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Sample records for hydrocarbon gravimetric method

  1. Gravimetric capillary method for kinematic viscosity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Jin, Wei-Qing

    1992-01-01

    A novel version of the capillary method for viscosity measurements of liquids is presented. Viscosity data can be deduced in a straightforward way from mass transfer data obtained by differential weighing during the gravity-induced flow of the liquid between two cylindrical chambers. Tests of this technique with water, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol suggest that this arrangement provides an accuracy of about +/- 1 percent. The technique facilitates operation under sealed, isothermal conditions and, thus can readily be applied to reactive and/or high vapor pressure liquids.

  2. Global gravimetric geoid model based a new method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W. B.; Han, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The geoid, defined as the equipotential surface nearest to the mean sea level, plays a key role in physical geodesy and unification of height datum system. In this study, we introduce a new method, which is quite different from the conventional geoid modeling methods (e.g., Stokes method, Molodensky method), to determine the global gravimetric geoid (GGG). Based on the new method, using the dada base of the external Earth gravity field model EGM2008, digital topographic model DTM2006.0 and crust density distribution model CRUST2.0, we first determined the inner geopotential field until to the depth of D, and then established a GGG model , the accuracy of which is evaluated by comparing with the observations from USA, AUS, some parts of Canada, and some parts of China. The main idea of the new method is stated as follows. Given the geopotential field (e.g. EGM2008) outside the Earth, we may determine the inner geopotential field until to the depth of D by using Newtonian integral, once the density distribution model (e.g. CRUST2.0) of a shallow layer until to the depth D is given. Then, based on the definition of the geoid (i.e. an equipotential surface nearest to the mean sea level) one may determine the GGG. This study is supported by Natural Science Foundation China (grant No.40974015; No.41174011; No.41021061; No.41128003).

  3. Humidity-conditioned gravimetric method to measure the water content of hydrogel contact lens materials.

    PubMed

    Galas, S L; Enns, J B

    1993-07-01

    A method to determine the humidity-conditioned gravimetric water content of hydrogel contact lens materials has been developed, in which errors due to blotting have been eliminated by conditioning the lens in a series of relative humidity (RH) environments before measuring the water content gravimetrically, and then extrapolating the water content to 100% RH. This method has been used to determine the water contents of representative materials from each of the four FDA lens groups, which were compared with their labeled values, as well as with values obtained from refractive index measurements. The deviation of the water content of soft contact lenses as measured by refractive index from that obtained gravimetrically increased as the water content decreased. The humidity-conditioned gravimetric method to determine water content of hydrophilic contact lenses is being proposed as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard, as an improvement over the gravimetric and refractive index methods.

  4. Comparison of fine particle measurements from a direct-reading instrument and a gravimetric sampling method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee Young; Magari, Shannon R; Herrick, Robert F; Smith, Thomas J; Christiani, David C

    2004-11-01

    Particulate air pollution, specifically the fine particle fraction (PM2.5), has been associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality in general population studies. Occupational exposure to fine particulate matter can exceed ambient levels by a large factor. Due to increased interest in the health effects of particulate matter, many particle sampling methods have been developed In this study, two such measurement methods were used simultaneously and compared. PM2.5 was sampled using a filter-based gravimetric sampling method and a direct-reading instrument, the TSI Inc. model 8520 DUSTTRAK aerosol monitor. Both sampling methods were used to determine the PM2.5 exposure in a group of boilermakers exposed to welding fumes and residual fuel oil ash. The geometric mean PM2.5 concentration was 0.30 mg/m3 (GSD 3.25) and 0.31 mg/m3 (GSD 2.90)from the DUSTTRAK and gravimetric method, respectively. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient for the gravimetric and DUSTTRAK PM2.5 concentrations was 0.68. Linear regression models indicated that log, DUSTTRAK PM2.5 concentrations significantly predicted loge gravimetric PM2.5 concentrations (p < 0.01). The association between log(e) DUSTTRAK and log, gravimetric PM2.5 concentrations was found to be modified by surrogate measures for seasonal variation and type of aerosol. PM2.5 measurements from the DUSTTRAK are well correlated and highly predictive of measurements from the gravimetric sampling method for the aerosols in these work environments. However, results from this study suggest that aerosol particle characteristics may affect the relationship between the gravimetric and DUSTTRAK PM2.5 measurements. Recalibration of the DUSTTRAK for the specific aerosol, as recommended by the manufacturer, may be necessary to produce valid measures of airborne particulate matter.

  5. A gravimetric adaptation of the filter paper press method for the determination of water-binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Karmas, E; Turk, K

    1975-07-18

    A gravimetric adaptation of the filter paper press method for the determination of water-binding capacity in meat was developed and its sensitivity was compared to that of the conventional planimetric technique of the method. Both the gravimetric and planimetric techniques were applied to samples of cooked fish treated with various water binders. The mean results of the samples were grouped and compared using an analysis of variance. In all comparisons, the gravimetric data produced higher F-values than did the planimetric data for the same samples. This indicated greater senstivity for the gravimetric technique.

  6. Gravimetric methods for the preparation of standard gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, M. J. T.; Vargha, G. M.; Brown, A. S.

    2011-10-01

    The most widely used method for the preparation of primary standard gas mixtures involves weighing the individual components into a cylinder. We present a new mathematical description of the method and its uncertainties. We use this to demonstrate how strategies for serial dilution can be identified that minimize the uncertainty in the final mixture and show how they can be implemented practically. We review published reports of high accuracy gravimetry and give examples of relative uncertainties in the composition of standards approaching 1 part-per-million in the best cases and in the range of 100 to 1000 parts-per-million more typically.

  7. Dietary fiber analysis of cassava using gravimetric methods.

    PubMed

    Rivera, C J; Gerardi, A G; Infante, R B; Carrasco, H J; Rodríguez, O

    1993-03-01

    We report the application of a method which combines digestion with pancreatin and neutral detergent treatment in the analytical study of dietary fiber from cassava. The use of pancreatin previous to the detergent extraction enabled rapid filtration, thus giving more reproducible results for neutral detergent fiber (NDF). Acid detergent fiber (ADF), hemicellulose, lignin and pectin were also determined. The values obtained for NDF (4.65%) and pectin (1.17%) are very important, considering their role in the digestive process.

  8. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  9. Gravimetric water distribution assessment from geoelectrical methods (ERT and EMI) in municipal solid waste landfill.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Gaël; Pilawski, Tamara; Dzaomuho-Lenieregue, Phidias; Hiligsmann, Serge; Delvigne, Frank; Thonart, Philippe; Robert, Tanguy; Nguyen, Frédéric; Hermans, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The gravimetric water content of the waste material is a key parameter in waste biodegradation. Previous studies suggest a correlation between changes in water content and modification of electrical resistivity. This study, based on field work in Mont-Saint-Guibert landfill (Belgium), aimed, on one hand, at characterizing the relationship between gravimetric water content and electrical resistivity and on the other hand, at assessing geoelectrical methods as tools to characterize the gravimetric water distribution in a landfill. Using excavated waste samples obtained after drilling, we investigated the influences of the temperature, the liquid phase conductivity, the compaction and the water content on the electrical resistivity. Our results demonstrate that Archie's law and Campbell's law accurately describe these relationships in municipal solid waste (MSW). Next, we conducted a geophysical survey in situ using two techniques: borehole electromagnetics (EM) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). First, in order to validate the use of EM, EM values obtained in situ were compared to electrical resistivity of excavated waste samples from corresponding depths. The petrophysical laws were used to account for the change of environmental parameters (temperature and compaction). A rather good correlation was obtained between direct measurement on waste samples and borehole electromagnetic data. Second, ERT and EM were used to acquire a spatial distribution of the electrical resistivity. Then, using the petrophysical laws, this information was used to estimate the water content distribution. In summary, our results demonstrate that geoelectrical methods represent a pertinent approach to characterize spatial distribution of water content in municipal landfills when properly interpreted using ground truth data. These methods might therefore prove to be valuable tools in waste biodegradation optimization projects.

  10. Comparison of gravimetric, creamatocrit and esterified fatty acid methods for determination of total fat content in human milk.

    PubMed

    Du, Jian; Gay, Melvin C L; Lai, Ching Tat; Trengove, Robert D; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T

    2017-02-15

    The gravimetric method is considered the gold standard for measuring the fat content of human milk. However, it is labor intensive and requires large volumes of human milk. Other methods, such as creamatocrit and esterified fatty acid assay (EFA), have also been used widely in fat analysis. However, these methods have not been compared concurrently with the gravimetric method. Comparison of the three methods was conducted with human milk of varying fat content. Correlations between these methods were high (r(2)=0.99). Statistical differences (P<0.001) were observed in the overall fat measurements and within each group (low, medium and high fat milk) using the three methods. Overall, stronger correlation with lower mean (4.73g/L) and percentage differences (5.16%) was observed with the creamatocrit than the EFA method when compared to the gravimetric method. Furthermore, the ease of operation and real-time analysis make the creamatocrit method preferable.

  11. Method for producing viscous hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Poston, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A method for recovering viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels from a subterranean formation by drilling a well bore through the formation and completing the well by cementing a casing means in the upper part of the pay zone. The well is completed as an open hole completion and a superheated thermal vapor stream comprised of steam and combustion gases is injected into the lower part of the pay zone. The combustion gases migrate to the top of the pay zone and form a gas cap which provides formation pressure to produce the viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels.

  12. A static method coupled with gravimetric analysis for the determination of solubilities of solids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, G.; Shenoy, S.; Weiss, R.A.; Erkey, C.

    2000-03-01

    A static method coupled with gravimetric analysis was developed to measure the solubility of solids in supercritical carbon dioxide. To test the validity and accuracy of this method, the solubilities of naphthalene and phenanthrene were determined. Excellent agreement was obtained between the data in the literature and the data obtained using this method.

  13. Catalytic method for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Sansone, M.J.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    A method for synthesizing hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting said gases with a slurry of a catalyst composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants.

  14. Catalytic method for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Sansone, Michael J.; Slegeir, William A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for synthesizing hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting said gases with a slurry of a catalyst composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants.

  15. A simple, gravimetric method to quantify inorganic carbon in calcareous soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total carbon (TC) in calcareous soils has two components: inorganic carbon (IC) as calcite and or dolomite and organic carbon (OC) in the soil organic matter. The IC must be measured and subtracted from TC to obtain OC. Our objective was to develop a simple gravimetric technique to quantify IC. Th...

  16. Investigations on vertical crustal movements in the Venezuelan Andes by gravimetric methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drewes, H.

    1978-01-01

    A precise gravimetric network has been installed in the Venezuelan Andes to study eventual gravity changes due to vertical tectonic movements. The design and the measurements of the network are described and the accuracy is estimated. In the center of the region a local gravity network has been reobserved three times. The detected variations are discussed. In order to obtain a genuine statement as far as possible about the significance of observed gravity changes, requirements for the procedure of monitoring precise gravity networks are pointed out.

  17. Preparation of primary reference material of argon in oxygen by the gravimetric method for application to thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Inseok; Bok Lee, Jin; Moon, Dong Min; Seog Kim, Jin

    2017-04-01

    Three mixtures of argon in oxygen with (1000, 350, 120) μmol mol‑1 amount fractions of argon were prepared by the gravimetric method for application to thermometry. The mixtures are to be used to study the effects of argon impurity in oxygen on the temperature of the triple point of oxygen. From an uncertainty assessment compliant with the international standards, the relative uncertainty of the amount fraction of argon in the two-step dilution method used in this work ranged from 0.040% to 0.072%. The uncertainty was dominated by the uncertainties in weighing the mass of argon in the pre-mixture and weighing the mass of the pre-mixture in the final mixture. The internal consistency of the amount fraction of argon given by the gravimetric method was verified to be within 0.025% by measurements via gas chromatography with a thermal conductivity detector. The resultant uncertainty in the amount fraction of argon corresponds to less than 5 μK in the effect of argon impurity on the triple point of oxygen. Therefore, the mixtures have sufficient precision for the thermal study of the argon-in-oxygen mixtures.

  18. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Energies from the PMO Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Charles F.

    1979-01-01

    Details a procedure for accurately calculating the quantum mechanical energies of hydrocarbons using the perturbational molecular orbital (PMO) method, which does not require the use of a computer. (BT)

  19. Determination of total dietary fiber (CODEX definition) by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Barry V; DeVries, Jonathan W; Rader, Jeanne I; Cohen, Gerald; Prosky, Leon; Mugford, David C; Champ, Martine; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    A method for the determination of total dietary fiber (TDF), as defined by the CODEX Alimentarius, was validated in foods. Based upon the principles of AOAC Official Methods 985.29, 991.43, 2001.03, and 2002.02, the method quantitates high- and low-molecular-weight dietary fiber (HMWDF and LMWDF, respectively). In 2007, McCleary described a method of extended enzymatic digestion at 37 degrees C to simulate human intestinal digestion followed by gravimetric isolation and quantitation of HMWDF and the use of LC to quantitate low-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (LMWSDF). The method thus quantitates the complete range of dietary fiber components from resistant starch (by utilizing the digestion conditions of AOAC Method 2002.02) to digestion resistant oligosaccharides (by incorporating the deionization and LC procedures of AOAC Method 2001.03). The method was evaluated through an AOAC collaborative study. Eighteen laboratories participated with 16 laboratories returning valid assay data for 16 test portions (eight blind duplicates) consisting of samples with a range of traditional dietary fiber, resistant starch, and nondigestible oligosaccharides. The dietary fiber content of the eight test pairs ranged from 11.57 to 47.83%. Digestion of samples under the conditions of AOAC Method 2002.02 followed by the isolation and gravimetric procedures of AOAC Methods 985.29 and 991.43 results in quantitation of HMWDF. The filtrate from the quantitation of HMWDF is concentrated, deionized, concentrated again, and analyzed by LC to determine the LMWSDF, i.e., all nondigestible oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization > or =3. TDF is calculated as the sum of HMWDF and LMWSDF. Repeatability standard deviations (Sr) ranged from 0.41 to 1.43, and reproducibility standard deviations (S(R)) ranged from 1.18 to 5.44. These results are comparable to other official dietary fiber methods, and the method is recommended for adoption as Official First Action.

  20. Geochemical methods of prospecting for hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Duchscherer, W. Jr.

    1980-12-01

    Because the commonly used reflection-seismograph exploration technique misses many marginal low-relief structural prospects and regardless of its electronic computer sophistication, overlooks almost all stratigraphic traps, the hydrocarbon exploration industry should take a look at geochemical prospecting methods, which detect geochemical anomalies in the near-surface soils by measuring the thermal dissociation of the soil carbonates that are found overlying hydrocarbon accumulations. To promote understanding of such prospecting techniques, Geochemical Surveys reviews the methods used, the soil-alteration patterns, the lateral and vertical migration of hydrocarbon gases, the halo phenomenon (a ring or annual anomaly), the geochemical modification of sediments, and the data-interpretation and exploration procedures involved in a carbonate ..delta.. C analysis, which measures the residual, stable, cumulative effect of hydrocarbon migration.

  1. Method for collecting and analyzing hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ouellette, G.P.; Larter, S.R.; Fox, J.R.

    1988-12-20

    This patent describes a method for separating and collecting hydrocarbons which include methane from a gas obtained from the vicinity of an earth formation and obtaining information from such a gas which is useful in predicting the hydrocarbon potential of such an earth formation, the method comprising the steps of: obtaining a sample of a gas from the vicinity of an earth formation, the sample including methane; removing any water, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide from the sample and passing the sample through a cryogenic trap to separate and collect any interfering gases and hydrocarbons having at least two carbon atoms from the sample into the cryogenic trap. The removing and passing steps produce a first gas which contains the methane from the sample but which is free of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, interfering gases, and hydrocarbons having at least two carbon atoms; converting the methane in the first gas to form a condensed carbon dioxide sample; carrying out the removing, passing, and converting steps under a continuous subatmospheric pressure in such a manner as to prevent condensation of any oxygen in the cryogenic trap and to prevent any atmospheric carbon dioxide from entering into the sample, the first gas, the cryogenic trap, and the condensed carbon dioxide sample; determining the stable carbon isotope ratio of the condensed carbon dioxide sample which can be then be used to predict the hydrocarbon potential of the earth formation.

  2. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  3. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom.

  4. Determination of insoluble, soluble, and total dietary fiber (CODEX definition) by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Barry V; DeVries, Jonathan W; Rader, Jeanne I; Cohen, Gerald; Prosky, Leon; Mugford, David C; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of insoluble (IDF), soluble (SDF), and total dietary fiber (TDF), as defined by the CODEX Alimentarius, was validated in foods. Based upon the principles of AOAC Official Methods 985.29, 991.43, 2001.03, and 2002.02, the method quantitates water-insoluble and water-soluble dietary fiber. This method extends the capabilities of the previously adopted AOAC Official Method 2009.01, Total Dietary Fiber in Foods, Enzymatic-Gravimetric-Liquid Chromatographic Method, applicable to plant material, foods, and food ingredients consistent with CODEX Definition 2009, including naturally occurring, isolated, modified, and synthetic polymers meeting that definition. The method was evaluated through an AOAC/AACC collaborative study. Twenty-two laboratories participated, with 19 laboratories returning valid assay data for 16 test portions (eight blind duplicates) consisting of samples with a range of traditional dietary fiber, resistant starch, and nondigestible oligosaccharides. The dietary fiber content of the eight test pairs ranged from 10.45 to 29.90%. Digestion of samples under the conditions of AOAC 2002.02 followed by the isolation, fractionation, and gravimetric procedures of AOAC 985.29 (and its extensions 991.42 and 993.19) and 991.43 results in quantitation of IDF and soluble dietary fiber that precipitates (SDFP). The filtrate from the quantitation of water-alcohol-insoluble dietary fiber is concentrated, deionized, concentrated again, and analyzed by LC to determine the SDF that remains soluble (SDFS), i.e., all dietary fiber polymers of degree of polymerization = 3 and higher, consisting primarily, but not exclusively, of oligosaccharides. SDF is calculated as the sum of SDFP and SDFS. TDF is calculated as the sum of IDF and SDF. The within-laboratory variability, repeatability SD (Sr), for IDF ranged from 0.13 to 0.71, and the between-laboratory variability, reproducibility SD (SR), for IDF ranged from 0.42 to 2.24. The within

  5. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-09-24

    A new protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. The isolated consortia and bacteria are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. The isolated consortia, bacteria, and dispersants are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  6. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  7. Investigation of the Properties of Pore-Confined Supercritical CO2 by Vibrating Tube and Gravimetric Adsorption Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszkiewicz, M. S.; Rother, G.; Wesolowski, D. J.; Cole, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate properties of multicomponent CO2-rich fluids are needed to understand and control the processes occurring during subsurface storage of CO2, enhanced coalbed methane recovery, and proposed geothermal heat mining using CO2 instead of water. While fluid transport in macroscopic fractures is mainly affected by bulk fluid properties, mineral dissolution and fluid-rock reactions occur at the solid-fluid interface located largely in mesopore and micropore networks. Densities, mineral solubilities, ionic and phase equilibria, and transport properties of multicomponent fluids change significantly in close proximity to mineral surfaces. Accurate modeling of the behavior of CO2-rich fluids and their effect on the evolution of the reservoir and caprock permeability depend on accurate properties of both bulk and confined phases. Although manometric, volumetric, and gravimetric techniques have been used successfully to investigate adsorption of low-density subcritical gases and vapors, they are not capable of complete characterization of interfacial processes at higher, liquid-like densities of supercritical fluids. As the density of bulk fluid becomes comparable to that of the pore fluid, excess adsorption is no longer a good estimate of total adsorption capacity of the formation and the properties of the pore fluid remain unknown. In this work vibrating tube densimetry of pore fluids was used for the first time as a novel method capable of providing the total amount of fluid contained within a pore system through a direct measurement of the mass of a fluid-saturated porous solid. The method is first demonstrated using propane at subcritical and supercritical temperatures between 35 °C and 97 °C confined in silica aerogel (density 0.2 g/cm3, porosity 90%) that was synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Sorption and desorption of carbon dioxide on the same solid was measured between 31 °C ( the critical temperature of CO2) and 50 °C at pressures to 140 bar (density

  8. Blood Density Is Nearly Equal to Water Density: A Validation Study of the Gravimetric Method of Measuring Intraoperative Blood Loss.

    PubMed

    Vitello, Dominic J; Ripper, Richard M; Fettiplace, Michael R; Weinberg, Guy L; Vitello, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The gravimetric method of weighing surgical sponges is used to quantify intraoperative blood loss. The dry mass minus the wet mass of the gauze equals the volume of blood lost. This method assumes that the density of blood is equivalent to water (1 gm/mL). This study's purpose was to validate the assumption that the density of blood is equivalent to water and to correlate density with hematocrit. Methods. 50 µL of whole blood was weighed from eighteen rats. A distilled water control was weighed for each blood sample. The averages of the blood and water were compared utilizing a Student's unpaired, one-tailed t-test. The masses of the blood samples and the hematocrits were compared using a linear regression. Results. The average mass of the eighteen blood samples was 0.0489 g and that of the distilled water controls was 0.0492 g. The t-test showed P = 0.2269 and R (2) = 0.03154. The hematocrit values ranged from 24% to 48%. The linear regression R (2) value was 0.1767. Conclusions. The R (2) value comparing the blood and distilled water masses suggests high correlation between the two populations. Linear regression showed the hematocrit was not proportional to the mass of the blood. The study confirmed that the measured density of blood is similar to water.

  9. Blood Density Is Nearly Equal to Water Density: A Validation Study of the Gravimetric Method of Measuring Intraoperative Blood Loss

    PubMed Central

    Vitello, Dominic J.; Ripper, Richard M.; Fettiplace, Michael R.; Weinberg, Guy L.; Vitello, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The gravimetric method of weighing surgical sponges is used to quantify intraoperative blood loss. The dry mass minus the wet mass of the gauze equals the volume of blood lost. This method assumes that the density of blood is equivalent to water (1 gm/mL). This study's purpose was to validate the assumption that the density of blood is equivalent to water and to correlate density with hematocrit. Methods. 50 µL of whole blood was weighed from eighteen rats. A distilled water control was weighed for each blood sample. The averages of the blood and water were compared utilizing a Student's unpaired, one-tailed t-test. The masses of the blood samples and the hematocrits were compared using a linear regression. Results. The average mass of the eighteen blood samples was 0.0489 g and that of the distilled water controls was 0.0492 g. The t-test showed P = 0.2269 and R2 = 0.03154. The hematocrit values ranged from 24% to 48%. The linear regression R2 value was 0.1767. Conclusions. The R2 value comparing the blood and distilled water masses suggests high correlation between the two populations. Linear regression showed the hematocrit was not proportional to the mass of the blood. The study confirmed that the measured density of blood is similar to water. PMID:26464949

  10. Comprehensive measurement of total nondigestible carbohydrates in foods by enzymatic-gravimetric method and liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nishibata, Toyohide; Tashiro, Kouichi; Kanahori, Sumiko; Hashizume, Chieko; Kitagawa, Machiko; Okuma, Kazuhiro; Gordon, Dennis T

    2009-09-09

    Total nondigestible carbohydrate (NDC) in foods was determined by combining, not modifications, AOAC Official Methods 991.43, 2001.03, and 2002.02. Total NDC included insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) + high-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (HMWSDF), nondigestible oligosaccharides (NDO) not precipitated in ethanol solution, and resistant starch (RS). Eight sources of NDC (cellulose, wheat bran, gum arabic, resistant maltodextrin, polydextrose, fructooligosaccharide, galactooligosaccharides, and RS) were incorporated in different combinations into standard formula bread samples. All of the NDC sources and bread samples were analyzed for their (1) IDF + HMWSDF content with corrections for residual RS amount using AOAC Official Method 991.43, (2) NDO by liquid chromatography (LC) in AOAC Official Method 2001.03, and (3) RS by AOAC Official Method 2002.02. The correlation coefficient (R(2)) comparing calculated amounts versus measured amounts of total NDC in 11 bread samples was 0.92. Analysis of commercial food samples was also well matched with the DF + NDO value on their nutritional label. Consequently, we confirmed a single measurement of LC can determine all NDO in foods, and total NDC in foods can be determined by unifying existing AOAC Official Methods.

  11. Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

    1983-06-21

    A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of hydrocarbons having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 340 to 360/sup 0/C, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, CH/sub 3/OH is produced in an amount of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture, and comprised 1 mole % of the effluent gas.

  12. Conversion method for gas streams containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Mallinson, Richard G.; Lobban, Lance; Liu, Chang-jun

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method of using the apparatus are provided for converting a gas stream containing hydrocarbons to a reaction product containing effluent molecules having at least one carbon atom, having at least one interior surface and at least one exterior surface, a first electrode and a second electrode with the first and second electrodes being selectively movable in relation to each other and positioned within the housing so as to be spatially disposed a predetermined distance from each other, a plasma discharge generator between the first and second electrodes, gas stream introducer and a collector for collecting the reaction product effluent produced by the reaction of the gas stream containing hydrocarbons with the plasma discharge between the first and second electrodes.

  13. Method and apparatus for low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Reagen, William Kevin; Janikowski, Stuart Kevin

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for decomposing halogenated hydrocarbons are provided. The halogenated hydrocarbon is mixed with solvating agents and maintained in a predetermined atmosphere and at a predetermined temperature. The mixture is contacted with recyclable reactive material for chemically reacting with the recyclable material to create dehalogenated hydrocarbons and halogenated inorganic compounds. A feature of the invention is that the process enables low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons.

  14. Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

    1985-04-16

    A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of aliphatic alcohols having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further optionally includes Na ions present as substitutional cations in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 570 to 630/sup 0/K, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, methanol and isobutanol are the predominant products and are produced in amounts of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture. 6 figs.

  15. A silica gel based method for extracting insect surface hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Ramírez, Santiago R; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2012-02-01

    Here, we describe a novel method for the extraction of insect cuticular hydrocarbons using silica gel, herein referred to as "silica-rubbing". This method permits the selective sampling of external hydrocarbons from insect cuticle surfaces for subsequent analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The cuticular hydrocarbons are first adsorbed to silica gel particles by rubbing the cuticle of insect specimens with the materials, and then are subsequently eluted using organic solvents. We compared the cuticular hydrocarbon profiles that resulted from extractions using silica-rubbing and solvent-soaking methods in four ant and one bee species: Linepithema humile, Azteca instabilis, Camponotus floridanus, Pogonomyrmex barbatus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and Euglossa dilemma (Hymenoptera: Apidae). We also compared the hydrocarbon profiles of Euglossa dilemma obtained via silica-rubbing and solid phase microextraction (SPME). Comparison of hydrocarbon profiles obtained by different extraction methods indicates that silica rubbing selectively extracts the hydrocarbons that are present on the surface of the cuticular wax layer, without extracting hydrocarbons from internal glands and tissues. Due to its surface specificity, efficiency, and low cost, this new method may be useful for studying the biology of insect cuticular hydrocarbons.

  16. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2009-02-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  17. Comparative study of the dynamic gravimetric and pulse chromatographic methods for the determination of Henry constants of adsorption for VOC zeolite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokerman, J.; Canet, X.; Mougin, P.; Limborg-Noetinger, S.; Frère, M.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a comparative study between a gravimetric apparatus operating under dynamic conditions and a pulse chromatographic device developed for the determination of Henry constants of adsorption for VOC-zeolite systems. In both cases, we provide a description of the experimental set-up and procedure, as well as a complete report on the treatment of the rough experimental data. The experimental errors are also discussed. The comparison work is based on the study of the adsorption of toluene on a NaY zeolite (Si/Al 2.43) for temperatures ranging from 503 to 623 K. The maximal discrepancy found between the experimental Henry constants was 15.0%. The pulse chromatographic method is only dedicated to high-temperature measurements. For low-temperature experiments, the rough data cannot be treated in an efficient way, and it is not possible to obtain reliable Henry constant values. The dynamic gravimetric method is not temperature limited. It is however time-consuming, especially when low-temperature measurements (not presented in this paper) are concerned. Both methods are complementary if the determination of Henry constants is required in a wide temperature range.

  18. The gravimetric geodesy investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siry, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    The Gravimetric Geodesy Investigation which will utilize altimeter and satellite-to-satellite tracking data from GEOS-C, ATS-F, and other spacecraft as appropriate to improve our knowledge of the earth's gravitational field is discussed. This investigation is interrelated with the study of oceanographic phenomena such as those associated with tides and currents, hence the latter are considered together with gravitational effects in the analysis of the data. The oceanographic effects, each of the order of a meter or two in amplitude and with still smaller uncertainties does not seriously hamper the altimeter gravimetric studies at the five meter level. Laser and satellite-to-satellite tracking data, when combined with the altimeter results, should provide the basis for such studies over wide areas of the ocean surface. Laser and conventional geodetic tracking data from ISAGEX and succeeding campaigns will provide a valuable framework for these analyses.

  19. Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Guy R. B.; Barraclough, Bruce L.; Vanderborgh, Nicholas E.

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

  20. Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, G.R.B.; Barraclough, B.L.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

    1981-02-19

    A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus, and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

  1. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Doshi, R.

    1999-07-27

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400 C for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide. 4 figs.

  2. Method and apparatus for detecting gem-polyhalogenated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, deceased, William G.; Anderson, legal representative, Johanna S.

    1990-01-01

    A method and optrode for detecting gem polyhalogenated hydrocarbons in a sample fluid based on a single phase Fujiwara reaction as provided. The method comprises contacting a reaction mixture with a sample fluid which contains the gem-polyhalogenated hydrocarbons. The reaction mixture comprises an aqueous solution of pyridine or derivative thereof and a hindered nitrogen base. Upon contact a fluorescent and/or chromgenic reaction product forms whose fluorescence and/or absorbance is related to the concentration of gem-polyhalogenated hydrocarbons in the sample fluid.

  3. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  4. Catalysts for converting syngas into liquid hydrocarbons and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Fei; Yan, Qiangu; Batchelor, William

    2016-03-15

    The presently-disclosed subject matter includes methods for producing liquid hydrocarbons from syngas. In some embodiments the syngas is obtained from biomass and/or comprises a relatively high amount of nitrogen and/or carbon dioxide. In some embodiments the present methods can convert syngas into liquid hydrocarbons through a one-stage process. Also provided are catalysts for producing liquid hydrocarbons from syngas, wherein the catalysts include a base material, a transition metal, and a promoter. In some embodiments the base material includes a zeolite-iron material or a cobalt-molybdenum carbide material. In still further embodiments the promoter can include an alkali metal.

  5. Hydrocarbons from plants: Analytical methods and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Melvin

    1980-11-01

    We have suggested that certain plants rich in hydrocarbon-like materials might be cultivated for renewable photosynthetic products. Two species were selected for experimental plantations: Euphorbia lathyris, an annual from seed and Euphorbia tirucalli, a perennial from cuttings, The yield from each species is over 10 barrels of oil/acre/year without genetic or agronomic improvement. In addition to plants, there are trees, such as species of Copaifera in Brazil and other tropical areas, which produce a diesel-like oil upon tapping. Each tree produces approximately 40 liters of hydrocarbon per year, and this material can be used directly by a diesel-powered car. Further efforts to develop plants as alternate energy sources are underway, as well as a continuing search for additional plant species throughout the world which have a similar capability.

  6. Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Sansone, M.J.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    1983-08-02

    A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint. 9 figs.

  7. Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Sansone, Michael J.; Slegeir, William A. R.

    1983-08-02

    A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint.

  8. Method and apparatus for detecting halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Monagle, Matthew; Coogan, John J.

    1997-01-01

    A halogenated hydrocarbon (HHC) detector is formed from a silent discharge (also called a dielectric barrier discharge) plasma generator. A silent discharge plasma device receives a gas sample that may contain one or more HHCs and produces free radicals and excited electrons for oxidizing the HHCs in the gas sample to produce water, carbon dioxide, and an acid including halogens in the HHCs. A detector is used to sensitively detect the presence of the acid. A conductivity cell detector combines the oxidation products with a solvent where dissociation of the acid increases the conductivity of the solvent. The conductivity cell output signal is then functionally related to the presence of HHCs in the gas sample. Other detectors include electrochemical cells, infrared spectrometers, and negative ion mobility spectrometers.

  9. Method for recovering light hydrocarbons from coal agglomerates

    DOEpatents

    Huettenhain, Horst; Benz, August D.; Getsoian, John

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing light hydrocarbons, such as heptane, from coal agglomerates includes an enclosed chamber having a substantially horizontal perforate surface therein. The coal agglomerates are introduced into a water bath within the chamber. The agglomerates are advanced over the surface while steam is substantially continuously introduced through the surface into the water bath. Steam heats the water and causes volatilization of the light hydrocarbons, which may be collected from the overhead of the chamber. The resulting agglomerates may be collected at the opposite end from the surface and subjected to final draining processes prior to transportation or use.

  10. Method for determining processability of a hydrocarbon containing feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2013-09-10

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

  11. Method and apparatus for producing oxygenates from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1995-01-01

    A chemical reactor for oxygenating hydrocarbons includes: a) a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell, the plasma cell comprising a pair of electrodes having a dielectric material and void therebetween, the plasma cell comprising a hydrocarbon gas inlet feeding to the void; b) a solid oxide electrochemical cell, the electrochemical cell comprising a solid oxide electrolyte positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, an oxygen containing gas inlet stream feeding to the porous cathode side of the electrochemical cell; c) a first gas passageway feeding from the void to the anode side of the electrochemical cell; and d) a gas outlet feeding from the anode side of the electrochemical cell to expel reaction products from the chemical reactor. A method of oxygenating hydrocarbons is also disclosed.

  12. Method and apparatus for producing oxygenates from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kong, P.C.; Lessing, P.A.

    1995-06-27

    A chemical reactor for oxygenating hydrocarbons includes: (a) a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell, the plasma cell comprising a pair of electrodes having a dielectric material and void therebetween, the plasma cell comprising a hydrocarbon gas inlet feeding to the void; (b) a solid oxide electrochemical cell, the electrochemical cell comprising a solid oxide electrolyte positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, an oxygen containing gas inlet stream feeding to the porous cathode side of the electrochemical cell; (c) a first gas passageway feeding from the void to the anode side of the electrochemical cell; and (d) a gas outlet feeding from the anode side of the electrochemical cell to expel reaction products from the chemical reactor. A method of oxygenating hydrocarbons is also disclosed. 4 figs.

  13. Comparison of real-time instruments and gravimetric method when measuring particulate matter in a residential building.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuocheng; Calderón, Leonardo; Patton, Allison P; Sorensen Allacci, MaryAnn; Senick, Jennifer; Wener, Richard; Andrews, Clinton J; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2016-11-01

    This study used several real-time and filter-based aerosol instruments to measure PM2.5 levels in a high-rise residential green building in the Northeastern US and compared performance of those instruments. PM2.5 24-hr average concentrations were determined using a Personal Modular Impactor (PMI) with 2.5 µm cut (SKC Inc., Eighty Four, PA) and a direct reading pDR-1500 (Thermo Scientific, Franklin, MA) as well as its filter. 1-hr average PM2.5 concentrations were measured in the same apartments with an Aerotrak Optical Particle Counter (OPC) (model 8220, TSI, Inc., Shoreview, MN) and a DustTrak DRX mass monitor (model 8534, TSI, Inc., Shoreview, MN). OPC and DRX measurements were compared with concurrent 1-hr mass concentration from the pDR-1500. The pDR-1500 direct reading showed approximately 40% higher particle mass concentration compared to its own filter (n = 41), and 25% higher PM2.5 mass concentration compared to the PMI2.5 filter. The pDR-1500 direct reading and PMI2.5 in non-smoking homes (self-reported) were not significantly different (n = 10, R(2) = 0.937), while the difference between measurements for smoking homes was 44% (n = 31, R(2) = 0.773). Both OPC and DRX data had substantial and significant systematic and proportional biases compared with pDR-1500 readings. However, these methods were highly correlated: R(2) = 0.936 for OPC versus pDR-1500 reading and R(2) = 0.863 for DRX versus pDR-1500 reading. The data suggest that accuracy of aerosol mass concentrations from direct-reading instruments in indoor environments depends on the instrument, and that correction factors can be used to reduce biases of these real-time monitors in residential green buildings with similar aerosol properties.

  14. Method for production of hydrocarbons from hydrates

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Patrick L.

    1984-01-01

    A method of recovering natural gas entrapped in frozen subsurface gas hydrate formations in arctic regions. A hot supersaturated solution of CaCl.sub.2 or CaBr.sub.2, or a mixture thereof, is pumped under pressure down a wellbore and into a subsurface hydrate formation so as to hydrostatically fracture the formation. The CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 solution dissolves the solid hydrates and thereby releases the gas entrapped therein. Additionally, the solution contains a polymeric viscosifier, which operates to maintain in suspension finely divided crystalline CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 that precipitates from the supersaturated solution as it is cooled during injection into the formation.

  15. Future Directions of Electromagnetic Methods for Hydrocarbon Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    For hydrocarbon applications, seismic exploration is the workhorse of the industry. Only in the borehole, electromagnetic (EM) methods play a dominant role, as they are mostly used to determine oil reserves and to distinguish water from oil-bearing zones. Throughout the past 60 years, we had several periods with an increased interest in EM. This increased with the success of the marine EM industry and now electromagnetics in general is considered for many new applications. The classic electromagnetic methods are borehole, onshore and offshore, and airborne EM methods. Airborne is covered elsewhere (see Smith, this issue). Marine EM material is readily available from the service company Web sites, and here I will only mention some future technical directions that are visible. The marine EM success is being carried back to the onshore market, fueled by geothermal and unconventional hydrocarbon applications. Oil companies are listening to pro-EM arguments, but still are hesitant to go through the learning exercises as early adopters. In particular, the huge business drivers of shale hydrocarbons and reservoir monitoring will bring markets many times bigger than the entire marine EM market. Additional applications include support for seismic operations, sub-salt, and sub-basalt, all areas where seismic exploration is costly and inefficient. Integration with EM will allow novel seismic methods to be applied. In the borehole, anisotropy measurements, now possible, form the missing link between surface measurements and ground truth. Three-dimensional (3D) induction measurements are readily available from several logging contractors. The trend to logging-while-drilling measurements will continue with many more EM technologies, and the effort of controlling the drill bit while drilling including look-ahead-and-around the drill bit is going on. Overall, the market for electromagnetics is increasing, and a demand for EM capable professionals will continue. The emphasis will

  16. Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Janoski, Edward J.; Hollstein, Elmer J.

    1985-12-31

    A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

  17. Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

    1984-09-29

    A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

  18. Method for recovering hydrocarbons from molten metal halides

    DOEpatents

    Pell, Melvyn B.

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy carbonaceous materials by contacting such carbonaceous materials with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst to produce hydrocarbons having lower molecular weights and thereafter recovering the hydrocarbons so produced from the molten metal halide, an improvement comprising injecting into the spent molten metal halide, a liquid low-boiling hydrocarbon stream is disclosed.

  19. Solution mining systems and methods for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre; Schoeling, Lanny Gene

    2009-07-14

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite is disclosed. The method includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation through at least two injection wells. A second fluid is produced from the portion through at least one injection well until at least two injection wells are interconnected such that fluid can flow between the two injection wells. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. The first fluid is injected through one of the interconnected injection wells. The second fluid is produced from at least one of the interconnected injection wells. Heat is provided from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

  20. Downhole fluid injection systems, CO2 sequestration methods, and hydrocarbon material recovery methods

    DOEpatents

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-07-28

    Downhole fluid injection systems are provided that can include a first well extending into a geological formation, and a fluid injector assembly located within the well. The fluid injector assembly can be configured to inject a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion into the surrounding geological formation. CO2 sequestration methods are provided that can include exposing a geological formation to a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion to sequester at least a portion of the CO2 from the emulsion within the formation. Hydrocarbon material recovery methods are provided that can include exposing a liquid CO2/H2O-emulsion to a geological formation having the hydrocarbon material therein. The methods can include recovering at least a portion of the hydrocarbon material from the formation.

  1. Method for producing hydrocarbon and alcohol mixtures. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

    1980-12-01

    It is an object of this invention to provide an efficient process for extracting alcohols and ketones from an aqueous solution containing the same into hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil. Another object of the invention is to provide a mixture consisting of hydrocarbon, alcohols or ketones, polyoxyalkylene polymer and water which can be directly added to fuels or further purified. The above stated objects are achieved in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention by contacting an aqueous fermentation liquor with a hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture containing carbon compounds having 5 to 18 carbon atoms, which may include gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. The hydrocarbon-aqueous alcohol solution is mixed in the presence or one or more of a group of polyoxyalkylene polymers described in detail hereinafter; the fermentation alcohol being extracted into the hydrocarbon fuel-polyoxyalkylene polymer mixture.

  2. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOEpatents

    Westhoff, James D.; Harak, Arnold E.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

  3. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOEpatents

    Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

    1988-05-04

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Apparatus and method for rapid separation and detection of hydrocarbon fractions in a fluid stream

    DOEpatents

    Sluder, Charles S.; Storey, John M.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.

    2013-01-22

    An apparatus and method for rapid fractionation of hydrocarbon phases in a sample fluid stream are disclosed. Examples of the disclosed apparatus and method include an assembly of elements in fluid communication with one another including one or more valves and at least one sorbent chamber for removing certain classifications of hydrocarbons and detecting the remaining fractions using a detector. The respective ratios of hydrocarbons are determined by comparison with a non separated fluid stream.

  5. Method for direct production of carbon disulfide and hydrogen from hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Frank Q.; Erekson, Erek James

    1998-12-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to carbon disulfide and hydrogen is provided comprising contacting the hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to a bi-functional catalyst residing in a controlled atmosphere for a time and at a temperature sufficient to produce carbon disulfide and hydrogen. Also provided is a catalyst for converting carbon sulfides and hydrogen sulfides to gasoline range hydrocarbons comprising a mixture containing a zeolite catalyst and a hydrogenating catalyst.

  6. Method for measurement of volatile oxygenated hydrocarbons in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibrock, E.; Slemr, J.

    An automated gas chromatographic method for the quantitative determination of oxygenated (C 2C 5 carbonyls and C 1C 2 alcohols) and some non-oxygenated (C 5C 8) hydrocarbons in ambient air has been developed. The analytical system consists of a gas chromatograph with a cryogenic sampling trap, a precolumn for the separation of water and other interfering compounds, a cryogenic focusing trap and two analytical columns connected in series. Substances are detected either by flame ionization or by a mass spectrometer. Ozone is removed by a potassium iodide scrubber placed upstream the sampling trap. External gas standards generated by a permeation device are used for calibration. The detection limits range between 0.03 and 0.08 ng (depending on the compound), equivalent to 5 to 56 ppt in 1 l of sampled air. The method was tested by an intercomparison with a different gas chromatographic technique for the determination of NMHC. The system has been applied since 1994 for measurements in ambient air. Data obtained during an intensive campaign in summer 1995 at the field station Wank (1778 m a.s.l.) near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, are reported and compared with NMHC mixing ratios measured simultaneously in the same air masses.

  7. Microbial Hydrocarbon and ToxicPollutant Degradation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, Dietrich; Janabi, Mustafa; O'Neil, James; Budinger, Thomas

    2011-08-16

    The goal of this project is to determine optimum conditions for bacterial oxidation of hydrocarbons and long-chain alkanes that are representative of petroleum contamination of the environment. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of concern because of their toxicity, low volatility, and resistance to microbial degradation, especially under anaerobic conditions. The uniqueness of our approach is to use carbon-11 in lieu of the traditional use of carbon-14.

  8. Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device

    DOEpatents

    Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

    2014-05-06

    A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

  9. Methods for estimating properties of hydrocarbons comprising asphaltenes based on their solubility

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2016-10-04

    Disclosed herein is a method of estimating a property of a hydrocarbon comprising the steps of: preparing a liquid sample of a hydrocarbon, the hydrocarbon having asphaltene fractions therein; precipitating at least some of the asphaltenes of a hydrocarbon from the liquid sample with one or more precipitants in a chromatographic column; dissolving at least two of the different asphaltene fractions from the precipitated asphaltenes during a successive dissolution protocol; eluting the at least two different dissolved asphaltene fractions from the chromatographic column; monitoring the amount of the fractions eluted from the chromatographic column; using detected signals to calculate a percentage of a peak area for a first of the asphaltene fractions and a peak area for a second of the asphaltene fractions relative to the total peak areas, to determine a parameter that relates to the property of the hydrocarbon; and estimating the property of the hydrocarbon.

  10. Nonthermal plasma systems and methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2005-05-24

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  11. Combination Gravimetric/Volumetric Sorption Instrument for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethea, Donald; Burress, Jacob

    The use of gaseous fuels such as hydrogen and methane (natural gas) will reduce emissions. Unfortunately, the storage of hydrogen and methane at room temperature is difficult because they are both supercritical gases, making the adoption of these fuels cumbersome. One means of overcoming the storage problem is to use physisorption-based systems which exploit the van der Waals interaction between the gas and a nanoporous material to compress the gases to near liquid densities. To measure the amount of gas in these materials, gravimetric or volumetric methods are employed. Gravimetric weighs the amount of gas and volumetric uses differences in gas pressures. Gravimetric systems typically have problems with buoyancy corrections. Volumetric systems normally have larger uncertainties that propagate through the isotherm. A modified system will be presented which allows for both gravimetric and volumetric gas sorption measurements. Additionally, the buoyancy corrections for the gravimetric measurements are significantly small and less than the uncertainties in the measurement. This apparatus can take measurements of most gases at room temperature and up to 200 bar.

  12. Compounds and methods for the production of long chain hydrocarbons from biological sources

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Cameron; Silks, Louis A; Sutton, Andrew D; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; Waldie, Fraser; West, Ryan; Collias, Dimitris Ioannis

    2016-08-23

    The present invention is directed to the preparation of oxygenated, unsaturated hydrocarbon compounds, such as derivatives of furfural or hydroxymethyl furfural produced by aldol condensation with a ketone or a ketoester, as well as methods of deoxidatively reducing those compounds with hydrogen under acidic conditions to provide saturated hydrocarbons useful as fuels.

  13. Gravimetric enrichment of high lipid and starch accumulating microalgae.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Morteza; Abbasabadi, Mahsa; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Hosseini, Maryam; Sheikhbaglou, Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    This study presents gravimetric enrichment of mixed culture to screen starch and lipid producing species separately in a sequencing batch reactor. In the enriched starch-producing mixed culture photobioreactor, the starch content at the end of steady state batch became 3.42 times the beginning of depletion. Whereas in the enriched lipid-producing photobioreactor, the lipid content at the end of steady state batch became 3 times the beginning of famine phase. The obtained results revealed that the gravimetric enrichment is a suitable screening method for specific production of storage compounds in none-sterile large-scaled condition.

  14. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

  15. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOEpatents

    Blandford, J.W.

    1995-01-17

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

  16. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOEpatents

    Blandford, Joseph W.

    1995-01-01

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

  17. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1994-06-28

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400 C to 1000 C where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100 C to 1600 C to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process. 5 figures.

  18. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100.degree. C. to 1600.degree. C. to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  19. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  20. Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system

    DOEpatents

    Kong, P.C.

    1997-05-06

    A method is described for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap there between. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition. 6 figs.

  1. Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.

    1997-01-01

    A method for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap therebetween. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition.

  2. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR STUDYING THE INTERACTION BETWEEN POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Methods for Studying the Interaction between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Biological Macromolecules .

    The mechanisms for the processes that result in significant biological activity of PAHs depend on the interaction of these molecules or their metabol...

  3. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, Gregory A.; Thomas, Charles P.

    1995-01-01

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  4. Method for direct conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons to liquids

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2006-03-07

    A chemical reactor for direct conversion of hydrocarbons includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell and a solid oxide electrochemical cell in fluid communication therewith. The discharge plasma cell comprises a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. The electrochemical cell comprises a mixed-conducting solid oxide electrolyte membrane tube positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, and a gas inlet tube for feeding oxygen containing gas to the porous cathode. An inlet is provided for feeding hydrocarbons to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a light source for directing ultraviolet light into the discharge plasma cell and the electrochemical cell.

  5. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOEpatents

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-10-03

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  6. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOEpatents

    Blandford, Joseph W.

    1994-01-01

    A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and export riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

  7. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOEpatents

    Blandford, Joseph W.

    1992-01-01

    A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and expert riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

  8. Methods of producing alkylated hydrocarbons from an in situ heat treatment process liquid

    DOEpatents

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Mo, Weijian; Muylle, Michel Serge Marie; Mandema, Remco Hugo; Nair, Vijay

    2009-09-01

    A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation.

  9. Sample preparation for thermo-gravimetric determination and thermo-gravimetric characterization of refuse derived fuel.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T; Bronson, B; Gogolek, P; Mehrani, P

    2016-02-01

    Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) is a useful method for characterizing fuels. In the past it has been applied to the study of refuse derived fuel (RDF) and related materials. However, the heterogeneity of RDF makes the preparation of small representative samples very difficult and this difficulty has limited the effectiveness of TGA for characterization of RDF. A TGA method was applied to a variety of materials prepared from a commercially available RDF using a variety of procedures. Applicability of TGA method to the determination of the renewable content of RDF was considered. Cryogenic ball milling was found to be an effective means of preparing RDF samples for TGA. When combined with an effective sample preparation, TGA could be used as an alternative method for assessing the renewable content of RDF.

  10. Recent analytical methods for atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Tang, Ning; Toriba, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Moreover, some oxidative metabolites of these pollutants, such as hydroxylated and epoxide PAHs, cause endocrine disruption or produce reactive oxygen species. These compounds have become a large concern from the viewpoint of particulate matter (PM2.5 ) pollution. This report deals with recent studies concerning analytical methods for PAHs, NPAHs and related compounds in atmospheric and biological samples.

  11. New method for determining heats of combustion of gaseous hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.; Puster, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    As a spin off of a system developed for monitoring and controlling the oxygen concentration in the Langley 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel, a highly accurate on-line technique was developed for determining heats of combustion of natural gas samples. It is based on measuring the ratio m/n, where m is the (volumetric) flowrate of oxygen required to enrich the carrier air in which the test gas flowing at the rate n is burned, such that the mole fraction of oxygen in the combustion product gases equals that in the carrier air. The m/n ratio is directly related to the heats of combustion of the saturated hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. A measurement of the m/n ratio for the test gas can provide a direct means of determination of its heat of combustion by using the calibration graph relating the m/n values for pure saturated hydrocarbons with their heats of combustion. The accuracy of the technique is determine solely by the accuracy with which the flowrates m and n can be measured and is of the order of 2 percent in the present study. The theoretical principles and experimental results are discussed.

  12. Method for determining asphaltene stability of a hydrocarbon-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

    2013-02-05

    A method for determining asphaltene stability in a hydrocarbon-containing material having solvated asphaltenes therein is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, it involves the steps of: (a) precipitating an amount of the asphaltenes from a liquid sample of the hydrocarbon-containing material with an alkane mobile phase solvent in a column; (b) dissolving a first amount and a second amount of the precipitated asphaltenes by changing the alkane mobile phase solvent to a final mobile phase solvent having a solubility parameter that is higher than the alkane mobile phase solvent; (c) monitoring the concentration of eluted fractions from the column; (d) creating a solubility profile of the dissolved asphaltenes in the hydrocarbon-containing material; and (e) determining one or more asphaltene stability parameters of the hydrocarbon-containing material.

  13. A high-order 3D spectral-element method for the forward modelling and inversion of gravimetric data - Application to the western Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Seoane, Lucia; Spangenberg, Hannah; Wang, Yi; Dufréchou, Grégory; Bonvalot, Sylvain; Bruinsma, Sean

    2017-01-01

    We image the internal density structure of the Pyrenees by inverting gravity data using an a priori density model derived by scaling a Vp model obtained by full waveform inversion of teleseismic P-waves. Gravity anomalies are computed via a 3D high-order finite-element integration in the same high-order spectral-element grid as the one used to solve the wave equation and thus to obtain the velocity model. The curvature of the Earth and surface topography are taken into account in order to obtain a density model as accurate as possible. The method is validated through comparisons with exact semi-analytical solutions. We show that the spectral element method drastically accelerates the computations when compared to other more classical methods. Different scaling relations between compressional velocity and density are tested, and the Nafe-Drake relation is the one that leads to the best agreement between computed and observed gravity anomalies. Gravity data inversion is then performed and the results allow us to put more constraints on the density structure of the shallow crust and on the deep architecture of the mountain range.

  14. Use of the Complex Conductivity Method to Monitor Hydrocarbon Degradation in Brackish Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Beaver, C. L.; Kimak, C.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination of the subsurface is a global environmental problem. The size, location and recurrence rate of contamination very often inhibits active remediation strategies. When there is no direct threat to humans, and direct/invasive remediation methods are prohibited, monitored natural attenuation is often the remediation method of choice. Consequently, long-term monitoring of hydrocarbon degradation is needed to validate remediation. Geophysical methods, frequently utilized to characterize subsurface contamination, have the potential to be adopted for long term monitoring of contaminant degradation. Over the last decade, the complex conductivity method has shown promise as a method for monitoring hydrocarbon degradation processes in freshwater environments. We investigated the sensitivity of complex conductivity to natural attenuation of oil in a brackish setting, being more representative of the conditions where most oil spills occur such as in coastal environments. We performed a series of laboratory hydrocarbon biodegradation experiments whilst continuously monitoring complex conductivity. Sediments from a beach impacted by the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill were used to provide the hydrocarbon degraders, while fluids with three different salinities, ranging from fresh water to brackish water, were used as the supporting media. All experimental columns, including two abiotic controls, were run in duplicate. Early results show a dependence of the complex conductivity parameters (both electrolytic and interfacial) on biodegradation processes. Despite the small signals relative to freshwater conditions, the imaginary part of the complex conductivity appears to be sensitive to biodegradation processes. The columns with highest salinity fluids - similar to the salinites for the site where the sediments were collected - showed distinctive complex conductivity responses similar to microbial growth curves. Geochemical monitoring confirmed elevated rates

  15. Final report on EURAMET.QM-S8: Analysis of impurities in pure and balance gases used to prepare primary standard gas mixtures by the gravimetric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudwater, R. J.; van Wijk, J. I. T.; Persijn, S.; Wessel, R. M.; van der Veen, A. M. H.; Mace, T.; Sutour, C.; Couette, J.; Milton, M.; Harling, A.; Vargha, G.; Uprichard, I.; Haerri, H.-P.; Niederhauser, B.; Tuma, D.; Maiwald, M.; Boissière, C.

    2013-01-01

    This supplementary comparison (EURAMET.QM-S8) concerns the purity analysis of nitrogen as used in reference gas mixture preparation. This project was carried out without adding impurities to the gas used for this comparison, and is therefore more representative to evaluate the analysis of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, oxygen, argon and water impurities in high-purity nitrogen. The analysis of the amount-of-substance fraction water was optional. Two 50 litre high purity nitrogen cylinders were purchased from a well-qualified supplier of specialty gases. The listed components were expected to be present in the pure nitrogen at the target levels as a result of the purification of the nitrogen. From the start of this comparison it was clear that the comparison may not lead to reference values for the constituents analysed. The results indicate that analyses of high purity gases are often limited by the limits of detection of analytical equipment used. The reports of the participating laboratories also indicate that there is no agreed method of determination of the uncertainty on a detection limit value. The results provide useful information on the performance of participants. For all analysed components there is reasonable agreement in results for LNE, VSL, METAS and NPL. For BAM only the argon result is in agreement. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Methods of reforming hydrocarbon fuels using hexaaluminate catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Todd H [Morgantown, WV; Berry, David A [Morgantown, WV; Shekhawat, Dushyant [Morgantown, WV

    2012-03-27

    A metal substituted hexaaluminate catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas of the general formula AB.sub.yAl.sub.12-yO.sub.19-.delta., A being selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and lanthanide metals or mixtures thereof. A dopant or surface modifier selected from a transitions metal, a spinel of an oxygen-ion conductor is incorporated. The dopant may be Ca, Cs, K, La, Sr, Ba, Li, Mg, Ce, Co, Fe, Ir, Rh, Ni, Ru, Cu, Pe, Os, Pd, Cr, Mn, W, Re, Sn, Gd, V, Ti, Ag, Au, and mixtures thereof. The oxygen-ion conductor may be a perovskite selected from M'RhO.sub.3, M'PtO.sub.3, M'PdO.sub.3, M'IrO.sub.3, M'RuO.sub.3 wherein M'=Mg, Sr, Ba, La, Ca; a spinel selected from MRh.sub.2O.sub.4, MPt.sub.2O.sub.4, MPd.sub.2O.sub.4, MIr.sub.2O.sub.4, MRu.sub.2O.sub.4 wherein M=Mg, Sr, Ba, La, Ca and mixtures thereof; a florite is selected from M''O.sub.2.

  17. Frangible catalyst pretreatment method for use in hydrocarbon hydrodemetallization process

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, R.M.; Chervenak, M.C.; Li, A.S.U.; Lin, S.J.D.; Malik, V.A.

    1984-06-05

    Activated bauxite particulate material having usual nominal particle size range of 20-50 mesh (U.S. Sieve Series) is treated by fluidization in an upflowing gas so as to attrite the particles and stabilize the particle shape and size, thereby making the catalyst more uniform in shape and resistent to attrition in subsequent ebullated bed reactor operations. The treated activated bauxite catalyst material is then rescreened to provide a narrower differential size range having a particle equivalent diameter ratio range for large to small particles of about 1.4-2.0, and a preferred 20-30 mesh (U.S. Sieve Series) particle size range. The selected pretreated catalyst is then introduced into the ebullated bed reactor of a hydrodemetallization process for hydrocarbon feedstocks containing high metals concentration. Use of such pretreated bauxite catalyst particles results in improved reactor fluidization operations and less catalyst loss by attrition and carryover of fines from the reactor, and achieves improved results of 60-70 W % demetallization and 50-55 V % hydroconversion of the 975/sup 0/ F./sub 30/ fraction to lower boiling hydrcarbon products in a single stage operation.

  18. Direct injection GC method for measuring light hydrocarbon emissions from cooling-tower water.

    PubMed

    Lee, Max M; Logan, Tim D; Sun, Kefu; Hurley, N Spencer; Swatloski, Robert A; Gluck, Steve J

    2003-12-15

    A Direct Injection GC method for quantifying low levels of light hydrocarbons (C6 and below) in cooling water has been developed. It is intended to overcome the limitations of the currently available technology. The principle of this method is to use a stripper column in a GC to strip waterfrom the hydrocarbons prior to entering the separation column. No sample preparation is required since the water sample is introduced directly into the GC. Method validation indicates that the Direct Injection GC method offers approximately 15 min analysis time with excellent precision and recovery. The calibration studies with ethylene and propylene show that both liquid and gas standards are suitable for routine calibration and calibration verification. The sampling method using zero headspace traditional VOA (Volatile Organic Analysis) vials and a sample chiller has also been validated. It is apparent that the sampling method is sufficient to minimize the potential for losses of light hydrocarbons, and samples can be held at 4 degrees C for up to 7 days with more than 93% recovery. The Direct Injection GC method also offers <1 ppb (w/v) level method detection limits for ethylene, propylene, and benzene. It is superior to the existing El Paso stripper method. In addition to lower detection limits for ethylene and propylene, the Direct Injection GC method quantifies individual light hydrocarbons in cooling water, provides better recoveries, and requires less maintenance and setup costs. Since the instrumentation and supplies are readily available, this technique could easily be established as a standard or alternative method for routine emission monitoring and leak detection of light hydrocarbons in cooling-tower water.

  19. Method of treating emissions of a hybrid vehicle with a hydrocarbon absorber and a catalyst bypass system

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Bryan Nathaniel; Gonze, Eugene V; Santoso, Halim G; Spohn, Brian L

    2014-01-14

    A method of treating emissions from an internal combustion engine of a hybrid vehicle includes directing a flow of air created by the internal combustion engine when the internal combustion engine is spinning but not being fueled through a hydrocarbon absorber to collect hydrocarbons within the flow of air. When the hydrocarbon absorber is full and unable to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through an electrically heated catalyst to treat the flow of air and remove the hydrocarbons. When the hydrocarbon absorber is not full and able to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through a bypass path that bypasses the electrically heated catalyst to conserve the thermal energy stored within the electrically heated catalyst.

  20. Rapid method for determination of content of unsaturated hydrocarbons in naphtha cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Mozhaiko, V.N.; Seleznev, V.D.

    1988-03-01

    The method to determine total content of unsaturated hydrocarbons in naphtha cuts from reforming, cracking, and pyrolysis consisted of exhaustive catalytic hydrogenation of the unsaturated hydrocarbons, with detection of the hydrogen consumed in the hydrogenation reaction. The analyses were performed in a KhL-4 chromatography; the gas flow plan is shown. Preliminary experiments with saturated hydrocarbons (hexane, octane, decane) were performed. Naphthene experiments (methylcyclopentane, cyclohexane) showed no peak to indicate an increase in hydrogen concentration. No hydrogenation was observed in experiments with benzene and toluene. A comparison was made from analyses using the GOST 2070-82 and the rapid method as applied to IBP-180/sup 0/C cuts from reformer naphthas produced under varying conditions of severity.

  1. Gravimetric maps of the Central African Republic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albouy, J.; Godivier, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Gravimetric maps of the Central African Republic are described including a map of Bouguer anomalies at 1/1,000,000 in two sections (eastern sheet, western sheet) and a map, in color, of Bouguer anomalies at 1/2,000,000. Instrumentation, data acquisition, calibration, and data correction procedures are discussed.

  2. Standard test method for acidity of distillation residues or hydrocarbon liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method covers the qualitative determination of the acidity of the distillation residue from a gasoline. The sample of distillation residue or hydrocarbon liquid is shaken with water and the aqueous layer tested for acidity to methyl orange. Some petroleum products are treated with mineral acid as part of the refining procedure. Obviously, any residual mineral acid in a petroleum product is undesirable. The absence of a positive indication in the test for acidity of the distillation residue or aqueous extract of a hydrocarbon liquid is an assurance of the care used in refining the fuel or solvent.

  3. Method for predicting fouling tendency of a hydrocarbon-containing feedstock

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

    2013-07-23

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock fouling tendency for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

  4. Development of Nitrogen-Hydrocarbon Atmospheric Carburizing and Process Control Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolan; Zurecki, Zbigniew; Sisson, Richard D.

    2013-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure carburizing and neutral carbon potential annealing in nitrogen containing small additions of hydrocarbon gases can offer cost and steel surface quality alternatives to the comparable, endothermic atmosphere, or vacuum operations. An experimental program was conducted for refining real-time process control methods in carburizing of AISI 8620 steel under N2-CH4, N2-C3H8 blends containing <5 vol.% of hydrocarbon gas at 900 and 930 °C. Multiple types of gas analyzers were used to monitor residual concentrations of H2, CO, CO2, H2O, O2, CH4, C3H8, and other hydrocarbons inside furnace. A modified shim stock technique was additionally evaluated for correlation with gas analysis and diffusional modeling using measured carbon mass flux values (g/cm2/s). Results of this evaluation work are presented.

  5. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  6. An interatomic potential for saturated hydrocarbons based on the modified embedded-atom method.

    PubMed

    Nouranian, S; Tschopp, M A; Gwaltney, S R; Baskes, M I; Horstemeyer, M F

    2014-04-07

    In this work, we developed an interatomic potential for saturated hydrocarbons using the modified embedded-atom method (MEAM), a reactive semi-empirical many-body potential based on density functional theory and pair potentials. We parameterized the potential by fitting to a large experimental and first-principles (FP) database consisting of (1) bond distances, bond angles, and atomization energies at 0 K of a homologous series of alkanes and their select isomers from methane to n-octane, (2) the potential energy curves of H2, CH, and C2 diatomics, (3) the potential energy curves of hydrogen, methane, ethane, and propane dimers, i.e., (H2)2, (CH4)2, (C2H6)2, and (C3H8)2, respectively, and (4) pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) data of a dense high-pressure methane system with the density of 0.5534 g cc(-1). We compared the atomization energies and geometries of a range of linear alkanes, cycloalkanes, and free radicals calculated from the MEAM potential to those calculated by other commonly used reactive potentials for hydrocarbons, i.e., second-generation reactive empirical bond order (REBO) and reactive force field (ReaxFF). MEAM reproduced the experimental and/or FP data with accuracy comparable to or better than REBO or ReaxFF. The experimental PVT data for a relatively large series of methane, ethane, propane, and butane systems with different densities were predicted reasonably well by the MEAM potential. Although the MEAM formalism has been applied to atomic systems with predominantly metallic bonding in the past, the current work demonstrates the promising extension of the MEAM potential to covalently bonded molecular systems, specifically saturated hydrocarbons and saturated hydrocarbon-based polymers. The MEAM potential has already been parameterized for a large number of metallic unary, binary, ternary, carbide, nitride, and hydride systems, and extending it to saturated hydrocarbons provides a reliable and transferable potential for atomistic

  7. ASSESSMENT OF HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE DETECTION METHODS ON THE FORT PECK RESERVATION, NORTHEAST MONTANA

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence M. Monson

    2003-06-30

    Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, Head Gas and Thermal Desorption methods best match production; other methods also map depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, Head Gas along with Microbial, Iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, that could represent micro-seepage chimneys, results are inconclusive. Reconnaissance mapping using Magnetic Susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent Soil Gas and Head Gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential. In the final year of this project the principle contractor, the Fort Peck Tribes, completed a second survey in the Wicape 3D Seismic Prospect Area (also known as Area 6 in Phase I of the project) and sampled several Landsat image features contained in the Smoke Creek Aeromag Anomaly Area (also known as Area 1 in Phase II of the project). Methods determined to be most useful in Phases I and II, were employed in this final Phase III of the study. The Southwest Wicape seismic anomaly was only partially confirmed. The abundant curvilinears proposed to be possible hydrocarbon micro-seepage chimneys in the Smoke Creek Area were not conclusively verified as such. Insufficient sampling of background data precludes affirmative identification of these mostly topographic Landsat features as gas induced soil and vegetation anomalies. However relatively higher light gas concentrations were found associated with some of the curvilinears. Based on the findings of this work the Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation intend to utilize surface hydrocarbon

  8. Additive Methods for Prediction of Thermochemical Properties. The Laidler Method Revisited. 1. Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Joa˜O. Paulo

    2006-03-01

    A new parameterization of the Laidler method for estimation of atomization enthalpies and standard enthalpies of formation at 298.15 K for several families of hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, polyenes, poly-ynes, alkyl radicals, cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, benzene derivatives, and polyaromatics) is presented. A total of 200 compounds (164 for liquid phase) are used for the calculation of the parameters. Comparison between the experimental values and those calculated using the group additive scheme led to an average difference of 1.28 kJṡmol-1 for the gas phase enthalpy of formation (excluding the polyaromatic compounds) and of 1.38 kJṡmol-1 for the liquid phase enthalpy of formation. The data base used appears to be essentially error free, but for some compounds (e.g., 2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane, with the highest deviation among all compounds except the polyaromatic ones) the experimental values might need a reevaluation. An Excel worksheet is provided to simplify the calculation of enthalpies of formation and atomization enthalpies based on the Laidler terms defined in this paper.

  9. Estimation of the gravimetric pole tide by stacking long time-series of GGP superconducting gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Yann; Hinderer, Jacques; Rogister, Yves; Rosat, Séverine

    2016-04-01

    We compute the gravimetric factor at the Chandler wobble (CW) frequency using time-series from superconducting gravimeters (SG) longer than a decade. We first individually process the polar motion and data at each individual gravity station to estimate the gravimetric factor amplitude and phase, then we make a global analysis by applying a stacking method to different subsets of up to seven SG stations. The stacking is an efficient way of getting rid of local effects and improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the combined data sets. Using the stacking method, we find a gravimetric factor amplitude and phase of 1.118 ± 0.016 and -0.45 ± 0.66 deg, respectively, which is smaller in amplitude than expected. The sources of error are then carefully considered. For both local and global analyses, the uncertainties on our results are reliably constrained by computing the standard deviation of the estimates of the gravimetric factor amplitude and phase for increasing length of the time-series. Constraints on the CW anelastic dissipation can be set since any departure of the gravimetric factor from its elastic value may provide some insights into the dissipative processes that occur at the CW period. In particular, assuming given rheological models for the Earth's mantle enables us to make the link between the gravimetric factor phase and the CW quality factor.

  10. Detailed gravimetric geoid for the United States.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strange, W. E.; Vincent, S. F.; Berry, R. H.; Marsh, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed gravimetric geoid was computed for the United States using a combination of satellite-derived spherical harmonic coefficients and 1 by 1 deg mean gravity values from surface gravimetry. Comparisons of this geoid with astrogeodetic geoid data indicate that a precision of plus or minus 2 meters has been obtained. Translations only were used to convert the NAD astrogeodetic geoid heights to geocentric astrogeodetic heights. On the basis of the agreement between the geocentric astrogeodetic geoid heights and the gravimetric geoid heights, no evidence is found for rotation in the North American datum. The value of the zero-order undulation can vary by 10 to 20 meters, depending on which investigator's station positions are used to establish it.

  11. Long life hydrocarbon conversion catalyst and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2002-11-12

    The present invention includes a catalyst that has at least four layers, (1) porous support, (2) buffer layer, (3) interfacial layer, and optionally (4) catalyst layer. The buffer layer provides a transition of thermal expansion coefficient from the porous support to the interfacial layer thereby reducing thermal expansion stress as the catalyst is heated to high operating temperatures. The method of the present invention for making the at least three layer catalyst has the steps of (1) selecting a porous support, (2) solution depositing an interfacial layer thereon, and optionally (3) depositing a catalyst material onto the interfacial layer; wherein the improvement comprises (4) depositing a buffer layer between the porous support and the interfacial layer.

  12. Methods of discovery and techniques to study endophytic fungi producing fuel-related hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Gary A

    2014-01-17

    One promising area in the search for renewable bio-fuels is the discovery of microorganisms that produce fuel-related hydrocarbons (mycodiesel) that is in stark contrast to yeast fermentation that utilizes expensive sugars or starch to produce ethanol, which is a proven and useful source of fuel, but by no means is it ideal. Recently, a number of endophytic fungi have been isolated and described that make compounds such as mono- terpenoids, alkanes, cyclohexanes, cyclopentanes, and alkyl alcohols/ketones, benzenes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Many of these compounds are either identical to or are closely related to those specific classes of molecules that are found in diesel. Most importantly, these organisms make hydrocarbons while utilizing cellulosic polymers found in all plant-based agricultural wastes. Also discussed are some novel methods and techniques to quantitatively and qualitatively study hydrocarbon production by these microbes. Two models are discussed for identifying potential fuel-related compounds, scaling up production of them and advanced engine testing. Finally, it seems possible that endophytic fungi may have an additional attribute of having contributed to the formation of crude oil in the first place and a description of the paleobiosphere, to test this hypothesis, is in this review.

  13. Method And Apparatus For Converting Hydrocarbon Fuel Into Hydrogen Gas And Carbon Dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2001-03-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reforming method is disclosed suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. A first mixture of an oxygen-containing gas and a first fuel is directed into a first tube 108 to produce a first reaction reformate. A second mixture of steam and a second fuel is directed into a second tube 116 annularly disposed about the first tube 108 to produce a second reaction reformate. The first and second reaction reformates are then directed into a reforming zone 144 and subject to a catalytic reforming reaction. In another aspect of the method, a first fuel is combusted with an oxygen-containing gas in a first zone 108 to produce a reformate stream, while a second fuel under steam reforming in a second zone 116. Heat energy from the first zone 108 is transferred to the second zone 116.

  14. Method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen from water and from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Willms, R. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes from water and from hydrocarbons. A palladium membrane, when utilized in cooperation with a nickel catalyst in a reactor, has been found to drive reactions such as water gas shift, steam reforming and methane cracking to substantial completion by removing the product hydrogen from the reacting mixture. In addition, ultrapure hydrogen is produced, thereby eliminating the need for an additional processing step.

  15. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

  16. The hydrocarbon accumulations mapping in crystalline rocks by mobile geophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, A.

    2013-05-01

    Sedimentary-migration origin theory of hydrocarbons dominates nowadays. However, a significant amount of hydrocarbon deposits were discovered in the crystalline rocks, which corroborates the theory of non-organic origin of hydrocarbons. During the solving of problems of oil and gas exploration in crystalline rocks and arrays so-called "direct" methods can be used. These methods include geoelectric methods of forming short-pulsed electromagnetic field (FSPEF) and vertical electric-resonance sounding (VERS) (FSPEF-VERS express-technology). Use of remote Earth sounding (RES) methods is also actual. These mobile technologies are extensively used during the exploration of hydrocarbon accumulations in crystalline rocks, including those within the Ukrainian crystalline shield. The results of explorations Four anomalous geoelectric zones of "gas condensate reservoir" type were quickly revealed as a result of reconnaissance prospecting works (Fig. 1). DTA "Obukhovychi". Anomaly was traced over a distance of 4 km. Approximate area is 12.0 km2. DTA"Korolevskaya". Preliminary established size of anomalous zone is 10.0 km2. The anomalous polarized layers of gas and gas-condensate type were determined. DTA "Olizarovskaya". Approximate size of anomaly is about 56.0 km2. This anomaly is the largest and the most intense. DTA "Druzhba". Preliminary estimated size of anomaly is 16.0 km2. Conclusions Long experience of a successful application of non-classical geoelectric methods for the solving of variety of practical tasks allow one to state their contribution to the development of a new paradigm of geophysical researches. Simultaneous usage of the remote sensing data processing and interpretation method and FSPEF and VERS technologies can essentially optimize and speed up geophysical work. References 1. S.P. Levashov. Detection and mapping of anomalies of "hydrocarbon deposit" type in the fault zones of crystalline arrays by geoelectric methods. / S.P. Levashov, N.A. Yakymchuk, I

  17. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Eddie G.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  18. Method and device for determining heats of combustion of gaseous hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J. (Inventor); Sprinkle, Danny R. (Inventor); Puster, Richard L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A method and device is provided for a quick, accurate and on-line determination of heats of combustion of gaseous hydrocarbons. First, the amount of oxygen in the carrier air stream is sensed by an oxygen sensing system. Second, three individual volumetric flow rates of oxygen, carrier stream air, and hydrocrabon test gas are introduced into a burner. The hydrocarbon test gas is fed into the burner at a volumetric flow rate, n, measured by a flowmeter. Third, the amount of oxygen in the resulting combustion products is sensed by an oxygen sensing system. Fourth, the volumetric flow rate of oxygen is adjusted until the amount of oxygen in the combustion product equals the amount of oxygen previously sensed in the carrier air stream. This equalizing volumetric flow rate is m and is measured by a flowmeter. The heat of combustion of the hydrocrabon test gas is then determined from the ratio m/n.

  19. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

    1993-01-19

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  20. Method for estimating processability of a hydrocarbon-containing feedstock for hydroprocessing

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

    2014-01-14

    Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitates asphaltenes. Determined parameters and processabilities for a plurality of feedstocks can be used to generate a mathematical relationship between parameter and processability; this relationship can be used to estimate the processability for hydroprocessing for a feedstock of unknown processability.

  1. The new gravimetric quasigeoid model KTH08 over Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ågren, Jonas; Sjöberg, Lars E.; Kiamehr, Ramin

    2009-08-01

    The least squares modification of Stokes formula has been developed in a series of papers published in Journal of Geodesy between 1984 and 2008. It consists of a least squares (stochastic) Stokes kernel modification with additive corrections for the topography, downward continuation, the atmosphere and the ellipsoidal shape of the Earth. The method, developed at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) will here be denoted by the abbreviated name the KTH method. This paper presents the computational results of a new gravimetric quasigeoid model over Sweden (the KTH08 model) by employing the KTH method. Traditionally the Nordic Geodetic Commission (NKG) has computed gravimetric quasigeoid models over Sweden and other Nordic countries; the latest model being NKG 2004. Another aim of this paper is therefore to compare KTH08 and NKG 2004 quasigeoid models and to evaluate their accuracies using GNSS/levelling height anomalies. The rms fit of KTH08 in 196 GNSS data points distributed over Sweden by using a 1(4)-parameter transformation is 22 (20) mm. It is concluded that KTH08 is a significant step forward compared to NKG 2004.

  2. Groundwater storage change detection using micro-gravimetric technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Diasty, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, new perspectives and developments in applying a ground-based micro-gravimetric method to detect groundwater storage change in Waterloo Moraine are investigated. Four epochs of gravity survey were conducted using absolute gravimeter (FG5), two relative gravity meters (CG5) and two geodetic global positioning systems (GPS) in the Waterloo Moraine in May and August of 2010 and 2011, respectively. Data were processed using the parametric least-squares method and integrated with geological and hydrological studies. The gravity differences between May and August for 2010 and 2011 epochs were inverted to provide the estimated total water storage changes. Changes in soil water content obtained from land surface models of Ecological Assimilation of Land and Climate Observations (EALCO) and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) program were employed to estimate the groundwater storage change. The ratios between the estimated groundwater storage changes and measured water table changes (specific yields) were determined at a local monitoring well located in the survey area. The results showed that the estimates of specific yields between May and August of 2010 and 2011 were consistent at a significant confidence level and are also within the range of the specific yield from geological and hydrological studies. Therefore, the micro-gravimetric (absolute and relative gravity meters) technology has demonstrated the great potential in detecting groundwater storage change and specific yield for local scale aquifers such as Waterloo Moraine.

  3. Method/basis set dependence of NICS values among metallic nano-clusters and hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Badri, Zahra; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Rashidi-Ranjbar, Parviz

    2012-03-14

    The influence of various all-electron basis sets and effective core potentials employed along with several DFT functionals (B3LYP, B3PW91, BLYP, BP86 and M06) on the magnitude of nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) values in different metallic nano-clusters and hydrocarbons is studied. In general, it is demonstrated that the NICS values are very sensitive to the applied method/basis set; however, the method/basis set dependence is more prominent for computed NICS values in transition metal clusters. In hydrocarbons, medium-size basis sets perform roughly similar to large basis sets in most cases. It is also found that NICS(0) values are more sensitive to the method/basis set variation compared to the NICS values computed at 1 or 2 Å above the ring plane. However, in many cases, no broad-spectrum regulation is found for the effect of basis set/method on the magnitude of NICS values. A detailed study showed that bond length alternation in a molecule has an insignificant effect on the magnitude of NICS values so the influence of method/basis sets on the magnitude of NICS values mostly arises from the different predicted ring current intensities at various computational levels.

  4. Modeling vibrational resonance in linear hydrocarbon chain with a mixed quantum-classical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2009-04-01

    The quantum dynamics of a vibrational excitation in a linear hydrocarbon model system is studied with a new mixed quantum-classical method. The method is suited to treat many-body systems consisting of a low dimensional quantum primary part coupled to a classical bath. The dynamics of the primary part is governed by the quantum corrected propagator, with the corrections defined in terms of matrix elements of zeroth order propagators. The corrections are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The ability of the method to describe dynamics of multidimensional systems has been tested. The results obtained by the method have been compared to previous quantum simulations performed with the quasiadiabatic path integral method.

  5. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  6. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  7. A simple method for calculating growth rates of petroleum hydrocarbon plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, B.A.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Curtis, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    Consumption of aquifer Fe(III) during biodegradation of ground water contaminants may result in expansion of a contaminant plume, changing the outlook for monitored natural attenuation. Data from two research sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons show that toluene and xylenes degrade under methanogenic conditions, but the benzene and ethylbenzene plumes grow as aquifer Fe(III) supplies are depleted. By considering a one-dimensional reaction front in a constant unidirectional flow field, it is possible to derive a simple expression for the growth rate of a benzene plume. The method balances the mass flux of benzene with the Fe(III) content of the aquifer, assuming that the biodegradation reaction is instantaneous. The resulting expression shows that the benzene front migration is retarded relative to the ground water velocity by a factor that depends on the concentrations of hydrocarbon and bioavailable Fe(III). The method provides good agreement with benzene plumes at a crude oil study site in Minnesota and a gasoline site in South Carolina. Compared to the South Carolina site, the Minnesota site has 25% higher benzene flux but eight times the Fe(III), leading to about one-sixth the expansion rate. Although it was developed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes, the growth-rate estimation method may have applications to contaminant plumes from other persistent contaminant sources. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  8. A simple method for calculating growth rates of petroleum hydrocarbon plumes.

    PubMed

    Bekins, Barbara A; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Curtis, Gary P

    2005-01-01

    Consumption of aquifer Fe(III) during biodegradation of ground water contaminants may result in expansion of a contaminant plume, changing the outlook for monitored natural attenuation. Data from two research sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons show that toluene and xylenes degrade under methanogenic conditions, but the benzene and ethylbenzene plumes grow as aquifer Fe(III) supplies are depleted. By considering a one-dimensional reaction front in a constant unidirectional flow field, it is possible to derive a simple expression for the growth rate of a benzene plume. The method balances the mass flux of benzene with the Fe(III) content of the aquifer, assuming that the biodegradation reaction is instantaneous. The resulting expression shows that the benzene front migration is retarded relative to the ground water velocity by a factor that depends on the concentrations of hydrocarbon and bioavailable Fe(III). The method provides good agreement with benzene plumes at a crude oil study site in Minnesota and a gasoline site in South Carolina. Compared to the South Carolina site, the Minnesota site has 25% higher benzene flux but eight times the Fe(III), leading to about one-sixth the expansion rate. Although it was developed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes, the growth-rate estimation method may have applications to contaminant plumes from other persistent contaminant sources.

  9. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods Capture Different Microbial Community Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Franck O. P.; Bell, Terrence H.; Marchand, Charlotte; de la Providencia, Ivan E.; El Yassimi, Abdel; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and sustainable approach for treating polluted soils, but our ability to improve on current bioremediation strategies depends on our ability to isolate microorganisms from these soils. Although culturing is widely used in bioremediation research and applications, it is unknown whether the composition of cultured isolates closely mirrors the indigenous microbial community from contaminated soils. To assess this, we paired culture-independent (454-pyrosequencing of total soil DNA) with culture-dependent (isolation using seven different growth media) techniques to analyse the bacterial and fungal communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. Although bacterial and fungal rarefaction curves were saturated for both methods, only 2.4% and 8.2% of the bacterial and fungal OTUs, respectively, were shared between datasets. Isolated taxa increased the total recovered species richness by only 2% for bacteria and 5% for fungi. Interestingly, none of the bacteria that we isolated were representative of the major bacterial OTUs recovered by 454-pyrosequencing. Isolation of fungi was moderately more effective at capturing the dominant OTUs observed by culture-independent analysis, as 3 of 31 cultured fungal strains ranked among the 20 most abundant fungal OTUs in the 454-pyrosequencing dataset. This study is one of the most comprehensive comparisons of microbial communities from hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using both isolation and high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:26053848

  10. [Method of infrared spectrum analysis of hydrocarbon mixed gas based on multilevel and SVM-subset].

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Xie, Wen-Jun; Liu, Jun-Hua

    2008-02-01

    The hydrocarbon mixed gas was characterized by multi-component and varied density. In order to deal with the difficulties that can not be actually solved with mass mixture gas spectrum data samples, 15 kinds of subset patterns were determined on the basis of investigations and studies, which needed 5 500 spectrum data samples for training and testing. On the basis of this, a method of hydrocarbon mixed gas infrared spectrum analysis based on 2-levels and 15 SVM-subsets was proposed in the light of the idea of working pattern recognition --> mixture gas analysis --> the final result output. In order to solve the problem of new subset working pattern, the SVM online categorization algorithm based on spectrum data relational rule was used. The experimental results show that the component concentration maximal deviation is 0.41% and the maximal average deviation is 0.04%. The method can be used in other mixture gas infrared spectrum analyses, and has the theoretic and application value.

  11. Simplified measurement technique for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using the EPA Method 5 sampling train

    SciTech Connect

    Jacko, R.B.; Holcomb, M.L.

    1984-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are emitted from a variety of processes, including combustion processes, that are often scrutinized for other air pollutants including particulate matter and inorganic oxides. Studies have shown that some PAH compounds are carcinogenic, thus stimulating interest in quantifying and studying the influence of various system parameters on PAH emissions. A problem is encountered when PAH measurements are required is selection of a sampling train suitable for quantifying both particulate and PAH compounds. Previous studies, where PAH compounds have been measured, have employed EPA Method 5 with various modifications to make it more suitable for collection of volatile and reactive organic compounds. The paper describes a technique using an adsorbent packed column that is easily retrofitted to the Method 5 sampling train and used with a standard soxhlet extraction apparatus. The adsorbent is contained in a stainless steel canister that is inserted in a Method 5 bubbler and later in an extraction soxhlet, thus eliminating the need for transferring adsorbent.

  12. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analysis in plant biota.

    PubMed

    Meudec, A; Dussauze, J; Jourdin, M; Deslandes, E; Poupart, N

    2006-03-10

    Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, a new method was developed for the identification and the quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in plants. This method was particularly optimised for PAH analyses in marine plants such as the halophytic species, Salicornia fragilis Ball et Tutin. The saponification of samples and their clean up by Florisil solid-phase extraction succeeded in eliminating pigments and natural compounds, which may interfere with GC-MS analysis. Moreover, a good recovery of the PAHs studied was obtained with percentages ranging from 88 to 116%. Application to the determination of PAH in a wide range of coastal halophytic plants is presented and validated the efficiency, the accuracy and the reproducibility of this method.

  13. A Review on Prediction Methods for Molar Enthalpies of Vaporization of Hydrocarbons: The ELBA Method as the Best Answer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Rui C.; Leal, João P.

    2012-12-01

    A review on prediction methods for molar enthalpies of vaporization at T = 298.15 K of hydrocarbons is presented. A new method is proposed and compared with six of the most common used ones from the literature. This new method, the extended Laidler bond additivity (ELBA), was applied to the prediction of standard molar enthalpies of vaporization of hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, polyenes, poly-ynes, cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, benzene compounds, biphenyl compounds, and polyphenyl compounds) at T = 298.15 K. A total of 260 experimental standard molar enthalpies of vaporization at T = 298.15 K were used for the parameters optimization. Comparison between the experimental values and those calculated using ELBA led to an average absolute difference of 0.35 kJ mol-1, corresponding to an average relative error of 0.92%. In addition, this new method proves to be better than the ones used for comparison with an independent set of 83 experimental standard molar enthalpies of vaporization at T = 298.15 K.

  14. Field studies: Test method for on-line continuous measurement of total hydrocarbons (THC) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) in stack gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, H.H.; Lai, C.C.; Chu, H.W.; Cheng, H.

    1999-07-01

    A new method for on-line monitoring of total hydrocarbons and non-methane hydrocarbons in stack gas simultaneously was developed in this study. Based on the principle of on-line GC/FID, the method was developed and can be considered as a new modification of the Method 25 and 25A of US EPA. Major advantages of the method included (1) capability of distinguishing methane as Method 25; (2) near-real-time results; (3) broad species coverage; (4) monitoring methane in straightforward manner; (5) low operation and maintenance costs. In the proposed method, test samples were continuously pumped from detection sources and loaded with a two-loop sampling valve. The samples were then injected into two GC columns-empty and molecular sieve columns. The empty column was used for detection of THC, and the molecular sieve column was for methane. The detector in this GC was FID. NMHC concentration was obtained by subtracting methane from THC. The tests were carried out to measure the THC and methane in waste gas in various industries, including surface coating, semiconductor manufacturing, synthetic leather industries. Recovery rates of THC in the samples were between 86% to 114% for about 100 m of transfer line of samples. For the standard gas, the recovery rate was about 101%, 6.6 % of measurement precision, and 88%--114% of accuracy. The results showed the promising and reliable measurement of the test method for THC and methane in waste gas.

  15. Method for the preparation of catalyst composition for use in cracking hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Ogata, M.; Ida, T.

    1987-01-13

    A method is described for preparing a catalyst composition for cracking hydrocarbons, which consists essentially of: spray drying an aqueous slurry containing (i) flash calcined alumina particles which have been prepared by contacting aluminum hydroxide which has been made by the Bayer process, with hot air having a temperature in the range of 350/sup 0/ to 700/sup 0/C., for 5 seconds or less, (ii) kaolin, (iii) a precursor of a siliceous inorganic oxide matrix, and (iv) a crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite, to obtain catalyst particles consisting essentially of from 10 to 30 wt. % of the flash-calcined alumina, from 30 to 55 wt. % of the kaolin, from 3 to 40 wt. % crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite and the balance is the siliceous inorganic oxide matrix. A method is also described in which the zeolite is rare earth exchange zeolite Y or hydrogen exchanged zeolite Y.

  16. Systems and methods for optically measuring properties of hydrocarbon fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Adler-Golden, S.; Bernstein, L.S.; Bien, F.; Gersh, M.E.; Goldstein, N.

    1998-10-13

    A system and method for optical interrogation and measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel gas includes a light source generating light at near-visible wavelengths. A cell containing the gas is optically coupled to the light source which is in turn partially transmitted by the sample. A spectrometer disperses the transmitted light and captures an image thereof. The image is captured by a low-cost silicon-based two-dimensional CCD array. The captured spectral image is processed by electronics for determining energy or BTU content and composition of the gas. The innovative optical approach provides a relatively inexpensive, durable, maintenance-free sensor and method which is reliable in the field and relatively simple to calibrate. In view of the above, accurate monitoring is possible at a plurality of locations along the distribution chain leading to more efficient distribution. 14 figs.

  17. Systems and methods for optically measuring properties of hydrocarbon fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Adler-Golden, Steven; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Bien, Fritz; Gersh, Michael E.; Goldstein, Neil

    1998-10-13

    A system and method for optical interrogation and measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel gas includes a light source generating light at near-visible wavelengths. A cell containing the gas is optically coupled to the light source which is in turn partially transmitted by the sample. A spectrometer disperses the transmitted light and captures an image thereof. The image is captured by a low-cost silicon-based two-dimensional CCD array. The captured spectral image is processed by electronics for determining energy or BTU content and composition of the gas. The innovative optical approach provides a relatively inexpensive, durable, maintenance-free sensor and method which is reliable in the field and relatively simple to calibrate. In view of the above, accurate monitoring is possible at a plurality of locations along the distribution chain leading to more efficient distribution.

  18. Comparison and Evaluation Methods for the Removal of Ethylene and Other Hydrocarbons from Air for Biological Studies 1

    PubMed Central

    Eastwell, Kenneth C.; Bassi, Pawan K.; Spencer, Mary E.

    1978-01-01

    A random sampling analysis of laboratory air and of air from commercially available cylinders indicated that they contain appreciable amounts of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, viz. methane, ethane, and ethylene, as contaminants. These impurities could lead to erroneous conclusions in studies of plant growth and metabolism. Different methods for removal of these contaminants were compared and evaluated in the present investigation for their suitability in plant studies. Most of the methods currently being used were found inadequate. The use of metal catalysts at high temperature, adapted from gas analysis techniques, provides an inexpensive and efficient method for removing hydrocarbons from air in both closed and continuous flow systems. PMID:16660593

  19. Astro- or gravimetric geoid - that is the question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstbach, G.

    2003-04-01

    In 1988 W.Torge expected to reach the "cm geoid" within 10 years. At that time the rms of regional geoid solutions were 5-10cm / 100 km. Astrogeodesy usually had 5-10 points per 1000 km^2, Gravimetry ca. 100 points. In the meantime the density of dg points increased remarkably because of automatic instruments; now some european countries have gravimetric geoids of "centimetric level" - using - special numerical methods (collocation, FT ...) - very detailed terrain models, evt. surface rock densities - but different methods show discrepancies of cm...dm and trends. According to my analyses [1997, 2002] of several european projects, Astro geoids are less sensitive to such effects. In the Alps and hilly areas I could show that Vertical deflections (VD) a) are 30 times more effective for geoid determination than gravimetry, b) quasirandom when crossing alpine valleys (dg = systematic negative). c) VD is less influenced by local density irregularities, d) has no border effect and e) allow better interpretation (Vector instead of Scalar dg) - - f) BUT takes a longer time for observation - up to 1999 - and - g) is dependent of tolerable good weather. NOW our CCD zenith camera is almost as quick as gravimeters. So 10-20 VDs per summer night seem to be possible. Hungarian colleagues discuss to measure 1000 points (like Austria) to increase the gravimetric geoid (˜100.000 pt.) from 8cm to 4cm. For NEW projects this would save 90% of costs &time - and difficult valley profiles in a 1km grid. But astro points in a 5km spacing are OK. The only drawbacks (f,g) reduce the economy from 30:1 to 20:1 - so I think Astrogeodesy starts its RENAISSANCE in any case. Do you agree? Why not?

  20. Precision gravimetric survey at the conditions of urban agglomerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Tatiana; Lygin, Ivan; Fadeev, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Large cities growth and aging lead to the irreversible negative changes of underground. The study of these changes at the urban area mainly based on the shallow methods of Geophysics, which extensive usage restricted by technogenic noise. Among others, precision gravimetry is allocated as method with good resistance to the urban noises. The main the objects of urban gravimetric survey are the soil decompaction, leaded to the rocks strength violation and the karst formation. Their gravity effects are too small, therefore investigation requires the modern high-precision equipment and special methods of measurements. The Gravimetry division of Lomonosov Moscow State University examin of modern precision gravimeters Scintrex CG-5 Autograv since 2006. The main performance characteristics of over 20 precision gravimeters were examined in various operational modes. Stationary mode. Long-term gravimetric measurements were carried at a base station. It shows that records obtained differ by high-frequency and mid-frequency (period 5 - 12 hours) components. The high-frequency component, determined as a standard deviation of measurement, characterizes the level of the system sensitivity to external noise and varies for different devices from 2 to 5-7 μGals. Midrange component, which closely meet to the rest of nonlinearity gravimeter drifts, is partially compensated by the equipment. This factor is very important in the case of gravimetric monitoring or observations, when midrange anomalies are the target ones. For the examined gravimeters, amplitudes' deviations, associated with this parameter may reach 10 μGals. Various transportation modes - were performed by walking (softest mode), lift (vertical overload), vehicle (horizontal overloads), boat (vertical plus horizontal overloads) and helicopter. The survey quality was compared by the variance of the measurement results and internal convergence of series. The measurement results variance (from ±2 to ±4 μGals) and its

  1. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites.

    PubMed

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  2. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites

    PubMed Central

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C.; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:27471499

  3. Method of processing a high-boiling fraction obtained in the cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, B.; Lang, U.; Wernicke, H.J.

    1981-01-13

    A process for the treatment of a hydrocarbon fraction having a boiling point range beginning above 200* C. and obtained in the cracking of hydrocarbons, in which the polymeric component resulting from the cracking pyrolysis is removed and the remaining polymer-free hydrocarbon is subjected to hydrogenation under such reaction conditions that the product is high in monoaromatic components while the polyaromatics are removed therefrom.

  4. Molecular mechanics-valence bond method for planar conjugated hydrocarbon cations.

    PubMed

    Hall, Katherine F; Tokmachev, Andrei M; Bearpark, Michael J; Boggio-Pasqua, Martial; Robb, Michael A

    2007-10-07

    We present an extension of the molecular mechanics-valence bond (MMVB) hybrid method to study ground and excited states of planar conjugated hydrocarbon cations. Currently, accurate excited state calculations on these systems are limited to expensive ab initio studies of smaller systems: up to 15 active electrons in 16 pi orbitals with complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) theory using high symmetry. The new MMVB extension provides a faster, cheaper treatment to investigate larger cation systems with more than 24 active orbitals. Extension requires both new matrix elements and new parameters: In this paper we present both, for the limited planar case. The scheme is tested for the planar radical cations of benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene. Calculated MMVB relative energies are in good agreement with CASSCF results for equilibrium geometries on the ground and first excited states, and conical intersections.

  5. A modified oxidative microcoulometric method for determination of sulphur in hydrocarbons containing large amounts of chlorine.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, A

    1977-01-01

    The oxidative coulometric method for trace sulphur determinations has been modified and a procedure is described which includes the elimination of the interferences caused by chlorine whilst retaining a high recovery of sulphur. The liquid hydrocarbon sample is combusted in an excess of oxygen at 1000 K followed by dilution with a proper flow of carbon monoxide at 1300 K. In this way the partial pressure of oxygen is kept small and the interfering chlorine compounds are effectively converted into hydrogen chloride which does not interfere with the coulometric titration. A recovery of sulphur of 96 +/- 1% was found for thiophene in mixtures of chlorobenzene (0-10%) and cyclohexane, thus indicating the absence of significant interference.

  6. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  7. Comparison of gravimetric and spectroscopic approaches to quantify stratum corneum removed by tape-stripping.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, D; Yang, Q; Guy, R H; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2012-09-01

    Skin surface tape-stripping is an extensively used technique to examine the distribution profile, penetration and safety of various active compounds. It is also a widely accepted method to probe skin barrier properties and more specifically, those of the stratum corneum (SC). The amount of SC removed by tape-stripping is generally determined either gravimetrically or by extraction and measurement of SC proteins. A novel infra-red densitometry (IRD) technique has recently been introduced to measure SC protein content. In the present study, IRD was investigated as an alternative method to measure the mass of SC removed by tape-stripping. Tape-stripping experiments were conducted on human volunteers. The weight of the stratum corneum removed was assessed by the gravimetric approach and by IRD. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured before and after each tape-strip. A linear correlation coefficient was obtained for the data from the gravimetric and IRD measurements (r(2)=0.65; n=240). IRD is therefore proposed as a rapid, non-destructive alternative to the gravimetric approach to estimate the amount of SC removed by tape-stripping in vivo.

  8. The inverse gravimetric problem in gravity modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanso, F.; Tscherning, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main purposes of geodesy is to determine the gravity field of the Earth in the space outside its physical surface. This purpose can be pursued without any particular knowledge of the internal density even if the exact shape of the physical surface of the Earth is not known, though this seems to entangle the two domains, as it was in the old Stoke's theory before the appearance of Molodensky's approach. Nevertheless, even when large, dense and homogeneous data sets are available, it was always recognized that subtracting from the gravity field the effect of the outer layer of the masses (topographic effect) yields a much smoother field. This is obviously more important when a sparse data set is bad so that any smoothing of the gravity field helps in interpolating between the data without raising the modeling error, this approach is generally followed because it has become very cheap in terms of computing time since the appearance of spectral techniques. The mathematical description of the Inverse Gravimetric Problem (IGP) is dominated mainly by two principles, which in loose terms can be formulated as follows: the knowledge of the external gravity field determines mainly the lateral variations of the density; and the deeper the density anomaly giving rise to a gravity anomaly, the more improperly posed is the problem of recovering the former from the latter. The statistical relation between rho and n (and its inverse) is also investigated in its general form, proving that degree cross-covariances have to be introduced to describe the behavior of rho. The problem of the simultaneous estimate of a spherical anomalous potential and of the external, topographic masses is addressed criticizing the choice of the mixed collection approach.

  9. Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream

    DOEpatents

    Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

  10. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  11. The Gravimetric Analysis of Nickel Using a Microwave Oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmosini, Nadia; Ghoreshy, Sanaz; Koether, Marina C.

    1997-08-01

    The procedure for the gravimetric quantitative analysis of the percent of nickel in steel has been modified to include the use of a microwave oven. Experiments performed with the microwave oven gave an average recovery of 99.9+0.3% whereas the conventional method gave a value of 99.5+0.6%. The Ni(DMG)2 samples, which were digested and dried in the microwave oven, showed no physical difference indicating that there was no chemical modification of the precipitate due to the microwave radiation. The microwave oven proved to be very useful for time efficiency, not only for the digestion and heating of the steel ore, but also for the drying of the ore, the crucibles, and the Ni(DMG)2 precipitate. The most significant advantages occur with the cooling time. However, it is not suggested that the entire experiment be performed with the microwave since constant attention, which is required with the microwave drying method, is not necessary for the conventional oven method. Therefore, in order to be more time effective, thought should be given as to which part of the method should be performed with the microwave and which should be performed with the conventional oven.

  12. Method for reducing the sulfur content of a sulfur-containing hydrocarbon stream

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2004-12-28

    The sulfur content of a liquid hydrocarbon stream is reduced under mild conditions by contracting a sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon stream with transition metal particles containing the transition metal in a zero oxidation state under conditions sufficient to provide a hydrocarbon product having a reduced sulfur content and metal sulfide particles. The transition metal particles can be produced in situ by adding a transition metal precursor, e.g., a transition metal carbonyl compound, to the sulfur-containing liquid feed stream and sonicating the feed steam/transition metal precursor combination under conditions sufficient to produce the transition metal particles.

  13. Interpretation of Gravimetric and Aeromagnetic Data of the Tecoripa Chart in Southeast Sonora, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Retama, S.; Montaño-Del Cid, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Tecoripa chart H12-D64 is located southeast of the state of Sonora, México, south of Arizona. The geology is represented by sedimentary rocks of the Ordovician and Triassic, volcanic rocks of the Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary, intrusive rocks from the Upper Cretaceous- Tertiary and sedimentary rocks of the Cenozoic. In this paper a gravimetric study was conducted to determine the configuration and depth of the basement and to develop a structural model of the subsurface. For this purpose a consistent gravimetric survey in 3 profiles was conducted. To complement this study, gravimetric data obtained by INEGI (96 gravimetric stations spaced every 4000 m) that correspond to a regional survey was also used. The two sets of data were corrected and processed with the WinGLink software. The profiles were then modeled using the Talwani method. 4 Profiles corresponding to the gravimetric survey and 5 data profiles from INEGI were modeled. Aeromagnetic data from the total field of Tecoripa chart were also processed. The digital information was integrated and processed by generating a data grid. Processes applied to data consisted of reduction to the pole, regional-residual separation and upward continuations. In general, the obtained structural models show intrusive bodies associated with well-defined high gravimetric and magnetic and low gravimetric and magnetic are associated with basins and sedimentary rocks. The obtained geological models show the basement represented by volcanic rocks of the Tarahumara Formation from the Upper Cretaceous which are in contact with sedimentary rocks from the Barranca Group from Upper Cretaceous and limestones from the Middle Ordovician. Both volcanic and sedimentary rocks are intruded by granodiorite- granite with ages of the Tertiary-Oligocene. Based on the superficial geology as well as in the configuration of the basement and the obtained structural model the existence of faults with NW-SE orientation that originate Horst and

  14. Method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide within a reformer 10 is disclosed. According to the method, a stream including an oxygen-containing gas is directed adjacent to a first vessel 18 and the oxygen-containing gas is heated. A stream including unburned fuel is introduced into the oxygen-containing gas stream to form a mixture including oxygen-containing gas and fuel. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and unburned fuel is directed tangentially into a partial oxidation reaction zone 24 within the first vessel 18. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and fuel is further directed through the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 to produce a heated reformate stream including hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide. Steam may also be mixed with the oxygen-containing gas and fuel, and the reformate stream from the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 directed into a steam reforming zone 26. High- and low-temperature shift reaction zones 64,76 may be employed for further fuel processing.

  15. Method and apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H.J.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for converting hydrocarbon fuel or an alcohol into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide. The apparatus includes a first vessel having a partial oxidation reaction zone and a separate steam reforming reaction zone that is distinct from the partial oxidation reaction zone. The first vessel has a first vessel inlet at the partial oxidation reaction zone and a first vessel outlet at the steam reforming zone. The reformer also includes a helical tube extending about the first vessel. The helical tube has a first end connected to an oxygen-containing source and a second end connected to the first vessel at the partial oxidation reaction zone. Oxygen gas from an oxygen-containing source can be directed through the helical tube to the first vessel. A second vessel having a second vessel inlet and second vessel outlet is annularly disposed about the first vessel. The helical tube is disposed between the first vessel and the second vessel and gases from the first vessel can be directed through second vessel.

  16. Alternative normalization method of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pollution level recorded by tree bark.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuli; Wang, Qiuquan; Yang, Limin; Li, Zhenji; Satake, Kenichi; Tsunoda, Kin-Ichi

    2006-10-01

    An alternative normalization method was developed for evaluating atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pollution level when using tree bark as a passive sampling medium. Perylene (PER), which mainly stems from natural biogenic processes, was proposed as a "natural internal compound" (NIC) of atmospheric PAHs accumulation processes from air into the bark, and a concentration ratio of target PAH to PER (RPAH/PER) was used to minimize the uncertainty in the evaluation of atmospheric PAHs pollution level. Systematic investigation of the effects of intrinsic bark characteristics and extrinsic seasonal meteorological conditions on the partition processes of atmospheric PAHs indicated that RPAH/PER is as an alternative index as compared to bark mass concentration (BMCPAH, ng/g dry bark), lipid mass concentration (LMCPAH, ng/g lipid of bark), and area mass concentration (AMCPAH, ng/m2 surface area of bark) for the evaluation of atmospheric PAHs pollution and that it allows more flexible sampling of tree barks. Clearly, the methodology should be expected to be useful for the objective evaluation of atmospheric pollution levels of other persistent organic pollutants when using tree bark and other passive sampling media if corresponding NICs are found in the future.

  17. Study of the profile of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric particles (PM 10) using multivariate methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallarosa, Juliana Braga; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Pires, Marçal; Fachel, Jandyra

    The scope of the present study is to identify and quantify the main sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Candiota region, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Four sampling sites at a distance of 50 km from the emission source were selected: Aceguá, Aeroporto, 8 de Agosto and Pedras Altas. Samples were collected from February 2001 to October 2001, using an HV PM 10 sampler for high volumes during a continuous period of 24 h every 15 days. The filters containing the particulate matter were extracted with dichloromethane in soxhlet and later analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The average concentrations of PAHs varied from 0.051 to 1.791 ng m -3. The analysis of their distribution amongst the main emission sources was done through the diagnosis of concentration ratios of PAHs, as well as using statistical methods like factor analysis. The statistical analysis separated the 13 compounds studied in 3 Factors, grouping under Factor 1 emissions from the combustion of coal and wood, under Factor 2 vehicular emissions from the combustion of diesel oil and gasoline and under Factor 3 emissions from unburned diesel oil and gasoline.

  18. Method And Apparatus For Converting Hydrocarbon Fuel Into Hydrogen Gas And Carbon Dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2000-09-26

    A method is disclosed for synthesizing hydrogen gas from hydrocarbon fuel. A first mixture of steam and a first fuel is directed into a first tube 208 to subject the first mixture to a first steam reforming reaction in the presence of a first catalyst 214. A stream of oxygen-containing gas is pre-heated by transferring heat energy from product gases. A second mixture of the pre-heated oxygen-containing gas and a second fuel is directed into a second tube 218 disposed about the first tube 208 to subject the second mixture to a partial oxidation reaction and to provide heat energy for transfer to the first tube 208. A first reaction reformate from the first tube 208 and a second reaction reformate from the second tube 218 are directed into a third tube 224 disposed about the second tube 218 to subject the first and second reaction reformates to a second steam reforming reaction, wherein heat energy is transferred to the third tube 224 from the second tube 218.

  19. A simultaneous analysis method of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nicotine, cotinine and metals in human hair.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenjiang; Wang, Bin; Ge, Shufang; Yan, Lailai; Liu, Yingying; Li, Zhiwen; Ren, Aiguo

    2016-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nicotine, cotinine, and metals in human hair have been used as important environmental exposure markers. We aimed to develop a simple method to simultaneously analyze these pollutants using a small quantity of hair. The digestion performances of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) for human hair were compared. Various solvents or their mixtures including n-hexane (HEX), dichloromethane (DCM) and trichloromethane (TCM), HEX:DCM32 (3/2) and HEX:TCM73 (7/3) were adopted to extract organics. The recoveries of metals were determined under an optimal operation of digestion and extraction. Our results showed that TMAH performed well in dissolving human hair and even better than NaOH. Overall, the recoveries for five solutions were acceptable for PAHs, nicotine in the range of 80%-110%. Except for HEX, other four extraction solutions had acceptable extraction efficiency for cotinine from HEX:TCM73 (88 ± 4.1%) to HEX:DCM32 (100 ± 2.8%). HEX:DCM32 was chosen as the optimal solvent in consideration of its extraction efficiency and lower density than water. The recoveries of 12 typical major or trace metals were mainly in the range of 90%-110% and some of them were close to 100%. In conclusion, the simultaneous analysis of PAHs, nicotine, cotinine, and metals was feasible. Our study provided a simple and low-cost technique for environmental epidemiological studies.

  20. Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in raw menhaden fish oil using fluorescence spectroscopy: Method development.

    PubMed

    Pena, Edwin A; Ridley, Lauren M; Murphy, Wyatt R; Sowa, John R; Bentivegna, Carolyn S

    2015-09-01

    Raw menhaden fish oil was developed for biomonitoring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using fluorescence spectroscopy. Menhaden (Genus Brevoortia) were collected in 2010 and/or 2011 from Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA; James River, Virginia, USA; Vermillion Bay, Louisiana, USA (VBLA); and Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA (BBLA). Barataria Bay, Louisiana received heavy oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Method development included determining optimal wavelengths for PAH detection, fish oil matrix interferences, and influence of solvent concentration on extraction. Results showed that some fish oils contained high molecular weight PAH-like compounds in addition to other fluorescent compounds such as albumin and vitamin A and vitamin E. None of these naturally occurring compounds interfered with detection of high molecular weight PAHs. However, data suggested that the lipid component of fish oil was altering fluorescence spectra by supporting the formation of PAH excimers. For example, the most intense excitation wavelength for hydroxypyrene shifted from Ex285/Em430 to Ex340/Em430. Comparison of Deepwater Horizon crude oil and fish oil spectra indicated that some fish oils contained crude oil-like PAHs. Using wavelengths of Ex360/Em430, fish oil concentrations were calculated as 3.92 μg/g, 0.61 μg/g, and 0.14 μg/g for a Delaware Bay sample, BBLA 2011, and VBLA 2011, respectively. Overall, these results supported using menhaden fish oil to track PAH exposures spatially and temporally.

  1. Potential of preliminary test methods to predict biodegradation performance of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil.

    PubMed

    Aichberger, H; Hasinger, Marion; Braun, Rudolf; Loibner, Andreas P

    2005-03-01

    Preliminary tests at different scales such as degradation experiments (laboratory) in shaking flasks, soil columns and lysimeters as well as in situ respiration tests (field) were performed with soil from two hydrocarbon contaminated sites. Tests have been evaluated in terms of their potential to provide information on feasibility, degradation rates and residual concentration of bioremediation in the vadose zone. Sample size, costs and duration increased with experimental scale in the order shaking flasks - soil columns - lysimeter - in situ respiration tests, only time demand of respiration tests was relatively low. First-order rate constants observed in degradation experiments exhibited significant differences between both, different experimental sizes and different soils. Rates were in line with type and history of contamination at the sites, but somewhat overestimated field rates particularly in small scale experiments. All laboratory experiments allowed an estimation of residual concentrations after remediation. In situ respiration tests were found to be an appropriate pre-testing and monitoring tool for bioventing although residual concentrations cannot be predicted from in situ respiration tests. Moreover, this method does not account for potential limitations that might hamper biodegradation in the longer term but only reflects the actual degradation potential when the test is performed.

  2. Analytical method development using functionalized polysulfone membranes for the determination of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

    PubMed

    Nuhu, Abdulmumin A; Basheer, Chanbasha; Abu-Thabit, Nedal Y; Alhooshani, Khalid; Al-Arfaj, Abdul Rahman

    2011-12-15

    In this study, functionalized polysulfone membrane has been utilized as a sorbent for the extraction of chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) in water samples. Two different functionalized polysulfones (i) phosphonic acid functionalized polysulfone (PPSU-A) with different forms (cross-linked and non cross-linked) membranes and (ii) phosphonic ester functionalized polysulfone (PPSU-E) with different forms (cross-linked and non cross-linked) were evaluated for the extraction of CHCs in water. A 10 ml of spiked water sample was extracted with 50mg piece of the functionalized membrane. After extraction, the membrane was desorbed by organic solvent and the extract was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Eight CHCs, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB), 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (1,2,3-TCB), 1,1,2,3,4,4-hexachloro-1,3-butadiene (HCBD), 1,2,4-trichloro-3-methylbenzene (TCMB), 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene (1,2,3,4-TeCB), 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (1,2,4,5-TeCB), pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were used as model compounds. Experimental parameters such as extraction time, desorption time, types of polymer membrane as well the nature of desorption solvent were optimized. Using optimum extraction conditions calibration curves were linear with coefficients of determination between 0.9954 and 0.9999 over wide range of concentrations (0.05-100 μgl(-1)). The method detection limits (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were in the range of 0.4-3.9 ng l(-1). The proposed method was evaluated for the determination of CHCs in drinking water samples.

  3. A Simple Method for Estimation of Dielectric Constants and Polarizabilities of Nonpolar and Slightly Polar Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panuganti, Sai R.; Wang, Fei; Chapman, Walter G.; Vargas, Francisco M.

    2016-07-01

    Many of the liquids that are used as electrical insulators are nonpolar or slightly polar petroleum-derived hydrocarbons, such as the ones used for cable and/or transformer oils. In this work, semi-empirical expressions with no adjustable parameters for the dielectric constant and the polarizability of nonpolar and slightly polar hydrocarbons and their mixtures are proposed and validated. The expressions that were derived using the Vargas-Chapman One-Third rule require the mass density and the molecular weight of the substance of interest. The equations were successfully tested for various hydrocarbons and polymers with dipole moments <0.23 and densities from 500 to 1200 kg\\cdot hbox {m}^{-3}. The predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data in a wide range of temperatures and pressures. The proposed expressions eliminate the need of extensive experimental data and require less input parameters compared to existing correlations.

  4. A semi-micro Soxhlet extraction method for the determination of extractable particulate organic matter and selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.; Gundel, L.A.; Wang, L.

    1989-02-01

    A semi-micro-Soxhlet extraction method has been developed for the determination of extractable particulate organic matter and selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in samples of particulate matter collected in homes in which concentrations are about 10 ..mu..g-m/sup /minus/3/ or more. The method involves a sequential extraction in a micro-Soxhlet apparatus with dichloromethane (DCM) followed by an optimal extraction with acetone (ACE). The extracts are then filtered in a specially developed semi-micro filtration/evaporation apparatus and brought to a final volume of 1.0 ml for extract weight determination. An aliquot of the DCM fraction is then analyzed for selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) using fluorescence detection for high sensitivity. 7 refs.

  5. Method and device for preparing a fluid hydrocarbon product from coal

    SciTech Connect

    den Otter, J.L.

    1984-11-20

    Coal is continuously fed into an extruder and reacts therein at elevated pressure and temperature and possibly in the presence of a catalyst with hydrogen and/or hydrogen containing compounds added to the contents of the extruder on at least one spot situated at a distance of at least three times the inner diameter of the extruder in front of the end of the screw. From the reaction product leaving the extruder hydrocarbons which are fluid under normal conditions are separated. Part of these hydrocarbons which are liquid under normal conditions may be recycled to the extruder.

  6. A theoretical study of the interference from chlorine in the oxidative coulometric method for trace determination of sulphur in hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, A

    1975-12-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the interference from chlorine in the oxidative coulometric method for trace sulphur determinations. A computer program (SOLGAS), based on the free-energy minimization principle, has been used to predict equilibrium compositions of the products resulting from combustion of a hydrocarbon sample containing sulphur and chlorine. The theoretical possibilities of overcoming the interference from chlorine and maintaining a high recovery of sulphur are described.

  7. Use of thermal desorption/gas chromatography as a performance-based screening method for petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, P.J. |; Crandall, K.; Dawson, L.; Kottenstette, R.; Wade, M. |

    1996-08-01

    Thermal desorption/gas chromatography (TD/GC) was used to screen soil samples on site for total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content during a RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI). It proved to be a rapid, cost- effective tool for detecting non-aromatic mineral oil in soil. The on- site TD/GC results correlated well with those generated at an off- site laboratory for samples analyzed in accordance with EPA Method 418.1.

  8. Apparatus and method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen from water and from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Willms, R. Scott; Birdsell, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    Apparatus and method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen from water and from hydrocarbon feed material. The feed material is caused to flow over a heated catalyst which fosters the water-gas shift reaction (H.sub.2 O+COH.sub.2 +CO.sub.2) and the methane steam reforming reaction (CH.sub.4 +H.sub.2 O3 H.sub.2 +CO). Both of these reactions proceed only to partial completion. However, by use of a Pd/Ag membrane which is exclusively permeable to hydrogen isotopes in the vicinity of the above reactions and by maintaining a vacuum on the permeate side of the membrane, product hydrogen isotopes are removed and the reactions are caused to proceed further toward completion. A two-stage palladium membrane reactor was tested with a feed composition of 28% CQ.sub.4, 35% Q.sub.2 O (where Q=H, D, or T), and 31% Ar in 31 hours of continuous operation during which 4.5 g of tritium were processed. Decontamination factors were found to increase with decreasing inlet rate. The first stage was observed to have a decontamination factor of approximately 200, while the second stage had a decontamination factor of 2.9.times.10.sup.6. The overall decontamination factor was 5.8.times.10.sup.8. When a Pt/.alpha.-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalyst is employed, decoking could be performed without catalyst degradation. However, by adjusting the carbon to oxygen ratio of the feed material with the addition of oxygen, coking could be altogether avoided.

  9. Sampling and analytical method development and hand wipe measurements of dermal exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Boeniger, Mark; Neumeister, Charles; Booth-Jones, Angela

    2008-07-01

    This article describes the laboratory assessment of a hand and surface wipe sampling method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The analytical method employed extraction of the wipe samples into dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) flourometric detection of pyrene, a predominant PAH in used gasoline engine oils (UGEO). Recovery of pyrene was evaluated for two different sampling media by first contaminating the hands of a small number of volunteers with UGEO, followed by applying a small amount of corn oil to the palms, and by wiping the skin with a Whatman cellulostic filter paper or a polyester fabric wipe (i.e., Alpha wipes). In summary, using either Whatman or Alpha wipes, the mean recovery of pyrene from the UGEO that was applied to the hands and contained within three consecutive wipes was 69% and 54%, respectively. However, the relative recovery of the first to second wipe was on average 47% and 75% for the two media, respectively. These results indicate that the Alpha wipes were more efficient at recovering pyrene in the first wipe but less efficient overall when all three consecutive samples were included. Even though this sampling was performed in a controlled laboratory environment, the minimum and maximum amount of pyrene recovered in the individual composite samples using either method spanned a range of twofold. Overall, intra-and interpersonal variability, as measured by coefficient of variation, were 22% and 19%, respectively, and were not statistically different by type of media used. This method was used in a pilot field survey to sample the hands of 18 automotive repair technicians and 18 office workers. Detectable amounts of pyrene (>0.2 microg/sample) were found on the hands of 61% and 0% of these two groups, respectively, with the highest measured quantity equal to 1.06 microg. Samples from the upper surfaces of automobile motors were generally low to nondetectable (<0.027 microg/sample), while

  10. A detailed gravimetric geoid from North America to Eurasia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, S. F.; Strange, W. E.; Marsh, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed gravimetric geoid of the United States, North Atlantic, and Eurasia, which was computed from a combination of satellite derived and surface gravity data, is presented. The precision of this detailed geoid is + or - 2 to + or - 3 m in the continents but may be in the range of 5 to 7 m in those areas where data is sparse. Comparisons of the detailed gravimetric geoid with results of Rapp, Fischer, and Rice for the United States, Bomford in Europe, and Heiskanen and Fischer in India are presented. Comparisons are also presented with geoid heights from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, and Europe.

  11. MODELS AND METHODS FOR PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON RISK ASSESSMENT: ONSITE, LUSTRISK, AND HSSM

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA has developed three tiers of models for analysis of fuel releases from underground storage tank (UST) systems: 1) OnSite; 2) LUSTRisk, and 3) the Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM). The tiered approach to modeling allows users to select a model based upon the amoun...

  12. A Monte Carlo simulation method for assessing biotransformation effects on groundwater fuel hydrocarbon plume lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, Walt W.

    2001-02-01

    Biotransformation of dissolved groundwater hydrocarbon plumes emanating from leaking underground fuel tanks should, in principle, result in plume length stabilization over relatively short distances, thus diminishing the environmental risk. However, because the behavior of hydrocarbon plumes is usually poorly constrained at most leaking underground fuel tank sites in terms of release history, groundwater velocity, dispersion, as well as the biotransformation rate, demonstrating such a limitation in plume length is problematic. Biotransformation signatures in the aquifer geochemistry, most notably elevated bicarbonate, may offer a means of constraining the relationship between plume length and the mean biotransformation rate. In this study, modeled plume lengths and spatial bicarbonate differences among a population of synthetic hydrocarbon plumes, generated through Monte Carlo simulation of an analytical solute transport model, are compared to field observations from six underground storage tank (UST) sites at military bases in California. Simulation results indicate that the relationship between plume length and the distribution of bicarbonate is best explained by biotransformation rates that are consistent with ranges commonly reported in the literature. This finding suggests that bicarbonate can indeed provide an independent means for evaluating limitations in hydrocarbon plume length resulting from biotransformation.

  13. Complex Exploration of Hydrocarbon Deposits on Arctic Shelf with Seismic, Electric Prospection and Electrochemical Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palamarchuk, Vasily; Holmyanskii, Mihail; Glinskaya, Nadezhda; Mishchenko, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Article describes basic principles of seismic, electric prospection and electrochemical data complexation, received on the same research objects. The goal of our exploration works is complex exploration of hydrocarbon deposits on arctic shelf. Complex is based on ion-selective electrodes for detection of heavy metal complex anomalies in sea…

  14. Subtask 1.20 - Development of Methods to Determine the Environmental Availability of PAHs, PCBs, and Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Hawthorne

    2007-06-30

    Three methods to determine the bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were modified and developed for application to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Water/XAD desorption and selective supercritical fluid extraction methods were developed to determine the rapidly-released fraction of PCBs from contaminated soils and sediments. A method to determine PCBs in sediment pore water based on solid-phase microextraction was also developed that is capable of determining low pg/mL concentrations with water samples as small as 1.5 mL.

  15. Seismic and gravimetric monitoring of deep creep in rock slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückl, E.; Pregesbauer, M.; Ullrich, C.

    2003-04-01

    Deep creep of rock slopes is frequently observed in high mountain areas. Over a time span of some thousand years many of these slopes developed according the pattern of a "Sackung" and obtained a stable equilibrium at present. However, there are also examples of deep creep changing unexpectedly to a rapid and catastrophic sliding motion. The intention of the seismic and gravimetric monitoring presented here is dedicated to the prediction of this change from deep creep to rapid sliding. During IDNDR several mass movements were investigated in Austria by geodetic (Brunner et. al., 2000), geophysical (Brückl, 2001) and remote sensing methods (Rott et. al., 2000). For the monitoring program we selected two of these rock slopes, which represent deep creep in an active and rather early state (Gradenbach, Carinthia and Hochmais-Atemskopf, Tyrol). Even there is no imminent danger, we cannot exclude a transition to a rapid and catastrophic rock slide for these slopes in future time. The two rock slopes are also monitored by geodetic methods by other organizations. Deep creep in rock slopes is accompanied by the development of cracks and may generate low magnitude earthquakes. The monitoring of these events supplies significant and unique information about the state and process of deep creep. The monitoring time we realized on the two rock slopes (Gradenbach and Hochmais-Atemskopf) comprises a total of 30 d with up to 10 seismic stations. At an average about one event per day was detected and localized. Magnitudes and seismic moments of the events and their pattern in space-time will be shown. Irreversible displacements associated with the seismic events are compared with the displacements measured by geodetic methods and the seismic efficiency is estimated. The ground water level belongs to the most important factors influencing the process of deep creep in rock slopes. Although it can be measured in boreholes, there are good reasons to develop and apply appropriate

  16. Evaluation of gravimetric techniques to estimate the microvascular filtration coefficient.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Laine, G A; Stewart, R H; Quick, C M

    2011-06-01

    Microvascular permeability to water is characterized by the microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)). Conventional gravimetric techniques to estimate K(f) rely on data obtained from either transient or steady-state increases in organ weight in response to increases in microvascular pressure. Both techniques result in considerably different estimates and neither account for interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return. We therefore developed a theoretical framework to evaluate K(f) estimation techniques by 1) comparing conventional techniques to a novel technique that includes effects of interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return, 2) evaluating the ability of conventional techniques to reproduce K(f) from simulated gravimetric data generated by a realistic interstitial fluid balance model, 3) analyzing new data collected from rat intestine, and 4) analyzing previously reported data. These approaches revealed that the steady-state gravimetric technique yields estimates that are not directly related to K(f) and are in some cases directly proportional to interstitial compliance. However, the transient gravimetric technique yields accurate estimates in some organs, because the typical experimental duration minimizes the effects of interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return. Furthermore, our analytical framework reveals that the supposed requirement of tying off all draining lymphatic vessels for the transient technique is unnecessary. Finally, our numerical simulations indicate that our comprehensive technique accurately reproduces the value of K(f) in all organs, is not confounded by interstitial storage and lymphatic return, and provides corroboration of the estimate from the transient technique.

  17. Decomposition of Copper (II) Sulfate Pentahydrate: A Sequential Gravimetric Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Arlo D.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an improved experiment of the thermal dehydration of copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate. The improvements described here are control of the temperature environment and a quantitative study of the decomposition reaction to a thermally stable oxide. Data will suffice to show sequential gravimetric analysis. (Author/SA)

  18. Determination of Phosphates by the Gravimetric Quimociac Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Lee Alan

    2008-01-01

    The determination of phosphates by the classic quimociac gravimetric technique was used successfully as a laboratory experiment in our undergraduate analytical chemistry course. Phosphate-containing compounds are dissolved in acid and converted to soluble orthophosphate ion (PO[subscript 4][superscript 3-]). The soluble phosphate is easily…

  19. 40 CFR 1065.290 - PM gravimetric balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PM gravimetric balance. 1065.290 Section 1065.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.290 PM...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.290 - PM gravimetric balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false PM gravimetric balance. 1065.290 Section 1065.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.290 PM...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.290 - PM gravimetric balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false PM gravimetric balance. 1065.290 Section 1065.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.290 PM...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.290 - PM gravimetric balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false PM gravimetric balance. 1065.290 Section 1065.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.290 PM...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.290 - PM gravimetric balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false PM gravimetric balance. 1065.290 Section 1065.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.290 PM...

  4. Gravimetric Determination of Sediment in Turbine Engine Lubricating Oils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    noncombustible sediment present in aircraft turbine engine lubricating oils . Both MIL-L-7808 and MIL-L-23699 lubricants were investigated. These...temperature. When these oils were heated to 140 F, they easily passed through a silver membrane filter. A test procedure for the gravimetric measurement of particulate contamination in turbine engine lubricating oils is proposed. (Author)

  5. Resonant efficiency improvement design of piezoelectric biosensor for bacteria gravimetric sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jang-Zern; Chen, Ching-Jung; Shie, Dung-Ting; Liu, Jen-Tsai

    2014-01-01

    The piezoelectric biosensor have been widely used in ultra-small mass detection of biomolecular, based on PZT piezoelectric material can create a variety of compositions geometrically; it could widely develop a high-frequency resonator and measure the change of the slightest mass while improve the limited detection simultaneously. Therefore, the piezoelectric biosensor of this study was fabricated by a spin-coating method and backside etching process for improving the characteristic of piezoelectric biosensor. The result exhibited that the 250 μm × 250 μm working size has the most favorable piezoelectric characteristic. The tunability was approximately 38.56 % and it showed that reducing the substrate thickness could obtain a clear resonance signal in a range of 60 to 380 MHz. In theory calculated for gravimetric sensing, it could achieve 0.1 ng sensing sensitivity. In gravimetric sensing, the sensing range was between 50,000~100,000 CFU/ml. Sensing range was lower in clinical urinary tract infection (100,000 CFU/ml), thus demonstrating its usefulness for preventive medicine. It can understand the piezoelectric sensor of this study has potential application in the future for biomedical gravimetric sensing.

  6. Gravimetric determination of beryllium with sodium oxinate.

    PubMed

    Hundekar, A M; Umapathy, P; Sen, D N

    1978-04-01

    Sodium oxinate is found to precipitate Be(II) quantitatively in the pH range 7.5-8.2. The complex has the composition Be(2)O(C(9)H(6)NO)(2).2H(2)O, is stable and can be weighed directly after drying at 105-110 degrees . A method for the estimation of Be(II) and its separation from interfering elements is described. The monohydrate has been prepared from the dihydrate and characterized. The results show the presence of hydroxyl bridges in the monohydrate. Methods using various organic reagents for the direct estimation of beryllium in ores and alloys have been examined and it is found that 4-chloro-2,5-dimethoxyacetoacetanilide gives the best results. A method for the determination of be(II) in beryl without prior separation of Fe(III) and Al(III) is described.

  7. Interatomic Potential for Hydrocarbons on the Basis of the Modified Embedded-Atom Method with Bond Order (MEAM-BO).

    PubMed

    Mun, Sungkwang; Bowman, Andrew L; Nouranian, Sasan; Gwaltney, Steven R; Baskes, Michael I; Horstemeyer, Mark F

    2017-02-23

    In this paper, we develop a new modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential that includes the bond order (MEAM-BO) to describe the energetics of unsaturated hydrocarbons (double and triple carbon bonds) and also develop improved parameters for saturated hydrocarbons from those of our previous work. Such quantities like bond lengths, bond angles, and atomization energies at 0 K, dimer molecule interactions, rotational barriers, and the pressure-volume-temperature relationships of dense systems of small molecules give a comparable or more accurate property relative to experimental and first-principles data than the classical reactive force fields REBO and ReaxFF. Our extension of the MEAM potential for unsaturated hydrocarbons (MEAM-BO) is a step toward developing more reliable and accurate polymer simulations with their associated structure-property relationships, such as reactive multicomponent (organic/metal) systems, polymer-metal interfaces, and nanocomposites. When the constants for the BO are zero, MEAM-BO reduces to the original MEAM potential. As such, this MEAM-BO potential describing the interaction of organic materials with metals within the same MEAM formalism is a significant advancement for computational materials science.

  8. Method for forming a potential hydrocarbon sensor with low sensitivity to methane and CO

    DOEpatents

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Brosha, Eric L.; Garzon, Fernando

    2003-12-02

    A hydrocarbon sensor is formed with an electrolyte body having a first electrolyte surface with a reference electrode depending therefrom and a metal oxide electrode body contained within the electrolyte body and having a first electrode surface coplanar with the first electrolyte surface. The sensor was formed by forming a sintered metal-oxide electrode body and placing the metal-oxide electrode body within an electrolyte powder. The electrolyte powder with the metal-oxide electrode body was pressed to form a pressed electrolyte body containing the metal-oxide electrode body. The electrolyte was removed from an electrolyte surface above the metal-oxide electrode body to expose a metal-oxide electrode surface that is coplanar with the electrolyte surface. The electrolyte body and the metal-oxide electrode body were then sintered to form the hydrocarbon sensor.

  9. Apparatus and methods for direct conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons to liquids

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2006-04-25

    A chemical reactor for direct conversion of hydrocarbons includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell and a solid oxide electrochemical cell in fluid communication therewith. The discharge plasma cell comprises a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. The electrochemical cell comprises a mixed-conducting solid oxide electrolyte membrane tube positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, and a gas inlet tube for feeding oxygen containing gas to the porous cathode. An inlet is provided for feeding hydrocarbons to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a light source for directing ultraviolet light into the discharge plasma cell and the electrochemical cell.

  10. Method of Generating Hydrocarbon Reagents from Diesel, Natural Gas and Other Logistical Fuels

    DOEpatents

    Herling, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Aardahl, Chris L [Richland, WA; Rozmiarek, Robert T [Middleton, WI; Rappe, Kenneth G [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Holladay, Jamelyn D [Kennewick, WA

    2008-10-14

    The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

  11. Method of generating hydrocarbon reagents from diesel, natural gas and other logistical fuels

    DOEpatents

    Herling, Darrell R.; Aardahl, Chris L.; Rozmiarek, Robert T.; Rappe, Kenneth G.; Wang, Yong; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2010-06-29

    The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

  12. Prediction of ecotoxicity of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils using physicochemical parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.C.L.; Chai, E.Y.; Chu, K.K.; Dorn, P.B.

    1999-11-01

    The physicochemical properties of eight hydrocarbon-contaminated soils were used to predict toxicity to earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and plants. The toxicity of these preremediated soils was assessed using earthworm avoidance, survival, and reproduction and seed germination and root growth in four plant species. No-observed-effect and 25% inhibitory concentrations were determined from the earthworm and plant assays. Physical property measurements and metals analyses of the soils were conducted. Hydrocarbon contamination was characterized by total petroleum hydrocarbons, oil and grease, and GC boiling-point distribution. Univariate and multivariate statistical methods were used to examine relationships between physical and chemical properties and biological endpoints. Soil groupings based on physicochemical properties and toxicity from cluster and principal component analyses were generally similar. Correlation analysis identified a number of significant relationships between soil parameters and toxicity that were used in univariate model development. Total petroleum hydrocarbons by gas chromatography and polars were identified as predictors of earthworm avoidance and survival and seed germination, explaining 65 to 75% of the variation in the data. Asphaltenes also explained 83% of the variation in seed germination. Gravimetric total petroleum hydrocarbons explained 40% of the variation in earthworm reproduction, whereas 43% of the variation in plant root growth was explained by asphaltenes. Multivariate one-component partial least squares models, which identified predictors similar to those identified by the univariate models, were also developed for worm avoidance and survival and seed germination and had predictive powers of 42 and 29%, respectively.

  13. A rapid column technique for trapping and collecting of volatile fungal hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon derivatives.

    PubMed

    Booth, Eric; Strobel, Gary; Knighton, Berk; Sears, Joe; Geary, Brad; Avci, Recep

    2011-10-01

    A custom-made stainless steel column was designed to contain various materials that would trap the hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon derivatives during the processes of fungal fermentation ultimately yielding preparative amounts of volatile organic substances (VOCs). Trapping materials tested in the column were Carbotrap materials A and B (Supelco) as well as bentonite-shale from the oil bearing areas of Eastern Montana, the former allowed for the effective and efficient trapping of VOCs from purged cultures of Hypoxylon sp. Trapping efficiencies of various materials were measured by both gravimetric as well as proton transfer reaction mass spectroscopy with the Carbotraps A and B being 99% efficient when tested with known amounts of 1,8-cineole. Trapped fungal VOCs could effectively be removed and recovered via controlled heating of the stainless steel column followed by passage of the gases through a liquid nitrogen trap at a recovery rate of ca 65-70%. This method provides for the recovery of mg quantities of compounds normally present in the gas phase that may be needed for spectroscopy, bioassays and further separation and analysis and may have wide applicability for many other biological systems involving VOCs. Other available Carbotraps could be used for other applications.

  14. [Contrastive study of two methods("programmed temperature vaporization with back flushing" and "head space") for light hydrocarbon analysis].

    PubMed

    Xiao, T R; Cai, B; Meng, J H; Wang, P R

    2001-07-01

    Light hydrocarbon analytical method of "PTV with Back Flushing" presented here is characterized as follows: a) with "PTV" inlets temperature programmed; b) with gas line system of "Back Flushing"; c) with direct injection of oil samples. After oil sample injection, "Back Flushing" is on when light hydrocarbon components enter into analytical chromatographic column. At the same time, the temperature of inlet increases. The high temperature and "Back Flushing" blow the heavy components in the oil samples out of the analytical system. Besides, the analytical method of "Head Space" was established. Both "PTV with Back Flushing" and "Head Space" have the advantages of long column life and short analysis time. The resolution for lighter components < C9 meets the criterion of ASTM D5134-98, with the good repeatability. Ten oil samples from 6 oil areas were analysed by using the two methods. The relative deviations between the two analytical results represented by 19 geochemistry parameters were about +/- (1%-25%). The reasons for the deviation are discussed. It is pointed out that in geochemistry study it is not acceptable to combine the data obtained from two analytical methods. The analytical results obtained by injecting crude oil directly into injector are more reliable. The results obtained in "Head Space" analytical method should be calibrated when used in geochemistry study.

  15. Development of an improved analytical method for the determination of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in transformer oil.

    PubMed

    Pillai, I; Ritchie, L; Heywood, R; Wilson, G; Pahlavanpour, B; Setford, S; Saini, S

    2005-02-04

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are natural constituents of transformer oils and are essential in prolonging transformer in-service lifetime. Issues concerning PAH carcinogenicity demand methods that provide qualitative and quantitative information on the PAH composition of new and in-service oils to allow informed operational decisions to be made. However, current analytical methods focus on PAH fingerprinting, as opposed to quantitative analysis and are also cumbersome, relying on the use of large (>100 ml) volumes of organic solvents, some of which are hazardous. This paper reports a method for the improved quantification of carcinogenic PAHs in transformer oils that is both simple and repeatable. The method uses commercially available solid-phase extraction columns and millilitre volumes of relatively non-hazardous solvents. Extraction efficiencies of > or =74% were obtained for the Environmental Protection Agency priority PAHs. The method has potential for automation and high-throughput analysis and thus is of interest to industries that use transformer oils.

  16. Quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mutagenicity by classification methods based on holistic theoretical molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Papa, Ester; Marrocchi, Assunta; Minuti, Lucio; Taticchi, Aldo

    2007-03-01

    Various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), ubiquitous environmental pollutants, are recognized mutagens and carcinogens. A homogeneous set of mutagenicity data (TA98 and TA100,+S9) for 32 benzocyclopentaphenanthrenes/chrysenes was modeled by the quantitative structure-activity relationship classification methods k-nearest neighbor and classification and regression tree, using theoretical holistic molecular descriptors. Genetic algorithm provided the selection of the best subset of variables for modeling mutagenicity. The models were validated by leave-one-out and leave-50%-out approaches and have good performance, with sensitivity and specificity ranges of 90-100%. Mutagenicity assessment for these PAHs requires only a few theoretical descriptors of their molecular structure.

  17. Development and validation of a cleanup method for hydrocarbon containing samples for the analysis of semivolatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, E.W.; Stromatt, R.W.; Campbell, J.A.; Steele, M.J.; Jones, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    Samples obtained from the Hanford single shell tanks (SSTs) are contaminated with normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) as hydrostatic fluid from the sampling process or can be native to the tank waste. The contamination is usually high enough that a dilution of up to several orders of magnitude may be required before the sample can be analyzed by the conventional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methodology. This can prevent detection and measurement of organic constituents that are present at lower concentration levels. To eliminate or minimize the problem, a sample cleanup method has been developed and validated and is presented in this document.

  18. Reliability of chemotherapy preparation processes: Evaluating independent double-checking and computer-assisted gravimetric control.

    PubMed

    Carrez, Laurent; Bouchoud, Lucie; Fleury-Souverain, Sandrine; Combescure, Christophe; Falaschi, Ludivine; Sadeghipour, Farshid; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Background and objectives Centralized chemotherapy preparation units have established systematic strategies to avoid errors. Our work aimed to evaluate the accuracy of manual preparations associated with different control methods. Method A simulation study in an operational setting used phenylephrine and lidocaine as markers. Each operator prepared syringes that were controlled using a different method during each of three sessions (no control, visual double-checking, and gravimetric control). Eight reconstitutions and dilutions were prepared in each session, with variable doses and volumes, using different concentrations of stock solutions. Results were analyzed according to qualitative (choice of stock solution) and quantitative criteria (accurate, <5% deviation from the target concentration; weakly accurate, 5%-10%; inaccurate, 10%-30%; wrong, >30% deviation). Results Eleven operators carried out 19 sessions. No final preparation (n = 438) contained a wrong drug. The protocol involving no control failed to detect 1 of 3 dose errors made and double-checking failed to detect 3 of 7 dose errors. The gravimetric control method detected all 5 out of 5 dose errors. The accuracy of the doses measured was equivalent across the control methods ( p = 0.63 Kruskal-Wallis). The final preparations ranged from 58% to 60% accurate, 25% to 27% weakly accurate, 14% to 17% inaccurate and 0.9% wrong. A high variability was observed between operators. Discussion Gravimetric control was the only method able to detect all dose errors, but it did not improve dose accuracy. A dose accuracy with <5% deviation cannot always be guaranteed using manual production. Automation should be considered in the future.

  19. A detailed gravimetric geoid of North America, Eurasia, and Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, S.; Strange, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed gravimetric geoid of North America, the North Atlantic, Eurasia, and Australia computed from a combination of satellite-derived and surface 1 x 1 gravity data, is presented. Using a consistent set of parameters, this geoid is referenced to an absolute datum. The precision of this detailed geoid is + or - 2 meters in the continents but may be in the range of 5 to 7 meters in those areas where data was sparse. Comparisons of the detailed gravimetric geoid with results of Rice for the United States, Bomford and Fischer in Eurasia, and Mather in Australia are presented. Comparisons are also presented with geoid heights from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Australia.

  20. A principal-component and least-squares method for allocating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment to multiple sources

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, W.A.; Mankiewicz, P.J.; Bence, A.E.; Page, D.S.; Parker, K.R.

    1997-06-01

    A method was developed to allocate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediment samples to the PAH sources from which they came. The method uses principal-component analysis to identify possible sources and a least-squares model to find the source mix that gives the best fit of 36 PAH analytes in each sample. The method identified 18 possible PAH sources in a large set of field data collected in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, after the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, including diesel oil, diesel soot, spilled crude oil in various weathering states, natural background, creosote, and combustion products from human activities and forest fires. Spill oil was generally found to be a small increment of the natural background in subtidal sediments, whereas combustion products were often the predominant sources for subtidal PAHs near sites of past or present human activity. The method appears to be applicable to other situations, including other spills.

  1. The use of HPGPC for determination of MWD of asphalt cement - A spectrophotometric vs. gravimetric finish

    SciTech Connect

    Bishara, S.W.; McReynolds, R.L. )

    1990-07-01

    A comparison between spectrophotometric and gravimetric methods to study MWD of asphalt is presented. Spectrophotometry suffers from not detecting saturated compounds, as well as from variation of molar absorptivity during analysis. To address these shortcoming, the whole asphalt sample is fractionated, and the relative molar absorptivity determined for each fraction. Using another sample weight of the whole asphalt, the saturates are separated, and injected to get their MWD using refractive index detection. This information, when used to mathematically treat the whole asphalt distribution data, can correct the latter to include saturates as well, but can only partially account for continuous variation of the molar absorptivity.

  2. Bayesian gravimetric inversion for local crustal model refinement in the Guangdong province, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Lorenzo; Reguzzoni, Mirko; Sampietro, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of the Earth crustal structure is a fundamental subject for many geophysical applications. As a first approximation, the crust composition can be subdivided into sediments and crystalline crust; the latter, in the case of the continental crust, can be further subdivided into upper, middle and lower crust, as it is done for example in the CRUST1.0 global model. Gravimetric inversion methods, in order to guarantee the uniqueness of the solution of the inverse problem, are generally used to infer only one boundary between two layers, e.g. the crustal thickness (i.e. the Moho depth). Here a method based on a Bayesian approach is proposed to refine an already existing crustal model by combining gravimetric observations and some a priori conditions on the crustal structure. Basically the method consists in subdividing the crustal volume under investigation into voxels and in estimating a label and a mass density for each voxel in such a way that the resulting gravimetric signal is consistent with the observed one and the a priori conditions are satisfied. The label characterizes the material type of each voxel, e.g. sediments, oceanic crust, upper crust, etc. The estimation procedure is based on a simulated annealing driven by a Gibbs sampler at each iterative step. Moreover, the proposed solution allows to easily integrate seismic profiles available in the study area to further constrain the result of the gravimetric inversion. In this work the method is applied to refine the crustal model beneath the Guangdong province in the Southern China. This region has been selected for its complex geological structure (e.g. both continental and oceanic crust are present) and for the plan of building here a massive detector of neutrino and geo-neutrino flux. For the latter experiment, an accurate knowledge of the underlying crustal structure is required. The gravity signal to be inverted, at a ground level and at a medium-high spatial resolution, comes from a recent

  3. An In Silico Approach for Evaluating a Fraction-Based, Risk Assessment Method for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nina Ching Y.; Rice, Glenn E.; Teuschler, Linda K.; Colman, Joan; Yang, Raymond S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Both the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MADEP) and the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group (TPHCWG) developed fraction-based approaches for assessing human health risks posed by total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) mixtures in the environment. Both organizations defined TPH fractions based on their expected environmental fate and by analytical chemical methods. They derived toxicity values for selected compounds within each fraction and used these as surrogates to assess hazard or risk of exposure to the whole fractions. Membership in a TPH fraction is generally defined by the number of carbon atoms in a compound and by a compound's equivalent carbon (EC) number index, which can predict its environmental fate. Here, we systematically and objectively re-evaluate the assignment of TPH to specific fractions using comparative molecular field analysis and hierarchical clustering. The approach is transparent and reproducible, reducing inherent reliance on judgment when toxicity information is limited. Our evaluation of membership in these fractions is highly consistent (˜80% on average across various fractions) with the empirical approach of MADEP and TPHCWG. Furthermore, the results support the general methodology of mixture risk assessment to assess both cancer and noncancer risk values after the application of fractionation. PMID:22496687

  4. Evaluation of methods for simultaneous collection and determination of nicotine and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor air

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Kuhlman, M.R.; Wilson, N.K.

    1990-01-01

    A study was performed to determine whether one sampling system and one analytical method can be used to measure both polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nicotine. The PAH collection efficiencies for both XAD-2 and XAD-4 adsorbents are very similar, but the nicotine collection efficiency was greater for XAD-4. The spiked perdeuterated PAH were retained well in both adsorbents after exposure to more than 300 cu m of air. A two-step Soxhlet extraction, dichloromethane followed by ethylacetate, was used to remove nicotine and PAH from XAD-4. The extract was analyzed by positive chemical ionization or electron impact gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine nicotine and PAH. It is shown that one sampling system (quartz fiber filter and XAD-4 in series) and one analytical method (Soxhlet extraction and GC/MS) can be used to measure both nicotine and PAH in indoor air.

  5. Evaluation of methods for simultaneous collection and determination of nicotine and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor air

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Kuhlman, M.R. ); Wilson, N.K. )

    1990-05-01

    A study was performed to determine whether one sampling system and one analytical method can be used to collect and measure both polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nicotine. PAH collection efficiencies for both XAD-2 and XAD-4 adsorbents were very similar, but nicotine collection efficiency was greater for XAD-4. Spiked perdeuterated PAHs were retained well in both adsorbents after exposure to more than 300 m{sup 3} of air. A two-step Soxhlet extraction, dichloromethane followed by ethyl acetate, was used to remove nicotine and PAHs from XAD-4. The extract was analyzed by positive chemical ionization or electron impact gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine nicotine and PAHs. It is shown that one sampling system (quartz fiber filter and XAD-4 in series) and one analytical method (Soxhlet extraction and GC/MS) can be used for both nicotine and PAHs in indoor.

  6. [Preparation method of stalk environmental biomaterial and its sorption ability for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water].

    PubMed

    He, Jiao; Kong, Huo-Liang; Han, Jin; Gao, Yan-Zheng

    2011-01-01

    The soybean, sesame and corn stalks were pyrolyzed and charred for 8 h at 300-700 degrees C to obtain stalk environmental biomaterials. The BET specific surface areas, methylene blue, and iodine adsorption capacity of the stalk environmental biomaterials were determined. The sorption efficiency of these materials on single polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and mixing PAHs were investigated. The BET specific surface areas of stalk biomaterials enlarged, and the sorption ability on methylene blue and iodine enhanced with increasing the treatment temperature. The obtained stalk biomaterials could effectively remove the PAHs from water. For instance, 91.28%, 89.01% and 99.66% of naphthalene, acenaphthene, and phenanthrene in 32 mL water were removed by 0.01 g biomaterials obtained by soybean stalk at 700 degrees C. The removal efficiencies of biomaterials for mixed PAHs in water were in the order of phenanthrene > naphthalene > acenaphthene. However, the sorption ability of produced stalk biomaterials differed significantly, and followed the order of corn > soybeans > sesame for the removal of naphthalene and acenaphthene, and soybean > corn > sesame for phenanthrene removal in water. Results of this work would provide some insight into the reuse of crop stalks, and also open a new view on the treatment of organic polluted water utilizing biomaterials.

  7. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated water and soil samples by immunological and chromatographic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Knopp, D.; Seifert, M.; Vaeaenaenen, V.; Niessner, R.

    2000-05-15

    An immunoassay was developed that can be used for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water, landfill leachate, and soil. As test format an indirect competitive microtiter plate ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) was applied. While groundwater samples from a former manufactured gas plant site could be analyzed directly, soil and landfill leachate had to be extracted and required at least a 100-fold dilution prior to immunochemical measurement. PAHs could be recovered from fortified reference soils as well as aged field samples with high yield using 1-h ultrasonication with acetonitrile. Extraction efficiency was comparable to Soxhlet extraction and ultrasonication with tetrahydrogurane. Recovery was lower with agitation but would still be acceptable for use in an on-site field test to provide rapid, semiquantitative, and reliable test results for making environmental decisions such as identifying hot spots, site mapping, monitoring of remediation processes, and selecting site samples for laboratory analysis. Classification of ELISA data showed that it was possible to estimate the PAH contamination in soils with about 5% false positive and 5% false negative results that may have arisen from heterogeneity of samples, cross-reactivity of compounds with a similar structure, humic acids, or unknown interferences.

  8. Critical evaluation of selected methods for the isolation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from wood stove creosote

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of creosote samples from a conventional air tight residential wood burning stove and a Franklin type stove were analyzed. It was determined that these samples did contain most of those PAH identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as priority pollutants. Furthermore, it was evidenced that these compounds are present in creosote generated by the air tight stove at levels approximately twice those found in the Franklin type counterpart. The investigation also focused on the evaluation of different classical liquid, and planar chromatographic techniques as well as the introduction of a novel approach for the isolation of PAH material from creosote. It was found that adsorbents commonly employed were too difficult to standardize for routine use and that the cleanest PAH fractions were obtained by gradient elution, circular, thin layer chromatography. Finally, the potential for future applications of gradient elution, circular, thin layer chromatography was demonstrated by the separation of both polar and nonpolar components in a single chromatogram.

  9. Developing receptor-oriented methods for non-methane hydrocarbon characterisation in urban air. Part II: source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borbon, Agnès; Fontaine, Hervé; Locoge, Nadine; Veillerot, Marc; Galloo, J. C.

    The methods and the results of non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) source apportionment are described at urban scale on a spatial and temporal basis. Here, hourly ambient concentrations of nearly 40 C 2-C 9 NMHC are used. Methods are based on the knowledge of the wintertime NMHC vehicle-exhaust emission ratio generally determined by simple regression analysis taking acetylene, ethylene, propene and 1,3-butadiene as auto-exhaust tracers. The RSD of the estimated source contributions is lower than 20%; the developed receptor-oriented methods are flexible and easily transposable to other areas. In winter, vehicle-exhaust emissions explain 100% of the NMHC majority levels and even isoprene. From May to November, our models revealed the temperature-dependent contribution of additional sources (0.71< r<0.90). On the one hand, the evaporation of fuel and solvent affects the whole C 4-C 9 NMHC fraction, and fluctuates between 20% and 50%, even for a northern France urban area. On the other hand, both vehicle-exhaust and biogenic emissions control the highly photoreactive isoprene distribution whatever the site; the traffic is responsible for a third of its levels in summer. Finally, the particular behaviour of the C 2-C 4 compounds pointed out dominant contributions, generally other than traffic. Suspected sources are numerous: natural gas leakage for ethane and propane, wintertime fuel evaporation for butanes and butenes, non-automotive combustion for ethylene and acetylene. Ethane and propane also showed that long-range advective transport, responsible for background concentrations, could significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon levels with a high atmospheric residence time (from 20% to 50%).

  10. Availability and leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Controlling processes and comparison of testing methods.

    PubMed

    Roskam, Gerlinde D; Comans, Rob N J

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the availability and leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from two contaminated materials, a tar-containing asphalt granulate (Sigma16 US-EPA PAHs 3412mg/kg) and gasworks soil (SigmaPAHs 900mg/kg), by comparing results from three typical types of leaching tests: a column, sequential batch, and two different availability tests. The sequential batch test was found to largely resemble the column test. However, the leaching of particularly the larger PAHs (>5 aromatic rings) was found to be enhanced in the batch test by up to an order of magnitude, probably due to their association with large DOC (dissolved organic carbon) molecules generated by the vigorous mixing. The release of PAHs in the two availability tests, in which the leaching is facilitated by either a high concentration of DOC or Tenax resin, was similar, although the latter test was easier to perform and yielded more repeatable results. The availability was much higher than the amount leached in the column and sequential batch tests. However, biodegradation had apparently occurred in the column test and the total amount of PAHs released by either leaching or biodegradation, 9% and 26% for asphalt granulate and gasworks soil, respectively, did equal the amount leached in the availability tests. Therefore, the availability was found to provide a relevant measure of the PAH fraction that can be released from the solid phase. These results stress the importance of using the available instead of the total amount of contaminant in the risk analysis of solid materials in utilization or disposal.

  11. Magnetometric and gravimetric surveys in fault detection over Acambay System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Serrano, A.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, J.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.

    2013-05-01

    In commemoration of the centennial of the Acambay intraplate earthquake of November 19th 1912, we carry out gravimetric and magnetometric surveys to define the structure of faults caused by this event. The study area is located approximately 11 km south of Acambay, in the Acambay-Tixmadeje fault system, where we performed two magnetometric surveys, the first consisting of 17 lines with a spacing of 35m between lines and 5m between stations, and the second with a total of 12 lines with the same spacing, both NW. In addition to these two lines we performed gravimetric profiles located in the central part of each magnetometric survey, with a spacing of 25m between stations, in order to correlate the results of both techniques, the lengths of such profiles were of 600m and 550m respectively. This work describes the data processing including directional derivatives, analytical signal and inversion, by means of which we obtain results of magnetic variations and anomaly traits highly correlated with those faults. It is of great importance to characterize these faults given the large population growth in the area and settlement houses on them, which involves a high risk in the security of the population, considering that these are active faults and cannot be discard earthquakes associated with them, so it is necessary for the authorities and people have relevant information to these problem.

  12. BOREAS HYD-8 1994 Gravimetric Moss Moisture Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xuewen; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-8 team made measurements of surface hydrological processes that were collected at the Northern Study Area-Old Black Spruce (NSA-OBS) Tower Flux site in 1994 and at Joey Lake, Manitoba, to support its research into point hydrological processes and the spatial variation of these processes. The data collected may be useful in characterizing canopy interception, drip, throughfall, moss interception, drainage, evaporation, and capacity during the growing season at daily temporal resolution. This particular data set contains the gravimetric moss moisture measurements from June to September 1994. A nested spatial sampling plan was implemented to support research into spatial variations of the measured hydrological processes and ultimately the impact of these variations on modeled carbon and water budgets. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The HYD-08 1994 gravimetric moss moisture data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  13. BOREAS HYD-8 1996 Gravimetric Moss Moisture Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, Richard; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-8 team made measurements of surface hydrological processes that were collected at the southern study area-Old Black Spruce (SSA-OBS) Tower Flux site in 1996 to support its research into point hydrological processes and the spatial variation of these processes. Data collected may be useful in characterizing canopy interception, drip, throughfall, moss interception, drainage, evaporation, and capacity during the growing season at daily temporal resolution. This particular data set contains the gravimetric moss moisture measurements from July to August 1996. To collect these data, a nested spatial sampling plan was implemented to support research into spatial variations of the measured hydrological processes and ultimately the impact of these variations on modeled carbon and water budgets. These data are stored in ASCII text files. The HYD-08 1996 gravimetric moss moisture data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. A real-time polymerase chain reaction method for monitoring anaerobic, hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria based on a catabolic gene.

    PubMed

    Beller, Harry R; Kane, Staci R; Legler, Tina C; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2002-09-15

    We have developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method that can quantify hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in sediment samples based on a catabolic gene associated with the first step of anaerobic toluene and xylene degradation. The target gene, bssA, codes for the alpha-subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase. The primer-probe set for real-time PCR was based on consensus regions of bssA from four denitrifying bacterial strains; bssA sequences for two of these strains were determined during this study. The method proved to be sensitive (detection limit ca. 5 gene copies) and had a linear range of >7 orders of magnitude. We used the method to investigate how gasohol releases from leaking underground storage tanks could affect indigenous toluene-degrading bacteria. Microcosms inoculated with aquifer sediments from four different sites were incubated anaerobically with BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) and nitrate in the presence and absence of ethanol. Overall, population trends were consistent with observed toluene degradation activity: the microcosms with the most rapid toluene degradation also had the largest numbers of bssA copies. In the microcosms with the most rapid toluene degradation, numbers of bssA copies increased 100-to 1000-fold over the first 4 days of incubation, during which time most of the toluene had been consumed. These results were supported by slot blot analyses with unamplified DNA and by cloning and sequencing of putative bssA amplicons, which confirmed the real-time PCR method's specificity for bssA. Use of a companion real-time PCR method for estimating total eubacterial populations (based on 16S rDNA) indicated that, in some cases, ethanol disproportionately supported the growth of bacteria that did not contain bssA. The real-time PCR method for bssA could be a powerful tool for monitored natural attenuation of BTEX in fuel-contaminated groundwater. To our knowledge, this is the first reported molecular method that

  15. Quantitation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH4) in cocoa and chocolate samples by an HPLC-FD method.

    PubMed

    Raters, Marion; Matissek, Reinhard

    2014-11-05

    As a consequence of the PAH4 (sum of four different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, named benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, and benzo[a]pyrene) maximum levels permitted in cocoa beans and derived products as of 2013, an high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection method (HPLC-FD) was developed and adapted to the complex cocoa butter matrix to enable a simultaneous determination of PAH4. The resulting analysis method was subsequently successfully validated. This method meets the requirements of Regulation (EU) No. 836/2011 regarding analysis methods criteria for determining PAH4 and is hence most suitable for monitoring the observance of the maximum levels applicable under Regulation (EU) No. 835/2011. Within the scope of this work, a total of 218 samples of raw cocoa, cocoa masses, and cocoa butter from several sample years (1999-2012), of various origins and treatments, as well as cocoa and chocolate products were analyzed for the occurrence of PAH4. In summary, it is noted that the current PAH contamination level of cocoa products can be deemed very slight overall.

  16. Validation and uncertainty estimation of UPLC-PDA method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in concrete.

    PubMed

    Acimovic, Danka D; Nikolic, Zeljka M; Tosic, Milos S; Milovanovic, Dubravka S; Nikolic, Vladimir M; Brdaric, Tanja P; Marceta-Kaninski, Milica P

    2017-03-05

    Human exposure to persistent organic contaminants, from building materials, negatively affects people's health and overall quality of life. This paper presents the validation and uncertainty assessment of the analytical method, developed for the simultaneous determination of 16 EPA polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in solid-solid concrete by ultra-performance liquid chromatography with photo diode-array detector. Linearity of calibration curves was good over the whole range of calibration. Limits of detection varied between 0.2 and 2.9μgkg(-1). The accuracy in terms of recovery of the validated method is within the range from 54 to 106%. The developed method proved to be appropriate for analysis of PAHs and can be used for the quality control testing of concrete during the construction of new buildings, the old residences and related buildings associated with sick-building syndrome. In addition, this is the first reported method described for the evaluation of PAHs in solid-solid concrete.

  17. Determination of volatile organic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil with efficient gas-chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijing; Geppert, Helmut; Fischer, Thomas; Wieprecht, Wolfgang; Möller, Detlev

    2015-01-01

    Determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in crude oil, such as super volatile organic compounds (super VOCs) and simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is vital for targeting crude oil spill spots. In this study, a static headspace gas chromatography flame ionization detection method was established for determination of super VOCs in crude oil with both external and internal standard determination, which can be used in the field when using portable gas chromatography. Identification was done by comparing the retention time with the corresponding standards and quantitation was done with a new one-drop method. Another simplified and efficient method was performed to analyze volatile PAHs in crude oil, which can also be used in field analysis. Toluene was used as the extraction solvent for PAHs in crude oil. Method validation for both analyses was satisfactory. The result showed that n-butane and n-pentane were maximum super VOCs and naphthalene, phenanthrene and fluorene were the main PAHs in the crude oil studied. The super VOCs quantity ranged from 3 to 6% and the main PAHs consisted of 0.02-0.06% of studied crude oil.

  18. A High Throughput Method for Measuring Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Seafood Using QuEChERS Extraction and SBSE.

    PubMed

    Pfannkoch, Edward A; Stuff, John R; Whitecavage, Jacqueline A; Blevins, John M; Seely, Kathryn A; Moran, Jeffery H

    2015-01-01

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Method NMFS-NWFSC-59 2004 is currently used to quantitatively analyze seafood for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination, especially following events such as the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion that released millions of barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. This method has limited throughput capacity; hence, alternative methods are necessary to meet analytical demands after such events. Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) is an effective technique to extract trace PAHs in water and the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) extraction strategy effectively extracts PAHs from complex food matrices. This study uses SBSE to concentrate PAHs and eliminate matrix interference from QuEChERS extracts of seafood, specifically oysters, fish, and shrimp. This method provides acceptable recovery (65-138%) linear calibrations and is sensitive (LOD = 0.02 ppb, LOQ = 0.06 ppb) while providing higher throughput and maintaining equivalency between NOAA 2004 as determined by analysis of NIST SRM 1974b mussel tissue.

  19. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years.

  20. Magnetic solid phase extraction and static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; Wang, Lijia; NguyenVan, Manh; Cai, Qingyun

    2016-01-15

    A magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) protocol combining a static headspace gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method has been developed for extraction, and determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in drinking water samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and modified by cholesterol chloroformate. Transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the cholesterol-functionalized sorbents, and the main parameters affecting the extraction as well as HS sampling, such as sorbent amount, extraction time, oven temperature and equilibration time have been investigated and established. Combination with HS sampling, the MSPE procedure was simple, fast and environmentally friendly, without need of any organic solvent. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels obtaining the limit of detection (S/N=3) ranging from 0.20 to 7.8 ng/L. Good values for intra and inter-day precision were obtained (RSDs ≤ 9.9%). The proposed method was successfully applied to drinking water samples.

  1. Comparison of methods used to determine the availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, J.D.; Hall, K.J.

    1998-12-01

    Comparison of SPMDs, Tenax TA, and polyethylene tube dialysis (PTD) methods were used to estimate the available fraction of PAH in marine sediment slurries. The polyethylene membrane used in the SPMD and PTD methods mimics a biomembrane. The PAH must diffuse through the membrane into triolein or pentane, respectively. The Tenax TA scavenges PAH from the water phase and is separated from the sediment, thus particle-associated PAH are excluded from all three methods. Spiked PAH were more readily available than endogenous (unspiked) PAH, and the presence of sediment organic matter decreased desorption and thus availability of the PAH. All three methods could aid in bioremediation feasibility assessments and predictions on the potential toxicity of sediments or soils. The SPMD method has the advantage of being available commercially, and the use of such a standard method allows comparison with other samples from the literature. The Tenax method gave similar results with the exception of the larger compounds that were recovered more efficiently, and it was less expensive. The PTD method was the most stringent assay for availability and could be useful in assessing the risk associated with exposure to a contaminated sample.

  2. Humidity and Gravimetric Equivalency Adjustments for Nephelometer-Based Particulate Matter Measurements of Emissions from Solid Biomass Fuel Use in Cookstoves

    PubMed Central

    Soneja, Sutyajeet; Chen, Chen; Tielsch, James M.; Katz, Joanne; Zeger, Scott L.; Checkley, William; Curriero, Frank C.; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2014-01-01

    Great uncertainty exists around indoor biomass burning exposure-disease relationships due to lack of detailed exposure data in large health outcome studies. Passive nephelometers can be used to estimate high particulate matter (PM) concentrations during cooking in low resource environments. Since passive nephelometers do not have a collection filter they are not subject to sampler overload. Nephelometric concentration readings can be biased due to particle growth in high humid environments and differences in compositional and size dependent aerosol characteristics. This paper explores relative humidity (RH) and gravimetric equivalency adjustment approaches to be used for the pDR-1000 used to assess indoor PM concentrations for a cookstove intervention trial in Nepal. Three approaches to humidity adjustment performed equivalently (similar root mean squared error). For gravimetric conversion, the new linear regression equation with log-transformed variables performed better than the traditional linear equation. In addition, gravimetric conversion equations utilizing a spline or quadratic term were examined. We propose a humidity adjustment equation encompassing the entire RH range instead of adjusting for RH above an arbitrary 60% threshold. Furthermore, we propose new integrated RH and gravimetric conversion methods because they have one response variable (gravimetric PM2.5 concentration), do not contain an RH threshold, and is straightforward. PMID:24950062

  3. Humidity and gravimetric equivalency adjustments for nephelometer-based particulate matter measurements of emissions from solid biomass fuel use in cookstoves.

    PubMed

    Soneja, Sutyajeet; Chen, Chen; Tielsch, James M; Katz, Joanne; Zeger, Scott L; Checkley, William; Curriero, Frank C; Breysse, Patrick N

    2014-06-19

    Great uncertainty exists around indoor biomass burning exposure-disease relationships due to lack of detailed exposure data in large health outcome studies. Passive nephelometers can be used to estimate high particulate matter (PM) concentrations during cooking in low resource environments. Since passive nephelometers do not have a collection filter they are not subject to sampler overload. Nephelometric concentration readings can be biased due to particle growth in high humid environments and differences in compositional and size dependent aerosol characteristics. This paper explores relative humidity (RH) and gravimetric equivalency adjustment approaches to be used for the pDR-1000 used to assess indoor PM concentrations for a cookstove intervention trial in Nepal. Three approaches to humidity adjustment performed equivalently (similar root mean squared error). For gravimetric conversion, the new linear regression equation with log-transformed variables performed better than the traditional linear equation. In addition, gravimetric conversion equations utilizing a spline or quadratic term were examined. We propose a humidity adjustment equation encompassing the entire RH range instead of adjusting for RH above an arbitrary 60% threshold. Furthermore, we propose new integrated RH and gravimetric conversion methods because they have one response variable (gravimetric PM2.5 concentration), do not contain an RH threshold, and is straightforward.

  4. BOREAS HYD-6 Ground Gravimetric Soil Moisture Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Thomas; Knapp, David E. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Peck, Eugene L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-6 team collected several data sets related to the moisture content of soil and overlying humus layers. This data set contains percent soil moisture ground measurements. These data were collected on the ground along the various flight lines flown in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Northern Study Area (NSA) during 1994 by the gamma ray instrument. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The HYD-06 ground gravimetric soil moisture data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. Field test of a generic method for halogenated hydrocarbons. Report for September 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.; McAllister, R.A.; McGaughey, J.F.

    1993-07-07

    The objective of the program was to perform a field validation of the VOST and SemiVOST methods as written at a coal fired power plant in a manner that will allow the collection of sufficient valid data to be able to establish the bias and precision of the methods for the halogenated organic compounds listed in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin, and dibenzofurans were excluded from the study because EPA specific methods already exist for these compounds. To achieve this objective, a field test site was selected to allow access for the quadruple sampling trains required for testing. Collection and evaluation of the data followed one of the acceptable approaches detailed in the EPA Method 301.

  6. Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Wamsley, Paula R.; Weimer, Carl S.; Nelson, Loren D.; O'Brien, Martin J.

    2003-01-01

    An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

  7. Gravimetric determination of the continental-oceanic boundary of the Argentine continental margin (from 36°S to 50°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arecco, María Alejandra; Ruiz, Francisco; Pizarro, Guillermo; Giménez, Mario; Martínez, Patricia; Ramos, Víctor A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the gravimetric analysis together with seismic data as an integral application in order to identify the continental-oceanic crust boundary (COB) of the Argentine continental margin from 36°S to 50°S in a continuous way. The gravimetric and seismic data are made up of large grids of data obtained from satellite altimetry and marine research. The methodology consists of three distinct methods: (i) the application of enhancement techniques to gravimetric anomalies, (ii) the calculation of crustal thinning from 3-D gravity inversion modelling of the crust-mantle discontinuity and (iii) 2-D gravimetric modelling supported by multichannel reflection and refraction seismic profiles. In the first method, the analytic signal, Theta map, and tilt angle and its horizontal derivative were applied. In the second method, crustal thickness was obtained as the difference in the depths of the crystalline basement and the crust-mantle discontinuity; the latter was obtained via gravimetric inversion. Finally, 2-D modelling was performed from free-air anomalies in two representative sections by considering as restriction surfaces those coming from the interpretation of seismic data. The results of the joint application of enhancement techniques and 2-D and 3-D modelling have enabled continuous interpretation of the COB. In this study, the COB was determined continuously from the integration of 2-D profiles of the enhancement techniques, taking account of crustal thickness and performing 2-D gravimetric modelling. The modelling technique was complemented by regional studies integrated with multichannel seismic reflection and seismic refraction lines, resulting in consistent enhancement techniques.

  8. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  9. Evaluation of gravimetric and volumetric dispensers of particles of nuclear material. [Accurate dispensing of fissile and fertile fuel into fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Angelini, P.

    1981-08-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies compared the abilities of volumetric and gravimetric dispensers to dispense accurately fissile and fertile fuel particles. Such devices are being developed for the fabrication of sphere-pac fuel rods for high-temperature gas-cooled light water and fast breeder reactors. The theoretical examination suggests that, although the fuel particles are dispensed more accurately by the gravimetric dispenser, the amount of nuclear material in the fuel particles dispensed by the two methods is not significantly different. The experimental results demonstrated that the volumetric dispenser can dispense both fuel particles and nuclear materials that meet standards for fabricating fuel rods. Performance of the more complex gravimetric dispenser was not significantly better than that of the simple yet accurate volumetric dispenser.

  10. DELINEATION OF SUBSURFACE HYDROCARBON CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION USING A DIRECT PUSH RESISTIVITY METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct push resistivity method was evaluated as a complementary screening tool to provide rapid in-situ contaminant detection to aid in better defining locations for drilling, sampling, and monitoring well installation at hazardous waste sites. Nine continuous direct push resi...

  11. Method of viscosifying aqueous fluids and process for recovery of hydrocarbons from subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Borchardt, J.K.

    1985-04-02

    The present invention relates to a method of viscosifying aqueous fluids and a viscosifying composition which when admixed with an aqueous fluid produces a viscosity increase in the fluid in excess of the additive viscosity of the individual composition components. The viscosifying composition comprises xanthan gum and at least one memeber selected from the group consisting of the ammonium, hydrogen or alkali metal salts of polystyrene sulfonate, polyvinyl sulfonate and hydrolyzed copolymers of styrene sulfonate and maleic anhydride.

  12. System and method for controlling hydrogen elimination during carbon nanotube synthesis from hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2010-03-23

    A system and method for producing carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition includes a catalyst support having first and second surfaces. The catalyst support is capable of hydrogen transport from the first to the second surface. A catalyst is provided on the first surface of the catalyst support. The catalyst is selected to catalyze the chemical vapor deposition formation of carbon nanotubes. A fuel source is provided for supplying fuel to the catalyst.

  13. Evaluation of field methods for estimating exposure of children in low-income families to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, N.K.; Chuang, J.C.; Lyu, C.

    1996-12-31

    Children in low-income families may have higher exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and related compounds than children in higher-income families. These higher exposures could result from the location of their homes, nearer to industrial sites and traffic; from poorer diet; from environmental tobacco smoke; or other causes. The study was designed to evaluate methods and estimate the range of total exposures of low-income children to PAH through various pathways. Nonsmoking participants with preschool children, incomes at or below the official US poverty level, and space heating in their homes were recruited. The PAH concentrations were measured in the household indoor and outdoor air, house dust, and yard soil, and in the diet of both an adult and a preschool child living in the home. An initial study in two homes and an additional study of nine homes, four urban and five rural, during the heating season were completed. The problems and successes encountered in the recruitment process and selected results of the heating season measurements are summarized in the paper.

  14. Identifying sources of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in a residential area in Italy using the integral pumping test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Luca; Lombi, Silvia; Zanini, Andrea

    2011-09-01

    The results of integral pumping tests (IPTs) performed in the city of Fabriano, Italy, are presented. The IPT methodology was developed by the European Union project INCORE, as a tool for groundwater investigation and source localization in contaminated areas. This methodology consists of a multiple-well pumping test in which the wells are positioned along a control plane downstream of suspected contaminant source zones and perpendicular to the mean groundwater flow direction. During the pumping, concentration time series of target contaminants are measured. In Fabriano, two control planes were realized to identify a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon plume, to estimate the mass fluxes and draw up a ranked list of the main contamination sources. A numerical flow model was implemented to support the IPT design and to interpret the results. This study revealed low-level trichloroethylene contamination (concentration below 8 μg/l), tetrachloroethylene contamination (mean concentration up to 500 μg/l) and a mass flow rate of about 300 g/day. Through the application of the IPT method, the mean contaminant concentrations, the spatial distribution of concentration values along the control planes, and the total contaminant mass flow rates were evaluated, and the investigation area was reduced for further and deeper investigation activities.

  15. Studies on the dissolution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated materials using a novel dialysis tubing experimental method

    SciTech Connect

    Woolgar, P.J. Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Stirling ); Jones, K.C. )

    1999-06-15

    Assessment of risk and remediation strategies at contaminated sites requires that both the amounts of contaminants present and their potential for release from materials and soils be evaluated. The release, or dissolution, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated materials to water was therefore investigated. To facilitate investigations of PAH dissolution from physically disparate materials such as solid coal tars, creosote, oil, and spent oxide, an experimental method for measuring dissolved PAHs was developed employing dialysis tubing in batch-type system. This was validated and compared to aqueous-phase PAH concentrations measured using more traditional techniques and also predicted using Raoult's law. The experimental procedure was successfully used to determine near equilibrium aqueous concentrations of PAHs, but it could only be used to determine relative rates of approach to equilibrium as the dialysis tubing effected the rate constants. It was found that the contaminant materials influenced dissolution, in particular the close to equilibrium concentrations. For materials chemically similar to PAHs, such as nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs), the concentrations could be predicted using Raoult's law. For materials that were chemically dissimilar to PAHs, such as spent oxide, release was more thermodynamically favorable than for NAPLs.

  16. Evaluation of Chemical Analysis Method and Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Content from Seafood and Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Young; Lee, Jee-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate contents of 8 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from frequently consumed seafood and dairy products and to evaluate their chemical analysis methods. Samples were collected from markets of 9 cities in Korea chosen as the population reference and evaluated. The methodology involved saponification, extraction with n-hexane, clean-up on Sep-Pak silica cartridges and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry analysis. Validation proceeded on 2 matrices. Recoveries for 8 PAHs ranged from 86.87 to 103.57%. The limit of detection (LOD) 8 PAHs was 0.04~0.20 µg/kg, and limit of quantification (LOQ) of 8 PAHs was 0.12~0.60 µg/kg. The mean concentration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) was 0.34 µg/kg from seafood and 0.34 µg/kg from dairy products. The total PAHs concentration was 1.06 µg/kg in seafood and 1.52 µg/kg in dairy products. PMID:26483885

  17. Method for recovery of hydrocarbons form contaminated soil or refuse materials

    DOEpatents

    Ignasiak, Teresa; Turak, Ali A.; Pawlak, Wanda; Ignasiak, Boleslaw L.; Guerra, Carlos R.; Zwillenberg, Melvin L.

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for separating an inert solid substantially inorganic fraction comprising sand or soil from a tarry or oily organic matter in a feedstock. The feedstock may be contaminated soil or tarry waste. The feedstock is combined with pulverized coal and water. The ratio (oil or tar to dry weight of coal) of about 1.0:10 to about 4.0:10 at a temperature in the range of 60.degree.-95.degree. C. The mixture is agitated, the coarse particles are removed, and up to about 0.10% by weight (based on weight of coal) of a frothing agent is added. The mixture is then subjected to flotation, and the froth is removed from the mixture.

  18. Decontamination of produced water containing petroleum hydrocarbons by electrochemical methods: a minireview.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Elisama Vieira; Bezerra Rocha, Jessica Horacina; de Araújo, Danyelle Medeiros; de Moura, Dayanne Chianca; Martínez-Huitle, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Produced water (PW) is the largest waste stream generated in oil and gas industries. The drilling and extraction operations that are aimed to maximize the production of oil may be counterbalanced by the huge production of contaminated water (called PW) with pollutants, such as heavy metals, dissolved/suspended solids, and organic compounds. PW is conventionally treated through different physical, chemical, and biological methods. In offshore platforms, because of space constraints, compact physical and chemical systems are used. However, major research efforts are being developed with innovative technologies for treating PW in order to comply with reuse and discharge limits. Among them, electrochemical technologies have been proposed as a promising alternative for the treatment of this kind of wastewaters. Then, this paper presents a minireview of efficient electrochemical technologies used until now for treating PW generated by petrochemical industry.

  19. Determination of the Canadian Gravimetric Geoid 2005 (CGG05) Using GRACE and Terrestrial Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Véronneau, M.

    2005-12-01

    The remove-restore technique and the Stokes kernel modification allow the combination of satellite gravity models and terrestrial gravity data for the determination of regional/continental high-resolution gravimetric geoid models. A number of kernel modifications have been suggested over the years to minimize errors in the satellite models and terrestrial data. However, the selection of the proper modification to the Stokes kernel depends largely on data quality. The Vanicek and Kleusberg (VK) kernel provides an efficient way to reduce the far-zone contribution (or truncation) error in the case of poor satellite models and poor remote (far zone) terrestrial gravity data. On the other hand, the degree-banded kernel acts as a filter weight function to remove systematic errors in the long wavelength components of the terrestrial gravity anomalies. It places significant emphasis on the satellite model. Back in 2000, the VK kernel and EGM96 were used in determining the Canadian Gravimetric Geoid 2000 (CGG2000). The kernel was modified to degree 30 to prevent error accumulation from EGM96. The validation of CGG2000 at 430 precise GPS-leveling stations indicates a standard deviation of 21.7 cm. Today, the GRACE mission is advancing the determination of the Earth gravity field to a new level. It poses a compelling question: What is the proper approach to combine GRACE models and the terrestrial gravity data? This presentation investigates methods of combining the high-accuracy of the GRACE gravity models with the high precision of the terrestrial gravity data for optimal estimation of the long- and short-wavelength components of the geoid model. First, a series of numerical simulations are conducted to study the effect of systematic and random errors in the satellite and terrestrial data on geoid modeling. Second, geoid models for North America are estimated from the GRACE gravity model (GGM02C) and terrestrial gravity data using different combination approaches. The

  20. Gravimetric preparation and characterization of primary reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbach, Angela; Noordmann, Janine; Görlitz, Volker; Pape, Carola; Richter, Silke; Kipphardt, Heinrich; Kopp, Gernot; Jährling, Reinhard; Rienitz, Olaf; Güttler, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Gravimetrically prepared mono-elemental reference solutions having a well-known mass fraction of approximately 1 g/kg (or a mass concentration of 1 g/L) define the very basis of virtually all measurements in inorganic analysis. Serving as the starting materials of all standard/calibration solutions, they link virtually all measurements of inorganic analytes (regardless of the method applied) to the purity of the solid materials (high-purity metals or salts) they were prepared from. In case these solid materials are characterized comprehensively with respect to their purity, this link also establishes direct metrological traceability to The International System of Units (SI). This, in turn, ensures the comparability of all results on the highest level achievable. Several national metrology institutes (NMIs) and designated institutes (DIs) have been working for nearly two decades in close cooperation with commercial producers on making an increasing number of traceable reference solutions available. Besides the comprehensive characterization of the solid starting materials, dissolving them both loss-free and completely under strict gravimetric control is a challenging problem in the case of several elements like molybdenum and rhodium. Within the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), in the Joint Research Project (JRP) called SIB09 Primary standards for challenging elements, reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium were prepared directly from the respective metals with a relative expanded uncertainty associated with the mass fraction of U rel(w) < 0.05 %. To achieve this, a microwave-assisted digestion procedure for Rh and a hotplate digestion procedure for Mo were developed along with highly accurate and precise inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) methods required to assist with the preparation and as dissemination tools.

  1. THE PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to be interested in developing methods for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in the environment. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are common contaminants in our environment. Being major product...

  2. Physically constrained source apportionment (PCSA) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon using the Multilinear Engine 2-species ratios (ME2-SR) method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gui-Rong; Shi, Guo-Liang; Tian, Ying-Ze; Wang, Yi-Nan; Zhang, Cai-Yan; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2015-01-01

    An improved physically constrained source apportionment (PCSA) technology using the Multilinear Engine 2-species ratios (ME2-SR) method was proposed and applied to quantify the sources of PM10- and PM2.5-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from Chengdu in winter time. Sixteen priority PAH compounds were detected with mean ΣPAH concentrations (sum of 16 PAHs) ranging from 70.65 ng/m(3) to 209.58 ng/m(3) and from 59.17 ng/m(3) to 170.64 ng/m(3) for the PM10 and PM2.5 samples, respectively. The ME2-SR and positive matrix factorization (PMF) models were employed to estimate the source contributions of PAHs, and these estimates agreed with the experimental results. For the PMF model, the highest contributor to the ΣPAHs was vehicular emission (81.69% for PM10, 82.06% for PM2.5), followed by coal combustion (12.68%, 12.11%), wood combustion (5.65%, 4.45%) and oil combustion (0.72%, 0.88%). For the ME2-SR method, the highest contributions were from diesel (43.19% for PM10, 47.17% for PM2.5) and gasoline exhaust (34.94%, 32.44%), followed by wood combustion (8.79%, 6.37%), coal combustion (12.46%, 12.37%) and oil combustion (0.80%, 1.22%). However, the PAH ratios calculated for the factors extracted by ME2-SR were closer to the values from actual source profiles, implying that the results obtained from ME2-SR might be physically constrained and satisfactory.

  3. Reservoir structures detection and hydrocarbons exploration using wavelet transform method in 2 oil fields in southwestern of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, H.; Saadatinejad, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    reservoirs and differ for limestone and sandstone. In this way, CWT applied on vertical sections and in 4 different iso-frequency displaying. By comparing these figures at 10, 16, 24 and 32 Hz, the presence of low frequency shadows under reservoir could be seen. These shadows have distinctly different dynamic frequency responses rather than the background, probably because the hydrocarbons have changed the reflectivity of the reservoir as the anomalies at 10 Hz are bright. In the 16 Hz section, anomalies almost stand out, and the difference between them becomes relatively weak; yet, some of them are still brighter than other anomalies at higher frequencies. Consequently, these variations of anomalies at different frequencies can consider as indicator from presence of hydrocarbons in the target reservoir. Finally, selecting a suitable wavelet is important step of CWT method and in all mentioned usages, Morlet wavelet has beneficial properties to applying in our investigation. In fact, Morlet wavelet demonstrates velocity dispersion and energy absorption to identify fault and gas respectively.

  4. Buoyancy-corrected gravimetric analysis of lightly loaded filters.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Pat E; Gardner, H David; Niu, Jianjun

    2010-09-01

    Numerous sources of uncertainty are associated with the gravimetric analysis of lightly loaded air filter samples (< 100 microg). The purpose of the study presented here is to investigate the effectiveness and limitations of air buoyancy corrections over experimentally adjusted conditions of temperature (21-25 degrees C) and relative humidity (RH) (16-60% RH). Conditioning (24 hr) and weighing were performed inside the Archimedes M3 environmentally controlled chamber. The measurements were performed using 20 size-fractionated samples of resuspended house dust loaded onto Teflo (PTFE) filters using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor representing a wide range of mass loading (7.2-3130 microg) and cut sizes (0.056-9.9 microm). By maintaining tight controls on humidity (within 0.5% RH of control setting) throughout pre- and postweighing at each stepwise increase in RH, it was possible to quantify error due to water absorption: 45% of the total mass change due to water absorption occurred between 16 and 50% RH, and 55% occurred between 50 and 60% RH. The buoyancy corrections ranged from -3.5 to +5.8 microg in magnitude and improved relative standard deviation (RSD) from 21.3% (uncorrected) to 5.6% (corrected) for a 7.2 microg sample. It is recommended that protocols for weighing low-mass particle samples (e.g., nanoparticle samples) should include buoyancy corrections and tight temperature/humidity controls. In some cases, conditioning times longer than 24 hr may be warranted.

  5. Airborne Gravity Data Enhances NGS Experimental Gravimetric Geoid in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, S. A.; Childers, V. A.; Li, X.; Roman, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey [NGS], through their Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum [GRAV-D] program, continues to update its gravimetry holdings by flying new airborne gravity surveys over a large fraction of the USA and its territories. By 2022, NGS intends that all orthometric heights in the USA will be determined in the field by using a reliable national gravimetric geoid model to transform from geodetic heights obtained from GPS. Several airborne campaigns have already been flown over Alaska and its coastline. Some of this Alaskan coastal data have been incorporated into a new NGS experimental geoid model - xGEOID14. The xGEOID14 model is the first in a series of annual experimental geoid models that will incorporate NGS GRAV-D airborne data. This series provides a useful benchmark for assessing and improving current techniques by which the airborne and land-survey data are filtered and cleaned, and then combined with satellite gravity models, elevation data (etc.) with the ultimate aim of computing a geoid model that can support a national physical height system by 2022. Here we will examine the NGS GRAV-D airborne data in Alaska, and assess its contribution to xGEOID14. Future prospects for xGEOID15 will also be considered.

  6. Laser-Induced Incandescence Calibration via Gravimetric Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, R. L.; Zhou, Z.; Choi, M. Y.

    1995-01-01

    Various beam imaging and/or sheet forming optics delivered light at 1064 nm from a pulsed Nd:YAG laser for use either as a beam of 3 mm radius or as a laser sheet. Imaging measurements were performed with a grated intensified array camera equipped with an ultraviolet f4.5 lens and a 40 mm extension tube. Point measurements were performed using an ultraviolet 250 mm focal length lens to collect and focus the laser induced incandescence (LII) signal into a 1 meter long quartz optical fiber which directed the LII signal to a 1/4 meter monochromator. An aperture preceding the lens restricted the signal collection region to 1 cm along the laser beam at the center of the gravimetric chimney. Signals from the PMT were processed by a boxcar integrator whereas the images were captured digitally using a frame-grabber with 16 MByte of on-board memory. Both 'point' and planar measurements were made with detector gates of 250 ns to minimize possible morphology bias in collection of the LII signal. Additionally, the imaging measurements were performed with broadband spectral collection of the LII signal to maximize the signal and again minimize any potential effects of morphology dependent heating and/or cooling rates. Digital delay generators controlled the firing of he laser, detector gates and data acquisition. Neutral density filters were used for both sets of measurements to maintain signal levels within linear dynamic ranges of the detectors, the range being determined prior to experiments.

  7. Method of using an aqueous chemical system to recover hydrocarbon and minimize wastes from sludge deposits in oil storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Goss, M.L.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes a process for separating and removing a hydrocarbon, water and solid components of sludge deposited in an oil storage tank. It comprises: introducing a sufficient amount of a nonionic surfactant in an aqueous solution to form a layer of the solution above the sludge layer; the nonionic surfactant comprising: C{sub 8}-C{sub 12} alkylphenol-ethylene oxide adducts of about 55%-75% by weight ethylene oxide, and at least one castor oil-ethylene oxide adduct of about 55%-75% by weight ethylene oxide; the nonionic surfactant being present in a quantity sufficient to separate hydrocarbon component from the sludge without forming an emulsion, adding a diluent, immiscible with the aqueous layer, for extracting the hydrocarbons, and separately draining the diluent layer and aqueous layer from the tank.

  8. QuEChERS Method Followed by Solid Phase Extraction Method for Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Khorshid, Mona; Souaya, Eglal R.; Hamzawy, Ahmed H.; Mohammed, Moustapha N.

    2015-01-01

    A gas chromatography equipped with mass spectrometer (GCMS) method was developed and validated for determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fish using modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) method for extraction and solid phase extraction for sample cleanup to remove most of the coextract combined with GCMS for determination of low concentration of selected group of PAHs in homogenized fish samples. PAHs were separated on a GCMS with HP-5ms Ultra Inert GC Column (30 m, 0.25 mm, and 0.25 µm). Mean recovery ranged from 56 to 115%. The extraction efficiency was consistent over the entire range where indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene and benzo(g,h,i)perylene showed recovery (65, 69%), respectively, at 2 µg/kg. No significant dispersion of results was observed for the other remaining PAHs and recovery did not differ substantially, and at the lowest and the highest concentrations mean recovery and RSD% showed that most of PAHs were between 70% and 120% with RSD less than 10%. The measurement uncertainty is expressed as expanded uncertainty and in terms of relative standard deviation (at 95% confidence level) is ±12%. This method is suitable for laboratories engaged daily in routine analysis of a large number of samples. PMID:25873966

  9. Integration of Remotely-Sensed Geobotanical and Structural Methods for Hydrocarbon Exploration in West-Central West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-26

    This report covers the first of the two years covered in the DOE grant to investigate structural and geobotanical features of hydrocarbon reservoirs in western West Virginia. The reader is referred to the three previous Quarterly reports for greater detail on tasks originally described in those reports. The progress of the project will be discussed with reference to the tasks identified for the project.

  10. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOEpatents

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  11. QUANTIFICATION AND INTERPRETATION OF TOTAL PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN SEDIMENT SAMPLES BY A GC/MS METHOD AND COMPARISON WITH EPA 418.1 AND A RAPID FIELD METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Total Petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as a lumped parameter can be easily and rapidly measured or monitored. Despite interpretational problems, it has become an accepted regulatory benchmark used widely to evaluate the extent of petroleum product contamination. Three cu...

  12. Hydrocarbon gas standards at the pmol/mol level to support ambient atmospheric measurements.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, George C; Duewer, David L; Ning, Li; DeSirant, Kathryn

    2010-02-01

    Studies of climate change increasingly recognize the diverse influences exerted by hydrocarbons in the atmosphere, including roles in particulates and ozone formation. Measurements of key non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) suggest atmospheric concentrations ranging from low pmol/mol to nmol/mol, depending on location and compound. To accurately establish concentration trends and to relate measurement records from many laboratories and researchers, it is essential to have good calibration standards. Several of the world's National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) are developing primary and secondary reference gas standards at the nmol/mol level. While the U.S. NMI, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), has developed pmol/mol standards for halocarbons and some volatile organics, the feasibility of preparing well-characterized, stable standards for NMHCs at the pmol/mol level is not yet established. NIST recently developed a suite of primary standards by gravimetric dilution that contains 18 NMHCs covering the concentration range of 60 pmol/mol to 230 pmol/mol. Taking into account the small but chemically significant contribution of NMHCs in the high-purity diluent nitrogen used in their preparation, the relative concentrations and short-term stability (2 to 3 months) of these NMHCs in the primary standards have been confirmed by chromatographic analysis. The gravimetric values assigned from the methods used to prepare the materials and the analytical concentrations determined from chromatographic analysis generally agree to within +/-2 pmol/mol. However, anomalous results for several of the compounds reflect the difficulties inherent in avoiding contamination and making accurate measurements at these very low levels.

  13. Application of InSAR and gravimetric surveys for developing construction codes in zones of land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction: case study of Aguascalientes, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Martínez, J.; Wdowinski, S.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Hernández-Marín, M.; Ortiz-Lozano, J. A.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.; Solano-Rojas, D.; Havazli, E.

    2015-11-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has become a valuable tool for surface deformation monitoring, including land subsidence associated with groundwater extraction. Another useful tools for studying Earth's surface processes are geophysical methods such as Gravimetry. In this work we present the application of InSAR analysis and gravimetric surveying to generate valuable information for risk management related to land subsidence and surface faulting. Subsidence of the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico is presented as study case. Aguascalientes local governments have addressed land subsidence issues by including new requirements for new constructions projects in the State Urban Construction Code. Nevertheless, the resulting zoning proposed in the code is still subjective and not clearly defined. Our work based on gravimetric and InSAR surveys is aimed for improving the subsidence hazard zoning proposed in the State Urban Code in a more comprehensive way. The study includes a 2007-2011 ALOS InSAR time-series analysis of the Aguascalientes valley, an interpretation of the compete Bouguer gravimetric anomaly of the Aguascalientes urban area, and the application of time series and gravimetric anomaly maps for improve the subsidence hazard zoning of Aguascalientes City.

  14. Process for recovering hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon-bearing formation

    SciTech Connect

    Alston, R.B.; Braden, W.B.; Flournoy, K.H.

    1980-03-11

    A method is described for transporting heavy crude oil through a pipeline which involves introducing into a pipeline or well-bore with the viscous hydrocarbons an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) coupling agent whereby there is spontaneously formed a low viscosity, salt tolerant, oil-in-water emulsion. Also disclosed is a method of recovery of hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon bearing formation employing an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) a coupling agent.

  15. Phase II Interim Report -- Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage Detection Methods on the Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, Lawrence M.

    2002-04-24

    The following work was performed: (1) collected reconnaissance micro-magnetic data and background field data for Area 1, (2) identified and collected soil sample data in three anomalous regions of Area 1, (3) sampled soils in Northwest Poplar Oil Field, (4) graphed, mapped, and interpreted all data areas listed above, (5) registered for the AAPG Penrose Conference on Hydrocarbon Seepage Mechanisms and Migration (postponed from 9/16/01 until 4/7/02 in Vancouver, B.C.). Results include the identification and confirmation of an oil and gas prospect in the northwest part of Area 1 and the verification of a potential shallow gas prospect in the West Poplar Area. Correlation of hydrocarbon micro-seepage to TM tonal anomalies needs further data analysis.

  16. Gravimetric observations of water storage change - lysimeters and superconducting gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzfeldt, B.; Güntner, A.; Merz, B.; Wziontek, H.

    2009-12-01

    Water storage changes (WSC) are a key component in the water balance equation, but the estimation of local WSC in the subsurface is still a challenging task. Despite many advances of WSC measurement technique, in general, the measurement scale (point scale) differs to the scale of interest. Advances in lysimeter techniques enable the direct measurement of the soil water balance on the field scale, but exclude WSC in greater depths below the lysimeter. Superconducting gravimeter (SG) measurements are influenced by local water mass changes and thus, may allow for observing WSC in the vadose and saturated zone in an integrative way. Vice versa, lysimeters can contribute to the reduction of noise by hydrological surface processes in SG observations. The Geodetic Observatory Wettzell (Germany) is the only place where both systems - a state-of-the-art weighable, suction-controlled lysimeter and a dual sphere SG -measure in parallel at a distance of around 40 m. This gives the unique opportunity to observe in-situ gravimetric WSC at the field scale by two independent techniques. In this study we focus on assessing the WSC estimated by the lysimeter and its local effect (Newtonian attraction) on the SG. First, we evaluate the lysimeter measurements by comparing them to TDR soil profile data in and around the lysimeter, in terms of artificial conditions in the lysimeter and spatial variability. Then, the effect of local soil moisture change on the SG residuals measured directly with the lysimeter is identified. Finally, we use a hydrological 1D model to estimate WSC in the vadose zone below the lysimeter, whereas the upper boundary is defined by the drainage measured by the lysimeter and the lower boundary by groundwater level data. The estimated WSC are used to explain the sources of the SG signal. Results show that the lysimeter reproduces the soil water dynamics in the field. The results also highlight the importance of WSC in the vadose zone below the lysimeter and the

  17. Interlaboratory evaluation of an off-line supercritical fluid extraction/infrared spectrometric method for determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in solid matrixes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Avila, V.; Young, R.; Kim, R.; Beckert, W.F. )

    1993-05-01

    A collaborative study was conducted, with 14 laboratories participating, to determine the method accuracy and precision of the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Methods 3560 and 8440. These methods involve the extraction of petroleum hydrocarbons from solid matrixes with supercritical carbon dioxide at 340 atm and 80 degrees C for 30 min (dynamic), collection of the extracted materials in tetrachloroethene (Method 3560), and analysis of the extracts by infrared (IR) spectrometry (Method 8440). The study design was based on the AOAC blind replicate design with balanced replicates. The study samples consisted of 4 solid matrixes that had petroleum hydrocarbon contents ranging from 614 to 32,600 mg/kg. Each of the 4 matrixes was extracted in triplicate, and the extracts were analyzed with 2 different IR spectrometers. In addition, each of the participating laboratories extracted a sample of unspiked clay soil, the same clay soil spiked with corn oil and reference oil at 1000 mg/kg each, and the same clay soil wetted to 30% water content and spiked with motor oil at 10,000 mg/kg (the latter 3 samples were extracted only once). Results indicated that the overall method accuracy for concentrations ranging from 614 to 32,600 mg/kg was 82.9%; the mean recoveries of petroleum hydrocarbons for each of the 4 solid matrixes ranged from 77.9 to 107% for analyses performed with the Perkin-Elmer Fourier transform IR spectrometer and from 75.9 to 101% for analyses performed with the Buck-Scientific IR spectrometer; the differences between the 2 instruments on a sample-by-sample basis were less than 17% for the total petroleum hydrocarbon determinations. The interlaboratory method precisions (RSDR) appeared to be matrix-dependent and ranged from 17.3 to 45.4% for analyses performed with the Perkin-Elmer Fourier transform IR spectrometer and from 16.7 to 47.9% for the Buck-Scientific IR spectrometer.

  18. Structures and hydrocarbon potential for the Intra-Carpathian basins of Czechoslovakia

    SciTech Connect

    Blizkovsky, M.; Kocak, A.; Morkovsky, M. ); Ciprys, V. ); Francu, J.; Hrusecky, I.; Pereszienyl, M. ); Hodan, S. ); Milicka, J. ); Muller, P. ); Hrusecky, I. )

    1991-08-01

    Hydrocarbon prospection and production is concentrated in the Neogene of the Vienna basin, Danube basin,and East-Slovakian (Transcarpathian) basin, in the inner Carpathian Paleogene, and in the Mesozoic of the Vienna basin. Evolution of these basins and their underlying formations have been controlled by different tectonic styles, volcanic activity, and thermal conditions. Geophysical surveys were comprised of gravimetric, magnetometric, and geoelectric measurements. Seismic methods were applied for mapping the structural units and the fault systems. Internal and detail structures were studied by use of three-dimensional seismic. Miocene shales and marls contain mostly kerogen types III, II-III, and III-IV. The initial source potential, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis, is less than 2 kg HC/t of rock, and is quite similar in all three basins with the exception of the upper Karpatian in the East-Slovakian basin, which is barren as a source rock. Source rock maturity was estimated using vitrinite reflectance and pyrolytic and chemical indicators. Hydrocarbon generation was reconstructed from burial and thermal histories in a one-dimensional time-temperature models, and contours of the ceiling and floor of the oil gas and gas windows from maps and regional sections. Source potential of the Neogene fill was calculated from the initial potential and the degree of kerogen to hydrocarbon conversion. Controlled by geothermal gradient, the total estimated potential decreases from the East-Slovakian to the Danube and Vienna basins; however, prospects of hydrocarbon generation and preservation in the rock increase in the same order, and are best in the Vienna basin.

  19. First Release of Gravimetric Geoid Model over Saudi Arabia Based on Terrestrial Gravity and GOCE Satellite Data: KSAG01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alothman, A. O.; Elsaka, B.

    2015-12-01

    A new gravimetric quasi-geoid, known as KSAG0, has been developed recently by Remove-Compute-Restore techniques (RCR), provided by the GRAVSOFT software, using gravimetric free air anomalies. The terrestrial gravity data used in this computations are: 1145 gravity field anomalies observed by ARAMCO (Saudi Arabian Oil Company) and 2470 Gravity measurements from BGI (Bureau Gravimétrique International). The computations were carried out implementing the least squares collocation method through the RCR techniques. The KSAG01 is based on merging in addition to the terrestrial gravity observations, GOCE satellite model (Eigen-6C4) and global gravity model (EGM2008) have been utilized in the computations. The long, medium and short wavelength spectrum of the height anomalies were compensated from Eigen-6C4 and EGM2008 geoid models truncated up to Degree and order (d/o) up to 2190. KSAG01 geoid covers 100 per cent of the kingdom, with geoid heights range from - 37.513 m in the southeast to 23.183 m in the northwest of the country. The accuracy of the geoid is governed by the accuracy, distribution, and spacing of the observations. The standard deviation of the predicted geoid heights is 0.115 m, with maximum errors of about 0.612 m. The RMS of geoid noise ranges from 0.019 m to 0.04 m. Comparison of the predicted gravimetric geoid with EGM, GOCE, and GPS/Levelling geoids, reveals a considerable improvements of the quasi-geoid heights over Saudi Arabia.

  20. First Release of Gravimetric Geoid Model over Saudi Arabia Based on Terrestrial Gravity and GOCE Satellite Data: KSAG01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alothman, Abdulaziz; Elsaka, Basem

    2016-04-01

    A new gravimetric quasi-geoid, known as KSAG0, has been developed recently by Remove-Compute-Restore techniques (RCR), provided by the GRAVSOFT software, using gravimetric free air anomalies. The terrestrial gravity data used in this computations are: 1145 gravity field anomalies observed by ARAMCO (Saudi Arabian Oil Company) and 2470 Gravity measurements from BGI (Bureau Gravimétrique International). The computations were carried out implementing the least squares collocation method through the RCR techniques. The KSAG01 is based on merging in addition to the terrestrial gravity observations, GOCE satellite model (Eigen-6C4) and global gravity model (EGM2008) have been utilized in the computations. The long, medium and short wavelength spectrum of the height anomalies were compensated from Eigen-6C4 and EGM2008 geoid models truncated up to Degree and order (d/o) up to 2190. KSAG01 geoid covers 100 per cent of the kingdom, with geoid heights range from - 37.513 m in the southeast to 23.183 m in the northwest of the country. The accuracy of the geoid is governed by the accuracy, distribution, and spacing of the observations. The standard deviation of the predicted geoid heights is 0.115 m, with maximum errors of about 0.612 m. The RMS of geoid noise ranges from 0.019 m to 0.04 m. Comparison of the predicted gravimetric geoid with EGM, GOCE, and GPS/Levelling geoids, reveals a considerable improvements of the quasi-geoid heights over Saudi Arabia.

  1. A method of calculating of the thermodynamic properties and the composition of the explosion products of hydrocarbons and air under partial chemical equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shargatov, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    We examined the approximate method to calculate composition and thermodynamic parameters of hydrocarbons-air nonequilibrium explosion products based on the assumption of the existence of a partial chemical equilibrium. With excellent accuracy of calculating thermodynamic properties and species mass fraction the respective stiff system of detailed kinetics differential equations can be replaced by the one differential equation or the two differential equations and a system of algebraic equations. This method is always consistent with the detailed kinetic mechanism. The constituent equations of the method were derived and the respective computer code written. We examine the applicability of the method by solving the test problem. The proposed method simulation results are in excellent agreement with the detailed kinetics model results corresponding the stiff ordinary differential equation solver including NO time histories.

  2. Thermal device and method for production of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by thermal dissociation of hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is produced in a fast quench reactor. The production of carbon monoxide includes injecting carbon dioxide and some air into a reactor chamber having a high temperature at its inlet and a rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Carbon dioxide and other reactants such as methane and other low molecular weight hydrocarbons are injected into the reactor chamber. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  3. Gravimetric and density profiling using the combination of surface acoustic waves and neutron reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Toolan, Daniel T W; Barker, Robert; Gough, Tim; Topham, Paul D; Howse, Jonathan R; Glidle, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    A new approach is described herein, where neutron reflectivity measurements that probe changes in the density profile of thin films as they absorb material from the gas phase have been combined with a Love wave based gravimetric assay that measures the mass of absorbed material. This combination of techniques not only determines the spatial distribution of absorbed molecules, but also reveals the amount of void space within the thin film (a quantity that can be difficult to assess using neutron reflectivity measurements alone). The uptake of organic solvent vapours into spun cast films of polystyrene has been used as a model system with a view to this method having the potential for extension to the study of other systems. These could include, for example, humidity sensors, hydrogel swelling, biomolecule adsorption or transformations of electroactive and chemically reactive thin films. This is the first ever demonstration of combined neutron reflectivity and Love wave-based gravimetry and the experimental caveats, limitations and scope of the method are explored and discussed in detail.

  4. A Study on Gravimetric Geoid Determination Using Analytical Downward Continuation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, Erdinç; Doǧan, Uǧur; Yıldız, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    The Stokes' formula requires the gravity anomaly on the Earth's surface be downward continued to the geoid and the mass above the geoid be removed. Although the Earth Gravity Field Models (EGMs) are used to compute quasi geoid models, gravimetric geoid determination is possible taking into account the topographic effects. Analytical or harmonic downward continuation of external gravity potential of the Earth into the topographic masses results in "analytical downward continuation error" or "topographic bias". One of the alternatives to compute topographic bias is spherical harmonic expansion of reciprocal distance including functional coefficients of Earth's radius and topographic height depending on the position. Spherical harmonic coefficients are then expanded into binomial series to compute the difference between the topographical potential and its downward continuation. On any coordinates on the Earth, topographic bias can easily be computed using these coefficients. Topographic bias provides a practical way to compute a regional geoid model transforming height anomalies computed from EGMs to geoid undulations. Using this technique, regional geoid models are determined in two test areas, the Auvergne, France and New Mexico, U.S.A, and compared with the GNSS/levelling geoid undulations and the regional geoid models computed using Least Squares Modification of Stokes' Formula (KTH method). Keywords: Analytical downward continuation, topographic bias, geoid determination, Earth Gravity Model, Least Squares Modification of Stokes' Formula (KTH method).

  5. Gravimetric effects of petroleum accumulations--A preliminary summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCulloh, Thane Hubert

    1966-01-01

    Negative gravity anomalies of very local extent and with amplitudes of 1.2 milligals or less have been observed over some known petroleum and natural gas fields in southern California and South Dagestan, U.S.S.R. Field evidence, laboratory measurements, and theory indicate that these anomalies are mainly the result of hydrocarbon pore fluids of densities significantly lower than that of water. Gravity meters already available have the precision necessary to detect some of these anomalies from surface measurements. In addition, a high-precision borehole gravity meter has been developed, by the industrial firm of LaCoste and Romberg, Inc., that can be used in wells with a casing 7 inches or more in diameter and at temperatures below 100?C. Field tests indicate that the prototype attains a precision in wells of ? 0.015 milligal for a single measurement. These observations and the new gravimeter should aid in the search for new petroleum fields and for new reservoirs in known fields that are incompletely explored.

  6. Development of a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method using a lighter-than-water ionic liquid for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water.

    PubMed

    Medina, Giselle S; Reta, Mario

    2016-11-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method using a lighter-than-water phosphonium-based ionic liquid for the extraction of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water samples has been developed. The extracted compounds were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to fluorescence/diode array detectors. The effects of several experimental parameters on the extraction efficiency, such as type and volume of ionic liquid and disperser solvent, type and concentration of salt in the aqueous phase and extraction time, were investigated and optimized. Three phosphonium-based ionic liquids were assayed, obtaining larger extraction efficiencies when trihexyl-(tetradecyl)phosphonium bromide was used. The optimized methodology requires a few microliters of a lighter-than-water phosphonium-based ionic liquid, which allows an easy separation of the extraction solvent phase. The obtained limits of detection were between 0.02 and 0.56 μg/L, enrichment factors between 109 and 228, recoveries between 60 and 108%, trueness between 0.4 and 9.9% and reproducibility values between 3 and 12% were obtained. These figures of merit combined with the simplicity, rapidity and low cost of the analytical methodology indicate that this is a viable and convenient alternative to the methods reported in the literature. The developed method was used to analyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in river water samples.

  7. A combined approach of physicochemical and biological methods for the characterization of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Masakorala, Kanaji; Yao, Jun; Chandankere, Radhika; Liu, Haijun; Liu, Wenjuan; Cai, Minmin; Choi, Martin M F

    2014-01-01

    Main physicochemical and microbiological parameters of collected petroleum-contaminated soils with different degrees of contamination from DaGang oil field (southeast of Tianjin, northeast China) were comparatively analyzed in order to assess the influence of petroleum contaminants on the physicochemical and microbiological properties of soil. An integration of microcalorimetric technique with urease enzyme analysis was used with the aim to assess a general status of soil metabolism and the potential availability of nitrogen nutrient in soils stressed by petroleum-derived contaminants. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of contaminated soils varied from 752.3 to 29,114 mg kg(−1). Although the studied physicochemical and biological parameters showed variations dependent on TPH content, the correlation matrix showed also highly significant correlation coefficients among parameters, suggesting their utility in describing a complex matrix such as soil even in the presence of a high level of contaminants. The microcalorimetric measures gave evidence of microbial adaptation under highest TPH concentration; this would help in assessing the potential of a polluted soil to promote self-degradation of oil-derived hydrocarbon under natural or assisted remediation. The results highlighted the importance of the application of combined approach in the study of those parameters driving the soil amelioration and bioremediation.

  8. Development, optimization, validation and application of faster gas chromatography - flame ionization detector method for the analysis of total petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Abdulrazaq; Pappoe, Michael; James, Lesley A; Hawboldt, Kelly

    2015-12-18

    This paper presents an important new approach to improving the timeliness of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) analysis in the soil by Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) using the CCME Canada-Wide Standard reference method. The Canada-Wide Standard (CWS) method is used for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon compounds across Canada. However, inter-laboratory application of this method for the analysis of TPH in the soil has often shown considerable variability in the results. This could be due, in part, to the different gas chromatography (GC) conditions, other steps involved in the method, as well as the soil properties. In addition, there are differences in the interpretation of the GC results, which impacts the determination of the effectiveness of remediation at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. In this work, multivariate experimental design approach was used to develop and validate the analytical method for a faster quantitative analysis of TPH in (contaminated) soil. A fractional factorial design (fFD) was used to screen six factors to identify the most significant factors impacting the analysis. These factors included: injection volume (μL), injection temperature (°C), oven program (°C/min), detector temperature (°C), carrier gas flow rate (mL/min) and solvent ratio (v/v hexane/dichloromethane). The most important factors (carrier gas flow rate and oven program) were then optimized using a central composite response surface design. Robustness testing and validation of model compares favourably with the experimental results with percentage difference of 2.78% for the analysis time. This research successfully reduced the method's standard analytical time from 20 to 8min with all the carbon fractions eluting. The method was successfully applied for fast TPH analysis of Bunker C oil contaminated soil. A reduced analytical time would offer many benefits including an improved laboratory reporting times, and overall improved clean up

  9. Advanced nanoporous materials for micro-gravimetric sensing to trace-level bio/chemical molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin; Yu, Haitao; Xu, Tiegang

    2014-10-13

    Functionalized nanoporous materials have been developed recently as bio/chemical sensing materials. Due to the huge specific surface of the nano-materials for molecular adsorption, high hopes have been placed on gravimetric detection with micro/nano resonant cantilevers for ultra-sensitive sensing of low-concentration bio/chemical substances. In order to enhance selectivity of the gravimetric resonant sensors to the target molecules, it is crucial to modify specific groups onto the pore-surface of the nano-materials. By loading the nanoporous sensing material onto the desired region of the mass-type transducers like resonant cantilevers, the micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors can be formed. Recently, such micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors have been successfully applied for rapid or on-the-spot detection of various bio/chemical molecules at the trace-concentration level. The applicable nanoporous sensing materials include mesoporous silica, zeolite, nanoporous graphene oxide (GO) and so on. This review article focuses on the recent achievements in design, preparation, functionalization and characterization of advanced nanoporous sensing materials for micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensing.

  10. Advanced Nanoporous Materials for Micro-Gravimetric Sensing to Trace-Level Bio/Chemical Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin; Yu, Haitao; Xu, Tiegang

    2014-01-01

    Functionalized nanoporous materials have been developed recently as bio/chemical sensing materials. Due to the huge specific surface of the nano-materials for molecular adsorption, high hopes have been placed on gravimetric detection with micro/nano resonant cantilevers for ultra-sensitive sensing of low-concentration bio/chemical substances. In order to enhance selectivity of the gravimetric resonant sensors to the target molecules, it is crucial to modify specific groups onto the pore-surface of the nano-materials. By loading the nanoporous sensing material onto the desired region of the mass-type transducers like resonant cantilevers, the micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors can be formed. Recently, such micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors have been successfully applied for rapid or on-the-spot detection of various bio/chemical molecules at the trace-concentration level. The applicable nanoporous sensing materials include mesoporous silica, zeolite, nanoporous graphene oxide (GO) and so on. This review article focuses on the recent achievements in design, preparation, functionalization and characterization of advanced nanoporous sensing materials for micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensing. PMID:25313499

  11. Sorption and diffusion of light hydrocarbons on Na-Y zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Palmas, S.; Polcaro, A.M.; Carta, R.; Tola, G. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the adsorption isotherms that were determined on zeolite Na-Y at 298, 313, and 333 K for propane and propylene and at 298 K for butane, trans-butene, 1-butene, and cis-butene. The pressure of the experiments ranged from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} to 30 kPa. The weight of adsorbed hydrocarbons was determined by a gravimetric method with a vacuum microbalance. The Henry constants were evaluated from the equilibrium measurements in the low-concentration range, and their sequence propane {lt} butane {lt} trans-butene {lt} propylene {lt} 1-butene {lt} cis-butene, was discussed in terms of the different adsorbate-adsorbent interactions. Equilibrium data, over the whole pressure range, were correlated by using the simplified model by Ruthven, based on statistical thermodynamics, and the appropriate parameters are reported. For C4 hydrocarbons, the intracrystalline diffusion process was also investigated and the Darken equation was used to correlate the uptake curves at the higher pressures. The diffusion coefficients were found in the order butane {gt} trans-butene {gt} 1-butene {gt} cis-butene and were compared to the available values in literature.

  12. Determination of Crude Fat in Food Products by Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Gravimetric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Nicholas H.; Dunn, Maureen; Patel, Sohita

    1997-09-01

    The use of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), a recently developed analytical extraction method, in the undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory is demonstrated. Specifically, the extraction and gravimetric analysis of the fats from a common commercial confection was performed by several groups of undergraduates, and the extraction recoveries were evaluated. The percentage of fat by weight in the candy bar sample was determined to be 21 +/- 2 %, a value found to be in agreement with the product labeling. Under the extraction conditions used, complete extraction required 400-700 mL of supercritical carbon dioxide, applied to a 1.0 g sample of candy in several extraction steps. Data relating extraction recovery to the volume of carbon dioxide used for extraction is shown. SFE is shown to be a versatile addition to the undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory, requiring a minimum of training and supervision. Finally, SFE can be extended to myriad physical and analytical measurements in the undergraduate laboratories. Examples derived from the current analytical literature are proposed.

  13. Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).

    PubMed

    Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

    2013-04-02

    Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored.

  14. Gravity effects obtained from global hydrology models in comparison with high precision gravimetric time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Wilmes, Herbert; Güntner, Andreas; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin

    2010-05-01

    Water mass changes are a major source of variations in residual gravimetric time series obtained from the combination of observations with superconducting and absolute gravimeters. Changes in the local water storage are the main influence, but global variations contribute to the signal significantly. For three European gravity stations, Bad Homburg, Wettzell and Medicina, different global hydrology models are compared. The influence of topographic effects is discussed and due to the long-term stability of the combined gravity time series, inter-annual signals in model data and gravimetric observations are compared. Two sources of influence are discriminated, i.e., the effect of a local zone with an extent of a few kilometers around the gravimetric station and the global contribution beyond 50km. Considering their coarse resolution and uncertainties, local effects calculated from global hydrological models are compared with the in-situ gravity observations and, for the station Wettzell, with local hydrological monitoring data.

  15. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smoked fish samples by a new microextraction technique and method optimisation using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Ghasemzadeh-Mohammadi, Vahid; Haratian, Parivash; Khaksar, Ramin; Chaichi, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a recently introduced method was applied to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Iranian smoked fish. The results showed that the interaction of hydrolysing solution volume with ethanol ratio, volumes of extracting and disperser solvent is significant in the obtained model. Optimized conditions were: a hydrolysing solution volume 10 ml with 50% ethanol, a pH of 5, and extracting and disperser solvent volumes of 150 and 500 μl respectively. The level of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined in 80 smoked fish consisting of four species. The contamination of benzo[a]pyrene in all samples except three was below the European Commission's maximum level of 2 μg kg(-1) for smoked fish, while the ∑4 PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, benzo[a]anthracene and benzo[b]fluoranthene) were between 3 and 12 μg kg(-1) wet weight in all samples. Of the species examined, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix had the highest PAHs (∑16).

  16. Stereoselective release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-deoxyadenosine adducts from DNA by the 32P postlabeling and deoxyribonuclease I/snake venom phosphodiesterase digestion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cheh, A.M.; Yagi, H.; Jerina, D.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The restricted ability of deoxyribonuclease I/snake venom phosphodiesterase digestion to liberate deoxyadenosine (dA) nucleotide adducts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from DNA, first observed by Dipple and Pigott with the bay-region diol epoxide adducts of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, has been observed with the dA adducts of benz(a)anthracene and benzo(c)phenanthrene diol epoxides. The micrococcal nuclease/spleen phosphodiesterase digestion used in the original 32P postlabeling procedure developed by Randerath to determine DNA adducts also failed to liberate dA nucleotide adducts quantitatively. Thus either method can potentially lead to an underestimation of the extent to which dA has been modified in DNA. The two digestion procedures exhibit systematic and mostly opposite stereoselectivity in the pattern of which dA adducts are resistant to digestion, which suggest that these adducts may have preferred orientations within modified DNA that are determined by whether they have the R or S configuration at C-1, the point of attachment between the exocyclic amino group of dA and the hydrocarbon; this in turn is dictated by the configuration about the precursor benzylic epoxide carbon and the cis versus trans nature of epoxide opening during adduct formation.

  17. Characterization of low molecular weight hydrocarbon oligomers by laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry using a solvent-free sample preparation method.

    PubMed

    Pruns, Julia K; Vietzke, Jens-Peter; Strassner, Manfred; Rapp, Claudius; Hintze, Ulrich; König, Wilfried A

    2002-01-01

    A new solvent-free sample preparation method using silver trifluoroacetate (AgTFA) was developed for the analysis of low molecular weight paraffins and microcrystalline waxes by laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOFMS). Experiments show that spectral quality can be enhanced by dispersing AgTFA directly in liquid paraffins without the use of additional solvents. This preparation mixture is applied directly to the MALDI probe. Solid waxes could be examined by melting prior to analysis. The method also provides sufficiently reproducible spectra that peak area ratios between mono- and bicyclic alkane peaks indicated variations in the cycloalkane content of paraffin samples. Dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons observed during the desorption/ionization process was studied by analysis of alkane standards.

  18. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  19. Geopotential coefficient determination and the gravimetric boundary value problem: A new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjoeberg, Lars E.

    1989-01-01

    New integral formulas to determine geopotential coefficients from terrestrial gravity and satellite altimetry data are given. The formulas are based on the integration of data over the non-spherical surface of the Earth. The effect of the topography to low degrees and orders of coefficients is estimated numerically. Formulas for the solution of the gravimetric boundary value problem are derived.

  20. Gravimetric Analysis of Bismuth in Bismuth Subsalicylate Tablets: A Versatile Quantitative Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Eric; Cheung, Ken; Pauls, Steve; Dick, Jonathan; Roth, Elijah; Zalewski, Nicole; Veldhuizen, Christopher; Coeler, Joel

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, lower- and upper-division students dissolved bismuth subsalicylate tablets in acid and precipitated the resultant Bi[superscript 3+] in solution with sodium phosphate for a gravimetric determination of bismuth subsalicylate in the tablets. With a labeled concentration of 262 mg/tablet, the combined data from three…

  1. Comparing gravimetric and real-time sampling of PM(2.5) concentrations inside truck cabins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Smith, Thomas J; Davis, Mary E; Levy, Jonathan I; Herrick, Robert; Jiang, Hongyu

    2011-11-01

    As part of a study on truck drivers' exposure and health risk, pickup and delivery (P&D) truck drivers' on-road exposure patterns to PM(2.5) were assessed in five, weeklong sampling trips in metropolitan areas of five U.S. cities from April to August of 2006. Drivers were sampled with real-time (DustTrak) and gravimetric samplers to measure average in-cabin PM(2.5) concentrations and to compare their correspondence in moving trucks. In addition, GPS measurements of truck locations, meteorological data, and driver behavioral data were collected throughout the day to determine which factors influence the relationship between real-time and gravimetric samplers. Results indicate that the association between average real-time and gravimetric PM(2.5) measurements on moving trucks was fairly consistent (Spearman rank correlation of 0.63), with DustTrak measurements exceeding gravimetric measurements by approximately a factor of 2. This ratio differed significantly only between the industrial Midwest cities and the other three sampled cities scattered in the South and West. There was also limited evidence of an effect of truck age. Filter samples collected concurrently with DustTrak measurements can be used to calibrate average mass concentration responses for the DustTrak, allowing for real-time measurements to be integrated into longer-term studies of inter-city and intra-urban exposure patterns for truck drivers.

  2. Gravimetric excitation function of polar motion from the GRACE RL05 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Impact of land hydrosphere on polar motion excitation is still not as well known as the impact of the angular momentum of the atmosphere and ocean. Satellite mission Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) from 2002 provides additional information about mass distribution of the land hydrosphere. However, despite the use of similar computational procedures, the differences between GRACE data series made available by the various centers of computations are still considerable. In the paper we compare three series of gravimetric excitation functions of polar motion determined from Rl05 GRACE solution from the Center for Space Research (CSR), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ). These data are used to determine the gravimetric polar motion excitation function. Gravimetric signal is compared also with the geodetic residuals computed by subtracting atmospheric and oceanic signals from geodetic excitation functions of polar motion. Gravimetric excitation functions obtained on the basis of JPL data differ significantly from the geodetic residuals while and the series obtained from CSR and GFZ are more compatible.

  3. On-chip temperature-compensated Love mode surface acoustic wave device for gravimetric sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Flewitt, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Love mode surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors have been recognized as one of the most sensitive devices for gravimetric sensors in liquid environments such as bio sensors. Device operation is based upon measuring changes in the transmitted (S21) frequency and phase of the first-order Love wave resonance associated with the device upon on attachment of mass. However, temperature variations also cause a change in the first order S21 parameters. In this work, shallow grooved reflectors and a "dotted" single phase unidirectional interdigitated transducer (D-SPUDT) have been added to the basic SAW structure, which promote unidirectional Love wave propagation from the device's input interdigitated transducers. Not only does this enhance the first-order S21 signal but also it allows propagation of a third-order Love wave. The attenuation coefficient of the third-order wave is sufficiently great that, whilst there is a clear reflected S11 signal, the third-order wave does not propagate into the gravimetric sensing area of the device. As a result, whilst the third-order S11 signal is affected by temperature changes, it is unaffected by mass attachment in the sensing area. It is shown that this signal can be used to remove temperature effects from the first-order S21 signal in real time. This allows gravimetric sensing to take place in an environment without the need for any other temperature measurement or temperature control; this is a particular requirement of gravimetric biosensors.

  4. H-H, C-H, and C-C NMR spin-spin coupling constants calculated by the FP-INDO method for aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. A. T.; Memory, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The FP-INDO (finite perturbation-intermediate neglect of differential overlap) method is used to calculate the H-H, C-H, and C-C coupling constants in hertz for molecules of six different benzenoid hydrocarbons: benzene, naphthalene, biphenyl, anthracene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. The calculations are based on both the actual and the average molecular geometries. It is found that only the actual molecular geometries can always yield the correct relative order of values for the H-H coupling constants. For the calculated C-C coupling constants, as for the calculated C-H coupling constants, the signs are positive (negative) for an odd (even) number of bonds connecting the two nuclei. Agreements between the calculated and experimental values of the coupling constants for all six molecules are comparable to those reported previously for other molecules.

  5. International comparison of a hydrocarbon gas standard at the picomol per mol level.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, George C; Duewer, David L; Apel, Eric; Baldan, Annarita; Hall, Bradley; Harling, Alice; Helmig, Detlev; Heo, Gwi Suk; Hueber, Jacques; Kim, Mi Eon; Kim, Yong Doo; Miller, Ben; Montzka, Steve; Riemer, Daniel

    2014-03-04

    Studies of climate change increasingly recognize the diverse influences of hydrocarbons in the atmosphere, including roles in particulates and ozone formation. Measurements of key nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) suggest atmospheric mole fractions ranging from low picomoles per mol (ppt) to nanomoles per mol (ppb), depending on location and compound. To accurately establish mole fraction trends and to relate measurement records from many laboratories and researchers, it is essential to have accurate, stable, calibration standards. In February of 2008, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed and reported on picomoles per mol standards containing 18 nonmethane hydrocarbon compounds covering the mole fraction range of 60 picomoles per mol to 230 picomoles per mol. The stability of these gas mixtures was only characterized over a short time period (2 to 3 months). NIST recently prepared a suite of primary standard gas mixtures by gravimetric dilution to ascertain the stability of the 2008 picomoles per mol NMHC standards suite. The data from this recent chromatographic intercomparison of the 2008 to the 2011 suites confirm a much longer stability of almost 5 years for 15 of the 18 hydrocarbons; the double-bonded alkenes of propene, isobutene, and 1-pentene showed instability, in line with previous publications. The agreement between the gravimetric values from preparation and the analytical mole fractions determined from regression illustrate the internal consistency of the suite within ±2 pmol/mol. However, results for several of the compounds reflect stability problems for the three double-bonded hydrocarbons. An international intercomparison on one of the 2008 standards has also been completed. Participants included National Metrology Institutes, United States government laboratories, and academic laboratories. In general, results for this intercomparison agree to within about ±5% with the gravimetric mole fractions of the hydrocarbons.

  6. Gravimetric measurements of materials outgassing applied to graphite-epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Scialdone, J.J.

    1989-12-01

    The outgassing rates of two graphite-epoxy laminates, American Cyanamide 985B-626 and HST-7B-112, were obtained using a gravimetric method. The rates as a function of time and temperature were derived from the measurements of their mass losses at temperatures varying from 25 to 150 C and for a time span of up to 400 hours in a vacuum. The data from those measurements were reduced to obtain the outgassing activation energies, the mass losses per unit mass or area, and the corresponding outgassing rates. The rates are expressed in closed-form equations and are directly usable for medling computations. The procedures to obtain these parameters are shown and may be used for the evaluation of other materials. The results of the tests show that the activation energies of the two materials are: 4630 cal/mole for the 985B-626 materials and 4791 cal/mole for the HST-7B-112 sample no. 10 Graphite Exoxy. The outgassing rates of these materials are in the 10E-5 g/sq cm/hr range and they decay according to a power of time of 0.60 at 25 C, indicating that the outgassing process is mainly a diffusion at that temperature. The normalized mass losses versus time obtained from these tests were compared to the discrete results obtained from the ASTM-E595 tests. The comparison provides general indications on the effects of temperature and time in relation to the ASTM test values obtained at 125 C for a 24-hour test duration.

  7. Synergistic improvement of gas sensing performance by micro-gravimetrically extracted kinetic/thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuanbao; Xu, Pengcheng; Yu, Haitao; Cheng, Zhenxing; Li, Xinxin

    2015-03-10

    A novel method is explored for comprehensive design/optimization of organophosphorus sensing material, which is loaded on mass-type microcantilever sensor. Conventionally, by directly observing the gas sensing response, it is difficult to build quantitative relationship with the intrinsic structure of the material. To break through this difficulty, resonant cantilever is employed as gravimetric tool to implement molecule adsorption experiment. Based on the sensing data, key kinetic/thermodynamic parameters of the material to the molecule, including adsorption heat -ΔH°, adsorption/desorption rate constants Ka and Kd, active-site number per unit mass N' and surface coverage θ, can be quantitatively extracted according to physical-chemistry theories. With gaseous DMMP (simulant of organophosphorus agents) as sensing target, the optimization route for three sensing materials is successfully demonstrated. Firstly, a hyper-branched polymer is evaluated. Though suffering low sensitivity due to insufficient N', the bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-hexafluoropropane (BHPF) sensing-group exhibits satisfactory reproducibility due to appropriate -ΔH°. To achieve more sensing-sites, KIT-5 mesoporous-silica with higher surface-area is assessed, resulting in good sensitivity but too high -ΔH° that brings poor repeatability. After comprehensive consideration, the confirmed BHPF sensing-group is grafted on the KIT-5 carrier to form an optimized DMMP sensing nanomaterial. Experimental results indicate that, featuring appropriate kinetic/thermodynamic parameters of -ΔH°, Ka, Kd, N' and θ, the BHPF-functionalized KIT-5 mesoporous silica exhibits synergistic improvement among reproducibility, sensitivity and response/recovery speed. The optimized material shows complete signal recovery, 55% sensitivity improvement than the hyper-branched polymer and 2∼3 folds faster response/recovery speed than the KIT-5 mesoporous silica.

  8. Production of hydrocarbons from hydrates. [DOE patent application

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, P.L.

    1981-09-08

    An economical and safe method of producing hydrocarbons (or natural gas) from in situ hydrocarbon-containing hydrates is given. Once started, the method will be self-driven and will continue producing hydrocarbons over an extended period of time (i.e., many days).

  9. Steam Hydrocarbon Cracking and Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golombok, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The interactive methods of steam hydrocarbon reforming and cracking of the oil and chemical industries are scrutinized, with special focus on their resemblance and variations. The two methods are illustrations of equilibrium-controlled and kinetically-controlled processes, the analysis of which involves theories, which overlap and balance each…

  10. Application of counter-current chromatography as a new pretreatment method for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xueli; Yang, Chunlei; Pei, Hairun; Li, Xinghong; Xu, Xiaobai; Ito, Yoichiro

    2012-02-01

    Counter-current chromatography (CCC) was investigated as a new sample pretreatment method for the determination of trace polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water environmental samples. The experiment was performed with a non-aqueous binary two-phase solvent system composed of n-heptane and acetonitrile. The CCC column was first filled with the upper stationary phase, and then a large volume of water sample was pumped into the column while the CCC column was rotated at 1600 rpm. Finally, the trace amounts of PAHs extracted and enriched in the stationary phase were eluted out by the lower mobile phase and determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The enrichment and cleanup of PAHs can be fulfilled online by this method with high recoveries (84.1-103.2%) and good reproducibility (RSDs: 4.9-12.2%) for 16 EPA PAHs under the optimized CCC pretreatment conditions. This method has been successfully applied to determine PAHs in lake water where 8 PAHs were detected in the concentration of 40.9-89.9 ng/L. The present method is extremely suitable for the preparation of large volume of environmental water sample for the determination of trace amounts of organic pollutants including PAHs as studied in this paper.

  11. Experimental evaluation of hydrocarbon detection with the Long-Offset Time-Domain Electromagnetic Method in the Cretaceous carbonates of the Tampico Misantla basin, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado Cardador, Manuel; Cuevas, Antonio L.; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Saito, Akira; Wada, Kazushige; Ishikawa, Hidehiro; Okuzumi, Koichi

    2003-02-01

    In Mexico, an experimental study with a Long-Offset Time-Domain Electromagnetic Method (LOTDEM) was carried out in the Tampico-Misantla basin of northeastern Mexico. The main objective was to evaluate this method for hydrocarbon exploration. The selected area is suitable for LOTDEM experiments because high quality seismic data, geological information and well logging data are available. The results obtained are excellent, and allow us to determine the types of fluids present in the rock pores and fractures of the studied geological structures. Resistivity anomalies correlate in position and depth with the geological structures observed in the seismic sections where the LOTDEM survey was carried out, and with well logging data from the nearby Franco Española oil field. In the studied area, these structures are 800-1200 m deep, in carbonate rocks with high clay content and are invaded by salt water. Consequently, the resistivity and primary porosities are very low. The main reservoirs of oil and gas in this region are a naturally fractured basinal facies, consisting of fine-grained limestones and shaly limestones, that corresponds to the Cretaceous units San Felipe, Agua Nueva, Tamaulipas Superior and Tamaulipas Inferior. The fractured rocks reservoirs are very difficult to detect, even with well logs. However, the results of this survey show the higher resolution, the greater depth of investigation, and the advantages that the LOTDEM method present compared to the traditional frequency domain electric and electromagnetic (FEM) methods.

  12. Development of a new sorptive extraction method based on simultaneous direct and headspace sampling modes for the screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples.

    PubMed

    Triñanes, Sara; Pena, Ma Teresa; Casais, Ma Carmen; Mejuto, Ma Carmen

    2015-01-01

    A new straightforward and inexpensive sample screening method for both EPA and EU priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water has been developed. The method is based on combined direct immersion and headspace (DIHS) sorptive extraction, using low-cost disposable material, coupled to ultraperformance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and UV detection (UPLC-FD-UV). Extraction parameters, such as the sampling mode, extraction time and ionic strength were investigated in detail and optimized. Under optimized conditions, water samples (16 mL) were concentrated in silicone disks by headspace (HS) and direct immersion (DI) modes simultaneously, at room temperature for 9h for the majority of the 24 studied compounds. Ultrasound-assisted desorption of extracted analytes in acetonitrile was carried out also at room temperature. The optimized chromatographic method provided a good linearity (R≥0.9991) and a broad linear range for all studied PAHs. The proposed analytical procedure exhibited a good precision level with relative standard deviations below 15% for all analytes. Quantification limits between 0.7 and 2.3 µg L(-1) and 0.16 and 3.90 ng L(-1) were obtained for compounds analyzed by UV (acenaphtylene, cyclopenta[c,d]pyrene and benzo[j]fluoranthene) and fluorescence, respectively. Finally, the proposed method was applied to the determination of PAHs in different real tap, river and wastewater samples.

  13. Development of an ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples.

    PubMed

    Pena, M Teresa; Casais, M Carmen; Mejuto, M Carmen; Cela, Rafael

    2009-09-04

    A simple, rapid and efficient method, ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME), has been developed for the first time for the determination of 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples. The chemical affinity between the ionic liquid (1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) and the analytes permits the extraction of the PAHs from the sample matrix also allowing their preconcentration. Thus, this technique combines extraction and concentration of the analytes into one step and avoids using toxic chlorinated solvents. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the type and volume of ionic liquid, type and volume of disperser solvent, extraction time, dispersion stage, centrifuging time and ionic strength, were optimised. Analysis of extracts was performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence detection (Flu). The optimised method exhibited a good precision level with relative standard deviation values between 1.2% and 5.7%. Quantification limits obtained for all of these considered compounds (between 0.1 and 7 ng L(-1)) were well below the limits recommended in the EU. The extraction yields for the different compounds obtained by IL-DLLME, ranged from 90.3% to 103.8%. Furthermore, high enrichment factors (301-346) were also achieved. The extraction efficiency of the optimised method is compared with that achieved by liquid-liquid extraction. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of PAHs in real water samples (tap, bottled, fountain, well, river, rainwater, treated and raw wastewater).

  14. A novel dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet method for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Ding, Zongqing; Lv, Lili; Song, Dandan; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2009-03-16

    A new dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet method (DLLME-SFO) was developed for the determination of five kinds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environmental water samples. In this method, no specific holder, such as the needle tip of microsyringe and the hollow fiber, is required for supporting the organic microdrop due to the using of organic solvent with low density and proper melting point. Furthermore, the extractant droplet can be collected easily by solidifying it in the lower temperature. 1-Dodecanol was chosen as extraction solvent in this work. A series of parameters that influence extraction were investigated systematically. Under optimal conditions, enrichment factors (EFs) for PAHs were in the range of 88-118. The limit of detections (LODs) for naphthalene, diphenyl, acenaphthene, anthracene and fluoranthene were 0.045, 0.86, 0.071, 1.1 and 0.66ngmL(-1), respectively. Good reproducibility and recovery of the method were also obtained. Compared with the traditional liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) methods, the proposed method obtained about 2 times higher enrichment factor than those in LPME. Moreover, the solidification of floating organic solvent facilitated the phase transfer. And most importantly, it avoided using high-density and toxic solvent in the traditional DLLME method. The proposed method was successfully applied to determinate PAHs in the environmental water samples. The simple and low-cost method provides an alternative method for the analysis of non-polar compounds in complex environmental water.

  15. A historical review of gravimetric observations in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragnvald Pettersen, Bjørn

    2016-10-01

    The first gravity determinations in Norway were made by Edward Sabine in 1823 with a pendulum instrument by Henry Kater. Seventy years later a Sterneck pendulum was acquired by the Norwegian Commission for the International Arc Measurements. It improved the precision and eventually reduced the bias of the absolute calibration from 85 to 15 mGal. The last pendulum observations in Norway were made in 1955 with an instrument from Cambridge University. At a precision of ±1 mGal, the purpose was to calibrate a section of the gravity line from Rome, Italy, to Hammerfest, Norway. Relative spring gravimeters were introduced in Norway in 1946 and were used to densify and expand the national gravity network. These data were used to produce regional geoids for Norway and adjacent ocean areas. Improved instrument precision allowed them to connect Norwegian and foreign fundamental stations as well. Extensive geophysical prospecting was made, as in other countries. The introduction of absolute gravimeters based on free-fall methods, especially after 2004, improved the calibration by 3 orders of magnitude and immediately revealed the secular changes of the gravity field in Norway. This was later confirmed by satellite gravimetry, which provides homogeneous data sets for global and regional gravity models. The first-ever determinations of gravity at sea were made by pendulum observations onboard the Norwegian polar vessel Fram during frozen-in conditions in the Arctic Ocean in 1893-1896. Simultaneously, an indirect method was developed at the University of Oslo for deducing gravity at sea with a hypsometer. The precision of both methods was greatly superseded by relative spring gravimeters 50 years later. They were employed extensively both at sea and on land. When GPS allowed precise positioning, relative gravimeters were mounted in airplanes to cover large areas of ocean faster than before. Gravimetry is currently being applied to study geodynamical phenomena relevant to

  16. Gravimetric determination of densities of seamounts along the Bonin Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takemi

    A new term "effective depth" is defined as the water depth including the nonlinear effect on a complete Bouguer correction. A least-squares method is used to determine the densities of seamounts from the linear relationship between free-air anomaly and the effective depth, which is calculated by applying a two-dimensional FFT to the bathymetric data. Densities of 19 seamounts along the Bonin Arc are determined using this least-squares method. For seven seamounts including two calderas and two islands, the densities are recalculated removing gravity effects of simple inner structures, which are inferred from the apparent density variations as functions of search radii. Generally speaking, with a track spacing less than 3 nautical miles and with a range of effective depths greater than 1 km, the densities can be determined with an accuracy of 0.05 g/cc. The determined densities have a wide range from 2.4 to nearly 3.0 g/cc. A relationship is recognized between densities of seamounts and their mean depths: the density increases with the depth and a prominent change in the rate of increase is seen at a depth of about 1 km. This is probably due to a decrease in porosity with increase in the depth. A clear pattern of densities is recognized for seamounts with mean depths of about 2 km: a density lower than 2.67 g/cc corresponds to an andesitic volcano and a density higher than 2.67 g/cc corresponds to a basaltic volcano. Two calderas are associated with high Bouguer anomalies.

  17. Formulation and analysis of food-grade mineral hydrocarbons in toxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Walters, D G; Sherrington, K V; Worrell, N; Riley, R A

    1994-06-01

    Methods are presented for the formulation and rapid determination of mineral hydrocarbons (MHCs) in animal diet and tissue. Food grade white oils and low melting point waxes are mixed as liquids with powdered diet. Higher melting point waxes are first powdered using a novel atomization technique before dry mixing with diet. MHCs sufficiently soluble in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) are determined in diet by ultrasonic solvent extraction, adsorption of polar material on Florisil and analysis of the residue by quantitative Fourier Transform Infra Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Quantification in tissue is achieved by aqueous saponification, followed by extraction, clean-up and FT-IR analysis as for diet samples. A 10-fold increase in sensitivity over previous methods is achieved, below 0.002% (w/w) in diet and 0.1 mg/g in tissue. Over 80% of the CCl4 used can be recovered and recycled. Control diet seems to contain approximately 0.003% (w/w) background MHC. The method was modified for one powdered wax, only sparingly soluble in CCl4, high concentrations being extracted from diet by flotation in aqueous cetrimide and determined gravimetrically with a limit of detection of 0.1% (w/w) in diet. Application of these methods to 90-day feeding studies is described, and future developments due to the phasing out of CCl4 are discussed.

  18. Integrated analysis of seismological, gravimetric and structural data for identification of active faults geometries in Abruzzo and Molise areas (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiosi, Germana; Nappi, Rosa; Alessio, Giuliana; Porfido, Sabina; Cella, Federico; Fedi, Maurizio; Florio, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    detected. The main results of our integrated analysis show a strong correlation among faults, hypocentral location of earthquakes and MDA lineaments from gravity data. Furthermore 2D seismic hypocentral locations together with high-resolution analysis of gravity anomalies have been correlated to estimate the fault systems parameters (strike, dip direction and dip angle) of some structures of the areas, through the application of the DEXP method (Fedi M. and M. Pilkington, 2012). References Fedi M., Cella F., Florio G., Rapolla A.; 2005: Multiscale Derivative Analysis of the gravity and magnetic fields of the Southern Apennines (Italy). In: Finetti I.R. (ed), CROP PROJECT: Deep Seismic Exploration of the Central Mediterranean and Italy, pp. 281-318. Fedi M., Pilkington M.; 2012: Understanding imaging methods for potential field data. Geophysics, 77: G13-G24. Gaudiosi G., Alessio G., Cella F., Fedi M., Florio G., Nappi, R.; 2012: Multiparametric data analysis for seismic sources identification in the Campanian area: merging of seismological, structural and gravimetric data. BGTA,. Vol. 53, n. 3, pp. 283-298.

  19. Granite petrogenesis revealed by combined gravimetric and radiometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartèse, Romain; Boulvais, Philippe; Poujol, Marc; Vigneresse, Jean-Louis

    2011-03-01

    In peneplaned terranes, it is often impossible to get a full 3D view of geological objects. In the case of granitic plutons, for which intrusive relationships between constituent units can provide first order information regarding their petrogenesis, this lack of 3D field evidence is a major issue. Indirect observations can be provided by geophysical surveys. Here, we interpret field gravity data and airborne gamma ray radiometric maps with whole rock geochemistry data in order to obtain information on granite petrogenesis. First, we test our proposed combined geophysical and geochemical approach on the Huelgoat Variscan intrusion (Armorican Massif, France) and we show that ternary radiometric maps are a good proxy for the distribution of K, U and Th radioelements. Then, we apply our method to the Lizio and Questembert Variscan granitic intrusions (Armorican Massif) and show that some features characteristic of the intrusions, such as the feeding zones, can be localised by geophysical imaging. Indeed, radiometric maps constitute a frozen image of the latest stage of the magmatic building of plutons.

  20. Gravimetric investigations on the North American Datum (1972 - 1973)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    All the available unclassified gravity data on the North American Datum (NAD) and in the surrounding oceans was assembled late in 1972 for the investigation of the gravity field in North America and its relation to North American Datum 1927 (NAD 27). The gravity data in Canada and the United States was compiled on a common datum compatible with the International Gravity Standardization Network 1971 (IGSN 71). The variation in the error of representation in the region is studied along with the correlation characteristics of gravity anomalies with elevation. A free air geoid (FAG 73) was computed from a combination of surface gravity data and Goddard Earth Model (GEM) 4 and this was used as the basis for the computation of the non-Stokesian contributions to the height anomaly. The geocentric orientation parameters obtained by this astrogravimetric method are compared with those obtained by satellite techniques. The differences are found to be no greater than those between individual satellite solutions. The differences between the astrogravimetric solution and satellite solutions GSFC 73 and GEM 6 are studied in detail with a view to obtaining a better understanding of these discrepancies.

  1. Efficacy of head space solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for determination of the trace extracellular hydrocarbons of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenna; Zhu, Tao; Wang, Yuejie; Zhang, Zhongyi; Jin, Zhao; Wang, Cong; Bai, Fali

    2016-09-01

    Hydrocarbons are widespread in cyanobacteria, and the biochemical synthetic pathways were recently identified. Intracellular fatty alka(e)nes of cyanobacteria have been detected by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, whether fatty alka(e)nes can be released to cyanobacterial culture media remains to be clarified. This work develops a sensitive method for analyzing the trace level of extracellular hydrocarbons in cyanobacterial culture media by head space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to GC/MS. Headspace (HS) extraction mode using polydimethylsiloxane fiber to extract for 30min at 50°C was employed as the optimal extraction conditions. Five cyanobacterial fatty alka(e)nes analogs including pentadecene (C15:1), pentadecane (C15:0), heptadecene (C17:1), heptadecane (C17:0), nonadecane (C19:0) were analyzed, and the data obtained from HS-SPME-GC/MS method were quantified using internal standard peak area comparisons. Limits of detection (LOD), limits of quantitation (LOQ), linear dynamic range, precisions (RSD) and recovery for the analysis of extracellular fatty alka(e)nes of cyanobacteria by HS-SPME-GC/MS were evaluated. The LODs limits of detection (S/N = 3) varied from 10 to 21 ng L-1. The correlation coefficients (r) of the calibration curves ranged from 0.9873 to 0.9977 with a linearity from 0.1 to 50 μg L-1. The RSD values were ranging from 7.8 to 14.0% and from 4.0 to 8.8% at 1.0 μg L-1 and 10.0 μg L-1 standard solutions, respectively. Comparative analysis of extracellular fatty alka(e)nes in the culture media of model cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 demonstrated that sensitivity of HS-SPME-GC/MS method was significantly higher than LLE method. Finally, we found that heptadecane can be released into the culture media of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 at the later growth period.

  2. Part A: Hydrocarbon Suspension in Slush Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindt, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of preparing suspensions of a hydrocarbon in slush hydrogen for nuclear fuel element corrosion inhibition in rocket engines were investigated. Suspensions were prepared using approximately 5000 ppm by mass of methane, ethane, or cyclopropane in slush hydrogen. The suspensions were stable in the slush, but the hydrocarbons settled out of the liquid melt.

  3. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, E.

    1995-05-23

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

  4. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1995-01-01

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  5. Application of high-speed counter-current chromatography as a new pretreatment method for analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xueli; Yang, Chunlei; Pei, Hairun; Li, Xinghong; Xu, Xiaobai; Ito, Yoichiro

    2011-01-01

    High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was investigated as a new sample pretreatment method for the analysis of trace polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water environmental samples. The experiment was performed with a nonaqueous binary two-phase solvent system composed of heptane-acetonitrile. The HSCCC column was first entirely filled with the upper stationary phase of the and a large volume of water sample was pumped into the column while the CCC column was rotated at 1600 rpm. Finally, the trace amount of PAHs extracted and enriched in the stationary phase were eluted out by the lower mobile phase. and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after concentration. The enrichment and cleanup of PAHs can be fulfilled online by this methodwithhigh recoveries (84.1%–103.2%) and good reproducibility (RSDs 4.9–12.2%) for 16 EPA PAHs under the optimized HSCCC pretreatment conditions. This method has been successfully applied to determine PAHs in lake waterwhere 8 PAHs were detected in the concentration of 40.9–89.9 ng/L. The present method is extremely suitable in the preparation of large volume of environmental water sample for the determination of a trace amount of organic pollutants including PAHs as studied in this paper. PMID:22282420

  6. Optimization and validation of a method using UHPLC-fluorescence for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cold-pressed vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Silva, Simone Alves da; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida Ferraz da Silva

    2017-04-15

    Among the different food categories, the oils and fats are important sources of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a group of organic chemical contaminants. The use of a validated method is essential to obtain reliable analytical results since the legislation establishes maximum limits in different foods. The objective of this study was to optimize and validate a method for the quantification of four PAHs [benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene] in vegetable oils. The samples were submitted to liquid-liquid extraction, followed by solid-phase extraction, and analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography. Under the optimized conditions, the validation parameters were evaluated according to the INMETRO Guidelines: linearity (r2 >0.99), selectivity (no matrix interference), limits of detection (0.08-0.30μgkg(-1)) and quantification (0.25-1.00μgkg(-1)), recovery (80.13-100.04%), repeatability and intermediate precision (<10% RSD). The method was found to be adequate for routine analysis of PAHs in the vegetable oils evaluated.

  7. Single-laboratory validation of a saponification method for the determination of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in edible oils by HPLC-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Akdoğan, Abdullah; Buttinger, Gerhard; Wenzl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method is reported for the determination of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), benz[a]anthracene (BaA), benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF) and chrysene (CHR)) in edible oils (sesame, maize, sunflower and olive oil) by high-performance liquid chromatography. Sample preparation is based on three steps including saponification, liquid-liquid partitioning and, finally, clean-up by solid phase extraction on 2 g of silica. Guidance on single-laboratory validation of the proposed analysis method was taken from the second edition of the Eurachem guide on method validation. The lower level of the working range of the method was determined by the limits of quantification of the individual analytes, and the upper level was equal to 5.0 µg kg(-1). The limits of detection and quantification of the four PAHs ranged from 0.06 to 0.12 µg kg(-1) and from 0.13 to 0.24 µg kg(-1). Recoveries of more than 84.8% were achieved for all four PAHs at two concentration levels (2.5 and 5.0 µg kg(-1)), and expanded relative measurement uncertainties were below 20%. The performance of the validated method was in all aspects compliant with provisions set in European Union legislation for the performance of analytical methods employed in the official control of food. The applicability of the method to routine samples was evaluated based on a limited number of commercial edible oil samples.

  8. Simultaneous monitoring method of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and persistent organic pollutants in the atmosphere using activated carbon fiber filter paper.

    PubMed

    Yagoh, Hiroaki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Tominaga, Yasuko; Shibuya, Nobuo; Masuda, Yoshio

    2006-04-01

    In order to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of PAHs and POPs in the atmosphere, an activated carbon fiber filter paper (ACFP) was used as the adsorbing material in this study. The pressurized liquid extraction method (PLE method) was used to extract PAHs and POPs collected on the ACFP. Toluene was an effective solvent to extract them from ACFP using the PLE method, but some of PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, were hardly extracted. These PAHs were adsorbed on the particulate matter in the atmosphere. In general, these forms of particulate matter could be collected using a quartz fiber paper (QFP); these PAHs were efficiently extracted from the QFP using the PLE method with toluene. In this study, the collecting method of the PAHs was modified by using QFP overlapped in front of the ACFP. Atmospheric monitoring of PAHs and POPs in Niigata area was performed using this method, and most of the target compounds were detected. However, some of the POPs, such as aldrin, endrin, mirex, could not be detected. The POPs, such as hexachlorobenzene, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane and chlordanes, and most of the PAHs were detected from all of the samples collected throughout the monitoring period. It was confirmed that these methods were effective to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of the PAHs and POPs in the atmosphere.

  9. Simultaneously high gravimetric and volumetric methane uptake characteristics of the metal-organic framework NU-111

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y; Srinivas, G; Wilmer, CE; Eryazici, I; Snurr, RQ; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK

    2013-01-01

    We show that the MOF NU-111 exhibits equally high volumetric and gravimetric methane uptake values, both within approximate to 75% of the DOE targets at 300 K. Upon reducing the temperature to 270 K, the uptake increases to 0.5 g g(-1) and 284 cc(STP) per cc at 65 bar. Adsorption of CO2 and H-2 is also reported. Simulated isotherms are in excellent agreement with those obtained from experiments.

  10. Validation of an Analytical Method for Determination of 13 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mineral water using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Ramezan; Kobarfard, Farzad; Yazdanpanah, Hassan; Eslamizad, Samira; Bayat, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) was used for the extraction and determination of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in mineral water samples. In this procedure, the suitable combination of extraction solvent (500 µL chloroform) and disperser solvent (1000 µL acetone) were quickly injected into the water sample (10.00 mL) by Hamilton syringe. After centrifugation, 500 µL of the lower organic phase was dried under a gentle stream of nitrogen, re-dissolved in chloroform and injected into GC-MS. Chloroform and acetone were found to be the best extraction and disperser solvent, respectively. Validation of the method was performed using spiked calibration curves. The enrichment factor ranged from 93 to 129 and the recovery ranged from 71 to 90%. The linear ranges for all the PAHs were 0.10-2.80 ngmL-1. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of PAHs in water by using anthracene-d10 as internal standard, were in the range of 4-11% for most of the analytes (n = 3). Limit of detection (LOD) for different PAHs were between 0.03 and 0.1 ngmL-1. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of PAHs in mineral water samples collected from Tehran. PMID:27610156

  11. Evaluation of sampling and analytical methods for nicotine and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon in indoor air. Final report, 1 February 1987-30 March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Kuhlman, M.R.; Hannan, S.W.; Bridges, C.

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate a potential collection medium, XAD-4 resin, for collecting nicotine and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and to determine whether one collection system and one analytical method will allow quantification of both compound classes in air. The extraction efficiency study was to determine the extraction method to quantitatively remove nicotine and PAH from XAD-4 resin. The results showed that a two-step Soxhlet extraction consisting of dichloromethane followed by ethyl acetate resulted in the best recoveries for both nicotine and PAH. In the sampling efficiency study, XAD-2 and XAD-4 resin were compared, in parallel, for collection of PAH and nicotine. Quartz fiber filters were placed upstream of both adsorbents to collect particles. Prior to sampling, both XAD-2 and XAD-4 traps were spiked with known amounts (2 microgram) of perdeuterated PAH and D3-nicotine. The experiments were performed with cigarette smoking and nonsmoking conditions. The spiked PAH were retained well in both adsorbents after exposure to more than 300 cu. m. of indoor air. The spiked XAD-4 resin gave higher recoveries for D3-nicotine than did the spiked XAD-2 resin. The collection efficiency for PAH for both adsorbents is very similar but higher levels of nicotine were collected on XAD-4 resin.

  12. Optimization of two different dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction methods followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) analysis in water.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wan-Chi; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-01

    Novel sample preparation methods termed "up-and-down shaker-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UDSA-DLLME)" and "water with low concentration of surfactant in dispersed solvent-assisted emulsion dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (WLSEME)" coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have been developed for the analysis of 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous samples. For UDSA-DLLME, an up-and-down shaker-assisted emulsification was employed. Extraction was complete in 3min. Only 14 μL of 1-heptanol was required, without a dispersive solvent. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range was 0.08-100 µg L(-1), and the LODs were in the range 0.022-0.060 µg L(-1). The enrichment factors (EFs) ranged from 392 to 766. Relative recoveries were between 84% and 113% for river, lake, and field water. In WLSEME, 9 μL of 1-nonanol as extraction solvent and 240 μL of 1 mg L(-1) Triton X-100 as surfactant were mixed in a microsyringe to form a cloudy emulsified solution, which was then injected into the samples. Compared with other surfactant-assisted emulsion methods, WLSEME uses much less surfactant. The linear range was 0.08-100 µg L(-1), and the LODs were 0.022-0.13 µg L(-1). The EFs ranged from 388 to 649. The relative recoveries were 86-114% for all three water specimens.

  13. Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Brigmon, Robin L.; Berry, Christopher J.

    2009-01-06

    A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

  14. Comparison of two extraction methods for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon residues in mallard duck eggs by GC and GC-MS. [NONE

    SciTech Connect

    Belisle, A.A.; Gay, M.L.; Coon, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbon residues in pooled eggs from a mallard duck on a diet of 25,000 ppm South Louisiana crude oil were compared after cleanup with and without saponification. The saponification procedure yielded superior reproducibility and extraction efficiency..

  15. Comparison of two extraction methods for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon residues in mallard duck eggs by GC and GC-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belisle, A.A.; Gay, M.L.; Coon, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbon residues in pooled eggs from a mallard duck on a diet of 25,000 ppm South Louisiana crude oil were compared after cleanup with and without saponification. The saponification procedure yielded superior reproducibility and extraction efficiency

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Mhiri, Najla; Karray, Fatma; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:26339653

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Yeast Strains from Petroleum Contaminated Industrial Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Mhiri, Najla; Karray, Fatma; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Two yeast strains are enriched and isolated from industrial refinery wastewater. These strains were observed for their ability to utilize several classes of petroleum hydrocarbons substrates, such as n-alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the D1/D2 variable domain and the ITS-region sequences indicated that strains HC1 and HC4 were members of the genera Candida and Trichosporon, respectively. The mechanism of hydrocarbon uptaking by yeast, Candida, and Trichosporon has been studied by means of the kinetic analysis of hydrocarbons-degrading yeasts growth and substrate assimilation. Biodegradation capacity and biomass quantity were daily measured during twelve days by gravimetric analysis and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry techniques. Removal of n-alkanes indicated a strong ability of hydrocarbon biodegradation by the isolated yeast strains. These two strains grew on long-chain n-alkane, diesel oil, and crude oil but failed to grow on short-chain n-alkane and aromatic hydrocarbons. Growth measurement attributes of the isolates, using n-hexadecane, diesel oil, and crude oil as substrates, showed that strain HC1 had better degradation for hydrocarbon substrates than strain HC4. In conclusion, these yeast strains can be useful for the bioremediation process and decreasing petroleum pollution in wastewater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons.

  18. Rapid method for hydrocarbon-type analysis of heavy oils and synthetic fuels by pyrolysis thin layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.A.; George, A.E.

    1982-09-01

    This work describes a rapid method for hydrocargon-type analysis applying thin layer chromatography (TLC) to the pentane-soluble fraction *malthenes) of the petroleum and synthetic fuels boiling above 200/sup 0/C. The principal component types encountered in this paper are saturates (SA), aromatics (AR), (mono and di together) polynuclear aromatics (PNA) and polar material (PO). The method uses a Iatroscan TLC pyrolyzer which combines the resolution capabilities of TLC with the possibility of quantification by using a flame-ionization detector (FID). Comparison of the results with those obtained by the API-60 procedure is presented.

  19. Correction for dispersion and Coulombic interactions in molecular clusters with density functional derived methods: application to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters.

    PubMed

    Rapacioli, Mathias; Spiegelman, Fernand; Talbi, Dahbia; Mineva, Tzonka; Goursot, Annick; Heine, Thomas; Seifert, Gotthard

    2009-06-28

    The density functional based tight binding (DFTB) is a semiempirical method derived from the density functional theory (DFT). It inherits therefore its problems in treating van der Waals clusters. A major error comes from dispersion forces, which are poorly described by commonly used DFT functionals, but which can be accounted for by an a posteriori treatment DFT-D. This correction is used for DFTB. The self-consistent charge (SCC) DFTB is built on Mulliken charges which are known to give a poor representation of Coulombic intermolecular potential. We propose to calculate this potential using the class IV/charge model 3 definition of atomic charges. The self-consistent calculation of these charges is introduced in the SCC procedure and corresponding nuclear forces are derived. Benzene dimer is then studied as a benchmark system with this corrected DFTB (c-DFTB-D) method, but also, for comparison, with the DFT-D. Both methods give similar results and are in agreement with references calculations (CCSD(T) and symmetry adapted perturbation theory) calculations. As a first application, pyrene dimer is studied with the c-DFTB-D and DFT-D methods. For coronene clusters, only the c-DFTB-D approach is used, which finds the sandwich configurations to be more stable than the T-shaped ones.

  20. Development of new method of δ(13)C measurement for trace hydrocarbons in natural gas using solid phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongping; Wang, Xibin; Li, Liwu; Zhang, Mingjie; Tao, Mingxin; Xing, Lantian; Cao, Chunhui; Xia, Yanqing

    2014-11-01

    Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of normal-level hydrocarbons (C1-C4) in natural gas is often successfully used in natural gas origin identification and classification, but little progress so far has been made for trace level hydrocarbons (C5-C14) in natural gas. In this study, we developed a method for rapid analysis of carbon isotopic ratios for trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples. This method can be described as a combined approach characterized by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) technique coupled to gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). In this study, the CAR-PDMS fiber was chosen as the SPME adsorptive material after comparative experiments with other four fibers, and the parameters, including equilibration time, extraction temperature and desorption time, for efficient extraction of trace hydrocarbons were systematically optimized. The results showed the carbon isotopic fractionation was not observed as a function of equilibration time and extraction temperature. And the δ(13)C signatures determined by SPME-GC/IRMS were in good agreement with the known δ(13)C values of C5-C14 measured by GC-IRMS, and the accuracy is generally within ±0.5‰. Five natural gas samples were analyzed using this method, and the δ(13)C values for C5-C14 components were obtained with satisfied repeatability. The SPME-GC/IRMS approach fitted with CAR-PDMS fiber is well suited for the preconcentration of trace hydrocarbons and provides so far the most reliable carbon isotopic analysis for trace compounds in natural gas.

  1. Quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in human hair by HPLC with fluorescence detection: a biological monitoring method to evaluate the exposure to PAHs.

    PubMed

    Toriba, Akira; Kuramae, Yayoi; Chetiyanukornkul, Thaneeya; Kizu, Ryoichi; Makino, Tsunehisa; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2003-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with fluorescence detection was developed for the quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in human hair. Fifteen kinds of PAHs classified as priority pollutants by the US EPA were quantified with four perdeuterated PAHs as internal standards. After 50 mg hair samples were washed with n-hexane to remove external contamination of PAHs, the samples were digested in 2.5 M sodium hydroxide. The digests were extracted with n-hexane and then analyzed by HPLC. Eleven kinds of PAHs were identified in hair samples of 20 subjects, and 10 kinds of PAHs were eventually quantified using the internal standards. For anthracene, chrysene and benzo[k]fluoranthene, significant differences were observed between smokers and non-smokers. Although benzo[b]fluoranthene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, benzo[ghi]perylene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene were observed in the particulates of indoor and outdoor air, they were not detected in all hair samples. The analysis of PAHs in human hair should be useful as a new biomarker to evaluate the exposure to PAHs.

  2. Detection and quantification of hydrocarbons in sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Williamson, Mike; Frank, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    A new technology developed by the US Geological Survey now allows for fast, direct detection of hydrocarbon plumes both in rivers and drifting in the deep ocean. Recent experiments show that the method can also detect and quantify hydrocarbons buried in river sediments and estuaries. This approach uses a variant of induced polarization, a surface-sensitive physical property of certain polarizable materials immersed in an electrolyte that can accept and adsorb charge under an inducing voltage. Known polarizable materials include most sulfides, ilmenite (FeTiO3), metallic objects such as buried wrecks and pipelines, and now hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon-in-water response to induced polarization is in fact nearly two orders of magnitude greater than the IP response of any of the hard minerals. The oil:water detection limit for hydrocarbons so far is down to 0.0002% in the laboratory.

  3. Isolation and Identification of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria from Ennore creek

    PubMed Central

    Subathra, Mamitha Kumar; Immanuel, Grasian; Suresh, Albert Haridoss

    2013-01-01

    The widespread problem caused due to petroleum products, is their discharge and accidental spillage in marine environment proving to be hazardous to the surroundings as well as life forms. Thus remediation of these hydrocarbons by natural decontamination process is of utmost importance. Bioremediation is a non-invasive and cost effective technique for the clean-up of these petroleum hydrocarbons. In this study we have investigated the ability of microorganisms present in the sediment sample to degrade these hydrocarbons, crude oil in particular, so that contaminated soils and water can be treated using microbes. Sediments samples were collected once in a month for a period of twelve months from area surrounding Ennore creek and screened for hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Of the 113 crude oil degrading isolates 15 isolates were selected and cultivated in BH media with 1% crude oil as a sole carbon and energy source. 3 efficient crude oil bacterial isolates Bacillus subtilis I1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa I5 and Pseudomonas putida I8 were identified both biochemically and phylogenetically. The quantitative analysis of biodegradation is carried out gravimetrically and highest degradation rate, 55% was recorded by Pseudomonas aeruginosa I5 isolate. PMID:23424279

  4. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  5. Method of CO and/or CO.sub.2 hydrogenation to higher hydrocarbons using doped mixed-metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, David A.; Haynes, Daniel J.; Abdelsayed, Victor; Smith, Mark W.; Spivey, James J.

    2017-03-21

    A method of hydrogenation utilizing a reactant gas mixture comprising a carbon oxide and a hydrogen agent, and a hydrogenation catalyst comprising a mixed-metal oxide containing metal sites supported and/or incorporated into the lattice. The mixed-metal oxide comprises a pyrochlore, a brownmillerite, or mixtures thereof doped at the A-site or the B-site. The metal site may comprise a deposited metal, where the deposited metal is a transition metal, an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, or mixtures thereof. Contact between the carbon oxide, hydrogen agent, and hydrogenation catalyst under appropriate conditions of temperature, pressure and gas flow rate generate a hydrogenation reaction and produce a hydrogenated product made up of carbon from the carbon oxide and some portion of the hydrogen agent. The carbon oxide may be CO, CO.sub.2, or mixtures thereof and the hydrogen agent may be H.sub.2. In a particular embodiment, the hydrogenated product comprises olefins, paraffins, or mixtures thereof.

  6. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  7. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  8. Utilization of an ionic liquid in situ preconcentration method for the determination of the 15 + 1 European Union polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in drinking water and fruit-tea infusions.

    PubMed

    Germán-Hernández, Mónica; Crespo-Llabrés, Pilar; Pino, Verónica; Ayala, Juan H; Afonso, Ana M

    2013-08-01

    An ionic liquid (IL) in situ preconcentration method was optimized and applied to the monitoring of the 15 + 1 European Union polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and fruit-tea infusions. The optimized method utilizes 10 mL of water (or infusion) containing 38 μL of the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and a content of 36.1 g/L NaCl, which are mixed with Li-NTf2 (340 μL, 0.2 g/mL), followed by vortex (4 min) and centrifugation (5 min). The obtained microdroplet containing hydrocarbons is diluted with acetonitrile and injected into an HPLC with UV/Vis and fluorescence detection. The method presented average enrichment factors of 127 for water (tap water and bottled water) and 27 for two fruit-tea infusions; with average relative recoveries of 86.7 and 106% for water and fruit-tea infusions, respectively. The method was sensitive, with detection limits ranging from 0.001 to 0.050 ng/mL in water, and from 0.010 to 0.600 ng/mL in fruit-tea infusions, for the fluorescent hydrocarbons. Real extraction efficiencies ranged from 12.7 to 58.7% for water, and from 20.2 to 117% for the infusions. The method was also fast (~12 min) and free of organic solvents in the extraction step.

  9. Investigating the quantitative structure-activity relationships for antibody recognition of two immunoassays for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by multiple regression methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Li; Gao, Zhi-Xian; Dai, Shu-Gui

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous contaminants found in the environment. Immunoassays represent useful analytical methods to complement traditional analytical procedures for PAHs. Cross-reactivity (CR) is a very useful character to evaluate the extent of cross-reaction of a cross-reactant in immunoreactions and immunoassays. The quantitative relationships between the molecular properties and the CR of PAHs were established by stepwise multiple linear regression, principal component regression and partial least square regression, using the data of two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The objective is to find the most important molecular properties that affect the CR, and predict the CR by multiple regression methods. The results show that the physicochemical, electronic and topological properties of the PAH molecules have an integrated effect on the CR properties for the two ELISAs, among which molar solubility (S(m)) and valence molecular connectivity index ((3)χ(v)) are the most important factors. The obtained regression equations for Ris(C) kit are all statistically significant (p < 0.005) and show satisfactory ability for predicting CR values, while equations for RaPID kit are all not significant (p > 0.05) and not suitable for predicting. It is probably because that the Ris(C) immunoassay employs a monoclonal antibody, while the RaPID kit is based on polyclonal antibody. Considering the important effect of solubility on the CR values, cross-reaction potential (CRP) is calculated and used as a complement of CR for evaluation of cross-reactions in immunoassays. Only the compounds with both high CR and high CRP can cause intense cross-reactions in immunoassays.

  10. Single-laboratory validation of a GC/MS method for the determination of 27 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in oils and fats.

    PubMed

    Rose, M; White, S; Macarthur, R; Petch, R G; Holland, J; Damant, A P

    2007-06-01

    A protocol for the measurement of 27 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in vegetable oils by GC/MS has undergone single-laboratory validation. PAHs were measured in three oils (olive pomace, sunflower and coconut oil). Five samples of each oil (one unfortified, and four fortified at concentrations between 2 and 50 microg kg(-1)) were analysed in replicate (four times in separate runs). Two samples (one unfortified and one fortified at 2 microg kg(-1)) of five oils (virgin olive oil, grapeseed oil, toasted sesame oil, olive margarine and palm oil) were also analysed. The validation included an assessment of measurement bias from the results of 120 measurements of a certified reference material (coconut oil BCR CRM458 certified for six PAHs). The method is capable of reliably detecting 26 out of 27 PAHs, at concentration <2 microg kg(-1) which is the European Union maximum limit for benzo[a]pyrene, in vegetable oils, olive pomace oil, sunflower oil and coconut oil. Quantitative results were obtained that are fit for purpose for concentrations from <2 to 50 microg kg(-1) for 24 out of 27 PAHs in olive pomace oil, sunflower oil and coconut oil. The reliable detection of 2 microg kg(-1) of PAHs in five additional oils (virgin olive oil, grapeseed oil, toasted sesame oil, olive margarine and palm oil) has been demonstrated. The method failed to produce fit-for-purpose results for the measurement of dibenzo[a,h]pyrene, anthanthrene and cyclopenta[c,d]pyrene. The reason for the failure was the large variation in results. The likely cause was the lack of availability of (13)C isotope internal standards for these PAHs at the time of the study. The protocol has been shown to be fit-for-purpose and is suitable for formal validation by inter-laboratory collaborative study.

  11. Determination of diesel fuel and motor oil in water and wastes by a modified diesel-range organics total petroleum hydrocarbon method

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, W.M.; Dhaliwal, J.S.; Perera, S.K.; Baumann, F.J.

    1996-03-01

    The American Petroleum Institute method for determination of diesel-range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) by gas-liquid chromatography with flame ionization detection was modified to allow simultaneous determination of motor oil. Motor oil elutes as a broad hump of unresolved alkanes and can be distinguished readily from diesel fuel and other fuel oils by its profile. The boiling point ranges for No. 2 diesel fuel and motor oil are C{sub 10{minus}} C{sub 21} and C{sub 21}-C{sub 38}, respectively, and these ranges define TPHs in diesel fuel (TPH-D) and motor oil (TPH-M). By this convention, less than 6% of No. 2 diesel is characterized as TPH-M, and less than 9% of motor oil is quantitated as TPH-D. Inlet discrimination was observed when motor oil was injected with a splitless injector. Accurate motor oil quantitation with splitless sample introduction requires calibration with the product or triacontane, which has a similar response factor. Detector response to motor oil (and other petroleum products) and a homologous series of n-alkanes was nearly constant when on-column injection was used. Instrument detection limit for motor oil was about 0.5 {mu}g (splitless injection, total area under the curve), and the widest linear range (up to 100 {mu}g) was obtained by subtracting the solvent chromatogram. Procedures for isolation of motor oil from oil-in-water (O/W) and water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions are described. Method detection limits for diesel fuel and motor oil in purified water were 0.041 and 1.5 mg/L, respectively. 11 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Song, Chunshan [State College, PA; Ma, Xiaoliang [State College, PA; Sprague, Michael J [Calgary, CA; Subramani, Velu [State College, PA

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  13. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  14. Carbon neutral hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank S; Keith, David W

    2008-11-13

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector may be the most difficult aspect of climate change mitigation. We suggest that carbon neutral hydrocarbons (CNHCs) offer an alternative pathway for deep emission cuts that complement the use of decarbonized energy carriers. Such fuels are synthesized from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon neutral hydrogen. The result is a liquid fuel compatible with the existing transportation infrastructure and therefore capable of a gradual deployment with minimum supply disruption. Capturing the atmospheric CO2 can be accomplished using biomass or industrial methods referred to as air capture. The viability of biomass fuels is strongly dependent on the environmental impacts of biomass production. Strong constraints on land use may favour the use of air capture. We conclude that CNHCs may be a viable alternative to hydrogen or conventional biofuels and warrant a comparable level of research effort and support.

  15. Thermo Gravimetric and Differential Thermal Analysis of Clay of Western Rajasthan (india)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhawat, M. S.

    The paper presents the study of thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis of blended clay. Western part of Rajasthan (India) is rich resource of Ball clays and it is mainly used by porcelain, sanitary ware, and tile industry. The quality and grade of clay available in the region vary from one deposit to other. To upgrade the fired colour and strength properties, different variety of clays may be blended together. The paper compares the results of thermal analysis one of blended clay B2 with reference clay of Ukraine which is imported by industries owners. The result revealed that the blended clay is having mineral kaolinite while the Ukrainian clay is Halloysite.

  16. Emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction based on deep eutectic solvent: An extraction method for the determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water samples.

    PubMed

    Khezeli, Tahere; Daneshfar, Ali; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-12-18

    In this study, for the first time, a simple, inexpensive and sensitive method named emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction based on deep eutectic solvent (ELLME-DES) was used for the extraction of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene (BTE) and seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water samples. In a typical experiment, 100μL of DES (as water-miscible extraction solvent) was added to 1.5mL of sample solution containing target analytes. A homogeneous solution was formed immediately. Injection of 100μL of THF (as emulsifier agent) into homogeneous solution provided a turbid state. After extraction, phase separation (aqueous phase/DES rich phase) was performed by centrifugation. DES rich phase was withdrawn by a micro-syringe and submitted to isocratic reverse-phase HPLC with UV detection. Under optimum conditions obtained by response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF), the calibration graphs were linear in the concentration range from 10 to 200μg/L for benzene, 10-400μg/L for toluene, 1-400μg/L for ethylbenzene, biphenyl, chrysene and fluorene, and 0.1-400μg/L for anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, phenanthrene and pyrene. The coefficients of determination (r(2)) and limits of detection were 0.9924-0.9997 and 0.02-6.8μg/L, respectively. This procedure was successfully applied to the determination of target analytes in spiked water samples. The relative mean recoveries ranged from 93.1 to 103.3%.

  17. A chemical extraction method for mimicking bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to wheat grown in soils containing various amounts of organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Shu Tao; Fuliu Xu; Wenxin Liu; Yanhong Cui; Raymond M. Coveney, Jr.

    2006-04-01

    Severe contamination of agricultural soils by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) occurs in many places in China mainly as a result of coal and biomass combustion. Because ingestion is the main source of human exposure to PAHs and vegetables are basic ingredients for the Chinese diet, it is important to know how and to what extent PAHs are accumulated in vegetables produced in contaminated soils. This study, evaluated the extent to which organic matter contents in soils influence the accumulation of PAHs by the roots of wheat plants and have developed a rapid chemical method for determining the bioavailability of PAH. Four PAHs, naphthalene, acenaphthylene, fluorene, and phenanthrene, were added to natural soil samples with different amounts of organic matter for pot experiments to evaluate apparent bioavailability of PAHs to wheat roots (Triticum aestivum L.). The extractabilities of PAHs in the soil were tested by a sequential extraction scheme using accelerated solvent extraction with water, n-hexane, and a mixture of dichloromethane and acetone as solvents. The water or n-hexane-extractable PAHs were positively correlated to dissolved organic matter (DOM) and negatively correlated to total organic matter (TOM), indicating mobilization and immobilization effects of DOM and TOM on soil PAHs, respectively. The apparent accumulation of PAHs by wheat roots was also positively and negatively correlated to DOM and TOM, respectively. As a result, there are positive correlations between the amounts of PAHs extracted by water or n-hexane and the quantities accumulated in plant roots, suggesting the feasibility of using water- or n-hexanes-extractable fractions as indicators of PAH availability to plants. 19 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in sediment by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Mary C.; Iverson, Jana L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    A method for the determination of 28 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 25 alkylated PAH homolog groups in sediment samples is described. The compounds are extracted from sediment by solvent extraction, followed by partial isolation using high-performance gel permeation chromatography. The compounds are identified and uantitated using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The report presents performance data for full-scan ion monitoring. Method detection limits in laboratory reagent matrix samples range from 1.3 to 5.1 micrograms per kilogram for the 28 PAHs. The 25 groups of alkylated PAHs are homologs of five groups of isomeric parent PAHs. Because of the lack of authentic standards, these homologs are reported semiquantitatively using a response factor from a parent PAH or a specific alkylated PAH. Precision data for the alkylated PAH homologs are presented using two different standard reference manuals produced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology: SRM 1941b and SRM 1944. The percent relative standard deviations for identified alkylated PAH homolog groups ranged from 1.55 to 6.98 for SRM 1941b and from 6.11 to 12.0 for SRM 1944. Homolog group concentrations reported under this method include the concentrations of individually identified compounds that are members of the group. Organochlorine (OC) pesticides--including toxaphene, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organophosphate (OP) pesticides--can be isolated simultaneously using this method. In brief, sediment samples are centrifuged to remove excess water and extracted overnight with dichloromethan (95 percent) and methanol (5 percent). The extract is concentrated and then filtered through a 0.2-micrometer polytetrafluoroethylene syringe filter. The PAH fraction is isolated by quantitatively injecting an aliquot of sample onto two polystyrene-divinylbenzene gel-permeation chromatographic columns connected in series. The compounds are eluted with dichloromethane

  19. The contribution of local gravimetric geoid models to the calibration of satellite altimetry data and an outlook of the latest GOCE GGM performance in Gavdos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziavos, I. N.; Vergos, G. S.; Mertikas, S. P.; Daskalakis, A.; Grigoriadis, V. N.; Tripolitsiotis, A.

    2013-04-01

    The use of geoid heights has been one of the available methodologies utilized for the independent calibration/validation of altimeters on-board satellites. This methodology has been employed for long in the Gavdos dedicated cal/val facility (Crete, Greece), where calibration results for the Jason satellites have been estimated, both for ascending and descending passes. The present work gives a detailed overview of the methodology followed in order to estimate a high-resolution and accuracy gravimetric geoid model for the wider Gavdos area, in support of the on-going calibration work. To estimate the geoid model, the well-known remove-compute-restore method is used while residual geoid heights are estimated through least-squares collocation so that associated errors are determined as well. It is found that the estimated formal geoid errors from LSC along passes 018 and 109 of Jason satellites, used for the bias estimation, range between ±0.8-1.6 cm. The so-derived geoid heights are employed in the determination of the Jason-2 altimeter bias for all available cycles (cycles 1-114, spanning the period from July 2008 to August 2011) together with the RioMed DOT model. From the results acquired the Jason-2 bias has been estimated to be +196.1 ± 3.2 mm for pass 109 and +161.9 ± 5.1 mm for pass 018. Within the same frame, the GOCE/GRACE-based geopotential model GOCO02s has been used to estimate the mean dynamic ocean topography and the steady-state circulation in the area around Gavdos. The so-derived DOT model was used to estimate the Jason-2 bias in an effort to evaluate the performance of satellite-only geoid models and investigate whether their spatial resolution and accuracy provides some improvement w.r.t. traditional local gravimetric geoids. From the results acquired with geoid heights from GOCO02s, the estimated Jason-2 bias deviates significantly from that of the local gravimetric model, which can be attributed to a possible mean offset and the low resolution

  20. Study of alumosilicate porcelains: Sol-gel preparation, characterization and erosion evaluated by gravimetric method

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanoviciene, Irma; Jankeviciute, Audrone; Pinkas, Jiri; Beganskiene, Aldona; Kareiva, Aivaras

    2008-11-03

    In this paper, the sol-gel synthesis and characteristic properties of kalsilite-type alumosilicates (KAlSiO{sub 4} and K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}AlSiO{sub 4}) are reported. The polycrystalline powders were characterized by thermal analysis (TG/DTA), powder X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-phase kalsilite oxides have been obtained after annealing precursor gels for 5 h in the temperature range of 750-850 deg. C. It was demonstrated that crystallinity of the samples slightly depends on the temperature of annealing. From the results obtained, it could be concluded that the KAlSiO{sub 4} solids are composed of the volumetric plate-like grains with no regular size (from 5 {mu}m to 30 {mu}m at 750 deg. C and around 5-50 {mu}m at 850 deg. C). Larger crystallites for mixed potassium-sodium kalsilite have formed (from 10 {mu}m to 80 {mu}m at 750 deg. C and >100 {mu}m at 850 deg. C) in comparison with potassium kalsilite samples). The erosion of obtained dental porcelain samples stored in saliva, beer and Coca-Cola was compared.

  1. Gravimetric response of water table fluctuations in the Sahelian Diffa site (East Niger): local effects including poro-elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, B.; Genthon, P.; Le Coz, M.; Hinderer, J.; Chalikakis, K.; Descloitres, M.

    2010-12-01

    The GHYRAF project (Gravimetry and HYdrology in AFrica) is devoted to a regional study of the relationship between hydrological and gravimetric signals in the Western African Monsoon area. Three sites are monitored in a decreasing pluviometric gradient: Djougou (North Benin), Wankama (Niamey area) and Bagara (Eastern Niger) with annual rainfalls amounting to 1200 mm, 600 mm and 350 mm, respectively. The Diffa/Bagara site is located 640m away from the Yobé temporary river, a tributary of Lake Chad fed by rainfall on the Jos Plateau (Nigeria) and that is generally flowing between mid July and January. Apart from this period, the river bed includes a series of ponds that form the top of the aquifer and that are pumped for intensive irrigated cropping. The 50m thick uppermost unconfined aquifer is locally recharged by the Yobé River and is flowing northwards. It has been explored by geophysical methods involving RMS and TDEM soundings, which provided information on its porosity and electrical conductivity, respectively. A series of nearly 50 holes drilled down to a 10 m depth in the Bagara area allowed to define the detailed sedimentary structure of the aquifer. It consists mainly of fluvial deposits with alternating layers of fine sands, coarse grained sands and clays. The sedimentary pile includes clayed layer of centimetric to metric thickness with a mean lateral extension of 300 m. The groundwater level is monitored by a series of 4 piezometers located at 25 m, 270 m, 500 m and 640 m from the river axis. The shape of the piezometric curve at the Bagara station is 0.4 m amplitude sinusoid and presents a maximum level at mid January and a minimum one near mid July. Clearly, water level fluctuations are governed by infiltration from the Yobe river with an offset controlled by the distance to it. With the 20% porosity measured by MRS, this would imply a nearly 30 nms-2 gravimetric signal, which is in fair agreement with the observed amplitude. However both the

  2. Assessment of factors influencing PM mass concentration measured by gravimetric & beta attenuation techniques at a suburban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, E.; Diapouli, E.; Tsilibari, E. M.; Adamopoulos, A. D.; Biskos, G.; Eleftheriadis, K.

    2016-04-01

    Near real-time atmospheric particulate matter (PM) monitors are extensively used in air quality networks given their ability to provide continuous measurements with minimal attention by the operator. Their principle of operation is based on measurement of a physical parameter that is quantitatively linked to the PM mass concentration. Significant discrepancies between these measurements and those obtained by the reference gravimetric method, conducted in regions with diverse climatic conditions, have been reported in the literature. In this study we compare systematic PM2.5 and PM10 gravimetric (GM) and beta attenuation (BA) measurements performed at a suburban site in Athens, Greece, over a period of 4 years (2009-2012). In general, BA and GM datasets exhibited similar temporal variation for both PM size fractions. An overestimation of the ΒΑ measurements, which was ∼30% for the PM2.5 and ∼10% for the PM10 data, was observed. Good linear correlations between GM and BA data were observed, with estimated Pearson coefficients being 0.79 for the PM2.5 and 0.85 for the PM10 measurements. The respective fitted equations through the entire dataset were BA = 0.71 GM + 6.2, and BA = 0.77 G M + 4.1. Better correlation between GM and BA measurements was observed during the cold rather than the warm period. Discrepancies between BA and GM PM2.5 measurements increased with increasing available water vapor, suggesting that the aerosol bound water has a strong effect on the measurements. The effect of filter material used for GM measurements (i.e., quartz, glass fiber, or Teflon) was also examined for the PM2.5 dataset. Best correlation between BA and GM data was observed when glass fiber, which is incidentally the material of the BA filter tape, was used in the GM measurements. When the BA to GM relationship was examined by further categorizing the data by the season (i.e., cold and warm period) for different filter types, the relationships that were fitted to the data

  3. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  4. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  5. Recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing vapors

    DOEpatents

    Mirza, Zia I.; Knell, Everett W.; Winter, Bruce L.

    1980-09-30

    Values are recovered from a hydrocarbon-containing vapor by contacting the vapor with quench liquid consisting essentially of hydrocarbons to form a condensate and a vapor residue, the condensate and quench fluid forming a combined liquid stream. The combined liquid stream is mixed with a viscosity-lowering liquid to form a mixed liquid having a viscosity lower than the viscosity of the combined liquid stream to permit easy handling of the combined liquid stream. The quench liquid is a cooled portion of the mixed liquid. Viscosity-lowering liquid is separated from a portion of the mixed liquid and cycled to form additional mixed liquid.

  6. CORONA-INDUCED PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS AND HYDROCARBONS OVER TIO2 IN THE ABSENCE OF A UV LIGHT SOURCE - A NOVEL AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY METHOD FOR OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corona-induced photooxidation is a novel oxidation methodology for the efficient oxidation of alcohols and hydrocarbons utilizing the advantage of both the high oxidizing power of ozone formed in the reactor as well as the photooxidation capability of the UV light generated durin...

  7. Least squares collocation applied to local gravimetric solutions from satellite gravity gradiometry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    An autonomous spaceborne gravity gradiometer mission is being considered as a post Geopotential Research Mission project. The introduction of satellite diometry data to geodesy is expected to improve solid earth gravity models. The possibility of utilizing gradiometer data for the determination of pertinent gravimetric quantities on a local basis is explored. The analytical technique of least squares collocation is investigated for its usefulness in local solutions of this type. It is assumed, in the error analysis, that the vertical gravity gradient component of the gradient tensor is used as the raw data signal from which the corresponding reference gradients are removed to create the centered observations required in the collocation solution. The reference gradients are computed from a high degree and order geopotential model. The solution can be made in terms of mean or point gravity anomalies, height anomalies, or other useful gravimetric quantities depending on the choice of covariance types. Selected for this study were 30 x 30 foot mean gravity and height anomalies. Existing software and new software are utilized to implement the collocation technique. It was determined that satellite gradiometry data at an altitude of 200 km can be used successfully for the determination of 30 x 30 foot mean gravity anomalies to an accuracy of 9.2 mgal from this algorithm. It is shown that the resulting accuracy estimates are sensitive to gravity model coefficient uncertainties, data reduction assumptions and satellite mission parameters.

  8. A kinetic study of pyrolysis and combustion of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris using thermo-gravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ankit; Chakraborty, Saikat

    2013-01-01

    This work uses thermo-gravimetric, differential thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analyses to evaluate the kinetics of pyrolysis (in inert/N(2) atmosphere) and (oxidative) combustion of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris by heating from 50 to 800 °C at heating rates of 5-40 °C/min. This study shows that combustion produces higher biomass conversion than pyrolysis, and that three stages of decomposition occur in both cases, of which, the second one--consisting of two temperature zones--is the main stage of devolatization. Proteins and carbohydrates are decomposed in the first of the two zones at activation energies of 51 and 45 kJ/mol for pyrolysis and combustion, respectively, while lipids are decomposed in its second zone at higher activation energies of 64 and 63 kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetic expressions of the reaction rates in the two zones for pyrolysis and combustion have been obtained and it has been shown that increased heating rates result in faster and higher conversion.

  9. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  10. Subsea hydrocarbon sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Marosko, R.J.; Warren, W.B.

    1981-08-04

    A hydrocarbon detection system is provided for use in a subsea hydrocarbon production installation which includes production tree assemblies, an electro-hydraulic control module located on the sea floor and remote from the production trees, cable assemblies interconnecting the control module with the production trees through magnetic coupling devices. A pair of inductive elements are electrically coupled by the surrounding sea water. Displacement of the conductive sea water by escaping hydrocarbons affects the coupling between the inductive elements to produce a hydrocarbon-presence-responsive output signal. The inductive elements are resonated within a selected frequency range by capacitors coupled with a primary inductor coil by auxiliary windings on a common core element. An excitation signal sweeps over the selected frequency range at a rate effective to produce a peak detected signal at the resonant frequency. The peak output signal is then monitored to form a control signal functionally related to the presence or absence of hydrocarbons in the sea water.

  11. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, Wei; Anderson, Roger N.

    1998-01-01

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

  12. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOEpatents

    He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

    1998-08-25

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

  13. Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Valone, Steven M.; Pattillo, Stevan G.; Trkula, Mitchell; Coates, Don M.; Shah, S. Ismat

    1996-01-01

    A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

  14. Antifoulant additive for light end hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Dickakian, G.B.

    1990-06-05

    This patent describes a method of treating a highly paraffinic hydrocarbon liquid containing not more than 5 wt% aromatics and from 10 to 10,000 ppm high molecular weight asphaltenes to prevent asphaltene fouling of equipment at temperatures below 400{degrees} F. It comprises: adding to the hydrocarbon liquid not less than 10 ppm and not more than 200 ppm of an oil soluble overbased magnesium alkyl aromatic sulfonate to inhibit asphaltene fouling.

  15. Emulsification of hydrocarbons by subsurface bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, D.S.; Thomas, J.M.; Raymond, R.L.; Ward, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions indicating the high probability of biosurfactant production.Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been

  16. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact

  17. Determination of the aromatic hydrocarbon to total hydrocarbon ratio of mineral oil in commercial lubricants.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Yoko; Suzuki, Kumi; Ogimoto, Mami

    2016-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the aromatic hydrocarbon to total hydrocarbon ratio of mineral oil in commercial lubricants; a survey was also conducted of commercial lubricants. Hydrocarbons in lubricants were separated from the matrix components of lubricants using a silica gel solid phase extraction (SPE) column. Normal-phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) coupled with an evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD) was used to determine the aromatic hydrocarbon to total hydrocarbon ratio. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with a diode array detector (DAD) and a refractive index detector (RID) was used to estimate carbon numbers and the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons, which supplemented the results obtained by NPLC/ELSD. Aromatic hydrocarbons were not detected in 12 lubricants specified for use for incidental food contact, but were detected in 13 out of 22 lubricants non-specified for incidental food contact at a ratio up to 18%. They were also detected in 10 out of 12 lubricants collected at food factories at a ratio up to 13%. The centre carbon numbers of hydrocarbons in commercial lubricants were estimated to be between C16 and C50.

  18. A highly accurate absolute gravimetric network for Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Christian; Ruess, Diethard; Butta, Hubert; Qirko, Kristaq; Pavicevic, Bozidar; Murat, Meha

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this project is to establish a basic gravity network in Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro to enable further investigations in geodetic and geophysical issues. Therefore the first time in history absolute gravity measurements were performed in these countries. The Norwegian mapping authority Kartverket is assisting the national mapping authorities in Kosovo (KCA) (Kosovo Cadastral Agency - Agjencia Kadastrale e Kosovës), Albania (ASIG) (Autoriteti Shtetëror i Informacionit Gjeohapësinor) and in Montenegro (REA) (Real Estate Administration of Montenegro - Uprava za nekretnine Crne Gore) in improving the geodetic frameworks. The gravity measurements are funded by Kartverket. The absolute gravimetric measurements were performed from BEV (Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying) with the absolute gravimeter FG5-242. As a national metrology institute (NMI) the Metrology Service of the BEV maintains the national standards for the realisation of the legal units of measurement and ensures their international equivalence and recognition. Laser and clock of the absolute gravimeter were calibrated before and after the measurements. The absolute gravimetric survey was carried out from September to October 2015. Finally all 8 scheduled stations were successfully measured: there are three stations located in Montenegro, two stations in Kosovo and three stations in Albania. The stations are distributed over the countries to establish a gravity network for each country. The vertical gradients were measured at all 8 stations with the relative gravimeter Scintrex CG5. The high class quality of some absolute gravity stations can be used for gravity monitoring activities in future. The measurement uncertainties of the absolute gravity measurements range around 2.5 micro Gal at all stations (1 microgal = 10-8 m/s2). In Montenegro the large gravity difference of 200 MilliGal between station Zabljak and Podgorica can be even used for calibration of relative gravimeters

  19. Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

    2007-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

  20. Hydrocarbon and nonhydrocarbon derivatives of cyclopropane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slabey, Vernon A; Wise, Paul H; Gibbons, Louis C

    1953-01-01

    The methods used to prepare and purify 19 hydrocarbon derivatives of cyclopropane are discussed. Of these hydrocarbons, 13 were synthesized for the first time. In addition to the hydrocarbons, six cyclopropylcarbinols, five alkyl cyclopropyl ketones, three cyclopropyl chlorides, and one cyclopropanedicarboxylate were prepared as synthesis intermediates. The melting points, boiling points, refractive indices, densities, and, in some instances, heats of combustion of both the hydrocarbon and nonhydrocarbon derivatives of cyclopropane were determined. These data and the infrared spectrum of each of the 34 cyclopropane compounds are presented in this report. The infrared absorption bands characteristic of the cyclopropyl ring are discussed, and some observations are made on the contribution of the cyclopropyl ring to the molecular refractions of cyclopropane compounds.

  1. Integration of remotely-sensed geobotanical and structural methods for hydrocarbon exploration in West-Central West Virginia. Quartery report, May 1, 1996--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Progress is reported on hydrocarbon exploration in West-Central West Virginia. In this period, the following tasks were carried out: a reconnaissance soil gas geochemical survey was performed at the Volcano test site and at the Lewis County test site; a geobotanical analysis of the September imagery was carried out in order to highlight spectral anomalies that appear to be associated with the historic volcano field and the Lewis County test site; and multi-temporal spectral reflectance measurements continued.

  2. Determination of descriptors for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related compounds by chromatographic methods and liquid-liquid partition in totally organic biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Ariyasena, Thiloka C; Poole, Colin F

    2014-09-26

    Retention factors on several columns and at various temperatures using gas chromatography and from reversed-phase liquid chromatography on a SunFire C18 column with various mobile phase compositions containing acetonitrile, methanol and tetrahydrofuran as strength adjusting solvents are combined with liquid-liquid partition coefficients in totally organic biphasic systems to calculate descriptors for 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eighteen related compounds of environmental interest. The use of a consistent protocol for the above measurements provides descriptors that are more self consistent for the estimation of physicochemical properties (octanol-water, air-octanol, air-water, aqueous solubility, and subcooled liquid vapor pressure). The descriptor in this report tend to have smaller values for the L and E descriptors and random differences in the B and S descriptors compared with literature sources. A simple atom fragment constant model is proposed for the estimation of descriptors from structure for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The new descriptors show no bias in the prediction of the air-water partition coefficient for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons unlike the literature values.

  3. Global detailed gravimetric geoid. [based on gravity model derived from satellite tracking and surface gravity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, S.; Marsh, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    A global detailed gravimetric geoid has been computed by combining the Goddard Space Flight Center GEM-4 gravity model derived from satellite and surface gravity data and surface 1 deg-by-1 deg mean free air gravity anomaly data. The accuracy of the geoid is + or - 2 meters on continents, 5 to 7 meters in areas where surface gravity data are sparse, and 10 to 15 meters in areas where no surface gravity data are available. Comparisons have been made with the astrogeodetic data provided by Rice (United States), Bomford (Europe), and Mather (Australia). Comparisons have also been carried out with geoid heights derived from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Australia.

  4. A micrographic and gravimetric study of intercalation and deintercalation of graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Intercalation and deintercalation of Union Carbide P-100 graphite fibers with liquid and vaporous bromine was studied gravimetrically and microscopically. The mass of the bromine intercalated fibers was found to be 17 to 20 percent greater than their pristine counterpart. This variation decreased to 17 to 18 percent after heating in air for 3 days at 200 C and to 14.5 to 18 percent after 6 days of 260 C heating. The fiber length did not change throughout the experiment. The fiber diameter increased during intercalation and decreased slightly upon deintercalation but was not affected by heating to 260 C for 3 days in air. Comparing the mass and volume data to those with highly oriented pyrolitic graphite or natural single crystal graphite suggested the possibility that the intercalated P-100 fibers could be mostly stage 4.

  5. Mean kernels to improve gravimetric geoid determination based on modified Stokes's integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, C.

    2011-11-01

    Gravimetric geoid computation is often based on modified Stokes's integration, where Stokes's integral is evaluated with some stochastic or deterministic kernel modification. Accurate numerical evaluation of Stokes's integral requires the modified kernel to be integrated across the area of each discretised grid cell (mean kernel). Evaluating the modified kernel at the center of the cell (point kernel) is an approximation, which may result in larger numerical integration errors near the computation point, where the modified kernel exhibits a strongly nonlinear behavior. The present study deals with the computation of whole-of-the-cell mean values of modified kernels, exemplified here with the Featherstone-Evans-Olliver (1998) kernel modification [Featherstone, W.E., Evans, J.D., Olliver, J.G., 1998. A Meissl-modified Vaníček and Kleusberg kernel to reduce the truncation error in gravimetric geoid computations. Journal of Geodesy 72(3), 154-160]. We investigate two approaches (analytical and numerical integration), which are capable of providing accurate mean kernels. The analytical integration approach is based on kernel weighting factors which are used for the conversion of point to mean kernels. For the efficient numerical integration, Gauss-Legendre quadrature is applied. The comparison of mean kernels from both approaches shows a satisfactory mutual agreement at the level of 10 -4 and better, which is considered to be sufficient for practical geoid computation requirements. Closed-loop tests based on the EGM2008 geopotential model demonstrate that using mean instead of point kernels reduces numerical integration errors by ˜65%. The use of mean kernels is recommended in remove-compute-restore geoid determination with the Featherstone-Evans-Olliver (1998) kernel or any other kernel modification under the condition that the kernel changes rapidly across the cells in the neighborhood of the computation point.

  6. Process for preparing hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Breuker, J.H.; De H.H.; Kwant, P.B.

    1980-01-15

    A process for preparing light distillate fractions and medicinal oil from heavy hydrocarbon oils comprises two-stage hydrocracking, fractionation distillation and catalytic hydrotreatment of at least part of the fractionation residue.

  7. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Funk, Edward W.; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Chang, Y. Alice

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture over a polymeric membrane which comprises a polymer capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds at temperature ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psi. The membranes which possess pore sizes ranging from about 10 to about 500 Angstroms are cast from a solvent solution and recovered.

  8. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  9. Development of a Joint Inversion Technique using Gravimetric and Muon-radiographic Data for Resolving Three-dimensional Density Structure of a Gigantic Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, R.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Okubo, S.; Oshima, H.; Maekawa, T.

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a method of analyzing gravimetric and muon-radiographic data for visualizing a three-dimensional density structure of a volcano. The method searches for a density structure that best explains the muon and gravity data simultaneously. For finding a solution, techniques in least-squares inversion were employed. According to the model simulation we have conducted, this new method was proved to have higher potential than previous gravimetric inversion and previous muon tomography [Taira,2010; Tanaka et al.,2010]. As a demonstration, we applied this method to Mt. Showa-Shinzan lava dome, Hokkaido, Japan. At this site, muon observation has already been performed with emulsion cloud chamber (ECC). The effective area of ECC was 1200 cm2, and the exposure time was 4 month.Tanaka et al.,[2007] calculated the amount of matter on the muon trajectories in the unit of gcm-2 (density times length). In addition to the muon data, we newly collected gravity data at 35 stations on / around the lava dome. The data was measured by using a LaCoste Romberg Gravimeter (G-875). Position of a gravity station was determined by GPS interferometry between a reference station and a moving station. Thereby, we conducted joint inversion of the muon and gravity data. The joint inversion yielded us the three-dimensional density profile of Mt.Showa-Shinzan. The density profile suggested the two features of the dome. Firstly, lava had intruded beneath the dome in a cylindrical shape whose diameter was 300 meter. This is inferred by the existence of high density(ρ > 2.4g/cc) region localized at an altitude of 220 ~ 260 meter. Secondly, we found a ultra high density region which was suspected to be a spine spreading vertically near the top of the dome.

  10. Hydrocarbon potential and exploration methods within cretaceous of Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt: a new frontier in a not-so-old area

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagne, A.J.; Boettcher, J.W.; Vuillermoz, C.

    1986-05-01

    A largely untested stratigraphic play exists within the Cretaceous section of the Utah-Wyoming Overthrust belt. Coarse Cretaceous sediments on the western Absaroka plate merge gradationally eastward into a predominantly shale section, which sets up the potential for Cretaceous sands to pinch out within Cretaceous shale in the Overthrust belt. The discovery well in this play is the Sam Gary Jr. 4-6X Lazeart with a reported initial potential of 87 BOPD from the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation. The anticipated source of hydrocarbons is Cretaceous shale - the documented source of most hydrocarbons found to date in the Utah-Wyoming Overthrust belt. Published research indicates that Cretaceous shales have reached adequate maturation levels under the Darby and Absaroka plates and probably on the back of the Absaroka plate. In addition, hydrocarbons may have moved updip from the generation area to shallower reservoirs as a result of secondary migration. Therefore, the geographic area of the play is extensive. State-of-the-art seismic data are an essential prerequisite for systematic exploration of the Cretaceous play. After acquiring a regional seismic grid and tying in well control and surface geology, the following procedure should be implemented: (1) use seismic reflections to establish a regional chronostratigraphic framework, (2) interpret seismic facies to determine geographic distribution of depositional environments, and (3) perform detailed interpretation and forward modeling to locate specific prospects. A reprocessed seismic line from the Overthrust belt confirms that data quality is high enough to use this procedure. An aggressive exploration program in this area is likely to result in significant reserve additions; a commitment to the search for the subtle trap in the Overthrust belt is now needed.

  11. A study of hydrocarbon migration events: Development and application of new methods for constraining the time of migration and an assessment of rock-fluid interactions. Final report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, R.D.; Engel, M.H.

    1993-12-31

    The authors are conducting the research to test and refine a paleomagnetic method for dating hydrocarbon migration, and to assess the chemical alteration of crude oils resulting from fluid-rock interactions. Samples were collected for paleomagnetic and organic geochemical investigations from several units. These include the Old Red Sandstone in Scotland, and the Schoolhouse Member of the Maroon Formation and the Belden Formation in Colorado. Studies of these units are completed or underway. In addition, simulation experiments, where the authors are attempting to form magnetite in the laboratory, are underway.

  12. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  13. Comparison of Factorial Kriging Analysis Method and Upward Continuation Filter to Recognize Subsurface Structures — A Case Study: Gravity Data from a Hydrocarbon Field in the Southeast Sedimentary Basins of the East Vietnam Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Mohammad-Reza; Koneshloo, Mohammad; Kamakar Rouhani, Abolghasem; Aghajani, Hamid

    2016-04-01

    To interpret geophysical anomaly maps, it is necessary to filter out regional and sometimes noise components. Each measured value in a gravity survey consists of different components. Upward continuation (UC) is one of the most widely used filters. The shortcoming of this filter is not to consider the spatial structure of the data, and also the fact that the trial and error approach and expert's judgment are needed to adjust it. This study aims to compare the factorial kriging analysis (FKA) and UC filters for separation of local and regional anomalies in the gravity data of a hydrocarbon field in the southeast sedimentary basins of the East Vietnam Sea. As shown in this paper, FKA method permits to filter out all of the identified structures, while the UC filter does not possess this capability. Therefore, beside general and classic filtering methods, the FKA method can be used as a strong method in filtering spatial structures and anomaly component.

  14. Structure and geological evolution of the island of Ponza, Italy: inferences from geological and gravimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, F.; Grimaldi, M.; Lirer, L.; Rapolla, A.

    1997-10-01

    A geological and a geophysical survey have been carried out at Ponza Island, Tyrrhenian sea, Italy. Geological and structural data allowed to identify three main tectonic systems: NW-SE, NE-SW and E-W trending. The first one is related to a pre-volcanic tectonic event, probably linked to the Pliocene extensional activity of the Tyrrhenian evolution; the other two systems affected the volcanic units in two different stages of the Lower Pleistocene, the earlier one after the rhyolitic hyaloclastic formation (HF) emplacement and the later one after the emplacement of older trachytic pyroclastic deposits (Lower Pyroclastic Units—LPU). The latter event was followed by the emersion of the whole Ponza area, as testified by a marked erosional surface and marine terrace deposits cropping out at the top of LPU. The Upper Pyroclastic Units (UPU) represent the younger trachytic activity of the island (1.3 Myr) and do not show evidence of tectonic activity. The NW-SE-trending tectonic system probably assisted the rhyolitic magma rise, while the NE-SW- and E-W-trending systems mainly assisted the trachytic magma rise, responsible for the explosive and effusive activity in the southern area and for the hydrothermal fluids that caused alteration processes in the northern area. A 161-station gravimetric survey was carried out on the island and surrounding islets. The geological data and the gravimetric survey have been used to propose a 2.5 D model in which rhyolitic hyaloclastic deposits (ρ = 1.7 g cm -3) overlay an articulated Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary substratum (ρ = 2.6 g cm -3) laying at a depth to 300 m below sea level. Both formations are crossed by rhyolitic dykes (ρ = 2.4 g cm -3) which mark feeder fractures. In the M. Guardia area, where a maximum is present, this model accounts for the presence of a horst of the rigid basement, a shallow trachytic lava flow and its feeder (ρ = 2.8 g cm -3).

  15. NIST gravimetrically prepared atmospheric level methane in dry air standards suite.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, George C; Carney, Jennifer; Guenther, Franklin R

    2012-04-17

    The Gas Metrology Group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology was tasked, by a congressional climate change act, to support the atmospheric measurement community through standards development of key greenhouse gases. This paper discusses the development of a methane (CH(4)) primary standard gas mixture (PSM) suite to support CH(4) measurement needs over a large amount-of-substance fraction range 0.3-20,000 μmol mol(-1), but with emphasis at the atmospheric level 300-4000 nmol mol(-1). Thirty-six CH(4) in dry air PSMs were prepared in 5.9 L high-pressure aluminum cylinders with use of a time-tested gravimetric technique. Ultimately 14 of these 36 PSMs define a CH(4) standard suite covering the nominal ambient atmospheric range of 300-4000 nmol mol(-1). Starting materials of pure CH(4) and cylinders of dry air were exhaustively analyzed to determine the purity and air composition. Gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) was used to determine a CH(4) response for each of the 14 PSMs where the reproducibility of average measurement ratios as a standard error was typically (0.04-0.26) %. An ISO 6134-compliant generalized least-squares regression (GenLine) program was used to analyze the consistency of the CH(4) suite. All 14 PSMs passed the u-test with residuals between the gravimetric and the GenLine solution values being between -0.74 and 1.31 nmol mol(-1); (0.00-0.16)% relative absolute. One of the 14 PSMs, FF4288 at 1836.16 ± 0.75 nmol mol(-1) (k = 1) amount-of-substance fraction, was sent to the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), the Republic of Korea's National Metrology Institute, for comparison. The same PSM was subsequently sent to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for analysis to their standards. Results show agreement between KRISS-NIST of +0.13% relative (+2.3 nmol mol(-1)) and NOAA-NIST of -0.14% relative (-2.54 nmol mol(-1)).

  16. Identification of chemistry-dependent artifacts on gravimetric PM fine readings at the T1 site during the MILAGRO field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, M.; Madronich, S.; Retama, A.; Weber, R.; Baumann, K.; Nenes, A.; Castillejos, M.; Ponce de León, C.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the MIRAGE (MILAGRO) study conducted 7-30 March 2006 in Mexico City and its Metropolitan Area (MCMA), fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) was collected using two Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) systems, and a Partisol instrument at the T1 super-site (Tecamac, State of Mexico). Inorganic analysis was performed on filter-based (PM 1, PM 2.5-URG) measurements also collected at this site. Measurements from the gravimetric (TEOMs, Partisol) and URG systems were inter-compared with chemical speciation measurements using a Particle Into Liquid Sampler (PILS) and Thermal Optical methods. Mass and chemical balances applied over the first part of the study (11-22 March) showed that a TEOM using a device (SES) which reduces particle-bound water and retains a fraction of semi-volatile compounds (SVM) gives readings ˜30% larger than a conventional TEOM. In the second part of the study (26-30 March), the loss of SVM during TEOM-heated filter collection (both systems) represented a significant fraction of PM 2.5 mass due to changes in particle composition. Overall, when nonvolatile nitrate dominated (i.e., when associated with crustal species and not NH 4+) and/or sulfate dominates (SO 42-/NO 3- molar ratio is >1), PM 2.5 mass readings are in agreement with those reported for the T1 site if TEOM is using a SES device. However, when volatile nitrate dominates (i.e., NH 4NO 3) or SO 42-/NO 3- molar ratio is <1, a larger fraction is lost from both TEOMs (with or without the SES device). Under the latter regime, uncertainties are large and gravimetric losses may reach 30%-50%. The gravimetric PARTISOL instrument recorded lower readings under all of the aforementioned conditions with differences versus TEOMs decreasing with increasing RH. These findings call for a careful characterization of such volatilization biases to improve current PM (PM 10, PM 2.5) measurements/networks, especially in alkaline-rich environments that can favor such biases. With regards

  17. Prediction of flame velocities of hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L; Simon, Dorothy M

    1954-01-01

    The laminar-flame-velocity data previously reported by the Lewis Laboratory are surveyed with respect to the correspondence between experimental flame velocities and values predicted by semitheoretical and empirical methods. The combustible mixture variables covered are hydrocarbon structure (56 hydrocarbons), equivalence ratio of fuel-air mixture, mole fraction of oxygen in the primary oxygen-nitrogen mixture (0.17 to 0.50), and initial mixture temperature (200 degrees to 615 degrees k). The semitheoretical method of prediction considered are based on three approximate theoretical equations for flame velocity: the Semenov equation, the Tanford-Pease equation, and the Manson equation.

  18. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Kambe, Takashi; Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L. T.; Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-07-01

    'Aromatic hydrocarbon' implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc's) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors, suggesting behavior not explained by the standard BCS picture of superconductivity. In this article, we describe the present status of this research field, and discuss its future prospects.

  19. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  20. Hydrocarbon fuel detergent

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.R.; Lyons, W.R.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a hydrocarbon fuel composition comprising: a hydrocarbon fuel; and a detergent amount of a detergent comprising an alkenylsuccinimide prepared by reacting an alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride with a mixture of amines, wherein at least 90 weight percent of the alkenyl substituent is derived from an olefin having a carbon chain of from 10 to 30 carbons or mixtures thereof, and wherein the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride is reacted with the mixture of amines at a mole ratio of 0.8 to 1.5 moles of the amines per mole of the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride.

  1. An instrument for gravimetric calibration of flow devices with corrosive gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remenyik, Carl J.; Hylton, James O.

    An instrument was developed for the calibration of mass flow controllers primarily used in the production of semiconductor wafers. Almost all other types of such calibrators require measurement of temperature, pressure, and volume. This instrument measures the weight of gas collected in a container and makes measuring those thermodynamic variables unnecessary. The need to measure the weight of the gas container is eliminated by submerging it in a liquid (presently water) and balancing its weight with the force of buoyancy. The accuracy of this gravimetric calibrator is unaffected by the pressure and temperature of the gas. The calibrator can also measure reactive, corrosive, and nonideal gases. The container remains connected to the process by a torsion capillary, and a load cell measures the changing gas weight continuously throughout the measuring process. A prototype was designed for gas flows ranging from 1 sccm of hydrogen to 10,000 sccm of tungsten hexafluoride, constructed, tested, and used to calibrate flow devices. Experience with the prototype and results are presented, and plans for further developments are discussed. Design of a version for the flow range from 0.1 sccm to 100 sccm is in progress.

  2. An Instrument for Gravimetric Calibration of Flow Devices with Corrosive Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1999-06-27

    An instrument was developed for the direct mass flow calibration of gas flowmeters that does not require measurement of temperature, pressure, or specific volume. This instrument measures the weight of gas collected in a container and makes measuring those thermodynamic variables unnecessary. The need to measure the weight of the gas container is eliminated by submerging it in a liquid (presently water) and balancing its weight with the force of buoyancy. The accuracy of this Gravimetric Calibrator is unaffected by the pressure and temperature of the gas. The Calibrator can also measure reactive, corrosive, and non-ideal gases. The container remains connected to the process by a torsion capillary, and a load cell measures the changing gas weight continuously throughout the measuring process. A prototype was designed for gas flows ranging from 1 sccm of hydrogen to 10,000 sccm of tungsten hexafluoride, constructed, tested, and used to calibrate flow devices. Experience with the prototype and results are presented, and plans for further developments are discussed.

  3. An instrument for gravimetric calibration of flow devices with corrosive gases

    SciTech Connect

    Remenyik, C.J.; Hylton, J.O.

    1995-04-01

    An instrument was developed for the calibration of mass flow controllers primarily used in the production of semiconductor wafers. Almost all other types of such calibrators require measurement of temperature, pressure and volume. This instrument measures the weight of gas collected in a container and makes measuring those thermodynamic variables unnecessary. The need to measure the weight of the gas container is eliminated by submerging it in a liquid (presently water) and balancing its weight with the force of buoyancy. The accuracy of this Gravimetric Calibrator is unaffected by the pressure and temperature of the gas. The Calibrator can also measure reactive, corrosive, and non-ideal gases. The container remains connected to the process by a torsion capillary, and a load cell measures the changing gas weight continuously throughout the measuring process. A prototype was designed for gas flows ranging from 1 sccm of hydrogen to 10,000 sccm of tungsten hexafluoride, constructed, tested, and used to calibrate flow devices. Experience with the prototype and results are presented, and plans for further developments are discussed. Design of a version for the flow range from 0.1 sccm to 100 sccm is in progress.

  4. Joint Interpretation of Magnetotelluric and Gravimetric Data from the South American Paraná Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, E. B.; Santos, H. B.; Vitorello, I.; Pádua, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    The Paraná Basin is a large sedimentary basin in central-eastern South America that extends through Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. Evolved completely over the South American continental crust, this Paleozoic basin is filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks deposited from the Silurian to the Cretaceous, when a significant basaltic effusion covered almost the entire area of the basin. A series of superposed sedimentary and volcanic rock layers were laid down under the influence of different tectonic settings, probably originated from distant collisional dynamics of continental boards that led to the amalgamation of Gondwanaland. The current boundaries of the basin can be the result of issuing erosional or of tectonic origin, such as the building up of large arches and faults. To evaluate the deep structural architecture of the lithosphere under a sedimentary basin is a great challenge, requiring the integration of different geophysical and geological studies. In this paper, we present the resulting Paraná Basin lithospheric model, obtained from processing and inversion of broadband and long-period magnetotelluric soundings along an E-W profile across the central part of the basin, complemented by a qualitative joint interpretation of gravimetric data, in order to obtain a more precise geoelectric model of the deep structure of the region.

  5. Gravimetric mass balance products for the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, Martin; Groh, Andreas; Horvath, Alexander; Forsberg, Rene; Meister, Rakia; Shepherd, Andrew; Hogg, Anna; Muir, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI) mass balance products for both the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) and the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) have been developed by the AIS_cci and the GIS_cci project. These Gravimetric Mass Balance (GMB) products are derived from satellite gravimetry data acquired by GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment), which is the only sensor directly sensitive to changes in mass. Using monthly GRACE gravity field solutions covering the period from 2002 until present two different GMB products are derived: (a) time series of monthly mass changes for the entire ice sheet and for individual drainage basins, and (b) gridded mass changes covering the entire ice sheet. The gridded product depicts spatial patterns of mass changes at a formal resolution of about 50 km, although the effective resolution provided by GRACE is about 200-500km. The algorithms used for the product generation have been selected within an open round robin experiment and are optimized to account for the complex GRACE error structures, to advance the limited spatial resolution and to separate signals super-imposed to mass changes of the cryosphere. Here the first release of the ESA CCI GMB products is presented. Both the basin averaged and the gridded products are assessed regarding their signal content and error characteristics. Finally, up-to-date mass balance estimates are presented for both ice sheets. The GMB products are freely accessible through data portals hosted by the AIS_cci and the GIS_cci project.

  6. Polyaniline nanofiber sponge filled graphene foam as high gravimetric and volumetric capacitance electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrós, J.; Boscá, A.; Martínez, J.; Ruiz-Gómez, S.; Pérez, L.; Barranco, V.; Calle, F.

    2016-06-01

    A 3D hierarchical porous composite structure is developed via the controlled electrodeposition of a polyaniline nanofiber sponge (PANI-NFS) that fills the pores of a chemical vapor deposited graphene foam (GF). The PANI-NFS/GF composite combines the efficient electronic transport in the GF scaffold (with 100-500 μm pore size) with the rapid diffusion of the electrolyte ions into the high-specific-surface-area and densely-packed PANI-NFS (with 100-500 nm pore size). The factor of 1000 in the pore hierarchy and the synergy between the materials, that form a supercapacitor composite electrode with an integrated extended current collector, lead to both very high gravimetric and volumetric capacitances. In particular, values of 1474 F g-1 and 86 F cm-3 for a GF filling factor of 11% (leading to an estimated value of 782 F cm-3 for 100%), respectively, are obtained at a current density of 0.47 A g-1. Moreover, the composite electrode presents a capacitance retention of 83% after 15000 cycles. This excellent behavior makes the PANI-NFS/GF composite electrodes very attractive for high-performance supercapacitors.

  7. Apparatus for recovering gaseous hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Guy R. B.; Barraclough, Bruce L.; Vanderborgh, Nicholas E.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

  8. Determination of benzo[a]pyrene levels in ambient air and the source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using a diagnostic ratio method in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Bortey-Sam, Nesta; Akoto, Osei; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2013-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous contaminants produced from incomplete combustion of fuel or vegetation fires. Their presence in air deserves attention because they can produce carcinogenic and mutagenic effects. As an industrialized and economically significant city in Ghana, Kumasi has been subject to heavy anthropogenic influences due to rapid economic development and urbanization leading to a greater fuel combustion rate. Airborne particulate samples were collected on filters using a Sibata air sampler and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our results indicated that air from the city center can be classified as highly polluted with benzo[a] pyrene (B[a]P). The diagnostic ratios of the results showed that PAHs in the air samples were mainly from fuel combustion.

  9. Molecular bioanalytical methods for monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in manufactured-gas-plant soils. Volume 2. Final report, September 1987-August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.M.H.; Sanseverino, J.; DiGrazia, P.M.; Applegate, B.M.; Sayler, G.S.

    1991-08-01

    The objectives of work described in the report were to provide fundamental information on the microbiology and biochemistry of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation, and to continue development and initiate applications for molecular techniques in providing needed information for biodegradation process monitoring and control. A significant portion of the effort was in support of research studies on dynamic systems analysis for PAH (presented in Volume I, GRI-91-0193). Specific work included: (1) Analyzing and developing a PAH degradative mixed bacterial culture for standardized bioreactor operation; (2) Developing a bacterial culture collection of organisms involved in PAH degradation; (3) Applying molecular techniques, principally DNA gene probe technology, for environmental diagnostic assessment of PAH bioremediation potential and biodegradation processes performance evaluation; (4) Development and application of reporter strain bioluminescent technology to improve capabilities of analysis for enzyme expression and/or bioavailability.

  10. Ab Initio-Based Predictions of Hydrocarbon Combustion Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-15

    occurring in hydrocarbon combustion at normal and extreme conditions. We are developing efficient, robust methods for automatically generating ...practical objective of the research was to address some of the challenges to developing improved hydrocarbon combustion models . This requires new...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This research addresses some of the challenges to developing improved combustion models for the discovery of alternative

  11. Preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers for the detection of aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Min-Jin; Shim, Wang-Geun; Yang, Chang Yel; Moon, Hee

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are designed to improve their sensitivity and selectivity for specific aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and xylene isomers. The MIPs based on methyl acrylate (MA) monomer are prepared using toluene and ethylene glycol dimetacrylate (EGDMA) as a template and a cross linking agent, respectively. The binding sites on the MIPs are characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), nitrogen adsorption isotherms, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The selective behaviors of the MIPs are evaluated by their adsorption properties on a gravimetric apparatus. It is found that the performance is strongly influenced by the composition ratios of cross-linker, functional monomer, and template molecule. The molecular recognition ability can be assessed on the basis of an imprinting effect. The results indicate that the prepared MIPs can be used for the aromatic hydrocarbon sensor materials with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  12. Zeroing in on hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Roest, I.P.B. van der; Brasser, D.J.S.; Wagebaert, A.P.J.; Stam, P.H.

    1997-05-01

    The increasing costs of remediating contaminated sites has stimulated research for cost-reducing techniques in soil investigation and cleanup techniques. MAP Environmental Research has developed a technology using ground penetrating radar in combination with in house developed software to locate and define the extent of hydrocarbon contamination. This article discusses the new technology. 2 figs.

  13. Hydrocarbon options emerge

    SciTech Connect

    Fairley, P.

    1995-11-01

    Europe stole the scene at last week`s International Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and Halon Alternatives Conference in Washington as attendees learned more about an accelerating shift to low-cost hydrocarbon refrigerants by European equipment manufacturers. Udo Wenning, representing German refrigerator market leader Bosch-Siemens, told the conference that hydrocarbons-isobutane as refrigerant and cyclopentane to blow the insulating foam-are now used in 90% of German production. Wenning says that in all performance parameters, hydrocarbons match the hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) replacements favored in the U.S. and Japan and that, unlike HCFCs and HFCs they have low global warming potential. Their Achille`s heel is flammability, Wenning says. American equipment manufacturers aiming to sell a new generation of equipment designed for the new HFC refrigerants sought to amplify concern over flammability at the conference. {open_quotes}In a society as litigious as ours, we do not see a future for flammable refrigerants,{close_quotes} says a representative of air conditioner manufacturer Carrier. Hydrocarbon supporters such as Greenpeace say the risks are mananageable.

  14. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1988-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  15. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  16. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1987-05-19

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 6 figs.

  17. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1988-09-13

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 5 figs.

  18. Polycyclic hydrocarbons and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gelboin, H.V.P; Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1981-01-01

    This book is Volume 3 of a three-volume series. It discusses polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the marine environment, various PAH dihydrodiols, certain enzyme reactions, carcinogenesis modifications, and tumor promotion. PAH epidemiology for quantifying cigarette smoking and air pollution risks is also covered. (JMT)

  19. Source identification of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil and sediments from Iguaçu River Watershed, Paraná, Brazil using the CHEMSIC method (CHEMometric analysis of Selected Ion Chromatograms).

    PubMed

    Gallotta, Fabiana D C; Christensen, Jan H

    2012-04-27

    A chemometric method based on principal component analysis (PCA) of pre-processed and combined sections of selected ion chromatograms (SICs) is used to characterise the hydrocarbon profiles in soil and sediment from Araucária, Guajuvira, General Lúcio and Balsa Nova Municipalities (Iguaçu River Watershed, Paraná, Brazil) and to indicate the main sources of hydrocarbon pollution. The study includes 38 SICs of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and four of petroleum biomarkers in two separate analyses. The most contaminated samples are inside the Presidente Getúlio Vargas Refinery area. These samples represent a petrogenic pattern and different weathering degrees. Samples from outside the refinery area are either less or not contaminated, or contain mixtures of diagenetic, pyrogenic and petrogenic inputs where different proportions predominate. The locations farthest away from industrial activity (Balsa Nova) contains the lowest levels of PAC contamination. There are no evidences to conclude positive matches between the samples from outside the refinery area and the Cusiana spilled oil.

  20. Hydrocarbonization research: completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, E.L.; Cochran, H.D. Jr.; Westmoreland, P.R.; Brown, C.H. Jr.; Oswald, G.E.; Barker, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbonization is a relatively simple process used for producing oil, substitute natural gas, and char by heating coal under a hydrogen-rich atmosphere. This report describes studies that were performed in a bench-scale hydrocarbonization system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period 1975 to 1978. The results of mock-up studies, coal metering valve and flowmeter development, and supporting work in an atmospheric hydrocarbonization system are also described. Oil, gas, and char yields were determined by hydrocarbonization of coal in a 0.1-m-diam fluidized-bed reactor operated at a pressure of 2170 kPa and at temperatures ranging from 694 to 854 K. The nominal coal feed rate was 4.5 kg/h. Wyodak subbituminous coal was used for most of the experiments. A maximum oil yield of approx. 21% based on moisture- and ash-free (maf) coal was achieved in the temperature range of 810 to 840 K. Recirculating fluidized-bed, uniformly fluidized-bed, and rapid hydropyrolysis reactors were used. A series of operability tests was made with Illinois No. 6 coal to determine whether caking coal could be processed in the recirculating fluidized-bed reactor. These tests were generally unsuccessful because of agglomeration and caking problems; however, these problems were eliminated by the use of chemically pretreated coal. Hydrocarbonization experiments were carried out with Illinois No. 6 coal that had been pretreated with CaO-NaOH, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and CaO-Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Oil yields of 14, 24, and 21%, respectively, were obtained from the runs with treated coal. Gas and char yield data and the composition of the oil, gas, and char products are presented.

  1. Mantle hydrocarbons: Abiotic or biotic?

    SciTech Connect

    Sugisaki, Ryuichi; Mimura, Koichi

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) and peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro and granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from field contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here {open_quotes}mantle hydrocarbons.{close_quotes} The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) {delta}{sup 13}C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about {minus}27{per_thousand}). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were inorganically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH{sub 4} at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C{sub 4}H{sub 10}. 76 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10.

  3. Catalysts for synthesizing various short chain hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Colmenares, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10), including novel photocatalysts, are disclosed for the synthesis of various short chain hydrocarbons. Light-transparent SiO.sub.2 aerogels doped with photochemically active uranyl ions (18) are fluidized in a fluidized-bed reactor (12) having a transparent window (16), by hydrogen and CO, C.sub.2 H.sub.4 or C.sub.2 H.sub.6 gas mixtures (20), and exposed to radiation (34) from a light source (32) external to the reactor (12), to produce the short chain hydrocarbons (36).

  4. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David Scott

    2009-07-21

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

  5. Ultrathin, Lightweight, and Wearable Li-O2 Battery with High Robustness and Gravimetric/Volumetric Energy Density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Xu, Ji-Jing; Liu, Qing-Chao; Chang, Zhi-Wen; Yin, Yan-Bin; Yang, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Xin-Bo

    2017-02-01

    An ultrathin, lightweight, and wearable Li-O2 battery with a novel segmented structure is first fabricated by employing a "break up the whole into parts" strategy. Superior battery performance including low overpotential, high specific capacity, good rate capability, excellent cycle stability, and high gravimetric/volumetric energy density (294.68 Wh kg(-1) /274.06 Wh L(-1) ) is successfully achieved even under repeatedly various deformation.

  6. Extracting hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A. Yu.; Ilyina, A. A.; Chuikin, A. V.; Velikov, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    An original method for the solid-phase microextraction of hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge is proposed. Comparative results from the chromatographic elution of substances after liquid-phase and solid-phase microextraction are presented. The percentage of the extraction of substances from aqueous solutions and the minimum detection limit for aromatic and aliphatic compounds are calculated.

  7. An NMR relaxometry and gravimetric study of gelatin-free aqueous polyacrylamide dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Steven; Schreiner, L. John

    2006-09-01

    In conformal radiation therapy, a high dose of radiation is given to a target volume to increase the probability of cure, and care is taken to minimize the dose to surrounding healthy tissue. The techniques used to achieve this are very complicated and the precise verification of the resulting three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution is required. Polyacrylamide gelatin (PAG) dosimeters with magnetic resonance imaging and optical computed tomography scanning provide the required 3D dosimetry with high spatial resolution. Many basic studies have characterized these chemical dosimeters that polymerize under irradiation. However, the investigation of the fundamental properties of the radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters is complicated by the presence of the background gelatin matrix. In this work, a gelatin-free model system for the study of the basic radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters has been developed. Experiments were performed on gelatin-free dosimeters, named aqueous polyacrylamide (APA) dosimeters, containing equal amounts of acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide. The APA dosimeters were prepared with four different total monomer concentrations (2, 4, 6 and 8% by weight). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin and spin-lattice proton relaxation measurements at 20 MHz, and gravimetric analyses performed on all four dosimeters, show a continuous degree of polymerization over the dose range of 0-25 Gy. The developed NMR model explains the relationship observed between the relaxation data and the amount of crosslinked polymer formed at each dose. This model can be extended with gelatin relaxation data to provide a fundamental understanding of radiation-induced polymerization in the conventional PAG dosimeters.

  8. Diamond-based MEMS devices for biosensing based on electrochemical and gravimetric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, John

    2005-03-01

    Diamond offers several potential advantages as a platform material for bioinorganic interfaces, including chemical and bio-inertness, electrochemistry, and high acoustic velocity. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), with a unique combination of physical, chemical and electrical properties, is attractive for a variety of biochemical/biomedical applications such as hermetic bio-inert coatings, MEMS compatible biosensors, and electrochemical biointerfaces. Over the past several years we have worked on both the fundamental and applied science related to enabling UNCD-based bioMEMS devices, which has encompassed both the development of UNCD surface functionalization strategies that allow fine control of surface hydrophobicity and bioactivity, as well as the development of material integration strategies and surface micromachining techniques to enable the microfabrication of UNCD structural layers (e.g. cantilevers) that incorporate these functionalized surfaces into MEMS devices which are back-end compatible with CMOS electronics. These devices could thus combine the electrochemical and gravimetric transduction of the selective adsorption of target analytes in MEMS structures fabricated directly on top of a silicon microchip.. In the past year we have successfully demonstrated the use of conducting UNCD thin films as electrochemical biointerfaces, via the successful attachment of a redox enzyme onto the UNCD surface, Glucose oxidase (GOD). The procedure to achieve GOD immobilization involved the electrochemical immobilization of nitrophenyl groups to the UNCD surface and transformation of nitrophenyl to aminophenyl groups and the covalent bonding of GOD to the carboxyl groups using the diisopropylcarbodiimide/ N-hydroxysuccinimide (DCC/NHS) as the catalyst. After immobilization, the activity of the enzyme was demonstrated via the direct electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide. We have also developed CMOS-compatible UNCD MEMS cantilevers and fixed-fixed beam

  9. Design and realization of the high-precision weighing systems as the gravimetric references in PTB's national water flow standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Rainer; Beyer, Karlheinz; Baade, Hans-Joachim

    2012-07-01

    PTB's ‘Hydrodynamic Test Field’, which represents a high-accuracy water flow calibration facility, serves as the national primary standard for liquid flow measurands. As the core reference device of this flow facility, a gravimetric standard has been incorporated, which comprises three special-design weighing systems: 300 kg, 3 tons and 30 tons. These gravimetric references were realized as a combination of a strain-gauge-based and an electromagnetic-force-compensation load-cell-based balance, each. Special emphasis had to be placed upon the dynamics design of the whole weighing system, due to the high measurement resolution and the dynamic behavior of the weighing systems, which are dynamically affected by mechanical vibrations caused by environmental impacts, flow machinery operation, flow noise in the pipework and induced wave motions in the weigh tanks. Taking into account all the above boundary conditions, the design work for the gravimetric reference resulted in a concrete foundation ‘rock’ of some 300 tons that rests on a number of vibration isolators. In addition to these passively operating vibration isolators, the vibration damping effect is enhanced by applying an electronic level regulation device.

  10. Gravimetric dilution of calibration gas mixtures (CO2, CO, and CH4 in He balance): Toward their uncertainty estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiman, Harry; Mulyana, Muhammad Rizky; Zuas, Oman

    2017-01-01

    Uncertainty estimation for the gravimetric dilution of four calibration gas mixtures [carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4) in helium (He) Balance] have been carried out according to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) of "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement". The uncertainty of the composition of gas mixtures was evaluated to measure the quality, reliability, and comparability of the prepared calibration gas mixtures. The analytical process for the uncertainty estimation is comprised of four main stages such as specification of measurand, identification, quantification of the relevant uncertainty sources, and combination of the individual uncertainty sources. In this study, important uncertainty sources including weighing, gas cylinder, component gas, certified calibration gas mixture (CCGM) added, and purity of the He balance were examined to estimate the final uncertainty of composition of diluted calibration gas mixtures. The results shows that the uncertainties of gravimetric dilution of the four calibration gas mixtures (CO2, CO, and CH4 in He Balance) were found in the range of 5.974% - 7.256% that were expressed as %relative of expanded uncertainty at 95% of confidence level (k=2). The major contribution of sources uncertainty to the final uncertainty arose from the uncertainty related to the certified calibration gas mixture (CCGM) which was the uncertainty value stated in the CCGM certificate. The verification of calibration gas mixtures composition shows that the gravimetric values of calibration gas mixtures were consistent with the results of measurement using gas chromatography flame ionization detector equipped by methanizer.

  11. Increased concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Alpine streams during annual snowmelt: investigating effects of sampling method, site characteristics, and meteorology.

    PubMed

    Shahpoury, Pourya; Hageman, Kimberly J; Matthaei, Christoph D; Alumbaugh, Robert E; Cook, Michelle E

    2014-10-07

    Silicone passive samplers and macroinvertebrates were used to measure time-integrated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in alpine streams during annual snowmelt. The three sampling sites were located near a main highway in Arthur's Pass National Park in the Southern Alps of New Zealand. A similar set of PAH congeners, composed of 2-4 rings, were found in silicone passive samplers and macroinvertebrates. The background PAH concentrations were similar at all sites, implying that proximity to the highway did not affect concentrations. In passive samplers, an increase of PAH concentrations by up to seven times was observed during snowmelt. In macroinvertebrates, the concentration changes were moderate; however, macroinvertebrate sampling did not occur during the main pulse observed in the passive samplers. The extent of vegetation in the catchment appeared to affect the concentration patterns seen at the different stream sites. A strong correlation was found between PAH concentrations in passive samplers and the amount of rainfall in the study area, indicating that the washout of contaminants from snowpack by rainfall was an important process.

  12. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  13. Hydrocarbon bioremediation -- An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation is the process that transforms xenobiotics introduced into the environment to a less toxic or innocuous form, or mineralizes them to inorganic species. The processes can be carried out through either aerobic or anaerobic pathways by indigenous heterotrophs or by specially engineered organisms. For some xenobiotics, the process can also be carried out by cometabolic processes, which use another compound as the carbon and energy source. This technique can be applied either in situ or ex situ. An overview is presented of real-world applications of a variety of hydrocarbon bioremediation approaches, including biopiling, bioventing, bioslurping, landfarming, electrobioreclamation, and biovertical circulation wells. Problems in translating laboratory and field-scale pilot test data to full-scale operating systems are discussed. Such issues include biodegradation enhancement, nutrient and electron acceptor delivery, alternative electron acceptors, and integration of biological, chemical, and physical approaches to hydrocarbon remediation.

  14. Site characterization and petroleum hydrocarbon plume mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a case study of site characterization and hydrocarbon contamination plume mapping/delineation in a gas processing plant in southern Mexico. The paper describes innovative and cost-effective use of passive (non-intrusive) and active (intrusive) techniques, including the use of compound-specific analytical methods for site characterization. The techniques used, on a demonstrative basis, include geophysical, geochemical, and borehole drilling. Geochemical techniques used to delineate the horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the site include soil gas surveys. The borehole drilling technique used to assess the vertical extent of contamination and confirm geophysical and geochemical data combines conventional hollow-stem auguring with direct push-probe using Geoprobe. Compound-specific analytical methods, such as hydrocarbon fingerprinting and a modified method for gasoline range organics, demonstrate the inherent merit and need for such analyses to properly characterize a site, while revealing the limitations of noncompound-specific total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. The results indicate that the techniques used in tandem can properly delineate the nature and extent of contamination at a site; often supplement or complement data, while reducing the risk of errors and omissions during the assessment phase; and provide data constructively to focus site-specific remediation efforts. 7 figs.

  15. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  16. Detection of new hydrocarbon reservoir using hydrocarbon microtremor combined attribute analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadhan, Dimmas; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Afnimar, Akbar, Muhammad Fadhillah; Mulyanagara, Guntur

    2013-09-01

    An increasing demand for oil and gas production undoubtedly triggered innovation in exploration studies to find new hydrocarbon reservoir. Low-frequency passive seismic method named Hy MAS (Hydrocarbon Microtremor Analysis) is a new method invented and developed recently by Spectraseis which provide a quick look to find new hydrocarbon reservoir prospect area. This method based on empirical study which investigated an increasing of spectra anomaly between 2 - 4 Hz above reservoir but missing from the measurement distant from the reservoir. This method is quite promising because it has been used as another DHI (Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator) instead of active seismic survey which has some problem when applied in sensitive biomes. Another advantage is this method is completely passive and does not require seismic artificial excitation sources. In this study, by utilizing many attributes mentioned in the latest publication of this method, we try to localize new hydrocarbon prospect area outside from the proven production field. We deployed 63 stations of measurement with two of them are located above the known reservoir production site. We measured every single attribute for each data acquired from all station and mapped it spatially for better understanding and interpretation. The analysis has been made by considering noise identification from the measurement location and controlled by the attribute values from the data acquired by two stations above the reservoir. As the result, we combined each attribute analysis and mapped it in weighted-scoring map which provide the level of consistency for every single attribute calculated in each station. Finally, the new reservoir location can be suggested by the station which has a weighted-score around the values from the two production reservoir stations. We successfully identified 5 new stations which expected to have good prospect of hydrocarbon reservoir.

  17. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  18. A synthetic Earth Gravity Model Designed Specifically for Testing Regional Gravimetric Geoid Determination Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, I.; Kuhn, M.; Claessens, S. J.; Featherstone, W. E.; Holmes, S. A.; Vaníček, P.

    2006-04-01

    A synthetic [simulated] Earth gravity model (SEGM) of the geoid, gravity and topography has been constructed over Australia specifically for validating regional gravimetric geoid determination theories, techniques and computer software. This regional high-resolution (1-arc-min by 1-arc-min) Australian SEGM (AusSEGM) is a combined source and effect model. The long-wavelength effect part (up to and including spherical harmonic degree and order 360) is taken from an assumed errorless EGM96 global geopotential model. Using forward modelling via numerical Newtonian integration, the short-wavelength source part is computed from a high-resolution (3-arc-sec by 3-arc-sec) synthetic digital elevation model (SDEM), which is a fractal surface based on the GLOBE v1 DEM. All topographic masses are modelled with a constant mass-density of 2,670 kg/m3. Based on these input data, gravity values on the synthetic topography (on a grid and at arbitrarily distributed discrete points) and consistent geoidal heights at regular 1-arc-min geographical grid nodes have been computed. The precision of the synthetic gravity and geoid data (after a first iteration) is estimated to be better than 30 μ Gal and 3 mm, respectively, which reduces to 1 μ Gal and 1 mm after a second iteration. The second iteration accounts for the changes in the geoid due to the superposed synthetic topographic mass distribution. The first iteration of AusSEGM is compared with Australian gravity and GPS-levelling data to verify that it gives a realistic representation of the Earth’s gravity field. As a by-product of this comparison, AusSEGM gives further evidence of the north south-trending error in the Australian Height Datum. The freely available AusSEGM-derived gravity and SDEM data, included as Electronic Supplementary Material (ESM) with this paper, can be used to compute a geoid model that, if correct, will agree to in 3 mm with the AusSEGM geoidal heights, thus offering independent verification of theories

  19. New Geomagnetic and Gravimetric Images of The Chicxulub Impact, Yucatan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, U.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Rebolledo, M.; Lara, J.

    The GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ) conducted in co-operation with the Uni- versidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) and the Consejo de Recursos Min- erales (CRM) 17 survey flights over the northern part of the Chicxulub impact struc- ture in the time frame from February 8th to February 24th, 2001. The aerogravimetry system of the GFZ was installed in a Britten-Norman Islander (BN-212), a small twin- engine aircraft so far used only for aeromagnetic surveys of the CRM. All flights in the area of interest were conducted from Mérida. GPS reference stations were installed in Mérida, Progreso and Celestun. The main profiles were flown in E-W-direction with a line spacing of 5 km and N-S-crossings of 30 km. The flight level was 600 ft over wa- ter and 1500 ft over land. The higher flight level on-shore was imperative due to safety regulations and turbulence effects being a compromise between resolution and flight stability. The main goal of the airborne survey was to fly aerogravimetry and aero- magnetometry over the Chicxulub impact structure in the northern part of Yucatán. To the present knowledge, the Chicxulub crater was caused by a meteorite impact about 65 million year before present. It is believed that among other events (large magmatic events in the Dekka region) this impact was mainly responsible for the mass extinction marking the Cretaceous-Tertiary-boundary. The northern part of the impact structure is buried under the sediments and shallow water of the southern Gulf of Mexico. This part is not accessible for research vessels because of its riffs and shoals close to the coast. Consequently, a large data gap remained in the most important, central part of the Chicxulub crater. Therefore, we mapped this area by aerogeophysical means to acquire geomagnetic and gravimetric images of strongly improved quality and resolu- tion. Both new data sets are used to discuss so far existing interpretations and models of the Chicxulub structure. Moreover, a

  20. Contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to SOA formed in an irradiated toluene/alpha-pinene/NO(x)/ air mixture: comparison of results using 14C content and SOA organic tracer methods.

    PubMed

    Offenberg, John H; Lewis, Charles W; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O

    2007-06-01

    An organic tracer method, recently proposed for estimating individual contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was evaluated by conducting a laboratory study where a binary hydrocarbon mixture, containing the anthropogenic aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene, and the biogenic monoterpene, alpha-pinene, was irradiated in air in the presence of NO(x) to form SOA. The contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to the total SOA concentration, calculated using the organic tracer method, were compared with those obtained with a more direct 14C content method. In the study, SOA to SOC ratios of 2.07 +/- 0.08 and 1.41 +/- 0.04 were measured for toluene and (alpha-pinene SOA, respectively. The individual tracer-based SOA contributions of 156 microg m(-3) for toluene and 198 microg m(-)3 for alpha-pinene, which together accounted for 82% of the gravimetrically determined total SOA concentration, compared well with the 14C values of 182 and 230 microg m(-3) measured for the respective SOA precursors. While there are uncertainties associated with the organic tracer method, largely due to the chemical complexity of SOA forming chemical mechanisms, the results of this study suggest the organic tracer method may serve as a useful tool for determining whether a precursor hydrocarbon is a major SOA contributor.

  1. Development of a supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of highly polar compounds in secondary organic aerosols formed from biogenic hydrocarbons in smog chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, L; Perraudin, E; Durand-Jolibois, R; Doussin, J F

    2006-11-01

    A new one-step method for the analysis of highly polar components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. This method should lead to a better understanding of SOA formation and evolution since it enables the compounds responsible for SOA formation to be identified. Since it is based on supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, it minimizes the analysis time and significantly enhances sensitivity, which makes it suitable for trace-level compounds, which are constituents of SOA. One of the key features of this method is the in situ derivatisation step: an online silylation allowing the measurement of highly polar, polyfunctional compounds, which is a prerequisite for the elucidation of chemical mechanisms. This paper presents the development of this analytical method and highlights its ability to address this major atmospheric issue through the analysis of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of a biogenic hydrocarbon (sabinene). Ozonolysis of sabinene was performed in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber. The aerosol components were derivatised in situ. More than thirty products, such as sabinaketone, sabinic acid and other multifunctional compounds including dicarboxylic acids and oxoacids, were measured. Nine of them were identified and quantified. The sensitivity and the linearity (0.91method were both good and detection limits ranged from 1.2 to 6.4 ng for the investigated compounds.

  2. A validated liquid chromatographic method for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in honey after homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction using hydrophilic acetonitrile and sodium chloride as mass separating agent.

    PubMed

    Koltsakidou, Anastasia; Zacharis, Constantinos K; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-16

    In the present report, a simple and cost-effective method for the determination of twelve US EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in honey samples after salting-assisted liquid-liquid extraction and UHPLC with fluorescence detection is proposed. The sample treatment is based on the usage of hydrophilic acetonitrile as extraction solvent and its phase separation under high salinity conditions. Due to the high sugar content of the samples the phase separation is promoted effortlessly. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency and method sensitivity including the concentration of the honey samples, the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and quantity of the inorganic salt, extraction time and centrifugation time was systematically investigated. The method was validated in-house according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC guidelines. The limit of detection (LOD) of the method lay between 0.02 and 0.04ngmL(-1) (corresponding to 0.08 and 0.16ngg(-1)) which are close to the quality criteria established by European Regulation (EC) 836/2011 concerning the PAHs in foodstuffs. The mean analytical bias (expressed as relative recoveries) in all spiking levels was acceptable being in the range of 54-118% while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was lower than 19%. The proposed method has been satisfactorily applied for the analysis of the selected PAHs residues in various honey samples obtained from Greek region.

  3. Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    2002-05-10

    Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

  4. Certification of new Pb iCRM (Candidate ERM-38xx series) via Gravimetric Isotope Mixtures and MC-ICP-MS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponzevera, E.; Quetel, C. R.

    2008-12-01

    Lead is known to be a particularly toxic chemical element. Mining and smelting of Pb and its domestic use over the centuries have contaminated the surface of Earth and jeopardized the health of humans, domestic animals and wildlife. Omnipresence of Pb has however an advantage. It can be used as an isotopic tracer of pollution sources and pathways in the environment. Pb isotopic Certified Reference Materials (iCRM) with undisputed characteristics are then required to validate Pb isotope ratio measurements. The materials currently available worldwide were produced in the 1960's by the National Bureau of Standards (now NIST, USA) and are now the object of polemics regarding the accuracy of some of the accompanying certified values. Moreover, new materials with lower relative uncertainty statements are demanded by users. This presentation is centred on the production and the certification at the EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements of a new series of Pb iCRM (candidate ERM-38xx series). The production included six Pb gravimetric isotope mixtures, a common Pb material dedicated to routine calibration work and a series of four 207Pb slightly enriched natural-like Pb materials for the validation of the δ-scale method below 0.01%. The gravimetric isotope mixtures method, originally supported by mass spectrometry measurements performed on GS-MS or TI-MS instruments, was applied successfully to MC-ICP-MS. The measurements and certification methods we developed were validated in several ways, including a systematic investigation on possible significant sources of uncertainty and comparisons of results obtained by different laboratories on identical samples. Relative uncertainties on isotope ratios obtained for the newly produced Pb iCRM are as low as 0.017%, which is between 2 and 4 times smaller than the uncertainties carried by the NIST-981 material. Going below 0.01% was not possible mainly because of uncompressible uncertainties coming from the

  5. Hydrocarbon Fuels Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    P.A.A 󈧄r𔃺 Masters, "High Density Propellants for Single Stage to Orbit Vehicles," Technical Memorandum, No. NASA/TM X -73503, Lewis Research Center...by interpolation. Optimum Hydrocarbon IP vs. LOX Sea-Level Expansion (14.7 psi, Pc’- 1000 psi) Z X .(299.6 sec) ---- 330 see. 310 see. 0...alkenes all lie along a vertical hne reflective of their common C.H2n molecular. formula. The positions of specific molecules are denoted by an X along with

  6. Moving hydrocarbons through portions of tar sands formations with a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Mudunuri, Ramesh Raju; Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael; Jaiswal, Namit; Mo, Weijian

    2010-05-18

    A method for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. The method includes heating a first portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the first portion. The heat is controlled to increase a fluid injectivity of the first portion. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid is injected and/or created in the first portion to cause at least some hydrocarbons to move from a second portion of the hydrocarbon layer to a third portion of the hydrocarbon layer. The second portion is between the first portion and the third portion. The first, second, and third portions are horizontally displaced from each other. The third portion is heated from one or more heaters located in the third portion. Hydrocarbons are produced from the third portion of the formation. The hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons from the second portion of the formation.

  7. Treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environment through bioremediation: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kriti; Chandra, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Bioremediation play key role in the treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated environment. Exposure of petroleum hydrocarbon into the environment occurs either due to human activities or accidentally and cause environmental pollution. Petroleum hydrocarbon cause many toxic compounds which are potent immunotoxicants and carcinogenic to human being. Remedial methods for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment include various physiochemical and biological methods. Due to the negative consequences caused by the physiochemical methods, the bioremediation technology is widely adapted and considered as one of the best technology for the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment. Bioremediation utilizes the natural ability of microorganism to degrade the hazardous compound into simpler and non hazardous form. This paper provides a review on the role of bioremediation in the treatment of petroleum contaminated environment, discuss various hazardous effects of petroleum hydrocarbon, various factors influencing biodegradation, role of various enzymes in biodegradation and genetic engineering in bioremediation.

  8. Volatile hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates are among the most commonly occurring and widely distributed contaminants in the environment. This chapter presents a summary of the sources, transport, fate, and remediation of volatile fuel hydrocarbons and fuel additives in the environment. Much research has focused on the transport and transformation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and methyl tert‐butyl ether, in groundwater following release from underground storage tanks. Natural attenuation from biodegradation limits the movement of these contaminants and has received considerable attention as an environmental restoration option. This chapter summarizes approaches to environmental restoration, including those that rely on natural attenuation, and also engineered or enhanced remediation. Researchers are increasingly combining several microbial and molecular-based methods to give a complete picture of biodegradation potential and occurrence at contaminated field sites. New insights into the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel additives have been gained by recent advances in analytical tools and approaches, including stable isotope fractionation, analysis of metabolic intermediates, and direct microbial evidence. However, development of long-term detailed monitoring programs is required to further develop conceptual models of natural attenuation and increase our understanding of the behavior of contaminant mixtures in the subsurface.

  9. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated polar soils.

    PubMed

    Aislabie, Jackie; Saul, David J; Foght, Julia M

    2006-06-01

    Bioremediation is increasingly viewed as an appropriate remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated polar soils. As for all soils, the successful application of bioremediation depends on appropriate biodegradative microbes and environmental conditions in situ. Laboratory studies have confirmed that hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria typically assigned to the genera Rhodococcus, Sphingomonas or Pseudomonas are present in contaminated polar soils. However, as indicated by the persistence of spilled hydrocarbons, environmental conditions in situ are suboptimal for biodegradation in polar soils. Therefore, it is likely that ex situ bioremediation will be the method of choice for ameliorating and controlling the factors limiting microbial activity, i.e. low and fluctuating soil temperatures, low levels of nutrients, and possible alkalinity and low moisture. Care must be taken when adding nutrients to the coarse-textured, low-moisture soils prevalent in continental Antarctica and the high Arctic because excess levels can inhibit hydrocarbon biodegradation by decreasing soil water potentials. Bioremediation experiments conducted on site in the Arctic indicate that land farming and biopiles may be useful approaches for bioremediation of polar soils.

  10. Chemical contamination and transformation of soils in hydrocarbon production regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamotaev, I. V.; Ivanov, I. V.; Mikheev, P. V.; Nikonova, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    The current concepts of soil pollution and transformation in the regions of hydrocarbon production have been reviewed. The development of an oil field creates extreme conditions for pedogenesis. Tendencies in the radial migration, spatial distribution, metabolism, and accumulation of pollutants (oil, oil products, and attendant heavy metals) in soils of different bioclimatic zones have been analyzed. The radial and lateral mobility of pollution halos is a universal tendency in the technogenic transformation of soils and soil cover in the regions of hydrocarbon production. The biodegradation time of different hydrocarbon compounds strongly varies under different landscape conditions, from several months to several tens of years. The transformation of original (mineral and organic) soils to their technogenic modifications (mechanically disturbed, chemically contaminated, and chemo soils and chemozems) occurs in the impact zone of technogenic hydrocarbon fluxes under any physiographical conditions. The integrated use of the existing methods for the determination of the total content and qualitative composition of bituminous substances and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in combination with the chromatographic determination of normal alkanes and hydrocarbon gases, as well as innovative methods of studies, allows revealing new processes and genetic relationships in soils and studying the functioning of soils and soil cover. The study of the hydrocarbon contamination of soils is important for development of restoration measures and lays the groundwork for the ecological and hygienic regulation based on the zonation of soil and landscape resistance to different pollutants.

  11. [Electrochemical reduction characteristics and mechanism of chlorinated hydrocarbon at the copper electrode].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Ying; Gao, Ting-Yao; Zhou, Rong-Feng; Ma, Lu-Ming

    2005-07-01

    The electrochemical reduction characteristics of chlorinated hydrocarbons were investigated by applying cyclic voltammetry technique. The reduction mechanism and reactivity of the chlorinated hydrocarbons at the copper electrodes were explored. The relation between the reductive reactivity at the copper electrode and the structures of this kind of compounds was discussed. The experimental results show that chlorinated paraffin hydrocarbons and a portion of chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons could be reduced directly at the copper electrode; however, chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons aren't easy to reduced directly at the copper electrode. The results provide a theoretical basis for the catalyzed iron inner electrolysis method.

  12. Identification of active faults in Abruzzo area (central Italy) through the analysis of geological, seismological and gravimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiso, Paola; Paoletti, Valeria; Gaudiosi, Germana; Nappi, Rosa; Cella, Federico; Fedi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Identification of active faults in abruzzo area (central italy) through the analysis of geological, seismological and gravimetric data The aim of this study is to identify and constrain the geometry of the seismogenic structures (active, outcropping and buried fault systems) of the Abruzzo area (central Italy), through an integrated analysis of geo-structural, seismic and gravimetric data. We generated three thematic: "faults", "earthquakes" and "gravimetric" data: i) The fault dataset consists of data extracted from the available structural and geological maps (ITHACA catalogue; the "Neotectonic Map of Italy" 1:500.000; several geological sheets 1:50.000 from ISPRA CARG project; the Geological Map 1:100.000 Sheet 1), and many geological studies. ii) The earthquakes datasets was created by merging the data from historical and instrumental Catalogues (CPTI04 and CPTI11; ISIDE - INGV). iii) The gravimetric datasets consists in the Multiscale Derivative Analysis (MDA) of the Bouguer anomaly map of the area, whose maxima show the presence of density lineaments. The merge of these datasets in GIS environment, highlighted four possible scenarios of correlation between faults, earthquakes and MDA maxima: 1) the existence of active faults, revealed by a strong correlation between epicentral location of seismic clusters, fault positions and MDA maxima; 2) the existence of buried active faults, highlighted by a good correlation between MDA maxima and epicentral positions, without correspondence with faults known from geological data; 3) the existence of inactive or silent faults, detected by the presence of faults reported in the geological datasets and literature which are associated with MDA maxima, without correlation of earthquakes; 4) the existence of faults not correlated with MDA maxima; this could be due to faults putting in contact two lithologies with a similar density. A comparison between seismic hypocentral locations and the fault geometry retrieved by DEXP

  13. Comparative study for determination of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons 'PAHs' by a new spectrophotometric method and multivariate calibration coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Omar; El Kosasy, A M; El-Sayed Okeil, S M

    2014-12-10

    A modified dispersive liquid-liquid extraction (DLLE) procedure coupled with spectrophotometric techniques was adopted for simultaneous determination of naphthalene, anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, alpha-naphthol and beta-naphthol in water samples. Two different methods were used, partial least-squares (PLS) method and a new derivative ratio method, namely extended derivative ratio (EDR). A PLS-2 model was established for simultaneous determination of the studied pollutants in methanol, by using twenty mixtures as calibration set and five mixtures as validation set. Also, in methanol a novel (EDR) method was developed for determination of the studied pollutants, where each component in the mixture of the five PAHs was determined by using a mixture of the other four components as divisor. Chemometric and EDR methods could be also adopted for determination of the studied PAH in water samples after transferring them from aqueous medium to the organic one by utilizing dispersive liquid-liquid extraction technique, where different parameters were investigated using a full factorial design. Both methods were compared and the proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines and successfully applied to determine these PAHs simultaneously in spiked water samples, where satisfactory results were obtained. All the results obtained agreed with those of published methods, where no significant difference was observed.

  14. Comparative study for determination of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ‘PAHs' by a new spectrophotometric method and multivariate calibration coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, Omar; El Kosasy, A. M.; El-Sayed Okeil, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    A modified dispersive liquid-liquid extraction (DLLE) procedure coupled with spectrophotometric techniques was adopted for simultaneous determination of naphthalene, anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, alpha-naphthol and beta-naphthol in water samples. Two different methods were used, partial least-squares (PLS) method and a new derivative ratio method, namely extended derivative ratio (EDR). A PLS-2 model was established for simultaneous determination of the studied pollutants in methanol, by using twenty mixtures as calibration set and five mixtures as validation set. Also, in methanol a novel (EDR) method was developed for determination of the studied pollutants, where each component in the mixture of the five PAHs was determined by using a mixture of the other four components as divisor. Chemometric and EDR methods could be also adopted for determination of the studied PAH in water samples after transferring them from aqueous medium to the organic one by utilizing dispersive liquid-liquid extraction technique, where different parameters were investigated using a full factorial design. Both methods were compared and the proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines and successfully applied to determine these PAHs simultaneously in spiked water samples, where satisfactory results were obtained. All the results obtained agreed with those of published methods, where no significant difference was observed.

  15. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  16. Enhanced liquid hydrocarbon recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.D.

    1992-07-14

    This patent describes a process for recovering liquid hydrocarbons. It comprises: injecting into a fractured subterranean formation a polymer enhanced foam comprising a polymer selected from a synthetic polymer or a biopolymer, a surfactant, an aqueous solvent and a gas, recovering liquid hydrocarbons from the formation.

  17. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  18. The stability and utility of diagnostic ratio hydrocarbon fingerprinting for soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, G.S.; Sara McMillen

    1996-12-31

    In order to recover costs for oil spill cleanup and restoration regulatory agencies and trustees of natural resources are interested in identifying parties responsible for hydrocarbon releases, and for associated environmental damages. Chemical analyses of contaminated soil and groundwater samples are currently used to identify the sources of contamination in soil and groundwater systems. However, conventional hydrocarbon fingerprinting approaches such as EPA Method 8015, EPA Method 8270, and ASTM Method 3328-91 afford a low resolution fingerprint that is easily degraded in the environment. The challenge to the hydrocarbon chemist is to develop an analytical approach that minimizes the impact of environmental weathering and biodegradation on the oil signature and improves the accuracy of oil source identification. An advanced chemical fingerprinting strategy is presented that combines sensitive and hydrocarbon specific analytical methods with a detailed interpretive strategy designed to minimize the impacts of environmental weathering and biodegradation. Data will be presented from a series of oil biodegradation studies in soil that clearly demonstrate the utility and stability of source ratio analysis over a wide range of oil degradation states and oil types. Using principal component analysis, stable source ratios of C{sub 3}-dibenzothiophenes/C{sub 3}-phenanthrenes, and C{sub 2}-dibenzothiophenes/C{sub 2}-phenanthrenes were identified and evaluated. These source ratios retain their characteristic source ratio signature even after 95 percent of the PAH and dibenzothiophene target analytes and 70 percent of the total oil has been biodegraded.

  19. The stability and utility of diagnostic ratio hydrocarbon fingerprinting for soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, G.S.; Sara McMillen

    1996-01-01

    In order to recover costs for oil spill cleanup and restoration regulatory agencies and trustees of natural resources are interested in identifying parties responsible for hydrocarbon releases, and for associated environmental damages. Chemical analyses of contaminated soil and groundwater samples are currently used to identify the sources of contamination in soil and groundwater systems. However, conventional hydrocarbon fingerprinting approaches such as EPA Method 8015, EPA Method 8270, and ASTM Method 3328-91 afford a low resolution fingerprint that is easily degraded in the environment. The challenge to the hydrocarbon chemist is to develop an analytical approach that minimizes the impact of environmental weathering and biodegradation on the oil signature and improves the accuracy of oil source identification. An advanced chemical fingerprinting strategy is presented that combines sensitive and hydrocarbon specific analytical methods with a detailed interpretive strategy designed to minimize the impacts of environmental weathering and biodegradation. Data will be presented from a series of oil biodegradation studies in soil that clearly demonstrate the utility and stability of source ratio analysis over a wide range of oil degradation states and oil types. Using principal component analysis, stable source ratios of C[sub 3]-dibenzothiophenes/C[sub 3]-phenanthrenes, and C[sub 2]-dibenzothiophenes/C[sub 2]-phenanthrenes were identified and evaluated. These source ratios retain their characteristic source ratio signature even after 95 percent of the PAH and dibenzothiophene target analytes and 70 percent of the total oil has been biodegraded.

  20. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  1. A magnetic-based dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction method using the metal-organic framework HKUST-1 and ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection for determining polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in waters and fruit tea infusions.

    PubMed

    Rocío-Bautista, Priscilla; Pino, Verónica; Ayala, Juan H; Pasán, Jorge; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; Afonso, Ana M

    2016-03-04

    A hybrid material composed by the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been synthetized in a quite simple manner, characterized, and used in a magnetic-assisted dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (M-d-μSPE) method in combination with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) and fluorescence detection (FD). The application was devoted to the determination of 8 heavy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different aqueous samples, specifically tap water, wastewaters, and fruit tea infusion samples. The overall M-d-μSPE-UHPLC-FD method was optimized and validated. The method is characterized by: its simplicity in both the preparation of the hybrid material (simple mixing) and the magnetic-assisted approach (∼10min extraction time), the use of low sorbent amounts (20mg of HKUST-1 and 5mg of Fe3O4 MNPs), and the low organic solvent consumption in the overall M-d-μSPE-UHPLC-FD method (1.5mL of acetonitrile in the M-d-μSPE method and 2.8mL of acetonitrile in the UHPLC-FD run). The resulting method has high sensitivity, with LODs down to 0.8ngL(-1); adequate intermediate precision, with relative standard deviation values (RSD) always lower than 6.3% (being the range 5.9-9.0% in tap water for a spiked level of 45ngL(-1), 6.1-14% in wastewaters for a spiked level of 45ngL(-1), and 7.2-17% in fruit tea infusion samples for a spiked level of 45ngL(-1)); and adequate relative recoveries, with average values of 82% in tap water, and 94% and 75% in wastewater and fruit tea infusion samples, respectively, if using the proper matrix-matched calibration.

  2. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a checkerboard pattern staged process

    SciTech Connect

    de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre; Pingo-Almada, Monica M; Miller, David Scott

    2009-06-02

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to two or more first sections of the formation with one or more first heaters in two or more of the first sections. The provided heat may mobilize first hydrocarbons in two or more of the first sections. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons are produced through production wells located in two or more second sections of the formation. The first sections and the second sections are arranged in a checkerboard pattern. A portion of at least one of the second sections proximate at least one production well is provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second sections with one or more second heaters in the second sections to further heat the second sections.

  3. Respirometry for assessing the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Plaza, G; Ulfig, K; Worsztynowicz, A; Malina, G; Krzeminska, B; Brigmon, R L

    2005-02-01

    The respiration method using the Micro-Oxymax respirometer was applied to evaluate the bioremediation potential of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in two biopiles at the oil refinery in Czechowice-Dziedzice, Poland. In biopiles 1 and 2, two different technologies, i.e., enhanced (engineered) bioremediation and monitored natural attenuation (MNA) were used, respectively. In biopiles 1 and 2, the bioremediation process lasted 6 years and 8 months, respectively. The biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated on the basis of CO2 production and O2 uptake. The CO2 production and O2 consumption rates during hydrocarbon biodegradation were calculated from the slopes of cumulative curve linear regressions. The results confirmed the hydrocarbon biodegradation process in both biopiles. However, in biopile 2 the process was more effective compared to biopile 1. In biopile 2, the O2 consumption and CO2 production means were 3.37 and 2.4 milliliters per kilogram of soil (dry weight) per minute, respectively. Whereas, in biopile 1, the O2 consumption and CO2 production means were 1.52 and 1.07 milliliters per kilogram of soil (dry weight) per minute, respectively. The mean biodegradation rate for biopile 2 was two times higher--67 mg hydrocarbons kg d.w.(-1)day(-1) compared with biopile 1, where the mean was 30 mg hydrocarbons kg d.w.(-1)day(-l). The results were correlated with petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations and microbial activity measured by dehydrogenase assay.

  4. Composition and concentrations of semi-volatile hydrocarbons. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinska, B.; Fung, K.; Sheetz, L.

    1992-08-01

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) in ambient air are routinely analyzed for C2 to C10 species. The Caldecott Tunnel, located in the San Francisco area, was selected as a site dominated by motor vehicle emissions. The remaining sampling sites were: Los Angeles as a typical urban site, and Oildale as a site dominated by oil production. Whole air samples, analyzed for C2 through C12 hydrocarbons, were collected using the stainless steel canisters. Semi-volatile hydrocarbons, in the range of C8 to C18, were collected using Tenax-TA solid adsorbent. The samples were analyzed using high resolution gas chromatographic separation and Fourier transform infrared/mass spectrometric detection (GC/IRD/MSD) or flame ionization detection (FID) of individual hydrocarbons. The comparison of hydrocarbon concentrations found in the Tenax and canister samples and the assessment of the levels of semivolatile hydrocarbons (C10-C18 range) relative to total non-methane hydrocarbons (C2-C10 or C2-C12), as measured by the canister method, is presented. The results showed that the percent contribution of SVHC to TNMHC ranged from approximately 1 to approximately 18% depending on the carbon number arbitrarily selected as a starting point of SVHC range.

  5. Structural features of the southern Tulum Fault System, western central Argentina, through gravimetric data and geomorphologic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Aixa I.; Christiansen, Rodolfo O.; Suvires, Graciela M.; Lince Klinger, Federico; Martinez, M. Patricia

    2016-12-01

    A gravimetric analysis over the Tulum Valley was made. This data was used to reveal the structural setting of the Tulum Fault System situated in the southeastern part of San Juan province in the arid western part of Argentina. This system is the boundary between two geological provinces, the eastern Precordillera Oriental and the Sierras Pampeanas Occidentales. Gravity data was processed using upward continuation and vertical derivative filters and all the results were compared with the geomorphological and the drainage systems maps of the area. Our assessment confirms the presence of two structures in the Pampeano basement with positive anomalies similar to those found in Valdivia and Barboza hills, two important depocenters with low gravimetric gradients separated by a zone with higher gravity anomalies than the depocenters to the east and west. In view of this, a structural map is proposed for the area. This system is important not only because it is the boundary between two geological provinces and has significance regarding regional tectonic issues but also because it controls the surface drainage, soils distribution and groundwater flow of the Tulum basin conditioning the land use distribution.

  6. Assessing dry density and gravimetric water content of soils in geotechnics with complex conductivity measurements : preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaouane, C.; Beck, Y.; Fauchard, C.; Chouteau, M.

    2012-12-01

    Quality controls of geotechnical works need gravimetric water content (w) and dry density (γd) measurements. Afterwards, results are compared to Proctor tests and referred to soil classification. Depending on the class of soils, different objectives must be achieved. Those measurements are usually carried out with neutron and gamma probes. Combined use of theses probes directly access (w, γd). Theses probes show great disadvantages as: nuclear hazard, heavy on-site, transporation and storage restrictions and low sampling volumes. Last decades showed a strong development of electrical and electromagnetic methods for mapping water content in soils. Still, their use in Geotechnics is limited due to interfacial effects neglected in common models but strong in compacted soils. We first showed that (w, γd) is equivalent to (φ, Sr) assuming density of particles γs=2.7 (g.cm-3). This assumption is true for common soils used in civil engineering. That first relationship allows us to work with meaningful parameters for geophysicists. Revil&Florsh recently adapted Vinegar&Waxman model for Spectal Induced Polarization (SIP) measurements at low frequencies (<50 kHz). This model relates quantitatively the electrical double layer polarization at the surface of grains. It takes into account saturation, porosity and granulometry. Standard granulometry and mineralogy are generally available in geotechnical campaigns. In-phase conductivity would be mostly related to saturation as quadrature conductivity would be related to porosity and surface conductivity. Although this model was developed for oil-bearing sands, we investigated its potential for compacted soils. Former DC-resistivity (ρ) measurements were carried out on a silty fined-grained soil (A1 in GTR classification or ML-CL in USCS) in a cylindrical cell (radius ~4 cm, heigth 7 cm). Median diameter of grain was 50 μm. For each measurement, samples were compacted at Proctor energy. We assessed (w, γd) by weighting and

  7. Hydrocarbon-enhanced particulate filter regeneration via microwave ignition

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Brown, David B.

    2010-02-02

    A regeneration method for a particulate filter includes estimating a quantity of particulate matter trapped within the particulate filter, comparing the quantity of particulate matter to a predetermined quantity, heating at least a portion of the particulate filter to a combustion temperature of the particulate matter, and introducing hydrocarbon fuel to the particulate filter. The hydrocarbon fuel facilitates combustion of the particulate matter to regenerate the particulate filter.

  8. Nucleate pool boiling of hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sardesai, R.G.; Palen, J.W.; Thome, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Schlunder method can be correctly used to predict boiling heat transfer coefficient of multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures. The method was tested against experimental mixtures containing up to five components. The Stephan-Abdelsalam correlation can be used to calculate a ''pseudo-single component'' boiling heat transfer coefficient for a mixture using weighted properties. The effective temperature driving force term and the high mass flux correction term in the Schlunder formulation are empirically adjusted to improve the accuracy of prediction. Predictions of the Schlunder method are sensitive to the VLE calculations. The UNIFAC method is used in this study for reasons discussed in the paper.

  9. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.L.; Bowes, E.; Green, G.J.; Marler, D.O.; Shihabi, D.S.; Socha, R.F.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feed is cracked in a cracking zone in the absence of added hydrogen and in the presence of a circulating inventory of solid acidic cracking a catalyst which acquires a deposit of coke that contains chemically bound nitrogen while the cracking catalyst is in the cracking zone, the coke catalyst being circulated to t regeneration zone to convert the coke catalyst to a regenerated catalyst with the formation of a flue gas comprising nitrogen oxides: the improvement comprises incorporating into the circulating catalyst inventory an amount of additive particles comprising a synthetic porous crystalline material containing copper metal or cations, to reduce the content of nitrogen oxides in the flue gas.

  10. Field test of a generic method for halogenated hydrocarbons: A vost test at a chemical manufacturing facility. Final report, September 1992-December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1994-06-01

    In evaluating stationary source sampling and analytical methodology, two different source types are used. EPA is evaluating the volatile halogenated organic compounds listed in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. An initial field evaluation study was conducted for the VOST (SW-846 sampling Method 0030, analytical Method 5041) at a coal fired steam generating plant. A chemical manufacturing facility was selected as a second test site. The presence of low levels of some of the compounds of interest was established by the VOST analysis of samples collected during a presurvey. The sampling plan followed the requirements of EPA Method 301, and the data were evaluated statistically. Of 23 volatile halogenated organic compounds tested, the VOST showed acceptable performance with respect to recovery and precision for 17.

  11. Effectiveness of chemically enhanced solubilization of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, A.T.; Fu, G.; Tomson, M.B.; Hunter, M.A.

    1997-08-01

    Hydrocarbon spills and leaks are a major source of groundwater pollution for urban and industrial regions of the US. Cleanup is most often attempted using pump-and-treat methods with numerous wells and a central treatment facility. Such procedures are notoriously inefficient when hydrocarbons are trapped in oil ganglia or capillaries, or are irreversibly sorbed. The residual hydrocarbons cannot be displaced under reasonable hydraulic gradients. Therefore, it is important to develop a more efficient method of removing such a pollutant source. Miscible solvents and surfactants are often proposed as the chemical enhancer for pump and treat. Several researches have applied the surfactant flush in both the laboratory soil columns and field-test plots. The efficiency of surfactants usually diminished within 20 pore volumes and a significant fraction of contaminant was not mobilized. Some thermodynamic or kinetic limitations may exist in surfactant flush. Research has shown that surfactant often adsorbed to soil and altered the adsorption/desorption properties of soil. These processes may be reversed by controlling the pH and ionic strength. Miscible solvent has been shown very effective in laboratory tests. There are strong reasons to believe that a combination of several enhancement regimes will have substantial performance advantages. Just as with bioremediation, different chemical-enhancement methods will probably be better suited to particular combinations of contaminant types and aquifer characteristics. This paper discusses the effectiveness of chemical-enhancement treatments and possible limitations.

  12. Electrochemical evaluation of the corrosion behaviour for structural steel SAE 1005 exposed to two different atmospheres (urban and industrial) and comparison with atmospheric corrosion gravimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Castiblanco, H.; Torres, C.; Palacios, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Atmospheric corrosion is a phenomenon we see every day in our environment that arises due to environmental pollution we generate, there is currently very little information on atmospheric corrosion in the department of Boyacá and in general, in Colombia. The aim of this paper is to analyse which of these two environments is more aggressive and wherein the steel corrodes faster. To analyse these phenomenon specimens made in steel SAE 105 exposed for five months to the atmosphere in the municipalities of Tunja and Nobsa (an urban atmosphere and other industrial atmosphere) were installed, a control was carried to verify the amount of time that will be exposed each of these samples to the atmosphere, of Thus it may determine the lifetime of a structural steel. For the analysis of these samples electrochemical tests were carried out to calculate the rate of corrosion and resistance to polarization, also the gravimetric method be conducted to compare what was the amount of mass lost during the time of exposure to each of the samples.

  13. Characterizing the transplanar and in-plane water transport of textiles with gravimetric and image analysis technique: Spontaneous Uptake Water Transport Tester

    PubMed Central

    Tang, K. P. M.; Wu, Y. S.; Chau, K. H.; Kan, C. W.; Fan, J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Water absorption and transport property of textiles is important since it affects wear comfort, efficiency of treatment and functionality of product. This paper introduces an accurate and reliable measurement tester, which is based on gravimetric and image analysis technique, for characterising the transplanar and in-plane wicking property of fabrics. The uniqueness of this instrument is that it is able to directly measure the water absorption amount in real-time, monitor the direction of water transport and estimate the amount of water left on skin when sweating. Throughout the experiment, water supply is continuous which simulates profuse sweating. Testing automation could even minimise variation caused by subjective manipulation, thus enhancing testing accuracy. This instrument is versatile in terms of the fabrics could be tested. A series of shirting fabrics made by different fabric structure and yarn were investigated and the results show that the proposed method has high sensitivity in differentiating fabrics with varying geometrical differences. Fabrics with known hydrophobicity were additionally tested to examine the sensitivity of the instrument. This instrument also demonstrates the flexibility to test on high performance moisture management fabrics and these fabrics were found to have excellent transplanar and in-plane wicking properties. PMID:25875329

  14. Effect of Surface Oxygen and Temperature on External and Micropore Adsorptionof Water in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Gravimetric Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Pyoungchung; Meyer III, Harry M; Agnihotri, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Gravimetric water adsorption experiments (T = 5, 20 and 35 oC and 0 < P/Po < 0.95) were performed for comparative purposes on several chemically and structurally distinct samples of single-walled carbons nanotubes including two activated carbon samples. The isotherms followed the type V curve and were fitted to a semi-empirical model which allowed distinguishing with statistical confidence the adsorptive contributions of primary sites and micropores (referred to here as pseudo-experimental isotherms). The isosteric heats of total water adsorption calculated from experimental isotherms ranged between 46 to 58 kJ/mol. The same calculations were performed on the separated adsorptive components: functional groups and micropore isotherms, and were found to be 0.5 to 16 kJ/mol and 1 to 3 kJ/mol, respectively. These values are similar to those available in the current literature reportedly estimated by calorimetric and molecular simulation techniques. From semi-empirical modeling, we discovered that we were able to reliably estimate temperature sensitive water-specific sample properties such as the concentration of primary sites (directly related to % O), the size of water clusters aggregating on primary sites (inversely related to % O) and those filling micropores (directly related to dominant pore size) and the equilibrium constants. We conclude that our approach is useful in interpreting experimental water adsorption thus aiding purely simulation based methods of studying the behavior of water in nanocarbons.

  15. A comparison of the extraction procedures and quantification methods for the chromatographic determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in charcoal grilled meat and fish.

    PubMed

    Viegas, O; Novo, P; Pinho, O; Ferreira, I M P L V O

    2012-01-15

    A method for analysis of 15 PAHs in charcoal-grilled meat/fish was established by high performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. Gradient elution was performed with methanol/water/ethyl acetate. Maxima excitation and emission wavelengths were selected for each PAH. Retention times were very stable with coefficients of variation below 0.24% within analytical day and below 0.60% across analytical days. Two different methods of cleanup and pre-concentration steps were compared. Solvent extraction assisted by sonication carried out with n-hexane on 2g of lyophilized meat or 1g of lyophilized fish allowed to obtain high sensitivity, reproducibility and better extraction efficiency. Limits of quantification (LOQs, s/n=10) were lower than 0.01ng/g of meat wet weight and lower than 0.02ng/g of fish wet weight for all PAHs (except for Na, Fl and IP that were lower than 0.1ng/g). Two different quantification methods were compared. Standard addition method compensated PAHs losses due to incomplete extraction and it is recommended for analyses of grilled meat and fish samples that usually contain very low amounts of the eight high molecular weight PAHs (BaA, Ch, BbF, BkF, BaP, IP, BgP, DhA).

  16. Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.

    2015-11-13

    A method for producing a hydrocarbon blendstock, the method comprising contacting at least one saturated acyclic alcohol having at least three and up to ten carbon atoms with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100°C and up to 550°C, wherein the metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and the metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting the alcohol to the hydrocarbon blendstock, wherein the method directly produces a hydrocarbon blendstock having less than 1 vol % ethylene and at least 35 vol % of hydrocarbon compounds containing at least eight carbon atoms.

  17. Development of a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method to quantify several urinary monohydroxy metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in occupationally exposed subjects.

    PubMed

    Campo, Laura; Rossella, Federica; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was the development of a method for the determination of 12 urinary monohydroxy metabolites of PAHs, namely 1-hydroxynaphthalene, 2-hydroxynaphthalene, 2-hydroxyfluorene, 9-hydroxyfluorene, 1-hydroxyphenanthrene, 2-hydroxyphenanthrene, 3-hydroxyphenanthrene, 4-hydroxyphenanthrene, 9-hydroxyphenanthrene, 1-hydroxypyrene, 6-hydroxychrysene, and 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene. Analytes were determined in the presence of deuterated analogues as internal standards, by GC/MS operating in the electron impact mode. Sample preparation was performed by enzymatic hydrolysis of glucoronate and sulphate conjugates of hydroxy metabolites of PAHs, liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, and derivatization with a silylating reagent. The method is very specific, limits of quantification are in the range 0.1-1.4 microg/l, and range of linearity is from limit of detection to 208 microg/l. Within- and between-run precision, expressed as coefficient of variation, are <20%; accuracy for most analytes is within 20% of the theoretical value. An application of the proposed method to the analysis of 10 urine samples from coke-oven workers shows that 1-hydroxynaphthalene and 2-hydroxyfluorene were the most abundant compounds (median 61.4 and 69.7 microg/l, respectively), while 6-hydroxychrysene, and 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene were always below the quantification limit.

  18. Microextraction by packed sorbent coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: a comparison between "draw-eject" and "extract-discard" methods under equilibrium conditions for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water.

    PubMed

    Quinto, Maurizio; Spadaccino, Giuseppina; Nardiello, Donatella; Palermo, Carmen; Amodio, Pierluigi; Li, Donghao; Centonze, Diego

    2014-12-05

    In this work, two different extraction procedures for the analysis of different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water by microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) have been compared in terms of sensitivity, reliability and time of analysis. The first method, called "draw-eject", consists of a sequence of cycles of aspirations and injections in the same vial; the second one, called "extract-discard", consists of a similar cycle sequence, but the aspired sample in this case is discarded into waste. The relevant partition equilibriums and extraction rates have been calculated by multivariate regression from the data obtained after MEPS gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MEPS-GC-MS) analysis of 16 PAHs from water samples. Partitioning parameters for a priori prediction of solute sorption equilibrium, recoveries and preconcentration effects in aqueous and solvent systems have been calculated and compared for the two extraction procedures. Finally, real samples from sea, agricultural irrigation wells, streams and tap water were analyzed. Detection (S/N≥3) and quantification (S/N≥10) limits were calculated for the extraction processes. Under the experimental conditions used for the "draw-eject" procedure, these values were in the range 0.5-2 ng L(-1) and 1.6-6.2 ng L(-1), while for the "extract-discard" procedure they ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 ng L(-1) and from 0.8 to 2.0 ng L(-1), respectively.

  19. Development and application of a simultaneous SPE-method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, heterocyclic PAHs (NSO-HET) and phenols in aqueous samples from German Rivers and the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Siemers, Anne-Kathrin; Mänz, Jan Sebastian; Palm, Wolf-Ulrich; Ruck, Wolfgang K L

    2015-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic PAHs (NSO-HETs), alkylated PAHs and phenols are known as the prevailing contaminants in groundwater at tar contaminated sites. Besides these local sources, the concentrations and the distribution in particular of NSO-HETs in environmental samples, such as rivers, have received notably less attention. To investigate their occurrence in river basins two sensitive analytical methods for the simultaneous extraction of 86 substances including NSO-HETs, classical EPA-PAHs, alkylated PAHs and phenols were developed: liquid-liquid extraction for the whole water phase and solid phase extraction for the dissolved water phase only. Solely GC-MS or additionally LC-MSMS for fractionated basic nitrogen heterocycles (N-HETs) were used for quantification. Limits of quantification were in the low ngL(-1) range. Concentrations were determined in 29 aqueous samples from 8 relatively large rivers located in Lower Saxony (Germany) and the North Sea. NSO-HETs had comparable or even higher sum concentrations than EPA-PAHs. N-HETs, especially acridine and quinolines with concentrations of up to 20ngL(-1) per substance, were predominant.

  20. BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

    2008-05-27

    BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

  1. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons by oleophilic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514.

    PubMed

    Varjani, Sunita J; Upasani, Vivek N

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study the potential of an indigenous strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514, isolated from petroleum-polluted soil, for the biodegradation of crude petroleum oil. The isolate completely decolorized 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol in 120h when grown at (37±1°C), indicating its hydrocarbon utilizing nature. Ex situ biodegradation study was performed to find out quantitative utilization and biodegradation of paraffin(s) present in crude oil. When the culture was grown in Bushnell-Hass medium containing crude oil (3%,v/v) at 37°C, 180rpm for 60days, the viscosity of the oil was reduced from 1883cp to 1002cp. Gravimetric and gas chromatographic analysis showed 61.03% and 60.63% of biodegradation of C8-C36+ hydrocarbons, respectively. These results indicated that the isolate has potential to be used for ex-situ and in-situ bioremediation of hydrocarbon pollutants and could have promising applications in petrochemical industry.

  2. Organic geochemistry of the Vindhyan sediments: Implications for hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, A. M.; Mani, Devleena; Madhavi, T.; Kavitha, S.; Kalpana, M. S.; Patil, D. J.; Sharma, Mukund

    2014-09-01

    The organic geochemical methods of hydrocarbon prospecting involve the characterization of sedimentary organic matter in terms of its abundance, source and thermal maturity, which are essential prerequisites for a hydrocarbon source rock. In the present study, evaluation of organic matter in the outcrop shale samples from the Semri and Kaimur Groups of Vindhyan basin was carried out using Rock Eval pyrolysis. Also, the adsorbed low molecular weight hydrocarbons, methane, ethane, propane and butane, were investigated in the near surface soils to infer the generation of hydrocarbons in the Vindhyan basin. The Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content in shales ranges between 0.04% and 1.43%. The S1 (thermally liberated free hydrocarbons) values range between 0.01-0.09 mgHC/gRock (milligram hydrocarbon per gram of rock sample), whereas the S2 (hydrocarbons from cracking of kerogen) show the values between 0.01 and 0.14 mgHC/gRock. Based on the Tmax (temperature at highest yield of S2) and the hydrogen index (HI) correlations, the organic matter is characterized by Type III kerogen. The adsorbed soil gas, CH4 (C1), C2H6 (C2), C3H8 (C3) and nC4H10, (nC4), concentrations measured in the soil samples from the eastern part of Vindhyan basin (Son Valley) vary from 0 to 186 ppb, 0 to 4 ppb, 0 to 5 ppb, and 0 to 1 ppb, respectively. The stable carbon isotope values for the desorbed methane (δ13C1) and ethane (δ13C2) range between -45.7‰ to -25.2‰ and -35.3‰ to -20.19‰ (VPDB), respectively suggesting a thermogenic source for these hydrocarbons. High concentrations of thermogenic hydrocarbons are characteristic of areas around Sagar, Narsinghpur, Katni and Satna in the Son Valley. The light hydrocarbon concentrations (C1-C4) in near surface soils of the western Vindhyan basin around Chambal Valley have been reported to vary between 1-2547 ppb, 1-558 ppb, 1-181 ppb, 1-37 ppb and 1-32 ppb, respectively with high concentrations around Baran-Jhalawar-Bhanpur-Garot regions (Kumar

  3. Effect of hydrocarbon fuel type on fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. L.; Bittker, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A modified jet fuel thermal oxidation tester (JFTOT) procedure was used to evaluate deposit and sediment formation for four pure hydrocarbon fuels over the temperature range 150 to 450 C in 316-stainless-steel heater tubes. Fuel types were a normal alkane, an alkene, a naphthene, and an aromatic. Each fuel exhibited certain distinctive deposit and sediment formation characteristics. The effect of aluminum and 316-stainless-steel heater tube surfaces on deposit formation for the fuel n-decane over the same temperature range was investigated. Results showed that an aluminum surface had lower deposit formation rates at all temperatures investigated. By using a modified JFTOT procedure the thermal stability of four pure hydrocarbon fuels and two practical fuels (Jet A and home heating oil no. 2) was rated on the basis of their breakpoint temperatures. Results indicate that this method could be used to rate thermal stability for a series of fuels.

  4. Density functional calculations on hydrocarbon isodesmic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Selmi, Massimo

    1994-06-01

    Hartree—Fock, Hartree—Fock-plus-correlation and self-consistent Kohn—Sham calculations are performed on a set of hydrocarbon isodesmic reactions, i.e. reactions among hydrocarbons in which the number and type of carbon—carbon and carbon—hydrogen bonds is conserved. It is found that neither Hartree—Fock nor Kohn—Sham methods correctly predict standard enthalpies, Δ Hr(298 K), of these reactions, even though — for reactions involving molecules containing strained double bonds — the agreement between the theoretical estimates and the experimental values of Δ Hr seems to be improved by the self-consistent solution of the Kohn—Sham equations. The remaining discrepancies are attributed to intramolecular dispersion effects, that are not described by ordinary exchange—correlation functionals, and are eliminated by introducing corrections based on a simple semi-empirical model.

  5. Catalytic pyrolysis of wheat bran for hydrocarbons production in the presence of zeolites and noble-metals by using TGA-FTIR method.

    PubMed

    Lazdovica, K; Liepina, L; Kampars, V

    2016-05-01

    Pyrolysis of wheat bran with or without catalysts was investigated using TGA-FTIR method in order to determine the influence of zeolite and noble metal catalysts on the evolution profile and relative yield of the volatile compounds. The addition of all catalysts decreased the volatile matter of wheat bran from 76.3% to 75.9%, 73.9%, 73.5%, 69.7% and increased the solid residue from 18.0% to 18.4%, 20.4%, 20.8%, 24.6% under the catalyst of ZSM-5, 5% Pd/C, MCM-41, and 5% Pt/C. Noble-metal catalysts had higher activity for deoxygenation of compounds containing carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups than zeolites. Degradation of nitrogen containing compounds atom proceeded better in presence of zeolites. Noble-metal catalysts promoted formation of aromatics and changed the profiles of evolved compounds whereas zeolites advanced formation of aliphatics and olefins.

  6. Low-Temperature Catalytic Process To Produce Hydrocarbons From Sugars

    DOEpatents

    Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

    2005-11-15

    Disclosed is a method of producing hydrogen from oxygenated hydrocarbon reactants, such as methanol, glycerol, sugars (e.g. glucose and xylose), or sugar alcohols (e.g. sorbitol). The method takes place in the condensed liquid phase. The method includes the steps of reacting water and a water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon in the presence of a metal-containing catalyst. The catalyst contains a metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIIIB transitional metals, alloys thereof, and mixtures thereof. The disclosed method can be run at lower temperatures than those used in the conventional steam reforming of alkanes.

  7. Vmh2 hydrophobin layer entraps glucose: A quantitative characterization by label-free optical and gravimetric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Ventura, B.; Rea, I.; Caliò, A.; Giardina, P.; Gravagnuolo, A. M.; Funari, R.; Altucci, C.; Velotta, R.; De Stefano, L.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrophobins (HFBs) are peculiar proteins which self-assemble at hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces into amphipathic membranes, and some of them (class I HFB) are able to form much more stable amyloid-like layers. This feature makes them suitable for many purposes, particularly when stable surface functionalization is required, also in view of their versatility in binding different kinds of molecules. For instance, it has been shown that Vmh2 from Pleurotus ostreatus (a class I HFB) is able to bind molecules like glucose, thus offering the perspective of using Vmh2 as a surface functionalization tool in bio-hybrid devices. In this paper a quantitative analysis of glucose interaction with the Vmh2 layer is reported; in particular, it is shown that Vmh2 layer swells by almost doubling its thickness as a result of glucose diffusion and each Vmh2 monomer is able to bind approximately 30 glucose molecules. These results have been achieved by self-assembling multi-layers of Vmh2 on a gold substrate and, subsequently, measuring both the mass of the bound glucose and the thickness of the resulting layer through two different and complementary techniques: quartz crystal-microbalance and ellipsometry. The data provided by the two techniques are in a satisfactory agreement and offer a plausible description of the mechanisms underlying the interaction of glucose with Vmh2 layer. This facile and versatile coating is of interest for biomedical applications of gold surfaces and particles.

  8. Evaluation of gravimetric ground truth soil moisture data collected for the agricultural soil moisture experiment, 1978 Colby, Kansas, aircraft mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, L. M.; Phinney, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Soil moisture data acquired to support the development of algorithms for estimating surface soil moisture from remotely sensed backscattering of microwaves from ground surfaces are presented. Aspects of field uniformity and variability of gravimetric soil moisture measurements are discussed. Moisture distribution patterns are illustrated by frequency distributions and contour plots. Standard deviations and coefficients of variation relative to degree of wetness and agronomic features of the fields are examined. Influence of sampling depth on observed moisture content an variability are indicated. For the various sets of measurements, soil moisture values that appear as outliers are flagged. The distribution and legal descriptions of the test fields are included along with examinations of soil types, agronomic features, and sampling plan. Bulk density data for experimental fields are appended, should analyses involving volumetric moisture content be of interest to the users of data in this report.

  9. Application of gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements after accelerated corrosion tests of steel embedded in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Duffó, Gustavo; Gaillard, Natalia; Mariscotti, Mario; Ruffolo, Marcelo

    2015-08-15

    The accelerated corrosion by the impressed current technique is widely used in studies of concrete durability since it has the advantage that tests can be carried out within reasonable periods of time. In the present work the relationship between the applied current density and the resulting damage on the reinforcing steel, by applying optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements, was studied by means of the implementation of accelerated corrosion tests on reinforced mortar. The results show that the efficiency of the applied current is between 1 and 77%, regardless of the applied current density, the water/cement ratio and the mortar cover depth of the specimens. The results show the applicability of the gamma-ray radiography technique to detect localized corrosion of steel rebars in laboratory specimens.

  10. Electromagnetic, magnetic, and gravimetric surveys at the Bi'r Jarbuah gold prospect, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.H.; Showail, A.A.; Bazzari, M.A.; Khoja, J.A.; Hajour, M.O.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed search for gold and associated minerals was begun in the Bi'r Jarbuah area in 1988. Crone electromagnetic (CEM), magnetic, and gravimetric surveys were run in the areas of greatest interest. Anomalous areas are most interesting in the southern part of the area where linear magnetic and gravity anomalies trend east-northeast and overlap in large part. They are most prominent at or near the south end of a diorite pluton where some quartz veins mined by the ancients also trend northeast. A second area, at the extreme southern end of the survey, contains a large CEM anomaly that coincides with northeast-trending magnetic and gravity anomalies. Although this second area is largely overlain by alluvium, a major quartz vein strikes to the northeast in the adjacent bedrock.

  11. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  12. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  13. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  14. Hydrocarbon potential of Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Achnin, H.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1988-08-01

    Morocco lies at the junction of the African and Eurasian plates and carries a record of their movements since the end of the Precambrian. Four structural regions with basins and troughs can be identified: Saharan (Tarfaya-Ayoun and Tindouf basins); Anti-Atlas (Souss and Ouarzazate troughs and Boudnib basin); the Essaouria, Doukkala, Tadla, Missour, High Plateau, and Guercif basins; and Meseta and Rif (Rharb and Pre-Rif basins). The targets in the Tindouf basin are Paleozoic, Cambrian, Ordovician (clastics), Devonian (limestones), and Carboniferous reservoirs sourced primarily by Silurian shales. In the remaining basins, excluding the Rharb, the reservoirs are Triassic detritals, limestones at the base of the Lias and Dogger, Malm detritals, and sandy horizons in the Cretaceous. In addition to the Silurian, potential source rocks include the Carboniferous and Permo-Carboniferous shales and clays; Jurassic shales, marls, and carbonates; and Cretaceous clays. In the Rharb basin, the objectives are sand lenses within the Miocene marls. The maturation level of the organic matter generally corresponds to oil and gas. The traps are stratigraphic (lenses and reefs) and structural (horsts and folds). The seals in the pre-Jurassic rocks are shales and evaporites; in the younger rocks, shales and marl. Hydrocarbon accumulations have been found in Paleozoic, Triassic, Liassic, Malm, and Miocene rocks.

  15. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  16. Illite and hydrocarbon exploration

    PubMed Central

    Pevear, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Illite is a general term for the dioctahedral mica-like clay mineral common in sedimentary rocks, especially shales. Illite is of interest to the petroleum industry because it can provide a K-Ar isotope date that constrains the timing of basin heating events. It is critical to establish that hydrocarbon formation and migration occurred after the formation of the trap (anticline, etc.) that is to hold the oil. Illite also may precipitate in the pores of sandstone reservoirs, impeding fluid flow. Illite in shales is a mixture of detrital mica and its weathering products with diagenetic illite formed by reaction with pore fluids during burial. K-Ar ages are apparent ages of mixtures of detrital and diagenetic end members, and what we need are the ages of the end members themselves. This paper describes a methodology, based on mineralogy and crystallography, for interpreting the K-Ar ages from illites in sedimentary rocks and for estimating the ages of the end members. PMID:10097055

  17. Extraction of petroleum hydrocarbons from soil by mechanical shaking

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.P.; Su, J.; Wetzel, S.; Pekarek, S.; Banks, M.K.

    1999-06-01

    A shaking extraction method for petroleum hydrocarbons in soil was developed and compared to Soxhlet extraction. Soxhlet extraction is an EPA-approved method for volatile and semivolatile organic contaminants from solid materials, but it has many disadvantages including long extraction periods and potential loss of volatile compounds. When field-moist soils are used, variability in subsamples is higher, and the extraction of hydrocarbons with a nonpolar solvent may be less efficient. A shaking method was designed to fill the need for simpler and more efficient extraction of petroleum hydrocarbons from soil. A systematic study of extraction conditions was performed for various soil types, soil weights, solvents, extraction times, and extraction cycles. The results were compared to those for Soxhlet extraction. Shaking 1 g of soil with a sequence of three 10-mL aliquots of dichloromethane or acetone was found to be equivalent to Soxhlet extraction for total petroleum hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Shaking with acetone was more consistent than all other methods for the extraction of specific compounds from aged, contaminated soil. The shaking method appears to be applicable to a wide range of soil types and petroleum contaminants but should be compared to Soxhlet extraction for new conditions.

  18. Microbial biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ri-He; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Xue, Yong; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Wei; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2008-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread in various ecosystems and are pollutants of great concern due to their potential toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because of their hydrophobic nature, most PAHs bind to particulates in soil and sediments, rendering them less available for biological uptake. Microbial degradation represents the major mechanism responsible for the ecological recovery of PAH-contaminated sites. The goal of this review is to provide an outline of the current knowledge of microbial PAH catabolism. In the past decade, the genetic regulation of the pathway involved in naphthalene degradation by different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria was studied in great detail. Based on both genomic and proteomic data, a deeper understanding of some high-molecular-weight PAH degradation pathways in bacteria was provided. The ability of nonligninolytic and ligninolytic fungi to transform or metabolize PAH pollutants has received considerable attention, and the biochemical principles underlying the degradation of PAHs were examined. In addition, this review summarizes the information known about the biochemical processes that determine the fate of the individual components of PAH mixtures in polluted ecosystems. A deeper understanding of the microorganism-mediated mechanisms of catalysis of PAHs will facilitate the development of new methods to enhance the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sites.

  19. Gravimetric measurements with use of a cantilever for controlling of electrochemical deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokaryn, Piotr; Janus, Pawel; Zajac, Jerzy; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Domanski, Krzysztof; Grabiec, Piotr

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we describe the method for monitoring the progress of electrochemical deposition process. The procedure allows to control the deposition of metals as well as conductive polymers on metallic seed layer. The method is particularly useful to very thin layers (1-10 nm) of deposited medium which mechanical or optical methods are troublesome for. In this method deposit is grown on the target and on the test silicon micro-cantilever with a metal pad. Galvanic deposition on the cantilever causes the change of its mass and consequently the change of its resonance frequency. Changes of the frequency is measured with laser vibro-meter then the layer thicknesses can be estimated basing on the cantilever calibration curve. Applying this method for controlling of gold deposition on platinum seed layer, for improving the properties of the biochemical sensors, is described in this paper.

  20. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  1. Integral Approaches to Determine Sub-Crustal Stress from Terrestrial Gravimetric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshagh, Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    The spherical harmonic expressions of the horizontal sub-crustal stress components induced by the mantle convection are convergent only to low degrees. In this paper, we use the method of stress (S) function with numerical differentiation and present a formula for determining the degree of convergence from the mean Moho depth. We found that for the global mean Moho depth, 23 km, this convergence degree is 622 and for Iran, 35 km, it is 372. Also, three methods are developed and applied for computing the sub-crustal stress, (1) direct integration with a spectral kernel limited up to the degree of convergence, (2) integral inversion with a kernel having closed-form formula without any frequency limit, and (3) solving an integral equation with limited spectral kernel to the convergence degree. The second method has no divergence problem and its kernel function is well behaving so that the system of equations from which the S function is determined is stable, and no regularisation is needed to solve it. It should be noted that for using this method the resolution of the recovery should be higher than 0.5° × 0.5°, otherwise the recovered S function and correspondingly the stress components will have smaller magnitude than those derived from the other two methods. Our numerical studies for stress recovery in Iran and its surrounding areas show that the methods, which use the limited spectral kernels to the convergence degree, deliver consistent results to that of the spherical harmonic expansion.

  2. Chemistry in the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization. An Energy Frontier Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Golisz, Suzanne R.; Gunnoe, T. Brent; Goddard, William A.; Groves, John T.; Periana, Roy A.

    2010-12-02

    Selective catalysts that activate small molecules such as hydrocarbons, dioxygen, water, carbon dioxide and dihydrogen are central to new technologies for the use of alternative energy sources. For example, controlled hydrocarbon functionalization can lead to high impact technologies, but such catalysts require a level of molecular control beyond current means. The Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization facilitates collaborations among research groups in catalysis, materials, electrochemistry, bioinorganic chemistry and quantum mechanics to develop, validate and optimize new methods to rearrange the bonds of hydrocarbons, activate and transform water and carbon dioxide, implement enzymatic strategies into synthetic systems and design optimal environments for catalysis.

  3. Prediction of Transport Properties of Permeants through Polymer Films. A Simple Gravimetric Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, L. N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Considers the applicability of the simple emersion/weight-gain method for predicting diffusion coefficients, solubilities, and permeation rates of chemicals in polymers that do not undergo physical and chemical deterioration. Presents the theoretical background, procedures and typical results related to this activity. (CW)

  4. Geophysical Signitures From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.

    2015-12-01

    The task of delineating the contamination plumes as well as studying their impact on the soil and groundwater biogeochemical properties is needed to support the remediation efforts and plans. Geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), induced polarization (IP), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and self-potential (SP) have been previously used to characterize contaminant plumes and investigate their impact on soil and groundwater properties (Atekwana et al., 2002, 2004; Benson et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 1996; Cassidy et al., 2001; Revil et al., 2003; Werkema et al., 2000). Our objective was to: estimate the hydrocarbon contamination extent in a contaminated site in northern France, and to adverse the effects of the oil spill on the groundwater properties. We aim to find a good combination of non-intrusive and low cost methods which we can use to follow the bio-remediation process, which is planned to proceed next year. We used four geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography, IP, GPR, and SP. The geophysical data was compared to geochemical ones obtained from 30 boreholes installed in the site during the geophysical surveys. Our results have shown: low electrical resistivity values; high chargeability values; negative SP anomalies; and attenuated GPR reflections coincident with groundwater contamination. Laboratory and field geochemical measurements have demonstrated increased groundwater electrical conductivity and increased microbial activity associated with hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater. Our study results support the conductive model suggested by studies such as Sauck (2000) and Atekwana et al., (2004), who suggest that biological alterations of hydrocarbon contamination can substantially modify the chemical and physical properties of the subsurface, producing a dramatic shift in the geo-electrical signature from resistive to conductive. The next stage of the research will include time lapse borehole

  5. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Yang; Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2010-08-10

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  6. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S; Carrera, Martin E; Colling, Craig W

    2011-11-29

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  7. Saturated hydrocarbons in bovine liver

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Bartholomew; Modzeleski, Vincent E.; Scott, Ward M.

    1969-01-01

    A homologous series of n-alkanes (C14–C33) and two isoprenoid hydrocarbons, 2,6,10,14-tetramethylhexadecane (phytane) and 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (pristane) have been identified in bovine liver. Another branched but non-isoprenoid alkane and three isomers of molecular formula C20H40 were partially identified. Phytane and the C18–C22 and C29–C33 n-alkanes were found to be the major components in liver, suggesting that at least the main hydrocarbon components were derived from various plants in the diet. The hydrocarbons were separated and identified by a series of steps involving solvent extraction, saponification, elution chromatography on alumina and silica gel columns, molecular sieving and by infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, followed by combined capillary gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. PMID:5820649

  8. Compounds in airborne particulates - Salts and hydrocarbons. [at Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Antoine, A. C.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Concentrations of 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the aliphatics as a group, sulfate, nitrate, fluoride, acidity, and carbon in the airborne particulate matter were measured at 16 sites in Cleveland, OH over a 1-year period during 1971 and 1972. Analytical methods used included gas chromatography, colorimetry, and combustion techniques. Uncertainties in the concentrations associated with the sampling procedures, and the analytical methods are evaluated. The data are discussed relative to other studies and source origins. High concentrations downwind of coke ovens for 3,4 benzopyrene are discussed. Hydrocarbon correlation studies indicated no significant relations among compounds studied.

  9. Quantification of petroleum-type hydrocarbons in avian tissue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gay, M.L.; Belisle, A.A.; Patton, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    Summary: Methods were developed for the analysis of 16 hydrocarbons in avian tissue. Mechanical extraction with pentane was followed by clean-up on Florisil and Silicar. Residues were determined by gas--liquid chromatography and gas-liquid, chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method was applied to the analysis of liver, kidney, fat, and brain tissue of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) fed a mixture of hydrocarbons. Measurable concentrations of all compounds analyzed were present in all tissues except brain. Highest concentrations were in fat.

  10. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  11. Comparison between light scattering and gravimetric samplers for PM10 mass concentration in poultry and pig houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambra-López, María; Winkel, Albert; Mosquera, Julio; Ogink, Nico W. M.; Aarnink, André J. A.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare co-located real-time light scattering devices and equivalent gravimetric samplers in poultry and pig houses for PM10 mass concentration, and to develop animal-specific calibration factors for light scattering samplers. These results will contribute to evaluate the comparability of different sampling instruments for PM10 concentrations. Paired DustTrak light scattering device (DustTrak aerosol monitor, TSI, U.S.) and PM10 gravimetric cyclone sampler were used for measuring PM10 mass concentrations during 24 h periods (from noon to noon) inside animal houses. Sampling was conducted in 32 animal houses in the Netherlands, including broilers, broiler breeders, layers in floor and in aviary system, turkeys, piglets, growing-finishing pigs in traditional and low emission housing with dry and liquid feed, and sows in individual and group housing. A total of 119 pairs of 24 h measurements (55 for poultry and 64 for pigs) were recorded and analyzed using linear regression analysis. Deviations between samplers were calculated and discussed. In poultry, cyclone sampler and DustTrak data fitted well to a linear regression, with a regression coefficient equal to 0.41, an intercept of 0.16 mg m-3 and a correlation coefficient of 0.91 (excluding turkeys). Results in turkeys showed a regression coefficient equal to 1.1 (P = 0.49), an intercept of 0.06 mg m-3 (P < 0.0001) and a correlation coefficient of 0.98. In pigs, we found a regression coefficient equal to 0.61, an intercept of 0.05 mg m-3 and a correlation coefficient of 0.84. Measured PM10 concentrations using DustTraks were clearly underestimated (approx. by a factor 2) in both poultry and pig housing systems compared with cyclone pre-separators. Absolute, relative, and random deviations increased with concentration. DustTrak light scattering devices should be self-calibrated to investigate PM10 mass concentrations accurately in animal houses. We recommend linear regression

  12. Bioremediation technologies for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1999-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs) are common and challenging contaminants that affect soil and sediments. Methods for treating PAHs have undergone change and refinement in the recent past, and this volume presents the latest trends in PAH remediation theory and practice. The papers in this volume cover topics ranging from the remediation of manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites to the remediation of sediments. The papers present lab and field studies, characterization studies, comparison studies, and descriptions of technologies ranging from composting to thermally enhanced bioremediation to fungal technologies and other innovative approaches.

  13. Microbial Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminants: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nilanjana; Chandran, Preethy

    2011-01-01

    One of the major environmental problems today is hydrocarbon contamination resulting from the activities related to the petrochemical industry. Accidental releases of petroleum products are of particular concern in the environment. Hydrocarbon components have been known to belong to the family of carcinogens and neurotoxic organic pollutants. Currently accepted disposal methods of incineration or burial insecure landfills can become prohibitively expensive when amounts of contaminants are large. Mechanical and chemical methods generally used to remove hydrocarbons from contaminated sites have limited effectiveness and can be expensive. Bioremediation is the promising technology for the treatment of these contaminated sites since it is cost-effective and will lead to complete mineralization. Bioremediation functions basically on biodegradation, which may refer to complete mineralization of organic contaminants into carbon dioxide, water, inorganic compounds, and cell protein or transformation of complex organic contaminants to other simpler organic compounds by biological agents like microorganisms. Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. This paper presents an updated overview of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by microorganisms under different ecosystems. PMID:21350672

  14. Comparison of methods for the measurement of mist and vapor from light mineral oil-based metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrew T

    2003-11-01

    The measurement of oil mist derived from metalworking fluids formulated with light mineral oils can be highly inaccurate when using traditional filter sampling. This is due to evaporation of oil from the filter. In this work the practicability of an alternative approach measuring total oil mist and vapor was investigated. Combinations of inhalable particle samplers with backup sorbent vapor traps and standard vapor sampling on pumped and diffusive sorbent tubes were evaluated with gravimetric, infrared spectroscopic, and gas chromatographic analytical methods against the performance requirements of European Standard EN 482. An artificial aerosol was used to compare the methods against a reference method of filter sampler in series with three impingers. Multi-orifice samplers were used with standard 8-mm diameter charcoal tubes at 2 L/min without any signs of channelling or significant breakthrough, as were conical inhalable samplers with XAD-2 tubes at 1 L/min. Most combinations of samplers had a bias of less than 3 percent, but solitary pumped charcoal tubes underestimated total oil by 13 percent. Diffusive sampling was affected by impaction of mist particles and condensation of oil vapor. Gravimetric analysis of filters revealed significant potential sample loss during storage, with 4 percent being lost after one day when stored at room temperature and 2 percent when refrigerated. Samples left overnight in the balance room to equilibrate lost 24 percent. Infrared spectroscopy gave more precise results for vapor than gas chromatography (p = 0.002). Gas chromatography was less susceptible to bias from contaminating solvent vapors than infrared spectroscopy, but was still vulnerable to petroleum distillates. Under the specific test conditions (one oil type and mist particle size), all combinations of methods examined complied with the requirements of European Standard EN 484. Total airborne oil can be measured accurately; however, care must be taken to avoid

  15. Hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon-soluble magnesium dialkoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kamienski, C.W.

    1988-05-31

    This patent describes a process for the preparation of hydrocarbon or chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent solutions of magnesium dialkoxides, which comprises reacting a suspension of magnesium metal or magnesium amide, or a solution of a dialkyimagnesium compound, in a volatile hydrocarbon or chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent with an alcohol selected from the group of (a) aliphatic, cycloaliphatic and acyclic C/sub 5/-C/sub 18/ beta- and gamma-alkyl-substituted secondary and tertiary monohydric alcohols; or (b) mixtures of the (a) alcohols with C/sub 3/-C/sub 18/ aliphatic or cycloaliphatic beta- and gamma-alkyl-unsubstituted secondary or tertiary alcohols; or (c) mixtures of the (a) alcohols with C/sub 1/-C/sub 18/ aliphatic primary unsubstituted and 2-alkyl-substituted alcohols; the mole ratios of the (a) to the (b), and the (a) to the (c), alcohols being 1 of the (a) alcohols to 0.1 to 2 of the (b) and/or the (c) alcohols.

  16. Synthesis of condensed phases containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons fullerenes and nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2004-10-19

    The invention relates to methods for producing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and nanotubes, comprising: a. heating at least one carbon-containing material to form a condensed phase comprising at least one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; b. collecting at least some of the condensed phase; c. reacting the condensed phase to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes.

  17. Results from the direct combination of satellite and gravimetric data. [orbit analysis and gravity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results have been obtained for the solution of 184 15-deg equal-area blocks directly from the analysis of satellite orbits, and from a combination of the satellite results with terrestrial gravity material. This test computation, made to verify the method, used 17,632 optical observations from ten satellites in 29 arcs averaging in length seven days. Analysis of the satellite results were made by comparing the solved for anomalies with the terrestrial anomaly set, and by developing the solved for anomalies into potential coefficients which were compared to the GEM 3 set of potential coefficients to degree 12. These comparisons indicated improvement in each solution as more arcs were added. The programs used in this solution can easily be used to solve for smaller size blocks and handle additional data types. The only limitation will be computer core availability and computer time.

  18. Evaluation and mapping of PM2.5 atmospheric aerosols in Arasia region using PIXE and gravimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumie, M.; Chiari, M.; Srour, A.; Sa'adeh, H.; Reslan, A.; Sultan, M.; Ahmad, M.; Calzolai, G.; Nava, S.; Zubaidi, Th.; Rihawy, M. S.; Hussein, T.; Arafah, D.-E.; Karydas, A. G.; Simon, A.; Nsouli, B.

    2016-03-01

    The present work is a part of a scientific study conducted among several Arab countries in west Asia, under an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regional technical cooperation project for Arasia region. The project aims at producing for the first time a database of particulate matter (PM) elemental concentrations in the region that will help in future air quality studies in order to identify commonalities and differences in the presence and contribution of fingerprint pollution sources among the Arasia Member States. The first regional campaign was launched simultaneously in Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, Syria and United Arab Emirates, using a harmonized sampling and analysis protocol of PM10 and PM2.5 samples. Different samples, collected between October 2014 and February 2015, from the participating countries, were analyzed by PIXE technique and gravimetric measurements were also carried out. The first results of the study will be discussed in a regional perspective. Our study shows that concentrations of fine aerosol fractions are often exceeding the WHO standard values as well as showing some disparities in the obtained values between the different sampling sites. However, some trend similarities of variations with time could also be observed, suggesting a common influence by trans-boundary or external sources of air pollution.

  19. Comparison of surface-coal-mine respirable dust concentrations measured with MRE and personal gravimetric sampling equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, J.J.; Tomb, T.F.; Gadomski, R.R.; Custer, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    All coal mine respirable dust concentrations measured with approved personal respirable dust sampling instruments are converted to equivalent MRE sampler concentrations by multiplying by the factor 1.38. This conversion factor was determined from comparison measurements made in underground coal mine environments. This report describes the results of the Mine Safety and Health Administration's (MSHA) sampling of surface mining operations to determine if 1.38 is a valid factor for converting surface coal mine dust samples collected with approved personal samplers to equivalent MRE concentrations. Comparative measurements were obtained with the MRE and personal gravimetric dust samplers at a variety of surface mining operations and coal preparation plants. Regression analysis was used to derive a relationship between measurements obtained with the MRE and personal respirable dust samplers. The factor derived for surface measurements was within 9 percent of that derived for underground measurements. It was concluded that 1.38 is the most applicable factor to use for converting personal respirable dust measurements to equivalent MRE measurements.

  20. Prediction of Thermodynamic Properties for Halogenated Hydrocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Yukihiro

    The predictive methods of thermodynamic properties are discussed with respect to the halogenated hydrocarbons using as working fluids for refrigeration and heat pump cycles. The methods introduced into this paper can be calculated by the limited information; critical properties, normal boiling point and acentric factor. The results of prediction are compared with the experimental values of PVT property, vapor pressure and saturated liquid density. On the basis of these comparisons, Lydersen's method for predicting the critical properties, the generalized vapor pressure correlation by Ashizawa et, al., and Hankinson-Thomson's method for predicting saturated liquid density can be recommended. With respect to the equation of state, either Soave equation or Peng-Robinson equation is effective in calculating the thermodynamic properties except high density region.