe, we observe the spectral dynamics of the polymer, guar, and its monomer, mannose, and compare the results to see how hydration dynamics change with varying concentration. Another polymer, Ficoll, and its monomer, sucrose, are also compared to see how polymer size affects hydration dynamics. The two results are as follows: (1) Guar experiences collective hydration at high concentrations, where as mannose experiences independent hydration; (2) no collective hydration is observed for Ficoll in the same concentration range as guar, possibly due to polymer shape and size. HFL experiences extremely high pressure during natural gas removal, so future studies will focus on how increased pressure affects the hydration dynamics of polymers and monomers.

  17. An analytical model for hydraulic fracturing in shallow bedrock formations.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, José Sérgio; Ballestero, Thomas Paul; Pitombeira, Ernesto da Silva

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical method is proposed to estimate post-fracturing fracture size and transmissivity, and as a test of the methodology, data collected from two wells were used for verification. This method can be employed before hydrofracturing in order to obtain estimates of the potential hydraulic benefits of hydraulic fracturing. Five different pumping test analysis methods were used to evaluate the well hydraulic data. The most effective methods were the Papadopulos-Cooper model (1967), which includes wellbore storage effects, and the Gringarten-Ramey model (1974), known as the single horizontal fracture model. The hydraulic parameters resulting from fitting these models to the field data revealed that as a result of hydraulic fracturing, the transmissivity increased more than 46 times in one well and increased 285 times in the other well. The model developed by dos Santos (2008), which considers horizontal radial fracture propagation from the hydraulically fractured well, was used to estimate potential fracture geometry after hydrofracturing. For the two studied wells, their fractures could have propagated to distances of almost 175 m or more and developed maximum apertures of about 2.20 mm and hydraulic apertures close to 0.30 mm. Fracturing at this site appears to have expanded and propagated existing fractures and not created new fractures. Hydraulic apertures calculated from pumping test analyses closely matched the results obtained from the hydraulic fracturing model. As a result of this model, post-fracturing geometry and resulting post-fracturing well yield can be estimated before the actual hydrofracturing.

  18. Numerical Modeling of a Thermal-Hydraulic Loop and Test Section Design for Heat Transfer Studies in Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Daniel

    A numerical tool for the simulation of the thermal dynamics of pipe networks with heat transfer has been developed with the novel capability of modeling supercritical fluids. The tool was developed to support the design and deployment of two thermal-hydraulic loops at Carleton University for the purpose of heat transfer studies in supercritical and near-critical fluids. First, the system was characterized based on its defining features; the characteristic length of the flow path is orders of magnitude larger than the other characteristic lengths that define the system's geometry; the behaviour of the working fluid in the supercritical thermodynamic state. An analysis of the transient thermal behaviour of the model's domains is then performed to determine the accuracy and range of validity of the modeling approach for simulating the transient thermal behaviour of a thermal-hydraulic loop. Preliminary designs of three test section geometries, for the purpose of heat transfer studies, are presented in support of the overall design of the Carleton supercritical thermal-hydraulic loops. A 7-rod-bundle, annular and tubular geometries are developed with support from the new numerical tool. Materials capable of meeting the experimental requirements while operating in supercritical water are determined. The necessary geometries to satisfy the experimental goals are then developed based on the material characteristics and predicted heat transfer behaviour from previous simulation results. An initial safety analysis is performed on the test section designs, where they are evaluated against the ASME Boiler, Pressure Vessel, and Pressure Piping Code standard, required for safe operation and certification.

  19. Management of a water distribution network by coupling GIS and hydraulic modeling: a case study of Chetouane in Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelbaki, Chérifa; Benchaib, Mohamed Mouâd; Benziada, Salim; Mahmoudi, Hacène; Goosen, Mattheus

    2016-04-01

    For more effective management of water distribution network in an arid region, Mapinfo GIS (8.0) software was coupled with a hydraulic model (EPANET 2.0) and applied to a case study region, Chetouane, situated in the north-west of Algeria. The area is characterized not only by water scarcity but also by poor water management practices. The results showed that a combination of GIS and modeling permits network operators to better analyze malfunctions with a resulting more rapid response as well as facilitating in an improved understanding of the work performed on the network. The grouping of GIS and modeling as an operating tool allows managers to diagnosis a network, to study solutions of problems and to predict future situations. The later can assist them in making informed decisions to ensure an acceptable performance level for optimal network operation.

  20. Hydraulic modeling of heat dispersion in large lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberman, E.; Stefan, H.

    1972-01-01

    Case studies of hydraulic models are described for four major generating plants, including information and maps of thermal distribution. Information is of interest to agencies involved in thermal pollution control.

  1. Hydraulic model of the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, A. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary planning for the formulation of the first year of hydraulic studies on the Chesapeake Bay model was recently completed. The primary purpose of this initial effort was to develop a study program that is both responsive to problems of immediate importance and at the same time ensure that from the very beginning of operation maximum economical use is made of the model. The formulation of this preliminary study plan involved an extensive analysis of the environmental, economic, and social aspects of a series of current problems in order to establish a priority listing of their importance. The study program that evolved is oriented towards the analysis of the effects of some of the works of man on the Chesapeake Bay estuarine environment.

  2. The magnitude of hydraulic redistribution by plant roots: a review and synthesis of empirical and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Cardon, Zoe G

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic redistribution (HR) - the movement of water from moist to dry soil through plant roots - occurs worldwide within a range of different ecosystems and plant species. The proposed ecological and hydrologic impacts of HR include increasing dry-season transpiration and photosynthetic rates, prolonging the life span of fine roots and maintaining root-soil contact in dry soils, and moving rainwater down into deeper soil layers where it does not evaporate. In this review, we compile estimates of the magnitude of HR from ecosystems around the world, using representative empirical and modeling studies from which we could extract amounts of water redistributed by plant root systems. The reported average magnitude of HR varies by nearly two orders of magnitude across ecosystems, from 0.04 to 1.3 mm H(2)O d(-1) in the empirical literature, and from 0.1 to 3.23 mm H(2)O d(-1) in the modeling literature. Using these synthesized data, along with other published studies, we examine this variation in the magnitude of upward and downward HR, considering effects of plant, soil and ecosystem characteristics, as well as effects of methodological details (in both empirical and modeling studies) on estimates of HR. We take both ecological and hydrologic perspectives.

  3. Experimental model studies of a hydraulic ram with special emphasis on the velocities in the ram tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basfeld, M.

    1980-12-01

    The velocity of the ram tube to make it accessible for production in pattern flows examining human circulation was investigated. A simplified theory of the function of the hydraulic ram was developed using the Navier-Stokes equation for a square rubbing component for one dimensional flows. The influence of the valve movement on the ram efficiency is evaluated. The difference between the significance of the influences on the ram model as opposed to the technical ram is discussed.

  4. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.; Kirby, Klane

    This curriculum guide contains a course in hydraulics to train entry-level workers for automotive mechanics and other fields that utilize hydraulics. The module contains 14 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) introduction to hydraulics; (2) fundamentals of hydraulics; (3) reservoirs; (4) lines, fittings, and couplers; (5)…

  5. John Day Tailrace MASS2 Hydraulic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2003-06-03

    Recent biological results for the Juvenile Bypass System at John Jay Lock and Dam have raised concerns about the hydraulic conditions that are created in the tailrace under different project operations. This Memorandum for Record discusses the development and application of a truncated MASS2 model in the John Day tailrace.

  6. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Nancy; And Others

    These instructional materials provide an orientation to hydraulics for use at the postsecondary level. The first of 12 sections presents an introduction to hydraulics, including discussion of principles of liquids, definitions, liquid flow, the two types of hydraulic fluids, pressure gauges, and strainers and filters. The second section identifies…

  7. Hydraulic Modeling of Lock Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    cation was that the guidewall design changed from a solid wall to one on pilings in which water was allowed to flow through and/or under the wall ...develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the Army, the...magnitudes and directions at lock approaches for open river conditions. The meshes were developed using the Surface- water Modeling System. The two

  8. Modeling multidomain hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Ryan D.; Abou Najm, Majdi R.; Rupp, David E.; Selker, John S.

    2016-10-01

    Shrink-swell soils crack and become compacted as they dry, changing properties such as bulk density and hydraulic conductivity. Multidomain models divide soil into independent realms that allow soil cracks to be incorporated into classical flow and transport models. Incongruously, most applications of multidomain models assume that the porosity distributions, bulk density, and effective saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil are constant. This study builds on a recently derived soil shrinkage model to develop a new multidomain, dual-permeability model that can accurately predict variations in soil hydraulic properties due to dynamic changes in crack size and connectivity. The model only requires estimates of soil gravimetric water content and a minimal set of parameters, all of which can be determined using laboratory and/or field measurements. We apply the model to eight clayey soils, and demonstrate its ability to quantify variations in volumetric water content (as can be determined during measurement of a soil water characteristic curve) and transient saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks (as can be measured using infiltration tests). The proposed model is able to capture observed variations in Ks of one to more than two orders of magnitude. In contrast, other dual-permeability models assume that Ks is constant, resulting in the potential for large error when predicting water movement through shrink-swell soils. Overall, the multidomain model presented here successfully quantifies fluctuations in the hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soil matrices, and are suitable for use in physical flow and transport models based on Darcy's Law, the Richards Equation, and the advection-dispersion equation.

  9. Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert L.

    Designed for use in courses where students are expected to become proficient in the area of hydraulics, including diesel engine mechanic programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of fourteen units of instruction. Unit titles include (1) Introduction, (2) Fundamentals of Hydraulics, (3) Reservoirs, (4) Lines, Fittings, and Couplers, (5) Seals,…

  10. Development of a hydraulic model of the human systemic circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, M. K.; Dharmalingham, R. K.

    1999-01-01

    Physical and numeric models of the human circulation are constructed for a number of objectives, including studies and training in physiologic control, interpretation of clinical observations, and testing of prosthetic cardiovascular devices. For many of these purposes it is important to quantitatively validate the dynamic response of the models in terms of the input impedance (Z = oscillatory pressure/oscillatory flow). To address this need, the authors developed an improved physical model. Using a computer study, the authors first identified the configuration of lumped parameter elements in a model of the systemic circulation; the result was a good match with human aortic input impedance with a minimum number of elements. Design, construction, and testing of a hydraulic model analogous to the computer model followed. Numeric results showed that a three element model with two resistors and one compliance produced reasonable matching without undue complication. The subsequent analogous hydraulic model included adjustable resistors incorporating a sliding plate to vary the flow area through a porous material and an adjustable compliance consisting of a variable-volume air chamber. The response of the hydraulic model compared favorably with other circulation models.

  11. Review of computational thermal-hydraulic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, R.H.; Keeton, L.W.

    1995-12-31

    Corrosion of heat transfer tubing in nuclear steam generators has been a persistent problem in the power generation industry, assuming many different forms over the years depending on chemistry and operating conditions. Whatever the corrosion mechanism, a fundamental understanding of the process is essential to establish effective management strategies. To gain this fundamental understanding requires an integrated investigative approach that merges technology from many diverse scientific disciplines. An important aspect of an integrated approach is characterization of the corrosive environment at high temperature. This begins with a thorough understanding of local thermal-hydraulic conditions, since they affect deposit formation, chemical concentration, and ultimately corrosion. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can and should play an important role in characterizing the thermal-hydraulic environment and in predicting the consequences of that environment,. The evolution of CFD technology now allows accurate calculation of steam generator thermal-hydraulic conditions and the resulting sludge deposit profiles. Similar calculations are also possible for model boilers, so that tests can be designed to be prototypic of the heat exchanger environment they are supposed to simulate. This paper illustrates the utility of CFD technology by way of examples in each of these two areas. This technology can be further extended to produce more detailed local calculations of the chemical environment in support plate crevices, beneath thick deposits on tubes, and deep in tubesheet sludge piles. Knowledge of this local chemical environment will provide the foundation for development of mechanistic corrosion models, which can be used to optimize inspection and cleaning schedules and focus the search for a viable fix.

  12. Advantages of 3D FEM numerical modeling over 2D, analyzed in a case study of transient thermal-hydraulic groundwater utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchsluger, Martin; Götzl, Gregor

    2014-05-01

    In general most aquifers have a much larger lateral extent than vertical. This fact leads to the application of the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumptions to many groundwater problems, whereas a two dimensional simulation is considered sufficient. By coupling transient fluid flow modeling with heat transport the 2D aquifer approximation is in many cases insufficient as it does not consider effects of the subjacent and overlying aquitards on heat propagation as well as the impact of surface climatic effects on shallow aquifers. A shallow Holocene aquifer in Vienna served as a case study to compare different modeling approaches in two and three dimensions in order to predict the performance and impact of a thermal aquifer utilization for heating (1.3 GWh) and cooling (1.4 GWh) of a communal building. With the assumption of a 6 doublets well field, the comparison was realized in three steps: At first a two dimensional model for unconfined flow was set up, assuming a varying hydraulic conductivity as well as a varying top and bottom elevation of the aquifer (gross - thickness). The model area was chosen along constant hydraulic head at steady state conditions. A second model was made by mapping solely the aquifer in three dimensions using the same subdomain and boundary conditions as defined in step one. The third model consists of a complete three dimensional geological build-up including the aquifer as well as the overlying and subjacent layers and additionally an annually variable climatic boundary condition at the surface. The latter was calibrated with measured water temperature at a nearby water gauge. For all three models the same annual operating mode of the 6 hydraulic doublets was assumed. Furthermore a limited maximal groundwater temperature at a range between 8 and 18 °C as well as a constrained well flow rate has been given. Finally a descriptive comparison of the three models concerning the extracted thermal power, drawdown, temperature distribution and Darcy

  13. Hydraulically interconnected vehicle suspension: background and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Smith, Wade A.; Jeyakumaran, Jeku

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for the frequency domain analysis of a vehicle fitted with a general hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) system. Ideally, interconnected suspensions have the capability, unique among passive systems, to provide stiffness and damping characteristics dependent on the all-wheel suspension mode in operation. A basic, lumped-mass, four-degree-of-freedom half-car model is used to illustrate the proposed methodology. The mechanical-fluid boundary condition in the double-acting cylinders is modelled as an external force on the mechanical system and a moving boundary on the fluid system. The fluid system itself is modelled using the hydraulic impedance method, in which the relationships between the dynamic fluid states, i.e. pressures and flows, at the extremities of a single fluid circuit are determined by the transfer matrix method. A set of coupled, frequency-dependent equations, which govern the dynamics of the integrated half-car system, are then derived and the application of these equations to both free and forced vibration analysis is explained. The fluid system impedance matrix for the two general wheel-pair interconnection types-anti-synchronous and anti-oppositional-is also given. To further outline the application of the proposed methodology, the paper finishes with an example using a typical anti-roll HIS system. The integrated half-car system's free vibration solutions and frequency response functions are then obtained and discussed in some detail. The presented approach provides a scientific basis for investigating the dynamic characteristics of HIS-equipped vehicles, and the results offer further confirmation that interconnected suspension schemes can provide, at least to some extent, individual control of modal stiffness and damping characteristics.

  14. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  15. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  16. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  17. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  18. 23 CFR 650.111 - Location hydraulic studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Location hydraulic studies. 650.111 Section 650.111 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Location and Hydraulic Design of Encroachments on Flood Plains §...

  19. Design, test and model of a hybrid magnetostrictive hydraulic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Wereley, Norman M.

    2009-08-01

    The basic operation of hybrid hydraulic actuators involves high frequency bi-directional operation of an active material that is converted to uni-directional motion of hydraulic fluid using valves. A hybrid actuator was developed using magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D as the driving element and hydraulic oil as the working fluid. Two different lengths of Terfenol-D rod, 51 and 102 mm, with the same diameter, 12.7 mm, were used. Tests with no load and with load were carried out to measure the performance for uni-directional motion of the output piston at different pumping frequencies. The maximum no-load flow rates were 24.8 cm3 s-1 and 22.7 cm3 s-1 with the 51 mm and 102 mm long rods respectively, and the peaks were noted around 325 Hz pumping frequency. The blocked force of the actuator was close to 89 N in both cases. A key observation was that, at these high pumping frequencies, the inertial effects of the fluid mass dominate over the viscous effects and the problem becomes unsteady in nature. In this study, we also develop a mathematical model of the hydraulic hybrid actuator in the time domain to show the basic operational principle under varying conditions and to capture phenomena affecting system performance. Governing equations for the pumping piston and output shaft were obtained from force equilibrium considerations, while compressibility of the working fluid was taken into account by incorporating the bulk modulus. Fluid inertia was represented by a lumped parameter approach to the transmission line model, giving rise to strongly coupled ordinary differential equations. The model was then used to calculate the no-load velocities of the actuator at different pumping frequencies and simulation results were compared with experimental data for model validation.

  20. Stability analysis for a delay differential equations model of a hydraulic turbine speed governor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halanay, Andrei; Safta, Carmen A.; Dragoi, Constantin; Piraianu, Vlad F.

    2017-01-01

    The paper aims to study the dynamic behavior of a speed governor for a hydraulic turbine using a mathematical model. The nonlinear mathematical model proposed consists in a system of delay differential equations (DDE) to be compared with already established mathematical models of ordinary differential equations (ODE). A new kind of nonlinearity is introduced as a time delay. The delays can characterize different running conditions of the speed governor. For example, it is considered that spool displacement of hydraulic amplifier might be blocked due to oil impurities in the oil supply system and so the hydraulic amplifier has a time delay in comparison to the time control. Numerical simulations are presented in a comparative manner. A stability analysis of the hydraulic control system is performed, too. Conclusions of the dynamic behavior using the DDE model of a hydraulic turbine speed governor are useful in modeling and controlling hydropower plants.

  1. Statistical Modeling of Hydraulic Conductivity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerschaert, M. M.; Dogan, M.; Hyndman, D. W.; Bohling, G.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) fields are a main source of uncertainty for ground water modeling. Numerical simulations for flow and transport require a detailed K field, which is usually synthesized using a combination of methods. Another presentation at this meeting will detail our simulation methods, using ground penetrating radar to establish facies boundaries, and a fractal K field simulation in each facies, based on high resolution K (HRK) data from the MADE site. This presentation will present some results of our statistical analysis, and the implications for K field modeling in general. Two striking observations have emerged from our work. The first is that a simple fractional difference filter can have a profound effect on the histograms of K data, organizing seemingly impossible data into a coherent distribution. The second is that a simple Gaussian K field in each facies combines into a strikingly non-Gaussian distribution when all facies are combined. This second observation can help to resolve a current controversy in the literature, between those who favor Gaussian models, and those who observe non-Gaussian K fields. Essentially, both camps are correct, but at different scales.

  2. The planetary hydraulics analysis based on a multi-resolution stereo DTMs and LISFLOOD-FP model: Case study in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Schumann, G.; Neal, J. C.; Lin, S.

    2013-12-01

    Earth is the only planet possessing an active hydrological system based on H2O circulation. However, after Mariner 9 discovered fluvial channels on Mars with similar features to Earth, it became clear that some solid planets and satellites once had water flows or pseudo hydrological systems of other liquids. After liquid water was identified as the agent of ancient martian fluvial activities, the valley and channels on the martian surface were investigated by a number of remote sensing and in-suit measurements. Among all available data sets, the stereo DTM and ortho from various successful orbital sensor, such as High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), Context Camera (CTX), and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), are being most widely used to trace the origin and consequences of martian hydrological channels. However, geomorphological analysis, with stereo DTM and ortho images over fluvial areas, has some limitations, and so a quantitative modeling method utilizing various spatial resolution DTMs is required. Thus in this study we tested the application of hydraulics analysis with multi-resolution martian DTMs, constructed in line with Kim and Muller's (2009) approach. An advanced LISFLOOD-FP model (Bates et al., 2010), which simulates in-channel dynamic wave behavior by solving 2D shallow water equations without advection, was introduced to conduct a high accuracy simulation together with 150-1.2m DTMs over test sites including Athabasca and Bahram valles. For application to a martian surface, technically the acceleration of gravity in LISFLOOD-FP was reduced to the martian value of 3.71 m s-2 and the Manning's n value (friction), the only free parameter in the model, was adjusted for martian gravity by scaling it. The approach employing multi-resolution stereo DTMs and LISFLOOD-FP was superior compared with the other research cases using a single DTM source for hydraulics analysis. HRSC DTMs, covering 50-150m resolutions was used to trace rough

  3. Pore-structure models of hydraulic conductivity for permeable pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, X.; Sansalone, J.; Ying, G.; Ranieri, V.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryPermeable pavement functions as a porous infrastructure interface allowing the infiltration and evaporation of rainfall-runoff while functioning as a relatively smooth load-bearing surface for vehicular transport. Hydraulic conductivity ( k) of permeable pavement is an important hydraulic property and is a function of the pore structure. This study examines k for a cementitious permeable pavement (CPP) through a series of pore-structure models. Measurements utilized include hydraulic head as well as total porosity, ( ϕ t), effective porosity ( ϕ e), tortuosity ( L e/ L) and pore size distribution (PSD) indices generated through X-ray tomography (XRT). XRT results indicate that the permeable pavement pore matrix is hetero-disperse, with high tortuosity and ϕ t ≠ ϕ e. Power law models of k- ϕ t and k- ϕ e relationships are developed for a CPP mix design. Results indicate that the Krüger, Fair-Hatch, Hazen, Slichter, Beyer and Terzaghi models based on simple pore-structure indices do not reproduce measured k values. The conventional Kozeny-Carman model (KCM), a more parameterized pore-structure model, did not reproduce measured k values. This study proposes a modified KCM utilizing ϕ e, specific surface area (SSA) pe and weighted tortuosity ( L e/ L) w. Results demonstrate that such permeable pavement pore-structure parameters with the modified KCM can predict k. The k results are combined with continuous simulation modeling using historical rainfall to provide nomographs examining permeable pavement as a low impact development (LID) infrastructure component.

  4. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  5. Mathematical modeling of bent-axis hydraulic piston motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Each of the DSN 70-m antennas uses 16 bent-axis hydraulic piston motors as part of the antenna drive system. On each of the two antenna axes, four motors are used to drive the antenna and four motors provide counter torque to remove the backlash in the antenna drive train. This article presents a mathematical model for bent-axis hydraulic piston motors. The model was developed to understand the influence of the hydraulic motors on the performance of the DSN 70-m antennas' servo control system.

  6. Modeling Hydraulic Components for Automated FMEA of a Braking System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    has to be based on a library of generic, context-independent component models. The systems that offer support to the automated generation of fault ...Modeling Hydraulic Components for Automated FMEA of a Braking System Peter Struss, Alessandro Fraracci Tech. Univ. of Munich, 85748 Garching...the hydraulic part of a vehicle braking system . We describe the FMEA task and the application problem and outline the foundations for automating the

  7. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned toward conditions usually encountered in the Marce...

  8. Hydraulic modeling development and application in water resources engineering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.; Yang, Chih Ted; Wang, Lawrence K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling has become widespread in water resources engineering and science to study rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal regions. For example, computer models are commonly used to forecast anthropogenic effects on the environment, and to help provide advanced mitigation measures against catastrophic events such as natural and dam-break floods. Linking hydraulic models to vegetation and habitat models has expanded their use in multidisciplinary applications to the riparian corridor. Implementation of these models in software packages on personal desktop computers has made them accessible to the general engineering community, and their use has been popularized by the need of minimal training due to intuitive graphical user interface front ends. Models are, however, complex and nontrivial, to the extent that even common terminology is sometimes ambiguous and often applied incorrectly. In fact, many efforts are currently under way in order to standardize terminology and offer guidelines for good practice, but none has yet reached unanimous acceptance. This chapter provides a view of the elements involved in modeling surface flows for the application in environmental water resources engineering. It presents the concepts and steps necessary for rational model development and use by starting with the exploration of the ideas involved in defining a model. Tangible form of those ideas is provided by the development of a mathematical and corresponding numerical hydraulic model, which is given with a substantial amount of detail. The issues of model deployment in a practical and productive work environment are also addressed. The chapter ends by presenting a few model applications highlighting the need for good quality control in model validation.

  9. Evaluating models for predicting hydraulic characteristics of layered soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavimbela, S. S. W.; van Rensburg, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    Soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K-coefficient) are critical hydraulic properties governing soil water activity on layered soils. Sustainable soil water conservation would not be possible without accurate knowledge of these hydraulic properties. Infield rainwater harvesting (IRWH) is one conservation technique adopted to improve the soil water regime of a number of clay soils found in the semi arid areas of Free State province of South Africa. Given that SWCC is much easier to measure, most soil water studies rely on SWCC information to predict in-situ K-coefficients. This work validated this practice on the Tukulu, Sepane and Swartland layered soil profiles. The measured SWCC was first described using Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980) and Kasugi (1996) parametric models. The conductivity functions of these models were then required to fit in-situ based K-coefficients derived from instantaneous profile method (IPM). The same K-coefficient was also fitted by HYDRUS 1-D using optimised SWCC parameters. Although all parametric models fitted the measured SWCC fairly well their corresponding conductivity functions could not do the same when fitting the in-situ based K-coefficients. Overestimates of more than 2 orders of magnitude especially at low soil water content (SWC) were observed. This phenomenon was pronounced among the upper horizons that overlaid a clayey horizon. However, optimized α and n parameters using HYDRUS 1-D showed remarkable agreement between fitted and in-situ K-coefficient with root sum of squares error (RMSE) recording values not exceeding unity. During this exercise the Brooks and Corey was replaced by modified van Genuchten model (Vogel and Cislerova, 1988) since it failed to produce unique inverse solutions. The models performance appeared to be soil specific with van Genuchten-Mualem (1980) performing fairly well on the Orthic and neucutanic horizons while its modified form fitted very

  10. Implementation of diverse tree hydraulics in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A.; Shevliakova, E.; Malyshev, S.; Weng, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the occurence of drought kill in forests worldwide. These mortality events are significant disruptions to the terrestrial carbon cycle, but the mechanisms required to represent drought kill are not represented in terrestrial carbon cycle models. In part, this is due to the challenge of representing the diversity of hydraulic strategies, which include stomatal sensitivity to water deficit and woody tissue vulnerability to cavitation at low water potential. In part, this is due to the challenge of representing this boundary value problem numerically, because the hydraulic components determine water potential at the leaf, but the stomatal conductance on the leaf also determines the hydraulic gradients within the plant. This poster will describe the development of a land surface model parameterization of diverse tree hydraulic strategies.

  11. Combining multiobjective optimization and Bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WöHling, Thomas; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2008-12-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multiobjective optimization and Bayesian model averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multiobjective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are postprocessed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multiobjective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  12. Updating flood maps efficiently using existing hydraulic models, very-high-accuracy elevation data, and a geographic information system; a pilot study on the Nisqually River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Haluska, Tana L.; Kresch, David L.

    2001-01-01

    A method of updating flood inundation maps at a fraction of the expense of using traditional methods was piloted in Washington State as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Urban Geologic and Hydrologic Hazards Initiative. Large savings in expense may be achieved by building upon previous Flood Insurance Studies and automating the process of flood delineation with a Geographic Information System (GIS); increases in accuracy and detail result from the use of very-high-accuracy elevation data and automated delineation; and the resulting digital data sets contain valuable ancillary information such as flood depth, as well as greatly facilitating map storage and utility. The method consists of creating stage-discharge relations from the archived output of the existing hydraulic model, using these relations to create updated flood stages for recalculated flood discharges, and using a GIS to automate the map generation process. Many of the effective flood maps were created in the late 1970?s and early 1980?s, and suffer from a number of well recognized deficiencies such as out-of-date or inaccurate estimates of discharges for selected recurrence intervals, changes in basin characteristics, and relatively low quality elevation data used for flood delineation. FEMA estimates that 45 percent of effective maps are over 10 years old (FEMA, 1997). Consequently, Congress has mandated the updating and periodic review of existing maps, which have cost the Nation almost 3 billion (1997) dollars. The need to update maps and the cost of doing so were the primary motivations for piloting a more cost-effective and efficient updating method. New technologies such as Geographic Information Systems and LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation mapping are key to improving the efficiency of flood map updating, but they also improve the accuracy, detail, and usefulness of the resulting digital flood maps. GISs produce digital maps without manual estimation of inundated areas between

  13. Influence of Elevation Data Source on 2D Hydraulic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, Krzysztof; StĘpnik, Mateusz; Kurczyński, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the influence of the source of various elevation data on hydraulic modelling in open channels. In the research, digital terrain models from different datasets were evaluated and used in two-dimensional hydraulic models. The following aerial and satellite elevation data were used to create the representation of terrain-digital terrain model: airborne laser scanning, image matching, elevation data collected in the LPIS, EuroDEM, and ASTER GDEM. From the results of five 2D hydrodynamic models with different input elevation data, the maximum depth and flow velocity of water were derived and compared with the results of the most accurate ALS data. For such an analysis a statistical evaluation and differences between hydraulic modelling results were prepared. The presented research proved the importance of the quality of elevation data in hydraulic modelling and showed that only ALS and photogrammetric data can be the most reliable elevation data source in accurate 2D hydraulic modelling.

  14. Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation using Bayesian Model Averaging and Generalized Parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, F. T.; Li, X.

    2006-12-01

    Non-uniqueness in parameterization scheme is an inherent problem in groundwater inverse modeling due to limited data. To cope with the non-uniqueness problem of parameterization, we introduce a Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) method to integrate a set of selected parameterization methods. The estimation uncertainty in BMA includes the uncertainty in individual parameterization methods as the within-parameterization variance and the uncertainty from using different parameterization methods as the between-parameterization variance. Moreover, the generalized parameterization (GP) method is considered in the geostatistical framework in this study. The GP method aims at increasing the flexibility of parameterization through the combination of a zonation structure and an interpolation method. The use of BMP with GP avoids over-confidence in a single parameterization method. A normalized least-squares estimation (NLSE) is adopted to calculate the posterior probability for each GP. We employee the adjoint state method for the sensitivity analysis on the weighting coefficients in the GP method. The adjoint state method is also applied to the NLSE problem. The proposed methodology is implemented to the Alamitos Barrier Project (ABP) in California, where the spatially distributed hydraulic conductivity is estimated. The optimal weighting coefficients embedded in GP are identified through the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) where the misfits between the observed and calculated groundwater heads are minimized. The conditional mean and conditional variance of the estimated hydraulic conductivity distribution using BMA are obtained to assess the estimation uncertainty.

  15. Effects of model layer simplification using composite hydraulic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Sepulveda, Nicasio; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater provides much of the fresh drinking water to more than 1.5 billion people in the world (Clarke et al., 1996) and in the United States more that 50 percent of citizens rely on groundwater for drinking water (Solley et al., 1998). As aquifer systems are developed for water supply, the hydrologic system is changed. Water pumped from the aquifer system initially can come from some combination of inducing more recharge, water permanently removed from storage, and decreased groundwater discharge. Once a new equilibrium is achieved, all of the pumpage must come from induced recharge and decreased discharge (Alley et al., 1999). Further development of groundwater resources may result in reductions of surface water runoff and base flows. Competing demands for groundwater resources require good management. Adequate data to characterize the aquifers and confining units of the system, like hydrologic boundaries, groundwater levels, streamflow, and groundwater pumping and climatic data for recharge estimation are to be collected in order to quantify the effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands, streams, and lakes. Once collected, three-dimensional (3D) groundwater flow models can be developed and calibrated and used as a tool for groundwater management. The main hydraulic parameters that comprise a regional or subregional model of an aquifer system are the hydraulic conductivity and storage properties of the aquifers and confining units (hydrogeologic units) that confine the system. Many 3D groundwater flow models used to help assess groundwater/surface-water interactions require calculating ?effective? or composite hydraulic properties of multilayered lithologic units within a hydrogeologic unit. The calculation of composite hydraulic properties stems from the need to characterize groundwater flow using coarse model layering in order to reduce simulation times while still representing the flow through the system accurately. The accuracy of flow models with

  16. Effects of model layer simplification using composite hydraulic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Nicasio; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of simplifying hydraulic property layering within an unconfined aquifer and the underlying confining unit were assessed. The hydraulic properties of lithologic units within the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were computed by analyzing the aquifer-test data using radial, axisymmetric two-dimensional (2D) flow. Time-varying recharge to the unconfined aquifer and pumping from the confined Upper Floridan aquifer (USA) were simulated using 3D flow. Conceptual flow models were developed by gradually reducing the number of lithologic units in the unconfined aquifer and confining unit by calculating composite hydraulic properties for the simplified lithologic units. Composite hydraulic properties were calculated using either thickness-weighted averages or inverse modeling using regression-based parameter estimation. No significant residuals were simulated when all lithologic units comprising the unconfined aquifer were simulated as one layer. The largest residuals occurred when the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were aggregated into a single layer (quasi-3D), with residuals over 100% for the leakage rates to the confined aquifer and the heads in the confining unit. Residuals increased with contrasts in vertical hydraulic conductivity between the unconfined aquifer and confining unit. Residuals increased when the constant-head boundary at the bottom of the Upper Floridan aquifer was replaced with a no-flow boundary.

  17. Empirical flow parameters : a tool for hydraulic model validity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Burley, Thomas E.; Cleveland, Theodore G.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) To determine and present from existing data in Texas, relations between observed stream flow, topographic slope, mean section velocity, and other hydraulic factors, to produce charts such as Figure 1 and to produce empirical distributions of the various flow parameters to provide a methodology to "check if model results are way off!"; (2) To produce a statistical regional tool to estimate mean velocity or other selected parameters for storm flows or other conditional discharges at ungauged locations (most bridge crossings) in Texas to provide a secondary way to compare such values to a conventional hydraulic modeling approach. (3.) To present ancillary values such as Froude number, stream power, Rosgen channel classification, sinuosity, and other selected characteristics (readily determinable from existing data) to provide additional information to engineers concerned with the hydraulic-soil-foundation component of transportation infrastructure.

  18. EPA Study of Hydraulic Fracturing and Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    In its FY2010 Appropriations Committee Conference Report, Congress directed EPA to study the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water, using: • Best available science • Independent sources of information • Transparent, peer-reviewed process • Consultatio...

  19. EPA releases progress report on hydraulic fracturing study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided a 21 December progress report on its ongoing national study about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. The agency said that a draft of the congressionally requested study will be released in 2014 for public and peer review and that its progress report does not draw conclusions about the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing, often referred to as fracking.

  20. Osmotic Model to Explain Anomalous Hydraulic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marine, I. Wendell; Fritz, Steven J.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that compacted clays act as osmotic membranes when they separate aqueous solutions of unequal ionic concentration. Theoretically, osmotically induced differential hydraulic pressure in groundwater systems can be relatively high. The magnitude depends primarily upon concentration differences across the membrane, type of ions, type of clay, and pore size. In experiments, thin, compacted clay membranes commonly exhibit varying degrees of osmotic efficiency due to ion leak-age through the clay. In natural systems the membrane and the solution containers are not as distinct and well defined as they are in the laboratory. Moreover, the membrane is commonly thick, inhomogeneous, and composite. In a buried Triassic basin at the Savannah River plant near Aiken, South Carolina, it is suspected that osmosis causes the saline water in the basin center to be slightly geopressurized in relation to freshwater in the overlying coastal plain aquifer. Two wells have heads of 7.88 and 12.98 bars (114.3 and 188.3 psi) above the head in the coastal plain aquifer. The head in each of these wells approximates the osmotic equilibrium head calculated from solution concentration of water produced by each well (12,000 and 18,500 mg/l, respectively). Other wells penetrating the top and edge of the Triassic basin probably penetrate a zone where ion leakage gives rise to less saline water. Thus these wells are not geopressurized.

  1. Characteristics of Hydraulic Shock Waves in an Inclined Chute Contraction by Using Three Dimensional Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chao; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Su, Yu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    The inclined rectangular chute construction is a common structure used in hydraulic engineering for typical reasons such as the increase of bottom slope, the transition from side channel intakes to tunnel spillways, the drainage construction, and the reduction of chute width due to bridges, flood diversion structures or irrigation systems. The converging vertical sidewalls of a chute contraction deflect the supercritical flow to form hydraulic shock waves. Hydraulic shock waves have narrow and locally extreme wavy surfaces, which commonly results in the requirement of higher height of sidewalls. Therefore, predicting the possible height and position of maximum hydraulic shock wave are necessary to design the required height of sidewalls to prevent flow overtopping. In this study, we used a three-dimensional computation fluid dynamics model (i.e., FLOW-3D) to simulate the characteristics of hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction. For this purpose, the parameters of simulated hydraulic shock wave, such as the shock angle, maximum shock wave height and maximum shock wave position in various conditions are compared with those calculated by the empirical relations obtained from literatures. We showed that the simulated results are extremely close to the experimental results. The numerical results validated the applicability of these empirical relations and extend their applicability to higher approach Froude numbers from 3.51 to 7.27. Furthermore, we also applied the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel under 200-year peak flow condition to FLOW-3D model to simulate the hydraulic shock waves and validate the effect of the installation of a diversion pier in the channel on promoting the stability of flow fluid. The results revealed that a diversion pier installed in the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel is helpful for improving the stability of flow field. In summary, this study demonstrates that FLOW-3D model can be used to simulate the

  2. Basics of Physical Modeling in Coastal and Hydraulic Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    tsunami wave runup due to edge waves traveling around an island. HYDRAULIC SIMILITUDE: The purpose of hydraulic similitude is to ensure that the...model reproduces the behavior of the prototype as much as possible (Goda 1985; Hughes 1993; Young et al. 1997). This similar behavior includes velocity ...instance, fluid velocity (V) has dimensions of length (L) divided by time (t), so the velocity scale (NV) is given by     / / p p p m L V m m p tm L

  3. MODELING HYDRAULIC PROBLEMS USING THE CVBEM AND THE MICROCOMPUTER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Chintu; Hromadka, T.V.

    1985-01-01

    The Complex Variable Boundary Element Method (CVBEM) offers an effective and efficient means for modeling two-dimensional potential and related flow problems. The method has been applied to various hydraulic and hydrodynamic problems - surface water, ground water, and other flows - and has proven its accuracy, reliability and usefulness. The paper describes the CVBEM and its application.

  4. State of the art hydraulic turbine model test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, Violaine; Duparchy, Alexandre; Andre, Francois; Larroze, Pierre-Yves

    2016-11-01

    Model tests are essential in hydraulic turbine development and related fields. The methods and technologies used to perform these tests show constant progress and provide access to further information. In addition, due to its contractual nature, the test demand evolves continuously in terms of quantity and accuracy. Keeping in mind that the principal aim of model testing is the transposition of the model measurements to the real machine, the measurements should be performed accurately, and a critical analysis of the model test results is required to distinguish the transposable hydraulic phenomena from the test rig interactions. Although the resonances’ effects are known and described in the IEC standard, their identification is difficult. Leaning on a strong experience of model testing, we will illustrate with a few examples of how to identify the potential problems induced by the test rig. This paper contains some of our best practices to obtain the most accurate, relevant, and independent test-rig measurements.

  5. Numerical modeling of consolidation processes in hydraulically deposited soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Nicholas Robert

    Hydraulically deposited soils are encountered in many common engineering applications including mine tailing and geotextile tube fills, though the consolidation process for such soils is highly nonlinear and requires the use of advanced numerical techniques to provide accurate predictions. Several commercially available finite element codes poses the ability to model soil consolidation, and it was the goal of this research to assess the ability of two of these codes, ABAQUS and PLAXIS, to model the large-strain, two-dimensional consolidation processes which occur in hydraulically deposited soils. A series of one- and two-dimensionally drained rectangular models were first created to assess the limitations of ABAQUS and PLAXIS when modeling consolidation of highly compressible soils. Then, geotextile tube and TSF models were created to represent actual scenarios which might be encountered in engineering practice. Several limitations were discovered, including the existence of a minimum preconsolidation stress below which numerical solutions become unstable.

  6. How Accurate Is A Hydraulic Model? | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Symposium paper Network hydraulic models are widely used, but their overall accuracy is often unknown. Models are developed to give utilities better insight into system hydraulic behavior, and increasingly the ability to predict the fate and transport of chemicals. Without an accessible and consistent means of validating a given model against the system it is meant to represent, the value of those supposed benefits should be questioned. Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) databases, though ubiquitous, are underused data sources for this type of task. Integrating a network model with a measurement database would offer professionals the ability to assess the model’s assumptions in an automated fashion by leveraging enormous amounts of data.

  7. Transient Inverse Calibration of a Facies-Based Groundwater Flow and Transport Model Using Contaminant Concentration and Hydraulic Head Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.; Bergeron, M. P.; Vermeul, V. R.; Ward, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    A three dimensional groundwater flow and transport model was calibrated against observations of both hydraulic head and tritium plume concentrations measured in wells. Hydraulic parameters were estimated with a transient inverse process using UCODE, a universal inverse modeling code developed jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the International Groundwater Modeling Center at the Colorado School of Mines. Previous groundwater models at the site had been calibrated using hydraulic head data in the transient inverse calibration process. The resulting models were good at fitting the hydraulic head data, but did not perform well in replicating the movement of contaminant plumes over this period. A separate transient inverse calibration effort used only tritium measurements collected from wells at the site over the operational period, along with estimates of the water volume and tritium mass discharged to the aquifer, to estimate the hydraulic properties. The resulting model did a better job of replicating the overall shape and development of the tritium plume, but did not do as well in matching the hydraulic heads. Both the hydraulic head and tritium concentration data sets were used jointly in the transient inverse process for this study. These data included 47,739 measurements of hydraulic head from 543 wells and 37,802 measurements of tritium concentrations from 1,201 wells. The transient inverse process estimated hydraulic conductivity for 18 facies-based zones in the main sand and gravel units in the unconfined aquifer. A simplified weighting scheme for the hydraulic head and tritium data was developed so that the overall sum-of-squared residuals for the inverse runs were roughly equally weighted for the two data sets. Preliminary simulation results from this combined calibration dataset show a good fit for both the evolving tritium plume and hydraulic head measurements over the operational period.

  8. Stem hydraulic capacitance decreases with drought stress: implications for modelling tree hydraulics in the Mediterranean oak Quercus ilex.

    PubMed

    Salomón, Roberto L; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesús; Steppe, Kathy

    2017-02-02

    Hydraulic modelling is a primary tool to predict plant performance in future drier scenarios. However, as most tree models are validated under non-stress conditions, they may fail when water becomes limiting. To simulate tree hydraulic functioning under moist and dry conditions, the current version of a water flow and storage mechanistic model was further developed by implementing equations that describe variation in xylem hydraulic resistance (RX ) and stem hydraulic capacitance (CS ) with predawn water potential (ΨPD ). The model was applied in a Mediterranean forest experiencing intense summer drought, where six Quercus ilex trees were instrumented to monitor stem diameter variations and sap flow, concurrently with measurements of predawn and midday leaf water potential. Best model performance was observed when CS was allowed to decrease with decreasing ΨPD . Hydraulic capacitance decreased from 62 to 25 kg m(-3)  MPa(-1) across the growing season. In parallel, tree transpiration decreased to a greater extent than the capacitive water release and the contribution of stored water to transpiration increased from 2.0 to 5.1%. Our results demonstrate the importance of stored water and seasonality in CS for tree hydraulic functioning, and they suggest that CS should be considered to predict the drought response of trees with models.

  9. Study of hydraulic air compression for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion open-cycle application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, A.; Chen, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A hydraulic air compressor, which requires no mechanical moving parts and operates in a nearly isothermal mode, can be an alternative for the noncondensible gas disposal of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power system. The compressor requires only a downward flow of water to accomplish air compression. An air compressor test loop was assembled and operated to obtain test data that would lead to the design of an OTEC hydraulic air compressor. A one dimensional, hydraulic gas compressor, computer model was employed to simulate the laboratory experiments, and it was tuned to fit the test results. A sensitivity study that shows the effects of various parameters on the applied head of the hydraulic air compression is presented.

  10. Using temperature modeling to investigate the temporal variability of riverbed hydraulic conductivity during storm events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutiti, Samuel; Levy, Jonathan

    2010-07-01

    SummaryUnderstanding the impact of storm events on riverbed hydraulic conductivity is crucial in assessing the efficacy of riverbank filtration as a water-treatment option. In this study, the variability of riverbed hydraulic conductivity and its correlation to river stage during storm events was investigated. Water levels and temperatures were continuously monitored in the river using creek piezometers screened beneath the riverbed, and monitoring wells located on the river bank. The range of values for water levels during the study period was from 161.3 to 163.7 m AMSL while temperatures ranged from 3.75 °C to 24 °C. During the duration of the study the Great Miami River was losing water to the underlying aquifer due to pumping in the adjacent municipal well field. Flow and heat transport were simulated in a groundwater heat and flow program VSH2D to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed. Hydraulic conductivity was estimated by using it as a calibration parameter to match simulated temperatures to observed temperatures in a monitoring well. Hydraulic heads in the aquifer responded to storm events at the same times but with dampened amplitudes compared to the river stage. The relative responses resulted in increased head gradients during the rising limb of the stage-hydrograph. Heat-flow modeling during five storm events demonstrated that a rise in head gradient alone was not sufficient to produce the temperature changes observed in the wells. Simulated temperatures were fitted to the observed data by varying both river stage (as measured in the field) and riverbed hydraulic conductivity. To produce the best fit temperatures, riverbed hydraulic conductivity consistently needed to be increased during the rising and peak stages of the storm events. The increased conductivity probably corresponds to a loss of fine sediments due to scour during high river stage. Hydraulic conductivity increases during storm events varied from a factor of two (0

  11. The EPA's Study on the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, Susan

    2013-03-01

    Natural gas plays a key role in our nation's clean energy future. The United States has vast reserves of natural gas that are commercially viable as a result of advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, which enable greater access to gas in rock formations deep underground. These advances have spurred a significant increase in the production of both natural gas and oil across the country. However, as the use of hydraulic fracturing has increased, so have concerns about its potential human health and environmental impacts, especially for drinking water. In response to public concern, the US Congress requested that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conduct scientific research to examine the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. In 2011, the EPA began research to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources, if any, and to identify the driving factors that may affect the severity and frequency of such impacts. The study is organized around the five stages of the hydraulic fracturing water cycle, from water acquisition through the mixing of chemicals and the injection of fracturing fluid to post-fracturing treatment and/or disposal of wastewater. EPA scientists are using a transdisciplinary research approach involving laboratory studies, computer modeling, toxicity assessments, and case studies to answer research questions associated with each stage of the water cycle. This talk will provide an overview of the EPA's study, including a description of the hydraulic fracturing water cycle and a summary of the ongoing research projects.

  12. Nonlinear mathematical modeling and sensitivity analysis of hydraulic drive unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Yu, Bin; Quan, Lingxiao; Ba, Kaixian; Wu, Liujie

    2015-09-01

    The previous sensitivity analysis researches are not accurate enough and also have the limited reference value, because those mathematical models are relatively simple and the change of the load and the initial displacement changes of the piston are ignored, even experiment verification is not conducted. Therefore, in view of deficiencies above, a nonlinear mathematical model is established in this paper, including dynamic characteristics of servo valve, nonlinear characteristics of pressure-flow, initial displacement of servo cylinder piston and friction nonlinearity. The transfer function block diagram is built for the hydraulic drive unit closed loop position control, as well as the state equations. Through deriving the time-varying coefficient items matrix and time-varying free items matrix of sensitivity equations respectively, the expression of sensitivity equations based on the nonlinear mathematical model are obtained. According to structure parameters of hydraulic drive unit, working parameters, fluid transmission characteristics and measured friction-velocity curves, the simulation analysis of hydraulic drive unit is completed on the MATLAB/Simulink simulation platform with the displacement step 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the developed nonlinear mathematical model is sufficient by comparing the characteristic curves of experimental step response and simulation step response under different constant load. Then, the sensitivity function time-history curves of seventeen parameters are obtained, basing on each state vector time-history curve of step response characteristic. The maximum value of displacement variation percentage and the sum of displacement variation absolute values in the sampling time are both taken as sensitivity indexes. The sensitivity indexes values above are calculated and shown visually in histograms under different working conditions, and change rules are analyzed. Then the sensitivity

  13. Application study of magnetic fluid seal in hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Y.; Zhang, W.

    2012-11-01

    The waterpower resources of our country are abundant, and the hydroelectric power is developed, but at present the main shaft sealing device of hydraulic turbine is easy to wear and tear and the leakage is great. The magnetic fluid seal has the advantages of no contact, no wear, self-healing, long life and so on. In this paper, the magnetic fluid seal would be used in the main shaft of hydraulic turbine, the sealing structure was built the model, meshed the geometry, applied loads and solved by using MULTIPHYSICS in ANSYS software, the influence of the various sealing structural parameters such as tooth width, height, slot width, sealing gap on the sealing property were analyzed, the magnetic fluid sealing device suitable for large-diameter shaft and sealing water was designed, the sealing problem of the hydraulic turbine main shaft was solved effectively which will bring huge economic benefits.

  14. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Podgorney, Robert Karl

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  15. Mesh convergence study for hydraulic turbine draft-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devals, C.; Vu, T. C.; Zhang, Y.; Dompierre, J.; Guibault, F.

    2016-11-01

    Computational flow analysis is an essential tool for hydraulic turbine designers. Grid generation is the first step in the flow analysis process. Grid quality and solution accuracy are strongly linked. Even though many studies have addressed the issue of mesh independence, there is still no definitive consensus on mesh best practices, and research on that topic is still needed. This paper presents a mesh convergence study for turbulence flow in hydraulic turbine draft- tubes which represents the most challenging turbine component for CFD predictions. The findings from this parametric study will be incorporated as mesh control rules in an in-house automatic mesh generator for turbine components.

  16. Technical Review of the UNET2D Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-05-18

    The Kansas City District of the US Army Corps of Engineers is engaged in a broad range of river management projects that require knowledge of spatially-varied hydraulic conditions such as velocities and water surface elevations. This information is needed to design new structures, improve existing operations, and assess aquatic habitat. Two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical hydraulic models are a common tool that can be used to provide velocity and depth information. Kansas City District is currently using a specific 2D model, UNET2D, that has been developed to meet the needs of their river engineering applications. This report documents a tech- nical review of UNET2D.

  17. Phase-field modeling of hydraulic fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Zachary A.; Landis, Chad M.

    2016-11-01

    In this work a theoretical framework implementing the phase-field approach to fracture is used to couple the physics of flow through porous media and cracks with the mechanics of fracture. The main modeling challenge addressed in this work, which is a challenge for all diffuse crack representations, is on how to allow for the flow of fluid and the action of fluid pressure on the aggregate within the diffuse damage zone of the cracks. The theory is constructed by presenting the general physical balance laws and conducting a consistent thermodynamic analysis to constrain the constitutive relationships. Constitutive equations that reproduce the desired responses at the various limits of the phase-field parameter are proposed in order to capture Darcy-type flow in the intact porous medium and Stokes-type flow within open cracks. A finite element formulation for the solution of the governing model equations is presented and discussed. Finally, the theoretical and numerical model is shown to compare favorably to several important analytical solutions. More complex and interesting calculations are also presented to illustrate some of the advantageous features of the approach.

  18. Studies investigate effects of hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-11-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, to enhance the retrieval of natural gas from shale has been increasing dramatically—the number of natural gas wells rose about 50% since 2000. Shale gas has been hailed as a relatively low-cost, abundant energy source that is cleaner than coal. However, fracking involves injecting large volumes of water, sand, and chemicals into deep shale gas reservoirs under high pressure to open fractures through which the gas can travel, and the process has generated much controversy. The popular press, advocacy organizations, and the documentary film Gasland by Josh Fox have helped bring this issue to a broad audience. Many have suggested that fracking has resulted in contaminated drinking water supplies, enhanced seismic activity, demands for large quantities of water that compete with other uses, and challenges in managing large volumes of resulting wastewater. As demand for expanded domestic energy production intensifies, there is potential for substantially increased use of fracking together with other recovery techniques for "unconventional gas resources," like extended horizontal drilling.

  19. Advanced geothermal hydraulics model -- Phase 1 final report, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    W. Zheng; J. Fu; W. C. Maurer

    1999-07-01

    An advanced geothermal well hydraulics model (GEODRIL) is being developed to accurately calculate bottom-hole conditions in these hot wells. In Phase 1, real-time monitoring and other improvements were added to GEODRIL. In Phase 2, GEODRIL will be integrated into Marconi's Intelligent Drilling Monitor (IDM) that will use artificial intelligence to detect lost circulation, fluid influxes and other circulation problems in geothermal wells. This software platform has potential for significantly reducing geothermal drilling costs.

  20. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Hafzullah; Sadan Ozgur Kirca, Veysel; Burgan, Halil Ibrahim; Kellecioglu, Dorukhan

    2016-05-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses) wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS) software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  1. Views on the future of thermal hydraulic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.

    1997-07-01

    It is essential for the U.S. NRC to sustain the highest level of the thermal-hydraulics and reactor safety research expertise and continuously improve their accident analysis capability. Such expertise should span over four different areas which are strongly related to each other. These are: (1) Reactor Safety Code Development, (2) Two-phase Flow Modeling, (3) Instrumentation and Fundamental Experimental Research, and (4) Separate Effect and Integral Test. The NRC is already considering a new effort in the area of advanced thermal-hydraulics effort. Its success largely depends on the availability of a significantly improved two-phase flow formulation and constitutive relations supported by detailed experimental data. Therefore, it is recommended that the NRC start significant research efforts in the areas of two-phase flow modeling, instrumentation, basic and separate effect experiments which should be pursued systematically and with clearly defined objectives. It is desirable that some international program is developed in this area. This paper is concentrated on those items in the thermal-hydraulic area which eventually determine the quality of future accident analysis codes.

  2. Statistical-physical model of the hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, B.; Marczewski, W.; Usowicz, J. B.; Lukowski, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    The water content in unsaturated subsurface soil layer is determined by processes of exchanging mass and energy between media of soil and atmosphere, and particular members of layered media. Generally they are non-homogeneous on different scales, considering soil porosity, soil texture including presence of vegetation elements in the root zone, and canopy above the surface, and varying biomass density of plants above the surface in clusters. That heterogeneity determines statistically effective values of particular physical properties. This work considers mainly those properties which determine the hydraulic conductivity of soil. This property is necessary for characterizing physically water transfer in the root zone and access of nutrient matter for plants, but it also the water capacity on the field scale. The temporal variability of forcing conditions and evolutionarily changing vegetation causes substantial effects of impact on the water capacity in large scales, bringing the evolution of water conditions in the entire area, spanning a possible temporal state in the range between floods and droughts. The dynamic of this evolution of water conditions is highly determined by vegetation but is hardly predictable in evaluations. Hydrological models require feeding with input data determining hydraulic properties of the porous soil which are proposed in this paper by means of the statistical-physical model of the water hydraulic conductivity. The statistical-physical model was determined for soils being typical in Euroregion Bug, Eastern Poland. The model is calibrated on the base of direct measurements in the field scales, and enables determining typical characteristics of water retention by the retention curves bounding the hydraulic conductivity to the state of water saturation of the soil. The values of the hydraulic conductivity in two reference states are used for calibrating the model. One is close to full saturation, and another is for low water content far

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics: does size matter?

    PubMed Central

    Tixier, Aude; Cochard, Hervé; Badel, Eric; Dusotoit-Coucaud, Anaïs; Jansen, Steven; Herbette, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    While Arabidopsis thaliana has been proposed as a model species for wood development, the potential of this tiny herb for studying xylem hydraulics remains unexplored and anticipated by scepticism. Inflorescence stems of A. thaliana were used to measure hydraulic conductivity and cavitation resistance, whereas light and electron microscopy allowed observations of vessels. In wild-type plants, measured and theoretical conductivity showed a significant correlation (R 2 = 0.80, P < 0.01). Moreover, scaling of vessel dimensions and intervessel pit structure of A. thaliana were consistent with structure–function relationships of woody plants. The reliability and resolution of the hydraulic methods applied to measure vulnerability to cavitation were addressed by comparing plants grown under different photoperiods or different mutant lines. Sigmoid vulnerability curves of A. thaliana indicated a pressure corresponding to 50% loss of hydraulic conductance (P 50) between –3 and –2.5MPa for short-day and long-day plants, respectively. Polygalacturonase mutants showed a higher P 50 value (–2.25MPa), suggesting a role for pectins in vulnerability to cavitation. The application of A. thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics provides exciting possibilities for (1) exploring the molecular basis of xylem anatomical features and (2) understanding genetic mechanisms behind xylem functional traits such as cavitation resistance. Compared to perennial woody species, however, the lesser amount of xylem in A. thaliana has its limitations. PMID:23547109

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics: does size matter?

    PubMed

    Tixier, Aude; Cochard, Hervé; Badel, Eric; Dusotoit-Coucaud, Anaïs; Jansen, Steven; Herbette, Stéphane

    2013-05-01

    While Arabidopsis thaliana has been proposed as a model species for wood development, the potential of this tiny herb for studying xylem hydraulics remains unexplored and anticipated by scepticism. Inflorescence stems of A. thaliana were used to measure hydraulic conductivity and cavitation resistance, whereas light and electron microscopy allowed observations of vessels. In wild-type plants, measured and theoretical conductivity showed a significant correlation (R (2) = 0.80, P < 0.01). Moreover, scaling of vessel dimensions and intervessel pit structure of A. thaliana were consistent with structure-function relationships of woody plants. The reliability and resolution of the hydraulic methods applied to measure vulnerability to cavitation were addressed by comparing plants grown under different photoperiods or different mutant lines. Sigmoid vulnerability curves of A. thaliana indicated a pressure corresponding to 50% loss of hydraulic conductance (P 50) between -3 and -2.5MPa for short-day and long-day plants, respectively. Polygalacturonase mutants showed a higher P 50 value (-2.25MPa), suggesting a role for pectins in vulnerability to cavitation. The application of A. thaliana as a model species for xylem hydraulics provides exciting possibilities for (1) exploring the molecular basis of xylem anatomical features and (2) understanding genetic mechanisms behind xylem functional traits such as cavitation resistance. Compared to perennial woody species, however, the lesser amount of xylem in A. thaliana has its limitations.

  5. Characteristics of concentrated flow hydraulics for rangeland ecosystems: implications for hydrologic modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated flow is often the dominant source of water erosion following disturbance on rangeland. Because of the lack of studies that explain the hydraulics of concentrated flow on rangelands, cropland-based equations have typically been used for rangeland hydrology and erosion modeling, leading t...

  6. Pen Branch Delta and Savannah River Swamp Hydraulic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.

    1999-05-13

    The proposed Savannah River Site (SRS) Wetlands Restoration Project area is located in Barnwell County, South Carolina on the southwestern boundary of the SRS Reservation. The swamp covers about 40.5 km2 and is bounded to the west and south by the Savannah River and to the north and east by low bluffs at the edge of the Savannah River floodplain. Water levels within the swamp are determined by stage along the Savannah River, local drainage, groundwater seepage, and inflows from four tributaries, Beaver Dam Creek, Fourmile Branch, Pen Branch, and Steel Creek. Historic discharges of heated process water into these tributaries scoured the streambed, created deltas in the adjacent wetland, and killed native vegetation in the vicinity of the delta deposits. Future releases from these tributaries will be substantially smaller and closer to ambient temperatures. One component of the proposed restoration project will be to reestablish indigenous wetland vegetation on the Pen Branch delta that covers about 1.0 km2. Long-term predictions of water levels within the swamp are required to determine the characteristics of suitable plants. The objective of the study was to predict water levels at various locations within the proposed SRS Wetlands Restoration Project area for a range of Savannah River flows and regulated releases from Pen Branch. TABS-MD, a United States Army Corps of Engineer developed two-dimensional finite element open channel hydraulic computer code, was used to model the SRS swamp area for various flow conditions.

  7. Development of two-phase pipeline hydraulic analysis model based on Beggs-Brill correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluyo, Joko; Hermawan, Achilleus; Indarto

    2016-06-01

    The hydraulic analysis is an important stage in a reliable pipeline design. In the implementation, fluid distribution from a source to the sinks often occurs on parallel pipeline networks. The solution to the problem is complicated because of the iterative technique requirement. Regarding its solution effectiveness, there is a need for analysis related to the model and the solution method. This study aims to investigate pipeline hydraulic analysis on distributing of two-phase fluids flow. The model uses Beggs-Brill correlation to converse mass flow rates into pressure drops. In the solution technique, the Newton-Raphson iterative method is utilized. The iterative technique is solved using a computer program. The study is carried out using a certain pipeline network. The model is validated by comparing between Beggs-Brill towards Mukherjee-Brill correlation. The result reveals that the computer program enables solving of iterative calculation on the parallel pipeline hydraulic analysis. Convergence iteration is achieved by 50 iterations. The main results of the model are mass flow rate and pressure drop. The mass flow rate is obtained in the deviation up to 2.06%, between Beggs-Brill and Mukherjee-Brill correlation. On the other hand, the pressure gradient deviation is achieved on a higher deviation due to the different approach of the two correlations. The model can be further developed in the hydraulic pipeline analysis for two-phase flow.

  8. Using Hydraulic Network Models to Teach Electric Circuit Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Irvin; EERC (Engineering Education Research Center) Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Unlike other engineering disciplines, teaching electric circuit principles is difficult for some students because there isn't a visual context to rely on. So concepts such as electric potential, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance have little meaning outside of their definition and the derived mathematical relationships. As a work in progress, we are developing a tool to support teaching, learning, and research of electric circuits. The tool will allow the user to design, build, and operate electric circuits in the form of hydraulic networks. We believe that this system will promote greater learning of electric circuit principles by visually realizing the conceptual and abstract concepts of electric circuits. Furthermore, as a teaching and learning tool, the hydraulic network system can be used to teach and improve comprehension of electrical principles in K through 12 classrooms and in cross-disciplinary environments such as Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Aeronautical Engineering. As a research tool, the hydraulic network can model and simulate micro/nano bio-electro-chemical systems. Organization within the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh.

  9. Modelling of hydraulic fracture propagation in inhomogeneous poroelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykin, A. N.; Golovin, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    In the paper a model for description of a hydraulic fracture propagation in inhomogeneous poroelastic medium is proposed. Among advantages of the presented numerical algorithm, there are incorporation of the near-tip analysis into the general computational scheme, account for the rock failure criterion on the base of the cohesive zone model, possibility for analysis of fracture propagation in inhomogeneous reservoirs. The numerical convergence of the algorithm is verified and the agreement of our numerical results with known solutions is established. The influence of the inhomogeneity of the reservoir permeability to the fracture time evolution is also demonstrated.

  10. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity: Chapter 21

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K(). The parameters that describe the K() curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  11. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-12-18

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The

  12. Discrete modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in a complex pre-existing fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Nakagawa, S.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and stimulation of fracture networks are widely used by the energy industry (e.g., shale gas extraction, enhanced geothermal systems) to increase permeability of geological formations. Numerous analytical and numerical models have been developed to help understand and predict the behavior of hydraulically induced fractures. However, many existing models assume simple fracturing scenarios with highly idealized fracture geometries (e.g., propagation of a single fracture with assumed shapes in a homogeneous medium). Modeling hydraulic fracture propagation in the presence of natural fractures and homogeneities can be very challenging because of the complex interactions between fluid, rock matrix, and rock interfaces, as well as the interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing natural fractures. In this study, the TOUGH-RBSN code for coupled hydro-mechanical modeling is utilized to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and its interaction with pre-existing fracture networks. The simulation tool combines TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach, with the implementation of a lattice modeling approach for geomechanical and fracture-damage behavior, named Rigid-Body-Spring Network (RBSN). The discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is facilitated in the Voronoi discretization via a fully automated modeling procedure. The numerical program is verified through a simple simulation for single fracture propagation, in which the resulting fracture geometry is compared to an analytical solution for given fracture length and aperture. Subsequently, predictive simulations are conducted for planned laboratory experiments using rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed, pre-existing fracture network. The results of a preliminary simulation demonstrate selective fracturing and fluid infiltration along the pre-existing fractures, with additional fracturing in part

  13. Use of hydraulic models to identify and resolve design isssues in FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strock, T.W.; Gohara, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The hydraulics within a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber involve several complex two-phase gas/liquid interactions that directly affect the scrubber pressure drop, mist elimination efficiency, and the mass transfer process of SO{sub 2} removal. Current industrial efforts to develop cost effective, high-efficiency wet FGD scrubbers are focusing, in part, on the hydraulics. The development of an experimental approach and test facility for understanding and optimizing wet scrubber flow characteristics has been completed. Hydraulic models simulate full-scale units and allow the designer to view the gas/liquid flow interactions. Modeling procedures for downsizing the wet scrubber for the laboratory have been developed and validated with field data comparisons. A one-eighth scale hydraulic model has been used to study several FGD scrubber design issues. Design changes to reduce capital and operating cost have been developed and tested. Recently, the model was used to design a commercial, uniform flow, high gas velocity absorber for the next generation of FGD systems.

  14. Hydraulic Implications of Different Megaflood Canyon Incision Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, I. J.; Lamb, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Deeply incised canyons are some of the most dramatic features of landscapes carved by megafloods. The geometry of these canyons may reveal information regarding flood magnitudes during the last ice age on Earth and the volume of water flowing on early Mars. Canyons on both planets have been alternatively modeled as 'channels', where the modern topography was completely inundated with water to the elevation of the canyon rims, or as 'valleys' that were progressively incised by lesser discharges. Here we combine numerical flood simulations and sediment transport mechanics to explore the hydraulic implications that result from modeling the canyons as 'channels' versus 'valleys'. Over 300 floods were simulated for Moses Coulee, a 60 km-long canyon in the Channeled Scablands of eastern Washington, USA, using a 2D, depth-averaged hydraulic model. We simulated floods with discharges ranging from 0.1 million m3 s-1 to 6 million m3 s-1 using both the modern landscape as a topographic boundary condition and synthetic topographies that restored the canyon floor to different elevations as guided by strath terraces. For each simulation we tracked whether shear stresses on the terrace treads exceeded thresholds for sliding of basalt columns. Simulations using the modern topography indicate shear stresses were sufficiently high to erode the terraces at discharges lower than bankfull, and surprisingly, shear stresses decrease with increasing discharge at some sites due to backwater dynamics, which constrains canyon formation to moderate discharges. Simulations performed on the synthetic topography suggest the canyon could have been incised progressively by floods smaller than those required to fill the canyon to bankfull stage. These results suggest the canyons can be viewed as valleys that incised progressively, as opposed to channels filled with water, which has implications for placing bounds on paleoflood hydraulic reconstruction on Earth and Mars.

  15. Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    SciTech Connect

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Wohling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  16. 75 FR 36387 - Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study; Correction AGENCY... Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study. The document contained an incorrect EPA Web site address in two...

  17. Synthetic Seismic Study for Hydraulic Fracture in Shale-Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y.; Li, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Many studies have been done regarding performance of hydraulically fractured horizontal wells in the Bakken Shale Play (Wiley et. al., 2004; Mille et. al., 2008; Tabatabaei et. al., 2009). It's of great interest that whether the invaded brine causes the gas shale layer to behave differently in seismic profile due to potentially important application on reservoir monitoring and management for gas shale reservoirs. Because gas shale formations are generally much thinner than their adjacent layers (usually less than 100 meters), it's usually difficult to pick the reflection wave response of gas shale layer from in-situ seismic profile. Therefore, we have designed a workflow to investigate the effects of hydraulic fracture in gas shale reservoir by using synthetic seismic survey on simplified subsurface model. The simplified model mainly consists of several horizontally homogeneous layers of sand and shale, whereas the hydraulic fracture occurs in the middle thin gas shale formation and causes brine invasion in part of it. The goal of the synthetic seismic investigation is to see how the response of the reflection wave from this layer behaves differently due to the hydraulic fracture. Due to the thickness and complex nature of shale reservoir, the greatest challenge would be to pick the seismic response of this formation from the background noise and to study the range of thickness and the depth of burial for this layer to be seismically detectable for the purpose of hydraulic fracture study. Seismic investigation is rarely used in the reservoir monitoring of gas shale reservoir due to seismic resolution limit. Thus, this study will help to explore potential seismic applications for gas shale reservoirs and improve understanding of seismic response of hydraulic fracture on unconventional reservoirs.

  18. Modeling and Control for an Asymmetric Hydraulic Active Suspension System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Won, Sangchul

    In this paper we present a model for an automotive active suspension system which includes the dynamics of an asymmetric hydraulic actuator. In this model the force exerted by a single-rod cylinder is regarded as an internal state, and the sum of the oil flow rates through the orifice of a servo valve as the control input. We obtain a linear time-invariant (LTI) state state equation and propose a force-tracking-free one-step control method which can accept various linear control techniques. An optimal state-feedback control is applied as an example. Quarter car test rig experiment results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in modeling and control.

  19. A Bayesian inverse modeling approach to estimate soil hydraulic properties of a toposequence in southeastern Amazonia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi Boschi, Raquel; Qin, Mingming; Gimenez, Daniel; Cooper, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Modeling is an important tool for better understanding and assessing land use impacts on landscape processes. A key point for environmental modeling is the knowledge of soil hydraulic properties. However, direct determination of soil hydraulic properties is difficult and costly, particularly in vast and remote regions such as one constituting the Amazon Biome. One way to overcome this problem is to extrapolate accurately estimated data to pedologically similar sites. The van Genuchten (VG) parametric equation is the most commonly used for modeling SWRC. The use of a Bayesian approach in combination with the Markov chain Monte Carlo to estimate the VG parameters has several advantages compared to the widely used global optimization techniques. The Bayesian approach provides posterior distributions of parameters that are independent from the initial values and allow for uncertainty analyses. The main objectives of this study were: i) to estimate hydraulic parameters from data of pasture and forest sites by the Bayesian inverse modeling approach; and ii) to investigate the extrapolation of the estimated VG parameters to a nearby toposequence with pedologically similar soils to those used for its estimate. The parameters were estimated from volumetric water content and tension observations obtained after rainfall events during a 207-day period from pasture and forest sites located in the southeastern Amazon region. These data were used to run HYDRUS-1D under a Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) scheme 10,000 times, and only the last 2,500 times were used to calculate the posterior distributions of each hydraulic parameter along with 95% confidence intervals (CI) of volumetric water content and tension time series. Then, the posterior distributions were used to generate hydraulic parameters for two nearby toposequences composed by six soil profiles, three are under forest and three are under pasture. The parameters of the nearby site were accepted when

  20. 75 FR 35023 - Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... AGENCY Informational Public Meetings for Hydraulic Fracturing Research Study AGENCY: Environmental... between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water. The meetings are open to all interested parties and will... Hydraulic Fracturing Study informational meetings are as follows: July 8, 2010, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.,...

  1. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction.

  2. Modeling hydraulic regenerative hybrid vehicles using AMESim and Matlab/Simulink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alfred; Smid, Edzko; Eshraghi, Moji; Caldwell, Niall; Woody, Dan

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the overview of the simulation modeling of a hydraulic system with regenerative braking used to improve vehicle emissions and fuel economy. Two simulation software packages were used together to enhance the simulation capability for fuel economy results and development of vehicle and hybrid control strategy. AMESim, a hydraulic simulation software package modeled the complex hydraulic circuit and component hardware and was interlinked with a Matlab/Simulink model of the vehicle, engine and the control strategy required to operate the vehicle and the hydraulic hybrid system through various North American and European drive cycles.

  3. Calibration of hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics for TOC removal modeling in biofilm reactors under different hydraulic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Soric, Audrey; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    In this study, total organic carbon (TOC) biodegradation was simulated by GPS-X software in biofilm reactors with carriers of plastic rings and glass beads under different hydraulic conditions. Hydrodynamic model by retention time distribution and biokinetic measurement by in-situ batch test served as two significant parts of model calibration. Experimental results showed that TOC removal efficiency was stable in both media due to the enough height of column, although the actual hydraulic volume changed during the variation of hydraulic condition. Simulated TOC removal efficiencies were close to experimental ones with low theil inequality coefficient values (below 0.15). Compared with glass beads, more TOC was removed in the filter with plastic rings due to the larger actual hydraulic volume and lower half saturation coefficient in spite of its lower maximum specific growth rate of biofilm, which highlighted the importance of calibrating hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics.

  4. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  5. Assessing the Transferability of Hydraulic Habitat Models for Atlantic Salmon Fry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millidine, K. J.; Malcolm, I.; Fryer, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic habitat models, which are logistically and technically challenging and expensive to produce, are frequently transferred between rivers without validation. Although this is known to be associated with problems, few studies have assessed the potential consequences for model predictions. This study investigated the local (within sub-catchment) transfer of hydraulic habitat models developed for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fry. Detailed 2D hydraulic models were developed for two adjacent reaches, each containing pool, riffle, glide and run habitats where salmon fry were stocked at uniform saturated densities. Substrate and cover were characterised using transects. Generalised Additive Models (GAM's) were fitted to seasonal fry abundance data, with Froude number, dominant substrate and cover included as predictor variables. Despite attempts to select reaches with similar characteristics, the spatial distribution of Froude, dominant substrate and cover differed, with substrate and cover exhibiting the greatest inter-reach differences. Froude was the most important individual predictor of fry abundance, with the highest densities observed at moderate Froude across all seasons. When transferred between reaches, models which contained multiple predictor variables and their interactions transferred less well than models containing Froude alone potentially reflecting inter-reach differences in the distribution of substrate and cover. This study suggests that (1) habitat models should be developed at sites offering maximum environmental complexity at a local level (2) scientists and managers should avoid transferring models between locations with different environmental characteristics, especially in the absence of model validation (3) complex models should be avoided (4) the transferability of Froude only models should be further investigated, if predictions of habitat quality are to be made at new sites.

  6. 3D Numerical Modeling of the Propagation of Hydraulic Fracture at Its Intersection with Natural (Pre-existing) Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, Ali Naghi; Goshtasbi, Kamran; Ahangari, Kaveh; Jin, Yan; Bahmani, Aram

    2017-02-01

    A variety of 3D numerical models were developed based on hydraulic fracture experiments to simulate the propagation of hydraulic fracture at its intersection with natural (pre-existing) fracture. Since the interaction between hydraulic and pre-existing fractures is a key condition that causes complex fracture patterns, the extended finite element method was employed in ABAQUS software to simulate the problem. The propagation of hydraulic fracture in a fractured medium was modeled in two horizontal differential stresses (Δ σ) of 5e6 and 10e6 Pa considering different strike and dip angles of pre-existing fracture. The rate of energy release was calculated in the directions of hydraulic and pre-existing fractures (G_{{frac}} /G_{{rock}}) at their intersection point to determine the fracture behavior. Opening and crossing were two dominant fracture behaviors during the hydraulic and pre-existing fracture interaction at low and high differential stress conditions, respectively. The results of numerical studies were compared with those of experimental models, showing a good agreement between the two to validate the accuracy of the models. Besides the horizontal differential stress, strike and dip angles of the natural (pre-existing) fracture, the key finding of this research was the significant effect of the energy release rate on the propagation behavior of the hydraulic fracture. This effect was more prominent under the influence of strike and dip angles, as well as differential stress. The obtained results can be used to predict and interpret the generation of complex hydraulic fracture patterns in field conditions.

  7. Hydraulic properties of a model dike from coupled Bayesian and multi-criteria hydrogeophysical inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, J. A.; Rings, J.; Vrugt, J. A.; Sorg, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2010-01-01

    SummaryCoupled hydrogeophysical inversion aims to improve the use of geophysical data for hydrological model parameterization. Several numerical studies have illustrated the feasibility and advantages of a coupled approach. However, there is still a lack of studies that apply the coupled inversion approach to actual field data. In this paper, we test the feasibility of coupled hydrogeophysical inversion for determining the hydraulic properties of a model dike using measurements of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). Our analysis uses a two-dimensional (2D) finite element hydrological model (HYDRUS-2D) coupled to a 2.5D finite element electrical resistivity code (CRMOD), and includes explicit recognition of parameter uncertainty by using a Bayesian and multiple criteria framework with the DREAM and AMALGAM population based search algorithms. To benchmark our inversion results, soil hydraulic properties determined from ERT data are compared with those separately obtained from detailed in situ soil water content measurements using Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). Our most important results are as follows. (1) TDR and ERT data theoretically contain sufficient information to resolve most of the soil hydraulic properties, (2) the DREAM-derived posterior distributions of the hydraulic parameters are quite similar when estimated separately using TDR and ERT measurements for model calibration, (3) among all parameters, the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the dike material is best constrained, (4) the saturation exponent of the petrophysical model is well defined, and matches independently measured values, (5) measured ERT data sufficiently constrain model predictions of water table dynamics within the model dike. This finding demonstrates an innate ability of ERT data to provide accurate hydrogeophysical parameterizations for flooding events, which is of particular relevance to dike management, and (6) the AMALGAM-derived Pareto front demonstrates trade-off in the

  8. Field study of subsurface heterogeneity with steady-state hydraulic tomography.

    PubMed

    Berg, Steven J; Illman, Walter A

    2013-01-01

    Remediation of subsurface contamination requires an understanding of the contaminant (history, source location, plume extent and concentration, etc.), and, knowledge of the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) that governs groundwater flow and solute transport. Many methods exist for characterizing K heterogeneity, but most if not all methods require the collection of a large number of small-scale data and its interpolation. In this study, we conduct a hydraulic tomography survey at a highly heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit at the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) located at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada to sequentially interpret four pumping tests using the steady-state form of the Sequential Successive Linear Estimator (SSLE) (Yeh and Liu 2000). The resulting three-dimensional (3D) K distribution (or K-tomogram) is compared against: (1) K distributions obtained through the inverse modeling of individual pumping tests using SSLE, and (2) effective hydraulic conductivity (K(eff) ) estimates obtained by automatically calibrating a groundwater flow model while treating the medium to be homogeneous. Such a K(eff) is often used for designing remediation operations, and thus is used as the basis for comparison with the K-tomogram. Our results clearly show that hydraulic tomography is superior to the inversions of single pumping tests or K(eff) estimates. This is particularly significant for contaminated sites where an accurate representation of the flow field is critical for simulating contaminant transport and injection of chemical and biological agents used for active remediation of contaminant source zones and plumes.

  9. Modelling the hydraulic and geochemical evolution of a hillslope transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, U.; Flegr, M.; Rügner, H.; Selle, B.; Grathwohl, P.

    2012-04-01

    Especially the long-term response of subsurface-surface water systems and their water quality on pressures such as diffuse pollution from agricultural activities or atmospheric deposition are not well understood at the catchment scale. The goal of this study is to quantify the factors that influence the geochemical interactions between soils and seepage water, rocks and groundwater as well the subsurface/surface water interaction in a comprehensive way. Only very recently numerical codes became available which not only couple flow and reactive transport but also unsaturated and saturated zone allowing it to follow water quality from the infiltration into the soil until discharge in a spring or river, of which the code MIN3P was used. In order to assess groundwater quality, the origin of the recharge water and its chemical evolution pathways have to be known at the catchment scale. This involves precipitation, evapotranspiration, seepage water infiltration, interflow and perched water, and finally the groundwater as well as the effluent to rivers or springs in a watershed. Water quality is affected by rainwater pH and dissolved solids, leaching of potential pollutants from top-soils, release of CO2 from organic matter oxidation / microbial respiration in the unsaturated zone and the water-rock interaction in the subsurface. A promising approach to identify the principal processes is the selection of vertical profiles along streamlines across the area of interest. That way, numerical simulations requiring only short computational time could be utilized to describe the water flow and solute transport from elevated parts of the catchment to the receiving stream. Eventually, this approach can be extended to capture a watershed in a three-dimensional model. A geologic model representative for a typical valley scenario in a triassic sequence landscape composed of of sandstones and marls was set up, consisting of a i) sand and gravel aquifer, ii) underlying and hill

  10. Mathematical Model of Hydraulic Fracturing of a Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharova, G. S.; Khramchenkov, M. G.

    2016-07-01

    A study has been made of the problem on the process of formation of a zone of higher-than-average permeability with a moving boundary in an initially low-permeability porous medium (problem on hydraulic fracturing of a bed) in a three-dimensional formulation. A characteristic feature of the three-dimensional problem was the taking into account the existence of two zones (zone with a regular permeability and the destruction zone) in the porous medium, whose contact region was determined using the condition of mass balance on the moving boundary. Special features fundamental to the process of mass transfer in such filtration-inhomogeneous porous media have been revealed and analyzed.

  11. Hydraulic Model Investigation. Libby Dam, Kootenai River, Montana. Hydraulic Model Investigations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    face of the dam and skewed to eliminate the need for corbels on the dam face. The Libby study was made to develop a similar design that also would be... corbels on the face of the dam that would contain intakes perpendicular to the sluice alignments. The intake design was similar to Plan D selected for

  12. Modelling Subduction Zone Magmatism Due to Hydraulic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, R.; Davies, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this project is to test the hypothesis that subduction zone magmatism involves hydraulic fractures propagating from the oceanic crust to the mantle wedge source region (Davies, 1999). We aim to test this hypothesis by developing a numerical model of the process, and then comparing model outputs with observations. The hypothesis proposes that the water interconnects in the slab following an earthquake. If sufficient pressure develops a hydrofracture occurs. The hydrofracture will expand in the direction of the least compressive stress and propagate in the direction of the most compressive stress, which is out into the wedge. Therefore we can calculate the hydrofracture path and end-point, given the start location on the slab and the propagation distance. We can therefore predict where water is added to the mantle wedge. To take this further we have developed a thermal model of a subduction zone. The model uses a finite difference, marker-in-cell method to solve the heat equation (Gerya, 2010). The velocity field was prescribed using the analytical expression of cornerflow (Batchelor, 1967). The markers contained within the fixed grid are used to track the different compositions and their properties. The subduction zone thermal model was benchmarked (Van Keken, 2008). We used the hydrous melting parameterization of Katz et.al., (2003) to calculate the degree of melting caused by the addition of water to the wedge. We investigate models where the hydrofractures, with properties constrained by estimated water fluxes, have random end points. The model predicts degree of melting, magma productivity, temperature of the melt and water content in the melt for different initial water fluxes. Future models will also include the buoyancy effect of the melt and residue. Batchelor, Cambridge UP, 1967. Davies, Nature, 398: 142-145, 1999. Gerya, Cambridge UP, 2010. Katz, Geochem. Geophys. Geosy, 4(9), 2003 Van Keken et.al. Phys. Earth. Planet. In., 171:187-197, 2008.

  13. Modeling the hydrologicEffects of Spatial Heterogeneity in Soil Hydraulic Properties in a Mountainous Watershed, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.; Jin, X.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties directly affects variations of hydrological processes at corresponding scales. Understanding spatial variation of soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture is therefore fundamental for modeling watershed ecohydrological processes. As part of the National Science Foundation of China (NSFC) funded ''Integrated Ecohydrological Research Plan of the Heihe River Watershed'', this study established an observation network that consists of sampling points, zones, and tributaries to analyze spatial variations of soil hydraulic properties in the Upper Reach of the Heihe River Watershed, a second largest inland river (terminal lake) with a drainage area of over 128,000 km2 in Northwest China. Spatial heterogeneity of soil properties was analyzed based on the large number of soil sampling and in situ observations. The spatial clustering method, Full-Order-CLK was employed to derive five soil heterogeneous zones (Configuration 97, 80, 65, 40, and 20). Subsequently, SWAT model was used to quantify the impact of the spatial heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties on hydrologic process in the study watershed. Results show the simulations by the SWAT model with the spatially clustered soil hydraulic information from the field sampling data had much better representation of the soil heterogeneity and more accurate performance than the model using the average soil property values for each soil type derived from the coarse soil datasets (Gansu Soil Handbook at 1:1,000,000 scale). Thus, incorporating detailed field sampling soil heterogeneity data greatly improves performance in hydrologic modeling.

  14. Hydraulic Fracturing and Drinking Water Resources: Update on EPA Hydraulic Fracturing Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural gas plays a key role in our nation's energy future and the process known as hydraulic fracturing (HF) is one way of accessing that resource. Over the past few years, several key technical, economic, and energy developments have spurred increased use of HF for gas extracti...

  15. Evaluating the Risks of Surface Spills Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Activities to Groundwater Resources: a Modeling Study in the South Platte Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, C.; McLaughlin, M.; Blotevogel, J.; Benson, D. A.; Borch, T.; McCray, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has revolutionized the U.S.'s energy portfolio by making shale reservoirs productive and commercially viable. However, the public is concerned that the chemical constituents in hydraulic fracturing fluid, produced water, or natural gas itself could potentially impact groundwater or adjacent streams. Here, we conduct fate and transport simulations of surface spills, the most likely contamination pathway to occur during oil and gas production operations, to evaluate whether or not these spills pose risks to groundwater quality. We focus on the South Platte Alluvial Aquifer, which is located in the greater Denver metro area and overlaps a zone of high-density oil and gas development. The purpose of this work is to assess the mobility and persistence of chemical contaminants (e.g. biocides, friction reducers, surfactants, hydrocarbons, etc.) —based on sorption to soil, degradation potential, co-contaminant interactions, and spill conditions—and to understand the site characteristics and hydrologic conditions that would make a particular location prone to groundwater quality degradation in the event of an accidental release. We propose a coupled analytical-numerical approach that could be duplicated by environmental consultants. Results suggest that risk of groundwater pollution, based on predicted concentration at the groundwater table, is low in most areas of the South Platte system for the contaminants investigated under common spill conditions. However, substantial risk may exist in certain areas where the groundwater table is shallow. In addition, transport of certain contaminants is influenced by interactions with other constituents in produced or stimulation fluids. By helping to identify locations in the Front Range of Colorado that are at low or high risk for groundwater contamination due to a surface spill, it is our hope that this work will aid in improving prevention, mitigation, and remediation practices so that decision-makers can

  16. Elucidating hydraulic fracturing impacts on groundwater quality using a regional geospatial statistical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Burton, Taylour G; Rifai, Hanadi S; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Fontenot, Brian E; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operations have been viewed as the cause of certain environmental issues including groundwater contamination. The potential for hydraulic fracturing to induce contaminant pathways in groundwater is not well understood since gas wells are completed while isolating the water table and the gas-bearing reservoirs lay thousands of feet below the water table. Recent studies have attributed ground water contamination to poor well construction and leaks in the wellbore annulus due to ruptured wellbore casings. In this paper, a geospatial model of the Barnett Shale region was created using ArcGIS. The model was used for spatial analysis of groundwater quality data in order to determine if regional variations in groundwater quality, as indicated by various groundwater constituent concentrations, may be associated with the presence of hydraulically fractured gas wells in the region. The Barnett Shale reservoir pressure, completions data, and fracture treatment data were evaluated as predictors of groundwater quality change. Results indicated that elevated concentrations of certain groundwater constituents are likely related to natural gas production in the study area and that beryllium, in this formation, could be used as an indicator variable for evaluating fracturing impacts on regional groundwater quality. Results also indicated that gas well density and formation pressures correlate to change in regional water quality whereas proximity to gas wells, by itself, does not. The results also provided indirect evidence supporting the possibility that micro annular fissures serve as a pathway transporting fluids and chemicals from the fractured wellbore to the overlying groundwater aquifers.

  17. Study on creating hydraulic tomography for crystalline rock using frequency dependent elastic wave velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, K.; Sakashita, S.; Ando, K.; Bruines, P.; Blechschmidt, I.; Kickmaier, W.; Onishi, Y.; Nishiyama, S.

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a technique to obtain hydraulic conductivity distribution in granite rock masses using seismic tomography. We apply the characteristic that elastic wave velocity disperses in fully saturated porous media on frequency and this velocity dispersion is governed by the hydraulic conductivity - this characteristic has been confirmed in laboratory experiments. The feasibility and design of the field experiment was demonstrated in a first step with numerical simulations. In a second step we applied the technique to the fractured granite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. The emphasis of the field campaign was on the evaluation of the range of applicability of this technique. The field campaign was structured in three steps, each one corresponding to a larger spatial scale. First, the seismic tomography was applied to a small area - the two boreholes were located at a distance of 1.5 m. In the following step, we selected a larger area, in which the distance of the boreholes amounts to 10 m and the field corresponds to a more complex geology. Finally we applied the testing to a field where the borehole distance was of the order of 75 m. We also drilled a borehole to confirm hydraulic characteristic and reviewed hydraulic model in the 1.5 m cross-hole location area. The results from the field campaign are presented and their application to the various fields are discussed and evaluated. (authors)

  18. New concentrated flow hydraulics equations for physically-based rangeland hydrology and erosion models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the hydraulics of concentrated flow using unconfined field experimental data over diverse rangeland landscapes, and developed new empirical prediction models of different rangeland concentrated flow hydraulic parameters, which can be applicable across a wide span of rangeland sites, soil...

  19. Engine Hydraulic Stability. [injector model for analyzing combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesselring, R. C.; Sprouse, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical injector model was developed specifically to analyze combustion instability coupling between the injector hydraulics and the combustion process. This digital computer dynamic injector model will, for any imposed chamber of inlet pressure profile with a frequency ranging from 100 to 3000 Hz (minimum) accurately predict/calculate the instantaneous injector flowrates. The injector system is described in terms of which flow segments enter and leave each pressure node. For each flow segment, a resistance, line lengths, and areas are required as inputs (the line lengths and areas are used in determining inertance). For each pressure node, volume and acoustic velocity are required as inputs (volume and acoustic velocity determine capacitance). The geometric criteria for determining inertances of flow segments and capacitance of pressure nodes was set. Also, a technique was developed for analytically determining time averaged steady-state pressure drops and flowrates for every flow segment in an injector when such data is not known. These pressure drops and flowrates are then used in determining the linearized flow resistance for each line segment of flow.

  20. Assessment of uncertainties of the models used in thermal-hydraulic computer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gricay, A. S.; Migrov, Yu. A.

    2015-09-01

    The article deals with matters concerned with the problem of determining the statistical characteristics of variable parameters (the variation range and distribution law) in analyzing the uncertainty and sensitivity of calculation results to uncertainty in input data. A comparative analysis of modern approaches to uncertainty in input data is presented. The need to develop an alternative method for estimating the uncertainty of model parameters used in thermal-hydraulic computer codes, in particular, in the closing correlations of the loop thermal hydraulics block, is shown. Such a method shall feature the minimal degree of subjectivism and must be based on objective quantitative assessment criteria. The method includes three sequential stages: selecting experimental data satisfying the specified criteria, identifying the key closing correlation using a sensitivity analysis, and carrying out case calculations followed by statistical processing of the results. By using the method, one can estimate the uncertainty range of a variable parameter and establish its distribution law in the above-mentioned range provided that the experimental information is sufficiently representative. Practical application of the method is demonstrated taking as an example the problem of estimating the uncertainty of a parameter appearing in the model describing transition to post-burnout heat transfer that is used in the thermal-hydraulic computer code KORSAR. The performed study revealed the need to narrow the previously established uncertainty range of this parameter and to replace the uniform distribution law in the above-mentioned range by the Gaussian distribution law. The proposed method can be applied to different thermal-hydraulic computer codes. In some cases, application of the method can make it possible to achieve a smaller degree of conservatism in the expert estimates of uncertainties pertinent to the model parameters used in computer codes.

  1. A mathematically continuous model for describing the hydraulic properties of unsaturated porous media over the entire range of matric suctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Guan, Huade

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that water flow in unsaturated porous media extends beyond the commonly known capillary-driven regime into the film regime. There is a need to develop the unsaturated hydraulic properties over the entire range of matric suctions to capture both flow regimes. In this study, Fredlund and Xing model is modified to represent the soil water retention curve from saturation to oven dryness. The new function is mathematically differentiable. The hydraulic conductivity function is composed of the capillary-driven term and film associated term, which is easy to apply. The new model has capacity to represent the bimodal hydraulic properties that are often present in structured and aggregated soils. Testing with the published data of sixteen soils shows good performance for both the water retention curve and the hydraulic conductivity function. For most soils, the new model results in a better agreement with observations than a published model. The result also indicates a possibility to improve the previously published film-associated hydraulic conductivity function.

  2. Compound random field models of multiple scale hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.S. ); Brannan, J.R. )

    1992-09-01

    Enormous amounts of hydrologic data are required to accurately simulate subsurface contaminant transport. Effectively supplementing measurements of hydrologic parameters such as permeability and porosity with soft'' information obtained from the interpretation of geologic cores and geophysical logs can improve the simulation of contaminant transport while reducing the measured data that are required. A method is presented herein for generating hydraulic conductivity fields comprised of several geological materials with hydraulic conductivities that can range over several orders of magnitude. This method utilizes indicator fields that are designed to allow random variation at the megascopic scale but are constrained by observations inferred from geophysical logs and geologic core data. The statistical description of random hydraulic conductivity values of distinct geological materials at the macroscopic scale may be obtained by conventional parameter estimation techniques. The combined approach can then be used to generate realizations of a hydraulic conductivity field for subsequent use in flow and transport simulations.

  3. Compound random field models of multiple scale hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.S.; Brannan, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    Enormous amounts of hydrologic data are required to accurately simulate subsurface contaminant transport. Effectively supplementing measurements of hydrologic parameters such as permeability and porosity with ``soft`` information obtained from the interpretation of geologic cores and geophysical logs can improve the simulation of contaminant transport while reducing the measured data that are required. A method is presented herein for generating hydraulic conductivity fields comprised of several geological materials with hydraulic conductivities that can range over several orders of magnitude. This method utilizes indicator fields that are designed to allow random variation at the megascopic scale but are constrained by observations inferred from geophysical logs and geologic core data. The statistical description of random hydraulic conductivity values of distinct geological materials at the macroscopic scale may be obtained by conventional parameter estimation techniques. The combined approach can then be used to generate realizations of a hydraulic conductivity field for subsequent use in flow and transport simulations.

  4. The application of Global Sensitivity Analysis to quantify the dominant input factors for hydraulic model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James; Pianosi, Francesca; Bates, Paul; Freer, Jim; Wagener, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Predicting flood inundation extents using hydraulic models is subject to a number of critical uncertainties. For a specific event, these uncertainties are known to have a large influence on model outputs and any subsequent analyses made by risk managers. Hydraulic modellers often approach such problems by applying uncertainty analysis techniques such as the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) methodology. However, these methods do not allow one to attribute which source of uncertainty has the most influence on the various model outputs that inform flood risk decision making. Another issue facing modellers is the amount of computational resource that is available to spend on modelling flood inundations that are 'fit for purpose' to the modelling objectives. Therefore a balance needs to be struck between computation time, realism and spatial resolution, and effectively characterising the uncertainty spread of predictions (for example from boundary conditions and model parameterisations). However, it is not fully understood how much of an impact each factor has on model performance, for example how much influence changing the spatial resolution of a model has on inundation predictions in comparison to other uncertainties inherent in the modelling process. Furthermore, when resampling fine scale topographic data in the form of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to coarser resolutions, there are a number of possible coarser DEMs that can be produced. Deciding which DEM is then chosen to represent the surface elevations in the model could also influence model performance. In this study we model a flood event using the hydraulic model LISFLOOD-FP and apply Sobol' Sensitivity Analysis to estimate which input factor, among the uncertainty in model boundary conditions, uncertain model parameters, the spatial resolution of the DEM and the choice of resampled DEM, have the most influence on a range of model outputs. These outputs include whole domain maximum

  5. Near-real-time simulation and internet-based delivery of forecast-flood inundation maps using two-dimensional hydraulic modeling--A pilot study for the Snoqualmie River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Fulford, Janice M.; Voss, Frank D.

    2002-01-01

    A system of numerical hydraulic modeling, geographic information system processing, and Internet map serving, supported by new data sources and application automation, was developed that generates inundation maps for forecast floods in near real time and makes them available through the Internet. Forecasts for flooding are generated by the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Center (RFC); these forecasts are retrieved automatically by the system and prepared for input to a hydraulic model. The model, TrimR2D, is a new, robust, two-dimensional model capable of simulating wide varieties of discharge hydrographs and relatively long stream reaches. TrimR2D was calibrated for a 28-kilometer reach of the Snoqualmie River in Washington State, and is used to estimate flood extent, depth, arrival time, and peak time for the RFC forecast. The results of the model are processed automatically by a Geographic Information System (GIS) into maps of flood extent, depth, and arrival and peak times. These maps subsequently are processed into formats acceptable by an Internet map server (IMS). The IMS application is a user-friendly interface to access the maps over the Internet; it allows users to select what information they wish to see presented and allows the authors to define scale-dependent availability of map layers and their symbology (appearance of map features). For example, the IMS presents a background of a digital USGS 1:100,000-scale quadrangle at smaller scales, and automatically switches to an ortho-rectified aerial photograph (a digital photograph that has camera angle and tilt distortions removed) at larger scales so viewers can see ground features that help them identify their area of interest more effectively. For the user, the option exists to select either background at any scale. Similar options are provided for both the map creator and the viewer for the various flood maps. This combination of a robust model, emerging IMS software, and application

  6. Hydraulic fracturing model based on the discrete fracture model and the generalized J integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Liu, Z. F.; Wang, X. H.; Zeng, B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydraulic fracturing technique is an effective stimulation for low permeability reservoirs. In fracturing models, one key point is to accurately calculate the flux across the fracture surface and the stress intensity factor. To achieve high precision, the discrete fracture model is recommended to calculate the flux. Using the generalized J integral, the present work obtains an accurate simulation of the stress intensity factor. Based on the above factors, an alternative hydraulic fracturing model is presented. Examples are included to demonstrate the reliability of the proposed model and its ability to model the fracture propagation. Subsequently, the model is used to describe the relationship between the geometry of the fracture and the fracturing equipment parameters. The numerical results indicate that the working pressure and the pump power will significantly influence the fracturing process.

  7. Low-field NMR logging sensor for measuring hydraulic parameters of model soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucre, Oscar; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Minière, Adrien; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-08-01

    SummaryKnowing the exact hydraulic parameters of soils is very important for improving water management in agriculture and for the refinement of climate models. Up to now, however, the investigation of such parameters has required applying two techniques simultaneously which is time-consuming and invasive. Thus, the objective of this current study is to present only one technique, i.e., a new non-invasive method to measure hydraulic parameters of model soils by using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hereby, two model clay or sandy soils were respectively filled in a 2 m-long acetate column having an integrated PVC tube. After the soils were completely saturated with water, a low-field NMR sensor was moved up and down in the PVC tube to quantitatively measure along the whole column the initial water content of each soil sample. Thereafter, both columns were allowed to drain. Meanwhile, the NMR sensor was set at a certain depth to measure the water content of that soil slice. Once the hydraulic equilibrium was reached in each of the two columns, a final moisture profile was taken along the whole column. Three curves were subsequently generated accordingly: (1) the initial moisture profile, (2) the evolution curve of the moisture depletion at that particular depth, and (3) the final moisture profile. All three curves were then inverse analyzed using a MATLAB code over numerical data produced with the van Genuchten-Mualem model. Hereby, a set of values ( α, n, θr and θs) was found for the hydraulic parameters for the soils under research. Additionally, the complete decaying NMR signal could be analyzed through Inverse Laplace Transformation and averaged on the 1/ T2 space. Through measurement of the decay in pure water, the effect on the relaxation caused by the sample could be estimated from the obtained spectra. The migration of the sample-related average <1/ T2, Sample> with decreasing saturation speaks for a enhancement of the surface relaxation as

  8. Hydraulic Model Investigation: Functional Design of Control Structures for Oregon Inlet, North Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    REPORT HL-83-10 0 US-Army Corps .FUNCTIONAL DESIGN OF CONTROL STRUCTURES FOR OREGON INLET, NORTH CAROLINA Hydraulic Model Investigation TI. by Noel W...purpose of the functional model was to investigate flow control characteristics of the proposed jetty system. Important design parameters and other...above design considerations were investigated with a combina- tion fixed-bed and movable-bed physical hydraulic model molded to the bathymetry of the

  9. [Input impedance for studying hydraulic parameters of the vessel system].

    PubMed

    Naumov, A Iu; Sheptutsolov, K V; Balashov, S A; Mel'kumiants, A M

    2001-03-01

    Vascular input impedance can be used as an effective tool in estimating hydraulic parameters of arterial bed. These parameters may be interpreted as hydraulic resistance, elastance and inertance of particular sites of the arterial system. There is no significant difference between these parameters and those obtained through a direct measurement.

  10. Sediment processes modelling below hydraulic mining: towards environmental impact mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalov, Sergey R.

    2010-05-01

    their nearness determines the water mass increase inside mining site. The predictive models were suggested to assess each of the mane-made processes contribution into the total sediment budget of the rivers below mining sites. The empirical data and theoretical and laboratory-derived correlations were used to obtain the predictive models for each processes of sediment supply. It was challenging to estimate specific erosion rate of washed exposed hillsides, channel incision, water supply conditions. Climatic and anthropogenic changes of water runoff also were simulated to decrease uncertainty of the proposed model. Application of the given approach to the hydraulic platinum-mining located in the Kamchatka peninsula (Koryak plateau, tributaries of the Vivenka River) gave the sediment budget of the placer-mined rivers and the total sediment yield supplied into the ocean from river basin. Polluted placer-mined rivers contribute about 30 % of the whole sediment yield of the Vivenka River. At the same time the catchment area of these rivers is less than 0,03 % from the whole Vivenka catchment area. Based on the sediment transport modeling the decision making system for controlling water pollution and stream community preservation was developed. Due to exposed hillside erosion prevention and settling pond system optimization the total decrease of sediment yield was up to 75 %.

  11. Hydraulics and flow modelling of water treatment wetlands constructed on peatlands in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kløve, Bjørn

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated flow structure, effective flow area (A(eff)) and effective porosity (theta(eff)) in three peatlands using the stable isotope (18)O/(16)O ratio and tracer tests. We also applied the readily available groundwater modelling MODFLOW code for wetland flow modelling and simulated in one study site how the hydraulic performance of the wetland will be improved by changing the design of the distribution ditch. Preferential flow paths occurred in all three studied wetlands and A(eff) varied from 40% to 90% of total wetland area while theta(eff) was 0.75-0.99. Constructed flow models accurately simulated the hydraulic head across wetlands (r(2)=0.95-0.99). Similarities between the flow models and the stable isotope distributions observed in this study suggest possibilities in using MODFLOW to design peatlands. The improvement of the inlet ditch configuration (ditch length/wetland width>0.45) can prevent or reduce short-circuiting and dead zones in peatlands treating wastewater.

  12. Triaxial coreflood study of the hydraulic fracturing of Utica Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Frash, L.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the central questions in unconventional oil and gas production research is the cause of limited recovery of hydrocarbon. There are many hypotheses including: 1) inadequate penetration of fractures within the stimulated volume; 2) limited proppant delivery; 3) multiphase flow phenomena that blocks hydrocarbon migration; etc. Underlying any solution to this problem must be an understanding of the hydrologic properties of hydraulically fractured shale. In this study, we conduct triaxial coreflood experiments using a gasket sealing mechanism to characterize hydraulic fracture development and permeability of Utica Shale samples. Our approach also includes fracture propagation with proppants. The triaxial coreflood experiments were conducted with an integrated x-ray tomography system that allows direct observation of fracture development using x-ray video radiography and x-ray computed tomography at elevated pressure. A semi-circular, fracture initiation notch was cut into an end-face of the cylindrical samples (1"-diameter with lengths from 0.375 to 1"). The notch was aligned parallel with the x-ray beam to allow video radiography of fracture growth as a function of injection pressure. The proppants included tungsten powder that provided good x-ray contrast for tracing proppant delivery and distribution within the fracture system. Fractures were propagated at injection pressures in excess of the confining pressure and permeability measurements were made in samples where the fractures propagated through the length of the sample, ideally without penetrating the sample sides. Following fracture development, permeability was characterized as a function of hydrostatic pressure and injection pressure. X-ray video radioadiography was used to study changes in fracture aperture in relation to permeability and proppant embedment. X-ray tomography was collected at steady-state conditions to fully characterize fracture geometry and proppant distribution.

  13. Thermal hydraulic characteristics study of prototype NET and CEA cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Maekawa, Ryuji

    1995-10-31

    The thermal hydraulic characteristics of low temperature helium in a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC) significantly affects the overall design and performance of the associated large scale superconducting magnet system. It is essential to understand the transient and steady state behavior of the helium in the conductor. Throughout the development of CICCs, the reduction of flow impedance has been one of the key factors to improving the overall pressure drop. The newly developed CICC for the ITER project has a hybrid cooling scheme: a central channel that is surrounded by bundles, for which the thermal hydraulic characteristics are not well understood. This thesis describes an experimental and analytical investigation of thermal hydraulic characteristics of low temperature helium in conventional and hybrid CICCS. Pressure drop measurements for both NET and CEA conductors have been conducted, using low temperature helium and liquid nitrogen to obtain a range of Reynolds numbers. The results are correlated with classical friction factor and Reynolds number analysis. The flow impedance reduction of the CEA conductor is described by measures of a developed flow model. Thermally induced flow in the CEA conductor has been studied with an inductive heating method. The induced velocity in the central channel is measured by a Pitot tube with steady state Reynolds number up to {approximately}7000. The transient pressure wave propagation has been recorded with pressure transducers placed equally along the conductor. The supercritical helium temperature in the central channel has been measured with the thermometer probe. However, the reduction of the central channel area significantly affects the overall thermal hydraulic characteristics of the conductor. The results suggest the importance of the central channel. A transient heat transfer experiment studied the.transverse heat transfer mechanism in the CEA conductor. The temperatures in the central channel and bundle region

  14. The role of 3D-hydraulics in habitat modelling of hydropeaking events.

    PubMed

    Pisaturo, Giuseppe Roberto; Righetti, Maurizio; Dumbser, Michael; Noack, Markus; Schneider, Matthias; Cavedon, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    One way to study ecological implications induced by hydropeaking represents the coupling of hydrodynamic models with habitat suitability models, in which hydrodynamic parameters are typically used to describe the physical habitat of indicator species. This article discusses the differences in habitat suitability assessment between 2D and 3D CFD modelling as input for the habitat simulation tool CASiMiR. In the first part of the article, the accuracy of the hydraulic model is evaluated by comparing the model results with laboratory (model of a laboratory channel with erodible bed) and field measurements (Valsura River, Bolzano, Italy). In the second part, the habitat suitability for the Valsura River case study (affected by hydropeaking), is analyzed comparing different approaches for the reconstruction of the velocity field (depth-averaged velocities from 2D modelling, bottom velocity field reconstruction with log-law approach from 2D modelling and bottom velocity field from 3D modelling). The results show that the habitat suitability index (HSI) using 2D or 3D hydrodynamic models can be significantly different. These differences can be ascribed to a higher capability to depict the features of the flow field with highly variable and heterogeneous boundary conditions and to the possibility to simulate the near bed hydrodynamic parameters, which are relevant for certain target species. In particular, the HSI-values using 3D hydraulics lead to larger areas of highly suitable habitats compared to 2D simulations. Moreover, considering the entire flow range of hydropeaking events, the habitat simulations with bottom flow velocities from 3D modelling provide suitable habitats over the entire flow range representing the availability of stable suitable habitats, while the habitat availability of 2D modelled flow velocity is continuously decreasing with increasing flow rates.

  15. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned towards conditions usually encountered in the Marcellus shale play in the Northeastern US at an approximate depth of 1500 m (~;;4,500 feet). Our modeling simulations indicate that when faults are present, micro-seismic events are possible, the magnitude of which is somewhat larger than the one associated with micro-seismic events originating from regular hydraulic fracturing because of the larger surface area that is available for rupture. The results of our simulations indicated fault rupture lengths of about 10 to 20 m, which, in rare cases can extend to over 100 m, depending on the fault permeability, the in situ stress field, and the fault strength properties. In addition to a single event rupture length of 10 to 20 m, repeated events and aseismic slip amounted to a total rupture length of 50 m, along with a shear offset displacement of less than 0.01 m. This indicates that the possibility of hydraulically induced fractures at great depth (thousands of meters) causing activation of faults and creation of a new flow path that can reach shallow groundwater resources (or even the surface) is remote. The expected low permeability of faults in producible shale is clearly a limiting factor for the possible rupture length and seismic magnitude. In fact, for a fault that is initially nearly-impermeable, the only possibility of larger fault slip event would be opening by hydraulic fracturing; this would allow pressure to penetrate the matrix along the fault and to reduce the frictional strength over a sufficiently large fault surface patch. However, our simulation results show that if the fault is initially impermeable, hydraulic fracturing along the fault results in numerous small micro-seismic events along with the propagation, effectively

  16. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale.

    PubMed

    Chau, Viet T; Bažant, Zdeněk P; Su, Yewang

    2016-10-13

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 10(5)-10(6) almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot's two-phase medium and Terzaghi's effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'.

  17. Modelling Hydraulic and Thermal Responses in a Benchmark for Deep Geothermal Heat Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbecher, E.; Oberdorfer, P.

    2012-04-01

    Geothermal heat production from deep reservoirs (5000-7000 m) is currently examined within the collaborative research program "Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling" (gebo), funded by the Ministry of Science and Culture of Lower Saxony (Germany) and Baker Hughes. The projects concern exploration and characterization of geothermal reservoirs as well as production. They are gathered in the four major topic fields: geosystem, drilling, materials, technical system. We present modelling of a benchmark set-up concerning the geothermal production itself. The benchmark model "Horstberg" was originally created by J. Löhken and is based on geological data, concerning the Horstberg site in Lower Saxony. The model region consists of a cube with a side length of 5 km, in which 13 geological layers are included. A fault zone splits the region into two parts with shifted layering. A well is implemented, reaching from the top to an optional depth crossing all layers including the fault zone. The original geological model was rebuilt and improved in COMSOL Multiphysics Version 4.2a. The heterogeneous and detailed configuration makes the model interesting for benchmarking hydrogeological and geothermal applications. It is possible to inject and pump at any level in the well and to study the hydraulic and thermal responses of the system. The hydraulic and thermal parameters can be varied, and groundwater flow can be introduced. Moreover, it is also possible to examine structural mechanical responses to changes in the stress field (which is not further examined here). The main purpose of the presented study is to examine the dynamical flow characteristics of a hydraulic high conductive zone (Detfurth) in connection to a high conductive fault. One example is the fluid injection in the Detfurth zone and production in the fault. The high conductive domains can provide a hydraulic connection between the well screens and the initiated flow circuit could be used for geothermal

  18. Final Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identif...

  19. EPA Published Research Related to the Hydraulic Fracturing Study

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A list of publications that will support the draft assessment report on the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. These publications have undergone peer review through the journal where the paper has been published.

  20. Executive Summary, Hydraulic Fracturing Study - Draft Assessment 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this Executive Summary of the HF Draft report, EPA highlights the reviews of scientific literature to assess the potential for hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas to change the quality or quantity of drinking water resources.

  1. Control method and system for hydraulic machines employing a dynamic joint motion model

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George [Reno, NV

    2011-11-22

    A control method and system for controlling a hydraulically actuated mechanical arm to perform a task, the mechanical arm optionally being a hydraulically actuated excavator arm. The method can include determining a dynamic model of the motion of the hydraulic arm for each hydraulic arm link by relating the input signal vector for each respective link to the output signal vector for the same link. Also the method can include determining an error signal for each link as the weighted sum of the differences between a measured position and a reference position and between the time derivatives of the measured position and the time derivatives of the reference position for each respective link. The weights used in the determination of the error signal can be determined from the constant coefficients of the dynamic model. The error signal can be applied in a closed negative feedback control loop to diminish or eliminate the error signal for each respective link.

  2. 1D Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Reactive transport modeling for deep geothermal systems: A case study of Groß Schönebeck reservoir, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driba, D. L.; De Lucia, M.; Peiffer, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-rock interactions in geothermal reservoirs are driven by the state of disequilibrium that persists among solid and solutes due to changing temperature and pressure. During operation of enhanced geothermal systems, injection of cooled water back into the reservoir disturbs the initial thermodynamic equilibrium between the reservoir and its geothermal fluid, which may induce modifications in permeability through changes in porosity and pore space geometry, consequently bringing about several impairments to the overall system.Modeling of fluid-rock interactions induced by injection of cold brine into Groß Schönebeck geothermal reservoir system situated in the Rotliegend sandstone at 4200m depth have been done by coupling geochemical modeling Code Phreeqc with OpenGeoSys. Through batch modeling the re-evaluation of the measured hydrochemical composition of the brine has been done using Quintessa databases, the results from the calculation indicate that a mineral phases comprising of K-feldspar, hematite, Barite, Calcite and Dolomite was found to match the hypothesis of equilibrium with the formation fluid, Reducing conditions are presumed in the model (pe = -3.5) in order to match the amount of observed dissolved Fe and thus considered as initial state for the reactive transport modeling. based on a measured composition of formation fluids and the predominant mineralogical assemblage of the host rock, a preliminary 1D Reactive transport modeling (RTM) was run with total time set to 30 years; results obtained for the initial simulation revealed that during this period, no significant change is evident for K-feldspar. Furthermore, the precipitation of calcite along the flow path in the brine results in a drop of pH from 6.2 to a value of 5.2 noticed over the simulated period. The circulation of cooled fluid in the reservoir is predicted to affect the temperature of the reservoir within the first 100 -150m from the injection well. Examination of porosity change in

  3. Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources (Monterey, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A summary of EPA's research relating to potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources will be presented. Background about the study plan development will be presented along with an analysis of the water cycle as it relates to hydraulic fracturing processe...

  4. Numerical study of rotor-stator interactions in a hydraulic turbine with Foam-extend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romain, Cappato; Guibault, François; Devals, Christophe; Nennemann, Bernd

    2016-11-01

    In the development of high head hydraulic turbines, vibrations are one of the critical problems. In Francis turbines, pressure fluctuations occur at the interface between the blades of the runner and guide vanes. This rotor-stator interaction can be responsible for fatigue failures and cracks. Although the flow inside the turbomachinery is complex, and the unsteadiness makes it difficult to model, the choice of an appropriate setup enables the study of this phenomenon. This study validates a numerical setup of the Foam-extend open source software for rotor-stator simulations. Pressure fluctuations results show a good correspondence with data from experiments.

  5. Mathematical modeling of hydraulic fracturing in coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Olovyanny, A.G.

    2005-02-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of coal seam is considered as a process of development of discontinuities in rock mass elements due to change in hydrogeomechanical situation on filtration of fluid under pressure. Failure is associated with excess of the effective stresses over the rock tension strength. The problem on filtration and failure of massif is solved by the finite-element method using the procedure of fictitious nodal forces.

  6. Modelling the Influence of Long-Term Hydraulic Conditions on Juvenile Salmon Habitats in AN Upland Scotish River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, L.; Malcolm, I.; Millidine, K. J.; Buddendorf, B.; Tetzlaff, D.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    Wild Atlantic salmon populations in Scottish rivers constitute an important economic and recreational resource, as well as being a key component of biodiversity. Salmon have very specific habitat requirements at different life stages and their distribution is therefore strongly influenced by a complex suite of biological and physical controls. Previous research has shown that stream hydrodynamics and channel morphology have a strong influence on the distribution and density of juvenile salmon. Here, we utilise a unique 20 year data set of spatially distributed juvenile salmon densities derived from annual electro-fishing surveys in an upland Scottish river. We examine to what extent the spatial and temporal variability of in-stream hydraulics regulates the spatial and temporal variability in the performance and density of juvenile salmon. A 2-D hydraulic model (River2D) is used to simulate water velocity and water depth under different flow conditions for seven different electro-fishing sites. The selected sites represent different hydromorphological environments including plane-bed, step-pool and pool riffle reaches. The bathymetry of each site was characterised using a total station providing an accurate DTM of the bed, and hydraulic simulations were driven by 20 year stream flow records. Habitat suitability curves, based on direct observations during electro-fishing surveys, were produced for a range of hydraulic indices for juvenile salmon. The hydraulic simulations showed marked spatial differences in juvenile habitat quality both within and between reaches. They also showed marked differences both within and between years. This is most evident in extreme years with wet summers when salmon feeding opportunities may be constrained. Integration of hydraulic habitat models, with fish preference curves and the long term hydrological data allows us to assess whether long-term changes in hydroclimate may be affecting juvenile salmonid populations in the study stream

  7. Modeling, Optimization, and Detailed Design of a Hydraulic Flywheel-Accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmaier, Kyle Glenn

    Improving mobile energy storage technology is an important means of addressing concerns over fossil fuel scarcity and energy independence. Traditional hydraulic accumulator energy storage, though favorable in power density, durability, cost, and environmental impact, suffers from relatively low energy density and a pressure-dependent state of charge. The hydraulic flywheel-accumulator concept utilizes both the hydro-pneumatic and rotating kinetic energy domains by employing a rotating pressure vessel. This thesis provides an in-depth analysis of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator concept and an assessment of the advantages it offers over traditional static accumulator energy storage. After specifying a practical architecture for the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator, this thesis addresses the complex fluid phenomena and control implications associated with multi-domain energy storage. To facilitate rapid selection of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator dimensions, computationally inexpensive material stress models are developed for each component. A drive cycle simulation strategy is also developed to assess the dynamic performance of the device. The stress models and performance simulation are combined to form a toolset that facilitates computationally-efficient model-based design. The aforementioned toolset has been embedded into a multi-objective optimization algorithm that aims to minimize the mass of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator system and to minimize the losses it incurs over the course of a drive cycle. Two optimizations have been performed - one with constraints that reflect a vehicle-scale application, and one with constraints that reflect a laboratory application. At both scales, the optimization results suggest that the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator offers at least an order of magnitude improvement over traditional static accumulator energy storage, while operating at efficiencies between 75% and 93%. A particular hydraulic flywheel-accumulator design

  8. Field study comparing the effect of hydraulic mixing on septic tank performance and sludge accumulation.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Fares

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of hydraulic mixing on anaerobic digestion and sludge accumulation in a septic tank. The performance of a septic tank equipped with a hydraulic mixer was compared with that of a similar standard septic tank over a period of 10 months. The study was conducted in two phases: Phase-I--from May to November 2013 (6 months); Phase-II--from January to May 2014 (4 months). Hydraulic mixing effectively reduced the effluent biological oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids, and reduced the sludge accumulation rate in the septic tank. The BOD removal efficiencies during Phase-II were 65% and 75% in the standard septic tank and a septic tank equipped with hydraulic mixer (Smart Digester™), respectively. The effect of hydraulic mixing reduced the rate of sludge accumulation from 0.64 cm/day to 0.27 cm/day, and increased the pump-out interval by a factor of 3.

  9. The Effect of Soil Hydraulic Properties vs. Soil Texture in Land Surface Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, E. D.; Small, E. E.

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of Soil Hydraulic Property (SHP) selection on modeled surface fluxes following a rain storm in a semi-arid environment. SHPs are often defined based on a Soil Texture Class (STC). To examine the effectiveness of this approach, the Noah land surface model was run with each of 1306 soils in a large SHP database. Within most STCs, the outputs have a range of 350 W/m2 for latent and sensible heat fluxes, and 8K for surface temperature. The average difference between STC median values is only 100 W/m2 for latent and sensible heat. It is concluded that STC explains 5-15% of the variance in model outputs and should not be used to determine SHPs.

  10. Simulation of Hydraulic and Natural Fracture Interaction Using a Coupled DFN-DEM Model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zhou; H. Huang; M. Deo

    2016-03-01

    The presence of natural fractures will usually result in a complex fracture network due to the interactions between hydraulic and natural fracture. The reactivation of natural fractures can generally provide additional flow paths from formation to wellbore which play a crucial role in improving the hydrocarbon recovery in these ultra-low permeability reservoir. Thus, accurate description of the geometry of discrete fractures and bedding is highly desired for accurate flow and production predictions. Compared to conventional continuum models that implicitly represent the discrete feature, Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models could realistically model the connectivity of discontinuities at both reservoir scale and well scale. In this work, a new hybrid numerical model that couples Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method (DL-DEM) is proposed to investigate the interaction between hydraulic fracture and natural fractures. Based on the proposed model, the effects of natural fracture orientation, density and injection properties on hydraulic-natural fractures interaction are investigated.

  11. Numerical modeling of the near-field hydraulics of water wells.

    PubMed

    Houben, Georg J; Hauschild, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Numerical flow models can be a useful tool for dimensioning water wells and to investigate the hydraulics in their near-field. Fully laminar flow can be assumed for all models calculated up to the screen. Therefore models can be used to predict--at least qualitatively, neglecting turbulent losses inside the well--the spatial distribution of inflow into the well and the overall hydraulic performance of different combinations of aquifer parameters and technical installations. Models for both horizontal (plan view) and vertical flow (cross section) to wells were calculated for a variety of setups. For the latter, this included variations of hydraulic conductivity of the screen, pump position, and aquifer heterogeneity. Models of suction flow control devices showed that they indeed can homogenize inflow, albeit at the cost of elevated entrance losses.

  12. An Experimental Study of Measuring Oscillatory and Transient Pressures in Hydraulic Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    dynamic conditions. One of these computer programs that was of interest in this study was the Hydraulic Systems Frequency Response (HsFR). H- SFR program...reason for that failure is that the model for the hose was not accurate enough. The predicted amplitudes were much lower than measurec’ values except...the line. 6. P(%)- in line - Pclanp on x 100 ( 6 Pin line 7. Span - The distance between two clamps. The trans- ducers were located in the center of the

  13. Mesoscopic aspects of root water uptake modeling - Hydraulic resistances and root geometry interpretations in plant transpiration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dusek, Jaromir; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-02-01

    In the context of soil water flow modeling, root water uptake is often evaluated based on water potential difference between the soil and the plant (the water potential gradient approach). Root water uptake rate is modulated by hydraulic resistance of both the root itself, and the soil in the root vicinity. The soil hydraulic resistance is a function of actual soil water content and can be assessed assuming radial axisymmetric water flow toward a single root (at the mesoscopic scale). In the present study, three approximate solutions of mesoscopic root water uptake - finite difference approximation, steady-state solution, and steady-rate solution - are examined regarding their ability to capture the pressure head variations in the root vicinity. Insignificance of their differences when implemented in the macroscopic soil water flow model is demonstrated using the critical root water uptake concept. Subsequently, macroscopic simulations of coupled soil water flow and root water uptake are presented for a forest site under temperate humid climate. Predicted soil water pressure heads and actual transpiration rates are compared with observed data. Scenario simulations illustrate uncertainties associated with estimates of root geometrical and hydraulic properties. Regarding the actual transpiration prediction, the correct characterization of active root system geometry and hydraulic properties seems far more important than the choice of a particular mesoscopic model.

  14. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masashi

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  15. Observational techniques for constraining hydraulic and hydrologic models for use in catchment scale flood impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Gareth; Wilkinson, Mark; Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; O'Donnell, Greg

    2015-04-01

    river stem and principal tributaries, it is possible to understand in detail how floods develop and propagate, both temporally and spatially. Traditional rainfall-runoff modelling involves the calibration of model parameters to achieve a best fit against an observed flow series, typically at a single location. The modelling approach adopted here is novel in that it directly uses the nested observed information to disaggregate the outlet hydrograph in terms of the source locations. Using a combination of local evidence and expert opinion, the model can be used to assess the impacts of distributed land use management changes and NFM on floods. These studies demonstrate the power of networks of observational instrumentation for constraining hydraulic and hydrologic models for use in prediction.

  16. Physical Hydraulic Model of Side-Channel Spillway of Lambuk DAM, Bali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harifa, A. C.; Sholichin, M.; Othman, F. B.

    2013-12-01

    The spillway is among the most important structures of a dam project. A spillway is designed to prevent overtopping of a dam at a place that is not designed for overtopping. Side-channel spillways are commonly used to release water flow from a reservoir in places where the sides are steep and have a considerable height above the dam. Experimental results were collected with a hydraulic model of the side-channel spillway for releasing the peak overflow of Lambuk Dam. This dam is, located on the Lambuk River, which is a tributary of the Yeh Hoo River ~ 34.6 km north of Denpasar on the island of Bali. The bituminous geomembrane faced dam is 24 m in height, with a 35-m wide spillway. The length of the side channel is 35 m long, with 58 m of transition channel, 67.37 m of chuteway channel and 22.71 m of stilling basin. The capacity of the spillway is 231.91 m3/s and the outlet works capacity is 165.28 m3/s. The reservoir is designed for irrigation and water supply. The purpose of this study was to optimize the designed of the structure and to ensure its safe operation. In hydraulic model may help the decision-makers to visualize the flow field before selecting a ';suitable' design. The hydraulic model study was performed to ensure passage of the maximum discharge at maximum reservoir capacity; to study the spillway approach conditions, water surface profiles, and flow patterns in the chuteway; and to reveal potential demerits of the proposed hydraulic design of various structures and explore solutions. The model was constructed at 1 : 40 scale, Reservoir topography was modeled using concrete, the river bed using sand and some gravel, the river berm using concrete, and the spillway and channel using Plexiglas. Water was measured using Rectangular contracted weir. Design floods (with return period in year) were Q2 = 111.40 m3/s, Q5 = 136.84 m3/s, Q10 = 159.32 m3/s, Q25 = 174.61 m3/s, Q50 = 185.13 m3/s, Q100 = 198.08 m3/s, Q200 = 210.55 m3/s, Q1000 = 231.91 m3/s and the

  17. 3D geostatistical modeling of fracture system in a granitic massif to characterize hydraulic properties and fracture distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Kubo, Taiki; Liu, Chunxue; Masoud, Alaa; Amano, Kenji; Kurihara, Arata; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Lanyon, Bill

    2015-10-01

    This study integrates 3D models of rock fractures from different sources and hydraulic properties aimed at identifying relationships between fractures and permeability. The Tono area in central Japan, chiefly overlain by Cretaceous granite, was examined because of the availability of a unique dataset from deep borehole data at 26 sites. A geostatistical method (GEOFRAC) that can incorporate orientations of sampled data was applied to 50,900 borehole fractures for spatial modeling of fractures over a 12 km by 8 km area, to a depth of 1.5 km. GEOFRAC produced a plausible 3D fracture model, in that the orientations of simulated fractures correspond to those of the sample data and the continuous fractures appeared near a known fault. Small-scale fracture distributions with dominant orientations were also characterized around the two shafts using fracture data from the shaft walls. By integrating the 3D model of hydraulic conductivity using sequential Gaussian simulation with the GEOFRAC fractures from the borehole data, the fracture sizes and directions that strongly affect permeable features were identified. Four fracture-related elements: lineaments from a shaded 10-m DEM, GEOFRAC fractures using the borehole and shaft data, and microcracks from SEM images, were used for correlating fracture attributes at different scales. The consistency of the semivariogram models of distribution densities was identified. Using an experimental relationship between hydraulic conductivity and fracture length, the fractures that typically affect the hydraulic properties at the drift scale were surmised to be in the range 100-200 m. These results are useful for a comprehensive understanding of rock fracture systems and their hydraulic characteristics at multiple scales in a target area.

  18. Dynamic Hydraulic Flow Stimulation on Mitigation of Trabecular Bone Loss in a Rat Functional Disuse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Minyi; Cheng, Jiqi; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2012-01-01

    Bone fluid flow (BFF) has been demonstrated as a critical regulator in mechanotransductive signaling and bone adaptation. Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and matrix strain have been identified as potential generator to regulate BFF. To elevate in vivo oscillatory BFF using ImP, a dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS) approach was developed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of DHS on mitigation of bone loss and structural alteration in a rat hindlimb suspension (HLS) functional disuse model. Sixty-one 5-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: 1) baseline control, 2) age-matched control, 3) HLS, 4) HLS + static loading, and 5) HLS + DHS. Hydraulic flow stimulation was carried out daily on a “10 min on-5min off-10min on” loading regime, 5 days/week, for total of 4 weeks in the tibial region. The metaphyseal trabecular regions of the proximal tibiae were analyzed using µCT and histomorphometry. Four weeks of HLS resulted in a significant loss of trabecular bone, leading to structural deterioration. HLS with static loading alone was not sufficient to attenuate the bone loss. Bone quantity and microarchitecture were significantly improved by applying DHS loading, resulting increase of 83% in bone volume fraction, 25% in trabecular number and mitigation of -26% in trabecular separation compared to HLS control. Histomorphometry analysis on trabecular mineralization coincided with the µCT analysis, in which DHS loading yielded increases of 34% in histomorphometric BV/TV, 121% in MS/BS, 190% in BFR/BS and 146% in BFR/BV, compared to the HLS control. Overall, the data demonstrated that dynamic hydraulic flow loading has potentials to provide regulatory signals for mitigating bone loss induced by functional disuse. This approach may provide a new alternative mechanical intervention for future clinical treatment for osteoporosis. PMID:22820398

  19. Dynamic hydraulic flow stimulation on mitigation of trabecular bone loss in a rat functional disuse model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minyi; Cheng, Jiqi; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2012-10-01

    Bone fluid flow (BFF) has been demonstrated as a critical regulator in mechanotransductive signaling and bone adaptation. Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and matrix strain have been identified as potential generators to regulate BFF. To elevate in vivo oscillatory BFF using ImP, a dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS) approach was developed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of DHS on mitigation of bone loss and structural alteration in a rat hindlimb suspension (HLS) functional disuse model. Sixty-one 5-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: 1) baseline control, 2) age-matched control, 3) HLS, 4) HLS+static loading, and 5) HLS+DHS. Hydraulic flow stimulation was carried out daily on a "10 min on-5 min off-10 min on" loading regime, 5 days/week, for a total of 4 weeks in the tibial region. The metaphyseal trabecular regions of the proximal tibiae were analyzed using μCT and histomorphometry. Four weeks of HLS resulted in a significant loss of trabecular bone, leading to structural deterioration. HLS with static loading alone was not sufficient to attenuate the bone loss. Bone quantity and microarchitecture were significantly improved by applying DHS loading, resulting increase of 83% in bone volume fraction, 25% in trabecular number and mitigation of 26% in trabecular separation compared to HLS control. Histomorphometry analysis on trabecular mineralization coincided with the μCT analysis, in which DHS loading yielded increases of 34% in histomorphometric BV/TV, 121% in MS/BS, 190% in BFR/BS and 146% in BFR/BV, compared to the HLS control. Overall, the data demonstrated that dynamic hydraulic flow loading has potentials to provide regulatory signals for mitigating bone loss induced by functional disuse. This approach may provide a new alternative mechanical intervention for future clinical treatment for osteoporosis.

  20. Inverse modeling of hydraulic tests in fractured crystalline rock based on a transition probability geostatistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessent, Daniela; Therrien, René; Lemieux, Jean-Michel

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations of a series of hydraulic interference tests conducted in crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto (Finland), a potential site for the disposal of the Finnish high-level nuclear waste. The tests are in a block of crystalline bedrock of about 0.03 km3 that contains low-transmissivity fractures. Fracture density, orientation, and fracture transmissivity are estimated from Posiva Flow Log (PFL) measurements in boreholes drilled in the rock block. On the basis of those data, a geostatistical approach relying on a transitional probability and Markov chain models is used to define a conceptual model based on stochastic fractured rock facies. Four facies are defined, from sparsely fractured bedrock to highly fractured bedrock. Using this conceptual model, three-dimensional groundwater flow is then simulated to reproduce interference pumping tests in either open or packed-off boreholes. Hydraulic conductivities of the fracture facies are estimated through automatic calibration using either hydraulic heads or both hydraulic heads and PFL flow rates as targets for calibration. The latter option produces a narrower confidence interval for the calibrated hydraulic conductivities, therefore reducing the associated uncertainty and demonstrating the usefulness of the measured PFL flow rates. Furthermore, the stochastic facies conceptual model is a suitable alternative to discrete fracture network models to simulate fluid flow in fractured geological media.

  1. Groundwater Flow Model Including Deeper Part On The Basis Of Field Data - Especially Determination Of Boundary Conditions And Hydraulic Parameters-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, I.; Itadera, K.

    2005-12-01

    The final purpose of our study is to clarify the quantitative groundwater flow including deeper part, 500-1000m depth, in the basin in caldera on the mountain. The computer simulation is one the best methods to achieve this purpose. In such a study, however, it is difficult to determine the boundary conditions and hydraulic properties of geology in deeper part, generally. For this reason, we selected Gora basin as a study area, because many hydraulic data have been stored for more than 30 years in this basin. In addition, because the volcanic thermal water is mainly formed by mixing of groundwater and thermal component, the study for deeper groundwater flow can contribute the agenda for the protection of thermal groundwater which is regards as a limited resource. Gora basin, in Hakone area is one of the most famous spa (a resort having thermal groundwater or hot springs) in Japan. The area of the basin is approximately 10 square kilometers and has more than 200 deep wells. In our study, at first, the dataset of hydraulic head was created by using the stored data to construct the conceptual model for groundwater flow. The potential distribution exhibited that the groundwater flowed downward dominant. And the geomorphology can be regarded as hydraulic boundary even in deer part, that is to say, we can regard the ridge as no flow boundary in simulation model. Next, for quantitative understanding of groundwater flow, we need to obtain not only boundary conditions but also hydraulic property of geology, for example, hydraulic conductivity, K, as one of the important parameters. Generally, such a parameter has not been measured in past survey. So, we used the belief method for calculating the hydraulic conductivity by using the data of thermal logging test, which was similar to a slug test. As results of the analysis, the close relationship between K and well depth were obtained. This result implies that the K value depends on the overburden pressure of geology. That is

  2. A field study of hydraulic, geochemical and stable isotope relationships in a coastal wetlands system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, S.; Reynolds, D. A.; La Salle, C. Le Gal

    2005-12-01

    Both chemical and stable isotope data provide important supplemental information to more traditional hydraulic data and unravel the processes that underpin the large variations in chemical and stable isotopic composition within a coastal wetland system. The system studied was the Lake Warden wetlands, located in Esperance, in south coast of Western Australia. The spatial and temporal variations of chemical and isotopic composition of the individual water bodies within the system were measured for an annual cycle. In broad terms, the groundwater levels appear to follow the topography but the distinct higher chloride and isotopic concentrations observed within the wetlands were not reflected in the low lying coastal plain groundwater. The hydraulic analysis of the region surrounding the wetlands suggest that the wetlands are flow-through bodies, however the chemical and isotope information indicates the lakes almost invariably act as discharge points for the surface water flows and the north-south groundwater flow. The northeast-southwest groundwater flow is along an observed paleochannel within the wetlands system and in this case the chemical and isotopic evidence are complimentary with the hydraulic study. The study highlighted the importance of correcting the isotopic values for the salt effect in highly saline water. The isotopic activity ratios of δ2H ( δ2H a) of some samples were up to 15‰ higher than the uncorrected values. The high salinity of the terminal lake in the wetlands chain also required implementation of a theoretical evaporative model to explain the lower enrichment of the isotopic results as compared to expectations for a shallow and ephemeral lake. The inter-lake variation in the theoretical evaporative model parameters, coupled with a significant variation in the hydrochemistry and isotope composition suggests that the lakes within the wetlands system cannot be treated as single water body as is implied by the bathymetry survey.

  3. Upscaling hydraulic conductivity from measurement-scale to model-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnink, Jan; Stafleu, Jan; Maljers, Densie; Schokker, Jeroen

    2013-04-01

    The Geological Survey of the Netherlands systematically produces both shallow (< 500 m) and deep 3D geological models of the Netherlands. These models are predictions of geometry and properties of the subsurface, and are used in applied research. One of the geological models for the shallow subsurface (GeoTOP) consists of voxels of 100 x 100 x 0.5 m to a depth of 30-50 m below surface. For each voxel, lithostratigraphy, facies and lithological classes are modeled with geostatistical simulation techniques. These simulation techniques allow for the spatial uncertainty of the model results to be calculated. One of the parameters that is subsequently assigned to the voxels in the GeoTOP model, is hydraulic conductivity (both horizontal and vertical). Hydraulic conductivities are measured on samples taken from high-quality drillings, which are subjected to falling head hydraulic conductivity tests. Samples are taken for all combinations of lithostratigraphy, facies and lithology that are present in the GeoTOP model. The volume of the samples is orders of magnitude smaller than the volume of a voxel in the GeoTOP model. Apart from that, the heterogeneity that occurs within a voxel is not accounted for in the GeoTOP model, since every voxel gets a single lithology that is deemed representative for the entire voxel To account for both the difference in volume and the within-voxel heterogeneity, an upscaling procedure is developed to produce up-scaled hydraulic conductivities for each GeoTOP voxel. A very fine 3D grid of 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.05 m is created that covers the GeoTOP voxel size (100 x 100 x 0.5 m) plus half of the dimensions of the GeoTOP voxel to counteract undesired edge-effects. It is assumed that the scale of the samples is comparable to the voxel size of this fine grid. For each lithostratigraphy and facies combination the spatial correlation structure (variogram) of the lithological classes is used to create 50 equiprobable distributions of lithology for the

  4. Power Efficient Hydraulic Systems. Volume 1. Study Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    AIRCRAFT SUBSYSTEMS TABLE 14. Baseline aircraft systems o HYDRAULIC SYSTEM o ELECTRICAL SYSTEM o 8000 PSI, 3 INDEPENDENT SYSTEMS o HVDC POWER o APU...valve (pump) HM hinge moment hp horsepower hr hour HVDC high voltage direct current Hz Hertz (cycles per second) IAP integrated actuator package I.D

  5. Estimating biozone hydraulic conductivity in wastewater soil-infiltration systems using inverse numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R; McCray, John E

    2007-06-01

    During operation of an onsite wastewater treatment system, a low-permeability biozone develops at the infiltrative surface (IS) during application of wastewater to soil. Inverse numerical-model simulations were used to estimate the biozone saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(biozone)) under variably saturated conditions for 29 wastewater infiltration test cells installed in a sandy loam field soil. Test cells employed two loading rates (4 and 8cm/day) and 3 IS designs: open chamber, gravel, and synthetic bundles. The ratio of K(biozone) to the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the natural soil (K(s)) was used to quantify the reductions in the IS hydraulic conductivity. A smaller value of K(biozone)/K(s,) reflects a greater reduction in hydraulic conductivity. The IS hydraulic conductivity was reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity was primarily influenced by wastewater loading rate and IS type and not by the K(s) of the native soil. The higher loading rate yielded greater reductions in IS hydraulic conductivity than the lower loading rate for bundle and gravel cells, but the difference was not statistically significant for chamber cells. Bundle and gravel cells exhibited a greater reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity than chamber cells at the higher loading rates, while the difference between gravel and bundle systems was not statistically significant. At the lower rate, bundle cells exhibited generally lower K(biozone)/K(s) values, but not at a statistically significant level, while gravel and chamber cells were statistically similar. Gravel cells exhibited the greatest variability in measured values, which may complicate design efforts based on K(biozone) evaluations for these systems. These results suggest that chamber systems may provide for a more robust design, particularly for high or variable wastewater infiltration rates.

  6. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken.

  7. The Benefit of Multi-Mission Altimetry Series for the Calibration of Hydraulic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; Castellarin, Attilio; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    The growing availability of satellite altimetric time series during last decades has fostered their use in many hydrological and hydraulic applications. However, the use of remotely sensed water level series still remains hampered by the limited temporal resolution that characterizes each sensor (i.e. revisit time varying from 10 to 35 days), as well as by the accuracy of different instrumentation adopted for monitoring inland water. As a consequence, each sensor is characterized by distinctive potentials and limitations that constrain its use for hydrological applications. In this study we refer to a stretch of about 140 km of the Po River (the longest Italian river) in order to investigate the performance of different altimetry series for the calibration of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic information. The usefulness of remotely sensed water surface elevation is tested using data collected by different altimetry missions (i.e., ERS-2, ENVISAT, TOPEX/Poseidon, JASON-2 and SARAL/Altika) by investigating the effect of (i) record length (i.e. number of satellite measurements provided by a given sensor at a specific satellite track) and (ii) data uncertainty (i.e. altimetry measurements errors). Since the relatively poor time resolution of satellites constrains the operational use of altimetric time series, in this study we also investigate the use of multi-mission altimetry series obtained by merging datasets sensed by different sensors over the study area. Benefits of the highest temporal frequency of multi-mission series are tested by calibrating the quasi-2d model referring in turn to original satellite series and multi-mission datasets. Jason-2 and ENVISAT outperform other sensors, ensuring the reliability on the calibration process for shorter time series. The multi-mission dataset appears particularly reliable and suitable for the calibration of hydraulic model. If short time periods are considered, the performance of the multi-mission dataset

  8. The development and calibration of a physical model to assist in optimising the hydraulic performance and design of maturation ponds.

    PubMed

    Aldana, G J; Lloyd, B J; Guganesharajah, K; Bracho, N

    2005-01-01

    A physical and a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model (HYDRO-3D) were developed to simulate the effects of novel maturation pond configurations, and critical environmental factors (wind speed and direction) on the hydraulic efficiency (HE) of full-scale maturation ponds. The aims of the study were to assess the reliability of the physical model and convergence with HYDRO-3D, as tools for assessing and predicting best hydraulic performance of ponds. The physical model of the open ponds was scaled to provide a similar nominal retention time (NRT) of 52 hours. Under natural conditions, with a variable prevailing westerly wind opposite to the inlet, a rhodamine tracer study on the full-scale prototype pond produced a mean hydraulic retention time (MHRT) of 18.5 hours (HE = 35.5%). Simulations of these wind conditions, but with constant wind speed and direction in both the physical model and HYDRO-3D, produced a higher MHRT of 21 hours in both models and an HE of 40.4%. In the absence of wind tracer studies in the open pond physical model revealed incomplete mixing with peak concentrations leaving the model in several hours, but an increase in MHRT to 24.5-28 hours (HE = 50.2-57.1%). Although wind blowing opposite to the inlet flow increases dispersion (mixing), it reduced hydraulic performance by 18-25%. Much higher HE values were achieved by baffles (67-74%) and three channel configurations (69-92%), compared with the original open pond configuration. Good agreement was achieved between the two models where key environmental and flow parameters can be controlled and set, but it is difficult to accurately simulate full-scale works conditions due to the unpredictability of natural hourly and daily fluctuation in these parameters.

  9. [Mathematical modeling of measuring the hydraulic conductivity of roots by the relaxation method].

    PubMed

    Logvenkov, S A

    2011-01-01

    The continuum model of radial mass transfer in plant roots developed previously has been used for processing the nonstationary experiments aimed at the determination of the root hydraulic conductivity. It is shown that, in contrast to compartmental models, our model allows one to describe the shape of the relaxation curve, in particular to separate segments with different relaxation times. It has been found that, for correctly determining the hydraulic conductivity, the method of data processing should be modified. A method for estimating the extracellular to intracellular conductivity ratio has been proposed.

  10. Constrained model based control for minimum-time start of hydraulic turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesnage, Hugo; Alamir, Mazen; Perrissin-Fabert, Nicolas; Alloin, Quentin

    2016-11-01

    This paper introduces a simplified model of hydraulic turbines including the hydraulic nonlinear hill-chart and a first order model of the penstock. Based on the resulting reduced model, a graphical representation of the vector fields of the resulting controlled system is obtained under band unlimited actuator. This ideal 2D-graphical representation enables an exact evaluation of the lower bound on the minimum achievable start-time as well as the time structure of the control profile. The consequences of the use of a band-limited actuator is also analyzed enabling a close estimation of the lower bound on the start time in practical situations.

  11. Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin dam-hydraulic system, travel time and temperature modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devkota, Bishnu; Imberger, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    SummaryTiete River System in the State of Sao Paolo, Brazil is characterized by complex hydraulics and operational problems due to series of dams and point and diffuse inflows along the river. A one dimension Lagrangian river model was developed and applied to the 313 km reach of the Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin from the Penha Dam to the head water of Bara Bonita Reservoir, a stretch of river that includes six small to medium size dams (3.4-22 m high) including the Pirapora Reservoir and 26 inflows into the river (11 tributaries, 9 diffuse source areas, and discharges of 4 cities stormwater and 2 wastewater treatment plants. The conservative tracer transport and temperature model that accounts for the short and long wave radiation and heat transfers at the free surface was included and solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The time variable catchment input to the model was the simulated output of the external hydrological model called Runoff Load Model which results were provided by CETESB. The numerical treatment of series of dams and spillway (that included uncontrolled overflow spillway, gate-controlled ogee spillway; and underflow gates and tunnels) and parameterisation of hydraulic jumps are described. Special attention was focused on the high spatial and temporal variation of flows in Tiete River Basin, a result of the large variation in catchment inflows and channel geometry due to dams and reservoirs along the river. Predicted and measured spatial and seasonal variation of flow and temperature profiles along the river show good agreement. The simulated travel time of conservative tracer is compared against the CETESB's 1982 and 1984 field study data in a 254 km reach of the Middle Tiete River that again shows good agreement. Being Lagrangian in construction, this new model is computationally efficient making it an ideal tool for long term simulation for water resource planning, management and operation decision making in a large and complex river

  12. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, G.; Facchi, A.; Gandolfi, C.; Ortuani, B.; Horeschi, D.; van Dam, J. C.

    2010-02-01

    Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still debated. However, we may wonder how the uncertainty in soil hydraulic parameters relates to the uncertainty of the selected modelling approach. We performed an intensive monitoring study during the cropping season of a 10 ha maize field in Northern Italy. The data were used to: i) compare different methods for determining soil hydraulic parameters and ii) evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in these parameters on different variables (i.e. evapotranspiration, average water content in the root zone, flux at the bottom boundary of the root zone) simulated by two hydrological models of different complexity: SWAP, a widely used model of soil moisture dynamics in unsaturated soils based on Richards equation, and ALHyMUS, a conceptual model of the same dynamics based on a reservoir cascade scheme. We employed five direct and indirect methods to determine soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon of the experimental profile. Two methods were based on a parameter optimization of: a) laboratory measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data and b) field measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data. The remaining three methods were based on the application of widely used Pedo-Transfer Functions: c) Rawls and Brakensiek, d) HYPRES, and e) ROSETTA. Simulations were performed using meteorological, irrigation and crop data measured at the experimental site during the period June - October 2006. Results showed a wide range of soil hydraulic parameter values generated with the different methods, especially for the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat and the shape parameter α of the van Genuchten curve. This is reflected in a variability of the modeling results which is

  13. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, G.; Facchi, A.; Gandolfi, C.; Ortuani, B.; Horeschi, D.; van Dam, J. C.

    2009-06-01

    Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still debated. However, we may wonder how the uncertainty in soil hydraulic parameters relates to the uncertainty of the selected modelling approach. We performed an intensive monitoring study during the cropping season of a 10 ha maize field in Northern Italy. These data were used to: i) compare different methods for determining soil hydraulic parameters and ii) evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in these parameters on different outputs (i.e. evapotranspiration, water content in the root zone, fluxes through the bottom boundary of the root zone) of two hydrological models with different complexity: SWAP, a widely used model of soil moisture dynamics in unsaturated soils based on Richards equation, and ALHyMUS, a conceptual model of the same dynamics based on a reservoir cascade scheme. We employed five direct and indirect methods to determine soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon of the experimental field. Two methods were based on a parameter optimization of: a) laboratory measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data and b) field measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data. Three methods were based on the application of widely used Pedo-Transfer Functions: c) Rawls and Brakensiek; d) HYPRES; and e) ROSETTA. Simulations were performed using meteorological, irrigation and crop data measured at the experimental site during the period June-October 2006. Results showed a wide range of soil hydraulic parameter values evaluated with the different methods, especially for the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat and the shape parameter α of the Van Genuchten curve. This is reflected in a variability of the modeling results which is, as expected, different for

  14. Assessing the influence of the rhizosphere on soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and numerical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Keith R.; Mooney, Sacha J.; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Crout, Neil M. J.; Roose, Tiina; Tracy, Saoirse R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water distribution in soil is crucial for enhancing our knowledge of managing soil and water resources. The application of X-ray computed tomography (CT) to the plant and soil sciences is now well established. However, few studies have utilized the technique for visualizing water in soil pore spaces. Here this method is utilized to visualize the water in soil in situ and in three-dimensions at successive reductive matric potentials in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The measurements are combined with numerical modelling to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, providing a complete picture of the hydraulic properties of the soil. The technique was performed on soil cores that were sampled adjacent to established roots (rhizosphere soil) and from soil that had not been influenced by roots (bulk soil). A water release curve was obtained for the different soil types using measurements of their pore geometries derived from CT imaging and verified using conventional methods, such as pressure plates. The water, soil, and air phases from the images were segmented and quantified using image analysis. The water release characteristics obtained for the contrasting soils showed clear differences in hydraulic properties between rhizosphere and bulk soil, especially in clay soil. The data suggest that soils influenced by roots (rhizosphere soil) are less porous due to increased aggregation when compared with bulk soil. The information and insights obtained on the hydraulic properties of rhizosphere and bulk soil will enhance our understanding of rhizosphere biophysics and improve current water uptake models. PMID:25740922

  15. Numerical and experimental study of low-frequency pressure pulsations in hydraulic units with Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, D.; Minakov, A.; Dekterev, D.; Sentyabov, A.; Dekterev, A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the numerical simulation method of three-dimensional turbulent flows in the hydraulic turbine. This technique was verified by means of experimental data obtained on a water model of the Francis turbines. An aerodynamic stand, which is a miniature copy of the real hydraulic turbine, was designed. A series of experiments have been carried out on this stand and the corresponding calculations were performed. The dependence of the velocity and pressure pulsations profiles for different operation regimes are presented.

  16. Quantifying the effects of boundary condition uncertainty in nested flood modelling of complex hydraulic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Maria; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Bates, Paul D.; Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim E.; Cea, Luis; Puertas, Jeronimo

    2015-04-01

    Flood inundation models require appropriate boundary conditions to be specified at the limits of the domain, which commonly include upstream flow rate and water stage at the downstream boundary of the reach being modelled. These data are usually acquired from gauging stations of the river network, where measured water levels are converted to discharge by means of a rating curve. Although generally treated as deterministic relationships, rating curves are subject to uncertainties which can limit their accuracy and applicability to any particular event, particularly for low-frequency events, where the rating curve relationship is sparsely sampled and needs to be extrapolated. Consequently, derived streamflow records can be particularly uncertain and/or problematic for high-return period estimates. Moreover, the limited number of gauges in reach-scale studies usually requires flow to be routed from upstream gauge stations to the boundary of the model domain, which introduces additional uncertainty. This is more likely to be the case with complex modelling approaches, in which only limited areas can be simulated due to computational cost and model setup requirements. In this study, a method to incorporate the rating curve uncertainty into the predictions of a reach-scale flood inundation model is proposed. Firstly, the uncertainty in the rating curves is quantified using a non-parametric local weighted regression approach and uncertainty bounds for discharge and water elevations at gauging locations are generated. A regional simplified-physics hydraulic model is then applied to combine these uncertainties and generate an ensemble of discharge and water elevation time series at the boundaries of a local-scale high complexity hydraulic model. Finally, the impact of this uncertainty on the local model performance is evaluated using flood extent data and measured water levels within the local model area. The local-scale model is applied to 7 km of the river Severn passing

  17. Variable hydraulic resistances and their impact on plant drought response modelling.

    PubMed

    Baert, Annelies; De Schepper, Veerle; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    Plant drought responses are still not fully understood. Improved knowledge on drought responses is, however, crucial to better predict their impact on individual plant and ecosystem functioning. Mechanistic models in combination with plant measurements are promising for obtaining information on plant water status and can assist us in understanding the effect of limiting soil water availability and drought stress. While existing models are reliable under sufficient soil water availability, they generally fail under dry conditions as not all appropriate mechanisms seem yet to have been implemented. We therefore aimed at identifying mechanisms underlying plant drought responses, and in particular investigated the behaviour of hydraulic resistances encountered in the soil and xylem for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.). A variable hydraulic soil-to-stem resistance was necessary to describe plant drought responses. In addition, implementation of a variable soil-to-stem hydraulic resistance enabled us to generate an in situ soil-to-stem vulnerability curve, which might be an alternative to the conventionally used vulnerability curves. Furthermore, a daily recalibration of the model revealed a drought-induced increase in radial hydraulic resistance between xylem and elastic living tissues. Accurate information on plant hydraulic resistances and simulation of plant drought responses can foster important discussions regarding the functioning of plants and ecosystems during droughts.

  18. Validation of hydraulic tomography in an unconfined aquifer: A controlled sandbox study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhanfeng; Illman, Walter A.; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J.; Berg, Steven J.; Mao, Deqiang

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of hydraulic tomography (HT) that considers variably saturated flow processes in mapping the heterogeneity of both the saturated and unsaturated zones in a laboratory unconfined aquifer. The successive linear estimator (SLE) developed by Mao et al. (2013c) for interpreting HT in unconfined aquifers is utilized to obtain tomograms of hydraulic conductivity (K), specific storage (Ss), and the unsaturated zone parameters (pore size parameter (α) and saturated water content (θs)) for the Gardner-Russo's model. The estimated tomograms are first evaluated by visually comparing them with stratigraphy visible in the sandbox. Results reveal that the HT analysis is able to accurately capture the location and extent of heterogeneity including high and low K layers within the saturated and unsaturated zones, as well as reasonable distribution patterns of α and θs for the Gardner-Russo's model. We then validate the estimated tomograms through predictions of drawdown responses of pumping tests not used during the inverse modeling effort. The strong agreement between simulated and observed drawdown curves obtained by pressure transducers and tensiometers demonstrates the robust performance of HT that considers variably saturated flow processes in unconfined aquifers and the unsaturated zone above it. In addition, compared to the case using the homogeneous assumption, HT results, as expected, yield significantly better predictions of drawdowns in both the saturated and unsaturated zones. This comparison further substantiates the unbiased and minimal variance of HT analysis with the SLE algorithm.

  19. Modeling of laboratory experiments determining the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.

    2008-12-01

    Precise characterization and modeling of groundwater flow systems are necessary for realistic performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal. In groundwater flow modeling, the gravity potential is commonly assumed as the dominant driving force of regional groundwater flow. However, the gravity potential flow model may have a limited ability to reconstruct the excess fluid pressure distributions occasionally observed in low-permeability formations. To improve groundwater flow models, geologic processes such as compaction disequilibrium, tectonic forces and diagenetic reactions have been invoked to reconstruct excess pressures. On the other hand, chemical osmosis has recently been considered as one of the driving forces of groundwater flow and a factor causing excess pressures in clay-rich formations with vertical salinity gradients. If a formation medium acts as a semi-permeable membrane, chemical osmosis induces a fluid movement in the direction of increasing salinity. Consequently, fluid pressure could increase where salinity is high and decrease where it is low. Thus, chemical osmosis could induce a fluid flow countering the pressure-driven flow in the formation. When osmotic- and pressure-driven flows equilibrate, the net flow ceases while the fluid pressures remain in disequilibrium. This means that the direction of groundwater flow might be misinterpreted without differentiating osmotically-induced pressure from those induced by other causes. However, the formation media are not perfect membranes, as they allow solute diffusion that accord to the salinity gradients. As a result, osmotic pressure would dissipate as the solutes diffuse from high to low concentrations. That means the time period during which the osmotic pressures are held in the formation depends on hydraulic and diffusive properties other than the chemico-osmotic property of the formation media. The osmotic pressures have indeed been observed in natural formations, and the chemico

  20. Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

  1. Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC`s current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

  2. Hydrodynamic Forces on Reverse Tainter Valves; Hydraulic Model Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    FACILITY: Completion of a physical model study of the culvert valves of the Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway (Stockstill et al., in...evaluation of culvert valves at Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway. Vicksburg, MS: US Army Engineer Research and Development Center

  3. Hydraulic modeling of mussel habitat at a bridge-replacement site, Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rogers, Megan E.; Zimmerman, Gregory F.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the statistical targets established, the hydraulic model results suggest that an additional 2428 m2 or a 30-percent increase in suitable mussel habitat could be generated at the replacement-bridge site when compared to the baseline condition associated with the existing bridge at that same location. The study did not address the influences of substrate, acid mine drainage, sediment loads from tributaries, and surface-water/ground-water exchange on mussel habitat. Future studies could include methods for quantifying (1) channel–substrate composition and distribution using tools such as hydroacoustic echosounders specifically designed and calibrated to identify bed composition and mussel populations, (2) surface-water and ground-water interactions, and (3) a high-streamflow event.

  4. Assessing the risk of groundwater contamination posed by hydraulic fracturing through the use of a fault tree assisted numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montague, J.; Pinder, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    Shale gas exploitation in the United States is an increasingly important resource, since 2007 the production of shale gas has increased at an average annual rate of 44%. The increasing importance of shale gas to U.S. energy production and energy security necessitates an appropriate risk assessment of all processes of hydraulic fracturing to ensure its continued safety. This paper seeks to address the methodology needed to develop a quantitative risk assessment of hydraulic fracturing on subsurface aquifers using a fault tree in conjunction with a numerical model. The model incorporates geologic uncertainty through the use of a Monte Carlo simulation. The workflow of the model is presented through the use of a case study site within the Marcellus Shale.

  5. Modelling and characteristic analysis of tri-axle trucks with hydraulically interconnected suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Han, Xu; Luo, Zhen; Zhang, Nong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) system is proposed for the implementation of a resistance control for the pitch and bounce modes of tri-axle heavy trucks. A lumped-mass half-truck model is established using the free-body diagram method. The equations of motion of a mechanical and hydraulic coupled system are developed by incorporating the hydraulic strut forces into the mechanical subsystem as externally applied forces. The transfer matrix method (TMM) is used to evaluate the impedance matrix of the hydraulic subsystem consisting of models of fluid pipes, damper valves, accumulators, and three-way junctions. The TMM is further applied to find the quantitative relationships between the hydraulic strut forces and boundary flow of the mechanical-fluid interactive subsystem. The modal analysis method is employed to perform the vibration analysis between the trucks with the conventional suspension and the proposed HIS. Comparison analysis focuses on free vibration with identified eigenvalues and eigenvectors, isolation vibration capacity, and force vibration in terms of the power spectrum density responses. The obtained results show the effectiveness of the proposed HIS system in reducing the pitch motion of sprung mass and simultaneously maintaining the ride comfort. The pitch stiffness is increased while the bounce stiffness is slightly softened. The peak values of sprung mass and wheel hop motions are greatly reduced, and the vibration decay rate of sprung mass is also significantly increased.

  6. Nonlinear dynamic modeling for smart material electro-hydraulic actuator development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, John P.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2013-03-01

    Smart material electro-hydraulic actuators use hydraulic rectification by one-way check valves to amplify the motion of smart materials, such as magnetostrictives and piezoelectrics, in order to create compact, lightweight actuators. A piston pump driven by a smart material is combined with a hydraulic cylinder to form a self-contained, power-by-wire actuator that can be used in place of a conventional hydraulic system without the need for hydraulic lines and a centralized pump. The performance of an experimental actuator driven by a 12.7 mm diameter, 114 mm length Terfenol-D rod is evaluated over a range of applied input frequencies, loads, and currents. The peak performance achieved is 37 W, moving a 220 N load at a rate of 17 cm/s and producing a blocked pressure of 12.5 MPa. Additional tests are conducted to quantify the dynamic behavior of the one-way reed valves using a scanning laser vibrometer to identify the frequency response of the reeds and the effect of the valve seat and fluid mass loading. A lumped-parameter model is developed for the system that includes valve inertia and fluid response nonlinearities, and the model results are compared with the experimental data.

  7. Analyzing Clues in River Evolution of the Bedrock-Controlled Colorado River using Hydraulic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magirl, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    hydraulic influence on the river with increasing discharge, suggesting these debris fans are particularly long lived in geologically active watersheds. The model also demonstrates that there is an optimum stream power whereby geomorphic work on most debris fans is greatest for intermediate floods, an important finding not previously known. The analytical techniques developed for this study provide important clues when reconstructing fluvial evolution in Grand Canyon while offering innovative ways to analyze the geomorphic response and evolution of bedrock-controlled rivers elsewhere.

  8. Numerical Hydraulic Study on Seawater Cooling System of Combined Cycle Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. Y.; Park, S. M.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.

    2010-06-01

    As the rated flow and pressure increase in pumping facilities, a proper design against surges and severe cavitations in the pipeline system is required. Pressure surge due to start-up, shut-down process and operation failure causes the water hammer in upstream of the closing valve and the cavitational hammer in downstream of the valve. Typical cause of water hammer is the urgent closure of valves by breakdown of power supply and unexpected failure of pumps. The abrupt changes in the flow rate of the liquid results in high pressure surges in upstream of the valves, thus kinetic energy is transformed into potential energy which leads to the sudden increase of the pressure that is called as water hammer. Also, by the inertia, the liquid continues to flow downstream of the valve with initial speed. Accordingly, the pressure decreases and an expanding vapor bubble known as column separation are formed near the valve. In this research, the hydraulic study on the closed cooling water heat exchanger line, which is the one part of the power plant, is introduced. The whole power plant consists of 1,200 MW combined power plant and 220,000 m3/day desalination facility. Cooling water for the plant is supplied by sea water circulating system with a capacity of 29 m3/s. The primary focus is to verify the steady state hydraulic capacity of the system. The secondary is to quantify transient issues and solutions in the system. The circuit was modeled using a commercial software. The stable piping network was designed through the hydraulic studies using the simulation for the various scenarios.

  9. A novel approach to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.; Sahimi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate prediction of conductivity in partially-saturated porous media has broad applications in various phenomena in porous media, and has been studied intensively since the 1940s by petroleum, chemical and civil engineers, and hydrologists. Many of the models developed in the past are based on the bundle of capillary tubes. In addition, pore network models have also been developed for simulating multiphase fluid flow in porous media and computing the conductivity in unsaturated porous media. In this study, we propose a novel approach using concepts from the effective-medium approximation (EMA) and percolation theory to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media whose pore-size distributions exhibit power-law scaling. In our approach, the EMA, originally developed for predicting electrical conductivity of composite materials, is used to predict the effective conductivity, from complete saturation to some intermediate water content that represents a crossover point. Below the crossover water content, but still above a critical saturation (percolation threshold), a universal scaling predicted by percolation theory, a power law that expresses the dependence of the conductivity on the water content (less a critical water saturation) with an exponent of 2, is invoked to describe the effective conductivity. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the approach, experimental data were used from the literature. The predicted hydraulic conductivities for most cases are in excellent agreement with the data. In a few cases the theory underestimates the hydraulic conductivities, which correspond to porous media with very broad pore-size distribution in which the largest pore radius is more than 7 orders of magnitude greater than the smallest one. The approach is also used to predict the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity for experiments in which capillary pressure data are available. The results indicate that the universal scaling of

  10. Combining SEBAL model and NMCGA algorithm for the estimation of effective soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y.; Mohanty, B. P.; Ines, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Remote sensing data provide valuable information in many hydrological and meteological models. In this study, NMCGA developed by Ines and Mohanty (2008, Parameter Conditioning with a Noisy Monte Carlo Genetic Algorithm for Estimating Effective Soil Hydraulic properties from Space, Water Resources Research) is combined with the SEBAL model to integrate an ET component for quantifying the effective hydraulic properties using the pixel-based soil moisture and ET datasets. Three numerical experiments are conducted for different scenarios: 1) a free-draining homogeneous soil column using ET, SM and SM+ET, 2) a homogenous column under the SM and SM+ET conditions with a shallow water table depth of -100 cm, and 3) validation of the combined NMCGA-ET at different hydroclimatic field conditions. The results of Case 1 examined under hypothetical conditions (from the UNSODA database) suggest that the combined NMCGA-ET improves the optimized solutions (theta(h) and K(h)) better than those of NMCGA alone, although K(h) will have small uncertainties, and will respond well to (deep) soil moisture dynamics in the unsaturated zone. The results in Case 2 are evident in that an ET component contributes to the reduction of uncertainties inherent in a shallow water table. In Case 3, the application of the combined NMCGA-ET is evaluated at the Walnut Creek, Iowa and Brown, Illinois, sites. The correlation (R2) and MBE under the SM+ET condition are identified as better than those of only using the SM condition at all sites. However, the results at the Brown site using the direct soil moisture estimation method (neutron probe technique) are estimated to be better than those at the WC sites. Nevertheless, the results estimated at the WC sites correspond well with the pixel-based observed values of soil moisture as well (R2 > 0.77). From these findings, it is demonstrated that the combined NMCGA-ET performs better than the NMCGA for quantifying effective soil hydraulic properties based on

  11. Hydraulic jumps in 'viscous' accretion disks. [in astronomical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed that the dissipative process necessary for rapid accretion disk evolution is driven by hydraulic jump waves on the surface of the disk. These waves are excited by the asymmetric nature of the central rotator (e.g., neutron star magnetosphere) and spiral out into the disk to form a pattern corotating with the central object. Disk matter in turn is slowed slightly at each encounter with the jump and spirals inward. In this process, the disk is heated by true turbulence produced in the jumps. Additional effects, such as a systematic misalignment of the magnetic moment of the neutron star until it is nearly orthogonal, and systematic distortion of the magnetosphere in such a way as to form an even more asymmetric central 'paddle wheel', may enhance the interaction with inflowing matter. The application to X-ray sources corresponds to the 'slow' solutions of Ghosh and Lamb, and therefore to rms magnetic fields of about 4 x 10 to the 10th gauss. Analogous phenomena have been proposed to act in the formation of galactic spiral structure.

  12. Centrifugal slurry pump wear and hydraulic studies. Phase II report. Experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, D.; Cooper, P.; Biswas, C.; Sloteman, D.; Onuschak, A.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by Ingersoll-Rand Research, Inc., under Phase II, Experimental Studies for the contract entitled, Centrifugal Slurry Pump Wear and Hydraulic Studies. This work was carried out for the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC-82PC50035. The basic development approach pursued this phase is presented, followed by a discussion on wear relationships. The analysis, which resulted in the development of a mathematical wear model relating pump life to some of the key design and operating parameters, is presented. The results, observations, and conclusions of the experimental investigation on small scale pumps that led to the selected design features for the prototype pump are discussed. The material investigation was performed at IRRI, ORNL and Battelle. The rationale for selecting the materials for testing, the test methods and apparatus used, and the results obtained are presented followed by a discussion on materials for a prototype pump. In addition, the prototype pump test facility description, as well as the related design and equipment details, are presented. 20 references, 53 figures, 13 tables.

  13. Modeling and control of a hydraulically actuated flexible-prismatic link robot

    SciTech Connect

    Love, L.; Kress, R.; Jansen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Most of the research related to flexible link manipulators to date has focused on single link, fixed length, single plane of vibration test beds. In addition, actuation has been predominantly based upon electromagnetic motors. Ironically, these elements are rarely found in the existing industrial long reach systems. This manuscript describes a new hydraulically actuated, long reach manipulator with a flexible prismatic link at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus is directed towards both modeling and control of hydraulic actuators as well as flexible links that have variable natural frequencies.

  14. Mathematic Modeling of Complex Hydraulic Machinery Systems When Evaluating Reliability Using Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemenkova, M. Yu; Shipovalov, A. N.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-04-01

    The main technological equipment of pipeline transport of hydrocarbons are hydraulic machines. During transportation of oil mainly used of centrifugal pumps, designed to work in the “pumping station-pipeline” system. Composition of a standard pumping station consists of several pumps, complex hydraulic piping. The authors have developed a set of models and algorithms for calculating system reliability of pumps. It is based on the theory of reliability. As an example, considered one of the estimation methods with the application of graph theory.

  15. Hydrodynamic and hydrostatic modelling of hydraulic journal bearings considering small displacement condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Yin; Chuang, Jen-Chen; Tu, Jia-Ying

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes modified coefficients for the dynamic model of hydraulic journal bearing system that integrates the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties. In recent years, design of hydraulic bearing for machine tool attracts worldwide attention, because hydraulic bearings are able to provide higher capacity and accuracy with lower friction, compared to conventional bearing systems. In order to achieve active control of the flow pressure and enhance the operation accuracy, the dynamic model of hydraulic bearings need to be developed. Modified coefficients of hydrostatic stiffness, hydrodynamic stiffness, and squeeze damping of the dynamic model are presented in this work, which are derived referring to small displacement analysis from literature. The proposed modified coefficients and model, which consider the pressure variations, relevant geometry size, and fluid properties of the journal bearings, are able to characterise the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties with better precision, thus offering the following pragmatic contribution: (1) on-line prediction of the eccentricity and the position of the shaft in the face of external force that results in vibration; (2) development of active control system to regulate the supply flow pressure and to minimize the eccentricity of the shaft. Theoretical derivation and simulation results with different vibration cases are discussed to verify the proposed techniques.

  16. Initial insights from 2.5D hydraulic modeling of floods in Athabasca Valles, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.P.; Denlinger, R.P.; O'Connell, D. R. H.; Burr, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first application of a 2.5D hydraulic model to catastrophic floods on Mars. This model simulates flow over complex topography and incorporates flood dynamics that could not be modeled in the earlier 1D models. We apply this model to Athabasca Valles, the youngest outflow channel on Mars, investigating previous bank-full discharge estimates and utilizing the interpolated Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter elevation map as input. We confirm that the bank-full assumption does not fit the observed landforms. Instead, the channel appears more deeply incised near the source. Flow modeling also identifies several areas of special interest, including a dry cataract that coincides with a region of predicted high erosion. However, artifacts in the elevation data strongly impacted estimated stages and velocities in other areas. More extensive connection between the flood hydraulics and observed landforms awaits improved topographic data.

  17. Modeling the impacts of soil hydraulic properties on temporal stability of soil moisture under a semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiejun

    2014-11-01

    Despite the significant spatiotemporal variability of soil moisture, the phenomenon of temporal stability of soil moisture (TS SM) has been widely observed in field studies. However, the lack of understandings of the factors that control TS SM has led to some contradictory findings about TS SM. To resolve this issue, numerical models may offer an alternative way to complement field studies by quantifying different controls on TS SM. In this study, a 1-D vadose zone model was adopted to simulate daily soil moisture contents, which were used to compute the mean relative difference (MRD) and standard deviation of relative difference (SDRD) of soil moisture. Different from recent modeling studies, a soil dataset was employed with 200 samples of correlated soil hydraulic parameters for sandy soils. Compared to the results of previous modeling studies, more reasonable patterns of MRD and SDRD that resembled field observations were produced. By varying soil hydraulic parameter values, different patterns of MRD and SDRD could also be generated, implying variations in soil hydraulic properties could partly control the patterns of MRD and SDRD. More specifically, the residual soil moisture content (θr) was found to be the primary control on MRD, mainly due to the semi-arid climate that was simulated. By fixing θr, however, a highly nonlinear relationship emerged between MRD and the shape factor n in the van Genuchten model, which resulted in the positively skewed distributions of MRD widely observed for sandy soils in field experiments. Moreover, both the range and skewness of the distributions of MRD were affected by the range of n. In addition, with increasing n, a positive correlation between MRD and the shape factor l in the van Genuchten model was also found. The simulation results suggested that the control of soil hydraulic properties on MRD might weaken for areas under bare surface conditions or for regions with more humid climates due to elevated soil moisture

  18. Enhanced Bank-Stability Modeling With Coupled Geotechnical, Hydraulic and Near-Bank Groundwater Sub-Models: Development and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. E.; Simon, A.; Bankhead, N.

    2008-12-01

    Physically-based, deterministic bank-stability models have recently been developed to effectively simulate the driving and resisting forces governing streambank erosion. Significant advances have been made in the manner in which groundwater flow through variably saturated porous media, planar and circular geotechnical failures and fluvial sediment transport are simulated. However, to date, coupling these models has required tedious exporting and conversion of geometries and results and manual remeshing. In this presentation, we introduce the first fully integrated suite of models that deterministically simulate the controlling hydrologic, hydraulic and geotechnical processes that govern streambank erosion and channel-width adjustment. The model suite incorporates routines that: 1. Permit the user to enter between 5 and 23 points to describe the bank cross-sectional geometry; 2. Automatically generate a mesh by which to implicitly discretize the 2-D Richards equation utilizing finite volumes. The resulting pentadiagonal matrix is solved iteratively with Stone's Strongly Implicit Procedure (SIP). Timesteps are automatically adjusted to minimize mass balance and truncation errors; 3. Evaluate the force-equilibrium factor of safety (Fs), permitting the simulation of planar and cantilever shear failures with a horizontal slice method and planar shear failures with tension cracks with a rigorous vertical slice method. A random walk approach is adopted to search for the minimum Fs; 4. Estimate the increase in cohesion due to vegetation with a global load-sharing Fibre Bundle Model; and 5. Simulate the erosion of the bank face and bank toe with an excess shear stress approach. Management options to increase slope stability (through the addition of vegetation) and reduce channel- boundary erodibility (through the addition of natural and artificial structures) are also incorporated. We illustrate the efficacy of the modeling approach with a series of case studies in which

  19. Simulation of the June 11, 2010, flood along the Little Missouri River near Langley, Arkansas, using a hydrologic model coupled to a hydraulic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westerman, Drew A.; Clark, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    The results from the precipitation-runoff hydrologic model, the one-dimensional unsteady-state hydraulic model, and a separate two-dimensional model developed as part of a coincident study, each complement the other in terms of streamflow timing, water-surface elevations, and velocities propagated by the June 11, 2010, flood event. The simulated grids for water depth and stream velocity from each model were directly compared by subtracting the one-dimensional hydraulic model grid from the two-dimensional model grid. The absolute mean difference for the simulated water depth was 0.9 foot. Additionally, the absolute mean difference for the simulated stream velocity was 1.9 feet per second.

  20. Interpretation of hydraulic model outputs in supporting ecologially-led river restoration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, E.; Moir, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    In river systems, hydrodynamic forces are a major driver for geomorphic change, and a major influence on aquatic habitat. Representative modelling of channel hydraulics is therefore an invaluable tool in ecologically-led river restoration design, enabling a quantitative and objective assessment of complex processes that are essential to achieve biophysical objectives. Hydraulic modelling can form part of an iterative design process, utilised to indicate 'design performance' through a wide range of descriptors (e.g. physical heterogeneity, hydraulic micro-habitat) afforded by each stage of the design. However, it is important that the limitations of any computational fluid dynamic approach (e.g., 2D depth-averaged simulations) are well communicated to other specialists (e.g., geomorphologists, ecologists), managers, regulators and clients. One aspect of hydraulics where this is specifically important is in the use of vorticity and coherent vortex structures as indicators of habitat suitability and the probability of regions of scour or deposition. It has long been recognised that eddies structures provide important physical and ecological function in rivers but calculating vorticity changes using hydraulic models is relatively new in river hydraulics. The use of such calculations is growing in both academia and industry, especially as restoration approaches such as engineered log jams introduce significant vorticity into the flow. However, the introduction of vorticity needs to be modelled with very high resolutions near solid boundaries, and the convected vortex structures themselves are inherently three dimensional. Neither of these is routinely captured in river hydraulic models. Specifically, the interpretation of vorticity patterns or coherent vortex structures from 2D depth averaged river models must be treated with caution, or provided with further interpretation. We present work that demonstrates how coherent vortex structures and vorticity have been used to

  1. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jong E.

    2005-11-01

    Earlier experiments determined that the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) core is cooled, not by an axial flow, but rather by a strong cross flow due to the thermal expansion of the coolant. To further complicate the flow field, a nitrogen-16 (N-16) pump was installed above the PSBR core to mix the exiting core buoyant thermal plume in order to delay the rapid release of radioactive N-16 to the PSBR pool surface. Thus, the interaction between the N-16 jet flow and the buoyancy driven flow complicates the analysis of the flow distribution in the PSBR pool. The main objectives of this study is to model the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the PSBR core and pool. During this study four major things were performed including the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for the PSBR pool, the stand-alone fuel rod model for a PSBR fuel rod, the velocity measurements in and around the PSBR core, and the temperature measurements in the PSBR pool. Once the flow field was predicted by the CFD model, the measurement devices were manufactured and calibrated based on the CFD results. The major contribution of this study is to understand and to explain the flow behavior in the PSBR subchannels and pool using the FLOW3D model. The stand-alone dynamic fuel rod model was developed to determine the temperature distribution inside a PSBR fuel rod. The stand-alone fuel rod model was coupled to the FLOW3D model and used to predict the temperature behavior during steady-state and pulsing. The heat transfer models in the stand-alone fuel rod code are used in order to overcome the disadvantage of the CFD code, which does not calculate the mechanical stress, the gap conductance, and the two phase heat transfer. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  2. Multiscale modelling of hydraulic conductivity in vuggy porous media.

    PubMed

    Daly, K R; Roose, T

    2014-02-08

    Flow in both saturated and non-saturated vuggy porous media, i.e. soil, is inherently multiscale. The complex microporous structure of the soil aggregates and the wider vugs provides a multitude of flow pathways and has received significant attention from the X-ray computed tomography (CT) community with a constant drive to image at higher resolution. Using multiscale homogenization, we derive averaged equations to study the effects of the microscale structure on the macroscopic flow. The averaged model captures the underlying geometry through a series of cell problems and is verified through direct comparison to numerical simulations of the full structure. These methods offer significant reductions in computation time and allow us to perform three-dimensional calculations with complex geometries on a desktop PC. The results show that the surface roughness of the aggregate has a significantly greater effect on the flow than the microstructure within the aggregate. Hence, this is the region in which the resolution of X-ray CT for image-based modelling has the greatest impact.

  3. Global river flood hazard maps: hydraulic modelling methods and appropriate uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townend, Samuel; Smith, Helen; Molloy, James

    2014-05-01

    Flood hazard is not well understood or documented in many parts of the world. Consequently, the (re-)insurance sector now needs to better understand where the potential for considerable river flooding aligns with significant exposure. For example, international manufacturing companies are often attracted to countries with emerging economies, meaning that events such as the 2011 Thailand floods have resulted in many multinational businesses with assets in these regions incurring large, unexpected losses. This contribution addresses and critically evaluates the hydraulic methods employed to develop a consistent global scale set of river flood hazard maps, used to fill the knowledge gap outlined above. The basis of the modelling approach is an innovative, bespoke 1D/2D hydraulic model (RFlow) which has been used to model a global river network of over 5.3 million kilometres. Estimated flood peaks at each of these model nodes are determined using an empirically based rainfall-runoff approach linking design rainfall to design river flood magnitudes. The hydraulic model is used to determine extents and depths of floodplain inundation following river bank overflow. From this, deterministic flood hazard maps are calculated for several design return periods between 20-years and 1,500-years. Firstly, we will discuss the rationale behind the appropriate hydraulic modelling methods and inputs chosen to produce a consistent global scaled river flood hazard map. This will highlight how a model designed to work with global datasets can be more favourable for hydraulic modelling at the global scale and why using innovative techniques customised for broad scale use are preferable to modifying existing hydraulic models. Similarly, the advantages and disadvantages of both 1D and 2D modelling will be explored and balanced against the time, computer and human resources available, particularly when using a Digital Surface Model at 30m resolution. Finally, we will suggest some

  4. A simple model for wide area hydraulic modelling in data sparse areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, J.; Schumann, G.; Bates, P.

    2012-04-01

    The simulation of wave propagation, level and discharge in large rivers systems at continental or global scales, for applications ranging from regional flood risk assessment to climate change impacts, requires computationally efficient hydraulic models that can be applied to locations where limited or no ground based data are available. Many existing global or large scale river routing schemes use kinematic or simpler wave models, which although computationally efficient, are unable to simulate backwatering and floodplain interactions that are key controllers of wave propagation in many large rivers. Diffusive wave models are often suggested as a more physically based alternative, however the lack of inertia in the scheme leads to long simulation times due to the very low slopes in large rivers. We present a Cartesian grid two-dimensional hydraulic model with a parameterised sub-grid scale representation of the 1D channel network that can be build entirely from remotely sensed data. For both channel and floodplain flows the model simulates a simplified shallow water wave (diffusion and inertia) using an explicit finite difference scheme, which was chosen because of its computational efficiency relative to both explicit diffusive and full shallow water wave models. The model was applied to an 800 km reach of the River Niger that includes the complex waterways and lakes of the Niger Inland Delta in Mali. This site has the advantage of having no or low vegetation cover and hence SRTM represents (close to) bare earth floodplain elevations. Floodplain elevation was defined at 1 km resolution from SRTM data to reduce pixel-to-pixel noise, while the widths of main rivers and floodplain channels were estimated from Landsat imagery. The channel bed was defined as a depth from the adjacent floodplain from hydraulic geometry principles using a power law relationship between channel width and depth. This was first approximated from empirical data from a range of other sites

  5. Engineering study of tank leaks related to hydraulic retrieval of sludge from tank 241-C-106. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.S.; Carlos, W.C.; Irwin, J.J.; Khaleel, R.; Kline, N.W.; Ludowise, J.D.; Marusich, R.M.; Rittman, P.D.

    1993-06-09

    This study evaluates hydraulic retrieval (sluicing) of the waste in single-shell tank 241-C-106 with respect to the likelihood of tank leaks, gross volumes of potential leaks, and their consequences. A description of hydraulic retrieval is developed to establish a baseline for the study. Leak models are developed based on postulated leak mechanisms to estimate the amount of waste that could potentially leak while sluicing. Transport models describe the movement of the waste constituents in the surrounding soil and groundwater after a leak occurs. Environmental impact and risk associated with tank leaks are evaluated. Transport of leaked material to the groundwater is found to be dependent on the rate of recharge of moisture in the soil for moderate-sized leaks. Providing a cover over the tank and surrounding area would eliminate the recharge. The bulk of any leaked material would remain in the vicinity of the tank for remedial action.

  6. Hydraulic modeling of clay ceramic water filters for point-of-use water treatment.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Ryan W; Cunningham, Jeffrey A; Mihelcic, James R

    2013-01-02

    The acceptability of ceramic filters for point-of-use water treatment depends not only on the quality of the filtered water, but also on the quantity of water the filters can produce. This paper presents two mathematical models for the hydraulic performance of ceramic water filters under typical usage. A model is developed for two common filter geometries: paraboloid- and frustum-shaped. Both models are calibrated and evaluated by comparison to experimental data. The hydraulic models are able to predict the following parameters as functions of time: water level in the filter (h), instantaneous volumetric flow rate of filtrate (Q), and cumulative volume of water produced (V). The models' utility is demonstrated by applying them to estimate how the volume of water produced depends on factors such as the filter shape and the frequency of filling. Both models predict that the volume of water produced can be increased by about 45% if users refill the filter three times per day versus only once per day. Also, the models predict that filter geometry affects the volume of water produced: for two filters with equal volume, equal wall thickness, and equal hydraulic conductivity, a filter that is tall and thin will produce as much as 25% more water than one which is shallow and wide. We suggest that the models can be used as tools to help optimize filter performance.

  7. The Effect of Loading Rate on Hydraulic Fracturing in Synthetic Granite - a Discrete Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomac, I.; Gutierrez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracture initiation and propagation from a borehole in hard synthetic rock is modeled using the two dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM). DEM uses previously established procedure for modeling the strength and deformation parameters of quasi-brittle rocks with the Bonded Particle Model (Itasca, 2004). A series of simulations of laboratory tests on granite in DEM serve as a reference for synthetic rock behavior. Fracturing is enabled by breaking parallel bonds between DEM particles as a result of the local stress state. Subsequent bond breakage induces fracture propagation during a time-stepping procedure. Hydraulic fracturing occurs when pressurized fluid induces hoop stresses around the wellbore which cause rock fracturing and serves for geo-reservoir permeability enhancement in oil, gas and geothermal industries. In DEM, a network of fluid pipes and reservoirs is used for mathematical calculation of fluid flow through narrow channels between DEM particles, where the hydro-mechanical coupling is fully enabled. The fluid flow calculation is superimposed with DEM stress-strain calculation at each time step. As a result, the fluid pressures during borehole pressurization in hydraulic fracturing, as well as, during the fracture propagation from the borehole, can be simulated. The objective of this study is to investigate numerically a hypothesis that fluid pressurization rate, or the fluid flow rate, influences upon character, shape and velocity of fracture propagation in rock. The second objective is to better understand and define constraints which are important for successful fracture propagation in quasi-brittle rock from the perspective of flow rate, fluid density, viscosity and compressibility relative to the rock physical properties. Results from this study indicate that not only too high fluid flow rates cause fracture arrest and multiple fracture branching from the borehole, but also that the relative compressibility of fracturing fluid and

  8. Impact of representation of hydraulic structures in modelling a Severn barrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Samuel; Ahmadian, Reza; Falconer, Roger A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, enhancements to the numerical representation of sluice gates and turbines were made to the hydro-environmental model Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), and applied to the Severn Tidal Power Group Cardiff-Weston Barrage. The extended domain of the EFDC Continental Shelf Model (CSM) allows far-field hydrodynamic impact assessment of the Severn Barrage, pre- and post-enhancement, to demonstrate the importance of accurate hydraulic structure representation. The enhancements were found to significantly affect peak water levels in the Bristol Channel, reducing levels by nearly 1 m in some areas, and even affect predictions as far-field as the West Coast of Scotland, albeit to a far lesser extent. The model was tested for sensitivity to changes in the discharge coefficient, Cd, used in calculating discharge through sluice gates and turbines. It was found that the performance of the Severn Barrage is not sensitive to changes to the Cd value, and is mitigated through the continual, rather than instantaneous, discharge across the structure. The EFDC CSM can now be said to be more accurately predicting the impacts of tidal range proposals, and the investigation of sensitivity to Cd improves the confidence in the modelling results, despite the uncertainty in this coefficient.

  9. Investigation of approximations in thermal-hydraulic modeling of core conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Patrick L.; Hanan, Nelson A.

    2008-07-15

    Neutronics analyses for core conversions are usually fairly detailed, for example representing all 4 flats and all 4 corners of all 6 tubes of all 20 IRT-3M or -4M fuel assemblies in the core of the VVR-SM reactor in Uzbekistan. The coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analysis for safety analysis transients is usually less detailed, for example modeling only a hot and an average fuel plate and the associated coolant. Several of the approximations have been studied using the RELAP5 and PARET computer codes in order to provide assurance that the lack of full detail is not important to the safety analysis. Two specific cases studied are (1) representation of a core of same- type fuel assemblies by a hot and an average assembly each having multiple channels as well as by merely a hot and average channel and (2) modeling a core containing multiple fuel types as the sum of fractional core models for each fuel type. (author)

  10. Prototype Data Models and Data Dictionaries for Hanford Sediment Physical and Hydraulic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Last, George V.; Middleton, Lisa A.

    2010-09-30

    The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) project, managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), has been compiling physical and hydraulic property data and parameters to support risk analyses and waste management decisions at Hanford. In FY09 the RDS project developed a strategic plan for a physical and hydraulic property database. This report documents prototype data models and dictionaries for these properties and associated parameters. Physical properties and hydraulic parameters and their distributions are required for any type of quantitative assessment of risk and uncertainty associated with predictions of contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface. The central plateau of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State contains most of the contamination at the Site and has up to {approx}100 m of unsaturated and unconsolidated or semi-consolidated sediments overlying the unconfined aquifer. These sediments contain a wide variety of contaminants ranging from organic compounds, such as carbon tetrachloride, to numerous radionuclides including technetium, plutonium, and uranium. Knowledge of the physical and hydraulic properties of the sediments and their distributions is critical for quantitative assessment of the transport of these contaminants in the subsurface, for evaluation of long-term risks and uncertainty associated with model predictions of contaminant transport and fate, and for evaluating, designing, and operating remediation alternatives. One of the goals of PNNL's RDS project is to work with the Hanford Environmental Data Manager (currently with CHPRC) to develop a protocol and schedule for incorporation of physical property and hydraulic parameter datasets currently maintained by PNNL into HEIS. This requires that the data first be reviewed to ensure quality and consistency. New data models must then be developed for HEIS that are

  11. Estuary Entrance, Umpqua River, Oregon: Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Umpqua River estuary model was of the fixed-bed type, constructed to scales of 1:30 horizontally and 1:100 vertically, and reproduced the lower...28 miles of the Umpqua River and an adjoining portion of the Pacific Ocean. The model was equipped with the necessary appurtenances for accurate

  12. Predicting Formation Damage in Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems Utilizing a Coupled Hydraulic-Thermal-Chemical Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Daniel; Regenspurg, Simona; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido; Kranz, Stefan; Saadat, Ali

    2014-05-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, large amounts of energy can be stored by injecting hot water into deep or intermediate aquifers. In a seasonal production-injection cycle, water is circulated through a system comprising the porous aquifer, a production well, a heat exchanger and an injection well. This process involves large temperature and pressure differences, which shift chemical equilibria and introduce or amplify mechanical processes. Rock-fluid interaction such as dissolution and precipitation or migration and deposition of fine particles will affect the hydraulic properties of the porous medium and may lead to irreversible formation damage. In consequence, these processes determine the long-term performance of the ATES system and need to be predicted to ensure the reliability of the system. However, high temperature and pressure gradients and dynamic feedback cycles pose challenges on predicting the influence of the relevant processes. Within this study, a reservoir model comprising a coupled hydraulic-thermal-chemical simulation was developed based on an ATES demonstration project located in the city of Berlin, Germany. The structural model was created with Petrel, based on data available from seismic cross-sections and wellbores. The reservoir simulation was realized by combining the capabilities of multiple simulation tools. For the reactive transport model, COMSOL Multiphysics (hydraulic-thermal) and PHREEQC (chemical) were combined using the novel interface COMSOL_PHREEQC, developed by Wissmeier & Barry (2011). It provides a MATLAB-based coupling interface between both programs. Compared to using COMSOL's built-in reactive transport simulator, PHREEQC additionally calculates adsorption and reaction kinetics and allows the selection of different activity coefficient models in the database. The presented simulation tool will be able to predict the most important aspects of hydraulic, thermal and chemical transport processes relevant to

  13. A Froude-scaled model of a bedrock-alluvial channel reach: 1. Hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Rebecca A.; Hoey, Trevor B.

    2016-09-01

    The controls on hydraulics in bedrock-alluvial rivers are relatively poorly understood, despite the importance of the flow in determining rates and patterns of sediment transport and consequent erosion. To measure hydraulics within a bedrock-alluvial channel, we developed a 1:10 Froude-scaled laboratory model of an 18 × 9 m bedrock-alluvial river reach using terrestrial laser scanning and 3-D printing. In the reported experiments, water depth and velocity were recorded at 18 locations within the channel at each of five different discharges. Additional data from runs with sediment cover in the flume were used to evaluate the hydraulic impact of sediment cover; the deposition and erosion of sediment patches in these runs are analyzed in the companion paper. In our data (1) spatial variation in both flow velocity and Froude number increases with discharge; (2) bulk flow resistance and Froude number become independent of discharge at higher discharges; (3) local flow velocity and Reynolds stress are correlated to the range of local bed topography at some, but not most, discharges; (4) at lower discharges, local topography induces vertical flow structures and slower velocities, but these effects decrease at higher discharges; and (5) there is a relationship between the linear combination of bed and sediment roughness and local flow velocity. These results demonstrate the control that bedrock topography exerts over both local and reach-scale flow conditions, but spatially distributed hydraulic data from bedrock-alluvial channels with different topographies are needed to generalize these findings.

  14. Digging Soil Experiments for Micro Hydraulic Excavators based on Model Predictive Tracking Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatsu, Takumi; Nonaka, Kenichiro; Sekiguchi, Kazuma; Suzuki, Katsumasa

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the increase of burden to operators and lack of skilled operators are the issue in the work of the hydraulic excavator. These problems are expected to be improved by autonomous control. In this paper, we present experimental results of hydraulic excavators using model predictive control (MPC) which incorporates servo mechanism. MPC optimizes digging operations by the optimal control input which is calculated by predicting the future states and satisfying the constraints. However, it is difficult for MPC to cope with the reaction force from soil when a hydraulic excavator performs excavation. Servo mechanism suppresses the influence of the constant disturbance using the error integration. However, the bucket tip deviates from a specified shape by the sudden change of the disturbance. We can expect that the tracking performance is improved by combining MPC and servo mechanism. Path-tracking controls of the bucket tip are performed using the optimal control input. We apply the proposed method to the Komatsu- made micro hydraulic excavator PC01 by experiments. We show the effectiveness of the proposed method through the experiment of digging soil by comparing servo mechanism and pure MPC with the proposed method.

  15. Study on adaptive PID algorithm of hydraulic turbine governing system based on fuzzy neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liangbao; Bao, Jumin

    2006-11-01

    The conventional hydraulic turbine governing system can't automatically modulate PID parameters according to the dynamic process of the system, the generator speed is unstable and the mains frequency fluctuation results in. To solve the above problem, the fuzzy neural network (FNN) and the adaptive control are combined to design an adaptive PID algorithm based on the fuzzy neural network which can effectively control the hydraulic turbine governing system. Finally, the improved mathematic model is simulated. The simulation results are compared with the conventional hydraulic turbine's. Thus the validity and superiority of the fuzzy neural network PID algorithm have been proved. The simulation results show that the algorithm not only retains the functions of fuzzy control, but also provides the ability to approach to the non-linear system. Also the dynamic process of the system can be reflected more precisely and the on-line adaptive control is implemented. The algorithm is superior to other methods in response and control effect.

  16. Method study on fuzzy-PID adaptive control of electric-hydraulic hitch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingsheng; Wang, Liubu; Liu, Jian; Ye, Jin

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, fuzzy-PID adaptive control method is applied to the control of tractor electric-hydraulic hitch system. According to the characteristics of the system, a fuzzy-PID adaptive controller is designed and the electric-hydraulic hitch system model is established. Traction control and position control performance simulation are carried out with the common PID control method. A field test rig was set up to test the electric-hydraulic hitch system. The test results showed that, after the fuzzy-PID adaptive control is adopted, when the tillage depth steps from 0.1m to 0.3m, the system transition process time is 4s, without overshoot, and when the tractive force steps from 3000N to 7000N, the system transition process time is 5s, the system overshoot is 25%.

  17. North Diversion Structure Albuquerque, New Mexico. Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    metal was used to construct the railroad bridge and the I beams under the bridge. 6. The coefficient of roughness of the model surface of the channel...operation to approximate the hydrograph flows and duration. 8. Water- surface elevations in the outlet channel were controlled with a broad - crested ... weir at the downstream end of the model. The elevation of the broad - crested weir was modified to reproduce various outlet channel 8 VV . .ML

  18. Sequential hydraulic tests for transient and highly permeable unconfined aquifer systems - model development and field-scale implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, C.-F.; Huang, Y.-J.; Dong, J.-J.; Yeh, T.-C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The transient hydraulic tomography survey (THTS) is a conceptually improved technique that efficiently estimates detailed variations in aquifer parameters. Based on the concept of the THTS, we developed a geostatistical inverse model to characterize saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) and the specific yield (Sy) in transient and unconfined aquifer systems. In this study, a synthetic example was first used to assess the accuracy of the developed inverse model. Multiple random K and Sy realizations with different variances of natural logarithm of K (lnK) were generated and systematically compared to evaluate the effects of joint inversion on K estimations. The model was implemented in field-scale, cross-hole injection tests in a shallow and highly permeable unconfined aquifer near the middle reaches of the Wu River in central Taiwan. To assess the effect of constant head boundary conditions on the estimation results, two additional modeling domains were evaluated on the basis of the same field data from the injection tests. The results of the synthetic example showed that the proposed inverse model can effectively reproduce the predefined K patterns and magnitudes. However, slightly less detail was obtained for the Sy field based on the sampling data from sequential transient hydraulic stresses. The joint inversion by using transient head observations could slightly decrease the accuracy of K estimations. The model implementation for field-scale injection tests showed that the model can estimate K and Sy fields with detailed spatial variations. Estimation results showed a relatively homogeneous aquifer for the tested well field. Results based on the three modeling domains showed similar patterns and magnitudes of K and Sy near the well locations. These results indicated that the THTS is relatively insensitive to artificially drawn boundary conditions even under transient conditions.

  19. Dynamic Modeling of Hydraulic Power Steering System with Variable Ratio Rack and Pinion Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Wang, Miao

    A comprehensive mathematical model of a typical hydraulic power steering system equipped with variable ratio rack and pinion gear is developed. The steering system’s dynamic characteristics are investigated and its forced vibrations are compared with those obtained from a counterpart system with a constant ratio rack and pinion gear. The modeling details of the mechanism subsystem, hydraulic supply lines subsystem and the rotary spool valve subsystem are provided and included in the integrated steering system model. The numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of the nonlinear parametric steering system. From the comparison between simulated results and the experimental ones, it is shown that the model accurately integrates the boost characteristics of the rotary spool valve which is the key component of hydraulic power steering system. The variable ratio rack-pinion gear behaviors significantly differently from its constant ratio counterpart does. It significantly affects not only the system natural frequencies but also reduces vibrations under constant rate and ramp torque steering inputs. The developed steering model produces valid predictions of the system’s behavior and therfore could assist engineers in the design and analysis of integrated steering systems.

  20. A multiscale approach to determine hydraulic conductivity in thick claystone aquitards using field, laboratory, and numerical modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.; Barbour, S. L.; Hendry, M. J.; Novakowski, K.; van der Kamp, G.

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the hydraulic conductivity (K) of aquitards is difficult due to technical and logistical difficulties associated with field-based methods as well as the cost and challenge of collecting representative and competent core samples for laboratory analysis. The objective of this study was to produce a multiscale comparison of vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kv and Kh, respectively) of a regionally extensive Cretaceous clay-rich aquitard in southern Saskatchewan. Ten vibrating wire pressure transducers were lowered into place at depths between 25 and 325 m, then the annular was space was filled with a cement-bentonite grout. The in situ Kh was estimated at the location of each transducer by simulating the early-time pore pressure measurements following setting of the grout using a 2-D axisymmetric, finite element, numerical model. Core samples were collected during drilling for conventional laboratory testing for Kv to compare with the transducer-determined in situ Kh. Results highlight the importance of scale and consideration of the presence of possible secondary features (e.g., fractures) in the aquitard. The proximity of the transducers to an active potash mine (˜1 km) where depressurization of an underlying aquifer resulted in drawdown through the aquitard provided a unique opportunity to model the current hydraulic head profile using both the Kh and Kv estimates. Results indicate that the transducer-determined Kh estimates would allow for the development of the current hydraulic head distribution, and that simulating the pore pressure recovery can be used to estimate moderately low in situ Kh (<10-11 m s-1).

  1. Investigation of wadeable and unwadeable natural hydraulic jumps by integrating high resolution field surveying, digital terrain modeling, and process measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallé, B. L.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2002-12-01

    Recent research in fluvial geomorphology has emphasized the development of three-dimensional digital terrain models (DTMs) to better understand the interrelationship between river processes and channel form. However, no attempts have previously been made to apply DTMs to bedrock-controlled boulder-bed channels. Recent advances in integrating CAD techniques with intensive and iterative field surveys has allowed for the development of high-resolution digital terrain models for the bed and water surface topographies of two wadeable hydraulic jumps in the upper South Fork American River basin, CA, and one unwadeable hydraulic jump in the Cache Creek basin, CA. Field surveys varied based on the presence of subaerial, subaqueous, and wadeable conditions, and were conducted at two discharges. For unwadeable conditions, a new high-resolution mechanical surveying system was used to sample the bed and water surface. In addition, process measurements such as air content were recorded. Average point densities ranged from 4 to 22 pts per sq. m over a 6 to 68 sq. m area. Maximum point densities ranged from 33 to 64 pts per sq. m. Bed DTMs for all sites indicate a sub-channel width control on jump formation. Water surface DTMs indicate the presence of a strong stage-dependence on water surface topography, with shifts in the nappe profile and downstream water surface slopes at higher discharges. Further, rapidly varying supercritical flows had planar or convex shapes that could be empirically related to underlying bed topography. Air content DTMs showed significant spatial and temporal variability as well as rapid air entrainment at the jump toe. Air detrainment varied considerably. Subsequently, DTMs and process data were used to test a series of simple empirical relationships not previously investigated for natural hydraulic jumps. Further study will emphasize the development and deployment of process-based instrumentation such that the complex turbulent air-water flow dynamics

  2. Inverse modeling of a multistep outflow experiment fordetermining hysteretic hydraulic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.; Finsterle, S.; Sonnenborg, T.O.

    1998-05-01

    A new, closed-form hysteretic model of the capillary pressure-saturation and relative permeability-saturation relationship has been implemented into ITOUGH2. The hysteretic capillary pressure function is based on the van Genuchten model, with a modified version of the dependent domain model of Mualem to describe the scanning curves. Hysteresis in the relative permeability relations is considered to be mainly a result of nonwetting fluid entrap- ment. The hysteresis model was used in combination with inverse modeling techniques to examine the potential of a simple drainage- imbibition experiment to determine hysteretic hydraulic properties.

  3. Application of a Hydrodynamic Model for Assessing the Hydraulic Capacity and Flow Field at Willamette Falls Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Cheegwan; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Divers, Arya-Behbehani

    2006-08-03

    The Willamette Falls Hydroelectric Power Dam, operated by Portland General Electric (PGE), is located on the Willamette River, Oregon. The Project site consists of T.W. Sullivan Power Plant and a 2,950-ft-long spillway located on the top of the Willamette Falls Dam. As part of the effort of protection and enhancement of environmental resources, a flow control structure at the dam was proposed to improve the flow field and enhance the downstream juvenile fish passage in the region just upstream of the forebay (pre-forebay). The flow in the pre-forebay of Willamette Falls Dam is affected by the complex geometry and bathymetry, powerhouse flow, fish ladder flow and the spillway around the dam. The expectation was that the flow would be sensitive to the proposed flow control structures and could be modified to enhance downstream migration. In this study, a three-dimensional, free-surface hydrodynamic model (EFDC) was developed for the pre-forebay region of Willamette Falls to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed alternative and its effect on the flow field in two different flow regimes (low and high river flow), as well as to assess the hydraulic capacity of flow control structures. One of the key challenges in this modeling study was to properly specify the free open boundary conditions along the 2,950-feet-long spillway. In this study, a pressure boundary condition based on hydraulic head rating curves was applied to the free spillway boundary. The numerical model was calibrated with ADP velocity measurements at 17 stations for the existing low flow condition. Good agreements between model results and measured data were obtained, indicating the successful application of pressure boundary condition on the free spillway boundary. The calibrated model was applied to simulate the flow field and free surface elevation in the high flow region near the control flow structures under different alternative conditions. The model results were used to evaluate the

  4. Antiquity versus modern times in hydraulics - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroia, L.; Georgescu, S. C.; Georgescu, A. M.

    2010-08-01

    Water supply and water management in Antiquity represent more than Modern World can imagine about how people in that period used to think about, and exploit the resources they had, aiming at developing and improving their society and own lives. This paper points out examples of how they handled different situations, and how they managed to cope with the growing number of population in the urban areas, by adapting or by improving their water supply systems. The paper tries to emphasize the engineering contribution of Rome and the Roman Empire, mainly in the capital but also in the provinces, as for instance the today territory of France, by analysing some aqueducts from the point of view of modern Hydraulic Engineering. A third order polynomial regression is proposed to compute the water flow rate, based on the flow cross-sectional area measured in quinaria. This paper also emphasizes on contradictory things between what we thought we knew about Ancient Roman civilization, and what could really be proven, either by a modern engineering approach, a documentary approach, or by commonsense, where none of the above could be used. It is certain that the world we live in is the heritage of the Greco-Roman culture and therefore, we are due to acknowledge their contribution, especially taking into account the lack of knowledge of that time, and the poor resources they had.

  5. Property-Transfer Modeling to Estimate Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Deep Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Winfield, Kari A.

    2007-01-01

    The unsaturated zone at the Idaho National Laboratory is complex, comprising thick basalt flow sequences interbedded with thinner sedimentary layers. Understanding the highly nonlinear relation between water content and hydraulic conductivity within the sedimentary interbeds is one element in predicting water flow and solute transport processes in this geologically complex environment. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments is costly and time consuming, therefore use of models that estimate this property from more easily measured bulk-physical properties is desirable. A capillary bundle model was used to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity for 40 samples from sedimentary interbeds using water-retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity derived from (1) laboratory measurements on core samples, and (2) site-specific property transfer regression models developed for the sedimentary interbeds. Four regression models were previously developed using bulk-physical property measurements (bulk density, the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient) as the explanatory variables. The response variables, estimated from linear combinations of the bulk physical properties, included saturated hydraulic conductivity and three parameters that define the water-retention curve. The degree to which the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves estimated from property-transfer-modeled water-retention parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity approximated the laboratory-measured data was evaluated using a goodness-of-fit indicator, the root-mean-square error. Because numerical models of variably saturated flow and transport require parameterized hydraulic properties as input, simulations were run to evaluate the effect of the various parameters on model results. Results show that the property transfer models based on easily measured bulk properties perform nearly as well as using curve fits to laboratory-measured water

  6. Hydraulic modeling for lahar hazards at cascades volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The National Weather Service flood routing model DAMBRK is able to closely replicate field-documented stages of historic and prehistoric lahars from Mt. Rainier, Washington, and Mt. Hood, Oregon. Modeled time-of-travel of flow waves are generally consistent with documented lahar travel-times from other volcanoes around the world. The model adequately replicates a range of lahars and debris flows, including the 230 million km3 Electron lahar from Mt. Rainier, as well as a 10 m3 debris flow generated in a large outdoor experimental flume. The model is used to simulate a hypothetical lahar with a volume of 50 million m3 down the East Fork Hood River from Mt. Hood, Oregon. Although a flow such as this is thought to be possible in the Hood River valley, no field evidence exists on which to base a hazards assessment. DAMBRK seems likely to be usable in many volcanic settings to estimate discharge, velocity, and inundation areas of lahars when input hydrographs and energy-loss coefficients can be reasonably estimated.

  7. A mathematical model of the inline CMOS matrix sensor for investigation of particles in hydraulic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilin, DV; Kudryavtsev, IA

    2016-10-01

    One of the most effective ways to diagnose the state of hydraulic system is an investigation of the particles in their liquids. The sizes of such particles range from 2 to 200 gm and their concentration and shape reveal important information about the current state of equipment and the necessity of maintenance. In-line automatic particle counters (APC), which are built into hydraulic system, are widely used for determination of particle size and concentration. These counters are based on a single photodiode and a light emitting diode (LED); however, samples of liquid are needed for analysis using microscope or industrial video camera in order to get information about particle shapes. The act of obtaining the sample leads to contamination by other particles from the air or from the sample tube, meaning that the results are usually corrupted. Using the CMOS or CCD matrix sensor without any lens for inline APC is the solution proposed by authors. In this case the matrix sensors are put into the liquid channel of the hydraulic system and illuminated by LED. This system could be stable in arduous conditions like high pressure and the vibration of the hydraulic system; however, the image or signal from that matrix sensor needs to be processed differently in comparison with the signal from microscope or industrial video camera because of relatively short distance between LED and sensor. This paper introduces mathematical model of a sensor with CMOS and LED, which can be built into hydraulic system. It is also provided a computational algorithm and results, which can be useful for calculation of particle sizes and shapes using the signal from the CMOS matrix sensor.

  8. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-01

    Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10(-10), 2.08 × 10(-9) and 6.8 × 10(-10)m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH=2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  9. The use of sediment deposition maps as auxiliary data for hydraulic model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukolwe, Micah; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2013-04-01

    One aspect of the French disaster mitigation setup is the statutory Risk Prevention Plans (PPR, Plans de Prévention des Risques); i.e. spatial identification of potential disasters and mitigation measures. The maps are categorised into three zones depicting increasing disaster severity and potential mitigation measures (RTM, 1999). Taking the example of the city of Barcelonnette, in South France (French Alps), floods have been the most frequent occurring natural hazard (Flageollet et al., 1996). Consequently, a case is put forward for the need for accurate flood extent delineation to support the decision making process. For this study, the Barcelonnette case study was considered, whereby the last devastating flooding was in June 1957 (Weber, 1994). Contrary to the recent advances in the proliferation of data to support flood inundation studies (Bates, 2012; Bates, 2004; Di Baldassarre and Uhlenbrook, 2012; Schumann et al., 2009), constraints are faced when analysing flood inundation events that occurred before the 1970's. In absence of frequent flooding, the analysis of historical flood extents may play an important role in shaping the awareness of local stakeholders and support land-use and urban planning. This study is part of a probabilistic flood mapping (e.g. Di Baldassarre et al., 2010, Horrit, 2006) of the valley carried out in a Monte-Carlo framework, while taking into account the peak flow and the parametric uncertainty. The simulations were carried out using the sub-grid channel model extension of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model (Bates et al, 2010; Neal et al., 2012). Sediment deposition maps (Lecarpentier, 1963) were used to analyse the model performance, additionally the graduation of the sediment deposition sizes showed the flood propagation and was used to analyse the model runs. However, there still remains the challenge of quantifying the uncertainty in the sediment deposition map and the actual flood extent.

  10. The effect of dynamic changes in soil bulk density on hydraulic properties: modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel

    2014-05-01

    Natural and artificial processes, like rainfall-induced soil surface sealing or mechanical compaction, disturb the soil structure and enhance dynamic changes of the related pore size distribution. These changes may influence many aspects of the soil-water-plant-atmosphere system. One of the easiest measurable variables is the soil bulk density. Approaches are suggested that could model the effect of the change in soil bulk density on soil permeability, water retention curve (WRC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function (HCF). The resulting expressions were calibrated and validated against experimental data corresponding to different soil types at various levels of compaction, and enable a relatively good prediction of the effect of bulk density on the soil hydraulic properties. These models allow estimating the impact of such changes on flow processes and on transport properties of heterogeneous soil profiles.

  11. Development of a river ice jam by a combined heat loss and hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, J.; Gröndal, G. O.

    2008-11-01

    The heat loss theory and the hydraulic theory for the analysis of the development of wide channel ice jams are discussed and shown. The heat loss theory has been used in Iceland for a long time, while the hydraulic theory largely follows the classical ice-jam build-up theories used in known CFD models. The results are combined in a new method to calculate the maximum thickness and the extent of an ice jam. The results compare favorably to the HEC-RAS model for the development of a very large ice jam in Thjorsa River in Iceland, and have been found in good agreement with historical data, collected where a hydroelectric dam project, Urridafoss, is being planned in the Thjorsa River.

  12. Development of a river ice jam by a combined heat loss and hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, J.; Orri Gröndal, G.

    2008-04-01

    This paper discusses and shows the heat loss theory and the hydraulic theory for the analysis of the development of wide channel ice jams. The heat loss theory has been used in Iceland for a long time, while the hydraulic theory largely follows the classical ice-jam build-up theories used in known CFD models. The results are combined in a new method to calculate the maximum thickness and the extent of an ice jam. The results compare favorably to the HEC-RAS model for the development of a very large ice jam in Thjorsa River in Iceland. They are also in good agreement with historical data, collected where a hydroelectric dam project, Urridafoss, is being planned in the Thjorsa River.

  13. A Comparison of Land Surface Model Soil Hydraulic Properties Estimated by Inverse Modeling and Pedotransfer Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, Ethan D.; Small, Eric E.

    2007-01-01

    Soil hydraulic properties (SHPs) regulate the movement of water in the soil. This in turn plays an important role in the water and energy cycles at the land surface. At present, SHPS are commonly defined by a simple pedotransfer function from soil texture class, but SHPs vary more within a texture class than between classes. To examine the impact of using soil texture class to predict SHPS, we run the Noah land surface model for a wide variety of measured SHPs. We find that across a range of vegetation cover (5 - 80% cover) and climates (250 - 900 mm mean annual precipitation), soil texture class only explains 5% of the variance expected from the real distribution of SHPs. We then show that modifying SHPs can drastically improve model performance. We compare two methods of estimating SHPs: (1) inverse method, and (2) soil texture class. Compared to texture class, inverse modeling reduces errors between measured and modeled latent heat flux from 88 to 28 w/m(exp 2). Additionally we find that with increasing vegetation cover the importance of SHPs decreases and that the van Genuchten m parameter becomes less important, while the saturated conductivity becomes more important.

  14. On the Single-Layer Hydraulics Model for Flows and Ventilation over Unban Areas in Stable Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric stability has substantial effects on the flows and heat/mass transport processes. While extensive studies have been conducted for neutral and unstable stabilities, rather limited studies have been devoted to stable stratification. Major technical reason is the demanding spatio-temporal resolution required to solve the small scales in stratified turbulent flows. Instead of continuous density variation, we use the single-layer hydraulics model (analogous to shallow water equations for global dynamics), to simulate the stratified flows and turbulence structure over hypothetical urban areas. An array of identical ribs in cross flows is used to model an idealized urban surface and the aerodynamic resistance is controlled by the separation among the ribs. Two immiscible fluids (water and air) with a large density difference (three order of magnitude) are used to simulate the stratification. The key assumption is that the density in the (lower) single layer is uniform. As a result, the stratification is measured by the Froude number Fr (= U/(gH)1/2; where U is the flow speed, g the gravitational acceleration and H the single-layer depth). One of the characteristics of single-layer hydraulics model is hydraulic jump which occurs when the flows are slowing down from Fr > 1 (high-speed flows over smoother surfaces) to Fr < 1 (lower-speed flows over rougher surfaces). It is noteworthy that kinetic energy does not conserve across hydraulic jump that, unavoidably, cascades to turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). We thus hypotheses that the elevated TKE could modify the street-level ventilation mechanism in the stratified flows across an abrupt change in surface roughness entering urban areas. Large-eddy simulation and laboratory-scale water channel experiments are sought to improve our understanding of the occurrence of hydraulic jump and the associated street-level ventilation mechanism in the stratified flows over urban areas. Preliminary results, by comparing the

  15. Dynamic modeling of the servovalves incorporated in the servo hydraulic system of the 70-meter DSN antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    As the pointing accuracy and service life requirements of the DSN 70 meter antenna increase, it is necessary to gain a more complete understanding of the servo hydraulic system in order to improve system designs to meet the new requirements. A mathematical model is developed for the servovalve incorporated into the hydraulic system of the 70 meter antenna and uses experimental data to verify the validity of the model and to identify the model parameters.

  16. Rock Island Arsenal Power Dam: Numerical Hydraulic Model Investigation of Channel Capacity for Power Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    and environmental challenges. ERDC develops innovative solutions in civil and military engineering, geospatial sciences, water resources, and...and Sylvan Slough, a side channel of the Mississippi River near Rock Island, IL. Water levels in the Moline Pool are regulated primarily by...Adaptive Hydraulics (AdH) numerical modeling system to solve the two- dimensional (2D), depth-averaged, shallow water equations describing open channel

  17. Discourse over a contested technology on Twitter: A case study of hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Hopke, Jill E; Simis, Molly

    2015-10-04

    High-volume hydraulic fracturing, a drilling simulation technique commonly referred to as "fracking," is a contested technology. In this article, we explore discourse over hydraulic fracturing and the shale industry on the social media platform Twitter during a period of heightened public contention regarding the application of the technology. We study the relative prominence of negative messaging about shale development in relation to pro-shale messaging on Twitter across five hashtags (#fracking, #globalfrackdown, #natgas, #shale, and #shalegas). We analyze the top actors tweeting using the #fracking hashtag and receiving @mentions with the hashtag. Results show statistically significant differences in the sentiment about hydraulic fracturing and shale development across the five hashtags. In addition, results show that the discourse on the main contested hashtag #fracking is dominated by activists, both individual activists and organizations. The highest proportion of tweeters, those posting messages using the hashtag #fracking, were individual activists, while the highest proportion of @mention references went to activist organizations.

  18. Quantifying Hydraulic Conductivity and Fluid Pressures in the Alpine Fault Hanging-Wall Using DFDP-2 Data and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussens, J. P.; Woodman, N. D.; Menzies, C. D.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Sutherland, R.; Capova, L.; Cox, S.; Upton, P.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow can play an important role in fault failure, due to the influence of pore pressure on effective confining stress and through chemical and thermal alteration of the fault zone. Rocks of the Alpine Fault Zone, both exposed at the surface and recovered in cores, show evidence for significant alteration by fluids. However, the fluid flow regime in the region is poorly constrained and its relationship with the behaviour of the fault is uncertain. In 2014 the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) drilled the DFDP-2B borehole, penetrating 893 m into the hanging-wall of the Alpine Fault. Prior to drilling, a set of hydrogeological models for the Whataroa Valley region, encompassing the DFDP-2B drill site, were constructed using the modelling software FEFLOW. Models were constructed for a range of plausible hydraulic conductivity structures for the region. They predicted strongly artesian hydraulic heads of 50-150 m above surface elevation and temperatures exceeding 100 °C within 1 km depth in bedrock beneath the DFDP-2 drill site, with the exact hydraulic and thermal gradients dependent on the hydraulic conductivity structure chosen. During the drilling project hydraulic and thermal data from the borehole was collected. This included 33 slug test datasets, carried out at a range of borehole depths throughout the project. Estimates for hydraulic conductivity were obtained by analysis of slug test data. Steady state hydraulic heads for the borehole, across a range of depths, were estimated from the slug test measurements. Depth profiles of hydraulic head show rapid increases in hydraulic head with depth, in line with model predictions. Results show fluid pressures greatly exceeding hydrostatic pressure in the shallow crust, reflecting significant upward flow of groundwater beneath the Whataroa Valley. Hydraulic conductivity estimates provide constraints on the hydraulic conductivity structure of the region. All hydraulic conductivity structures modelled thus far

  19. Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists

  20. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN TOPOGRAPHY AND ROUGHNESS IN A 2D RASTER-BASED HYDRAULIC MODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, M.; Yu, D.; Lane, S. N.; Benito-Ferrandez, G.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of river flow using hydraulic modelling and its implications in derived environmental applications are inextricably connected with the way in which the river boundary shape is represented. This relationship is scale-dependent upon the modelling resolution which in turn determines the importance of a subscale performance of the model and the way subscale (surface and flow) processes are parameterised. This work aims to explore scaling effects associated with the parameterisation of topography and roughness (i.e. surface at different scales) and possible interactions between its components (mesh resolution, topographic content of the DEM and roughness parameterisation) within a 2D raster-based diffusion-wave model. A distributed roughness variable which is scale dependent on the mesh resolution and the surface roughness of the DEM is incorporated to the hydraulic model. The roughness parameterisation is carried out on the basis of a LiDAR-derived vegetation height model and applied in a raster based 2D diffusion wave model. Topographic models with different topographic contents and a constant mesh resolution are generated using LiDAR data and different vertical thresholds. Five DEMs are generated with different topographic contents (±Δz), (DEM±5cm, DEM±10cm, DEM±25cm, DEM±50cm) and four mesh resolutions (1, 2, 4 and 8m) are assessed. A sensitivity analysis on the model results to mesh resolution due to interpolation and resampling procedures of topographic data is performed. Interactions between topographic and roughness parameterisation are related to model results and finally, geostatistical methods are used to document scaling effects in hydraulic modelling results and model performance. This method explicitly recognises the three-way interaction between the discretised mesh resolution and the topographic content in the DEM with the roughness parameterisation. The work shows how the subscale behaviour of the 2D hydraulic model is not well

  1. Modelling cave flow hydraulics in the Notranjski Kras, Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Gabrovsek, Franci

    2015-04-01

    The Notranjski Kras region is a karst region in western Slovenia, developed in Cretaceous limestone. The region is characterised by hilly relief, with peaks reaching 1300 m elevation. Several well-developed cave systems drain the karst aquifer, providing preferential flow pathes along two sections: The Pivka River, which sinks into Postojnska Jama and reappears in Planinska Jama, and the Stržen and Cerkniščica rivers, which sink into Karlovica Jama, flow through Zelške Jama and Tkalca Jama and also reappear in Planinska Jama. Both sub-surface flow pathes merge in Planinska Jama, providing water for the Unica river. The Unica river leaves Planinska Jama via a large karst srping and passes through Planinsko Polje, disappearing again through two groups of ponors, finally emerging in the Ljubljanka Springs at around 300 m asl. The sub-surface flow path through the Postojnska Jama cave system has been monitored with 7 stations distributed along the flow path, monitoring stage and temperature. We have used the stage data to model flow through the cave system with the program package SWMM, simulating the active parts of Postojnska Jama with simplified geometry. From the comparison of stage observations and predictions, we identified key sections in the cave, which control the sub-surface flow, such as passage constrictions, sumps and by-passes. Using a formal inverse procedure, we determined the geometry of this key sections by fitting predicted to observed stages, and we achieved a very high degree of correlation.

  2. Temporal evolution modeling of hydraulic and water quality performance of permeable pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; He, Jianxun; Valeo, Caterina; Chu, Angus

    2016-02-01

    A mathematical model for predicting hydraulic and water quality performance in both the short- and long-term is proposed based on field measurements for three types of permeable pavements: porous asphalt (PA), porous concrete (PC), and permeable inter-locking concrete pavers (PICP). The model was applied to three field-scale test sites in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The model performance was assessed in terms of hydraulic parameters including time to peak, peak flow and water balance and a water quality variable (the removal rate of total suspended solids). A total of 20 simulated storm events were used for model calibration and verification processes. The proposed model can simulate the outflow hydrographs with a coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.762 to 0.907, and normalized root-mean-square deviation (NRMSD) ranging from 13.78% to 17.83%. Comparison of the time to peak flow, peak flow, runoff volume and TSS removal rates between the measured and modeled values in model verification phase had a maximum difference of 11%. The results demonstrate that the proposed model is capable of capturing the temporal dynamics of the pavement performance. Therefore, the model has great potential as a practical modeling tool for permeable pavement design and performance assessment.

  3. Application of Hydraulic Tomography to Shallow Alluvial Sediments: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawad, H. J.; Yeh, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known aquifer heterogeneity can have a strong effect on aquifer response to pumping, yet it is still common for aquifers to be conceptualized as homogeneous. In this study, hydraulic tomography was applied to a shallow alluvial aquifer to delineate aquifer heterogeneity. As piezometers used for this analysis are fully screened, heterogeneous transmissivity estimates are two dimensional and represent a vertically averaged estimate at each model cell. The average saturated thickness of the alluvial aquifer under investigation increased by 46% over a 2 month period in response to a large precipitation event, therefore analysis of aquifer heterogeneity was conducted before and after the increase in saturated aquifer thickness to evaluate vertical heterogeneity. Analysis was completed using groundwater level and pumping rate information collected during normal wellfield operations thus eliminating the need to interrupt wellfield function. Initially one stable configuration of active pumping rate and groundwater level information was used to evaluate aquifer heterogeneity, and then 2 additional configurations were added in an attempt to refine the estimate. Results show that locations of likely high and low zones of transmissivity vary as saturated aquifer thickness increases. Forward simulations were then run using heterogeneous transmissivity estimates and a homogeneous transmissivity estimate from a traditional pumping test. The impact of noise in the groundwater level information associated with additional pumping configurations outweighed variation in aquifer response leading to deterioration in results from forward simulations carried out using heterogeneous transmissivity estimates. However, all groundwater level estimates generated using heterogeneous transmissivity estimates are better than estimates made using the traditional homogeneous approach. These results imply that aquifer parameter analysis can be conducted without interrupting normal

  4. Using hydraulic modeling to address social impacts of small dam removals in southern New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Wyrick, Joshua R; Rischman, Brian A; Burke, Christopher A; McGee, Craig; Williams, Chasity

    2009-07-01

    Small relic mill dams are common in the watersheds of southern New Jersey, dotting the landscape with many small neighborhood lakes. Originally built in the late 1800s, most of these dams have become increasingly unable to handle current design storms due to increased urbanization of the watersheds. Several of these dams have also been classified as "high hazard" by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Dam Safety Division because their failure has the potential for loss of life or extensive property damage. The current private owners are generally unable to afford the high repair costs needed to rehabilitate the dams to current safety standards, and are therefore more inclined to remove them. This research analyses both the physical and social impacts of the removal of two small dams in southern New Jersey, and integrates the two seemingly disparate concepts. Using hydraulic modeling and previous case studies, it is predicted that there will be limited effects to the hydrological and biological characteristics of the stream corridor. A survey distributed to the affected homeowners that live on these lakes shows that the community, however, expects significant impacts to the bio-physical characteristics of the stream corridor, as well financial impacts to their property value and social impacts to their recreational activities. The current study exposes the widening gap between policy makers and landowners, and highlights where complete stakeholder interaction could and should occur.

  5. Functional linear models to test for differences in prairie wetland hydraulic gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, Mark C.; Sojda, Richard S.; Preston, Todd M.; Swayne, David A.; Yang, Wanhong; Voinov, A.A.; Rizzoli, A.; Filatova, T.

    2010-01-01

    Functional data analysis provides a framework for analyzing multiple time series measured frequently in time, treating each series as a continuous function of time. Functional linear models are used to test for effects on hydraulic gradient functional responses collected from three types of land use in Northeastern Montana at fourteen locations. Penalized regression-splines are used to estimate the underlying continuous functions based on the discretely recorded (over time) gradient measurements. Permutation methods are used to assess the statistical significance of effects. A method for accommodating missing observations in each time series is described. Hydraulic gradients may be an initial and fundamental ecosystem process that responds to climate change. We suggest other potential uses of these methods for detecting evidence of climate change.

  6. A computationally efficient 2D hydraulic approach for global flood hazard modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begnudelli, L.; Kaheil, Y.; Sanders, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    We present a physically-based flood hazard model that incorporates two main components: a hydrologic model and a hydraulic model. For hydrology we use TOPNET, a more comprehensive version of the original TOPMODEL. To simulate flood propagation, we use a 2D Godunov-type finite volume shallow water model. Physically-based global flood hazard simulation poses enormous computational challenges stemming from the increasingly fine resolution of available topographic data which represents the key input. Parallel computing helps to distribute the computational cost, but the computationally-intensive hydraulic model must be made far faster and agile for global-scale feasibility. Here we present a novel technique for hydraulic modeling whereby the computational grid is much coarser (e.g., 5-50 times) than the available topographic data, but the coarse grid retains the storage and conveyance (cross-sectional area) of the fine resolution data. This allows the 2D hydraulic model to be run on extremely large domains (e.g. thousands km2) with a single computational processor, and opens the door to global coverage with parallel computing. The model also downscales the coarse grid results onto the high-resolution topographic data to produce fine-scale predictions of flood depths and velocities. The model achieves computational speeds typical of very coarse grids while achieving an accuracy expected of a much finer resolution. In addition, the model has potential for assimilation of remotely sensed water elevations, to define boundary conditions based on water levels or river discharges and to improve model results. The model is applied to two river basins: the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania, and the Ogeechee River in Florida. The two rivers represent different scales and span a wide range of topographic characteristics. Comparing spatial resolutions ranging between 30 m to 500 m in both river basins, the new technique was able to reduce simulation runtime by at least 25 fold

  7. Hydraulic aspects of riverbank filtration—field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Jürgen

    2002-09-01

    The Düsseldorf waterworks have been using riverbank filtration since 1870 with bank filtration as the most important source for public water supply in this densely populated and industrialised region. There have been many threats to this supply in the last few decades—e.g. poor river water quality, heavy clogging of the riverbed, accidental pollution—which had to be overcome. First field studies in the river Rhine were carried out with a diving cabin in 1953 and 1954 to investigate riverbed clogging during high loads of organic contaminants in the river water. In 1987 a second investigation of the riverbed followed in the same area during which time the water quality of the river had improved. After the Sandoz accident in 1986 a joint research project was carried out in the Lower Rhine region to improve knowledge of flow and transport phenomena of riverbank filtration and to develop numerical models for the dynamic simulation of flow and transport. The main objective of the field studies was to gain more insight into the dynamic river-aquifer interactions and the effects of fluctuating river levels. These fluctuations are not only relevant for clogging processes and the velocities and residence times in the subsoil, but can also affect the quality of the well water. Depth-orientated sampling in the adjacent aquifer was employed. One important finding was a marked age-stratification of the bank-filtered water which balances out fluctuating concentrations of dissolved compounds in the river water.

  8. Soil water balance scenario studies using predicted soil hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, A.; Wösten, J. H. M.; Bouma, J.; Várallyay, G.

    2006-03-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have become a topic drawing increasing interest within the field of soil and environmental research because they can provide important soil physical data at relatively low cost. Few studies, however, explore which contributions PTFs can make to land-use planning, in terms of examining the expected outcome of certain changes in soil and water management practices. This paper describes three scenario studies that show some aspects of how PTFs may help improve decision making about land management practices. We use an exploratory research approach using simulation modelling to explore the potential effect of alternative solutions in land management. We: (i) evaluate benefits and risks when irrigating a field, and the impact of soil heterogeneity; (ii) examine which changes can be expected (in terms of soil water balance and supply) if organic matter content is changed as a result of an alternative management system; (iii) evaluate the risk of leaching to deeper horizons in some soils of Hungary. Using this research approach, quantitative answers are provided to what if? type questions, allowing the distinction of trends and potential problems, which may contribute to the development of sustainable management systems.

  9. Impact of Model Uncertainty Description on Assimilating Hydraulic Head into the MIKE-SHE Distributed Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Madsen, H.; Ridler, M. E.; Rasmussen, J.; Refsgaard, J.; Jensen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Catchment-scale hydrological models are used as prediction tools to solve major challenges in water resources management. The reliability of hydrological model predictions is inevitably affected by the amount of information available to set up and calibrate the model. Data assimilation (DA) which combines complementary information from measurements and models has proven to be a powerful and promising tool in numerous research studies to improve model predictions. Especially, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) which is a popular sequential data assimilation technique, has been extensively studied in the earth sciences for assimilating in-situ measurements and remote sensing data. However, one of the major challenges in data assimilation to optimally combine model and measurements is the description of model uncertainty. Only few studies have been reported for defining appropriate model uncertainty in hydrological DA. Modeling uncertainties can be conceptually different in different applications. Traditionally, model uncertainty is represented by parameter uncertainty with corresponding parameter statistics determined by inverse modeling. In most hydrological DA applications, however, model uncertainty is defined by experience using simple statistical descriptions of different uncertainty sources. In this work, both the uncertainty derived from inverse modeling and from empirical knowledge are used and analyzed. A combination of parameter-based, forcing-based and state-based model error is implemented in the EnKF framework for assimilating groundwater hydraulic heads into a catchment-scale model of the Karup Catchment in Denmark using the distributed and integrated hydrological model MIKE SHE. A series of synthetic identical twin experiments are carried out to analyze the impact of different model error assumptions on the feasibility and efficiency of the assimilation. The optimality of the EnKF underlying twin test provides possibilities to diagnose model error

  10. Inverse modeling of soil water content to estimate the hydraulic properties of a shallow soil and the associated weathered bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourgeois, O.; Bouvier, C.; Brunet, P.; Ayral, P.-A.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling soil water flow requires the knowledge of numerous parameters associated to the water content and the soil hydraulic properties. Direct estimations of those parameters in laboratory require expensive equipment and the obtained parameters are generally not representative at the field scale because of the limitation of core sample size. Indirect methods such as inverse modeling are known to get efficient estimations and are easier to set up and process for large-scale studies. In this study, we investigated the capacity of an inverse modeling procedure to estimate the soil and the bedrock hydrodynamic properties only from in situ soil water content measurements at multiple depths under natural conditions. Multi-objective parameter optimization was performed using the HYDRUS-1D software and an external optimization procedure based on the NSGA-II algorithm. In a midslope shallow soil, water content was monitored at 3 depths, 20, 40, and 60 cm during 12 intense rainfall events, whose amounts ranged between 50 and 250 mm and duration between 1 and 5 days. The vertical profile was considered as 2 layers of soils above a third layer representing the weathered schist rock. This deep layer acted as a deep boundary condition, which features the bedrock permeability and water storage. Each layer was described trough the 6 parameters of the Mualem-van Genuchten formulation. The calibrated parameters appeared to have very low uncertainty while allowing a good modelisation of the observed water content variations. The calibrated saturated water content was close to the laboratory porosity measurements while the saturated hydraulic conductivity showed that the soil was highly permeable, as measured in the field. The inverse modeling approach allowed an estimation of the hydraulic properties of the bedrock layer where no measurement was available. The bedrock layer was found to have a low saturated hydraulic conductivity (<5 mm h-1), which means that the schist bedrock is

  11. Combined measurement and modeling of the hydrological impact of hydraulic redistribution using CLM4.5 at eight AmeriFlux sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes have been demonstrated in the field, but the current generation of standard earth system models does not include a representation of HR. Though recent studies have examined the effect of incorporating ...

  12. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  13. A combined monitoring and modeling approach to quantify water and nitrate leaching using effective soil column hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvreur, V.; Kandelous, M. M.; Moradi, A. B.; Baram, S.; Mairesse, H.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    There is a worldwide growing concern for agricultural lands input to groundwater pollution. Nitrate contamination of groundwater across the Central Valley of California has been related to its diverse and intensive agricultural practices. However, there has been no study comparing leaching of nitrate in each individual agricultural land within the complex and diversely managed studied area. A combined field monitoring and modeling approach was developed to quantify from simple measurements the leaching of water and nitrate below the root zone. The monitored state variables are soil water content at several depths within the root zone, soil matric potential at two depths below the root zone, and nitrate concentration in the soil solution. In the modeling part, unsaturated water flow and solute transport are simulated with the software HYDRUS in a soil profile fragmented in up to two soil hydraulic types, whose effective hydraulic properties are optimized with an inverse modeling method. The applicability of the method will first be demonstrated "in-silico", with synthetic soil water dynamics data generated with HYDRUS, and considering the soil column as the layering of several soil types characterized in-situ. The method will then be applied to actual soil water status data from various crops in California including tomato, citrus, almond, pistachio, and walnut. Eventually, improvements of irrigation and fertilization management practices (i.e. mainly questions of quantity and frequency of application minimizing leaching under constraint of water and nutrient availability) will be investigated using coupled modeling and optimization tools.

  14. New Conceptual Model for Soil Treatment Units: Formation of Multiple Hydraulic Zones during Unsaturated Wastewater Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Geza, Mengistu; Lowe, Kathryn S; Huntzinger, Deborah N; McCray, John E

    2013-07-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems are commonly used in the United States to reclaim domestic wastewater. A distinct biomat forms at the infiltrative surface, causing resistance to flow and decreasing soil moisture below the biomat. To simulate these conditions, previous modeling studies have used a two-layer approach: a thin biomat layer (1-5 cm thick) and the native soil layer below the biomat. However, the effect of wastewater application extends below the biomat layer. We used numerical modeling supported by experimental data to justify a new conceptual model that includes an intermediate zone (IZ) below the biomat. The conceptual model was set up using Hydrus 2D and calibrated against soil moisture and water flux measurements. The estimated hydraulic conductivity value for the IZ was between biomat and the native soil. The IZ has important implications for wastewater treatment. When the IZ was not considered, a loading rate of 5 cm d resulted in an 8.5-cm ponding. With the IZ, the same loading rate resulted in a 9.5-cm ponding. Without the IZ, up to 3.1 cm d of wastewater could be applied without ponding; with the IZ, only up to 2.8 cm d could be applied without ponding. The IZ also plays a significant role in soil moisture distribution. Without the IZ, near-saturation conditions were observed only within the biomat, whereas near-saturation conditions extended below the biomat with the IZ. Accurate prediction of ponding is important to prevent surfacing of wastewater. The degree of water and air saturation influences pollutant treatment efficiency through residence time, volatility, and biochemical reactions.

  15. Final Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources (02-24-2012)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water resources. More specifically, the study has been designed to assess the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources and to identif...

  16. Sensitivity analysis of hydraulic model to morphological changes and changes in flood inundation extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, J. S.; Freer, J.; Bates, P. D.; Sear, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research into modelling floodplain inundation processes is primarily concentrated on the simulation of inundation flow without considering the influences of channel morphology and sediment delivery from upstream. River channels are often represented by simplified geometry and implicitly assumed to remain unchanged. However, during and after flood episodes the river bed elevation can change quickly and in some cases drastically. Despite this, the effect of channel geometry and topographic complexity on model results has been largely unexplored. To address this issue, the impact of channel cross-section geometry, and channel long-profile variability on flood inundation extent are examined using a simplified 1D-2D hydraulic model (LISFLOOD-FP) of the Cockermouth floods of November 2009 within an uncertainty analysis framework. The Cockermouth region provides a useful test site for such study because of the availability of channel and floodplain data, the collection of post-event water and wrack marks and the presence of pre-and post-event morphological surveyed data. More importantly, in some areas the river has undergone significant course change and additionally the deposition of stones and debris on the floodplain. The use of relatively simple formulations of critical velocities in the initiation of motion formula enables the construction of a series of hypothetical bedform scenarios among cross-sections. These scenarios can be used as input to LISFLOOD-FP. Slope gradient, Manning roughness coefficients, grain size characteristic, and critical shear stress will be considered in a Monte Carlo simulation framework. The November 2009 Cockermouth flood is simulated and the results are analysed to quantify the accuracy associated with each bedform scenario and to assess how different channel long-profiles affects the performance of LISFLOOD-FP. The study will further analyse and quantify the variability and uncertainty of flood inundation extent resulting from

  17. Computational simulation of thermal hydraulic processes in the model LMFBR fuel assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayaskhalanov, M. V.; Merinov, I. G.; Korsun, A. S.; Vlasov, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify a developed software module on the experimental fuel assembly with partial blockage of the flow section. The developed software module for simulation of thermal hydraulic processes in liquid metal coolant is based on theory of anisotropic porous media with specially developed integral turbulence model for coefficients determination. The finite element method is used for numerical solution. Experimental data for hexahedral assembly with electrically heated smooth cylindrical rods cooled by liquid sodium are considered. The results of calculation obtained with developed software module for a case of corner blockade are presented. The calculated distribution of coolant velocities showed the presence of the vortex flow behind the blockade. Features vortex region are in a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data. This demonstrates the efficiency of the hydrodynamic unit for developed software module. But obtained radial coolant temperature profiles differ significantly from the experimental in the vortex flow region. The possible reasons for this discrepancy were analyzed.

  18. Reduced-order model based active disturbance rejection control of hydraulic servo system with singular value perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengwen; Quan, Long; Zhang, Shijie; Meng, Hongjun; Lan, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Hydraulic servomechanism is the typical mechanical/hydraulic double-dynamics coupling system with the high stiffness control and mismatched uncertainties input problems, which hinder direct applications of many advanced control approaches in the hydraulic servo fields. In this paper, by introducing the singular value perturbation theory, the original double-dynamics coupling model of the hydraulic servomechanism was reduced to a integral chain system. So that, the popular ADRC (active disturbance rejection control) technology could be directly applied to the reduced system. In addition, the high stiffness control and mismatched uncertainties input problems are avoided. The validity of the simplified model is analyzed and proven theoretically. The standard linear ADRC algorithm is then developed based on the obtained reduced-order model. Extensive comparative co-simulations and experiments are carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Moose Creek Dam Outlet Works and Diversion Channel Chena River Lakes Project, Alaska. Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    crosses the diver- sion channel 1,090 feet downstream from the highway crossing. At the downstream end of the channel, a fixed overflow sill controls water ...adequate to maintain a satisfactory water surface gradient through the reach. Flow conditions affecting fish passage and small- craft navigation through...criteria that were studied included hydraulic losses at channel constrictions and expansions, water surface profiles, and division of flow between the

  20. Modeling the Interaction Between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures Using Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Hai; Deo, Milind

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between hydraulic fractures (HF) and natural fractures (NF) will lead to complex fracture networks due to the branching and merging of natural and hydraulic fractures in unconventional reservoirs. In this paper, a newly developed hydraulic fracturing simulator based on discrete element method is used to predict the generation of complex fracture network in the presence of pre-existing natural fractures. By coupling geomechanics and reservoir flow within a dual lattice system, this simulator can effectively capture the poro-elastic effects and fluid leakoff into the formation. When HFs are intercepting single or multiple NFs, complex mechanisms such as direct crossing, arresting, dilating and branching can be simulated. Based on the model, the effects of injected fluid rate and viscosity, the orientation and permeability of NFs and stress anisotropy on the HF-NF interaction process are investigated. Combined impacts from multiple parameters are also examined in the paper. The numerical results show that large values of stress anisotropy, intercepting angle, injection rate and viscosity will impede the opening of NFs.

  1. Comparison of Measured and Modelled Hydraulic Conductivities of Fractured Sandstone Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka-Lokmane, S.; Liedl, R.; Teutsch, G.

    - A new method for characterising the detailed fracture geometry in sandstone cores is presented. This method is based on the impregnation of samples with coloured resin, without significant disturbance of the fractures. The fractures are made clearly visible by the resin, thus allowing the fracture geometry to be examined digitally. In order to model the bulk hydraulic conductivity, the samples are sectioned serially perpendicular to the flow direction. The hydraulic conductivity of individual sections is estimated by summing the contribution of the matrix and each fracture from the digital data. Finally, the hydraulic conductivity of the bulk sample is estimated by a harmonic average in series along the flow path. Results of this geometrical method are compared with actual physical conductivity values measured from fluid experiments carried out prior to sectioning. The predicted conductivity from the fracture geometry parameters (e.g., fracture aperture, fracture width, fracture length and fracture relative roughness all measured using an optical method) is in good agreement with the independent physical measurements, thereby validating the approach.

  2. Modelling the two-dimensional flow between an estuary and lake connected by a bi-directional hydraulic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigic, Sasha; King, Brian; Lemckert, Charles

    2005-04-01

    A method to model the influence of a hydraulic structure connecting two water bodies is presented. This method was incorporated into an existing two-dimensional (depth-averaged) hydrodynamic model. Specifically, the flow in and out of a cell (used to represent the hydraulic structure) is calculated using a broad crested weir formula and is determined from the time-varying head difference between the two systems. An example application of the method is also presented. In this example the hydraulic structure cell was used to model the flow through an automated bi-directional hydraulic structure connecting an estuary to an artificial lake system. The gates of this hydraulic structure are programmed to open four times each day (once during each semi-diurnal tidal phase) and remain open for a period of 2 hours, allowing alternative and partial exchange between the two water bodies. Hence, the model setup involved the specification of the opening and closing times of the gates and the calibration of the discharge coefficient. Tests indicated that these were the most sensitive parameters which ensured the correct volume of water exchange between the two systems. Finally, the model-predicted results were compared with available surface elevation observations at two sites within the lake. The comparison showed a good agreement (RMS error <0.09), quantifying the ability of the hydraulic structure cells to simulate the flux between the estuary and lake for each opening.

  3. Subchannel thermal-hydraulic modeling of an APT tungsten target rod bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.; Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    The planned target for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) neutron source consists of an array of tungsten rod bundles through which D{sub 2}O coolant flows axially. Here, a scoping analysis of flow through an APT target rod bundle was conducted to demonstrate that lateral cross-flows are important, and therefore subchannel modeling is necessary to accurately predict thermal-hydraulic behavior under boiling conditions. A local reactor assembly code, FLOWTRAN, was modified to model axial flow along the rod bundle as flow through three concentric heated annular passages.

  4. Hydraulic model of the proposed Water Recovery and Management system for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Charles E.; Bacskay, Allen S.

    1991-01-01

    A model of the Water Recovery and Management (WRM) system utilizing SINDA '85/FLUINT to determine its hydraulic operation characteristics, and to verify the design flow and pressure drop parameters is presented. The FLUINT analysis package is employed in the model to determine the flow and pressure characteristics when each of the different loop components is operational and contributing to the overall flow pattern. The water is driven in each loop by storage tanks pressurized with cabin air, and is routed through the system to the desired destination.

  5. Spent nuclear fuel vacuum drying thermal-hydraulic analysis and dynamic model development status report

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.; Ogden, D.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-28

    This report summarizes preliminary thermal hydraulic scoping analysis and model development associated with the K Basin spent fuel MCO draining and vacuum drying system. The purpose of the draining and drying system is to remove all free water from the interior of the MCO, baskets, and fuel prior to back filling with inert gas and transfer to the hot conditioning process. Dominant physical processes and parameters are delineated and related quantitatively. Minimum dynamic modeling capability required to simulate the process of transporting heat to the residual water on the fuel and transport of the steam produced from the system by vacuum pumping are defined.

  6. Numerical simulation of pulsation processes in hydraulic turbine based on 3D model of cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, L. V.; Chirkov, D. V.; Cherny, S. G.; Pylev, I. M.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach was proposed for simulation of unsteady cavitating flow in the flow passage of a hydraulic power plant. 1D hydro-acoustics equations are solved in the penstock domain. 3D equations of turbulent flow of isothermal compressible liquid-vapor mixture are solved in the turbine domain. Cavitation is described by a transfer equation for liquid phase with a source term which is responsible for evaporation and condensation. The developed method was applied for simulation of pulsations in pressure, discharge, and total energy propagating along the flow conduit of the hydraulic power plant. Simulation results are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiment. The influence of key physical and numerical parameters like discharge, cavitation number, penstock length, time step, and vapor density on simulation results was studied.

  7. Comparison of Hydraulic Methods and Tracer Experiments as Applied to the Development of Conceptual Models for Discrete Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakowski, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    The development of conceptual models for solute migration in discrete fracture networks has typically been based on a combination of core logs, borehole geophysics, and some form of single-well hydraulic test using discrete zones. More rarely, interwell hydraulic tests and interwell tracer experiments are utilised to directly explore potential transport pathways. The latter methods are less widely employed simply due to potentially significant increases in the cost and effort in site characterization. To date however there is a paucity of literature comparing the efficacy of the standard procedure with what should be more definitive identification of transport pathways using interwell methods. In the present study, a detailed comparison is conducted by developing conceptual models from three separate data sets, the first based on core logs, geology and single-well hydraulic tests, the second based on a large suite of pulse interference tests, and the third based on a series of radially-divergent and injection-withdrawal tracer experiments. The study was conducted in an array of five HQ-sized wells, 28-32 m in depth and arranged in a five star pattern, 10 m on a side. The wells penetrate the contact between a Cambrian-aged limestone, and underlying Precambrian gneiss. The core was logged for potentially open fractures using a ranking system, and 87 contiguous hydraulic tests were conducted using a 0.85-m packer spacing. A total of 57 pulse interference tests were conducted using two wells as injection points, and 11 tracer experiments were conducted using either sample collection or in-situ detection via a submersible fluorometer. The results showed very distinct conceptual models depending on the data set, with the model based on the single-well testing significantly over-predicting the number and connection of solute transport pathways. The results of the pulse interference tests also over predict the transport pathways, but to a lesser degree. Quantification of

  8. Large-scale, Two-Dimensional Hydraulic Modeling of a Braided River Using Multi-Resolution Topographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, B. F.; Schubert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Braided rivers are characterized by anastomosing channels separated by bars and islands and constantly undergo adjustments driven by erosional and depositional processes. Detailed data on the morphology of braided river channels can now be captured at varying scales and spatial resolutions using remote sensing technologies designed for topographic mapping, including interferometric synthetic aperture radar, aerial photogrammetry, and aerial and ground-based lidar. A common product of these data is a digital elevation model (DEM) which not only maps the morphological structure of the river at the time of data acquisition, but also enables analysis of the flow distribution, hydraulic geometry, and bed stresses. We present a 2D flow model of a 120 km reach of the Platte River, NE, US, parameterized with a 1 m DEM constructed from aerial lidar and channel bathymetry data. The model is motivated by the opportunity to study the flow distribution across threads of different sizes, to examine how braiding changes with increases in discharge, and to study how the distribution of flow among threads evolves with changes in stage. These results shed additional light on the hydraulic geometry of braided rivers. Additionally, the value of fine resolution data is measured by repeating this analysis with coarsened input data.

  9. Clogging development and hydraulic performance of the horizontal subsurface flow stormwater constructed wetlands: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ping; Yu, Bohai; Zhou, Yongchao; Zhang, Yiping; Li, Jin

    2017-02-21

    The horizontal subsurface constructed wetland (HSSF CW) is a highly effective technique for stormwater treatment. However, progressive clogging in HSSF CW is a widespread operational problem. The aim of this study was to understand the clogging development of HSSF CWs during stormwater treatment and to assess the influence of microorganisms and vegetation on the clogging. Moreover, the hydraulic performance of HSSF CWs in the process of clogging was evaluated in a tracer experiment. The results show that the HSSF CW can be divided into two sections, section I (circa 0-35 cm) and section II (circa 35-110 cm). The clogging is induced primarily by solid entrapment in section I and development of biofilm and vegetation roots in section II, respectively. The influence of vegetation and microorganisms on the clogging appears to differ in sections I and II. The tracer experiment shows that the hydraulic efficiency (λ) and the mean hydraulic retention time (t mean) increase with the clogging development; although, the short-circuiting region (S) extends slightly. In addition, the presence of vegetation can influence the hydraulic performance of the CWs, and their impact depends on the characteristics of the roots.

  10. The hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow: A new model and new experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, B. L.

    1996-02-01

    A new model for the hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow is presented. The equation of motion for a liquid annulus spreading out under the influence of hydrostatic pressure gradient and Frictional drag is developed. The resulting nonlinear differential equation for the liquid depth, h(r), is solved by computer simulation. The jump is assumed to begin when the laminar flow is engulfed by the underlying boundary layer liquid, as suggested recently in the literature. This complicated mixing process is crudely modeled by a drag term which slows the flow and initiates a positive feedback mechanism culminating at a new critical depth, beyond which the depth increases asymptotically to a final value. The model predicts a new relationship between the laminar flow depth just before the jump and the final depth. An experimental apparatus was built to make detailed measurements of the depth h(r), both in the region before the jump and beyond the jump. The theoretical predictions were compared to the experimental data, and gave surprisingly good agreement by suitable adjustment of the two parameters k and C of the model. The parameter k determines the growth rate of the boundary layer thickness, and C determines the drag force. The results suggest that the usual textbook assumption of zero momentum loss across the jump is not appropriate for this type of hydraulic jump. The case of a hydraulic jump in the absence of gravity is considered also and a much different behavior is predicted, which could be tested by experiment in a microgravity environment.

  11. Linking hydraulic traits to tropical forest function in a size-structured and trait-driven model (TFS v.1-Hydro)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, Bradley O.; Gloor, Manuel; Fauset, Sophie; Fyllas, Nikolaos M.; Galbraith, David R.; Baker, Timothy R.; Kruijt, Bart; Rowland, Lucy; Fisher, Rosie A.; Binks, Oliver J.; Sevanto, Sanna; Xu, Chonggang; Jansen, Steven; Choat, Brendan; Mencuccini, Maurizio; McDowell, Nate G.; Meir, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Forest ecosystem models based on heuristic water stress functions poorly predict tropical forest response to drought partly because they do not capture the diversity of hydraulic traits (including variation in tree size) observed in tropical forests. We developed a continuous porous media approach to modeling plant hydraulics in which all parameters of the constitutive equations are biologically interpretable and measurable plant hydraulic traits (e.g., turgor loss point πtlp, bulk elastic modulus ɛ, hydraulic capacitance Cft, xylem hydraulic conductivity ks,max, water potential at 50 % loss of conductivity for both xylem (P50,x) and stomata (P50,gs), and the leaf : sapwood area ratio Al : As). We embedded this plant hydraulics model within a trait forest simulator (TFS) that models light environments of individual trees and their upper boundary conditions (transpiration), as well as providing a means for parameterizing variation in hydraulic traits among individuals. We synthesized literature and existing databases to parameterize all hydraulic traits as a function of stem and leaf traits, including wood density (WD), leaf mass per area (LMA), and photosynthetic capacity (Amax), and evaluated the coupled model (called TFS v.1-Hydro) predictions, against observed diurnal and seasonal variability in stem and leaf water potential as well as stand-scaled sap flux. Our hydraulic trait synthesis revealed coordination among leaf and xylem hydraulic traits and statistically significant relationships of most hydraulic traits with more easily measured plant traits. Using the most informative empirical trait-trait relationships derived from this synthesis, TFS v.1-Hydro successfully captured individual variation in leaf and stem water potential due to increasing tree size and light environment, with model representation of hydraulic architecture and plant traits exerting primary and secondary controls, respectively, on the fidelity of model predictions. The plant

  12. Hydrological and hydraulic results of an integrated modelling approach in a mesoscale Chinese catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, B.; Strehmel, A.; Song, S.; Kuemmerlen, M.; Cai, Q.; Jähnig, S.; Fohrer, N.

    2012-04-01

    Catchment properties, in-stream processes and their effects on aquatic organisms are closely linked. For the assessment of key driving forces, pressures on an ecosystem, the habitat state and the effect of climate or land use changes on a habitat, DPSI (Driver-Pressure-State-Impact) approaches are used. The aim of our DFG-/NSFC project is the development of an integrated modelling approach to depict the impact of environmental changes on aquatic ecosystems in the Changjiang catchment of the Poyang lake area in China. We create a dynamic DPSI-system, integrating the models SWAT (catchment processes), HEC-RAS (in-stream processes) and BIOMOD (biological responses). The ecohydrological model SWAT simulates the water and nutrient balances of the entire catchment. The SWAT results as discharge and sediment are transferred to the hydraulic model HEC-RAS. HEC-RAS calculates in-stream parameters as flow velocity, water depths, shear stress, etc. for cross sections at selected river sections. Afterwards, both models transfer their results to the species distribution model BIOMOD, which calculates the habitat functions and occurrence probabilities for each selected species (benthic macroinvertebrates). The developed concept, the procedure of the field campaigns and the first steps and results of the ecohydrological and hydraulic modeling are presented. Catchment discharge time series of the SWAT model were used as boundary conditions to the hydraulic modelling. The HEC-RAS models were set up for ten river sections with a length of about 300 meters each. The calibration of the HEC-RAS stream flow models was carried out towards the elevation differences between adjacent cross-sections, rather than roughness values. In a sensitivity analysis this approach proved to yield very good calibration results. Among other parameters, the stream flow variables water depth, flow velocity, shear stress and stream power were calculated and analysed. The HEC-RAS model results showed that

  13. Assessment of hydraulic fish habitat condition using integrated toolkit: a case study of the Geum river basin, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangyoung; Kim, Jeongkon; Ko, Ick Hwan; Arthington, Angela; Jones, Gary; Yum, Kyung Taek

    2010-01-01

    Artificial changes of rivers, including construction and operation of dams, inevitably lead to physical and ecological changes throughout waterways and their floodplains. In this study, a conceptual model coupled with integrated numerical modeling is presented for hydraulic fish habitat assessment of the Geum River basin, Republic of Korea. Based on the major events which might have affected the ecological system, a conceptual model was formulated to guide desktop and field studies, modeling and scenario evaluations. The result of hydraulic fish habitat assessment indicated that the construction of the Daecheong Multipurpose Dam (DMD) in the Geum River basin has altered flow magnitudes and reduced the river's flow variability. Changes are evident in the magnitude of medium and small flows and the river experiences increased low flows during the dry season. Black shiner, an endangered fish species in Korea, was selected and analyzed to explore relationships between flow regime change by dams and changes to its preferred habitats. As a result, fewer sensitive riffle-benthic species were observed in the reaches downstream of DMD due to the reduction of suitable habitat conditions such as riffle-pool sequences. The proposed conceptual model and integrated toolkit would allow river managers to isolate the physical and biological effects associated with dam operation and could be useful for developing river management strategies.

  14. The catastrophic failures of plants hydraulic network examined trough an model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaimé, Diane; Marmottant, Philippe; Brodribb, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Plants live a dangerous game: they have to facilitate water transport in their xylem conduits while minimizing the consequence of hydraulic failure. Indeed, as water flows under negative pressure inside these conduits, cavitation bubbles can spontaneously occur. The failure dynamics of this hydraulic network is poorly studied, while it has important ecological and bioengineering implications. Here, by using dark-field transmission microscopy, we were able to directly visualize the spreading of cavitation bubbles within leaves, where the xylem conduits form a 2D and transparent network. We observe the surprising fact that the probability of cavitation increases in larger veins, where the majority of water flows. Next, in order to understand the physical mechanism of nucleation and propagation, we built artificial networks of channels made in hydrogel, where evaporation generates negative pressures. We find the hydraulic failure follows two stages: first a sudden bubble nucleation relaxing to the elastic stored of the system, and then a slow expansion driven by the flow of water in the surrounding medium. Channel constrictions slow the propagation of the bubble, similarly to the small valves that connect plants conduits. P.M. acknowledges support from the University of Tasmania for a visiting scholar grant.

  15. Inverse modeling of coastal aquifers using tidal response and hydraulic tests.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Andrés; Castro, Eduardo; Barbieri, Manuela; Carrera, Jesús; Bea, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Remediation of contaminated aquifers demands a reliable characterization of hydraulic connectivity patterns. Hydraulic diffusivity is possibly the best indicator of connectivity. It can be derived using the tidal response method (TRM), which is based on fitting observations to a closed-form solution. Unfortunately, the conventional TRM assumes homogeneity. The objective of this study was to overcome this limitation and use tidal response to identify preferential flowpaths. Additionally, the procedure requires joint inversion with hydraulic test data. These provide further information on connectivity and are needed to resolve diffusivity into transmissivity and storage coefficient. Spatial variability is characterized using the regularized pilot points method. Actual application may be complicated by the need to filter tidal effects from the response to pumping and by the need to deal with different types of data, which we have addressed using maximum likelihood methods. Application to a contaminated artificial coastal fill leads to flowpaths that are consistent with the materials used during construction and to solute transport predictions that compare well with observations. We conclude that tidal response can be used to identify connectivity patterns. As such, it should be useful when designing measures to control sea water intrusion.

  16. Analysis and Prediction of Rainfall and Storm Surge Interactions in the Clear Creek Watershed using Unsteady-State HEC-RAS Hydraulic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Heather

    This study presents an unsteady-state hydraulic model analysis of hurricane storm surge and rainfall-runoff interactions in the Clear Creek Watershed, a basin draining into Galveston Bay and vulnerable to flooding from both intense local rainfalls and storm surge. Storm surge and rainfall-runoff have historically been modeled separately, and thus the linkage and interactions between the two during a hurricane are not completely understood. This study simulates the two processes simultaneously by using storm surge stage hydrographs as boundary conditions in the Hydrologic Engineering Center’s - River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) hydraulic model. Storm surge hydrographs for a severe hurricane were generated in the Advanced Circulation Model for Oceanic, Coastal, and Estuarine Waters (ADCIRC) model to predict the flooding that could be caused by a worst-case scenario. Using this scenario, zones have been identified to represent areas in the Clear Creek Watershed vulnerable to flooding from storm surge, rainfall, or both.

  17. Modeling Atmospheric Emissions and Calculating Mortality Rates Associated with High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Alyssa

    Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are a growing pollution concern throughout the global community, as they have been linked to numerous health issues. The freight transportation sector is a large source of these emissions and is expected to continue growing as globalization persists. Within the US, the expanding development of the natural gas industry is helping to support many industries and leading to increased transportation. The process of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing (HVHF) is one of the newer advanced extraction techniques that is increasing natural gas and oil reserves dramatically within the US, however the technique is very resource intensive. HVHF requires large volumes of water and sand per well, which is primarily transported by trucks in rural areas. Trucks are also used to transport waste away from HVHF well sites. This study focused on the emissions generated from the transportation of HVHF materials to remote well sites, dispersion, and subsequent health impacts. The Geospatial Intermodal Freight Transport (GIFT) model was used in this analysis within ArcGIS to identify roadways with high volume traffic and emissions. High traffic road segments were used as emissions sources to determine the atmospheric dispersion of particulate matter using AERMOD, an EPA model that calculates geographic dispersion and concentrations of pollutants. Output from AERMOD was overlaid with census data to determine which communities may be impacted by increased emissions from HVHF transport. The anticipated number of mortalities within the impacted communities was calculated, and mortality rates from these additional emissions were computed to be 1 in 10 million people for a simulated truck fleet meeting stricter 2007 emission standards, representing a best case scenario. Mortality rates due to increased truck emissions from average, in-use vehicles, which represent a mixed age truck fleet, are expected to be higher (1 death per 341,000 people annually).

  18. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  19. Modeling the performance of an anaerobic baffled reactor with the variation of hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzheng; Shi, En; Antwi, Philip; Leu, Shao-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic baffled reactors (ABRs) have been widely used in engineering but very few models have been developed to simulate its performance. Based on the integration of biomass retention and liquid-gas mass transfer of biogas into the biochemical process derived in the International Water Association (IWA) Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 (ADM1), a mathematical model was developed to predict volatile fatty acids (VFAs), chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) and biogas in a 4-compartment ABR operated with variable hydraulic retention time (HRT). The model was calibrated and validated with the experimental data obtained from the reactor when the HRT decreased from 2.0 to 1.0d by stages. It was found that the predicted VFAs, CODCr and biogas agreed well with the experimental data. Consequently, the developed model was a reliable tool to enhance the understanding among the mechanisms of the anaerobic digestion in ABRs, as well as to reactor's designing and operation.

  20. A tracer study for assessing the interactions between hydraulic retention time and transport processes in a wetland system for nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Wanielista, Martin P

    2012-03-01

    In this study, a new-generation subsurface upflow wetland (SUW) system packed with the unique sorption media was introduced for nutrient removal. To explore the interface between hydraulic and environmental performance, a tracer study was carried out in concert with a transport model to collectively provide hydraulic retention time (7.1 days) and compelling evidence of pollutant fate and transport processes. Research findings indicate that our pollution-control media demonstrate smooth nutrient removal efficiencies across different sampling port locations given the appropriate size distribution conversant with the anticipated hydraulic patterns and layered structure among the sorption media components. The sizable capacity for nutrient removal in this bioprocess confirms that SUW is a promising substitute for an extension of traditional on-site wastewater treatment systems.

  1. Hydraulic Model Investigation: Walnut Creek Flood-Control Project Contra Costa County, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT HL-87-14 WALNUT CREEK FLOOD-CONTROL PROJECT CONTRA COSTA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Hydraulic Model Investigation by W. G. Davis O11C tLE...34’ : AA Ii iA e d S O a :::: SCALE IN MILES 5 0 5 10 Figure 1. Vicinity map 4~ 4.. %- . " . " %____ WALNUT CREEK FLOOD-CONTROL PROJECT CONTRA COSTA COUNTY...Pleasant Hi-1, nd Martinez, California, on its way to the Suisin Bay. All of th.e planned imcrovements are located in Contra Costa County, California

  2. Arterial mechanics in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Mechanical properties, hydraulic conductivity, and two-phase (solid/fluid) finite element models.

    PubMed

    Gaballa, M A; Raya, T E; Simon, B R; Goldman, S

    1992-07-01

    To characterize the interaction between mechanical and fluid transport properties in hypertension, we measured in vivo elastic material constants and hydraulic conductivity in intact segments of carotid arteries in normal and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). With the use of a finite element model, the arterial wall was modeled as a large-deformation, two-phase (solid/fluid) medium, which accounts for the existence and motion of the tissue fluid. Measurements of internal diameter and transmural pressures were obtained during continuous increases in pressure from 0 to 200 mm Hg. Strain and stress components were calculated based on a pseudostrain exponential energy density function. To measure the hydraulic conductivity, segments of the carotid artery were isolated, filled with a 4% oxygenated albumin-Tyrode's solution, and connected to a capillary tube. The movement of the meniscus of the capillary tube represented the fluid filtration across the artery. To study the influence of transmural pressure on hydraulic conductivity, measurement of fluid filtration across the arterial wall was obtained at transmural pressures of 50 and 100 mm Hg. The material constants in the SHR (n = 9) were higher (p less than 0.05 for all variables) than in normal rats (n = 10): c = 1,343 +/- 96 versus 1,158 +/- 65 mm Hg, b1 = 1.84 +/- 0.24 versus 1.22 +/- 0.22, b2 = 0.769 +/- 0.114 versus 0.616 +/- 0.11, b3 = 0.017 +/- 0.005 versus 0.0065 +/- 0.002, b4 = 0.206 +/- 0.04 versus 0.083 +/- 0.03, b5 = 0.0594 +/- 0.007 versus 0.0217 +/- 0.006, and b6 = 0.22 +/- 0.09 versus 0.123 +/- 0.02, respectively. The hydraulic conductivity of the total wall, calculated from the filtration data, was lower (p less than 0.05) at both 50 and 100 mm Hg in the SHR (n = 6) compared with normal rats (n = 7): 1.12 +/- 0.31 x 10(-8) and 0.72 +/- 0.23 x 10(-8) versus 1.95 +/- 0.53 x 10(-8) and 1.35 +/- 0.47 x 10(-8) cm/(sec.mm Hg), respectively. The intergroup comparisons between 50 and 100 mm Hg in both SHR

  3. Numerical Study of Critical Role of Rock Heterogeneity in Hydraulic Fracture Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zhou; H. Huang; M. Deo

    2016-03-01

    Log and seismic data indicate that most shale formations have strong heterogeneity. Conventional analytical and semi-analytical fracture models are not enough to simulate the complex fracture propagation in these highly heterogeneous formation. Without considering the intrinsic heterogeneity, predicted morphology of hydraulic fracture may be biased and misleading in optimizing the completion strategy. In this paper, a fully coupling fluid flow and geomechanics hydraulic fracture simulator based on dual-lattice Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to predict the hydraulic fracture propagation in heterogeneous reservoir. The heterogeneity of rock is simulated by assigning different material force constant and critical strain to different particles and is adjusted by conditioning to the measured data and observed geological features. Based on proposed model, the effects of heterogeneity at different scale on micromechanical behavior and induced macroscopic fractures are examined. From the numerical results, the microcrack will be more inclined to form at the grain weaker interface. The conventional simulator with homogeneous assumption is not applicable for highly heterogeneous shale formation.

  4. Linking Tropical Forest Function to Hydraulic Traits in a Size-Structured and Trait-Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, B. O.; Gloor, M.; Fauset, S.; Fyllas, N.; Galbraith, D.; Baker, T. R.; Rowland, L.; Fisher, R.; Binks, O.; Sevanto, S.; Xu, C.; Jansen, S.; Choat, B.; Mencuccini, M.; McDowell, N. G.; Meir, P.

    2015-12-01

    A major weakness of forest ecosystem models is their inability to capture the diversity of responses to changes in water availability, severely hampering efforts to predict the fate of tropical forests under climate change. Such models often prescribe moisture sensitivity using heuristic response functions that are uniform across all individuals and lack important knowledge about trade-offs in hydraulic traits. We address this weakness by implementing a process representation of plant hydraulics into an individual- and trait-based model (Trait Forest Simulator; TFS) intended for application at discrete sites where community-level distributions of stem and leaf trait spectra (wood density, leaf mass per area, leaf nitrogen and phosphorus content) are known. The model represents a trade-off in the safety and efficiency of water conduction in xylem tissue through hydraulic traits, while accounting for the counteracting effects of increasing hydraulic path length and xylem conduit taper on whole-plant hydraulic resistance with increasing tree size. Using existing trait databases and additional meta-analyses from the rich literature on tropical tree ecophysiology, we obtained all necessary hydraulic parameters associated with xylem conductivity, vulnerability curves, pressure-volume curves, and hydraulic architecture (e.g., leaf-to-sapwood area ratios) as a function of the aforementioned traits and tree size. Incorporating these relationships in the model greatly improved the diversity of tree response to seasonal changes in water availability as well as in response to drought, as determined by comparison with field observations and experiments. Importantly, this individual- and trait-based framework provides a testbed for identifying both critical processes and functional traits needed for inclusion in coarse-scale Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, which will lead to reduced uncertainty in the future state of tropical forests.

  5. Suitability of parametric models to describe the hydraulic properties of an unsaturated coarse sand and gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mace, Andy; Rudolph, David L.; Kachanoski , R. Gary

    1998-01-01

    The performance of parametric models used to describe soil water retention (SWR) properties and predict unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) as a function of volumetric water content (θ) is examined using SWR and K(θ) data for coarse sand and gravel sediments. Six 70 cm long, 10 cm diameter cores of glacial outwash were instrumented at eight depths with porous cup ten-siometers and time domain reflectometry probes to measure soil water pressure head (h) and θ, respectively, for seven unsaturated and one saturated steady-state flow conditions. Forty-two θ(h) and K(θ) relationships were measured from the infiltration tests on the cores. Of the four SWR models compared in the analysis, the van Genuchten (1980) equation with parameters m and n restricted according to the Mualem (m = 1 - 1/n) criterion is best suited to describe the θ(h) relationships. The accuracy of two models that predict K(θ) using parameter values derived from the SWR models was also evaluated. The model developed by van Genuchten (1980) based on the theoretical expression of Mualem (1976) predicted K(θ) more accurately than the van Genuchten (1980) model based on the theory of Burdine (1953). A sensitivity analysis shows that more accurate predictions of K(θ) are achieved using SWR model parameters derived with residual water content (θr) specified according to independent measurements of θ at values of h where θ/h ∼ 0 rather than model-fit θr values. The accuracy of the model K(θ) function improves markedly when at least one value of unsaturated K is used to scale the K(θ) function predicted using the saturated K. The results of this investigation indicate that the hydraulic properties of coarse-grained sediments can be accurately described using the parametric models. In addition, data collection efforts should focus on measuring at least one value of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and as complete a set of SWR data as possible, particularly in the dry range.

  6. Computational thermal-hydraulic modeling of a steam generator and a boiler simulator autoclave

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, R.H.; Keeton, L.W.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion of heat transfer tubing in nuclear steam generators has been a persistent problem in the power generation industry, assuming many different forms over the years depending on chemistry and operating conditions. Whatever the corrosion mechanism, a funding understanding of the process is essential to establish effective management strategies. To gain this fundamental understanding requires an integrated investigative approach that merges technology from many diverse scientific disciplines. An important aspect of an integrated approach is characterization of the corrosive environment at high temperature. This begins with a thorough understanding of local thermal-hydraulic conditions, since they affect deposit formation, chemical concentration, and ultimately corrosion. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can and should play an important role in characterizing the thermal-hydraulic environment and in predicting the consequences of that environment. The evolution of CFD technology now allows accurate calculation of steam generator thermal-hydraulic conditions and the resulting sludge deposit profiles. Similar calculations are also possible for model boilers, so that tests can be designed to be prototypic of the heat exchanger environment they are supposed to simulate. This paper illustrates the utility of CFD technology by way of examples in each of these two areas. This technology can be further extended to produce more detailed local calculations of the chemical environment in support plate crevices, beneath thick deposits on tubes, and deep in tubesheet sludge. Knowledge of this local chemical environment will provide the foundation for development of mechanistic corrosion models, which can be used to optimize inspection and cleaning schedules and focus the search for a viable fix.

  7. Hydraulic fracturing model featuring initiation beyond the wellbore wall for directional well in coal bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuwei; Jia, Dan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Jia; Fu, Chunkai; Yang, Xinliang; Ai, Chi

    2016-08-01

    In developing internal fracture systems in coal beds, the initiation mechanism differs greatly from that of conventional ones and initiations may be produced beyond the wellbore wall. This paper describes the features of the internal structure of coal beds and RFPA2D simulation is used to attest the possible occurrence of initiation beyond the wellbore wall in coal bed hydraulic fracturing. Using the theory of elasticity and fracture mechanics, we analyse the stress distribution in the vicinal coal rock. Then by taking into consideration the effects of the spatial relationship between coal bed cleats and the wellbore, we establish a model for calculating both tensile and shear initiation pressure that occur along cleats beyond the wellbore wall. The simulation in this paper indicates that for shear initiations that happen along coal cleats, the pressure required to initiate fracture for cleats beyond the wellbore wall is evidently lower than that on the wellbore wall, thus it is easier to initiate shear fractures for cleats beyond the wellbore wall. For tensile failure, the pressure required to initiate tensile fracture for cleats beyond the wellbore wall is obviously higher than that for cleats at the wellbore wall, thus it is easier to initiate tensile fractures for cleats at the wellbore wall. On the one hand, this paper has proved the possible occurrence of initiations beyond the wellbore wall and has changed the current assumption that hydraulic fractures can only occur at the wellbore wall. On the other hand, the established theoretical model provides a new approach to calculating the initiation pressure in hydraulic fracturing.

  8. The application of Biological-Hydraulic coupled model for Tubificidae-microorganism interaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiao; Sun, Peide; Song, Yingqi; Wang, Ruyi; Fang, Zhiguo

    2010-11-01

    Based on the fully coupled activated sludge model (FCASM), the novel model Tubificidae -Fully Coupled Activated Sludge Model-hydraulic (T-FCASM-Hydro), has been developed in our previous work. T-FCASM-Hydro not only describe the interactive system between Tubificidae and functional microorganisms for the sludge reduction and nutrient removal simultaneously, but also considere the interaction between biological and hydraulic field, After calibration and validation of T-FCASM-Hydro at Zhuji Feida-hongyu Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Zhejiang province, T-FCASM-Hydro was applied for determining optimal operating condition in the WWTP. Simulation results showed that nitrogen and phosphorus could be removed efficiently, and the efficiency of NH4+-N removal enhanced with increase of DO concentration. At a certain low level of DO concentration in the aerobic stage, shortcut nitrification-denitrification dominated in the process of denitrification in the novel system. However, overhigh agitation (>6 mgṡL-1) could result in the unfavorable feeding behavior of Tubificidae because of the strong flow disturbance, which might lead to low rate of sludge reduction. High sludge reduction rate and high removal rate of nitrogen and phosphorus could be obtained in the new-style oxidation ditch when DO concentration at the aerobic stage with Tubificidae was maintained at 3.6 gṡm-3.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation in process reactors during aeration tank settling.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D; Ingildsen, P; Rasmussen, M R; Laursen, J

    2006-01-01

    Aeration tank settling is a control method allowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration tank settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plants using the present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. This paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet and outlet causing a disruption of the sludge blanket at the outlet and thereby reducing the retention of sludge in the process tank. The model has allowed us to establish a clear picture of the problems arising at the plant during aeration tank settling. Secondly, several process tank design changes have been suggested and tested by means of computational fluid dynamics modelling. The most promising design changes have been found and reported.

  10. Full equations utilities (FEQUTL) model for the approximation of hydraulic characteristics of open channels and control structures during unsteady flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franz, Delbert D.; Melching, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    The Full EQuations UTiLities (FEQUTL) model is a computer program for computation of tables that list the hydraulic characteristics of open channels and control structures as a function of upstream and downstream depths; these tables facilitate the simulation of unsteady flow in a stream system with the Full Equations (FEQ) model. Simulation of unsteady flow requires many iterations for each time period computed. Thus, computation of hydraulic characteristics during the simulations is impractical, and preparation of function tables and application of table look-up procedures facilitates simulation of unsteady flow. Three general types of function tables are computed: one-dimensional tables that relate hydraulic characteristics to upstream flow depth, two-dimensional tables that relate flow through control structures to upstream and downstream flow depth, and three-dimensional tables that relate flow through gated structures to upstream and downstream flow depth and gate setting. For open-channel reaches, six types of one-dimensional function tables contain different combinations of the top width of flow, area, first moment of area with respect to the water surface, conveyance, flux coefficients, and correction coefficients for channel curvilinearity. For hydraulic control structures, one type of one-dimensional function table contains relations between flow and upstream depth, and two types of two-dimensional function tables contain relations among flow and upstream and downstream flow depths. For hydraulic control structures with gates, a three-dimensional function table lists the system of two-dimensional tables that contain the relations among flow and upstream and downstream flow depths that correspond to different gate openings. Hydraulic control structures for which function tables containing flow relations are prepared in FEQUTL include expansions, contractions, bridges, culverts, embankments, weirs, closed conduits (circular, rectangular, and pipe

  11. Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores with supercritical steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ken Oglesby

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores at various depths and with various hole sizes, tubing, fluids and rates showed theoretical feasibility. WELLFLO SIMULATIONS REPORT STEP 4: DRILLING 10,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 5: DRILLING 20,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 6: DRILLING 30,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE Mehmet Karaaslan, MSI

  12. On the Development of a Model for Flood-Tidal Deltas and the Hydraulic Efficiency of Associated Tidal Inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, M.; Smith, T. L.; Giese, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    A highly energetic, rapidly changing system provides the opportunity to study the potential for linking flood-tidal deltas and tidal inlets in order to predict possible future inlet scenarios. These subtidal and intertidal sedimentary deposits are formed by flood-tidal currents and modified by ebb-tidal currents and as such can elucidate past and present hydraulic conditions. Further, within the proposed conceptual model the evolution of these features can lend insight into future system and inlet development. An ongoing study documented a feedback mechanism linking the primary flood-tidal delta with the migration of the tidal inlet in the study area on Cape Cod, Massachusetts USA. This was based on field surveys (n = 10) of intertidal bedforms, a tidal current velocity survey, and 2 dimensional analyses of aerial photographs from 1938 to the present (n = 32). Three-dimensional analysis of the flood-tidal delta and inlet was conducted using bathymetry from a 2014 vessel-based survey using Phase-Measuring Sidescan Sonar, coupled with bathymetric Lidar from 2007 and 2010. A conceptual model for this and similar systems is being developed. As seen in the study area material entrained in the longshore sediment transport system becomes incorporated into the swash platform. As a result more sediment is introduced into the harbor during flood tides increasing the size of the flood-tidal delta. If the increase in size reduces the hydraulic efficiency of the ebb-tidal flow a feedback mechanism can result. Ebb-tidal flow is restricted, channels become narrower and deeper, and this channelization leads to an increase in shallower areas in the harbor, which further increases sediment transport during flood-tidal flow. If the cycle continues the system becomes too hydraulically inefficient and a correction occurs, that can be gradual or rapid, either of which has implications for system evolution and/or management. This preliminary model was developed from field observations in

  13. Megaflood erosion of the Tsangpo Gorge constrained by hydraulic modeling, geochronology, and geochemical fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turzewski, M. D.; Huntington, K. W.; LeVeque, R. J.; Feathers, J. K.; Larsen, I. J.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The role of extreme floods in long-term erosion and landscape evolution is difficult to study because these events occur infrequently on human timescales and cannot often be observed directly. We address this difficulty using the rich sedimentary record of extreme floods preserved within the Siang River valley of the Eastern Himalaya, which hosts slackwater deposits from historical landslide-dam outburst floods and prehistoric glacial lake outburst megafloods sourced upstream of the Tsangpo gorge in Tibet. Previous workers used detrital zircon U-Pb ages of modern river sediments and flood sands to suggest that megafloods more effectively focus erosion in the Tsangpo gorge than modern peak flows and the year 2000 flood; however, this finding is based on only four, undated megaflood deposits, and a thorough investigation of the history, hydraulics, and erosive impact of different magnitude flood events is lacking. To expand this record and better understand the relationship between floods, erosion, and deposition, we combined field observations and dating of flood deposits with sediment provenance constraints and numerical flood modeling. We surveyed the trim line from the 2000 flood and identified two historical and 18 ancient slackwater flood deposits. Radiocarbon dates of megaflood deposits range from 1200-1650 14C yr B.P and correlate with upstream glacial lake terraces in Tibet dated by previous workers. Single-grain infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating of feldspar from megaflood deposits produced ages of 10 to 27 ka that correlate to older glacial lake terraces in Tibet. Using reconstructed glacial and landslide-dammed lakes and modern topography, we simulated the 2000 flood and two megaflood events with GeoClaw, an open source program designed to model geophysical flows. Modeled inundation for the 2000 flood is comparable to the observed flood stage, trim line, and distribution of slackwater deposits. Inundation maps from megaflood simulations

  14. Quantification of Parameter Uncertainty of a Distributed Hydraulic Model Using Ensemble Smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; McLaughlin, Dennis; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Li, Wenpeng; Dong, Xinguang

    2014-05-01

    Yanqi basin is an important agricultural region in Xinjiang, in Northwest China. The irrigated agricultural land has been increasing in the past decades and made the basin suffer from many environmental problems such as soil salinization, decreased lake level, deteriorated lake water quality, decreased surface water flow to the downstream and damaged riverine forests. A 3-dimensional distributed numerical flow and transport model is built using MIKESHE/MIKE11 which contains saturated and unsaturated zones, rivers and lakes. It allows to better understand the impacts of individual hydrological units and their interactions. Before using the model for quantifying solutions for the environmental problems, the parameter uncertainties of the complex distributed model are assessed using an Ensemble Smoother (ES). ES is a data assimilation method to improve an ensemble of prior parameters by assimilating time series of observations over the whole time period available. It is basically a stochastic calibration method. In this case study, an iterative ES is applied, called Ensemble Smoother with Multiple Data Assimilation (ESMDA) (Emerick and Reynolds, 2012). Two alternatives are considered to update parameters in each iteration. One is the Ensemble Kalman Filter with perturbed observations and the other is an Unbiased Square root filter which updates parameter means and perturbations separately. Seventeen parameters are chosen from the distributed flow and transport model to quantify their uncertainty. Fifty prior replicates of each parameter are generated using the Latin Hypercube Sampling method. The distribution of posterior parameters and outputs obtained from the alternative methods are similar. The results indicate that the uncertainty of the parameters is narrowed during the smoother updating process, reflecting the information obtained from the observations. The most sensitive parameters are the dispersion coefficient of the lakes and the hydraulic conductivity of

  15. Electrical Conductivity and Dielectric Studies of Hydraulic Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Marianela Perez

    Electrical properties of portland cements and other non-portland cementitious materials have been studied at two different stages of hydration. The following relationships have been observed:. Higher water/cement (w/c) ratio (0.5 compared to 0.4) resulted in an increase of the relative permittivity and electrical conductivity of early stage hydrating materials. The relative permittivity values were close to 10('7). The phenomena giving rise to changes in electrical conductivity have been related to the heat of hydration. Higher alkali ion concentration resulted in higher electrical conductivity and relative permittivity values in cement pastes. Cations of inorganic admixtures were found to increase maximum peak of electrical conductivity and relative permittivity in the order: Ca('++) > Mg('++) > Sr('++) and K('+) (TURNEQ) Na('+) > Li('+). Dielectric properties of pressed hardened materials cured over water for 1 day with w/c = 0.20 and heat treated to 500(DEGREES)C prepared with type I, type III, and a microfine calcium silicate (MC500) cement have been compared as a function of temperature and frequency. The relative permittivity for type I hardened materials at 30(DEGREES)C was found to range from 12.5 to 9.4 at frequencies from 1 KHz to 2 MHz. The dissipation factor was found to range from 0.122 to 0.014. The relative permittivity and dissipation factors for type III hardened materials were found to range from 17.8 to 13.0 and from 0.035 to 0.071, respectively, and for MC500 hardened materials were determined to range from 7.6 to 6.9 and from 0.033 to 0.002, respectively. The activation energies determined from Arrhenius plots for the relaxation mechanism operating in these materials correspond to 0.33, 0.30, and 0.46 eV for type I, type III, and MC500 densified hardened materials, respectively. Cement/polymer composites have been prepared using 1.76 wt.% methyl cellulose polymer and a w/c ratio of 0.17. The relative permittivity and loss factor the samples

  16. Modular GIS Framework for National Scale Hydrologic and Hydraulic Modeling Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djokic, D.; Noman, N.; Kopp, S.

    2015-12-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) have been extensively used for pre- and post-processing of hydrologic and hydraulic models at multiple scales. An extensible GIS-based framework was developed for characterization of drainage systems (stream networks, catchments, floodplain characteristics) and model integration. The framework is implemented as a set of free, open source, Python tools and builds on core ArcGIS functionality and uses geoprocessing capabilities to ensure extensibility. Utilization of COTS GIS core capabilities allows immediate use of model results in a variety of existing online applications and integration with other data sources and applications.The poster presents the use of this framework to downscale global hydrologic models to local hydraulic scale and post process the hydraulic modeling results and generate floodplains at any local resolution. Flow forecasts from ECMWF or WRF-Hydro are downscaled and combined with other ancillary data for input into the RAPID flood routing model. RAPID model results (stream flow along each reach) are ingested into a GIS-based scale dependent stream network database for efficient flow utilization and visualization over space and time. Once the flows are known at localized reaches, the tools can be used to derive the floodplain depth and extent for each time step in the forecast at any available local resolution. If existing rating curves are available they can be used to relate the flow to the depth of flooding, or synthetic rating curves can be derived using the tools in the toolkit and some ancillary data/assumptions. The results can be published as time-enabled spatial services to be consumed by web applications that use floodplain information as an input. Some of the existing online presentation templates can be easily combined with available online demographic and infrastructure data to present the impact of the potential floods on the local community through simple, end user products. This framework

  17. A method to calibrate channel friction and bathymetry parameters of a Sub-Grid hydraulic model using SAR flood images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites are capable of all-weather day and night observations that can discriminate between land and smooth open water surfaces over large scales. Because of this there has been much interest in the use of SAR satellite data to improve our understanding of water processes, in particular for fluvial flood inundation mechanisms. Past studies prove that integrating SAR derived data with hydraulic models can improve simulations of flooding. However while much of this work focusses on improving model channel roughness values or inflows in ungauged catchments, improvement of model bathymetry is often overlooked. The provision of good bathymetric data is critical to the performance of hydraulic models but there are only a small number of ways to obtain bathymetry information where no direct measurements exist. Spatially distributed river depths are also rarely available. We present a methodology for calibration of model average channel depth and roughness parameters concurrently using SAR images of flood extent and a Sub-Grid model utilising hydraulic geometry concepts. The methodology uses real data from the European Space Agency's archive of ENVISAT[1] Wide Swath Mode images of the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury during flood peaks between 2007 and 2010. Historic ENVISAT WSM images are currently free and easy to access from archive but the methodology can be applied with any available SAR data. The approach makes use of the SAR image processing algorithm of Giustarini[2] et al. (2013) to generate binary flood maps. A unique feature of the calibration methodology is to also use parameter 'identifiability' to locate the parameters with higher accuracy from a pre-assigned range (adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[3] et al., 2003). [1] https://gpod.eo.esa.int/services/ [2] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote

  18. Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, Wayne R.; Elliott, Peggy E.; Geldon, Arthur L.

    2001-01-01

    The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada, between latitudes 35? and 38?15' north and longitudes 115? and 117?45' west. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

  19. Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Belcher; P.E. Elliott; A.L. Geldon

    2001-12-31

    The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model, were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

  20. A high resolution coupled hydrologic-hydraulic model (HiResFlood-UCI) for flash flood modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phu; Thorstensen, Andrea; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Hsu, Kuolin; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sanders, Brett; Koren, Victor; Cui, Zhengtao; Smith, Michael

    2016-10-01

    HiResFlood-UCI was developed by coupling the NWS's hydrologic model (HL-RDHM) with the hydraulic model (BreZo) for flash flood modeling at decameter resolutions. The coupled model uses HL-RDHM as a rainfall-runoff generator and replaces the routing scheme of HL-RDHM with the 2D hydraulic model (BreZo) in order to predict localized flood depths and velocities. A semi-automated technique of unstructured mesh generation was developed to cluster an adequate density of computational cells along river channels such that numerical errors are negligible compared with other sources of error, while ensuring that computational costs of the hydraulic model are kept to a bare minimum. HiResFlood-UCI was implemented for a watershed (ELDO2) in the DMIP2 experiment domain in Oklahoma. Using synthetic precipitation input, the model was tested for various components including HL-RDHM parameters (a priori versus calibrated), channel and floodplain Manning n values, DEM resolution (10 m versus 30 m) and computation mesh resolution (10 m+ versus 30 m+). Simulations with calibrated versus a priori parameters of HL-RDHM show that HiResFlood-UCI produces reasonable results with the a priori parameters from NWS. Sensitivities to hydraulic model resistance parameters, mesh resolution and DEM resolution are also identified, pointing to the importance of model calibration and validation for accurate prediction of localized flood intensities. HiResFlood-UCI performance was examined using 6 measured precipitation events as model input for model calibration and validation of the streamflow at the outlet. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) obtained ranges from 0.588 to 0.905. The model was also validated for the flooded map using USGS observed water level at an interior point. The predicted flood stage error is 0.82 m or less, based on a comparison to measured stage. Validation of stage and discharge predictions builds confidence in model predictions of flood extent and localized velocities

  1. Modeling Hydraulic Responses to Meteorological Forcing: fromCanopy to Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur

    2007-02-08

    An understanding of the hydrologic interactions amongatmosphere, land surface, and subsurface is one of the keys tounderstanding the water cycling system that supports our life system onearth. Properly modeling such interactionsis a difficult task because oftheinherent coupled processes and complex feedback structures amongsubsystems. In this paper, we present a model that simulates thelandsurface and subsurface hydrologic response to meteorological forcing.This model combines a state of the art landsurface model, the NCARCommunity Land Model version 3 (CLM3), with a variablysaturatedgroundwater model, the TOUGH2, through an internal interfacethat includes flux and state variables shared by the two submodels.Specifically, TOUGH2, in its simulation, uses infiltration, evaporation,and rootuptake rates, calculated by CLM3, as source/sink terms? CLM3, inits simulation, uses saturation and capillary pressure profiles,calculated by TOUGH2, as state variables. This new model, CLMT2,preserves the best aspects of both submodels: the state of the artmodeling capability of surface energy and hydrologic processes from CLM3and the more realistic physical process based modeling capability ofsubsurface hydrologic processes from TOUGH2. The preliminary simulationresults show that the coupled model greatly improves the predictions ofthe water table, evapotranspiration, surface temperature, and moisture inthe top 20 cm of soil at a real watershed, as evaluated from 18 years ofobserved data. The new model is also ready to be coupled with anatmospheric simulation model, representing one of the first models thatare capable to simulate hydraulic processes from top of the atmosphere todeep ground.

  2. Cold source moderator vessel development for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: Thermal-hydraulic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.; Wendel, M.W.

    1998-07-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design, test, and install a cold neutron source facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This new cold source employs supercritical hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures both as the medium for neutron moderation and as the working fluid for removal of internally-generated nuclear heating. The competing design goals of minimizing moderator vessel mass and providing adequate structural integrity for the vessel motivated the requirement of detailed multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses of the moderator vessel as a critical design subtask. This paper provides a summary review of the HFIR cold source moderator vessel design and a description of the thermal-hydraulic studies that were carried out to support the vessel development.

  3. Monitoring of an hydraulic structure affected by ASR: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Patrice; Ballivy, Gerard; Gravel, Clermont; Saint-Pierre, Francois

    2010-04-15

    Relevant and effective instruments and techniques must be selected for monitoring hydraulic structures affected by Alkali-Silica Reaction ('ASR'). A program aiming at assessing the condition of a hydraulic structure affected by ASR is presented in this paper. The structure has been exhibiting signs of ASR for more than 30 years and shows various levels of damage. The program encompassed different components, consisting of: (1) stress measurement, (2) evaluation of concrete condition by nondestructive methods without drilling (seismic tomography), (3) the evaluation of the mechanical, physical and petrographic properties of the concrete determined from cores recovered from full-length boreholes. The results of this case study suggest that ASR may generate relatively little damage in structures and that the concrete mechanical properties do not seem to be significantly affected despite high expansion levels measured in this structure. A major crack was localized with the seismic tomography. The monitoring program will be used to follow the development of ASR in the structure.

  4. Simulating HFIR Core Thermal Hydraulics Using 3D-2D Model Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Adam R; Freels, James D; Ekici, Kivanc

    2013-01-01

    A model utilizing interdimensional variable coupling is presented for simulating the thermal hydraulic interactions of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The model s domain consists of a single, explicitly represented three-dimensional fuel plate and a simplified two-dimensional coolant channel slice. In simplifying the coolant channel, and thus the number of mesh points in which the Navier-Stokes equations must be solved, the computational cost and solution time are both greatly reduced. In order for the reduced-dimension coolant channel to interact with the explicitly represented fuel plate, however, interdimensional variable coupling must be enacted along all shared boundaries. The primary focus of this paper is in detailing the collection, storage, passage, and application of variables across this interdimensional interface. Comparisons are made showing the general speed-up associated with this simplified coupled model.

  5. Study on test and preparation of load spectrum of hydraulic excavator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Feng, Guodi; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yingzhi

    2017-01-01

    Due to harsh working conditions, the components of hydraulic excavator are subject to large amount of alternating load and random load during the operation and they are seriously damaged. The test of load signal and preparation of load spectrum for the hydraulic excavator are studied in this paper. In the first place, pretreatment of filtering and noise reduction for load signal is conducted based on experimental test on site and experimental working condition analysis. After the load signal is processed in sections, distribution fitting is performed for information like mean amplitude after rain flow counting with the approach of probability statistics to get the probability distribution function for mean value and amplitude value. Finally the two dimensional load spectrum for mean amplitude is obtained and program spectrum loading solution of fatigue experiment is given. The study of load signal test and load spectrum preparation method for hydraulic excavator conducted in this paper is of great significance for clarification of load distribution of excavator and further reliability test of excavator.

  6. Hydraulic Cushion” Type Overload Protection Devices Usable in Mechanical Presses. A Patent Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioară, R.

    2016-11-01

    The possible consequences of machine-tool overload are well-known. In order to prevent such, machine-tools are equipped with various overload protection devices. Mechanical presses, intensively strained machine-tools, are typically equipped with three protection systems: against accidental access to the working area during machine deployment, against torque overload and force overload. Force overload protection systems include either destructible parts and are used in small to medium nominal force mechanical presses, or non-destructible ones used mostly in medium to large nominal force (H-frame) presses. A particular class of force overload protection systems without destructible parts are “hydraulic cushion” type devices. While such systems do not necessarily cause the machine to stop, the slide's stroke does not reach the initial dead centre and consequently cannot exert the designed technological force on the workpiece. By a patent study referencing 19 relevant patents the paper captures both the diversity of the constrictive solutions of “hydraulic cushion” type protection devices and their positioning modalities within the structure of a mechanical press. An important aim of the study is to highlight the reserve of creativity existing in this field, at least from the viewpoint of the hydraulic cushion positioning, as well as to emphasize the essential requirement of a relative motion between the mobile and the fixed parts of the tool, a motion of opposite sense to that of the slide-crank mechanism.

  7. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  8. Modeled hydraulic redistribution in tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations: the implications of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Kailiang; Foster, Adrianna

    2016-04-01

    Past studies have largely focused on hydraulic redistribution (HR) in trees, shrubs, and grasses, and recognized its role in interspecies interactions. HR in plants that conduct crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), however, remains poorly investigated, as does the effect of HR on transpiration in different vegetation associations (i.e., tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations). We have developed a mechanistic model to investigate the net direction and magnitude of HR at the patch scale for tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations at the growing season to yearly timescale. The modeling results show that deep-rooted CAM plants in CAM-grass associations could perform hydraulic lift at a higher rate than trees in tree-grass associations in a relatively wet environment, as explained by a significant increase in grass transpiration rate in the shallow soil layer, balancing a lower transpiration rate by CAM plants. By comparison, trees in tree-CAM associations may perform hydraulic descent at a higher rate than those in tree-grass associations in a dry environment. Model simulations also show that hydraulic lift increases the transpiration of shallow-rooted plants, while hydraulic descent increases that of deep-rooted plants. CAM plants transpire during the night and thus perform HR during the day. Based on these model simulations, we suggest that the ability of CAM plants to perform HR at a higher rate may have different effects on the surrounding plant community than those of plants with C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathways (i.e., diurnal transpiration).

  9. A hydraulic model is compatible with rapid changes in leaf elongation under fluctuating evaporative demand and soil water status.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Cecilio F; Bosio, Mickael; Parent, Boris; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

    2014-04-01

    Plants are constantly facing rapid changes in evaporative demand and soil water content, which affect their water status and growth. In apparent contradiction to a hydraulic hypothesis, leaf elongation rate (LER) declined in the morning and recovered upon soil rehydration considerably quicker than transpiration rate and leaf water potential (typical half-times of 30 min versus 1-2 h). The morning decline of LER began at very low light and transpiration and closely followed the stomatal opening of leaves receiving direct light, which represent a small fraction of leaf area. A simulation model in maize (Zea mays) suggests that these findings are still compatible with a hydraulic hypothesis. The small water flux linked to stomatal aperture would be sufficient to decrease water potentials of the xylem and growing tissues, thereby causing a rapid decline of simulated LER, while the simulated water potential of mature tissues declines more slowly due to a high hydraulic capacitance. The model also captured growth patterns in the evening or upon soil rehydration. Changes in plant hydraulic conductance partly counteracted those of transpiration. Root hydraulic conductivity increased continuously in the morning, consistent with the transcript abundance of Zea maize Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein aquaporins. Transgenic lines underproducing abscisic acid, with lower hydraulic conductivity and higher stomatal conductance, had a LER declining more rapidly than wild-type plants. Whole-genome transcriptome and phosphoproteome analyses suggested that the hydraulic processes proposed here might be associated with other rapidly occurring mechanisms. Overall, the mechanisms and model presented here may be an essential component of drought tolerance in naturally fluctuating evaporative demand and soil moisture.

  10. Hydraulic and Vegetative Models of Historic Environmental Conditions Isolate the Role of Riparian Vegetation in Inducing Channel Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    elevation of tamarisk-dominated stands in the study reaches allowed us to temporally and spatially scale the vegetative hydraulic roughness. Flood-event hydrology and sediment rating curves were derived from nearby USGS stream gages. The two flood events, while similar in flood peak magnitude, had strikingly different geomorphic effects. The 1984 flood left extensive fine-grained deposits in the study areas, but the 2011 flood caused significant scour as well as fill, resulting in significant areas of erosion as well as deposition. One reason for this finding is the difference in flood duration. However, other observed differences appear to be a result of the temporal differences in distribution and density of tamarisk stands wherein the density of riparian vegetation increased greatly between 1984 and 2011 . Our integration of sedimentologic, topographic, and vegetation stand structure data with hydraulic modeling also makes it possible to anticipate the style and magnitude of future channel changes in response to future changes in the flow regime, sediment supply, and/or riparian vegetation communities composition.

  11. Control of dense collagen gel scaffolds for tissue engineering through measurement and modelling of hydraulic permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpooshan, Vahid

    Among various natural biopolymers, type I collagen gels have demonstrated the highest potential as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE). However, the successful application of collagen gels requires a greater understanding of the relationship between their microstructure and physical-mechanical properties. Therefore, a precise method to modulate collagen gel microstructure in order to attain optimal scaffold properties for diverse biomedical applications is necessary. This dissertation describes a new approach to produce collagen gels with defined microstructures, quantified by hydraulic permeability ( k), in order to optimize scaffold properties for TE applications. It was hypothesized that the measurement of k can be used to study the role of microstructure in collagen gel properties, as well as cell function and cell-scaffold interactions. Applying increasing levels of plastic compression (PC) to the highly hydrated collagen gels resulted in an increase in collagen fibrillar density, reduced Happel model derived k values, increased gel stiffness, promoted MSC metabolic activity, osteogenic differentiation, and mineral deposition, while cell-induced gel contraction diminished. Thus, collagen gels with lower k and higher stiffness values exhibited greater potential for bone tissue engineering. Correlating between collagen gel microstructure, k, and fibroblast function within collagen gels indicated that increasing the level of PC yielded a reduction in pore size and an increase in fibril bundle diameter. Decrease in k values resulted in a decrease in gel contraction and an increase in cell metabolic activity. An increase in cell density accelerated contraction. Therefore, fibroblast function within collagen gels can be optimised by a balance between the microstructure, k, and cell seeding density. Developing a micromechanical model to measure experimental k of collagen gels during confined compression revealed the formation of a dense collagen lamella

  12. Case studies for solving the Saint-Venant equations using the method of characteristics: pipeline hydraulic transients and discharge propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, R. M.; Tiago Filho, G. L.; dos Santos, I. F. S.; da Silva, F. G. B.

    2014-03-01

    Hydraulic transients occur during a change from one equilibrium state to another, for example, in flows. The pipeline project should provide the head and discharge in any operating states, e.g., sudden valve opening or closure. Among the various numerical approaches for the calculation of pipeline transients, the method of characteristics (MOC) is advantageous This study aims to present a hydraulic transitory study as MOC applications for solving the Saint- Venant equations in two case studies: 1) in a penstock of a small hydropower system as a simple pipeline in the case of valve-closure in the downstream boundary with a reservoir in the upstream boundary; and 2) for discharge propagation into a channel by velocity and depth of the flow channel along space evaluation. The main data for the first case study consisted of a design head that is 182 meters, a turbine discharge of 13.82 m3/s, a diameter of 4 meters and length pipe (penstock) of 2,152.50 meters. Regarding the second case study, the entry hydrogram was given to a rectangular channel with a width of 6.1 meters, length of 3,048 meters, slope of 0.0016 meters, and exhibited uniform flow with nominal depth of 2.44 meters. The characteristic curve of the discharge in the downstream extremity is Q = 158.(y - 3.25)32. The proposed methodology by Chaudry [5] concerning the development of hydrodynamic models was used. The obtained results for first case study showed that the simulated values for valve pressure while varying turning the valve between 4 and 12 seconds results in maximum values of pressures that oscillated between 219.97mca and 212.39 mca (4s) and 196.42mca and 190.86mca (12s). For the second case study, the values of discharge, velocity, and depth for x=0 and elapsed time of 850s were, respectively, 127.70m3/s, 3.87m/s, and 5.36m. For x=0 and an elapsed time of 1,230s, the values were 87.92m3/s, 4.49m/s, and 3.21m. Therefore, the MOC numerical approach has been confirmed to be useful for several

  13. Phase-field modeling of fracture propagation under hydraulic stimulation in pre-fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khisamitov, Ildar; Mohseni, Seyed Ali; Meschke, Guenther

    2016-04-01

    The presentation presents the numerical analysis of hydraulic fracturing within Griffith theory of brittle damage. The phase-field method [1] is employed to model brittle fracture propagation driven by pressurized fluids within fully saturated porous rocks. The phase-field equation is coupled with the Biot-theory using the effective stress concept. The porous rock is assumed as fully saturated with incompressible fluid and deforms within elasticity theory. The hydraulic fracturing propagates under mode I crack opening in quasi-static regime with slow fluid flow in porous matrix and fracture. The phase-field approach for the modelling of brittle fracture [2] coincides with the maximum energy release rate criterion in fracture mechanics theory. The phase-field equation is approximated over entire the domain and introduces new degree of freedom (damage variable). Crack surface is represented by a smooth regularized damage distribution over the fractured area. The presented numerical investigations are characterized by different scenarios of hydraulic stimulation and the interaction of a new fracture emanating from the bore hole with pre-existing cracks. The scenarios include predefined fractures with different oriented to specific angle and spatial distribution over the entire domain. The undamaged rock matrix is modeled as an isotropic elastic material with initial porosity and isotropic matrix permeability. The flow within the undamaged region is governed by Darcy's law while the fluid flow in fractures is approximated by cubic law with the crack opening computed from the displacement solution and the damage variable distribution [3]. Initial fractures are modeled by an initial distribution of the damage variable and by special zero-thickness interface finite elements. Adaptive algorithms in conjunction with appropriately chosen refinement criteria are utilized to reduce the computational costs. References [1] M.J. Borden "A phase-field description of dynamic

  14. Optimal hydraulic design of earth dam cross section using saturated-unsaturated seepage flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.-Q.; Unami, K.; Kawachi, T.

    An optimal hydraulic design problem regarding an earth dam cross section is formulated as an inverse problem for the steady model of saturated-unsaturated seepage flows in porous media. In the problem formulation, the choice of soil material to be used in each point of the dam cross sectional domain is considered as the control variable to be identified. The performance index used to evaluate the appropriateness of the design is defined as the sum of two square integral norms, which represent reducing the saturated zone and minimizing material costs. It is also shown that the first norm bounds the total seepage discharge through the earth dam. Since the governing variational boundary value problem as well as the adjoint problem is well-posed, a deterministic approach is taken. A numerical scheme including pseudo-unsteady terms is developed to calculate the optimal solution in an ideal earth dam cross section to be designed utilizing two different types of soil material. The results show that an inclined clay core of less hydraulic conductivity should be located on the upstream side of the cross section. The unsaturated zone turns out to play an important role in the flow field and the optimal design.

  15. 1PM TODAY: EPA to Hold Media Conference Call on Study of Hydraulic Fracturing Activities on Drinking Water Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials will deliver remarks about the agency's study on potential impacts on drinking water resources in the United States from hydraulic fracturing activities, as requested by Congress, on a med

  16. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic properties and evaluation of property-transfer models for deep sedimentary interbeds, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kimberlie; Johnson, Brittany D.; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2014-01-01

    During 2013–14, the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, focused on further characterization of the sedimentary interbeds below the future site of the proposed Remote Handled Low-Level Waste (RHLLW) facility, which is intended for the long-term storage of low-level radioactive waste. Twelve core samples from the sedimentary interbeds from a borehole near the proposed facility were collected for laboratory analysis of hydraulic properties, which also allowed further testing of the property-transfer modeling approach. For each core sample, the steady-state centrifuge method was used to measure relations between matric potential, saturation, and conductivity. These laboratory measurements were compared to water-retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity parameters estimated using the established property-transfer models. For each core sample obtained, the agreement between measured and estimated hydraulic parameters was evaluated quantitatively using the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). The highest correlation is for saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) with an r value of 0.922. The saturated water content (qsat) also exhibits a strong linear correlation with an r value of 0.892. The curve shape parameter (λ) has a value of 0.731, whereas the curve scaling parameter (yo) has the lowest r value of 0.528. The r values demonstrate that model predictions correspond well to the laboratory measured properties for most parameters, which supports the value of extending this approach for quantifying unsaturated hydraulic properties at various sites throughout INL.

  17. Hydraulic modeling of unsteady debris-flow surges with solid-fluid interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Interactions of solid and fluid constituents produce the unique style of motion that typifies debris flows. To simulate this motion, a new hydraulic model represents debris flows as deforming masses of granular solids variably liquefied by viscous pore fluid. The momentum equation of the model describes how internal and boundary forces change as coarse-grained surge heads dominated by grain-contact friction grade into muddy debris-flow bodies more strongly influenced by fluid viscosity and pressure. Scaling analysis reveals that pore-pressure variations can cause flow resistance in surge heads to surpass that in debris-flow bodies by orders of magnitude. Numerical solutions of the coupled momentum and continuity equations provide good predictions of unsteady, nonuniform motion of experimental debris flows from initiation through deposition.

  18. Anisotropic hydraulic permeability in compressed articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    The extent to which articular cartilage hydraulic permeability is anisotropic is largely unknown, despite its importance for understanding mechanisms of joint lubrication, load bearing, transport phenomena, and mechanotransduction. We developed and applied new techniques for the direct measurement of hydraulic permeability within statically compressed adult bovine cartilage explant disks, dissected such that disk axes were perpendicular to the articular surface. Applied pressure gradients were kept small to minimize flow-induced matrix compaction, and fluid outflows were measured by observation of a meniscus in a glass capillary under a microscope. Explant disk geometry under radially unconfined axial compression was measured by direct microscopic observation. Pressure, flow, and geometry data were input to a finite element model where hydraulic permeabilities in the disk axial and radial directions were determined. At less than 10% static compression, near free-swelling conditions, hydraulic permeability was nearly isotropic, with values corresponding to those of previous studies. With increasing static compression, hydraulic permeability decreased, but the radially directed permeability decreased more dramatically than the axially directed permeability such that strong anisotropy (a 10-fold difference between axial and radial directions) in the hydraulic permeability tensor was evident for static compression of 20-40%. Results correspond well with predictions of a previous microstructurally-based model for effects of tissue mechanical deformations on glycosaminoglycan architecture and cartilage hydraulic permeability. Findings inform understanding of structure-function relationships in cartilage matrix, and suggest several biomechanical roles for compression-induced anisotropic hydraulic permeability in articular cartilage.

  19. Laboratory characterization of hydraulic properties of sandstones using induced polarization and nuclear magnetic resonance for a joint permeability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, G. K.; Keating, K.; Binley, A. M.; Slater, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    The permeability of sandstones can be modeled using the Katz and Thompson (KT) model which relates permeability to a characteristic hydraulic length scale, typically measured by mercury injection, and the electrically interconnected porosity. In situ estimation of these hydraulic parameters remains a challenge in hydrogeology; emerging geophysical technologies may help to solve this problem. Induced polarization (IP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are two geophysical methods shown to be sensitive to physical properties of the pore space that control fluid flow, such as the pore size distribution. Using laboratory data collected on sandstone cores with a diverse range of properties, we demonstrate that our measured NMR parameters best predict the characteristic hydraulic length scale of the KT model, while the IP data can be used to improve estimates of the true formation factor. We incorporate these estimated hydraulic parameters into a KT model to derive an IP-NMR permeability model that compares favorably to permeability estimates from the KT model using mercury injection measurements. Furthermore, the resulting model uses parameters that are potentially measureable in the field; future work will focus on implementing the model at the field scale.

  20. Development of a hybrid (numerical-hydraulic) circulatory model: prototype testing and its response to IABP assistance.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Kozarski, M; De Lazzari, C; Górczyńska, K; Tosti, G; Darowski, M

    2005-07-01

    Merging numerical and physical models of the circulation makes it possible to develop a new class of circulatory models defined as hybrid. This solution reduces the costs, enhances the flexibility and opens the way to many applications ranging from research to education and heart assist devices testing. In the prototype described in this paper, a hydraulic model of systemic arterial tree is connected to a lumped parameters numerical model including pulmonary circulation and the remaining parts of systemic circulation. The hydraulic model consists of a characteristic resistance, of a silicon rubber tube to allow the insertion of an Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) and of a lumped parameters compliance. Two electro-hydraulic interfaces, realized by means of gear pumps driven by DC motors, connect the numerical section with both terminals of the hydraulic section. The lumped parameters numerical model and the control system (including analog to digital and digital to analog converters)are developed in LabVIEW environment. The behavior of the model is analyzed by means of the ventricular pressure-volume loops and the time courses of arterial and ventricular pressures and flows in different circulatory conditions. A simulated pathological condition was set to test the IABP and verify the response of the system to this type of mechanical circulatory assistance. The results show that the model can represent hemodynamic relationships in different ventricular and circulatory conditions and is able to react to the IABP assistance.

  1. Water related triggering mechanisms of shallow landslides: Numerical modelling of hydraulic flows in slopes verified with field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broennimann, C.; Tacher, L.

    2009-04-01

    element software. Different scenarios of groundwater flow pattern and hydraulic head distribution in the saturated and unsaturated zones were modelled considering transient hydraulic conditions. The hydraulic pressure boundary conditions can then be introduced in a geomechanical model in order to evaluate mass movements and to estimate the soil stability. In a next step, a 10 x 30 m large test side situated inside the above mentioned study area was chosen to investigate the slopes behaviour during a triggering field experiment carried out in October 2008. With the aim to provoke a shallow landslide the test site with a mean inclination of 35° was intensely irrigated with sprinklers during 5 days (20 - 30 mm/hr). Transient soil parameters such as suction, pore water pressure and saturation at different depth, water infiltration rate, ground water table and soil movements in a mm-scale were measured. During this first field experiment, the slope remained stable. At this state the results of experiment and models suggest that: - At the experiment scale, heavy rainfall is not sufficient to trigger a mass movement if the hydrogeological conditions inside the substratum (bedrock) are not in a critical state as well. During the experiment, the bedrock was not saturated and played a draining role. - The behaviour of the local area, at the experiment scale, must be modelled within a regional scale (e.g. kilometric) to consider the role of hydraulic pressures inside the bedrock. The results obtained from the experiment will be used to refine the numeric models and to design future field experiments.

  2. Scalable Generalization of Hydraulic Conductivity in Quaternary Strata for Use in a Regional Groundwater Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatnieks, J.; Popovs, K.; Klints, I.; Timuhins, A.; Kalvans, A.; Delina, A.; Saks, T.

    2012-04-01

    The cover of Quaternary sediments especially in formerly glaciated territories usually is the most complex part of the sedimentary sequences. In regional hydro-geological models it is often assumed as a single layer with uniform or calibrated properties (Valner 2003). However, the properties and structure of Quaternary sediments control the groundwater recharge: it can either direct the groundwater flow horizontally towards discharge in topographic lows or vertically, recharging groundwater in the bedrock. This work aims to present calibration results and detail our experience while integrating a scalable generalization of hydraulic conductivity for Quaternary strata in the regional groundwater modelling system for the Baltic artesian basin - MOSYS V1. We also present a method for solving boundary transitions between spatial clusters of lithologically similar structure. In this study the main unit of generalization is the spatial cluster. Clusters are obtained from distance calculations combining the Normalized Compression Distance (NCD) metric, calculated by the CompLearn parameter-free machine learning toolkit, with normalized Euclidean distance measures for coordinates of the borehole log data. A hierarchical clustering solution is used for obtaining cluster membership identifier for each borehole. Using boreholes as generator points for Voronoi tessellation and dissolving resulting polygons according to their cluster membership attribute, allows us to obtain spatial regions representing a certain degree of similarity in lithological structure. This degree of similarity and the spatial heterogeneity of the cluster polygons can be varied by different flattening of the hierarchical cluster model into variable number of clusters. This provides a scalable generalization solution which can be adapted according to model calibration performance. Using the dissimilarity matrix of the NCD metric, a borehole most similar to all the others from the lithological structure

  3. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, Roman; Makarashvili, Vakho; Heltemes, Thad; Sun, Zaijing; Wardle, Kent E.; Bailey, James; Quigley, Kevin; Stepinski, Dominique; Vandegrift, George

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  4. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; ...

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismicmore » moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.« less

  5. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismic moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.

  6. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Adam R

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL HYDRAULICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thermal, chemical, and biological quality of water in rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and near coastal areas is inseparable from a consideration of hydraulic engineering principles: therefore, the term environmental hydraulics. In this chapter we discuss the basic principles of w...

  8. Impact of Pin-by-Pin Thermal-Hydraulic Feedback Modeling on Steady-State Core Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Akio; Ikeno, Tsutomu

    2005-02-15

    In this paper, the effect of a pin-by-pin thermal-hydraulic feedback treatment on the core characteristics at a steady-state condition is investigated using a three-dimensional fine-mesh core calculation code. Currently, advanced nodal codes treat the inside of an assembly as homogeneous, and the temperature distribution inside a node is usually ignored. Namely, the fuel temperature is estimated from the assembly average power density, and the moderator temperature is calculated from the nodewise closed-channel model. However, the validity of a flat temperature distribution inside a node has not yet been investigated, because a three-dimensional pin-by-pin whole-core calculation must be done for comparison. A three-dimensional pin-by-pin nodal-transport code for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core analysis, SCOPE2, was used in this study since it can directly treat the pin-by-pin feedback effect. A whole-core subchannel analysis code was developed to enhance the thermal-hydraulic capability of SCOPE2. The pin-by-pin feedback models for fuel and moderator temperature were established, and their impact on the core characteristics was investigated in a 3 x 3 multiassembly and the whole PWR core geometries. The calculations showed that modeling of the pin-by-pin temperature distribution revealed a negligible effect on core reactivity and only a slight impact on the radial peaking factor. The difference in the radial peaking factor that is exposed by the pin-by-pin temperature modeling is less than 0.005 in the test calculations.

  9. Comparison of empirical, semi-empirical and physically based models of soil hydraulic functions derived for bi-modal soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutílek, M.; Jendele, L.; Krejča, M.

    2009-02-01

    The accelerated flow in soil pores is responsible for a rapid transport of pollutants from the soil surface to deeper layers up to groundwater. The term preferential flow is used for this type of transport. Our study was aimed at the preferential flow realized in the structural porous domain in bi-modal soils. We compared equations describing the soil water retention function h( θ) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity K( h), eventually K( θ) modified for bi-modal soils, where θ is the soil water content and h is the pressure head. The analytical description of a curve passing experimental data sets of the soil hydraulic function is typical for the empirical equation characterized by fitting parameters only. If the measured data are described by the equation derived by the physical model without using fitting parameters, we speak about a physically based model. There exist several transitional subtypes between empirical and physically based models. They are denoted as semi-empirical, or semi-physical. We tested 3 models of soil water retention function and 3 models of unsaturated conductivity using experimental data sets of sand, silt, silt loam and loam. All used soils are typical by their bi-modality of the soil porous system. The model efficiency was estimated by RMSE (Root mean square error) and by RSE (Relative square error). The semi-empirical equation of the soil water retention function had the lowest values of RMSE and RSE and was qualified as "optimal" for the formal description of the shape of the water retention function. With this equation, the fit of the modelled data to experiments was the closest one. The fitting parameters smoothed the difference between the model and the physical reality of the soil porous media. The physical equation based upon the model of the pore size distribution did not allow exact fitting of the modelled data to the experimental data due to the rigidity and simplicity of the physical model when compared to the real soil

  10. Analytical modeling of a hydraulically-compensated compressed-air energy-storage system

    SciTech Connect

    McMonagle, C.A.; Rowe, D.S.

    1982-12-01

    A computer program was developed to calculate the dynamic response of a hydraulically-compensated compressed air energy storage (CAES) system, including the compressor, air pipe, cavern, and hydraulic compensation pipe. The model is theoretically based on the two-fluid model in which the dynamics of each phase are presented by its set of conservation equations for mass and momentum. The conservation equations define the space and time distribution of pressure, void fraction, air saturation, and phase velocities. The phases are coupled by two interface equations. The first defines the rate of generation (or dissolution) of gaseous air in water and can include the effects of supersaturation. The second defines the frictional shear coupling (drag) between the gaseous air and water as they move relative to each other. The relative motion of the air and water is, therefore, calculated and not specified by a slip or drift-velocity correlation. The total CASE system is represented by a nodal arrangement. The conservation equations are written for each nodal volume and are solved numerically. System boundary conditions include the air flow rate, atmospheric pressure at the top of the compensation pipe, and air saturation in the reservoir. Initial conditions are selected for velocity and air saturation. Uniform and constant temperature (60/sup 0/F) is assumed. The analytical model was used to investigate the dynamic response of a proposed system.Investigative calculations considered high and low water levels, and a variety of charging and operating conditions. For all cases investigated, the cavern response to air-charging, was a damped oscillation of pressure and flow. Detailed results are presented. These calculations indicate that the Champagne Effect is unlikely to cause blowout for a properly designed CAES system.

  11. Effect of biocrust: study of mechanical and hydraulic properties and erodibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavík, Martin; Bruthans, Jiří; Schweigstillová, Jana

    2016-04-01

    It is well-known that lichens and other organisms forming crust on soil or rock surface play important role in weathering but may also protect underlying material from fast erosion. So far, there have been only few measurements comparing mechanical or hydraulic properties of biocrust with its subsurface on locked sand and friable sandstones, so the overall effect of the biocrust is not well-understood. Objective of our study is to quantify the effect of the biocrust on mechanical and hydraulic properties of friable sandstone and locked sand of Cretaceous age in six different localities with varying aspect and inclination and age of exposure in sandpit Strelec (Czech Rep.). On the artificial exposures, biocrust developed within last 10-30 years. Beside measurements of mechanical and hydraulic properties, SEM and mercury intrusion porosimetry in crust and subsurface was performed. Drilling resistance technique was found an excellent method to distinguish the biocrust from its subsurface (~3 mm thick biocrust has up to 12 times higher drilling resistance than underlying material). Surface zone with the biocrust has 3 - 25 times higher tensile strength than the subsurface material (1 - 25 kPa). In comparison with the subsurface, the biocrust is considerably less erodible (based on water jet testing). Biocrust saturated hydraulic conductivity is 15 - 240 times lower than the subsurface (6*10 -5 - 1*10 -4 m/s) and its permeability for water vapor is 4 - 9 times lower than subsurface. Presence of the biocrust slows down capillary absorption of water 4 - 25 times. The biocrust is thus forming firm surface which protects underlying material from rain and flowing water erosion and which considerably modifies its hydraulic properties. Material with crust exposed to calcination, leaching by concentrated peroxide and experiments with zymoliase enzyme strongly indicate that major contribution to crust hardening is provided by organic matter. Based on DNA sequencing the crust is

  12. Rapid setup of the high resolution interactive hydrological / hydraulic model for flood forecasting at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, G.; Haag, A.; Winsemius, H.; Baart, F.; Hut, R.; Drost, N.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid predictions of flood using high resolution process-based numerical models applied at global scale is a useful tool for flood forecasting. Usually it requires days or even months to create such a model for a specific area and in most cases the process assumes a lot of manual work. Our goal is to significantly decrease the time required for this process by means of software integration of data processing tools, numerical models and global data sets. The methodology is based on the use of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB to identify the potential flood areas. An automated set of tools will be applied to generate a coupled hydrological / hydraulic model using a high resolution input data based on free global data sets such as SRTM, HydroSHEDS, CORINE, and OpenStreetMaps. This information should be sufficient to generate high resolution input for distributed rainfall-runoff and shallow water flow models. For the detection of potential flood areas, and generation of the unstructured model grid required by the D-Flow FM hydrodynamic model, we will use Height Above the Nearest Drainage (HAND) dataset derived from SRTM. For coupling the distributed hydrological and shallow water models we will use the Basic Model Interface (BMI). BMI is a lightweight API that enables communication with numerical models at runtime. We will validate benefits of the algorithm by applying it to the San Francisco bay area. The models and data processing tools will be integrated into an interactive user interface that will enable data exploration and will allow generation of new models based on user request or automatic rules. Using our approach we expect to make significant steps towards realizing our goal of global availability of flood forecasting models.

  13. Testing the skill of numerical hydraulic modeling to simulate spatiotemporal flooding patterns in the Logone floodplain, Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Alfonso; Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Durand, Michael; Mark, Bryan G.; Moritz, Mark; Jung, Hahn Chul; Neal, Jeffrey; Shastry, Apoorva; Laborde, Sarah; Phang, Sui Chian; Hamilton, Ian M.; Xiao, Ningchuan

    2016-08-01

    Recent innovations in hydraulic modeling have enabled global simulation of rivers, including simulation of their coupled wetlands and floodplains. Accurate simulations of floodplains using these approaches may imply tremendous advances in global hydrologic studies and in biogeochemical cycling. One such innovation is to explicitly treat sub-grid channels within two-dimensional models, given only remotely sensed data in areas with limited data availability. However, predicting inundated area in floodplains using a sub-grid model has not been rigorously validated. In this study, we applied the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model using a sub-grid channel parameterization to simulate inundation dynamics on the Logone River floodplain, in northern Cameroon, from 2001 to 2007. Our goal was to determine whether floodplain dynamics could be simulated with sufficient accuracy to understand human and natural contributions to current and future inundation patterns. Model inputs in this data-sparse region include in situ river discharge, satellite-derived rainfall, and the shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) floodplain elevation. We found that the model accurately simulated total floodplain inundation, with a Pearson correlation coefficient greater than 0.9, and RMSE less than 700 km2, compared to peak inundation greater than 6000 km2. Predicted discharge downstream of the floodplain matched measurements (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.81), and indicated that net flow from the channel to the floodplain was modeled accurately. However, the spatial pattern of inundation was not well simulated, apparently due to uncertainties in SRTM elevations. We evaluated model results at 250, 500 and 1000-m spatial resolutions, and found that results are insensitive to spatial resolution. We also compared the model output against results from a run of LISFLOOD-FP in which the sub-grid channel parameterization was disabled, finding that the sub-grid parameterization simulated more realistic

  14. A model for estimating the hydraulic conductivity of granular material based on grain shape, grain size, and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Sperry, J.M.; Peirce, J.J.

    1995-11-01

    Particle shape is an important parameter in numerous civil, environmental, and petroleum engineering applications. In ground-water flow, the shape of individual particles comprising the soil affects the soil`s pore size distribution and, hence, the important flow characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity and headloss. A model for delineating the relative importance of particle size, particle shape, and porosity, (and their interactions), in explaining the variability of hydraulic conductivity of a granular porous medium is developed and tested. Three types of porous media are considered in this work: spherical glass beads; granular sand; and irregularly shaped, shredded glass particles. A reliable method for quantifying the three-dimensional shape and packing of large samples of irregular particles based on their angle of repose is presented. The results of column experiments indicate that in the size range examined (i.e., 149 {micro}m to 2,380 {micro}m), the single most important predictor of hydraulic conductivity is seen to be particle size, explaining 69% of the variability. Porous media comprising irregular particles exhibit lower hydraulic conductivity only for the larger (707 to 841 {micro}m) particles. For the smaller (149 to 177 {micro}m) particles, particle shape has no observable influence on hydraulic conductivity. The results of the regression analysis reveal the importance off the interaction between particle size and porosity, indicating that similar pore configurations for a given type of particle are not achieved at different sizes. This empirical model seems to provide better estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of granular porous media comprising irregular particles than selected models based solely on grain size, including Hazen, Kozeny-Carman, and more recently Alyamani and Sen.

  15. Remote Sensing-Derived Water Extent and Level to Constrain Hydraulic Flood Forecasting Models: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, Stefania; Li, Yuan; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Walker, Jeffrey P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate, precise and timely forecasts of flood wave arrival time, depth and velocity at each point of the floodplain are essential to reduce damage and save lives. Current computational capabilities support hydraulic models of increasing complexity over extended catchments. Yet a number of sources of uncertainty (e.g., input and boundary conditions, implementation data) may hinder the delivery of accurate predictions. Field gauging data of water levels and discharge have traditionally been used for hydraulic model calibration, validation and real-time constraint. However, the discrete spatial distribution of field data impedes the testing of the model skill at the two-dimensional scale. The increasing availability of spatially distributed remote sensing (RS) observations of flood extent and water level offers the opportunity for a comprehensive analysis of the predictive capability of hydraulic models. The adequate use of the large amount of information offered by RS observations triggers a series of challenging questions on the resolution, accuracy and frequency of acquisition of RS observations; on RS data processing algorithms; and on calibration, validation and data assimilation protocols. This paper presents a review of the availability of RS observations of flood extent and levels, and their use for calibration, validation and real-time constraint of hydraulic flood forecasting models. A number of conclusions and recommendations for future research are drawn with the aim of harmonising the pace of technological developments and their applications.

  16. Study of thermal and hydraulic performances of circular and square ribbed rough microchannels using LBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, M. A.; Kim, H. D.; Lee, Y. W.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of roughness geometries and relative roughness height at the slip flow regime to investigate the thermal and hydraulic performances of microchannel have been considered in the present article using a thermal Lattice Boltzmann Method (TLBM). A two dimensional 9-bit (D2Q9) single relaxation time (SRT) model is used to simulate this problem. In micro-flows, the local density variation is still relatively small, but the total density changes, therefore, in order to account this density variation and its effect on the kinematic viscosity v, a new relaxation time proposed by Niu et al.[13] is used. The roughness geometry is modeled as a series of square and circular riblets with a relative roughness height from 0% to 10% of the channel height. The friction coefficients in terms of Poiseuille number (Pn) and the dimensionless heat transfer rate in terms of Nusselt number (Nu) have been discussed in order to analyze the roughness effects. The thermal-hydraulic performance ( η) is calculated considering the simultaneous effects of thermal and fluid friction (pressure drop) at the slip flow regime at Knudsen number, Kn, ranging from 0.01 to 0.10 with other controlling parameters for both kind of geometries. The results have been compared with previous published works and it is found to be in very good agreement.

  17. Study on Dynamical Simulation of Railway Vehicle Bogie Parameters Test-bench Electro-hydraulic Servo System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhikun; Su, Jian; Xu, Guan; Cao, Xiaoning

    Dynamical mathematical model was established for accurately positioning, fast response and real-time tracing of electro-hydraulic servo control system in railway vehicle bog ie parameters test system with elastic load. The model could precisely control the output of position and force of the hydraulic cylinders. Induction method was proposed in the paper. Dynamical simulation verified the mathematical model by SIMULINK software. Meanwhile the key factors affecting the dynamical characteristics of the system were discussed in detail. Through the simulation results, high precision is obtained in application and the need of real-time control on the railway vehicle bogie parameters test-bench is realized.

  18. On the importance of geological data for hydraulic tomography analysis: Laboratory sandbox study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhanfeng; Illman, Walter A.; Berg, Steven J.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the importance of geological data in Hydraulic Tomography (HT) through sandbox experiments. In particular, four groundwater models with homogeneous geological units constructed with borehole data of varying accuracy are jointly calibrated with multiple pumping test data of two different pumping and observation densities. The results are compared to those from a geostatistical inverse model. Model calibration and validation performances are quantitatively assessed using drawdown scatterplots. We find that accurate and inaccurate geological models can be well calibrated, despite the estimated K values for the poor geological models being quite different from the actual values. Model validation results reveal that inaccurate geological models yield poor drawdown predictions, but using more calibration data improves its predictive capability. Moreover, model comparisons among a highly parameterized geostatistical and layer-based geological models show that, (1) as the number of pumping tests and monitoring locations are reduced, the performance gap between the approaches decreases, and (2) a simplified geological model with a fewer number of layers is more reliable than the one based on the wrong description of stratigraphy. Finally, using a geological model as prior information in geostatistical inverse models results in the preservation of geological features, especially in areas where drawdown data are not available. Overall, our sandbox results emphasize the importance of incorporating geological data in HT surveys when data from pumping tests is sparse. These findings have important implications for field applications of HT where well distances are large.

  19. Modeling the influence of varying hydraulic conditions on aerobic respiration and denitrification in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Exchange of water and solutes across the stream-sediment interface is an important control for biogeochemical transformations in the hyporheic zone (HZ) with measurable impacts on nutrient cycling and solute attenuation in fluvial systems. Here we investigate the interplay between turbulent stream flow and HZ flow under various hydraulic conditions applied to two cases: a) three-dimensional generic pool-riffle sequences with different morphological properties, and b) a real mid-stream gravel-bar. Stream flow is simulated by the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM which provides the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed. It is sequentially coupled to the top of the groundwater model code MIN3P, simulating flow, solute transport, aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. Flow in the HZ is directly influenced by the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed surface and the ambient groundwater flow. Three reactive transport scenarios are considered: 1) stream water as the primary source of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 2) upwelling groundwater as an additionally source of NO3, and 3) upwelling groundwater as an additional source of DO in various concentrations. Results show an increase in hyporheic exchange flow for increasing stream discharge with a concurrent decrease in residence time. The fraction of circulating stream water through the HZ is in the range of 1x10-5 to 1x10-6 per unit stream length, decreasing with increasing discharge. Ambient groundwater flow in both the up- and downwelling direction diminishes significantly the hyporheic exchange flow and extent. Biogeochemical processes in the HZ are strongly controlled by ambient groundwater flow, even more so than by changes in stream discharge. AR and DN efficiencies of the HZ are significantly reduced by up- and downwelling groundwater and are positively correlated with median residence times. AR occurs in

  20. Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.; Basher, A.M.H.

    1996-09-01

    To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical

  1. Non-linear modelling and optimal control of a hydraulically actuated seismic isolator test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Stefano; Russo, Riccardo; Strano, Salvatore; Terzo, Mario

    2013-02-01

    This paper investigates the modelling, parameter identification and control of an unidirectional hydraulically actuated seismic isolator test rig. The plant is characterized by non-linearities such as the valve dead zone and frictions. A non-linear model is derived and then employed for parameter identification. The results concerning the model validation are illustrated and they fully confirm the effectiveness of the proposed model. The testing procedure of the isolation systems is based on the definition of a target displacement time history of the sliding table and, consequently, the precision of the table positioning is of primary importance. In order to minimize the test rig tracking error, a suitable control system has to be adopted. The system non-linearities highly limit the performances of the classical linear control and a non-linear one is therefore adopted. The test rig mathematical model is employed for a non-linear control design that minimizes the error between the target table position and the current one. The controller synthesis is made by taking no specimen into account. The proposed approach consists of a non-linear optimal control based on the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE). Numerical simulations have been performed in order to evaluate the soundness of the designed control with and without the specimen under test. The results confirm that the performances of the proposed non-linear controller are not invalidated because of the presence of the specimen.

  2. Simulation-optimization model for water management in hydraulic fracturing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, E. A.; Uddameri, V.

    2015-09-01

    A combined simulation-optimization model was developed to minimize the freshwater footprint at multi-well hydraulic fracturing sites. The model seeks to reduce freshwater use by blending it with brackish groundwater and recovered water. Time-varying water quality and quantity mass balance expressions and drawdown calculations using the Theis solution along with the superposition principle were embedded into the optimization model and solved using genetic algorithms. The model was parameterized for representative conditions in the Permian Basin oil and gas play region with the Dockum Formation serving as the brackish water source (Texas, USA). The results indicate that freshwater use can be reduced by 25-30 % by blending. Recovered water accounted for 2-3 % of the total blend or 10-15 % of total water recovered on-site. The concentration requirements of sulfate and magnesium limited blending. The evaporation in the frac pit constrained the amount blended during summer, while well yield of the brackish (Dockum) aquifer constrained the blending during winter. The Edwards-Trinity aquifer provided the best quality water compared to the Ogallala and Pecos Valley aquifers. However, the aquifer has low diffusivity causing the drawdown impacts to be felt over large areas. Speciation calculations carried out using PHREEQC indicated that precipitation of barium and strontium minerals is unlikely in the blended water. Conversely, the potential for precipitation of iron minerals is high. The developed simulation-optimization modeling framework is flexible and easily adapted for water management at other fracturing sites.

  3. Interdependence of chronic hydraulic dysfunction and canopy processes can improve integrated models of tree response to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. Scott; Roberts, David E.; Ewers, Brent E.; Sperry, John S.; McDowell, Nathan G.; Pockman, William T.

    2015-08-01

    Hydraulic systems of plants have evolved in the context of carbon allocation and fitness trade-offs of maximizing carbon gain and water transport in the face of short and long-term fluctuations in environmental conditions. The resulting diversity of traits include a continuum of isohydry-anisohydry or high to low relative stomatal closure during drought, shedding of canopy foliage or disconnecting roots from soil to survive drought, and adjusting root areas to efficiently manage canopy water costs associated with photosynthesis. These traits are examined within TREES, an integrated model that explicitly couples photosynthesis and carbon allocation to soil-plant hydraulics and canopy processes. Key advances of the model are its ability to account for differences in soil and xylem cavitation, transience of hydraulic impairment associated with delayed or no refilling of xylem, and carbon allocation to plant structures based on photosynthetic uptake of carbon and hydraulic limitations to water transport. The model was used to examine hydraulic traits of cooccurring isohydric (piñon pine) and anisohydric (one-seed juniper) trees from a field-based experimental drought. Model predictions of both transpiration and leaf water potential were improved when there was no refilling of xylem over simulations where xylem was able refill in response to soil water recharge. Model experiments with alternative root-to-leaf area ratios (RR/L) showed the RR/L that supports maximum cumulative water use is not beneficial for supporting maximum carbon gain during extended drought, illustrating how a process model reveals trade-offs in plant traits.

  4. Mechanics and hydraulics of unsaturated soils: what makes interfaces an indispensable part of a physically-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikooee, E.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The foundations of the current theories for hydraulics and mechanics of unsaturated soils have been mainly based on the empirically introduced equations. There are various characteristics of unsaturated soils for which lots of different empirical equations have been proposed such as hydraulic conductivity, water retention curve, and effective stress parameter. One of the remarkable challenges which all current models face is hysteresis, i.e., for a certain matric suction, values of saturation, hydraulic conductivity and effective stress parameter in drying state and wetting are different. Conventional models of hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils try to account for the hysteresis phenomenon by means of different empirical equations for each hydraulic path. Hassanizadeh and Gray (1993) claimed that the hysteresis in capillary pressure-saturation curves can be modelled through the inclusion of air-water interfaces as a new independent variable [1]. It has recently been stated that the same conjecture can be made for suction stress [2]. Therefore, it seems to better portray hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils, interfaces are required as an indispensable part of the framework [3, 4]. This presentation aims at introducing the drawbacks of current theories of hydraulics and mechanics of unsaturated soils. For this purpose, the role of interfaces in the mechanics and hydraulics of unsaturated soils is explained and different possibilities to account for the contribution of interfaces are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future research directions are set forth. References[1] Hassanizadeh, S.M. & Gray, W.G.: Thermodynamic basis of capillary pressure in porous media. Water Resour.Res. 29(1993), 3389-3405.[2] Nikooee, E., Habibagahi, G., Hassanizadeh, S.M. & Ghahramani, A.: Effective Stress in unsaturated Soils: a thermodynamic approach based on the interfacial energy and hydromechanical coupling. Transport porous Med. 96

  5. Eco-hydrologic model cascades: Simulating land use and climate change impacts on hydrology, hydraulics and habitats for fish and macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Guse, Björn; Kail, Jochem; Radinger, Johannes; Schröder, Maria; Kiesel, Jens; Hering, Daniel; Wolter, Christian; Fohrer, Nicola

    2015-11-15

    Climate and land use changes affect the hydro- and biosphere at different spatial scales. These changes alter hydrological processes at the catchment scale, which impact hydrodynamics and habitat conditions for biota at the river reach scale. In order to investigate the impact of large-scale changes on biota, a cascade of models at different scales is required. Using scenario simulations, the impact of climate and land use change can be compared along the model cascade. Such a cascade of consecutively coupled models was applied in this study. Discharge and water quality are predicted with a hydrological model at the catchment scale. The hydraulic flow conditions are predicted by hydrodynamic models. The habitat suitability under these hydraulic and water quality conditions is assessed based on habitat models for fish and macroinvertebrates. This modelling cascade was applied to predict and compare the impacts of climate- and land use changes at different scales to finally assess their effects on fish and macroinvertebrates. Model simulations revealed that magnitude and direction of change differed along the modelling cascade. Whilst the hydrological model predicted a relevant decrease of discharge due to climate change, the hydraulic conditions changed less. Generally, the habitat suitability for fish decreased but this was strongly species-specific and suitability even increased for some species. In contrast to climate change, the effect of land use change on discharge was negligible. However, land use change had a stronger impact on the modelled nitrate concentrations affecting the abundances of macroinvertebrates. The scenario simulations for the two organism groups illustrated that direction and intensity of changes in habitat suitability are highly species-dependent. Thus, a joined model analysis of different organism groups combined with the results of hydrological and hydrodynamic models is recommended to assess the impact of climate and land use changes on

  6. Predicting the impact of feed spacer modification on biofouling by hydraulic characterization and biofouling studies in membrane fouling simulators.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, A; Lehmann, S; Bucs, Sz S; Fresquet, M; Fel, L; Prest, E I E C; Ogier, J; Schellenberg, C; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2017-03-01

    Feed spacers are an essential part of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules. Geometric modification of feed spacers is a potential option to reduce the impact of biofouling on the performance of membrane systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biofouling potential of two commercially available reference feed spacers and four modified feed spacers. The spacers were compared on hydraulic characterization and in biofouling studies with membrane fouling simulators (MFSs). The virgin feed spacer was characterized hydraulically by their resistance, measured in terms of feed channel pressure drop, performed by operating MFSs at varying feed water flow rates. Short-term (9 days) biofouling studies were carried out with nutrient dosage to the MFS feed water to accelerate the biofouling rate. Long-term (96 days) biofouling studies were done without nutrient dosage to the MFS feed water. Feed channel pressure drop was monitored and accumulation of active biomass was quantified by adenosine tri phosphate (ATP) determination. The six feed spacers were ranked on pressure drop (hydraulic characterization) and on biofouling impact (biofouling studies). Significantly different trends in hydraulic resistance and biofouling impact for the six feed spacers were observed. The same ranking for biofouling impact on the feed spacers was found for the (i) short-term biofouling study with nutrient dosage and the (ii) long-term biofouling study without nutrient dosage. The ranking for hydraulic resistance for six virgin feed spacers differed significantly from the ranking of the biofouling impact, indicating that hydraulic resistance of clean feed spacers does not predict the hydraulic resistance of biofouled feed spacers. Better geometric design of feed spacers can be a suitable approach to minimize impact of biofouling in spiral wound membrane systems.

  7. Incorporating Artificial Neural Networks in the dynamic thermal-hydraulic model of a controlled cryogenic circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, S.; Bonifetto, R.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2015-09-01

    A model based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) is developed for the heated line portion of a cryogenic circuit, where supercritical helium (SHe) flows and that also includes a cold circulator, valves, pipes/cryolines and heat exchangers between the main loop and a saturated liquid helium (LHe) bath. The heated line mimics the heat load coming from the superconducting magnets to their cryogenic cooling circuits during the operation of a tokamak fusion reactor. An ANN is trained, using the output from simulations of the circuit performed with the 4C thermal-hydraulic (TH) code, to reproduce the dynamic behavior of the heated line, including for the first time also scenarios where different types of controls act on the circuit. The ANN is then implemented in the 4C circuit model as a new component, which substitutes the original 4C heated line model. For different operational scenarios and control strategies, a good agreement is shown between the simplified ANN model results and the original 4C results, as well as with experimental data from the HELIOS facility confirming the suitability of this new approach which, extended to an entire magnet systems, can lead to real-time control of the cooling loops and fast assessment of control strategies for heat load smoothing to the cryoplant.

  8. Modified kinetic-hydraulic UASB reactor model for treatment of wastewater containing biodegradable organic substrates.

    PubMed

    El-Seddik, Mostafa M; Galal, Mona M; Radwan, A G; Abdel-Halim, Hisham S

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a modified kinetic-hydraulic model for up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor aimed to treat wastewater of biodegradable organic substrates as acetic acid based on Van der Meer model incorporated with biological granules inclusion. This dynamic model illustrates the biomass kinetic reaction rate for both direct and indirect growth of microorganisms coupled with the amount of biogas produced by methanogenic bacteria in bed and blanket zones of reactor. Moreover, the pH value required for substrate degradation at the peak specific growth rate of bacteria is discussed for Andrews' kinetics. The sensitivity analyses of biomass concentration with respect to fraction of volume of reactor occupied by granules and up-flow velocity are also demonstrated. Furthermore, the modified mass balance equations of reactor are applied during steady state using Newton Raphson technique to obtain a suitable degree of freedom for the modified model matching with the measured results of UASB Sanhour wastewater treatment plant in Fayoum, Egypt.

  9. Depth-averaged model for hydraulic jumps on an inclined plate.

    PubMed

    Benilov, E S

    2014-05-01

    We examine the dynamics of a layer of viscous liquid on an inclined plate. If the layer's upstream depth h(-) exceeds the downstream depth h(+), a smooth hydraulic jump (bore) forms and starts propagating down the slope. If the ratio η = h(+)/h(-) is sufficiently small and/or the plate's inclination angle is sufficiently large, the bore overturns and no smooth steadily propagating solution exists in this case. In this work, the dynamics of bores is examined using a heuristic depth-averaged model where the vertical structure of the flow is approximated by a polynomial. It turns out that even the simplest version of the model (based on the parabolic approximation) is remarkably accurate, producing results which agree, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with those obtained through the Stokes equations. Furthermore, the depth-averaged model allows one to derive a sufficient criterion of bore overturning, which happens to be valid for the exact model as well. Physically, this criterion reflects the fact that, for small η, a stagnation point appears in the flow, causing wave overturning.

  10. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  11. Hydraulic Modeling of Alluvial Fans along the Truckee Canal using the 2-Dimensional Model SRH2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J.; Kallio, R.; Sankovich, V.

    2013-12-01

    Alluvial fans are gently sloping, fan-shaped landforms created by sediment deposition at the ends of mountain valleys. Their gentle slopes and scenic vistas are attractive to developers. Unfortunately, alluvial fans are highly flood-prone, and the flow paths of flood events are highly variable, thereby placing human developments at risk. Many studies have been performed on alluvial fans in the arid west because of the uncertainty of their flow paths and flood extents. Most of these studies have been focused on flood elevations and mitigation. This study is not focused on the flood elevations. Rather, it is focused on the attenuation effects of alluvial fans on floods entering and potentially failing a Reclamation canal. The Truckee Canal diverts water from the Truckee River to Lahontan Reservoir. The drainage areas along the canal are alluvial fans with complex distributary channel networks . Ideally, in nature, the sediment grain-size distribution along the alluvial fan flow paths would provide enough infiltration and subsurface storage to attenuate floods entering the canal and reduce risk to low levels. Human development, however, can prevent the natural losses from occurring due to concentrated flows within the alluvial fan. While the concentrated flows might mitigate flood risk inside the fan, they do not lower the flood risk of the canal. A 2-dimensional hydraulic model, SRH-2D, was coupled to a 1-dimensional rainfall-runoff model to estimate the flood attenuation effects of the alluvial fan network surrounding an 11 mile stretch of the Truckee Canal near Fernley, Nevada. Floods having annual exceedance probabilities ranging from 1/10 to 1/100 were computed and analyzed. SRH-2D uses a zonal approach for modeling river systems, allowing areas to be divided into separate zones based on physical parameters such as surface roughness and infiltration. One of the major features of SRH-2D is the adoption of an unstructured hybrid mixed element mesh, which is based

  12. Thermal-hydraulic studies of the Advanced Neutron Source cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was to be a user-oriented neutron research facility producing the most intense steady-state flux of thermal and cold neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the production of cold neutrons was a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410-mm-diam sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design were performed with heat conduction simulations of the vessel walls and multidimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This report presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that were planned to verify the final design.

  13. Determinants of modelling choices for 1-D free-surface flow and morphodynamics in hydrology and hydraulics: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheviron, Bruno; Moussa, Roger

    2016-09-01

    This review paper investigates the determinants of modelling choices, for numerous applications of 1-D free-surface flow and morphodynamic equations in hydrology and hydraulics, across multiple spatiotemporal scales. We aim to characterize each case study by its signature composed of model refinement (Navier-Stokes: NS; Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes: RANS; Saint-Venant: SV; or approximations to Saint-Venant: ASV), spatiotemporal scales and subscales (domain length: L from 1 cm to 1000 km; temporal scale: T from 1 s to 1 year; flow depth: H from 1 mm to 10 m; spatial step for modelling: δL; temporal step: δT), flow typology (Overland: O; High gradient: Hg; Bedforms: B; Fluvial: F), and dimensionless numbers (dimensionless time period T*, Reynolds number Re, Froude number Fr, slope S, inundation ratio Λz, Shields number θ). The determinants of modelling choices are therefore sought in the interplay between flow characteristics and cross-scale and scale-independent views. The influence of spatiotemporal scales on modelling choices is first quantified through the expected correlation between increasing scales and decreasing model refinements (though modelling objectives also show through the chosen spatial and temporal subscales). Then flow typology appears a secondary but important determinant in the choice of model refinement. This finding is confirmed by the discriminating values of several dimensionless numbers, which prove preferential associations between model refinements and flow typologies. This review is intended to help modellers in positioning their choices with respect to the most frequent practices, within a generic, normative procedure possibly enriched by the community for a larger, comprehensive and updated image of modelling strategies.

  14. A finite-element model for simulating hydraulic interchange of surface and ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    A model was developed to be useful for predicting changes in streamflow as a result of groundwater pumping. The stream aquifer model is especially useful for simulating streams that flow intermittently owing to leakage to the aquifer or diversion for irrigation or streams that become perched owing to declining hydraulic head in the aquifer. The model couples the equation of two-dimensional groundwater flow with the kinematic equations of one-dimensional open-channel flow. Darcy 's law for vertical flow through a semipermeable streambed is used to couple the groundwater flow and streamflow equations. The equations of flow are approximated numerically by the finite-element method. A listing of the Fortran program that solves the equations of flow , and a description of data-input formats are given in the report. The program can simulate a variety of hydrologic characteristics including perched streams, streamflow diversions , springs, recharge from irrigated acreage, and evapotranspiration from the water table and phreatophytes. Time-dependent boundary conditions can be simulated. The program can be modified easily to simulate unconfined aquifers and aquifers with variable directions of anisotropy. (USGS)

  15. Hydraulic Modeling and Evolutionary Optimization for Enhanced Real-Time Decision Support of Combined Sewer Overflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, A. L.; Minsker, B. S.; Schmidt, A. R.; Ostfeld, A.

    2011-12-01

    Real-time mitigation of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) requires evaluation of multiple operational strategies during rapidly changing rainfall events. Simulation models for hydraulically complex systems can effectively provide decision support for short time intervals when coupled with efficient optimization. This work seeks to reduce CSOs for a test case roughly based on the North Branch of the Chicago Tunnel and Reservoir Plan (TARP), which is operated by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). The North Branch tunnel flows to a junction with the main TARP system. The Chicago combined sewer system alleviates potential CSOs by directing high interceptor flows through sluice gates and dropshafts to a deep tunnel. Decision variables to control CSOs consist of sluice gate positions that control water flow to the tunnel as well as a treatment plant pumping rate that lowers interceptor water levels. A physics-based numerical model is used to simulate the hydraulic effects of changes in the decision variables. The numerical model is step-wise steady and conserves water mass and momentum at each time step by iterating through a series of look-up tables. The look-up tables are constructed offline to avoid extensive real-time calculations, and describe conduit storage and water elevations as a function of flow. A genetic algorithm (GA) is used to minimize CSOs at each time interval within a moving horizon framework. Decision variables are coded at 15-minute increments and GA solutions are two hours in duration. At each 15-minute interval, the algorithm identifies a good solution for a two-hour rainfall forecast. Three GA modifications help reduce optimization time. The first adjustment reduces the search alphabet by eliminating sluice gate positions that do not influence overflow volume. The second GA retains knowledge of the best decision at the previous interval by shifting the genes in the best previous sequence to initialize search at

  16. Linking hydraulic traits to tropical forest function in a size-structured and trait-driven model (TFS v.1-Hydro)

    DOE PAGES

    Christoffersen, Bradley O.; Gloor, Manuel; Fauset, Sophie; ...

    2016-11-24

    Forest ecosystem models based on heuristic water stress functions poorly predict tropical forest response to drought partly because they do not capture the diversity of hydraulic traits (including variation in tree size) observed in tropical forests. We developed a continuous porous media approach to modeling plant hydraulics in which all parameters of the constitutive equations are biologically interpretable and measurable plant hydraulic traits (e.g., turgor loss point πtlp, bulk elastic modulus ε, hydraulic capacitance Cft, xylem hydraulic conductivity ks,max, water potential at 50 % loss of conductivity for both xylem (P50,x) and stomata (P50,gs), and the leaf : sapwood area ratio Al : As). Wemore » embedded this plant hydraulics model within a trait forest simulator (TFS) that models light environments of individual trees and their upper boundary conditions (transpiration), as well as providing a means for parameterizing variation in hydraulic traits among individuals. We synthesized literature and existing databases to parameterize all hydraulic traits as a function of stem and leaf traits, including wood density (WD), leaf mass per area (LMA), and photosynthetic capacity (Amax), and evaluated the coupled model (called TFS v.1-Hydro) predictions, against observed diurnal and seasonal variability in stem and leaf water potential as well as stand-scaled sap flux. Our hydraulic trait synthesis revealed coordination among leaf and xylem hydraulic traits and statistically significant relationships of most hydraulic traits with more easily measured plant traits. Using the most informative empirical trait–trait relationships derived from this synthesis, TFS v.1-Hydro successfully captured individual variation in leaf and stem water potential due to increasing tree size and light environment, with model representation of hydraulic architecture and plant traits exerting primary and secondary controls, respectively, on the fidelity of model

  17. HYDRAULIC SERVO

    DOEpatents

    Wiegand, D.E.

    1962-05-01

    A hydraulic servo is designed in which a small pressure difference produced at two orifices by an electrically operated flapper arm in a constantly flowing hydraulic loop is hydraulically amplified by two constant flow pumps, two additional orifices, and three unconnected ball pistons. Two of the pistons are of one size and operate against the additional orifices, and the third piston is of a different size and operates between and against the first two pistons. (AEC)

  18. Lead retention mechanisms and hydraulic conductivity studies of various bentonites for geoenvironment applications.

    PubMed

    Nakano, A; Li, L Y; Ohtsubo, M; Mishra, A K; Higashi, T

    2008-05-01

    Four bentonites from various sources were exposed to batch adsorption testing, selective sequential extraction and consolidation tests to investigate their metal retention capacity and hydraulic conductivity for geoenvironmental application such as in clay barrier materials. The Japanese bentonites (JB1-JB3) contain approximately 2-4% of carbonate and trace amount of zeolite (JB2 and JB3), whereas the US bentonite has < 1% carbonate and no zeolite. The rank of smectite content in the bentonites are USB > JB1 > JB3 > JB2. The materials ranked as JB2 approximately JB3 > JB1 > USB, according to retention capacity, while after the removal of carbonate the retention capacity order was JB1 approximately JB2 approximately JB3 > USB. SSE results indicate that carbonate plays a major role at low Pb solution concentration and precipitate as PbCO3. Once the carbonate is exhausted, the clay composition dominates the sorption process. The hydraulic conductivity of the bentonite mixtures (basalt + 10% bentonite) using water was kUSB < kJB1 < kJB3 < kJB2, consistent with the smectite content and swelling power, with USB having the highest proportion of smectite. Among the Japanese bentonites studied, JB1 is the best candidate for barrier material, comparable to the widely used USB.

  19. Data Analytics of Hydraulic Fracturing Data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jovan Yang; Viswanathan, Hari; Hyman, Jeffery; Middleton, Richard

    2016-08-11

    These are a set of slides on the data analytics of hydraulic fracturing data. The conclusions from this research are the following: they proposed a permeability evolution as a new mechanism to explain hydraulic fracturing trends; they created a model to include this mechanism and it showed promising results; the paper from this research is ready for submission; they devised a way to identify and sort refractures in order to study their effects, and this paper is currently being written.

  20. A complete soil hydraulic model accounting for capillary and adsorptive water retention, capillary and film conductivity, and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudiyanto; Sakai, Masaru; van Genuchten, Martinus Th.; Alazba, A. A.; Setiawan, Budi Indra; Minasny, Budiman

    2015-11-01

    A soil hydraulic model that considers capillary hysteretic and adsorptive water retention as well as capillary and film conductivity covering the complete soil moisture range is presented. The model was obtained by incorporating the capillary hysteresis model of Parker and Lenhard into the hydraulic model of Peters-Durner-Iden (PDI) as formulated for the van Genuchten (VG) retention equation. The formulation includes the following processes: capillary hysteresis accounting for air entrapment, closed scanning curves, nonhysteretic sorption of water retention onto mineral surfaces, a hysteretic function for the capillary conductivity, a nonhysteretic function for the film conductivity, and a nearly nonhysteretic function of the conductivity as a function of water content (θ) for the entire range of water contents. The proposed model only requires two additional parameters to describe hysteresis. The model was found to accurately describe observed hysteretic water retention and conductivity data for a dune sand. Using a range of published data sets, relationships could be established between the capillary water retention and film conductivity parameters. Including vapor conductivity improved conductivity descriptions in the very dry range. The resulting model allows predictions of the hydraulic conductivity from saturation until complete dryness using water retention parameters.

  1. Modelling of a hydraulic engine mount with fluid-structure interaction finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Lu, Zhen-Hua

    2004-08-01

    Hydraulic engine mount (HEM) is now widely used as a highly effective vibration isolator in automotive powertrain. A lumped parameter (LP) model is a traditional model for modelling the dynamic characteristics of HEM, in which the system parameters are usually obtained by experiments. In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) finite element analysis (FEA) method and a non-linear FEA technology are used to determine the system parameters, and a fully coupled FSI model is developed for modelling the static and lower-frequency performance of an HEM. A FSI FEA technique is used to estimate the parameters of volumetric compliances, equivalent piston area, inertia and resistance of the fluid in the inertia track and the decoupler of an HEM. A non-linear FEA method is applied to determine the dynamic stiffness of rubber spring of the HEM. The system parameters predicated by FEA are compared favorably with experimental data and/or analytical solutions. A numerical simulation for an HEM with an inertia track and a free decoupler is performed based on the FSI model and the LP model along with the estimated system parameters, and again the simulation results are compared with experimental data. The calculated time histories of some variables in the model, such as the pressure in the upper chamber, the displacement of the free decoupler and the volume flow through the inertia track and the decoupler, under different excitations, elucidate the working mechanism of the HEM. The pressure distribution calculated with the FSI model in the chambers of the HEM validates the assumption that the pressure distribution in the upper and lower chamber is uniform in the LP model. The work conducted in the paper demonstrates that the methods for estimating the system parameters in the LP model and the FSI model for modelling HEM are effective, with which the dynamic characteristic analysis and design optimization of an HEM can be performed before its prototype development, and this

  2. An approach towards a parameterised model for risk assessment of hydraulic fracturing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gläser, Dennis; Class, Holger; Kissinger, Alexander; Beck, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The main ambition of the recently started research project FracRisk (funded within the EU Horizon 2020 programme) is the development of a comprehensive knowledge base and the formulation of scientific recommendations, which can contribute to efforts aimed at minimising the environmental footprint of shale gas production while addressing scientific and public concerns. Forward numerical modelling linked to a detailed risk and uncertainty assessment is applied for estimating the mechanical, hydromechanical, and geochemical consequences resulting from hydraulic fracturing. To capture a broad range of environmental risks, six exemplary scenarios focussing on different physical processes on different spatial and temporal scales are investigated. An approach regarding sources, pathways and targets is used for the quantification of the environmental impacts. A fundamental understanding of the potential risks is achieved by allowing for mutual feedback between the scenarios, identifying key parameters and processes. The coupling of the scenarios to a Polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) paves the way to an abstracted and parameterised model for risk assessment to be used both by regulators and contractors. This contribution at an early stage of the project will elaborate on the general workflow of implementing focussed scenarios into a PCE-based Monte-Carlo approach to parameter sensitivities, that will eventually be embedded into a FEP-based (features, events, processes) evaluation of risk and counteractive measures.

  3. A New Physics-Based Modeling of Multiple Non-Planar Hydraulic Fractures Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Hai; Deo, Milind; Jiang, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Because of the low permeability in shale plays, closely spaced hydraulic fractures and multilateral horizontal wells are generally required to improve production. Therefore, understanding the potential fracture interaction and stress evolution is critical in optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multi-stage horizontal wells. In this paper, a novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple non-planar fractures propagation. The numerical model from Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to simulate the mechanics of fracture propagations and interactions, while a conjugate irregular lattice network is generated to represent fluid flow in both fractures and formation. The fluid flow in the formation is controlled by Darcy’s law, but within fractures it is simulated by using cubic law for laminar flow through parallel plates. Initiation, growth and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. We investigate the fracture propagation path in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs using the simulator developed. Stress shadow caused by the transverse fracture will change the orientation of principal stress in the fracture neighborhood, which may inhibit or alter the growth direction of nearby fracture clusters. However, the initial in-situ stress anisotropy often helps overcome this phenomenon. Under large in-situ stress anisotropy, the hydraulic fractures are more likely to propagate in a direction that is perpendicular to the minimum horizontal stress. Under small in-situ stress anisotropy, there is a greater chance for fractures from nearby clusters to merge with each other. Then, we examine the differences in fracture geometry caused by fracturing in cemented or uncemented wellbore. Moreover, the impact of

  4. Hydraulic Characteristics of the San Gregorio Creek Drainage Basin, California: a Preliminary Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. R.; Snow, M. K.; Pestrong, R.; Sklar, L. S.; Vavro, M.; Sawachi, A.; Talapian, E.; Bailey, E.

    2004-12-01

    Population pressures within the greater San Francisco Bay Area are forcing development into nearby rural communities, and are impacting local environments. This study of the San Gregorio Creek Watershed is designed as a baseline for evaluating the effect increasing development within the drainage basin has on its river system. We hope to provide evidence for that impact through laboratory and field studies that provide a snap-shot of this drainage basin's current characteristics. The San Gregorio Creek watershed, in the Coast Ranges, is located in the southwestern portion of San Mateo County, California. It drains the western slopes of the Santa Cruz Mountains, in the Coast Ranges into the Pacific Ocean at the town of San Gregorio. Most of its fingertip tributaries flow into the trunk from the north and west, with elevations as high as 2050 feet. The watershed includes an area of approximately 51.6 square miles and San Gregorio Creek, the trunk stream, is roughly 12 miles long. San Gregorio Creek is a fourth order perennial stream. It is fed by a number of major tributaries, the largest of which are Alpine, Mindego, and La Honda creeks. The U.S. Geological Survey maintains a stream gauging station for San Gregorio Creek at the town of San Gregorio, where it has been monitoring stream flows for more than 30 years through its Water Resources Department. The resulting data indicate a mean discharge of 36.4 cfs. Map studies of hydraulic geometry for the drainage basin reveal geometric characteristics for San Gregorio Creek that coincide with similar streams in comparable climatic and environmental settings. Stream table studies are used to further investigate fundamental stream processes. Field studies at selected reaches throughout the drainage basin will document hydraulic characteristics. The results of this study will contribute to more comprehensive studies demonstrateing channel response to changing environmental conditions.

  5. Linking Tropical Forest Function to Hydraulic Traits in a Size-Structured and Trait-Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, B. O.; Gloor, E. U.; Fauset, S.; Fyllas, N.; Galbraith, D.; Baker, T. R.; Rowland, L.; Fisher, R.; Binks, O.; Mencuccini, M.; Malhi, Y.; Stahl, C.; Wagner, F. H.; Bonal, D.; da Costa, A. C. L.; Ferreira, L.; Meir, P.

    2014-12-01

    A major weakness of forest ecosystem models applied to Amazonia is their inability to capture the diversity of responses to changes in water availability commonly observed within and across forest communities, severely hampering efforts to predict the fate of Amazon forests under climate change. Such models often prescribe moisture sensitivity using heuristic response functions which are uniform across all individuals and lack important knowledge about trade-offs in hydraulic traits. We address this weakness by implementing a process representation of plant hydraulics into an individual- and trait-based model (Trait Forest Simulator; TFS) intended for application at discrete sites across Amazonia. The model represents a trade-off in the safety and efficiency of water conduction in xylem tissue through hydraulic traits, which then lead to variation in plant water use and growth dynamics. The model accounts for the buffering effects of leaf and stem capacitance on leaf water potential at short time scales, and cavitation-induced reductions in whole-plant conductance over longer periods of water stress. We explore multiple possible links between this hydraulic trait spectrum and other whole-plant traits, such as maximum photosynthetic capacity and wood density. The model is shown to greatly improve the diversity of tree response to seasonal changes in water availability as well as response to drought, as determined by comparison with sap flux and stem dendrometry measurements. Importantly, this individual- and trait-based framework provides a testbed for identifying both critical processes and functional traits needed for inclusion in coarse-scale Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, which will lead to reduced uncertainty in the future state of Amazon tropical forests.

  6. Measurement of flow diverter hydraulic resistance to model flow modification in and around intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ugron, Adám; Szikora, István; Paál, György

    2014-06-01

    Flow diverters (FDs) have been successfully applied in the recent decade to the treatment of intracranial aneurysms by impairing the communication between the flows in the parent artery and the aneurysm and, thus, the blood within the aneurysm sac. It would be desirable to have a simple and accurate computational method to follow the changes in the peri- and intraaneurysmal flow caused by the presence of FDs. The detailed flow simulation around the intricate wire structure of the FDs has three disadvantages: need for high amount of computational resources and highly skilled professionals to prepare the computational grid, and also the lack of validation that makes the invested effort questionable. In this paper, we propose a porous layer method to model the hydraulic resistance (HR) of one or several layers of the FDs. The basis of this proposal is twofold: first, from an application point of view, the only interesting parameter regarding the function of the FD is its HR; second, we have developed a method to measure the HR with a simple apparatus. We present the results of these measurements and demonstrate their utility in numerical simulations of patient-specific aneurysm simulations.

  7. Educating students and stakeholders about shale gas production using a physical model of hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, M.; Garten, L.

    2013-12-01

    Natural gas from shale gas deposits in the United States can potentially help reduce the dependency on foreign energy sources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve economic development in currently depressed regions of the country. However, the hydraulic fracturing process (';fracking') employed to release natural gas from formation such as the Marcellus Shale in New York State and Pennsylvania carries significant environmental risks, in particular for local and regional water resources. The current polarized discussion of the topic needs to be informed by sound data and a better understanding of the technical, scientific, social, and economic aspects of hydrofracking. We developed, built and tested an interactive portable physical model of the gas production by hydrofracking that can be used in class rooms and at public events to visualize the procedures and associated risks including the dynamics of water, gas and fracking fluids. Dyes are used to identify shale, fracking fluids and backflow and can be traced in the adjacent groundwater system. Gas production is visualized by a CO2 producing acid/bicarbonate solution reaction. The tank was shown to considerably improve knowledge of environmental issues related to unconventional gas production by hydrofracking in an advanced undergraduate course.

  8. Measurement of flow diverter hydraulic resistance to model flow modification in and around intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Szikora, István; Paál, György

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters (FDs) have been successfully applied in the recent decade to the treatment of intracranial aneurysms by impairing the communication between the flows in the parent artery and the aneurysm and, thus, the blood within the aneurysm sac. It would be desirable to have a simple and accurate computational method to follow the changes in the peri- and intraaneurysmal flow caused by the presence of FDs. The detailed flow simulation around the intricate wire structure of the FDs has three disadvantages: need for high amount of computational resources and highly skilled professionals to prepare the computational grid, and also the lack of validation that makes the invested effort questionable. In this paper, we propose a porous layer method to model the hydraulic resistance (HR) of one or several layers of the FDs. The basis of this proposal is twofold: first, from an application point of view, the only interesting parameter regarding the function of the FD is its HR; second, we have developed a method to measure the HR with a simple apparatus. We present the results of these measurements and demonstrate their utility in numerical simulations of patient-specific aneurysm simulations. PMID:24936307

  9. Reduction of the uncertainties in the water level-discharge relation of a 1D hydraulic model in the context of operational flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habert, J.; Ricci, S.; Le Pape, E.; Thual, O.; Piacentini, A.; Goutal, N.; Jonville, G.; Rochoux, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a data-driven hydrodynamic simulator based on the 1-D hydraulic solver dedicated to flood forecasting with lead time of an hour up to 24 h. The goal of the study is to reduce uncertainties in the hydraulic model and thus provide more reliable simulations and forecasts in real time for operational use by the national hydrometeorological flood forecasting center in France. Previous studies have shown that sequential assimilation of water level or discharge data allows to adjust the inflows to the hydraulic network resulting in a significant improvement of the discharge while leaving the water level state imperfect. Two strategies are proposed here to improve the water level-discharge relation in the model. At first, a modeling strategy consists in improving the description of the river bed geometry using topographic and bathymetric measurements. Secondly, an inverse modeling strategy proposes to locally correct friction coefficients in the river bed and the flood plain through the assimilation of in situ water level measurements. This approach is based on an Extended Kalman filter algorithm that sequentially assimilates data to infer the upstream and lateral inflows at first and then the friction coefficients. It provides a time varying correction of the hydrological boundary conditions and hydraulic parameters. The merits of both strategies are demonstrated on the Marne catchment in France for eight validation flood events and the January 2004 flood event is used as an illustrative example throughout the paper. The Nash-Sutcliffe criterion for water level is improved from 0.135 to 0.832 for a 12-h forecast lead time with the data assimilation strategy. These developments have been implemented at the SAMA SPC (local flood forecasting service in the Haute-Marne French department) and used for operational forecast since 2013. They were shown to provide an efficient tool for evaluating flood risk and to improve the flood early warning system

  10. Physico-chemical characterization of mortars as a tool in studying specific hydraulic components: application to the study of ancient Naxos aqueduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, P.; Galanos, A.; Doganis, I.; Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.

    2011-07-01

    Mortars and plasters from the ancient aqueduct on the island of Naxos, Greece, were studied with regard to mineralogical and chemical composition, grain size distribution, raw materials and hydraulic properties, in order to assess their characteristics and design compatible repair mortars. The authentic materials contained lime, crushed-brick, siliceous and calcitic aggregates, in different proportions according to mortar type. Crushed-bricks fired at low temperatures and lightweight volcanic aggregates contained amorphous phases, which upon reaction with lime yielded hydraulic components capable of protecting the construction from the continuous presence of water. Hydraulic calcium silicate/aluminate hydrates, the proportions and the perfect packing of the raw materials, along with the diligent application justify the longevity and durability of the studied samples. The hydraulic properties of samples were pointed out through (a) the well-established CO2/H2O ratio derived from the thermogravimetric analysis and (b) by introducing two powerful indices issued from the chemical analysis, namely CaOhydr and soluble SiO2 hydr. These indices improved the clustering of hydraulic mortars and provided better correlation between mortars, plasters and their binders. By comparing grain size distribution and hydraulicity indices it was possible to distinguish among the construction phases. Based on this study, repair mortars were formulated by hydraulic lime, siliceous sand, calcareous and crushed-brick aggregates, with the optimal water content, ensuring optimum workability and compatible appearance with the authentic ones.

  11. Global dynamic modeling of electro-hydraulic 3-UPS/S parallel stabilized platform by bond graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijie; Guo, Fei; Li, Yongquan; Lu, Wenjuan

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic modeling of a parallel manipulator(PM) is an important issue. A complete PM system is actually composed of multiple physical domains. As PMs are widely used in various fields, the importance of modeling the global dynamic model of the PM system becomes increasingly prominent. Currently there lacks further research in global dynamic modeling. A unified modeling approach for the multi-energy domains PM system is proposed based on bond graph and a global dynamic model of the 3-UPS/S parallel stabilized platform involving mechanical and electrical-hydraulic elements is built. Firstly, the screw bond graph theory is improved based on the screw theory, the modular joint model is modeled and the normalized dynamic model of the mechanism is established. Secondly, combined with the electro-hydraulic servo system model built by traditional bond graph, the global dynamic model of the system is obtained, and then the motion, force and power of any element can be obtained directly. Lastly, the experiments and simulations of the driving forces, pressure and flow are performed, and the results show that, the theoretical calculation results of the driving forces are in accord with the experimental ones, and the pressure and flow of the first limb and the third limb are symmetry with each other. The results are reasonable and verify the correctness and effectiveness of the model and the method. The proposed dynamic modeling method provides a reference for modeling of other multi-energy domains system which contains complex PM.

  12. Numerical modeling of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of wire-on-tube condensers operating with HFC-134a using homogeneous equilibrium model: evaluation of some void fraction correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzella, Matheus dos Santos; Cabezas-Gómez, Luben; da Silva, José Antônio; Maia, Cristiana Brasil; Hanriot, Sérgio de Morais

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a numerical evaluation of the influence of some void fraction correlations over the thermal-hydraulic behavior of wire-on-tube condensers operating with HFC-134a. The numerical model is based on finite volume method considering the homogeneous equilibrium model. Empirical correlations are applied to provide closure relations. Results show that the choice of void fraction correlation influences the refrigerant charge and pressure drop calculations, while no influences the heat transfer rate.

  13. Streambed Hydraulic Conductivity Structures: Enhanced Hyporheic Exchange and Contaminant Removal in Model and Constructed Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, S.; Higgins, C. P.; McCray, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Urban- and agriculturally-impacted streams face widespread water quality challenges from excess nutrients, metals, and pathogens from nonpoint sources, which the hyporheic zone (HZ) can capture and treat. However, flow through the HZ is typically small relative to stream flow and thus water quality contributions from the HZ are practically insignificant. Hyporheic exchange is a prominent topic in stream biogeochemistry, but growing understanding of HZ processes has not been translated into practical applications. In particular, existing HZ restoration structures (i.e. cross-vanes) do not exchange water efficiently nor control the residence time (RT) of downwelling streamwater. Here we present subsurface modifications to streambed hydraulic conductivity (K) to drive efficient hyporheic exchange and control RT, thereby enhancing the effectiveness of the HZ. Coordinated high K (i.e. gravel) and low K (i.e. concrete, clay) modifications are termed Biohydrochemical Enhancement structures for Streamwater Treatment (BEST). BEST can simply use native sediments or may also incorporate reactive geomedia to enhance reactions. The contaminant mitigation potentials of BEST were estimated based on hyporheic flow and RT outputs from MODFLOW and MODPATH models and reported nutrient, metal, and pathogen removal rate constants from literature for specific porous media. Reactions of interest include denitrification and removal of phosphate, metals, and E. coli. Simulations showed that BEST structures in series can substantially improve water quality in small streams along reaches of tens of meters. The model results are compared to observed data in tank and constructed stream experiments. Preliminary results with BEST incorporating woodchip geomedia demonstrate rapid denitrification exceeding model predictions. These experiments should establish BEST as a novel stream restoration structure or Best Management Practice (BMP) option to help practitioners achieve stormwater compliance.

  14. Toward a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity in climate models: Simulation of rapid groundwater fluctuations in Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2015-12-31

    Preferential flow through weathered bedrock leads to rapid rise of the water table after the first rainstorms and significant water storage (also known as ‘‘rock moisture’’) in the fractures. We present a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that captures the preferential flow and is easy to implement in global climate models. To mimic the naturally varying heterogeneity with depth in the subsurface, the model represents the hydraulic conductivity as a product of the effective saturation and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a lognormal distribution. The mean of the background Kbkg decreases monotonically with depth, while its variance reduces with the effective saturation. Model parameters are derived by assimilating into Richards’ equation 6 years of 30 min observations of precipitation (mm) and water table depths (m), from seven wells along a steep hillslope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California. The results show that the observed rapid penetration of precipitation and the fast rise of the water table from the well locations, after the first winter rains, are well captured with the new stochastic approach in contrast to the standard van Genuchten model of hydraulic conductivity, which requires significantly higher levels of saturated soils to produce the same results. ‘‘Rock moisture,’’ the moisture between the soil mantle and the water table, comprises 30% of the moisture because of the great depth of the weathered bedrock layer and could be a potential source of moisture to sustain trees through extended dry periods. Moreover, storage of moisture in the soil mantle is smaller, implying less surface runoff and less evaporation, with the proposed new model.

  15. Toward a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity in climate models: Simulation of rapid groundwater fluctuations in Northern California

    DOE PAGES

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2015-12-31

    Preferential flow through weathered bedrock leads to rapid rise of the water table after the first rainstorms and significant water storage (also known as ‘‘rock moisture’’) in the fractures. We present a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that captures the preferential flow and is easy to implement in global climate models. To mimic the naturally varying heterogeneity with depth in the subsurface, the model represents the hydraulic conductivity as a product of the effective saturation and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a lognormal distribution. The mean of the background Kbkg decreases monotonically with depth, while its variance reducesmore » with the effective saturation. Model parameters are derived by assimilating into Richards’ equation 6 years of 30 min observations of precipitation (mm) and water table depths (m), from seven wells along a steep hillslope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California. The results show that the observed rapid penetration of precipitation and the fast rise of the water table from the well locations, after the first winter rains, are well captured with the new stochastic approach in contrast to the standard van Genuchten model of hydraulic conductivity, which requires significantly higher levels of saturated soils to produce the same results. ‘‘Rock moisture,’’ the moisture between the soil mantle and the water table, comprises 30% of the moisture because of the great depth of the weathered bedrock layer and could be a potential source of moisture to sustain trees through extended dry periods. Moreover, storage of moisture in the soil mantle is smaller, implying less surface runoff and less evaporation, with the proposed new model.« less

  16. Toward a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity in climate models: Simulation of rapid groundwater fluctuations in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2015-12-01

    Preferential flow through weathered bedrock leads to rapid rise of the water table after the first rainstorms and significant water storage (also known as "rock moisture") in the fractures. We present a new parameterization of hydraulic conductivity that captures the preferential flow and is easy to implement in global climate models. To mimic the naturally varying heterogeneity with depth in the subsurface, the model represents the hydraulic conductivity as a product of the effective saturation and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a lognormal distribution. The mean of the background Kbkg decreases monotonically with depth, while its variance reduces with the effective saturation. Model parameters are derived by assimilating into Richards' equation 6 years of 30 min observations of precipitation (mm) and water table depths (m), from seven wells along a steep hillslope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California. The results show that the observed rapid penetration of precipitation and the fast rise of the water table from the well locations, after the first winter rains, are well captured with the new stochastic approach in contrast to the standard van Genuchten model of hydraulic conductivity, which requires significantly higher levels of saturated soils to produce the same results. "Rock moisture," the moisture between the soil mantle and the water table, comprises 30% of the moisture because of the great depth of the weathered bedrock layer and could be a potential source of moisture to sustain trees through extended dry periods. Furthermore, storage of moisture in the soil mantle is smaller, implying less surface runoff and less evaporation, with the proposed new model.

  17. RELAP5 model to simulate the thermal-hydraulic effects of grid spacers and cladding rupture during reflood

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianandan, C.K.; Klingenfus, J.A.; Reilly, S.S.

    1995-09-01

    Droplet breakup at spacer grids and a cladding swelled and ruptured locations plays an important role in the cooling of nuclear fuel rods during the reflooding period of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the reflood phase, a spacer grid affects the thermal-hydraulic system behavior through increased turbulence, droplet breakup due to impact on grid straps, grid rewetting, and liquid holdup due to grid form losses. Recently, models to simulate spacer grid effects and blockage and rupture effects on system thermal hydraulics were added to the B&W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) version of the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. Several FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood tests, CCTF Tests C1-19 and C2-6, SCTF Test S3-15, and G2 Test 561 were simulated using RELAP5/MOD2-B&W to verify the applicability of the model at the cladding swelled and rupture locations. The results demonstrate the importance of modeling the thermal-hydraulic effects due to grids, and clad swelling and rupture to correctly predict the clad temperature response during the reflood phase of large break LOCA. The RELAP5 models and the test results are described in this paper.

  18. Development of roughness updating based on artificial neural network in a river hydraulic model for flash flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, J. C.; Hsu, M. H.; Duann, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Flood is the worst weather-related hazard in Taiwan because of steep terrain and storm. The tropical storm often results in disastrous flash flood. To provide reliable forecast of water stages in rivers is indispensable for proper actions in the emergency response during flood. The river hydraulic model based on dynamic wave theory using an implicit finite-difference method is developed with river roughness updating for flash flood forecast. The artificial neural network (ANN) is employed to update the roughness of rivers in accordance with the observed river stages at each time-step of the flood routing process. Several typhoon events at Tamsui River are utilized to evaluate the accuracy of flood forecasting. The results present the adaptive n-values of roughness for river hydraulic model that can provide a better flow state for subsequent forecasting at significant locations and longitudinal profiles along rivers.

  19. Weighted recalibration of the Rosetta pedotransfer model with improved estimates of hydraulic parameter distributions and summary statistics (Rosetta3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yonggen; Schaap, Marcel G.

    2017-04-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been widely used to predict soil hydraulic parameters in favor of expensive laboratory or field measurements. Rosetta (Schaap et al., 2001, denoted as Rosetta1) is one of many PTFs and is based on artificial neural network (ANN) analysis coupled with the bootstrap re-sampling method which allows the estimation of van Genuchten water retention parameters (van Genuchten, 1980, abbreviated here as VG), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and their uncertainties. In this study, we present an improved set of hierarchical pedotransfer functions (Rosetta3) that unify the water retention and Ks submodels into one. Parameter uncertainty of the fit of the VG curve to the original retention data is used in the ANN calibration procedure to reduce bias of parameters predicted by the new PTF. One thousand bootstrap replicas were used to calibrate the new models compared to 60 or 100 in Rosetta1, thus allowing the uni-variate and bi-variate probability distributions of predicted parameters to be quantified in greater detail. We determined the optimal weights for VG parameters and Ks, the optimal number of hidden nodes in ANN, and the number of bootstrap replicas required for statistically stable estimates. Results show that matric potential-dependent bias was reduced significantly while root mean square error (RMSE) for water content were reduced modestly; RMSE for Ks was increased by 0.9% (H3w) to 3.3% (H5w) in the new models on log scale of Ks compared with the Rosetta1 model. It was found that estimated distributions of parameters were mildly non-Gaussian and could instead be described rather well with heavy-tailed α-stable distributions. On the other hand, arithmetic means had only a small estimation bias for most textures when compared with the mean-like ;shift; parameter of the α-stable distributions. Arithmetic means and (co-)variances are therefore still recommended as summary statistics of the estimated distributions. However, it

  20. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

  1. Modeling the Hydraulics of Root Growth in Three Dimensions with Phloem Water Sources1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wiegers, Brandy S.; Cheer, Angela Y.; Silk, Wendy K.

    2009-01-01

    Primary growth is characterized by cell expansion facilitated by water uptake generating hydrostatic (turgor) pressure to inflate the cell, stretching the rigid cell walls. The multiple source theory of root growth hypothesizes that root growth involves transport of water both from the soil surrounding the growth zone and from the mature tissue higher in the root via phloem and protophloem. Here, protophloem water sources are used as boundary conditions in a classical, three-dimensional model of growth-sustaining water potentials in primary roots. The model predicts small radial gradients in water potential, with a significant longitudinal gradient. The results improve the agreement of theory with empirical studies for water potential in the primary growth zone of roots of maize (Zea mays). A sensitivity analysis quantifies the functional importance of apical phloem differentiation in permitting growth and reveals that the presence of phloem water sources makes the growth-sustaining water relations of the root relatively insensitive to changes in root radius and hydraulic conductivity. Adaptation to drought and other environmental stresses is predicted to involve more apical differentiation of phloem and/or higher phloem delivery rates to the growth zone. PMID:19542299

  2. A reactive transport modelling approach to assess the leaching potential of hydraulic fracturing fluids associated with coal seam gas extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallants, Dirk; Simunek, Jirka; Gerke, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Coal Seam Gas production generates large volumes of "produced" water that may contain compounds originating from the use of hydraulic fracturing fluids. Such produced water also contains elevated concentrations of naturally occurring inorganic and organic compounds, and usually has a high salinity. Leaching of produced water from storage ponds may occur as a result of flooding or containment failure. Some produced water is used for irrigation of specific crops tolerant to elevated salt levels. These chemicals may potentially contaminate soil, shallow groundwater, and groundwater, as well as receiving surface waters. This paper presents an application of scenario modelling using the reactive transport model for variably-saturated media HP1 (coupled HYDRUS-1D and PHREEQC). We evaluate the fate of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and naturally occurring chemicals in soil as a result of unintentional release from storage ponds or when produced water from Coal Seam Gas operations is used in irrigation practices. We present a review of exposure pathways and relevant hydro-bio-geo-chemical processes, a collation of physico-chemical properties of organic/inorganic contaminants as input to a set of generic simulations of transport and attenuation in variably saturated soil profiles. We demonstrate the ability to model the coupled processes of flow and transport in soil of contaminants associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids and naturally occurring contaminants.

  3. Modelling of diffusion-limited retardation of contaminants in hydraulically and lithologically nonuniform media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, Rudolf; Ptak, Thomas

    2003-11-01

    A new reactive transport modelling approach and examples of its application are presented, dealing with the impact of sorption/desorption kinetics on the spreading of solutes, e.g. organic contaminants, in groundwater. Slow sorption/desorption is known from the literature to be strongly responsible for the retardation of organic contaminants. The modelling concept applied in this paper quantifies sorption/desorption kinetics by an intra-particle diffusion approach. According to this idea, solute uptake by or release from the aquifer material is modelled at small scale by a "slow" diffusion process where the diffusion coefficient is reduced as compared to the aqueous diffusion coefficient due to (i) the size and shape of intra-particle pores and (ii) retarded transport of solutes within intra-particle pores governed by a nonlinear sorption isotherm. This process-based concept has the advantage of requiring only measurable model parameters, thus avoiding fitting parameters like first-order rate coefficients. In addition, the approach presented here allows for modelling of slow sorption/desorption in lithologically nonuniform media. Therefore, it accounts for well-known experimental findings indicating that sorptive properties depend on (i) the grain size distribution of the aquifer material and (ii) the lithological composition (e.g. percentage of quartz, sandstone, limestone, etc.) of each grain size fraction. The small-scale physico-chemical model describing sorption/desorption is coupled to a large-scale model of groundwater flow and solute transport. Consequently, hydraulic heterogeneities may also be considered by the overall model. This coupling is regarded as an essential prerequisite for simulating field-scale scenarios which will be addressed by a forthcoming publication. This paper focuses on mathematical model formulation, implementation of the numerical code and lab-scale model applications highlighting the sorption and desorption behavior of an organic

  4. Natural attenuation of fuel hydrocarbon contaminants: Hydraulic conductivity dependency of biodegradation rates in a field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-07-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  5. Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbon Contaminants: Correlation of Biodegradation with Hydraulic Conductivity in a Field Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-10-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, USA. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  6. A preliminary statistical model for hydraulic fracture-induced seismicity in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani, Hadi; Atkinson, Gail M.

    2016-10-01

    We characterize the statistical relationship between hydraulic fracturing and seismicity in western Canada by using the concept of cellular seismicity. We determine the regionally averaged probability that hydraulic fracture operations will be associated with M ≥ 3 seismicity within a 10 km grid cell. This rate is 0.01 to 0.026 at the 95th percentile confidence limit. Monte Carlo simulations confirm that the observed correlations are extremely unlikely (≪1%) to have been obtained by chance. Proximity to a disposal well and proximity to the Swan Hills Formation, which has been suggested as a proxy for basement controlled faults, appear to increase the likelihood that hydraulic fracturing will trigger seismicity.

  7. Application of a new hydraulic conductivity model to simulate rapid groundwater fluctuations in the Eel River watershed in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrettas, M. D.; Fung, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    High-frequency multi-year observations of the water table at several wells in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve in the Eel River Watershed in northern California show rapid fluctuations, where the water table, some 10-15 meters below the surface, rises by as much as 1 meter in a day or two after the first storms of the rain season. The observations highlight preferential flow through weathered bedrock, which can store as much as 30% of the moisture in the column ("rock moisture"). This rapid transfer of moisture and storage at depth could have a significant impact on ecosystem dynamics and the water and energy budgets of the atmosphere on various time scales. Despite its high importance, preferential flow through weather bedrock is not routinely captured in most climate models. This work presents a new hydraulic conductivity parameterization that captures the preferential flow, with straightforward implementation into current global climate models. The hydraulic conductivity is represented as a product of the effective saturation (normalized water content) and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a depth dependent lognormal distribution. A unique feature of the parameterization is that the variance of hydraulic conductivity is large when there is little rock moisture, and decreases with increasing saturation, mimicking flow through fractures. The new method is applied to seven wells locations on a steep (35 degrees) hill-slope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California, for the duration of six years and estimates of the model parameters are provided by assimilating, into Richards' equation, measurements of precipitation [mm] and water table depths [m] at 30-minute time intervals. The simulation results show that the new approach yields a good agreement of the rapid rise of the observed water table at the tested well locations. Furthermore, the water stored in the weathered bedrock is estimated to be in the range between 32% and 41%, which could

  8. Investigating the Fate of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid in Shale Gas Formations Through Two-Phase Numerical Modelling of Fluid Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R.; Doster, F.; Celia, M. A.; Bandilla, K.

    2015-12-01

    The process of hydraulic fracturing in shale gas formations typically involves the injection of large quantities of water-based fluid (2×107L typical) into the shale formations in order to fracture the rock. A large proportion of the fracturing fluids injected into shale gas wells during hydraulic fracturing does not return out of the well once production begins. The percentage of water returning varies within and between different shale plays, but is generally around 30%. The large proportion of the fluid that does not return raises the possibility that it could migrate out of the target shale formation and potentially toward aquifers and the surface through pathways such as the created hydraulic fractures, faults and adjacent wells. A leading hypothesis for the fate of the remaining fracturing fluid is that it is spontaneously imbibed from the hydraulic fractures into the shale rock matrix due to the low water saturation and very high capillary pressure in the shale. The imbibition hypothesis is assessed using numerical modeling of the two-phase flow of fracturing fluid and gas in the shale during injection. The model incorporates relevant two-phase physical phenomena such as capillarity and relative permeability, including hysteretic behavior in both. Modeling scenarios for fracturing fluid injection were assessed under varying conditions for shale reservoir parameters and spatial heterogeneities in permeability and wettability. The results showed that the unaccounted fracturing fluid may plausibly be imbibed into the shale matrix under certain conditions, and that significant small-scale spatial heterogeneity in the shale permeability likely plays an important role in imbibing the fracturing fluid.

  9. Laboratory-Measured and Property-Transfer Modeled Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Snake River Plain Aquifer Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.

    2008-01-01

    Sediments are believed to comprise as much as 50 percent of the Snake River Plain aquifer thickness in some locations within the Idaho National Laboratory. However, the hydraulic properties of these deep sediments have not been well characterized and they are not represented explicitly in the current conceptual model of subregional scale ground-water flow. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the nature of the sedimentary material within the aquifer and to test the applicability of a site-specific property-transfer model developed for the sedimentary interbeds of the unsaturated zone. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) was measured for 10 core samples from sedimentary interbeds within the Snake River Plain aquifer and also estimated using the property-transfer model. The property-transfer model for predicting Ksat was previously developed using a multiple linear-regression technique with bulk physical-property measurements (bulk density [pbulk], the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient) as the explanatory variables. The model systematically underestimates Ksat,typically by about a factor of 10, which likely is due to higher bulk-density values for the aquifer samples compared to the samples from the unsaturated zone upon which the model was developed. Linear relations between the logarithm of Ksat and pbulk also were explored for comparison.

  10. Effect of physical property of supporting media and variable hydraulic loading on hydraulic characteristics of advanced onsite wastewater treatment system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meena Kumari; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory-scale study was carried out to investigate the effects of physical properties of the supporting media and variable hydraulic shock loads on the hydraulic characteristics of an advanced onsite wastewater treatment system. The system consisted of two upflow anaerobic reactors (a septic tank and an anaerobic filter) accommodated within a single unit. The study was divided into three phases on the basis of three different supporting media (Aqwise carriers, corrugated ring and baked clay) used in the anaerobic filter. Hydraulic loadings were based on peak flow factor (PFF), varying from one to six, to simulate the actual conditions during onsite wastewater treatment. Hydraulic characteristics of the system were identified on the basis of residence time distribution analyses. The system showed a very good hydraulic efficiency, between 0.86 and 0.93, with the media of highest porosity at the hydraulic loading of PFF≤4. At the higher hydraulic loading of PFF 6 also, an appreciable hydraulic efficiency of 0.74 was observed. The system also showed good chemical oxygen demand and total suspended solids removal efficiency of 80.5% and 82.3%, respectively at the higher hydraulic loading of PFF 6. Plug-flow dispersion model was found to be the most appropriate one to describe the mixing pattern of the system, with different supporting media at variable loading, during the tracer study.

  11. Calibration of 2D Hydraulic Inundation Models with SAR Imagery in the Floodplain Region of the Lower Tagus River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestana, Rita; Matias, Magda; Canelas, Ricardo; Roque, Dora; Araujo, Amelia; Van Zeller, Emilia; Trigo-Teixeira, Antonio; Ferreira, Rui; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Heleno, Sandra; Falcão, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Alexandre B.

    2014-05-01

    Floods account for 40% of all natural hazards worldwide and were responsible for the loss of about 100 thousand human lives and affected more than 1,4 million people in the last decade of the 20th century alone. Floods have been the deadliest natural hazard in Portugal in the last 100 years. In terms of inundated area, the largest floods in Portugal occur in the Lower Tagus (LT) River. On average, the river overflows every 2.5 years, at times blocking roads and causing important agricultural damages. The economical relevance of the area and the high frequency of the relevant flood events make the LT floodplain a good pilot region to conduct a data-driven, systematic calibration work of flood hydraulic models. This paper focus on the calibration of 2D-horizontal flood simulation models for the floods of 1997, 2001 and 2006 on a 70-km stretch of the LT River, between Tramagal and Omnias, using the software Tuflow. This computational engine provides 2D solutions based on the Stelling finite-difference, alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme that solves the full 2D free surface shallow-water flow equations and allowed the introduction of structures that constrain water flow. The models were based on a digital terrain model (DTM) acquired in 2008 by radar techniques (5m of spatial resolution) and on in situ measurements of water elevation in Omnias (downstream boundary condition) and discharge in Tramagal and Zezere (upstream boundary conditions). Due to the relevancy of several dykes on this stretch of the LT River, non-existent on the available DTM, five of them were introduced in the models. All models have the same boundaries and were simulated using steady-state flow initial conditions. The resolution of the 2D grid mesh was 30m. Land cover data for the study area was retrieved from Corine Land Cover 2006 (CO-ordination of INformation on the Environment) with spatial resolution of 100m, and combined with estimated manning coefficients obtained in literature

  12. An exact explicit solution for one-dimensional, transient, nonlinear Richards' equation for modeling infiltration with special hydraulic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    This work develops a simple exact and explicit solution of the one-dimensional transient and nonlinear Richards' equation for soils in a special case of exponential water retention curve and power law hydraulic conductivity. The exact solution is obtained as traveling wave based on the approach proposed by Philip (1957, 1967) and adopted by Zlotnik et al. (2007). The obtained solution is novel, and it expresses explicitly the water content as function of the depth and time. It can be useful to model infiltration into semi-infinite soils with time-dependent boundary conditions and infiltration with constant boundary condition but space-dependent initial condition. A complete analytical inverse procedure based on the proposed analytical solution is presented which allows the estimation of hydraulic parameters. The proposed exact solution is also important for the verification of numerical schemes as well as for checking the implementation of time-dependent boundary conditions.

  13. Development of property-transfer models for estimating the hydraulic properties of deep sediments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winfield, Kari A.

    2005-01-01

    estimated from the appropriate regression equation and used to calculate an estimated water-retention curve. The degree to which the estimated curve approximated the measured curve was quantified using a goodness-of-fit indicator, the root-mean-square error. Comparison of the root-mean-square-error distributions for each alternative particle-size model showed that the estimated water-retention curves were insensitive to the way the particle-size distribution was represented. Bulk density, the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient were chosen as input parameters for the final models. The property-transfer models developed in this study allow easy determination of hydraulic properties without need for their direct measurement. Additionally, the models provide the basis for development of theoretical models that rely on physical relationships between the pore-size distribution and the bulk-physical properties of the media. With this adaptation, the property-transfer models should have greater application throughout the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and other geographic locations.

  14. EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CAPTURE DUE TO CHANGING FLOW PATTERNS USING MAPPING AND MODELING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    SPILIOTOPOULOS AA; SWANSON LC; SHANNON R; TONKIN MJ

    2011-04-07

    Robust performance evaluation represents one of the most challenging aspects of groundwater pump-and-treat (P&T) remedy implementation. In most cases, the primary goal of the P&T system is hydraulic containment, and ultimately recovery, of contaminants to protect downgradient receptors. Estimating the extent of hydraulic containment is particularly challenging under changing flow patterns due to variable pumping, boundaries and/or other conditions. We present a systematic approach to estimate hydraulic containment using multiple lines of evidence based on (a) water-level mapping and (b) groundwater modeling. Capture Frequency Maps (CFMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-level maps developed for each available water level data set using universal kriging. In a similar manner, Capture Efficiency Maps (CEMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-levels calculated using a transient groundwater flow model: tracking is undertaken independently for each stress period using a very low effective porosity, depicting the 'instantaneous' fate of each particle each stress period. Although conceptually similar, the two methods differ in their underlying assumptions and their limitations: their use together identifies areas where containment may be reliable (i.e., where the methods are in agreement) and where containment is uncertain (typically, where the methods disagree). A field-scale example is presented to illustrate these concepts.

  15. Estimating the Potential Toxicity of Chemicals Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Operations Using Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Modeling.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Stanek, John; DeWoskin, Robert S; Burgoon, Lyle D

    2016-07-19

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identified 1173 chemicals associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids, flowback, or produced water, of which 1026 (87%) lack chronic oral toxicity values for human health assessments. To facilitate the ranking and prioritization of chemicals that lack toxicity values, it may be useful to employ toxicity estimates from quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. Here we describe an approach for applying the results of a QSAR model from the TOPKAT program suite, which provides estimates of the rat chronic oral lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL). Of the 1173 chemicals, TOPKAT was able to generate LOAEL estimates for 515 (44%). To address the uncertainty associated with these estimates, we assigned qualitative confidence scores (high, medium, or low) to each TOPKAT LOAEL estimate, and found 481 to be high-confidence. For 48 chemicals that had both a high-confidence TOPKAT LOAEL estimate and a chronic oral reference dose from EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database, Spearman rank correlation identified 68% agreement between the two values (permutation p-value =1 × 10(-11)). These results provide support for the use of TOPKAT LOAEL estimates in identifying and prioritizing potentially hazardous chemicals. High-confidence TOPKAT LOAEL estimates were available for 389 of 1026 hydraulic fracturing-related chemicals that lack chronic oral RfVs and OSFs from EPA-identified sources, including a subset of chemicals that are frequently used in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

  16. IN-SERVICE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF GCLS IN LANDFILL COVERS - LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments using multi-species inorganic solutions (containing calcium and sodium) were conducted on specimens of a new geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) containing sodium bentonite to determine how cation exchange and desiccation affected the hydraulic conductivity. Calc...

  17. Hydraulic testing plan for the Bear Creek Valley Treatability Study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study is intended to provide site-specific data defining potential treatability technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. The ultimate goal of this effort is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium, technetium, nitrate, and several metals from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. This project directly supports the BCV Feasibility Study. Part of the Treatability Study, Phase II Hydraulic Performance Testing, will produce hydraulic and treatment performance data required to design a long-term treatment system. This effort consists of the installation and testing of two groundwater collection systems: a trench in the vicinity of GW-835 and an angled pumping well adjacent to NT-1. Pumping tests and evaluations of gradients under ambient conditions will provide data for full-scale design of treatment systems. In addition to hydraulic performance, in situ treatment chemistry data will be obtained from monitoring wells installed in the reactive media section of the trench. The in situ treatment work is not part of this test plan. This Hydraulic Testing Plan describes the location and installation of the trench and NT-1 wells, the locations and purpose of the monitoring wells, and the procedures for the pumping tests of the trench and NT-1 wells.

  18. Hydraulics of high-yield orchard trees: a case study of three Malus domestica cultivars.

    PubMed

    Beikircher, Barbara; De Cesare, Chiara; Mayr, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    The drought tolerance of three economically important apple cultivars, Golden Delicious, Braeburn and Red Delicious, was analysed. The work offers insights into the hydraulics of these high-yield trees and indicates a possible hydraulic limitation of carbon gain. The hydraulic safety and efficiency of branch xylem and leaves were quantified, drought tolerance of living tissues was measured and stomatal regulation, turgor-loss point and osmotic potential at full turgor were analysed. Physiological measurements were correlated with anatomical parameters, such as conduit diameter, cell-wall reinforcement, stomatal density and stomatal pore length. Hydraulic safety differed considerably between the three cultivars with Golden Delicious being significantly less vulnerable to drought-induced embolism than Braeburn and Red Delicious. In Golden Delicious, leaves were less resistant than branch xylem, while in the other cultivars leaves were more resistant than branch xylem. Hydraulic efficiency and xylem anatomical measurements indicate differences in pit properties, which may also be responsible for variations in hydraulic safety. In all three cultivars, full stomatal closure occurred at water potentials where turgor had already been lost and severe loss of hydraulic conductivity as well as damage to living cells had been induced. The consequential negative safety margins pose a risk for hydraulic failure but facilitate carbon gain, which is further improved by the observed high stomatal conductance. Maximal stomatal conductance was clearly seen to be related to stomatal density and size. Based on our results, these three high-yield Malus domestica Borkh. cultivars span a wide range of drought tolerances, appear optimized for maximal carbon gain and, thus, all perform best under well-managed growing conditions.

  19. Nanoscale zero-valent iron for metal/metalloid removal from model hydraulic fracturing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuqing; Lei, Cheng; Khan, Eakalak; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik; Lin, Daohui; Feng, Yujie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was tested for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), and As(V) in model saline wastewaters from hydraulic fracturing. Increasing ionic strength (I) from 0.35 to 4.10 M (Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters) increased Cu(II) removal (25.4-80.0%), inhibited Zn(II) removal (58.7-42.9%), slightly increased and then reduced Cr(VI) removal (65.7-44.1%), and almost unaffected As(V) removal (66.7-75.1%) by 8-h reaction with nZVI at 1-2 g L(-1). The removal kinetics conformed to pseudo-second-order model, and increasing I decreased the surface area-normalized rate coefficient (ksa) of Cu(II) and Cr(VI), probably because agglomeration of nZVI in saline wastewaters restricted diffusion of metal(loid)s to active surface sites. Increasing I induced severe Fe dissolution from 0.37 to 0.77% in DIW to 4.87-13.0% in Day-90 wastewater; and Fe dissolution showed a significant positive correlation with Cu(II) removal. With surface stabilization by alginate and polyvinyl alcohol, the performance of entrapped nZVI in Day-90 wastewater was improved for Zn(II) and Cr(VI), and Fe dissolution was restrained (3.20-7.36%). The X-ray spectroscopic analysis and chemical speciation modelling demonstrated that the difference in removal trends from Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters was attributed to: (i) distinctive removal mechanisms of Cu(II) and Cr(VI) (adsorption, (co-)precipitation, and reduction), compared to Zn(II) (adsorption) and As(V) (bidentate inner-sphere complexation); and (ii) changes in solution speciation (e.g., from Zn(2+) to ZnCl3(-) and ZnCl4(2-); from CrO4(2-) to CaCrO4 complex). Bare nZVI was susceptible to variations in wastewater chemistry while entrapped nZVI was more stable and environmentally benign, which could be used to remove metals/metalloids before subsequent treatment for reuse/disposal.

  20. Effective soil hydraulic properties in space and time: some field data analysis and modeling concepts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil hydraulic properties, which control surface fluxes and storage of water and chemicals in the soil profile, vary in space and time. Spatial variability above the measurement scale (e.g., soil area of 0.07 m2 or support volume of 14 L) must be upscaled appropriately to determine “effective” hydr...

  1. Modeled hydraulic redistribution by Helianthus annuus L. matches observed data only after model modification to include nighttime transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Cardon, Z. G.; Rockwell, F. E.; Teshera-Levye, J.; Zwieniecki, M.; Holbrook, N. M.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water from moist to dry soil layers through the root systems of plants, referred to as hydraulic redistribution (HR), occurs throughout the world and is thought to influence carbon and water budgets and ecosystem functioning. The realized hydrologic, biogeochemical, and ecological consequences of HR depend on the amount of redistributed water, while the ability to assess these impacts requires models that correctly capture HR magnitude and timing. Using several soil types and two eco-types of Helianthus annuus L. in split-pot experiments, we examined how well the widely used HR modeling formulation developed by Ryel et al. (2002) could match experimental determination of HR across a range of water potential driving gradients. H. annuus carries out extensive nighttime transpiration, and though over the last decade it has become more widely recognized that nighttime transpiration occurs in multiple species and many ecosystems, the original Ryel et al. (2002) formulation does not include the effect of nighttime transpiration on HR. We developed and added a representation of nighttime transpiration into the formulation, and only then was the model able to capture the dynamics and magnitude of HR we observed as soils dried and nighttime stomatal behavior changed, both influencing HR.

  2. A coupled carbon and plant hydraulic model to predict ecosystem carbon and water flux responses to disturbance and environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. S.; Ewers, B. E.; Roberts, D. E.; McDowell, N. G.; Pendall, E.; Frank, J. M.; Reed, D. E.; Massman, W. J.; Mitra, B.

    2011-12-01

    Changing climate drivers including temperature, humidity, precipitation, and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations directly control land surface exchanges of CO2 and water. In a profound way these responses are modulated by disturbances that are driven by or exacerbated by climate change. Predicting these changes is challenging given that the feedbacks between environmental controls, disturbances, and fluxes are complex. Flux data in areas of bark beetle outbreaks in the western U.S.A. show differential declines in carbon and water flux in response to the occlusion of xylem by associated fungi. For example, bark beetle infestation at the GLEES AmeriFlux site manifested in a decline in summer water use efficiency to 60% in the year after peak infestation compared to previous years, and no recovery of carbon uptake following a period of high vapor pressure deficit. This points to complex feedbacks between disturbance and differential ecosystem reaction and relaxation responses. Theory based on plant hydraulics and extending to include links to carbon storage and exhaustion has potential for explaining these dynamics with simple, yet rigorous models. In this spirit we developed a coupled model that combines an existing model of canopy water and carbon flow, TREES [e.g., Loranty et al., 2010], with the Sperry et al., [1998] plant hydraulic model. The new model simultaneously solves carbon uptake and losses along with plant hydraulics, and allows for testing specific hypotheses on feedbacks between xylem dysfunction, stomatal and non-stomatal controls on photosynthesis and carbon allocation, and autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. These are constrained through gas exchange, root vulnerability to cavitation, sap flux, and eddy covariance data in a novel model complexity-testing framework. Our analysis focuses on an ecosystem gradient spanning sagebrush to subalpine forests. Our modeling results support hypotheses on feedbacks between hydraulic dysfunction and 1) non

  3. Tree level hydrodynamic approach for resolving aboveground water storage and stomatal conductance and modeling the effects of tree hydraulic strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirfenderesgi, Golnazalsadat; Bohrer, Gil; Matheny, Ashley M.; Fatichi, Simone; Moraes Frasson, Renato Prata; Schäfer, Karina V. R.

    2016-07-01

    The finite difference ecosystem-scale tree crown hydrodynamics model version 2 (FETCH2) is a tree-scale hydrodynamic model of transpiration. The FETCH2 model employs a finite difference numerical methodology and a simplified single-beam conduit system to explicitly resolve xylem water potentials throughout the vertical extent of a tree. Empirical equations relate water potential within the stem to stomatal conductance of the leaves at each height throughout the crown. While highly simplified, this approach brings additional realism to the simulation of transpiration by linking stomatal responses to stem water potential rather than directly to soil moisture, as is currently the case in the majority of land surface models. FETCH2 accounts for plant hydraulic traits, such as the degree of anisohydric/isohydric response of stomata, maximal xylem conductivity, vertical distribution of leaf area, and maximal and minimal xylem water content. We used FETCH2 along with sap flow and eddy covariance data sets collected from a mixed plot of two genera (oak/pine) in Silas Little Experimental Forest, NJ, USA, to conduct an analysis of the intergeneric variation of hydraulic strategies and their effects on diurnal and seasonal transpiration dynamics. We define these strategies through the parameters that describe the genus level transpiration and xylem conductivity responses to changes in stem water potential. Our evaluation revealed that FETCH2 considerably improved the simulation of ecosystem transpiration and latent heat flux in comparison to more conventional models. A virtual experiment showed that the model was able to capture the effect of hydraulic strategies such as isohydric/anisohydric behavior on stomatal conductance under different soil-water availability conditions.

  4. Hysteresis phenomena in hydraulic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, H. J.; Luo, X. W.; Chen, Y. L.; Xu, H. Y.; Farhat, M.

    2012-11-01

    Hysteresis phenomena demonstrate the lag between the generation and the removal of some physical phenomena. This paper studies the hysteresis phenomena of the head-drop in a scaled model pump turbine using experiment test and CFD methods. These lag is induced by complicated flow patterns, which influenced the reliability of rotating machine. Keeping the same measurement procedure is concluded for the hydraulic machine measurement.

  5. Effective application of LIDAR data in two-dimensional hydraulic modelling. (Polish Title: Efektywne wykorzystanie danych LIDAR w dwuwymiarowym modelowaniu hydraulicznym)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, K.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents aspects of ALS data usage in two-dimensional hydraulic modelling including generation of high-precision digital terrain models, their effective processing which is a compromise between the resolution and the accuracy of the processed data, as well as information about the roughness of the land cover providing information that could compete with information from topographic databases and orthophotomaps. Still evolving ALS technology makes it possible to collect the data with constantly increasing spatial resolution that guarantees correct representation of the terrain shape and height. It also provides a reliable description of the land cover. However, the size of generated files may cause problems in their effective usage in the 2D hydraulic modeling where Saint-Venant's equations are implemented. High-resolution elevation models make it impossible or prolong the duration of the calculations for large areas in complex algorithms defining a model of the water movement, which is directly related to the cost of the hydraulic analysis. As far as an effective usage of voluminous datasets is concerned, the data reduction is recommended. Such a process should reduce the size of the data files, maintain their accuracy and keep the appropriate structure to allow their further application in the hydraulic modelling. An application of only a few percent of unprocessed datasets, selected with the use of specified filtering algorithms and spatial analysis tools, can give the same result of the hydraulic modeling obtained in a significantly shorter time than the result of the comparable operation on unprocessed datasets. Such an approach, however, is not commonly used, which means the most reliable hydraulic models are applied only in small areas in the largest cities. Another application of ALS data is its potential usage in digital roughness model creation for 2D hydraulic models. There are many possibilities of roughness coefficient estimation in hydraulic

  6. Experimental Study of Liquid Jet Impingement in Microgravity: The Hydraulic Jump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avedisian, C. T.; Zhao, Z.

    1996-01-01

    A preliminary study of the Circular Hydraulic Jump (CHJ) in microgravity is reported using water as the working fluid. The evolution of the CHJ radius was measured during a sudden transition from normal to microgravity in a drop tower. The downstream height of the CHJ was controlled by submerging the target plate in a tank filled with water to the desired depth, and the measurements are compared with an existing theory for the location of the CHJ. Results showed that the CHJ diameter was larger in microgravity than normal gravity. The adjustment of the CHJ diameter to a sudden change in gravity occurred over a period of about 200 ms for the conditions of the present study, and remained constant thereafter. For flow conditions that a CHJ was not first established at normal gravity but which later appeared during the transition to microgravity, the CHJ diameter was not constant during the period of microgravity but continually changed. Good agreement between the measured and predicted CHJ diameter was found for the normal gravity data, but comparatively poorer agreement was observed for the microgravity measurements.

  7. Exposure of aircraft maintenance technicians to organophosphates from hydraulic fluids and turbine oils: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Birgit Karin; Koslitz, Stephan; Weiss, Tobias; Broding, Horst Christoph; Brüning, Thomas; Bünger, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fluids and turbine oils contain organophosphates like tricresyl phosphate isomers, triphenyl phosphate and tributyl phosphate from very small up to high percentages. The aim of this pilot study was to determine if aircraft maintenance technicians are exposed to relevant amounts of organophosphates. Dialkyl and diaryl phosphate metabolites of seven organophosphates were quantified in pre- and post-shift spot urine samples of technicians (N=5) by GC-MS/MS after solid phase extraction and derivatization. Pre- and post shift values of tributyl phosphate metabolites (dibutyl phosphate (DBP): median pre-shift: 12.5 μg/L, post-shift: 23.5 μg/L) and triphenyl phosphate metabolites (diphenyl phosphate (DPP): median pre-shift: 2.9 μg/L, post-shift: 3.5 μg/L) were statistically higher than in a control group from the general population (median DBP: <0.25 μg/L, median DPP: 0.5 μg/L). No tricresyl phosphate metabolites were detected. The aircraft maintenance technicians were occupationally exposed to tributyl and triphenyl phosphate but not to tricresyl phosphate, tri-(2-chloroethyl)- and tri-(2-chloropropyl)-phosphate. Further studies are necessary to collect information on sources, routes of uptake and varying exposures during different work tasks, evaluate possible health effects and to set up appropriate protective measures.

  8. Hydraulic Model Study of Port Huron Ice Control Structure,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    release; distribution unlimited. 17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract entered in Block 20, If differeit from Report) IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES *1. KEY...teUnclassified SECUR ITY CLASSTFICATtO~t OF THIS PAGE (WhRen Date E[ntered) Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(Wha Date Enteftd) 20. Abstract ...Dist I Special • " iii CONTENTS Page Abstract

  9. Low Freshwater Inflow Study. Chesapeake Bay Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    47 discharge from other main bay tributaries such as the Elizabeth, Back (Virginia), Piankatank, Saint Mary’s, South, Magothy , Back (Maryland), Bush...Proto Ft) James R. (Continued) J- 10-01 26 2, 13, 24 Little Choptank R. LC-01-01 17 4, 12 LC-02-01 22 4, 12, 21 Magothy R. MA-01-01 21 4, 12, 18 MA-02

  10. A study of passive and adaptive hydraulic engine mount systems with emphasis on non-linear characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G.; Singh, R.

    1995-01-01

    Passive hydraulic mounts exhibit excitation frequency variant and deflection amplitude sensitive stiffness and damping properties. Such non-linear dynamic characteristics are examined by using analytical and experimental methods, both at the device level and within the context of a simplified vehicle model. A new lumped parameter non-linear mathematical model of the hydraulic mount is developed by simulating its decoupler switching mechanism and inertia track dynamics. The low frequency performance features and limitations of several passive mounts are made clear through the non-linear vehicle model simulation and comparable laboratory vibration tests. The high frequency performance problems of the passive hydraulic mount are identified by applying the quasi-linear analysis method. Based on these results, a new adaptive mount system is developed which exhibits broad bandwidth performance features up to 250 Hz. It implements an on-off damping control mode by using engine intake manifold vacuum and a microprocessor based solenoid valve controller. A laboratory bench set-up has already demonstrated its operational feasibility. Through analytical methods, it is observed that our adaptive mount provides superior dynamic performance to passive engine mounts and comparable performance to a small scale active mount over a wide frequency range, given the engine mounting resonance control, shock absorption and vibration isolation performance requirements. Although technical prospects of the proposed adaptive system appear promising, the in situperformance needs to be evaluated.

  11. Gas Transfer in Hydraulic Jumps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    gas transfer based on measurements made in a hydraulic model. 5. Hydraulic jumps are flow phenomena that are part of the energy dissipation design at...gas transfer to energy dissipation. In a hydraulic jump, the energy loss is related to the Froude number of incoming flow. Fig- ures 15, 16, and 17...number in a similar manner for each of the unit discharges tested. As energy dissipation and Froude number in- creased, gas loss increased for a

  12. A study on the optimal hydraulic loading rate and plant ratios in recirculation aquaponic system.

    PubMed

    Endut, Azizah; Jusoh, A; Ali, N; Wan Nik, W B; Hassan, A

    2010-03-01

    The growths of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were evaluated in recirculation aquaponic system (RAS). Fish production performance, plant growth and nutrient removal were measured and their dependence on hydraulic loading rate (HLR) was assessed. Fish production did not differ significantly between hydraulic loading rates. In contrast to the fish production, the water spinach yield was significantly higher in the lower hydraulic loading rate. Fish production, plant growth and percentage nutrient removal were highest at hydraulic loading rate of 1.28 m/day. The ratio of fish to plant production has been calculated to balance nutrient generation from fish with nutrient removal by plants and the optimum ratio was 15-42 gram of fish feed/m(2) of plant growing area. Each unit in RAS was evaluated in terms of oxygen demand. Using specified feeding regime, mass balance equations were applied to quantify the waste discharges from rearing tanks and treatment units. The waste discharged was found to be strongly dependent on hydraulic loading rate.

  13. A hydraulic-photosynthetic model based on extended HLH and its application to Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens).

    PubMed

    Du, Ning; Fan, Jintu; Chen, Shuo; Liu, Yang

    2008-07-21

    Although recent investigations [Ryan, M.G., Yoder, B.J., 1997. Hydraulic limits to tree height and tree growth. Bioscience 47, 235-242; Koch, G.W., Sillett, S.C.,Jennings, G.M.,Davis, S.D., 2004. The limits to tree height. Nature 428, 851-854; Niklas, K.J., Spatz, H., 2004. Growth and hydraulic (not mechanical) constraints govern the scaling of tree height and mass. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 101, 15661-15663; Ryan, M.G., Phillips, N., Bond, B.J., 2006. Hydraulic limitation hypothesis revisited. Plant Cell Environ. 29, 367-381; Niklas, K.J., 2007. Maximum plant height and the biophysical factors that limit it. Tree Physiol. 27, 433-440; Burgess, S.S.O., Dawson, T.E., 2007. Predicting the limits to tree height using statistical regressions of leaf traits. New Phytol. 174, 626-636] suggested that the hydraulic limitation hypothesis (HLH) is the most plausible theory to explain the biophysical limits to maximum tree height and the decline in tree growth rate with age, the analysis is largely qualitative or based on statistical regression. Here we present an integrated biophysical model based on the principle that trees develop physiological compensations (e.g. the declined leaf water potential and the tapering of conduits with heights [West, G.B., Brown, J.H., Enquist, B.J., 1999. A general model for the structure and allometry of plant vascular systems. Nature 400, 664-667]) to resist the increasing water stress with height, the classical HLH and the biochemical limitations on photosynthesis [von Caemmerer, S., 2000. Biochemical Models of Leaf Photosynthesis. CSIRO Publishing, Australia]. The model has been applied to the tallest trees in the world (viz. Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens)). Xylem water potential, leaf carbon isotope composition, leaf mass to area ratio at different heights derived from the model show good agreements with the experimental measurements of Koch et al. [2004. The limits to tree height. Nature 428, 851-854]. The model also well explains the

  14. Modeling and Measuring the Interaction between Hydrokinetic Devices and the Hydraulic and Sedimentary Environment of the Tanana River, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravens, T. M.; Kartezhnikova, M.; Edgerly, E.; Opsahl, B.; Hansen, N.; Kasper, J.; Schmid, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report on our efforts to model and measure the interaction between hydrokinetic (HK) devices and the hydraulic and sedimentary environment of the Tanana River, by Nenana Alaska. The Tanana River, by Nenana Alaska, has an open-water median flow rate of about 1325 m3/s, a width of about 200 m, a maximum depth of about 9 m, peak flow velocities of about 2.5 m/s, and suspended sediment concentrations as high as 2 g/L. Preliminary modeling of the hydraulic impact of a 45 KW cross-flow-style HK turbine using SNL-EFDC software found that the device raised water levels upstream of the device by about 0.5 cm. It also led to reductions in velocity of about 0.05 m and enhancements of about 0.01 m/s. In this paper, we will report on ongoing efforts to model the corresponding sedimentary impacts of HK devices at this location. In late August of 2014, a 15 KW open-center-style hydrokinetic turbine (manufactured by Oceana Energy Corporation) was deployed for a three week period at the Tanana River site. Device performance (e.g., power generation and angular frequency (rpm's)) were monitored along with environmental parameters including: velocity as a function of depth upstream and downstream of the device, turbulence at "hub elevation" upstream and downstream of the device, suspended sediment concentration upstream and downstream of the device, and sediment bed elevation before and after testing. In this paper, we will report on all of these data as well as data on the abrasion of device components. Further, we will present data on the dependence of device coefficient of performance and turbulence intensity. Finally, we will compare modeled and measured hydraulic and sedimentary impacts of the HK device.

  15. Numerical study of laminar, standing hydraulic jumps in a planar geometry.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Tomar, Gaurav; Govindarajan, Rama

    2015-05-01

    We solve the two-dimensional, planar Navier-Stokes equations to simulate a laminar, standing hydraulic jump using a Volume-of-Fluid method. The geometry downstream of the jump has been designed to be similar to experimental conditions by including a pit at the edge of the platform over which liquid film flows. We obtain jumps with and without separation. Increasing the inlet Froude number pushes the jump downstream and makes the slope of the jump weaker, consistent with experimental observations of circular jumps, and decreasing the Reynolds number brings the jump upstream while making it steeper. We study the effect of the length of the domain and that of a downstream obstacle on the structure and location of the jump. The transient flow which leads to a final steady jump is described for the first time to our knowledge. In the moderate Reynolds number regime, we obtain steady undular jumps with a separated bubble underneath the first few undulations. Interestingly, surface tension leads to shortening of wavelength of these undulations. We show that the undulations can be explained using the inviscid theory of Benjamin and Lighthill (Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A, 1954). We hope this new finding will motivate experimental verification.

  16. Characteristics of microearthquakes accompanying hydraulic fracturing as determined from studies of spectra of seismic waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; Bame, D.

    1985-03-01

    A study of the spectral properties of the waveforms recorded during hydraulic fracturing earthquakes has been carried out to obtain information about the physical dimensions of the earthquakes. We find two types of events. The first type has waveforms with clear P and S arrivals and spectra that are very similar to earthquakes occurring in tectonic regions. These events are interpreted as being due to shear slip along fault planes. The second type of event has waveforms that are similar in many ways to long period earthquakes observed at volcanoes and is called long period. Many waveforms of these events are identical, which implies that these events represent repeated activation of a given source. We propose that the source of these long period events is the sudden opening of a channel that connects two cracks filled with fluid at different pressures. The sizes of the two cracks differ, which causes two or more peaks to appear in the spectra, each peak being associated with one physical dimension of the crack. From the frequencies at which spectral peaks occur, we estimate crack dimensions of between 3 and 22m. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Hydraulic tool

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, J.T.

    1988-04-05

    A hydraulic force-delivering tool including a cylinder, a piston slidable in the cylinder and a hydraulic pump to deliver fluid under pressure to the cylinder the hydraulic pump is described, comprising: a pump body; means forming a cylindrical chamber in the pump body; at least one inlet port opening into one end of the chamber from outside the body; means forming an outlet port at the other end of the chamber; a check valve in the outlet port enabling outward flow only; a pump rod plunger reciprocable through a given stroke in the chamber; inner and outer concentric cylindrical surfaces in the chamber and on the plunger, respectively; an annular shoulder on the chamber inner cylindrical surface facing toward the other end of the chamber; an annular seal member slidable along the pump rod and conditioned to seal against the shoulder; and spring means biasing the seal member toward the shoulder.

  18. Effect of Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Y.; Wang, Y.; Shi, G.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic Fracturing has been used successfully in the oil and gas industry to enhance oil and gas production in the past few decades. Recent years have seen the great development of tight gas, coal bed methane and shale gas. Natural fractures are believed to play an important role in the hydraulic fracturing of such formations. Whether natural fractures can benefit the fracture propagation and enhance final production needs to be studied. Various methods have been used to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. Discontinuous Deformation Analysis (DDA) is a numerical method which belongs to the family of discrete element methods. In this paper, DDA is coupled with a fluid pipe network model to simulate the pressure response in the formation during hydraulic fracturing. The focus is to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. In particular, the effect of rock joint properties, joint orientations and rock properties on fracture initiation and propagation will be analyzed. The result shows that DDA is a promising tool to study such complex behavior of rocks. Finally, the advantages of disadvantages of our current model and future research directions will be discussed.

  19. Fully Coupled Geomechanics and Discrete Flow Network Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Hao, Y; Carrigan, C R

    2011-01-18

    The primary objective of our current research is to develop a computational test bed for evaluating borehole techniques to enhance fluid flow and heat transfer in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Simulating processes resulting in hydraulic fracturing and/or the remobilization of existing fractures, especially the interaction between propagating fractures and existing fractures, represents a critical goal of our project. To this end, we are continuing to develop a hydraulic fracturing simulation capability within the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC), a combined FEM/DEM analysis code with explicit solid-fluid mechanics coupling. LDEC simulations start from an initial fracture distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other modifications to the fracture system. The output is transferred to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to capture heat transfer and flow at the reservoir scale. This approach is intended to offer flexibility in the types of analyses we can perform, including evaluating the effects of different system heterogeneities on the heat extraction rate as well as seismicity associated with geothermal operations. This paper details the basic methodology of our approach. Two numerical examples showing the capability and effectiveness of our simulator are also presented.

  20. The application of various anatomical techniques for studying the hydraulic network in tomato fruit pedicels.

    PubMed

    Rancić, Dragana; Quarrie, Sofija Pekić; Radosević, Radenko; Terzić, Maja; Pećinar, Ilinka; Stikić, Radmila; Jansen, Steven

    2010-10-01

    The abscission zone in fruit pedicels plays an important role in affecting not only water uptake in the developing fruit, but also in the transport of chemical signals from root to shoot. In order to characterize the hydraulic network of tomato fruit pedicels, we applied various techniques, including light, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, maceration, tissue clearing, and X-ray computed tomography. Because of significant changes in xylem anatomy, the abscission zone in tomato fruit pedicels is illustrated to show a clear reduction in hydraulic conductance. Based on anatomical measurements, the theoretical axial xylem conductance was calculated via the Hagen-Poiseuille law, suggesting that the hydraulic resistance of the abscission zone increases at least two orders of magnitude compared to the pedicel zone near the stem. The advantages and shortcomings of the microscope techniques applied are discussed.

  1. Stomatal regulation by microclimate and tree water relations: interpreting ecophysiological field data with a hydraulic plant model.

    PubMed

    Zweifel, Roman; Steppe, Kathy; Sterck, Frank J

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics in microclimate and physiological plant traits were studied for Pubescent oak and Scots pine in a dry inner-alpine valley in Switzerland, at a 10 min resolution for three consecutive years (2001-2003). As expected, stomata tended to close with increasing drought in air and soil. However, stomatal aperture in oak was smaller than in pine under relatively wet conditions, but larger under dry conditions. To explore underlying mechanisms, a model was applied that (i) quantifies water relations within trees from physical principles (mechanistic part) and (ii) assumes that signals from light, stomatal aperture, crown water potential, and tree water deficit in storage pools control stomata (systemic part). The stomata of pine showed a more sensitive response to increasing drought because both factors, the slowly changing tree water deficit and the rapidly changing crown water potential, closed the stomata. By contrast, the stomata of oak became less drought-sensitive as the closing signal of crown water potential was opposed by the opening signal of tree water deficit. Moreover, parameter optimization suggests that oak withdrew more water from the storage pools and reduced leaf water potentials to lower levels, without risking serious damage by cavitation. The new model thus suggests how the hydraulic water flow and storage system determines the responses in stomatal aperture and transpiration to drought at time scales ranging from hours to multiple years, and why pine and oak might differ in such responses. These differences explain why oaks are more efficient competitors during drought periods, although this was not the case in the extremely dry year 2003, which provoked massive leaf loss and, from July onwards, physiological activity almost ceased.

  2. Potential of high resolution satellite imagery, remote weather data and 1D hydraulic modeling to evaluate flood areas in Gonaives, Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozza, Andrea; Durand, Arnaud; Allenbach, Bernard; Confortola, Gabriele; Bocchiola, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    We present a feasibility study to explore potential of high-resolution imagery, coupled with hydraulic flood modeling to predict flooding risks, applied to the case study of Gonaives basins (585 km²), Haiti. We propose a methodology working at different scales, providing accurate results and a faster intervention during extreme flood events. The 'Hispaniola' island, in the Caribbean tropical zone, is often affected by extreme floods events. Floods are caused by tropical springs and hurricanes, and may lead to several damages, including cholera epidemics, as recently occurred, in the wake of the earthquake upon January 12th 2010 (magnitude 7.0). Floods studies based upon hydrological and hydraulic modeling are hampered by almost complete lack of ground data. Thenceforth, and given the noticeable cost involved in the organization of field measurement campaigns, the need for exploitation of remote sensing images data. HEC-RAS 1D modeling is carried out under different scenarios of available Digital Elevation Models. The DEMs are generated using optical remote sensing satellite (WorldView-1) and SRTM, combined with information from an open source database (Open Street Map). We study two recent flood episodes, where flood maps from remote sensing were available. Flood extent and land use have been assessed by way of data from SPOT-5 satellite, after hurricane Jeanne in 2004 and hurricane Hanna in 2008. A semi-distributed, DEM based hydrological model is used to simulate flood flows during the hurricanes. Precipitation input is taken from daily rainfall data derived from TRMM satellite, plus proper downscaling. The hydraulic model is calibrated using floodplain friction as tuning parameters against the observed flooded area. We compare different scenarios of flood simulation, and the predictive power of model calibration. The method provide acceptable results in depicting flooded areas, especially considering the tremendous lack of ground data, and show the potential of

  3. Evaluating hydraulic and disinfection efficiencies of a full-scale ozone contactor using a RANS-based modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Tejada-Martínez, Andrés E; Zhang, Qiong; Lei, Hongxia

    2014-04-01

    The capability of predicting hydraulic and disinfection efficiencies of ozone disinfection contactors is essential for evaluating existing contactors and improving future designs. Previous attempts based on ideal and non-ideal models for the hydraulics and simplified mechanisms for chemical reaction modeling have resulted in low accuracy and are restricted to contactors with simple geometries. This manuscript develops a modeling framework for the ozonation process by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a kinetics-based reaction modeling for the first time. This computational framework has been applied to the full-scale ozone contactor operated by the City of Tampa Water Department. Flow fields, residence time distribution, ozone concentration distribution, and concentration-contact time (CT) distribution within the contactor have been predicted via the computational framework. The predictions of ozone and bromate concentrations at sample points agree well with physical experimental data measured in the contactor. The predicted CT values at the contactor outlet demonstrate that the disinfection performance of the ozone contactor operated by the City of Tampa Water Department is sufficient to meet regulation requirements. The impact of seasonal flow rate change on disinfection performance is found to be significant and deserves attention during the management and operation of a water treatment plant.

  4. Mathematical model for calculation of the heat-hydraulic modes of heating points of heat-supplying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaginova, Z. I.

    2016-03-01

    The mathematical model and calculation method of the thermal-hydraulic modes of heat points, based on the theory of hydraulic circuits, being developed at the Melentiev Energy Systems Institute are presented. The redundant circuit of the heat point was developed, in which all possible connecting circuits (CC) of the heat engineering equipment and the places of possible installation of control valve were inserted. It allows simulating the operating modes both at central heat points (CHP) and individual heat points (IHP). The configuration of the desired circuit is carried out automatically by removing the unnecessary links. The following circuits connecting the heating systems (HS) are considered: the dependent circuit (direct and through mixing elevator) and independent one (through the heater). The following connecting circuits of the load of hot water supply (HWS) were considered: open CC (direct water pumping from pipelines of heat networks) and a closed CC with connecting the HWS heaters on single-level (serial and parallel) and two-level (sequential and combined) circuits. The following connecting circuits of the ventilation systems (VS) were also considered: dependent circuit and independent one through a common heat exchanger with HS load. In the heat points, water temperature regulators for the hot water supply and ventilation and flow regulators for the heating system, as well as to the inlet as a whole, are possible. According to the accepted decomposition, the model of the heat point is an integral part of the overall heat-hydraulic model of the heat-supplying system having intermediate control stages (CHP and IHP), which allows to consider the operating modes of the heat networks of different levels connected with each other through CHP as well as connected through IHP of consumers with various connecting circuits of local systems of heat consumption: heating, ventilation and hot water supply. The model is implemented in the Angara data

  5. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  6. The hydraulic capacity of deteriorating sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Pollert, J; Ugarelli, R; Saegrov, S; Schilling, W; Di Federico, V

    2005-01-01

    Sewer and wastewater systems suffer from insufficient capacity, construction flaws and pipe deterioration. Consequences are structural failures, local floods, surface erosion and pollution of receiving waters bodies. European cities spend in the order of five billion Euro per year for wastewater network rehabilitation. This amount is estimated to increase due to network ageing. The project CARE-S (Computer Aided RE-habilitation of Sewer Networks) deals with sewer and storm water networks. The final project goal is to develop integrated software, which provides the most cost-efficient system of maintenance, repair and rehabilitation of sewer networks. Decisions on investments in rehabilitation often have to be made with uncertain information about the structural condition and the hydraulic performance of a sewer system. Because of this, decision-making involves considerable risks. This paper presents the results of research focused on the study of hydraulic effects caused by failures due to temporal decline of sewer systems. Hydraulic simulations are usually carried out by running commercial models that apply, as input, default values of parameters that strongly influence results. Using CCTV inspections information as dataset to catalogue principal types of failures affecting pipes, a 3D model was used to evaluate their hydraulic consequences. The translation of failures effects in parameters values producing the same hydraulic conditions caused by failures was carried out through the comparison of laboratory experiences and 3D simulations results. Those parameters could be the input of 1D commercial models instead of the default values commonly inserted.

  7. Denitrification in a low-temperature bioreactor system at two different hydraulic residence times: laboratory column studies.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Albin; Herbert, Roger B

    2016-09-15

    Nitrate removal rates in a mixture of pine woodchips and sewage sludge were determined in laboratory column studies at 5°C, 12°C, and 22°C, and at two different hydraulic residence times (HRTs; 58.2-64.0 hours and 18.7-20.6 hours). Baffles installed in the flow path were tested as a measure to reduce preferential flow behavior, and to increase the nitrate removal in the columns. The nitrate removal in the columns was simulated at 5°C and 12°C using a combined Arrhenius-Monod equation controlling the removal rate, and a first-order exchange model for incorporation of stagnant zones. Denitrification in the mixture of pine woodchips and sewage sludge reduced nitrate concentrations of 30 mg N L(-1) at 5°C to below detection limits at a HRT of 58.2-64.0 hours. At a HRT of 18.7-20.6 hours, nitrate removal was incomplete. The Arrhenius frequency factor and activation energy retrieved from the low HRT data supported a biochemically controlled reaction rate; the same parameters, however, could not be used to simulate the nitrate removal at high HRT. The results show an inversely proportional relationship between the advection velocity and the nitrate removal rate, suggesting that bioreactor performance could be enhanced by promoting low advection velocities.

  8. Improving actuation efficiency through variable recruitment hydraulic McKibben muscles: modeling, orderly recruitment control, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Meller, Michael; Chipka, Jordan; Volkov, Alexander; Bryant, Matthew; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2016-11-03

    Hydraulic control systems have become increasingly popular as the means of actuation for human-scale legged robots and assistive devices. One of the biggest limitations to these systems is their run time untethered from a power source. One way to increase endurance is by improving actuation efficiency. We investigate reducing servovalve throttling losses by using a selective recruitment artificial muscle bundle comprised of three motor units. Each motor unit is made up of a pair of hydraulic McKibben muscles connected to one servovalve. The pressure and recruitment state of the artificial muscle bundle can be adjusted to match the load in an efficient manner, much like the firing rate and total number of recruited motor units is adjusted in skeletal muscle. A volume-based effective initial braid angle is used in the model of each recruitment level. This semi-empirical model is utilized to predict the efficiency gains of the proposed variable recruitment actuation scheme versus a throttling-only approach. A real-time orderly recruitment controller with pressure-based thresholds is developed. This controller is used to experimentally validate the model-predicted efficiency gains of recruitment on a robot arm. The results show that utilizing variable recruitment allows for much higher efficiencies over a broader operating envelope.

  9. Quantitative hydrologic and hydraulic models for jokulhlaup-type outflow channels on Mars: Application of Earth analogues, comparative geomorphology, and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Douglas A.

    To better understand the geologic and hydrologic history of Mars, hydraulic models of catastrophic outflow channels on both Earth and Mars provides insight into the volumes of water necessary to create jokulhlaup-type outflow events. Applying these hydraulic models to Mars outflow channels serves to test hypotheses about the conveyance of water on Mars and if the water source was from air-fall precipitation that was contained in a source basin or if the water was derived from subsurface aquifers beneath a confining cryolithic (ground-ice) layer. Additionally, these models may provide insight to the climate dynamics of the Martian planet. A one-dimensional standard step method hydraulic model is used for the estimation of catastrophic outflow from chaotic terrain on Mars. Jokulhlaup-type Earth analogue sites at Eddy Narrows, Montana, and Jokulsa a Fjollum channel in Iceland are used to refine and calibrate the model and to assess correlations between channel hydraulics and the fluvial geomorphology present. The model uses remote sensing data and geographic information system feature classes to create a more accurate hydraulic profile of the outflow channels. The derived channel geometry profile is input to the hydraulic model where subcritical to supercritical flow is computed under steady flow conditions. A new method is developed as a guide to estimate the channel surface roughness coefficient, Manning's n, utilizing estimated thermal inertia from single-point temperature measurements from Mars orbital satellites and in situ collections from the Mars Exploration Rovers. Earth analogue results show that a re-evaluation of the Glacial Lake Missoula paleoflood peak discharge at Eddy Narrows is less than originally estimated. The proposed new peak discharge is estimated at 8.9 x 10 6 m3 s-1, with a mean flow velocity of 16.5 m s-1 and a power of 4899 W m-2. Hydraulic modeling of the Jokulsa a Fjollum channel in Iceland resulted in the discovery of the largest Holocene

  10. Study of bioleaching under different hydraulic retention time for enhancing the dewaterability of digestate.

    PubMed

    Li, Linshuai; Gao, Jingqing; Zhu, Songfeng; Li, Yonghong; Zhang, Ruiqin

    2015-12-01

    Dewatering of kitchen waste digestate is a key problem to solve so as to increase the application of kitchen waste after anaerobic digestion. In this study, the effects of bioleaching under different hydraulic retention time (HRT = 2, 2.5, and 3 days) on dewaterability of kitchen waste digestate were evaluated. A 12-stage plug flow bioreactor with 180 L working volume was used for digestate bioleaching. The bioleached digestate under different HRTs were collected and dewatered by plate-and-frame filter press. The results showed that the moisture contents of digestate cakes were 67.87 % at 2 days of HRT, 58.06 % at 2.5 days of HRT, and 54.45 % at 3 days of HRT, respectively, indicating the longer the HRT, the lower the moisture content of filter cake. Balanced between the cost and practical need, 2.5 days can be used as the HRT in engineering application. Under the condition of HRT of 2.5 days, the pH, specific resistance to filtration (SRF), capillary suction time (CST), and sedimentation rate of digestate changed from the initial values of 8.08, 210.6 s, 23.4 × 10(12) m kg(-1) and 10 % to 3.21, 32.7 s, 2.44 × 10(12) m kg(-1) and 76.8 %, respectively. Based on the observations above, the authors conclude that bioleaching technology is an effective method to enhance digestate dewaterability and reduce the cost of subsequent reutilization.

  11. Inhibitor studies of leaf lamina hydraulic conductance in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Mihaela C; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2010-02-01

    The present study investigated leaf water transport properties in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaves. Leaf lamina hydraulic conductance (K(lam)) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) were drastically suppressed by NaF (a general metabolic inhibitor). In leaves treated with 0.2 mM HgCl(2) (an aquaporin blocker), K(lam) declined by 22% when the leaves were sampled in June but the decline was not significant when the leaves were sampled in August. The leaves sampled in June that transpired 30 mM beta-mercaptoethanol following mercury application showed similar K(lam) as those in control leaves transpiring distilled water. When leaves were pressure-infiltrated with 0.1 mM HgCl(2), K(lam) significantly declined by 25%. Atrazine (a photosystem II inhibitor) drastically reduced leaf net CO(2) uptake by the leaves from seedlings and mature trees but did not have any effect on K(lam) regardless of the irradiance at the leaf level during the K(lam) measurements. When PTS(3) (trisodium 3-hydroxy-5,8,10-pyrenetrisulphonate) apoplastic tracer was pressure-infiltrated inside the leaves, its concentration in the leaf exudates did not change from ambient light to high irradiance treatment and declined in the presence of HgCl(2) in the treatment solution. Trembling aspen K(lam) appears to be linked to leaf metabolism and is uncoupled from the short-term variations in photosynthesis. Aquaporin-mediated water transport does not appear to constitute the dominant pathway for the pressure-driven water flow in the leaves of trembling aspen trees.

  12. Molecular hydraulic properties of montmorillonite: a polarized fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, Priyanthi M; Katti, Kalpana S; Katti, Dinesh R

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the rates at which fluid flows into clay interlayers at the molecular level is fundamental to designing an effective clay barrier system. In this work, molecular interactions at the Na-montmorillonite (MMT)-water interface, emphasizing the flow properties of the clay interlayer, have been studied at the molecular and nanoscale level using polarized Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Clay-water slurries were smeared on inert gold-coated metal substrates for FT-IR experiments and slurries were smeared on quartz plates for XRD experiments. By analyzing the O-H stretching and H-O-H bending vibrations in clay slurries, it was concluded that the molecular behavior of interlayer water is significantly different from the molecular behavior of bulk water. With increasing clay-water interaction time, it was also seen that the Si-O stretching bands of clay are being significantly altered by the water molecules in the interlayer. Using these spectroscopic techniques we have estimated the time required for water to flow into the clay interlayer. Further, by analyzing the particle size of the clay using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we were able to estimate the flow velocity of the water in the clay interlayer. This velocity is found to be 3.23 x 10(-9) cm/s. This flow velocity was found to be of the same order of magnitude as the hydraulic conductivity of smectite-type clay reported elsewhere. Also described in this work is the correct positioning of the Si-O out-of-plane vibration band of MMT at the two-layer saturation level in the interlayer. This band was only observed in p-polarized spectra at 1211 cm(-1). Thus, we attribute this band to the Si-O out-of-plane vibration band.

  13. Determining sources of elevated salinity in pre-hydraulic fracturing water quality data using a multivariate discriminant analysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautz, L. K.; Hoke, G. D.; Lu, Z.; Siegel, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has the potential to introduce saline water into the environment due to migration of deep formation water to shallow aquifers and/or discharge of flowback water to the environment during transport and disposal. It is challenging to definitively identify whether elevated salinity is associated with hydraulic fracturing, in part, due to the real possibility of other anthropogenic sources of salinity in the human-impacted watersheds in which drilling is taking place and some formation water present naturally in shallow groundwater aquifers. We combined new and published chemistry data for private drinking water wells sampled across five southern New York (NY) counties overlying the Marcellus Shale (Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Steuben, and Tioga). Measurements include Cl, Na, Br, I, Ca, Mg, Ba, SO4, and Sr. We compared this baseline groundwater quality data in NY, now under a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, with published chemistry data for 6 different potential sources of elevated salinity in shallow groundwater, including Appalachian Basin formation water, road salt runoff, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, and water softeners. A multivariate random number generator was used to create a synthetic, low salinity (< 20 mg/L Cl) groundwater data set (n=1000) based on the statistical properties of the observed low salinity groundwater. The synthetic, low salinity groundwater was then artificially mixed with variable proportions of different potential sources of salinity to explore chemical differences between groundwater impacted by formation water, road salt runoff, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, and water softeners. We then trained a multivariate, discriminant analysis model on the resulting data set to classify observed high salinity groundwater (> 20 mg/L Cl) as being affected by formation water, road salt, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, or water softeners. Single elements or pairs of

  14. Using observed postconstruction peak discharges to evaluate a hydrologic and hydraulic design model, Boneyard Creek, Champaign and Urbana, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Over, Thomas M.; Soong, David T.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Boneyard Creek—which drains an urbanized watershed in the cities of Champaign and Urbana, Illinois, including part of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) campus—has historically been prone to flooding. Using the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM), a hydrologic and hydraulic model of Boneyard Creek was developed for the design of the projects making up the first phase of a long-term plan for flood control on Boneyard Creek, and the construction of the projects was completed in May 2003. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Cities of Champaign and Urbana and UIUC, installed and operated stream and rain gages in order to obtain data for evaluation of the design-model simulations. In this study, design-model simulations were evaluated by using observed postconstruction precipitation and peak-discharge data. Between May 2003 and September 2008, five high-flow events on Boneyard Creek satisfied the study criterion. The five events were simulated with the design model by using observed precipitation. The simulations were run with two different values of the parameter controlling the soil moisture at the beginning of the storms and two different ways of spatially distributing the precipitation, making a total of four simulation scenarios. The simulated and observed peak discharges and stages were compared at gaged locations along the Creek. The discharge at one of these locations was deemed to be critical for evaluating the design model. The uncertainty of the measured peak discharge was also estimated at the critical location with a method based on linear regression of the stage and discharge relation, an estimate of the uncertainty of the acoustic Doppler velocity meter measurements, and the uncertainty of the stage measurements. For four of the five events, the simulated peak discharges lie within the 95-percent confidence interval of the observed peak discharges at the critical location; the fifth was just outside the upper end of

  15. GHGfrack: An Open-Source Model for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Combustion of Fuel during Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Vafi, Kourosh; Brandt, Adam

    2016-07-19

    This paper introduces GHGfrack, an open-source engineering-based model that estimates energy consumption and associated GHG emissions from drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations. We describe verification and calibration of GHGfrack against field data for energy and fuel consumption. We run GHGfrack using data from 6927 wells in Eagle Ford and 4431 wells in Bakken oil fields. The average estimated energy consumption in Eagle Ford wells using lateral hole diameters of 8 (3)/4 and 6 (1)/8 in. are 2.25 and 2.73 TJ/well, respectively. The average estimated energy consumption in Bakken wells using hole diameters of 6 in. for horizontal section is 2.16 TJ/well. We estimate average greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 419 and 510 tonne of equivalent CO2 per well (tonne of CO2 eq/well) for the two aforementioned assumed geometries in Eagle Ford, respectively, and 417 tonne of CO2 eq/well for the case of Bakken. These estimates are limited only to GHG emissions from combustion of diesel fuel to supply energy only for rotation of drill string, drilling mud circulation, and fracturing pumps. Sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the top three key variables in driving energy intensity in drilling are the lateral hole diameter, drill pipe internal diameter, and mud flow rate. In hydraulic fracturing, the top three are lateral casing diameter, fracturing fluid volume, and length of the lateral.

  16. Quantitative flood risk assessment in historic cities: sensitivity to hydraulic modeling and open socio-economic data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Castelli, Fabio; Brugioni, Marcello; Franceschini, Serena; Mazzanti, Bernardo

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of flood risk in urban areas is considered nowadays a crucial issue to be addressed by technicians and public authorities and requires the estimation of hazard, vulnerability and exposure. Each step of the risk assessment brings its uncertainties to the final result, thus the analysis of the sensitivity to the different contributors is required. Since the damages are generally evaluated through stage-damage functions one of the most important contribution is the estimated value of the water depth. Water depth is the outcome of hydraulic models that can be implemented with different modeling approaches and levels of spatial detail, thus providing flood depth maps that may differ in the extension of the inundated area and in the flood depth value. It is generally argued that 2D models are the most suitable to describe flood behavior in the urban environment although most of applications are carried out in small and sparse urban areas. In the historic cities a 2D model provides reliable results if the grid size is small enough to describe the street/building pattern, implying long simulation runs. Another contribution is given by monetary values assigned to the damage categories that may come from different proxy variables and may oscillate according to the real estate quotations. The risk assessment here presented is made possible thanks to a methodology based on the open data, both socio-economic and territorial, that are available in the web. In this work the risk assessment procedure and the sensitivity analysis are applied to the main cities located along the Arno river, Pisa and Florence (Italy) that are usually considered of broad interest for the importance of urban and cultural heritage. The risk is estimated accounting for structures, household contents, commercial and tertiary sectors which are the most representative of the studied areas. The evaluation and mapping of micro-scale flood risk is carried out in a GIS environment using open data

  17. Coupling atmospheric, hydrological and hydraulic models to develop a catalogue of worst-case scenarios for extreme flooding in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Gómez-Navarro, Juan; Felder, Guido; Raible, Christoph C.; Martius, Olivia; Rössler, Ole

    2015-04-01

    Extreme flooding are a natural threat that leads to great economical cost, especially in densely populated areas such as Switzerland. However, the study of such extremes is difficult due to the fact they are, by definition, very rare, whereas the instrumental period is relatively short. This hampers the study of events with large return periods, which are precisely those more relevant from the impact point of view. Thus, new methodologies have to be developed that provide a deeper understanding of such disastrous situations and their driving mechanisms. This study employs a chain of models that allow the study of the frequency and severity of such situations and to analyse their driving physical mechanisms. First, a long climate simulation (a control simulation spanning more than 500 years) with the comprehensive Global Circulation Model (GCM) CESM1 is used as test-bed for producing a dataset of several centuries of physically consistent climate. This data is then used to filter out a number of case studies corresponding to extreme situations, which are selected as candidates for further analysis. However, although the physical consistency of this simulation ensures that the synoptic circulation leading to the selected events is plausible, the global model employs a coarse spatial resolution (1 degree) that precludes the accurate simulation of the precipitation in areas of complex topography such as Switzerland. Hence, once the dates of the candidate cases are selected within the GCM run, this dataset is downscaled with the Regional Climate Model (RCM) WRF. The RCM implements a spatial resolution of 2 km over the entire alpine area, which allows it to reproduce more accurately the precipitation induced by interactions between the large-scale forcing and the orography. The results show that WRF is able to improve the simulation of precipitation compared to the GCM alone. Although the large-scale flow and the location of the precipitation maxima is very similar in

  18. The Effects of Spatial Resolution and Dimensionality on Modeling Braided River Hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenau, E. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Braided rivers are challenging features to quantify due to their dynamic morphology and dominance in remote locations. Advances in hydrodynamic modeling and remote sensing over the past few decades offer opportunities to explore braided river processes at finer resolutions with increased efficiency. These methods allow us to address questions such as: What model structure is necessary to accurately reproduce inundation extent and water surface elevations in a braided river? What effects do the smaller channels within a braided river have on simulating wave propagation and slope? How much accuracy is lost as model resolution and dimension are decreased? Here, we use the raster-based hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP to simulate water surface elevations, inundation extent, and slope at various resolutions and dimensions over a ~90 km reach of the Tanana River, Alaska. Model input and validation data were collected during two field campaigns in the summers of 2013 and 2015. Field data included water surface elevation, discharge, velocity, slope, and bathymetric measurements. Six models are run to simulate flood waves across the study reach over a two-month timespan. The model structures vary in complexity from a full 2D model at 10 m resolution to a coupled 1D/2D model at 100 m resolution where the channel is represented in 1D by an effective centerline within a 2D floodplain grid. Results from the different models are compared to assess the effects on inundation extent, wave celerity, water elevations and slope. Digital elevation model (DEM) quality and resolution have major effects on inundation extent and water surface elevations, while model dimensionality has a larger effect on wave celerity and slope. Future work will compare model outputs with AirSWOT data, an airborne analog for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which aims to provide high-resolution measurements of terrestrial and ocean water surface elevations globally.

  19. Multiple parameterization for hydraulic conductivity identification.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Frank T-C; Li, Xiaobao

    2008-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity identification remains a challenging inverse problem in ground water modeling because of the inherent nonuniqueness and lack of flexibility in parameterization methods. This study introduces maximum weighted log-likelihood estimation (MWLLE) along with multiple generalized parameterization (GP) methods to identify hydraulic conductivity and to address nonuniqueness and inflexibility problems in parameterization. A scaling factor for information criteria is suggested to obtain reasonable weights of parameterization methods for the MWLLE and model averaging method. The scaling factor is a statistical parameter relating to a desired significance level in Occam's window and the variance of the chi-squares distribution of the fitting error. Through model averaging with multiple GP methods, the conditional estimate of hydraulic conductivity and its total conditional covariances are calculated. A numerical example illustrates the issue arising from Occam's window in estimating model weights and shows the usefulness of the scaling factor to obtain reasonable model weights. Moreover, the numerical example demonstrates the advantage of using multiple GP methods over the zonation and interpolation methods because GP provides better models in the model averaging method. The methodology is applied to the Alamitos Gap area, California, to identify the hydraulic conductivity field. The results show that the use of the scaling factor is necessary in order to incorporate good parameterization methods and to avoid a dominant parameterization method.

  20. Hydraulic fracture model and diagnostics verification at GRI/DOE multi-site projects and tight gas sand program support. Final report, July 28, 1993--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over twenty years. Early production experiments included nuclear stimulations and massive hydraulic fracture treatments. This work culminated in the US Department of Energy (DOE)`s Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory designed to study the reservoir and production characteristics of low permeability sands. A key feature of MWX was an infrastructure which included several closely spaced wells that allowed detailed characterization of the reservoir through log and core analysis, and well testing. Interference and tracer tests, as well as the use of fracture diagnostics gave further information on stimulation and production characteristics. Thus, the Multiwell Experiment provided a unique opportunity for identifying the factors affecting production from tight gas sand reservoirs. The purpose of this operation was to support the gathering of field data that may be used to resolve the number of unknowns associated with measuring and modeling the dimensions of hydraulic fractures. Using the close-well infrastructure at the Multiwell Site near Rifle, Colorado, this operation focused primarily on the field design and execution of experiments. The data derived from the experiments were gathered and analyzed by DOE team contractors.

  1. Computational open-channel hydraulics for movable-bed problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Chintu; ,

    1990-01-01

    As a major branch of computational hydraulics, notable advances have been made in numerical modeling of unsteady open-channel flow since the beginning of the computer age. According to the broader definition and scope of 'computational hydraulics,' the basic concepts and technology of modeling unsteady open-channel flow have been systematically studied previously. As a natural extension, computational open-channel hydraulics for movable-bed problems are addressed in this paper. The introduction of the multimode method of characteristics (MMOC) has made the modeling of this class of unsteady flows both practical and effective. New modeling techniques are developed, thereby shedding light on several aspects of computational hydraulics. Some special features of movable-bed channel-flow simulation are discussed here in the same order as given by the author in the fixed-bed case.

  2. Microbial effect on soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Alex; Rosenzweig, Ravid; Volk, Elazar; Rosenkranz, Hella; Iden, Sascha; Durner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Although largely ignored, the soil contains large amount of biofilms (attached microbes) that can affect many processes. While biochemical processes are studied, biophysical processes receive only little attention. Biofilms may occupy some of the pore space, and by that affect the soil hydraulic properties. This effect on unsaturated soils, however, was not intensively studied. In this research we directly measure the hydraulic properties, namely the soil's unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function and retention curve, for soils containing real biofilm. To do that we inoculate soil with biofilm-forming bacteria and incubate it with sufficient amounts of nutrient until biofilm is formed. The hydraulic properties of the incubated soil are then measured using several techniques, including multi-step outflow and evaporation method. The longer measurements (evaporation method) are conducted under refrigeration conditions to minimize microbial activity during the experiment. The results show a clear effect of the biofilm, where the biofilm-affected soil (sandy loam in our case) behaves like a much finer soil. This qualitatively makes sense as the biofilm generates an effective pore size distribution that is characterized by smaller pores. However, the effect is much more complex and needs to be studied carefully considering (for example) dual porosity models. We compare our preliminary results with other experiments, including flow-through column experiments and experiments with biofilm analogues. Clearly a better understanding of the way microbial activity alters the hydraulic properties may help designing more efficient bioremediation, irrigation, and other soil-related processes.

  3. GROUT HOPPER MODELING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-08-30

    The Saltstone facility has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The dry feeds and the salt solution are already mixed in the mixer prior to being transferred to the hopper tank. The hopper modeling study through this work will focus on fluid stirring and agitation, instead of traditional mixing in the literature, in order to keep the tank contents in motion during their residence time so that they will not be upset or solidified prior to transferring the grout to the Saltstone disposal facility. The primary objective of the work is to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady

  4. Integrating deterministic lithostratigraphic models in stochastic realizations of subsurface heterogeneity. Impact on predictions of lithology, hydraulic heads and groundwater fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marco; Kearsey, Timothy; Kingdon, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Realistic representations of geological complexity are important to address several engineering and environmental challenges. The spatial distribution of properties controlling physical and geochemical processes can be effectively described by the geological structure of the subsurface. In this work, we present an approach to account for geological structure in geostatistical simulations of categorical variables. The approach is based on the extraction of information from a deterministic conceptualization of the subsurface, which is then used in the geostatistical analysis for the development of models of spatial correlation and as soft conditioning data. The approach was tested to simulate the distribution of four lithofacies in highly heterolithic Quaternary deposits. A transition probability-based stochastic model was implemented using hard borehole data and soft data extracted from a 3-D deterministic lithostratigraphic model. Simulated lithofacies distributions were also used as input in a flow model for numerical simulation of hydraulic head and groundwater flux. The outputs from these models were compared to corresponding values from models based exclusively on borehole data. Results show that soft lithostratigraphic information increases the accuracy and reduces the uncertainty of these predictions. The representation of the geological structure also allows a more precise definition of the spatial distribution of prediction uncertainty, here quantified with a metric based on Shannon information entropy. Correlations between prediction uncertainties for lithofacies, hydraulic heads and groundwater fluxes were also investigated. The results from this analysis provide useful insights about the incorporation of soft geological data into stochastic realizations of subsurface heterogeneity, and emphasize the critical importance of this type of information for reducing the uncertainty of simulations considering flux-dependent processes.

  5. Initial-value methods for a simplified subchannel model of thermal-hydraulic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.; Neil, C.H.

    1980-12-01

    It is shown that many of the numerical difficulties and phenomena encountered in subchannel analysis have counterparts within a simple two-subchannel model, which permits analytic study of these matters. Results are presented that suggest that the reported inability of initial-value techniques for subchannel models to cope with flow-blockage problems may be peculiar to the particular initial-value techniques frequently used.

  6. A Hydraulic Model Is Compatible with Rapid Changes in Leaf Elongation under Fluctuating Evaporative Demand and Soil Water Status1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, Cecilio F.; Bosio, Mickael; Parent, Boris; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

    2014-01-01

    Plants are constantly facing rapid changes in evaporative demand and soil water content, which affect their water status and growth. In apparent contradiction to a hydraulic hypothesis, leaf elongation rate (LER) declined in the morning and recovered upon soil rehydration considerably quicker than transpiration rate and leaf wa