Science.gov

Sample records for hydrocarbon scramjet fuels

  1. Simulation of a hydrocarbon fueled scramjet exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, J.

    1982-01-01

    Exhaust nozzle flow fields for a fully integrated, hydrocarbon burning scramjet were calculated for flight conditions of M (undisturbed free stream) = 4 at 6.1 km altitude and M (undisturbed free stream) = 6 at 30.5 km altitude. Equilibrium flow, frozen flow, and finite rate chemistry effects are considered. All flow fields were calculated by method of characteristics. Finite rate chemistry results were evaluated by a one dimensional code (Bittker) using streamtube area distributions extracted from the equilibrium flow field, and compared to very slow artificial rate cases for the same streamtube area distribution. Several candidate substitute gas mixtures, designed to simulate the gas dynamics of the real engine exhaust flow, were examined. Two mixtures are found to give excellent simulations of the specified exhaust flow fields when evaluated by the same method of characteristics computer code.

  2. O and temperature in a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenstein, C. S.; Schultz, I. A.; Spearrin, R. M.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    The design and demonstration of a two-color tunable diode laser sensor for measurements of temperature and H2O in an ethylene-fueled model scramjet combustor are presented. This sensor probes multiple H2O transitions in the fundamental vibration bands near 2.5 μm that are up to 20 times stronger than those used by previous near-infrared H2O sensors. In addition, two design measures enabled high-fidelity measurements in the nonuniform flow field. (1) A recently developed calibration-free scanned-wavelength-modulation spectroscopy spectral-fitting strategy was used to infer the integrated absorbance of each transition without a priori knowledge of the absorption lineshape and (2) transitions with strengths that scale near-linearly with temperature were used to accurately determine the H2O column density and the H2O-weighted path-averaged temperature from the integrated absorbance of two transitions.

  3. Nonlinear characteristics and detection of combustion modes for a hydrocarbon fueled scramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cong; Yang, Qingchun; Chang, Juntao; Tang, Jingfeng; Bao, Wen

    2015-05-01

    An experimental investigation of combustion mode transition in a hydrocarbon fueled scramjet combustor model is reported under Mach number 2.1 and 2.5 inflow conditions. Three different combustion modes with respect to equivalence ratio are observed, namely, scramjet mode, weak ramjet mode and strong ramjet mode. The typical features of different combustion modes are analyzed by wall-pressures and one-dimensionally estimated Mach number distributions. The processes of combustion mode transitions show significant nonlinear characteristics. The static pressure and Mach number have discontinuous sudden changes as the mode transition occurs, especially near the fuel-supply region, emphasizing the importance of detection and control of combustion modes. The nonlinear characteristics of wall-pressures near the exit of the isolator can be used in the detection of different combustion modes. A series of experiments prove that this pressure-magnitude-based detection technique is feasible.

  4. Opposed Jet Burner Extinction Limits: Simple Mixed Hydrocarbon Scramjet Fuels vs Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2007-01-01

    Opposed Jet Burner tools have been used extensively by the authors to measure Flame Strength (FS) of laminar non-premixed H2 air and simple hydrocarbon (HC) air counterflow diffusion flames at 1-atm. FS represents a strain-induced extinction limit based on air jet velocity. This paper follows AIAA-2006-5223, and provides new HC air FSs for global testing of chemical kinetics, and for characterizing idealized flameholding potentials during early scramjet-like combustion. Previous FS data included six HCs, pure and N2-diluted; and three HC-diluted H2 fuels, where FS decayed very nonlinearly as HC was added to H2, due to H-atom scavenging. This study presents FSs on mixtures of (candidate surrogate) HCs, some with very high FS ethylene. Included are four binary gaseous systems at 300 K, and a hot ternary system at approx. 600 K. The binaries are methane + ethylene, ethane + ethylene, methane + ethane, and methane + propylene. The first three also form two ternary systems. The hot ternary includes both 10.8 and 21.3 mole % vaporized n-heptane and full ranges of methane + ethylene. Normalized FS data provide accurate means of (1) validating, globally, chemical kinetics for extinction of non-premixed flames, and (2) estimating (scaling by HC) the loss of incipient flameholding in scramjet combustors. The n-heptane is part of a proposed baseline simulant (10 mole % with 30% methane + 60% ethylene) that mimics the ignition of endothermically cracked JP-7 like kerosene fuel, as suggested by Colket and Spadaccini in 2001 in their shock tube Scramjet Fuels Autoignition Study. Presently, we use FS to gauge idealized flameholding, and define HC surrogates. First, FS was characterized for hot nheptane + methane + ethylene; then a hot 36 mole % methane + 64% ethylene surrogate was defined that mimics FS of the baseline simulant system. A similar hot ethane + ethylene surrogate can also be defined, but it has lower vapor pressure at 300 K, and thus exhibits reduced gaseous

  5. Perspective of laser-induced plasma ignition of hydrocarbon fuel in Scramjet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Leichao; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Jianhan; Yu, Xin; Li, Xipeng

    2016-01-01

    Laser-induced plasma ignition of an ethylene fuelled cavity was successfully conducted in a model scramjet engine combustor. The ethylene was injected 10mm upstream of cavity flameholder from 3 orifices 60 degree inclined relative to freestream direction. The 1064nm laser beam, from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source running at 3Hz and 200mJ per pulse, was focused into cavity for ignition. High speed photography was used to capture the transient ignition process. The laser-induced gas breakdown, flame kernel generation and propagation were all recorded and ensuing stable supersonic combustion was established in cavity. The flame kernel is found rotating anti-clockwise and gradually moves upwards as the entrainment of circulation flow in cavity. The flame is then stretched from leading edge to trailing edge to fully fill the entire cavity. Eventually, a stable combustion is achieved roughly 900μs after the laser pulse. The results show promising potentials for practical application. The perspective of laser-induced plasma ignition of hydrocarbon fuel in scramjet engine is outlined.

  6. Design Considerations of ISTAR Hydrocarbon Fueled Combustor Operating in Air Augmented Rocket, Ramjet and Scramjet Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreadis, Dean; Drake, Alan; Garrett, Joseph L.; Gettinger, Christopher D.; Hoxie, Stephen S.

    2003-01-01

    The development and ground test of a rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) propulsion system is being conducted as part of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Integrated System Test of an Airbreathing Rocket (ISTAR) program. The eventual flight vehicle (X-43B) is designed to support an air-launched self-powered Mach 0.7 to 7.0 demonstration of an RBCC engine through all of its airbreathing propulsion modes - air augmented rocket (AAR), ramjet (RJ), and scramjet (SJ). Through the use of analytical tools, numerical simulations, and experimental tests the ISTAR program is developing and validating a hydrocarbon-fueled RBCC combustor design methodology. This methodology will then be used to design an integrated RBCC propulsion system that produces robust ignition and combustion stability characteristics while maximizing combustion efficiency and minimizing drag losses. First order analytical and numerical methods used to design hydrocarbon-fueled combustors are discussed with emphasis on the methods and determination of requirements necessary to establish engine operability and performance characteristics.

  7. Design Considerations of Istar Hydrocarbon Fueled Combustor Operating in Air Augmented Rocket, Ramjet and Scramjet Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreadis, Dean; Drake, Alan; Garrett, Joseph L.; Gettinger, Christopher D.; Hoxie, Stephen S.

    2002-01-01

    The development and ground test of a rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) propulsion system is being conducted as part of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Integrated System Test of an Airbreathing Rocket (ISTAR) program. The eventual flight vehicle (X-43B) is designed to support an air-launched self-powered Mach 0.7 to 7.0 demonstration of an RBCC engine through all of its airbreathing propulsion modes - air augmented rocket (AAR), ramjet (RJ), and scramjet (SJ). Through the use of analytical tools, numerical simulations, and experimental tests the ISTAR program is developing and validating a hydrocarbon-fueled RBCC combustor design methodology. This methodology will then be used to design an integrated RBCC propulsion system thai: produces robust ignition and combustion stability characteristics while maximizing combustion efficiency and minimizing drag losses. First order analytical and numerical methods used to design hydrocarbon-fueled combustors are discussed with emphasis on the methods and determination of requirements necessary to establish engine operability and performance characteristics.

  8. Laser-Based Measurements of OH, Temperature, and Water Vapor Concentration in a Hydrocarbon-Fueled Scramjet (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    its cowl wall. The combustor had over 200 pressure taps instrumented on all four walls, including measurements at the combustor exit and in the base...connect hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor . Planar laser- induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the OH radical is used to examine the flame structure...within the combustor . Tunable diode laser- based absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is used to measure water vapor concentration and static temperature near

  9. Opposed Jet Burner Approach for Characterizing Flameholding Potentials of Hydrocarbon Scramjet Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Convery, Janet L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2006-01-01

    Opposed Jet Burner (OJB) tools have been used extensively by the authors to measure Flame Strength (FS) extinction limits of laminar H2/N2 air and (recently) hydrocarbon (HC) air Counterflow Diffusion Flames (CFDFs) at one atm. This paper details normalization of FSs of N2- diluted H2 and HC systems to account for effects of fuel composition, temperature, pressure, jet diameter, inflow Reynolds number, and inflow velocity profile (plug, contoured nozzle; and parabolic, straight tube). Normalized results exemplify a sensitive accurate means of validating, globally, reduced chemical kinetic models at approx. 1 atm and the relatively low temperatures approximating the loss of non-premixed idealized flameholding, e.g., in scramjet combustors. Laminar FS is defined locally as maximum air input velocity, U(sub air), that sustains combustion of a counter-jet of g-fuel at extinction. It uniquely characterizes a fuel. And global axial strain rate at extinction (U(sub air) normalized by nozzle or tube diameter, D(sub n or (sub t)) can be compared directly with computed extinction limits, determined using either a 1-D Navier Stokes stream-function solution, using detailed transport and finite rate chemistry, or (better yet) a detailed 2-D Navier Stokes numerical simulation. The experimental results define an idealized flameholding reactivity scale that shows wide ranging (50 x) normalized FS s for various vaporized-liquid and gaseous HCs, including, in ascending order: JP-10, methane, JP-7, n-heptane, n-butane, propane, ethane, and ethylene. Results from H2 air produce a unique and exceptionally strong flame that agree within approx. 1% of a recent 2-D numerically simulated FS for a 3 mm tube-OJB. Thus we suggest that experimental FS s and/or FS ratios, for various neat and blended HCs w/ and w/o additives, offer accurate global tests of chemical kinetic models at the Ts and Ps of extinction. In conclusion, we argue the FS approach is more direct and fundamental, for

  10. Experimental investigations on active cooling thermal protection structure of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor in arc heated facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianqiang, Tu; Jinlong, Peng; Xianning, Yang; Lianzhong, Chen

    2016-10-01

    The active cooling thermal protection technology is the efficient method to resolve the long-duration work and reusable problems of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor, where worst thermo-mechanical loads occur. The fuel is passed through coolant channels adjacent to the heated surfaces to absorb heat from the heating exchanger panels, prior to injection into the combustor. The heating exchanger both cooled down the wall temperature of the combustor wall and heats and cracks the hydrocarbon fuel inside the panel to permit an easier combustion and satisfying combustion efficiency. The subscale active cooling metallic panels, with dimensions of 100×100 mm and different coolant channel sizes, have been tested under typical combustion thermal environment produced by arc heated Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD). The heat exchange ability of different coolant channel sizes has been obtained. The big-scale active cooling metallic panel, with dimensions of 100 × 750 mm and the coolant channel sizes of better heating exchange performance, has been made and tested in the big-scale arc heated TFD facility. The test results show that the local superheated ablation is easy to happen for the cooling fuel assigned asymmetrically in the bigscale active cooling metallic panel, and the cooling fuel rate can reduce 8%˜10% after spraying the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) in the heating surface.

  11. Gaseous Surrogate Hydrocarbons for a Hifire Scramjet that Mimic Opposed Jet Extinction Limits for Cracked JP Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes, first, the top-down methodology used to define simple gaseous surrogate hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures for a hypersonic scramjet combustion subtask of the HiFIRE program. It then presents new and updated Opposed Jet Burner (OJB) extinction-limit Flame Strength (FS) data obtained from laminar non-premixed HC vs. air counterflow diffusion flames at 1-atm, which follow from earlier investigations. FS represents a strain-induced extinction limit based on cross-section-average air jet velocity, U(sub air), that sustains combustion of a counter jet of gaseous fuel just before extinction. FS uniquely characterizes a kinetically limited fuel combustion rate. More generally, Applied Stress Rates (ASRs) at extinction (U(sub air) normalized by nozzle or tube diameter, D(sub n or t) can directly be compared with extinction limits determined numerically using either a 1-D or (preferably) a 2-D Navier Stokes simulation with detailed transport and finite rate chemistry. The FS results help to characterize and define three candidate surrogate HC fuel mixtures that exhibit a common FS 70% greater than for vaporized JP-7 fuel. These include a binary fuel mixture of 64% ethylene + 36% methane, which is our primary recommendation. It is intended to mimic the critical flameholding limit of a thermally- or catalytically-cracked JP-7 like fuel in HiFIRE scramjet combustion tests. Our supporting experimental results include: (1) An idealized kinetically-limited ASR reactivity scale, which represents maximum strength non-premixed flames for several gaseous and vaporized liquid HCs; (2) FS characterizations of Colket and Spadaccini s suggested ternary surrogate, of 60% ethylene + 30% methane + 10% n-heptane, which matches the ignition delay of a typical cracked JP fuel; (3) Data showing how our recommended binary surrogate, of 64% ethylene + 36% methane, has an identical FS; (4) Data that characterize an alternate surrogate of 44% ethylene + 56% ethane with identical

  12. Analysis of a hydrocarbon scramjet with augmented preburning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molvik, Gregory A.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Huynh, Loc C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a feasibility study of a hydrocarbon scramjet design utilizing an augmented preburner upstream of the main fuel injector locations. The combustor design evaluated here is for a small hypersonic research vehicle. It consists of a preburner into which a small amount of fuel is burned with on-board liquid oxygen and injected into the main airflow, upstream of the main fuel injector locations, thus ensuring that combustion is present and uninterrupted. Two degrees of analysis are presented including a one-dimensional cycle analysis and a complete computational fluid dynamic analysis with finite-rate chemistry and a two-equation turbulence model. Comparison of these analyses show good agreement when the CFD-predicted fuel consumption schedule is used in the cycle analysis.

  13. Hypermixer Pylon Fuel Injection for Scramjet Combustors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-11

    wall cavities, intrusive geometries like pylons and struts , or a combination thereof. The type of fuel injection strategy largely depends on the...be affixed to combustor walls or placed on intru- sive geometries like struts or pylons. Wall injection comes with an inherent combustor airflow...only one wall . Using in-stream struts and pylons as fueling devices has been a common practice in scramjet design. Much research continues to be

  14. Simultaneous Measurements of Temperature and Major Species Concentration in a Hydrocarbon-Fueled Dual Mode Scramjet Using WIDECARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Emanuela Carolina Angela

    Width increased dual-pump enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (WIDECARS) measurements were conducted in a McKenna air-ethylene premixed burner, at nominal equivalence ratio range between 0.55 and 2.50 to provide quantitative measurements of six major combustion species (C2H 4, N2, O2, H2, CO, CO2) concentration and temperature simultaneously. The purpose of this test was to investigate the uncertainties in the experimental and spectral modeling methods in preparation for an subsequent scramjet C2H4/air combustion test at the University of Virginia-Aerospace Research Laboratory. A broadband Pyrromethene (PM) PM597 and PM650 dye laser mixture and optical cavity were studied and optimized to excite the Raman shift of all the target species. Two hundred single shot recorded spectra were processed, theoretically fitted and then compared to computational models, to verify where chemical equilibrium or adiabatic condition occurred, providing experimental flame location and formation, species concentrations, temperature, and heat losses inputs to computational kinetic models. The Stark effect, temperature, and concentration errors are discussed. Subsequently, WIDECARS measurements of a premixed air-ethylene flame were successfully acquired in a direct connect small-scale dual-mode scramjet combustor, at University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility (UVaSCF). A nominal Mach 5 flight condition was simulated (stagnation pressure p0 = 300 kPa, temperature T0 = 1200 K, equivalence ratio range ER = 0.3 -- 0.4). The purpose of this test was to provide quantitative measurements of the six major combustion species concentration and temperature. Point-wise measurements were taken by mapping four two-dimensional orthogonal planes (before, within, and two planes after the cavity flame holder) with respect to the combustor freestream direction. Two hundred single shot recorded spectra were processed and theoretically fitted. Mean flow and standard deviation are

  15. System design and analysis of hydrocarbon scramjet with regeneration cooling and expansion cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianyu; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Hua; Shen, Chibing

    2015-06-01

    A new expansion cycle scheme of the scramjet engine system including a hydrocarbon-fuel-based (kerosene) regenerativecooling system and supercritical/cracking kerosene-based turbo-pump was proposed in this paper. In this cycle scheme, the supercritical/cracking kerosene with high pressure and high temperature is formed through the cooling channel. And then, in order to make better use of the high energy of the supercritical/cracking fuel, the supercritical/cracking kerosene fuel was used to drive the turbo-pump to obtain a high pressure of the cold kerosenefuel at the entrance of the cooling channel. In the end, the supercritical/cracking kerosene from the turbine exit is injected into the scramjet combustor. Such supercritical/cracking kerosene fuel can decrease the fuel-air mixing length and increase the combustion efficiency, due to the gas state and low molecular weight of the cracking fuel. In order to ignite the cold kerosene in the start-up stage, the ethylene-assisted ignition subsystem was applied. In the present paper, operating modes and characteristics of the expansion cycle system are first described.And then, the overall design of the system and the characterisitics of the start-up process are analyzed numerically to investigate effects of the system parameters on the scramjet start-up performance. The results show that the expansion cycle system proposed in this paper can work well under typical conditions. The research work in this paper can help to make a solid foundation for the research on the coupling characteristics between the dynamicsand thermodynamics of the scramjet expansion cycle system

  16. Fuel-Air Mixing and Combustion in Scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. P.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Cutler, A. D.

    2002-01-01

    Activities in the area of scramjet fuel-air mixing and combustion associated with the Research and Technology Organization Working Group on Technologies for Propelled Hypersonic Flight are described. Work discussed in this paper has centered on the design of two basic experiments for studying the mixing and combustion of fuel and air in a scramjet. Simulations were conducted to aid in the design of these experiments. The experimental models were then constructed, and data were collected in the laboratory. Comparison of the data from a coaxial jet mixing experiment and a supersonic combustor experiment with a combustor code were then made and described. This work was conducted by NATO to validate combustion codes currently employed in scramjet design and to aid in the development of improved turbulence and combustion models employed by the codes.

  17. X-51A Scramjet Demonstrator Program: Waverider Ground and Flight Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    USAF) WaveRider program. The overall test objective of the X-51A program was to demonstrate a scramjet engine using endothermic hydrocarbon fuel...Hypersonic Technology (HyTech) scramjet engine, integrated into the vehicle, used endothermic hydrocarbon fuel (JP-7). The X-51A was designed to be

  18. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  19. Review of the potential of silanes as rocket/scramjet fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidding, Bernhard; Pfitzner, Michael; Simone, Domenico; Bruno, Claudio

    2008-07-01

    Experimental use as well as theoretical considerations regarding silanes as fuels for spacecrafts and supersonic flight are reviewed. The historical circumstances leading to the utilization of monosilane as a fuel additive for scramjets are highlighted and milestones in the chemical research on silanes are summarized. Recent developments such as the use of monosilane as an ignition aid in the NASA X-43A scramjet flights as well as general progress in silicon hydride research, including liquid higher silanes and the resulting potential for the propulsion field are discussed.

  20. Hydrocarbon fuel detergent

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.R.; Lyons, W.R.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a hydrocarbon fuel composition comprising: a hydrocarbon fuel; and a detergent amount of a detergent comprising an alkenylsuccinimide prepared by reacting an alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride with a mixture of amines, wherein at least 90 weight percent of the alkenyl substituent is derived from an olefin having a carbon chain of from 10 to 30 carbons or mixtures thereof, and wherein the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride is reacted with the mixture of amines at a mole ratio of 0.8 to 1.5 moles of the amines per mole of the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride.

  1. Combustion characteristics of thermally stressed hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Colin William

    Liquid propelled propulsion systems, which range from rocket systems to hypersonic scramjet and ramjet engines, require active cooling in order to prevent additional payload requirements. In these systems, the liquid fuel is used as a coolant and is delivered through micro-channels that surround the combustion chambers, nozzles, as well as the exterior surfaces in order to extract heat from these affected areas. During this process, heat exchange occurs through phase change, sensible heat extraction, and endothermic reactions experienced by the liquid fuel. Previous research has demonstrated the significant modifications in fuel composition and changes to the fuel's physical properties that can result from these endothermic reactions. As a next step, we are experimentally investigating the effect that endothermic reactions have on fundamental flame behavior for real hydrocarbon fuels that are used as rocket and jet propellants. To achieve this goal, we have developed a counter-flow flame burner to measure extinction limits of the thermally stressed fuels. The counter-flow flame system is to be coupled with a high pressure reactor, capable of subjecting the fuel to 170 atm and 873 K, effectively simulating the extreme environment that cause the liquid fuel to experience endothermic reactions. The fundamental flame properties of the reacted fuels will be compared to those of unreacted fuels, allowing us to determine the role of endothermic reactions on the combustion behavior of current hydrocarbon jet and rocket propellants. To quantify the change in transport properties and chemical kinetics of the reacting mixture, simultaneous numerical simulations of the reactor portion of the experiment coupled with a counterflow flame simulation are performed using n-heptane and n-dodecane.

  2. Fuel Injector Design Optimization for an Annular Scramjet Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A four-parameter, three-level, central composite experiment design has been used to optimize the configuration of an annular scramjet injector geometry using computational fluid dynamics. The computational fluid dynamic solutions played the role of computer experiments, and response surface methodology was used to capture the simulation results for mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery within the scramjet flowpath. An optimization procedure, based upon the response surface results of mixing efficiency, was used to compare the optimal design configuration against the target efficiency value of 92.5%. The results of three different optimization procedures are presented and all point to the need to look outside the current design space for different injector geometries that can meet or exceed the stated mixing efficiency target.

  3. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  4. Mixing enhancement in a scramjet combustor using fuel jet injection swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesberg, Sonja M.

    The scramjet engine has proven to be a viable means of powering a hypersonic vehicle, especially after successful flights of the X-51 WaveRider and various Hy-SHOT test vehicles. The major challenge associated with operating a scramjet engine is the short residence time of the fuel and oxidizer in the combustor. The fuel and oxidizer have only milliseconds to mix, ignite and combust in the combustion chamber. Combustion cannot occur until the fuel and oxidizer are mixed on a molecular level. Therefore the improvement of mixing is of utmost interest since this can increase combustion efficiency. This study investigated mixing enhancement of fuel and oxidizer within the combustion chamber of a scramjet by introducing swirl to the fuel jet. The investigation was accomplished with numerical simulations using STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamic software. The geometry of the University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility was used to model the isolator, combustor and nozzle of a scramjet engine for simulation purposes. Experimental data from previous research at the facility was used to verify the simulation model before investigating the effect of fuel jet swirl on mixing. The model used coaxial fuel jet with a swirling annular jet. Single coaxial fuel jet and dual coaxial fuel jet configurations were simulated for the investigation. The coaxial fuel jets were modelled with a swirling annular jet and non-swirling core jet. Numerical analysis showed that fuel jet swirl not only increased mixing and entrainment of the fuel with the oxidizer but the mixing occurred further upstream than without fuel jet swirl. The burning efficiency was calculated for the all the configurations. An increase in burning efficiency indicated an increase in the mixing of H2 with O2. In the case of the single fuel jet models, the maximum burning efficiency increase due to fuel injection jet swirl was 23.3%. The research also investigated the possibility that interaction between two

  5. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Song, Chunshan [State College, PA; Ma, Xiaoliang [State College, PA; Sprague, Michael J [Calgary, CA; Subramani, Velu [State College, PA

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  6. Effect of hydrocarbon fuel type on fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. L.; Bittker, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A modified jet fuel thermal oxidation tester (JFTOT) procedure was used to evaluate deposit and sediment formation for four pure hydrocarbon fuels over the temperature range 150 to 450 C in 316-stainless-steel heater tubes. Fuel types were a normal alkane, an alkene, a naphthene, and an aromatic. Each fuel exhibited certain distinctive deposit and sediment formation characteristics. The effect of aluminum and 316-stainless-steel heater tube surfaces on deposit formation for the fuel n-decane over the same temperature range was investigated. Results showed that an aluminum surface had lower deposit formation rates at all temperatures investigated. By using a modified JFTOT procedure the thermal stability of four pure hydrocarbon fuels and two practical fuels (Jet A and home heating oil no. 2) was rated on the basis of their breakpoint temperatures. Results indicate that this method could be used to rate thermal stability for a series of fuels.

  7. Nitric Oxide and Oxygen Air-Contamination Effects on Extinction Limits of Non-Premixed Hydrocarbon-Air Flames for a HIFiRE Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Dawson, Lucy C.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2009-01-01

    Unique nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen air-contamination effects on the extinction Flame Strength (FS) of non-premixed hydrocarbon (HC) vs. air flames are characterized for 7 gaseous HCs, using a new idealized 9.3 mm straight-tube Opposed Jet Burner (OJB) at 1 atm. FS represents a laminar strain-induced extinction limit based on cross-section-average air jet velocity, Uair, that sustains combustion of a counter jet of gaseous fuel just before extinction. Besides ethane, propane, butane, and propylene, the HCs include ethylene, methane, and a 64 mole-% ethylene / 36 % methane mixture, the writer s previously recommended gaseous surrogate fuel for HIFiRE scramjet tests. The HC vs. clean air part of the work is an extension of a May 2008 JANNAF paper that characterized surrogates for the HIFiRE project that should mimic the flameholding of reformed (thermally- or catalytically-cracked) endothermic JP-like fuels. The new FS data for 7 HCs vs. clean air are thus consolidated with the previously validated data, normalized to absolute (local) axial-input strain rates, and co-plotted on a dual kinetically dominated reactivity scale. Excellent agreement with the prior data is obtained for all 7 fuels. Detailed comparisons are also made with recently published (Univ. Va) numerical results for ethylene extinction. A 2009-revised ethylene kinetic model (Univ. Southern Cal) led to predicted limits within approx. 5 % (compared to 45 %, earlier) of this writer s 2008 (and present) ethylene FSs, and also with recent independent data (Univ. Va) obtained on a new OJB system. These +/- 5 % agreements, and a hoped-for "near-identically-performing" reduced kinetics model, would greatly enhance the capability for accurate numerical simulations of surrogate HC flameholding in scramjets. The measured air-contamination effects on normalized FS extinction limits are projected to assess ongoing Arc-Heater-induced "facility test effects" of NO production (e.g., 3 mole-%) and resultant oxygen

  8. Effects of compression and expansion ramp fuel injector configuration on scramjet combustion and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Scott D.; Baker, N. R.; Capriotti, D. P.; Northam, G. B.

    1993-01-01

    A scramjet combustor with four wall-ramp injectors containing Mach-1.7 fuel jets in the base of the ramps was investigated experimentally. During the test program, two swept ramp injector designs were evaluated. One swept-ramp model had 10-deg compression-ramps and the other had 10-deg expansion cavities between flush wall ramps. The scramjet combustor model was instrumented with pressure taps and heat-flux gages. The pressure measurements indicated that both injector configurations were effective in promoting mixing and combustion. Autoignition occurred for the compression-ramp injectors, and the fuel began to burn immediately downstream of the injectors. In tests of the expansion ramps, a pilot was required to ignite the fuel, and the fuel did not burn for a distance of at least two gaps downstream of the injectors. Once initiated, combustion was rapid in this configuration. Heat transfer measurements showed that the heat flux differed greatly both across the width of the combustor and along the length of the combustor.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation Of The Fuel Injection In Scramjet Combustion Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Z. A.; Thornber, R. J. R.; Drikakis, D.

    2011-05-01

    Fuel injection in a typical scramjet combustion chamber is a very challenging flow to characterise either in experimental or computational studies. It involves multi- species compressible turbulent features with complex coherent flow structures arising as a result of sonic fuel injection transverse or inclined to the free-stream super- sonic flow. In this paper the fuel injection in the HyShot- II combustion chamber is studied using an Implicit LES method employing a modified very high order accurate numerical method. To gain accurate mean inflow boundary conditions, a thermally perfect gas formulation has been employed in preliminary simulations of the inlet ramp and cowl configuration. The results of these simulations are presented and validated against wind tunnel data.

  10. Visualization and Analysis of a Hydrocarbon Premixed Flame a in Small Scale Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Luca Maria Luigi

    Nitric oxide (NO) planar induced laser fluorescence (PLIF) measurements have been performed in a small scale scramjet combustor at the University of Virginia Aerospace Research Laboratory at nominal simulated Mach 5 flight enthalpy. A mixture of NO and N2 was injected at the upstream end of the inlet isolator as a surrogate for ethylene fuel, and the mixing of this fuel simulant was studied with and without a shock train. The shock train was produced by an air throttle, which simulated the blockage effects of combustion downstream of the cavity flame holder. NO PLIF signal was imaged in a plane orthogonal to the freestream at the leading edge of the cavity. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to identify the most uniform cases, which were achieved by varying the location of the fuel injection and shock train. This method was used to screen different possible fueling configurations to provide optimized test conditions for follow-on combustion measurements using ethylene fuel. A theoretical study of the selected NO rotational transitions was performed to obtain a LIF signal that is linear with NO mole fraction and approximately independent of pressure and temperature. In the same facility, OH PLIF measurements were also performed; OH lines were carefully chosen to have fluorescent signal that is independent of pressure and temperature but linear with mole fraction. The OH PLIF signal was imaged in planes orthogonal to and parallel to the freestream flow at different equivalence ratios. Flameout limits were tested and identified. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to compare the results with width increased dual-pump enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (WIDECARS) measurements in the same facility and large eddy simulation/Reynolds average Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) numerical simulations. The flame angle was found to be approximately 10 degrees for several different conditions, which is in agreement with numerical

  11. Numerical Simulation of Vitiation Effects on a Hydrogen-Fueled Dual-Mode Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Trefny, Charles J.; Bhagwandin, Vishal A.

    2010-01-01

    The Wind-US computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver was used to simulate dual-mode direct-connect ramjet/scramjet engine flowpath tests conducted in the University of Virginia (UVa) Supersonic Combustion Facility (SCF). The objective was to develop a computational capability within Wind-US to aid current hypersonic research and provide insight to flow as well as chemistry details that are not resolved by instruments available. Computational results are compared with experimental data to validate the accuracy of the numerical modeling. These results include two fuel-off non-reacting and eight fuel-on reacting cases with different equivalence ratios, split between one set with a clean (non-vitiated) air supply and the other set with a vitiated air supply (12 percent H2O vapor). The Peters and Rogg hydrogen-air chemical kinetics model was selected for the scramjet simulations. A limited sensitivity study was done to investigate the choice of turbulence model and inviscid flux scheme and led to the selection of the k-epsilon model and Harten, Lax and van Leer (for contact waves) (HLLC) scheme for general use. Simulation results show reasonably good agreement with experimental data and the overall vitiation effects were captured.

  12. Hydrocarbon-Fueled Scramjet Research at Hypersonic Mach Numbers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-31

    the pressure to drop , and a larger area of recompression to develop at the rear cavity face, resulting in increased drag. Opposite results appeared when...this ratio reaches a steady state by 1.5 ms after shock reflection. It is apparent from Fig. 2.2 that the reservoir pressure has dropped from the...uses the correlation of Millikan and White (1963) to determine the vibrational freezing temperatures for the major flow species, assuming collision

  13. Nitric Oxide PLIF Visualization of Simulated Fuel-Air Mixing in a Dual-Mode Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) planar induced laser fluorescence (PLIF) measurements have been performed in a small scale scramjet combustor at the University of Virginia Aerospace Research Laboratory at nominal simulated Mach 5 flight. A mixture of NO and N2 was injected at the upstream end of the inlet isolator as a surrogate for ethylene fuel, and the mixing of this fuel simulant was studied with and without a shock train. The shock train was produced by an air throttle, which simulated the blockage effects of combustion downstream of the cavity flame holder. NO PLIF signal was imaged in a plane orthogonal to the freestream at the leading edge of the cavity. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to identify the most uniform cases, which were achieved by varying the location of the fuel injection and shock train. This method was used to screen different possible fueling configurations to provide optimized test conditions for follow-on combustion measurements using ethylene fuel. A theoretical study of the selected NO rotational transitions was performed to obtain a LIF signal that is linear with NO mole fraction and approximately independent of pressure and temperature.

  14. Comparing hydrogen and hydrocarbon booster fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of the consequences of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels as the basis of launch vehicle booster rocket-stage performance notes that hydrocarbon fuels lead to lower vehicle dry mass, for low-velocity requirements, while hydrogen fuel furnishes lower dry mass. Vehicles employing both types of fuel attempt to take advantage of the low intercept and slope of hydrocarbon fuel at low velocity, and subsequently, of the slope of the hydrogen curves at higher velocities.

  15. Hydrocarbon Fuels Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    P.A.A 󈧄r𔃺 Masters, "High Density Propellants for Single Stage to Orbit Vehicles," Technical Memorandum, No. NASA/TM X -73503, Lewis Research Center...by interpolation. Optimum Hydrocarbon IP vs. LOX Sea-Level Expansion (14.7 psi, Pc’- 1000 psi) Z X .(299.6 sec) ---- 330 see. 310 see. 0...alkenes all lie along a vertical hne reflective of their common C.H2n molecular. formula. The positions of specific molecules are denoted by an X along with

  16. Scramjet Thermal Management (Tenue thermique des superstatoreacteurs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    combustion). Airbreathing launchers could typically use hydrogen-fuelled DMR. Less energetic fuels like hydrocarbons could also be used at a Mach number ...failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number . 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2010 2. REPORT TYPE...N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Scramjet Thermal Management (Tenue thermique des superstatoréacteurs) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  17. Characterization of a swept-strut hydrogen fuel-injector for scramjet applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.; Trexler, C. A.; Anderson, G. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of a swept-strut hydrogen fuel-injector simulating the center strut of a three strut scramjet module at Mach 6 flight conditions are presented. Detailed wall pressure distributions from over 100 separate tests with overall fuel flow from 0.1 to 1.3 times stoichiometric and test gas stagnation temperature from 1100 to 2400 K were recorded. The distance for pressure rise from the point of injection was found to increase with increasing test stagnation temperature. This trend indicates that chemical kinetics in the immediate region of perpendicular injection are not likely to be the mechanism controlling the onset of pressure rise. A fluid dynamic mechanism is suggested involving separation of the boundary layer downstream of injection which is forced upstream from the trailing edge by pressure rise due to combustion occurring in the base region of the strut. The results obtained indicate that the swept-strut fuel-injector concept can be adapted to a wide range of flight conditions by varying the amount of perpendicular fuel injection.

  18. Parametric scramjet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongseong

    The performance of a hypersonic flight vehicle will depend on existing materials and fuels; this work presents the performance of the ideal scramjet engine for three different combustion chamber materials and three different candidate fuels. Engine performance is explored by parametric cycle analysis for the ideal scramjet as a function of material maximum service temperature and the lower heating value of jet engine fuels. The thermodynamic analysis is based on the Brayton cycle as similarly employed in describing the performance of the ramjet, turbojet, and fanjet ideal engines. The objective of this work is to explore material operating temperatures and fuel possibilities for the combustion chamber of a scramjet propulsion system to show how they relate to scramjet performance and the seven scramjet engine parameters: specific thrust, fuel-to-air ratio, thrust-specific fuel consumption, thermal efficiency, propulsive efficiency, overall efficiency, and thrust flux. The information presented in this work has not been done by others in the scientific literature. This work yields simple algebraic equations for scramjet performance which are similar to that of the ideal ramjet, ideal turbojet and ideal turbofan engines.

  19. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Scramjet Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen; Hass, Neal; Storch, Andrea; Gruber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A series of hydrocarbon-fueled direct-connect scramjet ground tests has been completed in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF) at simulated Mach 8 flight conditions. These experiments were part of an initial test phase to support Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program. In this flight experiment, a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet is intended to demonstrate transition from dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and a majority of the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests were to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the simulated Mach 6-8 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition. Both of these objectives were achieved prior to the HiFIRE Flight 2 payload Critical Design Review. Mach 8 ground test results are presented in this report, including flowpath surface pressure distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath in scramjet-mode over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 8 simulation, as well as over a range of fuel equivalence ratios. Flowpath analysis using ground test data is presented elsewhere; however, limited comparisons with analytical predictions suggest that both scramjet-mode operation and the combustion performance objective are achieved at Mach 8 conditions.

  20. Mach 2 combustion characteristics of hydrogen/hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; Northam, G. Burton; Bell, Randy A.

    1987-01-01

    The combustion of H2/CH4 and H2/C2H4 mixtures containing 10-70 vol pct hydrocarbon at cumbustor inlet Mach number 2 and temperatures 2000-4000 R is investigated experimentally, applying direct-connect test hardware and techniques similar to those described by Diskin and Northam (1987) in the facilities of the NASA Langley Hypersonic Propulsion Branch. The experimental setup, procedures, and data-reduction methods are described; and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Fuel type and mixture are found to have little effect on the wall heating rate measured near the combustor exit, but H2/C2H4 is shown to burn much more efficiently than H2/CH4, with no pilot-off blowout at equivalence ratios greater than 0.5. It is suggested that H2/hydrocarbon mixtures are feasible fuels (at least in terms of combustion efficiency) for scramjet SSTO vehicles operating at freestream Mach numbers above 4.

  1. Mach 2 combustion characteristics of hydrogen/hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; Jachimowski, C. J.; Northam, G. Burton; Bell, Randy A.

    1987-01-01

    The combustion of H2/CH4 and H2/C2H4 mixtures containing 10 to 70 vol pct hydrocarbon at combustor inlet Mach number 2 and temperatures 2000 to 4000 R is investigated experimentally, applying direct-connect test hardware and techniques similar to those described by Diskin and Northam (1987) in the facilities of the NASA Langley Hypersonic Propulsion Branch. The experimental setup, procedures, and data-reduction methods are described; and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Fuel type and mixture are found to have little effect on the wall heating rate measured near the combustor exit, but H2/C2H4 is shown to burn much more efficiently than H2/CH4, with no pilot-off blowout equivalence ratios greater than 0.5. It is suggested that H2/hydrocarbon mixtures are feasible fuels (at least in terms of combustion efficiency) for scramjet SSTO vehicles operating at freestream Mach numbers above 4.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROCARBON JET FUELS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AIRCRAFT ENGINE OILS, *AVIATION FUELS, *HYDROCARBONS, *JET ENGINE FUELS, *LUBRICANTS, *POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, ALKYL RADICALS, BENZENE, CATALYSIS...CHEMICAL REACTIONS , COMBUSTION, CUMENES, DECOMPOSITION, ETHYLENES, FORMALDEHYDE, FRAGMENTATION, HIGH TEMPERATURE, HYDROGENATION, NAPHTHALENES, PHYSICAL

  3. Numerical investigation of a hydrogen-fueled scramjet combustor at flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabadan, E.; Weigand, B.

    2013-03-01

    Numerical investigations of a hydrogen-fueled scramjet combustor at cruise flight conditions of Mach 8 at an altitude of 30 km have been performed. Two combustor configurations were investigated: a single-stage combustor with a central strut injector and a two-staged combustor combining the central strut and wall-mounted ramp injectors. These numerical simulations are aimed to study the flow structure, supersonic mixing, autoignition, and combustion for the present combustor configurations. A turbulent flow from a separate intake calculation was used as inflow condition for the combustor. A better performance for the two-staged combustor configuration was observed. The combination of the central strut injection together with the wall-ramp injection improved the turbulent mixing and, consequently, the combustion process. Inside the supersonic combustion chamber, the autoignition zone occurred downstream of the injectors, and combustion takes place accompanied by high heat release and pressure rise. As the equivalence ratio was increased, the combustion became stronger causing an upstream displacement of the shock train producing different pressure variations. For the two-staged combustor configuration, the location of the autoignition zone was found to appear further upstream compared to single-stage combustor. Mixing was improved by addition of the second-stage injection. The influence of the wall temperature was also investigated showing an effect on the combustion pressure rise and the length and location of the shock train.

  4. Thermal performance of a scramjet combustor operating at Mach 5.6 flight conditions. Final report, May 1996--May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, S.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Emmer, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the experimental data and the procedures used in acquiring and reducing the thermal loads data during tests of a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor at United Technologies Research Center (UTRC). This research effort is part of the UTRC effort to develop dual-mode scramjet combustor technology to support the development of Mach S missile technology. The objective of the thermal loads testing was to map the thermal and mechanical loads, including heat transfer, dynamic and static pressures, and skin friction in a scramjet combustor during direct-connect scramjet tests. The tests were conducted at the UTRC Ramject/Scramjet direct-connect combustor test facility in East Hartford, CT.

  5. Evaluation of a storable fluorine based pilot for scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, G. S.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An ignitor/pilot device for scramjet engines has been tested with C2H4, C2H6, and CH4 gaseous hydrocarbon fuels at Mach 2. The pilot was designed to operate with storable nontoxic propellants rather than hazardous pyrophorics; the pilot fluid is a mixture of ethylene, oxygen, and sulfur hexafluoride. The pilot reduced the minimum temperature at which all three hydrocarbon fuels ignited; a comparison was then conducted between combustion efficiency calculations for these test results and those of pilots using nitrogen in place of sulfur hexafluoride, and using silane-hydrogen (yielding equivalent energy). The nitrogen-substituted pilot exhibited the highest efficiency.

  6. Jet aircraft hydrocarbon fuels technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longwell, J. P. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A broad specification, referee fuel was proposed for research and development. This fuel has a lower, closely specified hydrogen content and higher final boiling point and freezing point than ASTM Jet A. The workshop recommended various priority items for fuel research and development. Key items include prediction of tradeoffs among fuel refining, distribution, and aircraft operating costs; combustor liner temperature and emissions studies; and practical simulator investigations of the effect of high freezing point and low thermal stability fuels on aircraft fuel systems.

  7. Numerical heat transfer analysis of transcritical hydrocarbon fuel flow in a tube partially filled with porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuguang; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Silong; Qin, Jiang; Bao, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon fuel has been widely used in air-breathing scramjets and liquid rocket engines as coolant and propellant. However, possible heat transfer deterioration and threats from local high heat flux area in scramjet make heat transfer enhancement essential. In this work, 2-D steady numerical simulation was carried out to study different schemes of heat transfer enhancement based on a partially filled porous media in a tube. Both boundary and central layouts were analyzed and effects of gradient porous media were also compared. The results show that heat transfer in the transcritical area is enhanced at least 3 times with the current configuration compared to the clear tube. Besides, the proper use of gradient porous media also enhances the heat transfer compared to homogenous porous media, which could help to avoid possible over-temperature in the thermal protection.

  8. Profiling refined hydrocarbon fuels using polar components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Hostettler, F.D.

    2007-01-01

    Identification of a fuel released into the environment can be difficult due to biodegradation or weathering. Negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry was used to screen for unique polar components in a wide variety of commercial hydrocarbon products and mixtures. These fuels produced unique and relatively simple spectra. When applied to hydrocarbon samples from a large, long-term fuel spill in a relatively cool climate in which the alkane, isoprenoid, and alkylcyclohexane portions had begun to biodegrade or weather, the polar components in these samples had changed little over time. This technique provided rapid fuel identification on hydrocarbons released into the environment, without sample preparation, fractionation, or chromatography. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  9. Scramjet Fuel Injection Array Optimization Utilizing Mixed Variable Pattern Search With Kriging Surrogates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    layer to create effects non -existent at lower speeds [37]. A schematic of a theorized scramjet engine is shown in Figure 1.3 [19]. In this graphic, the...the pressure on inclined bodies based on Newtonian impact theory [17]. The Mach disk center location, empirically calculated in [16], is given by y1 d...to optimize several aerodynamic shapes in hypersonic flow based on Newtonian flow theory. They reported improved convergence over strictly

  10. Hydrocarbon fuel cooling technologies for advanced propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, D.R.; Spadaccini, L.J.

    1997-04-01

    Storable hydrocarbon fuels that undergo endothermic reaction provide an attractive heat sink for future high-speed aircraft. An investigation was conducted to explore the endothermic potential of practical fuels, with inexpensive and readily available catalysts, under operating conditions simulative of high-speed flight applications. High heat sink capacities and desirable reaction products have been demonstrated for n-heptane and Norpar 12 fuels using zeolite catalysts in coated tube reactor configurations. The effects of fuel composition and operating condition on extent of fuel conversion, product composition, and the corresponding endotherm have been examined. The results obtained in this study provide a basis for catalytic-reactor/heat-exchanger design and analysis.

  11. Detonability of hydrocarbon fuels in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, H. D.; Mcclenagan, R. D.; Bishop, C. V.; Benz, F. J.; Pitz, W. J.; Westbrook, C. K.; Lee, J. H. S.

    1991-01-01

    Studies were conducted of the detonation of gas-phase mixtures of n-hexane and JP-4, with oxidizers as varied as air and pure oxygen, measuring detonation velocities and cell sizes as a function of stoichiometry and diluent concentration. The induction length of a one-dimensional Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering detonation was calculated on the basis of a theoretical model that employed the reaction kinetics of the hydrocarbon fuels used. Critical energy and critical tube diameter are compared for a relative measure of the heavy hydrocarbon fuels studied; detonation sensitivity appears to increase slightly with increasing carbon number.

  12. Volatile hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates are among the most commonly occurring and widely distributed contaminants in the environment. This chapter presents a summary of the sources, transport, fate, and remediation of volatile fuel hydrocarbons and fuel additives in the environment. Much research has focused on the transport and transformation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and methyl tert‐butyl ether, in groundwater following release from underground storage tanks. Natural attenuation from biodegradation limits the movement of these contaminants and has received considerable attention as an environmental restoration option. This chapter summarizes approaches to environmental restoration, including those that rely on natural attenuation, and also engineered or enhanced remediation. Researchers are increasingly combining several microbial and molecular-based methods to give a complete picture of biodegradation potential and occurrence at contaminated field sites. New insights into the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel additives have been gained by recent advances in analytical tools and approaches, including stable isotope fractionation, analysis of metabolic intermediates, and direct microbial evidence. However, development of long-term detailed monitoring programs is required to further develop conceptual models of natural attenuation and increase our understanding of the behavior of contaminant mixtures in the subsurface.

  13. Strained Hydrocarbons as Potential Hypergolic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A storable combination of high-energy hypergolic fuel and oxidizer is advantageous to the future of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). The combination will allow an increase in energy per unit volume of fuel and eliminate the need for an external ignition system. Strained systems have been studied as potential high-density fuels. Adding hypergolic functional groups, such as amino groups, to these hydrocarbons will potentially allow auto ignition of strained systems with hydrogen peroxide. Several straight chain amines and their strained counterparts containing an equivalent number of carbon atoms have been purchased and synthesized. These amines provide initial studies to determine the effects of fuel vapor pressure, strain energy, fuel miscibility, and amine substitution upon fuel ignition time and hypergolicity with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizer.

  14. Process for vaporizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Szydlowski, Donald F.; Kuzminskas, Vaidotas; Bittner, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a process for vaporizing liquid hydrocarbon fuels efficiently and without the formation of carbon residue on the apparatus used. The process includes simultaneously passing the liquid fuel and an inert hot gas downwardly through a plurality of vertically spaed apart regions of high surface area packing material. The liquid thinly coats the packing surface, and the sensible heat of the hot gas vaporizes this coating of liquid. Unvaporized liquid passing through one region of packing is uniformly redistributed over the top surface of the next region until all fuel has been vaporized using only the sensible heat of the hot gas stream.

  15. Viability of Selected Microorganisms in Hydrocarbon Fuels.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, H G; Carroll, M T; Owen, H P; Pritchard, D J

    1963-11-01

    A laboratory study of the viability of selected microorganisms in a hydrocarbon fuel medium was carried out on 19 species of microorganisms, representative of the types found as natural contaminants in aircraft fuels. More species remained viable when inoculated in pure cultures than when inoculated in mixed (composite) cultures. Of the 19 species selected, 10 were still viable after 3 months and 5 were viable after 4 months in the pure culture inoculants. In the complete composite culture inoculant, the bacterial species which were viable at the end of 4 months were the same as those found in the pure culture inoculant. No fungi remained viable in the complete composite cultures after a 3-week period. The microorganisms which remain viable in a hydrocarbon fuel medium are considered indicative of a satisfactory inoculum to be used as a test culture in laboratory analysis of mechanical control techniques.

  16. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, R.; Szetela, E. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study deposit formation in hydrocarbon fuels under flow conditions that exist in high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. A high pressure fuel coking test apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition (coking) limits and carbon deposition rates in heated copper tubes for two hydrocarbon rocket fuels, RP-1 and commercial-grade propane. Tests were also conducted using JP-7 and chemically-pure propane as being representative of more refined cuts of the baseline fuels. A parametric evaluation of fuel thermal stability was performed at pressures of 136 atm to 340 atm, bulk fuel velocities in the range 6 to 30 m/sec, and tube wall temperatures in the range 422 to 811 K. Results indicated that substantial deposit formation occurs with RP-1 fuel at wall temperatures between 600 and 800 K, with peak deposit formation occurring near 700 K. No improvements were obtained when deoxygenated JP-7 fuel was substituted for RP-1. The carbon deposition rates for the propane fuels were generally higher than those obtained for either of the kerosene fuels at any given wall temperature. There appeared to be little difference between commercial-grade and chemically-pure propane with regard to type and quantity of deposit. Results of tests conducted with RP-1 indicated that the rate of deposit formation increased slightly with pressure over the range 136 atm to 340 atm. Finally, lating the inside wall of the tubes with nickel was found to significantly reduce carbon deposition rates for RP-1 fuel.

  17. Scramjet Inlets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    integration et gestion thermique) 14. ABSTRACT The supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet, is the engine cycle most suitable for sustained...and the stream thrust of the flow exiting the engine. The flow enters the engine at ambient conditions and at the flight velocity, so calculation of

  18. Scramjet fuel injector design parameters and considerations: Development of a two-dimensional tangential fuel injector with constant pressure at the flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnone, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    The factors affecting a tangential fuel injector design for scramjet operation are reviewed and their effect on the efficiency of the supersonic combustion process is evaluated using both experimental data and theoretical predictions. A description of the physical problem of supersonic combustion and method of analysis is followed by a presentation and evaluation of some standard and exotic types of fuel injectors. Engineering fuel injector design criteria and hydrogen ignition schemes are presented along with a cursory review of available experimental data. A two-dimensional tangential fuel injector design is developed using analyses as a guide in evaluating the effects on the combustion process of various initial and boundary conditions including splitter plate thickness, injector wall temperature, pressure gradients, etc. The fuel injector wall geometry is shaped so as to maintain approximately constant pressure at the flame as required by a cycle analysis. A viscous characteristics program which accounts for lateral as well as axial pressure variations due to the mixing and combustion process is used in determining the wall geometry.

  19. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  20. Hydrogen-fueled scramjet investigation. Final report, Feb 87-Apr 90

    SciTech Connect

    Peschke, W.T.; Barber, T.J.; Chiappetta, L.; Anderson, T.J.; Eckerle, W.J.

    1991-02-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the supersonic mixing and combustion processes associated with a free-shear layer. A specific objective comprised quantifying the effects on the mixing and combustion processes of pressure gradients associated with the production of shock waves in the flowfield. An experiment was conducted in a generic supersonic combustion configuration that incorporated the essential characteristics of scramjet combustors currently being considered for flight application. The objective of the analytical effort was to evaluate mixing and combustion models in state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. The experiments provided accurate data used to formulate code input conditions and to evaluate codes that were formulated for application in current high-speed propulsion design activities. Species concentration, total and static temperature, and pitot pressure profiles were measured in a shear layer experiment in which gaseous hydrogen was injected tangentially into a Mach 3 (nominal) vitiated air stream. In this experiment, hydrogen was injected adjacent to the upperwall of the test section. A nonintrusive optical diagnostic technique was used in conjunction with intrusive probing to define the flowfield initial conditions and to characterize the detailed features of the flowfield subsequent to hydrogen injection and combustion.

  1. OH PLIF Visualization of a Premixed Ethylene-fueled Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Johansen, Craig T.; Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) planar induced laser fluorescence (PLIF) measurements have been performed in a small-scale scramjet combustor at the University of Virginia Aerospace Research Laboratory at nominal simulated Mach 5 enthalpy. OH lines were carefully chosen to have fluorescent signal that is independent of pressure and temperature but linear with mole fraction. The OH PLIF signal was imaged in planes orthogonal to and parallel to the freestream flow at different equivalence ratios. Flameout limits were tested and identified. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to compare the results with width increased dual-pump enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (WIDECARS) measurements in the same facility and large eddy simulation/Reynolds average Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) numerical simulation. The flame angle was found to be approximately 10 degrees for several different conditions, which is in agreement with numerical predictions and measurements using WIDECARS. Finally, a comparison between NO PLIF non-combustion cases and OH PLIF combustion cases is provided: the comparison reveals that the dominant effect of flame propagation is freestream turbulence rather than heat release and concentration gradients.

  2. A review of the neurotoxicity risk of selected hydrocarbon fuels.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, G D; Still, K R; Alexander, W K; Nordholm, A F; Wilson, C L; Rossi, J; Mattie, D R

    2001-01-01

    Over 1.3 million civilian and military personnel are occupationally exposed to hydrocarbon fuels, emphasizing gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, or kerosene. These exposures may occur acutely or chronically to raw fuel, vapor, aerosol, or fuel combustion exhaust by dermal, respiratory inhalation, or oral ingestion routes, and commonly occur concurrently with exposure to other chemicals and stressors. Hydrocarbon fuels are complex mixtures of 150-260+ aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds containing varying concentrations of potential neurotoxicants including benzene, n-hexane, toluene, xylenes, naphthalene, and certain n-C9-C12 fractions (n-propylbenzene, trimethylbenzene isomers). Due to their natural petroleum base, the chemical composition of different hydrocarbon fuels is not defined, and the fuels are classified according to broad performance criteria such as flash and boiling points, complicating toxicological comparisons. While hydrocarbon fuel exposures occur typically at concentrations below permissible exposure limits for their constituent chemicals, it is unknown whether additive or synergistic interactions may result in unpredicted neurotoxicity. The inclusion of up to six performance additives in existing fuel formulations presents additional neurotoxicity challenge. Additionally, exposures to hydrocarbon fuels, typically with minimal respiratory or dermal protection, range from weekly fueling of personal automobiles to waist-deep immersion of personnel in raw fuel during maintenance of aircraft fuel tanks. Occupational exposures may occur on a near daily basis for from several months to over 20 yr. A number of published studies have reported acute or persisting neurotoxic effects from acute, subchronic, or chronic exposure of humans or animals to hydrocarbon fuels, or to certain constituent chemicals of these fuels. This review summarizes human and animal studies of hydrocarbon fuel-induced neurotoxicity and neurobehavioral consequences. It is

  3. Pyrochlore catalysts for hydrocarbon fuel reforming

    DOEpatents

    Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Haynes, Daniel; Smith, Mark; Spivey, James J.

    2012-08-14

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A2B2-y-zB'yB"zO7-.DELTA., where y>0 and z.gtoreq.0. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  4. Photosynthetic terpene hydrocarbon production for fuels and chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photosynthetic terpene production[ED1] represents an energy and carbon-efficient route for hydrocarbon fuel production. Diverse terpene structures also provide the potential to produce next-generation 'drop-in' hydrocarbon fuel molecules. However, it is highly challenging to achieve efficient redire...

  5. High performance, high density hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankenfeld, J. W.; Hastings, T. W.; Lieberman, M.; Taylor, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The fuels were selected from 77 original candidates on the basis of estimated merit index and cost effectiveness. The ten candidates consisted of 3 pure compounds, 4 chemical plant streams and 3 refinery streams. Critical physical and chemical properties of the candidate fuels were measured including heat of combustion, density, and viscosity as a function of temperature, freezing points, vapor pressure, boiling point, thermal stability. The best all around candidate was found to be a chemical plant olefin stream rich in dicyclopentadiene. This material has a high merit index and is available at low cost. Possible problem areas were identified as low temperature flow properties and thermal stability. An economic analysis was carried out to determine the production costs of top candidates. The chemical plant and refinery streams were all less than 44 cent/kg while the pure compounds were greater than 44 cent/kg. A literature survey was conducted on the state of the art of advanced hydrocarbon fuel technology as applied to high energy propellents. Several areas for additional research were identified.

  6. Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Mark L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

  7. Effect of deoxygenation and prestressing on hydrocarbon fuel thermal stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A jet fuel thermal oxidation tester was used to study the effect of deoxygenation and deoxygenated prestressing on deposit formation when hydrocarbon fuels are thermally stressed. Four pure hydrocarbons (n-decane, cyclohexane, benzene and 1-hexene) and two mixtures (10 percent tetralin in n-dodecane and commercial Jet A) were used at temperatures of 250 C to 400 C. Deoxygenation decreased deposit formation for cycloheaxane but increased it for benzene. Deoxygenation decreased deposit formation for the two fuel mixtures at 250 C but had no effect at 350 C. Deoxygenated prestressing either increased or decreased deposit formation depending on the fuel used and the temperature.

  8. Basic Considerations in the Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels with Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Henry C; Hibbard, Robert R

    1957-01-01

    Basic combustion research is collected, collated, and interpreted as it applies to flight propulsion. The following fundamental processes are treated in separate chapters: atomization and evaporation of liquid fuels, flow and mixing processes in combustion chambers, ignition and flammability of hydrocarbon fuels, laminar flame propagation, turbulent flames, flame stabilization, diffusion flames, oscillations in combustors, and smoke and coke formation in the combustion of hydrocarbon-air mixtures. Theoretical background, basic experimental data, and practical significance to flight propulsion are presented.

  9. Dual-Mode Scramjet Flameholding Operability Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Flameholding measurements were made in two different direct connect combustor facilities that were designed to simulate a cavity flameholder in the flowfield of a hydrocarbon fueled dual-mode scramjet combustor. The presence of a shocktrain upstream of the flameholder has a significant impact on the inlet flow to the combustor and on the flameholding limits. A throttle was installed in the downstream end of the test rigs to provide the needed back-pressurization and decouple the operation of the flameholder from the backpressure formed by heat release and thermal choking, as in a flight engine. Measurements were made primarily with ethylene fuel but a limited number of tests were also performed with heated gaseous JP-7 fuel injection. The flameholding limits were measured by ramping inlet air temperature down until blowout was observed. The tests performed in the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) facility used a hydrogen fueled vitiated air heater, Mach 2.2 and 3.3 inlet nozzles, a scramjet combustor rig with a 1.666 by 6 inch inlet and a 0.65 inch deep cavity. Mean blowout temperature measured at the baseline condition with ethylene fuel, the Mach 2.2 inlet and a cavity pressure of 21 psia was 1502 oR. Flameholding sensitivity to a variety of parameters was assessed. Blowout temperature was found to be most sensitive to fuel injection location and fuel flowrates and surprisingly insensitive to operating pressure (by varying both back-pressurization and inlet flowrate) and inlet Mach number. Video imaging through both the bottom and side wall windows was collected simultaneously and showed that the flame structure was quite unsteady with significant lateral movements as well as movement upstream of the flameholder. Experiments in the University of Virginia (UVa) test facility used a Mach 2 inlet nozzle with a 1 inch by 1.5 inch exit cross section, an aspect ratio of 1.5 versus 3.6 in the UTRC facility. The UVa facility tests were designed to measure the

  10. Formulating liquid hydrocarbon fuels for SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, G. J.; Preece, J.; Kendall, K.

    The injection of liquid hydrocarbons directly into an SOFC system is considered for application to hybrid vehicles. The main problem is carbon deposition on the nickel anode when molecules such as ethanol or iso-octane are injected directly. Such carbon deposition has been studied using a microtubular SOFC with a mass spectrometer analysing the product gases to investigate the reaction sequence and also to investigate the deposited carbon by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). The results show that only two liquids could be injected directly onto nickel cermet anodes without serious carbon blockage, methanol and methanoic acid. Even then, TPO experiments revealed deposition of small amounts of carbon which could be prevented by small additions of air or water to the fuel. Gasoline type molecules like iso-octane killed the SOFC in about 30 min operation, with about 90% of the molecular carbon being deposited on the nickel cermet anode. However, certain mixtures of iso-octane, water, alcohol and surfactant were found to produce beneficial results with remarkably low carbon deposition, less than 1% of the molecular carbon appearing on the anode. Such formulations had octane numbers appropriate to internal combustion engine operation.

  11. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  12. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Doshi, R.

    1999-07-27

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400 C for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide. 4 figs.

  13. Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  14. Conversion of Pentose-Derived Furans into Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, L.; Johnson, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in the conversion of biomass-derived hemicellulose into hydrocarbon molecules that can be used in the formulation of 'drop-in' fuels such as gasoline (C5-12), diesel (C10-20) and jet fuel (C9-16). Our focus lies on the use of furfuryl alcohol as a starting material since that is already produced commercially from hemicellulose-derived pentoses. The steps required to convert the latter into hydrocarbons are 1) oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol to form dimers (C10) and trimers (C15), and 2) hydrotreatment of the dimers and trimers to produce a mixture of linear hydrocarbons with carbon chain lengths in the range of diesel and jet fuels. However, furfuryl alcohol readily polymerizes to form resins in the presence of an acid catalyst, and the exothermic oligomerization must be carried out under reaction control. This presentation will discuss our progress in the development of this sugar-to-hydrocarbon pathway.

  15. Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Kuester, James L.

    1987-07-07

    A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C.sub.7 -C.sub.17 paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+.

  16. Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Kuester, J.L.

    1987-07-07

    A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process is described to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C[sub 7]-C[sub 17] paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+. 1 fig.

  17. Scramjet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Bulman, M.J.

    1993-06-22

    A fuel injector mounted flush to the wall of a combustor through which air flows at a predetermined air pressure in a direction defined as the air flow direction, the fuel injector is described comprising: a generally elongated body including a surface substantially flush with the wall, the surface having a proximate end and a distal end aligned with the air flow direction such that the air flow direction extends from the proximate end to the distal end; at least one fuel inlet port connected to the generally elongated body; a single elongated exit slot having a longitudinal axis parallel to the air flow direction, the elongated exit slot having an exit slot cross section perpendicular to the longitudinal axis, the exit slot cross section having a width parallel to the surface and a depth perpendicular to the surface, the width and depth increasing in the air flow direction; and at least one throat in the generally elongated body communicating the fuel inlet port with the single elongated exit slot, wherein the single elongated exit slot and the throat are configured to create and maintain a substantially streamlined supersonic fuel jet plume shape having a local exit pressure substantially equal to the predetermined air pressure.

  18. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  19. Compatibility of Direct Sugar to Hydrocarbon (DSH-76) with Combined Contaminated Fuel Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-31

    produced from the direct sugar to hydrocarbon (DSH) production process. Petroleum sourced F-76, alternative fuel source DSH-76 and 70/30 & 50/50...of the CCFD with the renewable aviation and marine diesel fuels. The Direct Sugar to Hydrocarbon (DSH) production pathway produces fuels made...from direct fermentation of sugar into olefinic hydrocarbons. The olefinic hydrocarbons are hydroprocessed to produce an iso-paraffinic hydrocarbon

  20. Electrolytes for Hydrocarbon Air Fuel Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    performed on four commercially available electrolytes; namely, -methanedisulfonic acid - sulfoacetic acid -10-dl-camphorsulfonic acid -and...hydrocarbon chain can increase the stability of aliphatic sulfonic acids . Sulfoacetic and dl-10-camphorsulfonic acids were tested and found to decompose...thermally. 0 Sulfoacetic acid thermally decomposes at 180 C apparently due to decarboxylation. This is substantially below the 245 C reported by previous

  1. Electrolytes for Hydrocarbon Air Fuel Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    available electrolytes; namely, -methanedisulfonic acid - sulfoacetic acid -10-dl-camphorsulfonic acid -and pentadecafluorooctanoic acid . These four...in the hydrocarbon chain can increase the stability of aliphatic sulfonic acids . Sulfoacetic and dl-10-camphorsulfonic acids were tested and found to...decompose thermally. 6 Sulfoacetic acid thermally decomposes at 180 C apparently due to decarboxylation. This is substantially 6 below the 245 C

  2. Spiking of Hydrocarbon Fuels with Silanes-based Combustion Enhancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidding, Bernhard; Fikri, Mustapha; Bozkurt, Metehan; Schulz, Christof; Soltner, Theresa; Kornath, Andreas; Pfitzner, Michael; Lang, Martin; Adamczyk, Andrew J.; Broadbelt, Linda; Ellerbrock, Hartwig; Simone, Domenico; Bruno, Claudio

    The concept of spiking hydrocarbon fuels such as kerosenes with liquid silicon hydrides in order to render the fuel combination hypergolic and to improve the combustion efficiency is presented and preliminarily analyzed. In view of scarcity of available data, various approaches are used, among them quantum-mechanical ab initio calculations for the thermodynamics and shock-tube measurements for the kinetics of higher, liquid silanes. Based on these results and other data, performance predictions indicate that miscible hydrocarbon/silicon hydride fuels (HC/SH) have the potential to be stored in a single tank, to be hypergolic with many oxidizers, and to yield similar, partly better specific impulses (and volume-specific impulses) than hydrocarbon fuels without silane additives. A variety of hybrid HC/SH fuel combinations seems to be accessible, which might offer the possibility to design a fuel combination with characteristics adjustable in a wide range. The current and future availability of larger amounts of liquid silanes is discussed.

  3. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

  4. Oxidation and formation of deposit precursors in hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, S. E., Jr.; Mayo, F. R.; Lan, B.; St.john, G. A.; Dulin, D.

    1982-01-01

    A practical fuel, home heating oil no. 2 (Fuel C), and the pure hydrocarbon, n-dodecane, were subjected to mild oxidation at 130 C and the resulting oxygenated reaction products, deposit precursors, were analyzed using field ionization mass spectrometry. Results for fuel C indicated that, as oxidation was initially extended, certain oxygenated reaction products of increasing molecular weights in the form of monomers, dimers and some trimers were produced. Further oxidation time increase resulted in further increase in monomers but a marked decrease in dimers and trimers. This suggests that these larger molecular weight products have proceeded to form deposit and separated from the fuel mixture. Results for a dodecane indicated that yields for dimers and trimers were very low. Dimers were produced as a result of interaction between oxygenated products with each other rather than with another fuel molecule. This occurred even though fuel molecule concentration was 50 times, or more greater than that for these oxygenated reaction products.

  5. Shock Tunnel Studies of Scramjet Phenomena 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalker, R. J.; Bakos, R. J.; Morgan, R. G.; Porter, L.; Mee, D.; Paull, A.; Tuttle, S.; Simmons, J. M.; Wendt, M.; Skinner, K.

    1995-01-01

    Reports by the staff of the University of Queensland on various research studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology and hypervelocity pulse test facilities are presented. These reports document the tests conducted in the reflected shock tunnel T4 and supporting research facilities that have been used to study the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen fuel in generic scramjets at flow conditions typical of hypersonic flight. In addition, topics include the development of instrumentation and measurement technology, such as combustor wall shear and stream composition in pulse facilities, and numerical studies and analyses of the scramjet combustor process and the test facility operation. This research activity is Supplement 10 under NASA Grant NAGw-674.

  6. Spontaneous ignition delay characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Freeman, W. G.; Cowell, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of pressure on the autoignition characteristics of homogeneous mixtures of hydrocarbon fuels in air is examined. Autoignition delay times are measured for propane, ethylene, methane, and acetylene in a continuous flow apparatus featuring a multi-point fuel injector. Results are presented for mixture temperatures from 670K to 1020K, pressures from 1 to 10 atmospheres, equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 0.7, and velocities from 5 to 30 m/s. Delay time is related to pressure, temperature, and fuel concentration by global reaction theory. The results show variations in global activation energy from 25 to 38 kcal/kg-mol, pressure exponents from 0.66 to 1.21, and fuel concentration exponents from 0.19 to 0.75 for the fuels studied. These results are generally in good agreement with previous studies carried out under similar conditions.

  7. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Copenhaver, Sally C.; Aines, Roger D.

    2000-01-01

    In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

  8. Shock tunnel studies of scramjet phenomena, supplement 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, M.; Nettleton, M.; Morgan, R. G.; Skinner, K.; Casey, R.; Stalker, R.; Brescianini, C.; Paull, A.; Allen, G.; Smart, M.

    1993-01-01

    Reports by the staff of the University of Queensland on various research studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology are presented. These reports document the tests conducted in the reflected shock tunnel T4 and supporting research facilities that have been used to study the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen fuel in generic scramjets at flow conditions typical of hypersonic flight. In addition, topics include the development of instrumentation and measurement technology, such as combustor wall shear and stream composition in pulse facilities, and numerical studies and analyses of the scramjet combustor process and the test facility operation.

  9. Shock tunnel studies of scramjet phenomena, supplement 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakos, R. J.; Morgan, R. G.; Tuttle, S. L.; Kelly, G. M.; Paull, A.; Simmons, J. M.; Stalker, R. J.; Pulsonetti, M. V.; Buttsworth, D.; Allen, G. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Reports by the staff of the University of Queensland on various research studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology are presented. These reports document the tests conducted in the reflected shock tunnel T4 and supporting research facilities that have been used to study the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen fuel in generic scramjets at flow conditions typical of hypersonic flight. In addition, topics include the development of instrumentation and measurement technology, such as combustor wall shear and stream composition in pulse facilities, and numerical studies and analyses of the scramjet combustor process and the test facility operation. This research activity is Supplement 7 under NASA Grant NAGW-674.

  10. Shock tunnel studies of scramjet phenomena, supplement 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalker, R. J.; Hollis, P.; Allen, G. A.; Roberts, G. T.; Tuttle, S.; Bakos, R. J.; Morgan, R. G.; Pulsonetti, M. V.; Brescianini, C.; Buttsworth, D. R.

    1993-01-01

    Reports by the staff of the University of Oueensland on various research studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology are presented. These reports document the tests conducted in the reflected shock tunnel T4 and supporting research facilities that have been used to study the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen fuel in generic scramjets at flow conditions typical of hypersonic flight. In addition, topics include the development of instrumentation and measurement technology, such as combustor wall shear and stream composition in pulse facilities, and numerical studies and analyses of the scramjet combustor process and the test facility operation. This research activity is Supplement 8 under NASA Grant NAGW-674.

  11. Scramjet Combustion Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    plan for these flights is as follows: Scramjet Combustion Processes RTO-EN-AVT-185 11 - 21 HyShot 5 – A Free-Flying Hypersonic Glider HyShot...5 will be a hypersonic glider designed to fly at Mach 8. It will separate from its rocket booster in space and perform controlled manoeuvres as it...RTO-EN-AVT-185 11 - 1 Scramjet Combustion Processes Michael Smart and Ray Stalker Centre for Hypersonics The University of Queensland

  12. Molecular Aluminum Additive for Burn Enhancement of Hydrocarbon Fuels.

    PubMed

    Guerieri, Philip M; DeCarlo, Samantha; Eichhorn, Bryan; Connell, Terrence; Yetter, Richard A; Tang, Xin; Hicks, Zachary; Bowen, Kit H; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-11-12

    Additives to hydrocarbon fuels are commonly explored to change the combustion dynamics, chemical distribution, and/or product integrity. Here we employ a novel aluminum-based molecular additive, Al(I) tetrameric cluster [AlBrNEt3]4 (Et = C2H5), to a hydrocarbon fuel and evaluate the resultant single-droplet combustion properties. This Al4 cluster offers a soluble alternative to nanoscale particulate additives that have recently been explored and may mitigate the observed problems of particle aggregation. Results show the [AlBrNEt3]4 additive to increase the burn rate constant of a toluene-diethyl ether fuel mixture by ∼20% in a room temperature oxygen environment with only 39 mM of active aluminum additive (0.16 wt % limited by additive solubility). In comparison, a roughly similar addition of nano-aluminum particulate shows no discernible difference in burn properties of the hydrocarbon fuel. High speed video shows the [AlBrNEt3]4 to induce microexplosive gas release events during the last ∼30% of the droplet combustion time. We attribute this to HBr gas release based on results of temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments of the [AlBrNEt3]4 dosed with O2 and D2O. A possible mechanism of burn rate enhancement is presented that is consistent with microexplosion observations and TPR results.

  13. Deposit formation and heat transfer in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanetti, A. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.; Szetela, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental research program was undertaken to investigate the thermal stability and heat transfer characteristics of several hydrocarbon fuels under conditions that simulate high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. The rates of carbon deposition in heated copper and nickel-plated copper tubes were determined for RP-1, propane, and natural gas using a continuous flow test apparatus which permitted independent variation and evaluation of the effect on deposit formation of wall temperature, fuel pressure, and fuel velocity. In addition, the effects of fuel additives and contaminants, cryogenic fuel temperatures, and extended duration testing with intermittent operation were examined. Parametric tests to map the thermal stability characteristics of RP-1, commercial-grade propane, and natural gas were conducted at pressures of 6.9 to 13.8 MPa, bulk fuel velocities of 30 to 90 m/s, and tube wall temperatures in the range of 230 to 810 K. Also, tests were run in which propane and natural gas fuels were chilled to 230 and 160 K, respectively. Corrosion of the copper tube surface was detected for all fuels tested. Plating the inside of the copper tubes with nickel reduced deposit formation and eliminated tube corrosion in most cases. The lowest rates of carbon deposition were obtained for natural gas, and the highest rates were obtained for propane. For all fuels tested, the forced-convection heat transfer film coefficients were satisfactorily correlated using a Nusselt-Reynolds-Prandtl number equation.

  14. OPERATION OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ANODES WITH PRACTICAL HYDROCARBON FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Scott A. Barnett; Jiang Liu; Yuanbo Lin

    2004-07-30

    This work was carried out to achieve a better understanding of how SOFC anodes work with real fuels. The motivation was to improve the fuel flexibility of SOFC anodes, thereby allowing simplification and cost reduction of SOFC power plants. The work was based on prior results indicating that Ni-YSZ anode-supported SOFCs can be operated directly on methane and natural gas, while SOFCs with novel anode compositions can work with higher hydrocarbons. While these results were promising, more work was clearly needed to establish the feasibility of these direct-hydrocarbon SOFCs. Basic information on hydrocarbon-anode reactions should be broadly useful because reformate fuel gas can contain residual hydrocarbons, especially methane. In the Phase I project, we have studied the reaction mechanisms of various hydrocarbons--including methane, natural gas, and higher hydrocarbons--on two kinds of Ni-containing anodes: conventional Ni-YSZ anodes and a novel ceramic-based anode composition that avoid problems with coking. The effect of sulfur impurities was also studied. The program was aimed both at achieving an understanding of the interactions between real fuels and SOFC anodes, and providing enough information to establish the feasibility of operating SOFC stacks directly on hydrocarbon fuels. A combination of techniques was used to provide insight into the hydrocarbon reactions at these anodes during SOFC operation. Differentially-pumped mass spectrometry was be used for product-gas analysis both with and without cell operation. Impedance spectroscopy was used in order to understand electrochemical rate-limiting steps. Open-circuit voltages measurements under a range of conditions was used to help determine anode electrochemical reactions. Life tests over a wide range of conditions were used to establish the conditions for stable operation of anode-supported SOFC stacks directly on methane. Redox cycling was carried out on ceramic-based anodes. Tests on sulfur tolerance of

  15. Pathways for Biomass-Derived Lignin to Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Laskar, Dhrubojyoti; Yang, Bin; Wang, Huamin; Lee, Guo-Shuh J.

    2013-09-01

    Production of hydrocarbon fuel from biomass-derived lignin sources with current version of biorefinery infrastructure would significantly improve the total carbon use in biomass and make biomass conversion more economically viable. Thus, developing specialty and commodity products from biomass derived-lignin has been an important industrial and scientific endeavor for several decades. However, deconstruction of lignin’s complex polymeric framework into low molecular weight reactive moieties amenable for deoxygenation and subsequent processing into hydrocarbons has been proven challenging. This review offers a comprehensive outlook on the existing body of work that has been devoted to catalytic processing of lignin derivatives into hydrocarbon fuels, focusing on: (1) The intrinsic complexity and characteristic structural features of biomass-derived lignin; (2) Existing processing technologies for the isolation and depolymerization of bulk lignin (including detailed mechanistic considerations); (3) Approaches aimed at significantly improving the yields of depolymerized lignin species amenable to catalytic upgrading, and; (4) Catalytic upgrading, using aqueous phase processes for transforming depolymerized lignin to hydrocarbon derivatives. Technical barriers and challenges to the valorization of lignin are highlighted throughout. The central goal of this review is to present an array of strategies that have been reported to obtain lignin, deconstruct it to reactive intermediates, and reduce its substantial oxygen content to yield hydrocarbon liquids. In this regard, reaction networks with reference to studies of lignin model compounds are exclusively surveyed. Special attention is paid to catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, hydrogenolyis and hydrogenation. Finally, this review addresses important features of lignin that are vital to economic success of hydrocarbon production.

  16. Determination of solid mass fraction in partially frozen hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotterell, E. M.; Mossadegh, R.; Bruce, A. J.; Moynihan, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Filtration procedures alone are insufficient to determine the amounts of crystalline solid in a partially frozen hydrocarbon distillate fraction. This is due to the nature of the solidification process by which a large amount of liquid becomes entrapped within an interconnected crystalline structure. A technique has been developed to supplement filtration methods with an independent determination of the amount of liquid in the precipitate thereby revealing the actual value of mass percent crystalline solid, %S. A non-crystallizing dye is injected into the fuel and used as a tracer during the filtration. The relative concentrations of the dye in the filtrate and precipitate fractions is subsequently detected by a spectrophotometric comparison. The filtration apparatus was assembled so that the temperature of the sample is recorded immediately above the filter. Also, a second method of calculation has been established which allows significant reduction in test time while retaining acceptable accuracy of results. Data have been obtained for eight different kerosene range hydrocarbon fuels.

  17. Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2014-08-26

    Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

  18. Characteristics and combustion of future hydrocarbon fuels. [aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Grobman, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    As the world supply of petroleum crude oil is being depleted, the supply of high-quality crude oil is also dwindling. This dwindling supply is beginning to manifest itself in the form of crude oils containing higher percentages of aromatic compounds, sulphur, nitrogen, and trace constituents. The result of this trend is described and the change in important crude oil characteristics, as related to aircraft fuels, is discussed. As available petroleum is further depleted, the use of synthetic crude oils (those derived from coal and oil shale) may be required. The principal properties of these syncrudes and the fuels that can be derived from them are described. In addition to the changes in the supply of crude oil, increasing competition for middle-distillate fuels may require that specifications be broadened in future fuels. The impact that the resultant potential changes in fuel properties may have on combustion and thermal stability characteristics is illustrated and discussed in terms of ignition, soot formation, carbon deposition flame radiation, and emissions.

  19. Conversion of Biomass-Derived Furans into Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, L.; Johnson, D. K.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most studied chemical transformations of carbohydrates is their thermocatalytic dehydration to form furans. Cellulose-derived glucose is thereby converted into 5-hydroxymethylfurfuraldehyde (5-HMF), while the hemicellulose-derived pentoses (e.g., xylose, arabinose) form furfuraldehyde. Our objective is to identify new pathways to convert furfuryl alcohol into a mixture of aliphatic hydrocarbons that can be used as drop-in fuels for diesel (C10-20) and jet fuel (C9-16) blends. Furfuryl alcohol is produced commercially through hydrogenation of furfuraldehyde that is derived from hemicellulose-derived pentoses via acid-catalyzed dehydration. The steps that we are currently pursuing to convert furfuryl alcohol into hydrocarbons are 1) oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol to form dimers (C10) and trimers (C15), and 2) hydrotreatment of the dimers and trimers to produce a mixture of linear hydrocarbons with carbon chain lengths in the range of diesel and jet fuels. This presentation will discuss our progress in the development of this pathway.

  20. Deposit formation and heat transfer in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanetti, A. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.; Szetela, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental research program was undertaken to investigate the thermal stability and heat transfer characteristics of several hydrocarbon fuels under conditions that simulate high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. The rates of carbon deposition in heated copper and nickel-plated copper tubes were determined for RP-1, propane, and natural gas using a continuous flow test apparatus which permitted independent variation and evaluation of the effect on deposit formation of wall temperature, fuel pressure, and fuel velocity. In addition, the effects of fuel additives and contaminants, cryogenic fuel temperatures, and extended duration testing with intermittent operation were examined. Corrosion of the copper tube surface was detected for all fuels tested; however, plating the insides of the tubes with nickel reduced deposit formation and eliminated corrosion in most cases. The lowest rates of carbon deposition were obtained for natural gas, and the highest rates were obtained for propane. Forced-convection heat transfer film coefficients were satisfactorily correlated using a Nusselt-Reynolds-Prandtl number equation for all the fuels tested.

  1. Comparative Flow Path Analysis and Design Assessment of an Axisymmetric Hydrogen Fueled Scramjet Flight Test Engine at a Mach Number of 6.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClinton, C.; Rondakov, A.; Semenov, V.; Kopehenov, V.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has contracted with the Central Institute of Aviation Motors CIAM to perform a flight test and ground test and provide a scramjet engine for ground test in the United States. The objective of this contract is to obtain ground to flight correlation for a supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) engine operating point at a Mach number of 6.5. This paper presents results from a flow path performance and thermal evaluation performed on the design proposed by the CIAM. This study shows that the engine will perform in the scramjet mode for stoichiometric operation at a flight Mach number of 6.5. Thermal assessment of the structure indicates that the combustor cooling liner will provide adequate cooling for a Mach number of 6.5 test condition and that optional material proposed by CIAM for the cowl leading-edge design are required to allow operation with or without a type IV shock-shock interaction.

  2. Internal performance predictions for Langley scramjet engine module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.

    1978-01-01

    A one dimensional theoretical method for the prediction of the internal performance of a scramjet engine is presented. The effects of changes in vehicle forebody flow parameters and characteristics on predicted thrust for the scramjet engine were evaluated using this method, and results are presented. A theoretical evaluation of the effects of changes in the scramjet engine's internal parameters is also presented. Theoretical internal performance predictions, in terms thrust coefficient and specific impulse, are provided for the scramjet engine for free stream Mach numbers of 5, 6, and 7 free stream dynamic pressure of 23,940 N/sq m forebody surface angles of 4.6 deg to 14.6 deg, and fuel equivalence ratio of 1.0.

  3. Validation of scramjet exhaust simulation technique at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, H. B.; Konopka, W.; Leng, J.

    1979-01-01

    Current design philosophy for hydrogen-fueled, scramjet-powered hypersonic aircraft results in configurations with strong couplings between the engine plume and vehicle aerodynamics. The experimental verification of the scramjet exhaust simulation is described. The scramjet exhaust was reproduced for the Mach 6 flight condition by the detonation tube simulator. The exhaust flow pressure profiles, and to a large extent the heat transfer rate profiles, were then duplicated by cool gas mixtures of Argon and Freon 13B1 or Freon 12. The results of these experiments indicate that a cool gas simulation of the hot scramjet exhaust is a viable simulation technique except for phenomena which are dependent on the wall temperature relative to flow temperature.

  4. Syngas Conversion to Hydrocarbon Fuels through Mixed Alcohol Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Jinjing; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2013-05-13

    Synthesis gas (syngas) can be used to synthesize a variety of fuels and chemicals. Domestic transportation and military operational interests have driven continued focus on domestic syngas-based fuels production. Liquid transportation fuels may be made from syngas via four basic processes: 1) higher alcohols, 2) Fischer-Tropsch (FT), 3) methanol-to-gasoline (MTG), and 4) methanol-to-olefins (MTO) and olefins-to-gasoline/distillate (MOGD). Compared to FT and higher alcohols, MTG and MTO-MOGD have received less attention in recent years. Due to the high capital cost of these synthetic fuel plants, the production cost of the finished fuel cannot compete with petroleum-derived fuel. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has recently evaluated one way to potentially reduce capital cost and overall production cost for MTG by combining the methanol and MTG syntheses in a single reactor. The concept consists of mixing the conventional MTG catalyst (i.e. HZSM-5) with an alcohol synthesis catalyst. It was found that a methanol synthesis catalyst, stable at high temperature (i.e. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3) [1], when mixed with ZSM-5, was active for syngas conversion. Relatively high syngas conversion can be achieved as the equilibrium-driven conversion limitations for methanol and dimethyl ether are removed as they are intermediates to the final hydrocarbon product. However, selectivity control was difficult to achieve as formation of undesirable durene and light hydrocarbons was problematic [2]. The objective of the present study was thus to evaluate other potential composite catalyst systems and optimize the reactions conditions for the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon fuels, through the use of mixed alcohol intermediates. Mixed alcohols are of interest as they have recently been reported to produce higher yields of gasoline compared to methanol [3]. 1. Lebarbier, V.M., Dagle, R.A., Kovarik, L., Lizarazo-Adarme, J.A., King, D.L., Palo, D.R., Catalyst Science & Technology, 2012, 2

  5. OVRhyp, Scramjet Test Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslan, J.; Bisard, T.; Dallinga, S.; Draper, K.; Hufford, G.; Peters, W.; Rogers, J.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design for an unmanned hypersonic research vehicle to test scramjet engines is presented. The aircraft will be launched from a carrier aircraft at an altitude of 40,000 feet at Mach 0.8. The vehicle will then accelerate to Mach 6 at an altitude of 100,000 feet. At this stage the prototype scramjet will be employed to accelerate the vehicle to Mach 10 and maintain Mach 10 flight for 2 minutes. The aircraft will then decelerate and safely land.

  6. Direct internal reforming of hydrocarbon fuels in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhongliang

    2005-07-01

    The direct operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) on hydrocarbon fuels is desired since it could reduce power plant size, weight and complexity. The primary challenge is to find effective means through which anode-coking could be suppressed or avoided. Throughout the research, conventional Ni-anode supported SOFCs were employed because they provide high power densities and are being actively developed for commercial applications. Various strategies were used to reduce or avoid anode-coking during the SOFC operation. Firstly, air or CO2/H2O was added to hydrocarbon fuels, such that coking was less thermodynamically favorable, and the resulting internal partial oxidation or dry/steam reforming reactions provided H 2 and CO to the fuel cell. For example, for low hydrocarbons like propane, coke-free operation was achieved on 8% yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte SOFCs via internal partial oxidation, yielding stable and high power densities, e.g. 0.7 W·cm-2 at 790°C. Secondly, a novel design for hydrocarbon fueled SOFCs was proposed, i.e. a separate supported catalyst (Ru-CeO2) layer was placed against the anode side. The catalyst layer provided good catalytic activity for the hydrocarbon reforming reactions, while the nickel-based anode was retained to provide excellent electrochemical activity for the oxidation of the hydrogen and carbon monoxide reforming products. For heavy hydrocarbons like iso-octane, the catalyst layer was crucial far allowing stable cell operation without coking. The lack of coking at the Ni-YSZ anode can be explained by reforming at the Ru-Ceria catalyst layer, which eliminated most of the hydrocarbon species before the fuel reached the anode. A key element of this strategy was the choice of a catalyst metal, Ru, that promotes hydrocarbon reforming but does not itself cause coking. Thirdly, reduced-temperature SOFCs with thin samarium-doped Ceria (SDC) electrolytes were developed; these devices have potentially improved

  7. Supersonic mixing and combustion in scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.; Capriotti, D. P.; Byington, C. S.; Greenberg, I.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are being conducted to explore techniques to enhance mixing in scramjet combustors using parallel fuel injection from the base of swept and unswept wall-mounted ramps. The experiments reported herein were conducted using Mach 2 and 3 combustor inlet conditions. Supporting computational and cold flow studies indicated that the observed enhanced mixing for the swept ramp configuration is primarily due to the substantially higher degree of vorticity and entrainment generated by the swept trailing edges.

  8. Chemical reduction of biomass polysaccharides to liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.; Alaniz, N.J.; Beech, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Biomass is fractionated into the principle components cellulose (1), hemicellulose (2), and lignin (3). The two polysaccharide fractions 1 & 2 are converted into polyols by catalytic hydrogenation. Sorbitol, resulting from 1 for example, is treated sequentially with a redox coupled mixture of hydriodic acid and phosphorous acid and then with alcoholic base to afford a mixture of hydrocarbons including hexene. Step 2 of the process is highly tunable and can directly produce about 80% hydrocarbon oligomers, C{sub 12}H{sub 22} and C{sub 18}H{sub 32} and only about 20% of the intermediate 2-iodohexane. Recent results in the development of this new process will be presented. Oxygenate fuel additives, hexanols and hexyl ethers are also available by further reactions of hexene. These are presented in the accompanying paper.

  9. Preliminary Economics for Hydrocarbon Fuel Production from Cellulosic Sugars

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, James R.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2014-05-18

    Biorefinery process and economic models built in CHEMCAD and a preliminary, genome-scale metabolic model for the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi were used to simulate the bioconversion of corn stover to lipids, and the upgrading of these hydrocarbon precursors to diesel and jet fuel. The metabolic model was based on the recently released genome sequence for L. starkeyi and on metabolic pathway information from the literature. The process model was based on bioconversion, lipid extraction, and lipid oil upgrading data found in literature, on new laboratory experimental data, and on yield predictions from the preliminary L. starkeyi metabolic model. The current plant gate production cost for a distillate-range hydrocarbon fuel was estimated by the process model Base Case to be $9.5/gallon ($9.0 /gallon of gasoline equivalent) with assumptions of 2011$, 10% internal return on investment, and 2205 ton/day dry feed rate. Opportunities for reducing the cost to below $5.0/gallon, such as improving bioconversion lipid yield and hydrogenation catalyst selectivity, are presented in a Target Case. The process and economic models developed for this work will be updated in 2014 with new experimental data and predictions from a refined metabolic network model for L. starkeyi. Attaining a production cost of $3.0/gallon will require finding higher value uses for lignin other than power generation, such as conversion to additional fuel or to a co-product.

  10. Experimental study of the thermal stability of hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marteney, P. J.; Colket, M. B.; Vranos, A.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal stability of two hydrocarbon fuels (premium diesel and regular diesel) was determined in a flow reactor under conditions representing operation of an aircraft gas turbine engine. Temperature was varied from 300 to 750 F (422 to 672 K) for fuel flows of 2.84 to 56.8 liters/hr (corresponding to 6.84 x 0.00010 to 1.63 x 0.010 kg/sec for regular diesel fuel and 6.55 x 0.00010 to 1.37 x 0.010 kg/sec for premium diesel fuel); test times varied between 1 and 8 hr. The rate of deposition was obtained through measurement of weight gained by metal discs fixed along the channel wall. The rate of deposit formation is best correlated by an Arrhenius expression. The sample discs in the flow reactor were varied among stainless steel, aluminum and brass; fuels were doped with quinoline, indole, and benzoyl perioxide to yield nitrogen or oxygen concentrations of approximately 1000 ppm. The most substantial change in rate was an increase in deposits for brass discs; other disc materials or the additives caused only small perturbations. Tests were also conducted in a static reactor at temperatures of 300 to 800 F for times of 30 min to 2 1/2 hr. Much smaller deposition was found, indicating the importance of fluid transport in the mechanism.

  11. Ionic Liquid Based Conversion of Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    for the crystal structure of Zwitterion 1. Chemical Formula C4H14N2O3S Formula Weight 170.23 Crystal System Triclinic Space group P-1 (No. 2...hydrocarbon fuels. Over the past year we have used small angle neutron scattering to characterize the structure of cellulose dissolved in an ionic...CH3 N N+ SO3 - + CF3SO3H CH3 N N + SO3H CF3SO3- (2) 2 Figure 3. Crystal packing of Zwitterion 1. Figure 3 shows the crystal structure

  12. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Foral, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

  13. Catalytic co-pyrolysis of waste vegetable oil and high density polyethylene for hydrocarbon fuel production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunpu; Dai, Leilei; Fan, Liangliang; Cao, Leipeng; Zhou, Yue; Zhao, Yunfeng; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a ZrO2-based polycrystalline ceramic foam catalyst was prepared and used in catalytic co-pyrolysis of waste vegetable oil and high density polyethylene (HDPE) for hydrocarbon fuel production. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, catalyst dosage, and HDPE to waste vegetable oil ratio on the product distribution and hydrocarbon fuel composition were examined. Experimental results indicate that the maximum hydrocarbon fuel yield of 63.1wt. % was obtained at 430°C, and the oxygenates were rarely detected in the hydrocarbon fuel. The hydrocarbon fuel yield increased when the catalyst was used. At the catalyst dosage of 15wt.%, the proportion of alkanes in the hydrocarbon fuel reached 97.85wt.%, which greatly simplified the fuel composition and improved the fuel quality. With the augment of HDPE to waste vegetable oil ratio, the hydrocarbon fuel yield monotonously increased. At the HDPE to waste vegetable oil ratio of 1:1, the maximum proportion (97.85wt.%) of alkanes was obtained. Moreover, the properties of hydrocarbon fuel were superior to biodiesel and 0(#) diesel due to higher calorific value, better low-temperature low fluidity, and lower density and viscosity.

  14. Free-radicals aided combustion with scramjet applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Kumar, Ramohalli

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations aimed at altering 'nature-prescribed' combustion rates in hydrogen/hydrocarbon reactions with (enriched) air are presented. The intent is to anchor flame zones in supersonic streams, and to ensure proper and controllable complete combustion in scramjets. The diagnostics are nonintrusive through IR thermograms and acoustic emissions in the control and free-radicals altered flame zones.

  15. Pyrochlore-type catalysts for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Berry, David A [Morgantown, WV; Shekhawat, Dushyant [Morgantown, WV; Haynes, Daniel [Morgantown, WV; Smith, Mark [Morgantown, WV; Spivey, James J [Baton Rouge, LA

    2012-03-13

    A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A.sub.2-w-xA'.sub.wA''.sub.xB.sub.2-y-zB'.sub.yB''.sub.zO.sub.7-.DELTA.. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H.sub.2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fuel-oil contaminated soils, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Aislabie, J; Balks, M; Astori, N; Stevenson, G; Symons, R

    1999-12-01

    Where fuel oil spills have occurred on Antarctic soils polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) may accumulate. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected from fuel spill sites up to 30 years old, and from nearby control sites, and analysed for the 16 PAHs on the USEPA priority pollutants list, as well as for two methyl substituted naphthalenes, 1-methylnaphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene. PAH levels ranged from 41-8105 ng g-1 of dried soil in the samples from contaminated sites and were below detection limits in control site samples. PAH were detected in surface soils and had migrated to lower depths in the contaminated soil. The predominant PAH detected were naphthalene and its methyl derivatives.

  17. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Ground Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, Neal E.; Cabell, Karen F.; Storch, Andrea M.

    2010-01-01

    The initial phase of hydrocarbon-fueled ground tests supporting Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experiment (HIFiRE) Program has been conducted in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HIFiRE Program, an Air Force-lead international cooperative program includes eight different flight test experiments designed to target specific challenges of hypersonic flight. The second of the eight planned flight experiments is a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet flight test intended to demonstrate dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools. A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink, direct-connect ground test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests are to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the Mach 6.0-8.0 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition prior to the HiFIRE payload Critical Design Review. Although the phase I test plans include testing over the Mach 6 to 8 flight simulation range, only Mach 6 testing will be reported in this paper. Experimental results presented here include flowpath surface pressure, temperature, and heat flux distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 6 simulation, as well as a range of fuel equivalence ratios and fuel injection distributions. Both ethylene and a mixture of ethylene and methane (planned for flight) were tested. Maximum back pressure and flameholding limits, as well as a baseline fuel schedule, that covers the Mach 5.84-6.5 test space have been

  18. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

  19. Thermocatalytic CO2-Free Production of Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    University of Central Florida

    2004-01-30

    The main objective of this project is the development of an economically viable thermocatalytic process for production of hydrogen and carbon from natural gas or other hydrocarbon fuels with minimal environmental impact. The three major technical goals of this project are: (1) to accomplish efficient production of hydrogen and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive and durable carbon catalysts, (2) to obviate the concurrent production of CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts and drastically reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the process, and (3) to produce valuable carbon products in order to reduce the cost of hydrogen production The important feature of the process is that the reaction is catalyzed by carbon particulates produced in the process, so no external catalyst is required (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts are generated during hydrocarbon decomposition stage, (2) no expensive catalysts are used in the process, (3) several valuable forms of carbon can be produced in the process depending on the process conditions (e.g., turbostratic carbon, pyrolytic graphite, spherical carbon particles, carbon filaments etc.), and (4) CO{sub 2} emissions could be drastically reduced (compared to conventional processes).

  20. Shock tunnel studies of scramjet phenomena, supplement 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, R.; Stalker, R. J.; Brescianini, C. P.; Morgan, R. G.; Jacobs, P. A.; Wendt, M.; Ward, N. R.; Akman, N.; Allen, G. A.; Skinner, K.

    1990-01-01

    A series of reports are presented on SCRAMjet studies, shock tunnel studies, and expansion tube studies. The SCRAMjet studies include: (1) Investigation of a Supersonic Combustion Layer; (2) Wall Injected SCRAMjet Experiments; (3) Supersonic Combustion with Transvers, Circular, Wall Jets; (4) Dissociated Test Gas Effects on SCRAMjet Combustors; (5) Use of Silane as a Fuel Additive for Hypersonic Thrust Production, (6) Pressure-length Correlations in Supersonic Combustion; (7) Hot Hydrogen Injection Technique for Shock Tunnels; (8) Heat Release - Wave Interaction Phenomena in Hypersonic Flows; (9) A Study of the Wave Drag in Hypersonic SCRAMjets; (10) Parametric Study of Thrust Production in the Two Dimensional SCRAMjet; (11) The Design of a Mass Spectrometer for use in Hypersonic Impulse Facilities; and (12) Development of a Skin Friction Gauge for use in an Impulse Facility. The shock tunnel studies include: (1) Hypervelocity flow in Axisymmetric Nozzles; (2) Shock Tunnel Development; and (3) Real Gas Efects in Hypervelocity Flows over an Inclined Cone. The expansion tube studies include: (1) Investigation of Flow Characteristics in TQ Expansion Tube; and (2) Disturbances in the Driver Gas of a Shock Tube.

  1. Liquid Oxygen Cooling of Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1989-01-01

    Rocket engines using liquid oxygen (LOX) and hydrocarbon fuel as the propellants are being given serious consideration for future launch vehicle propulsion. Normally, the fuel is used to regeneratively cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability. Another possibility for the coolant is the liquid oxygen. Combustion chambers previously tested with LOX and RP-1 as propellants and LOX as the collant demonstrated the feasibility of using liquid oxygen as a coolant up to a chamber pressure of 13.8 MPa (2000 psia). However, there was concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot gas side wall. In order to study this effect, chambers were fabricated with slots machined upstream of the throat between the cooling passage wall and the hot gas side wall to simulate cracks. The chambers were tested at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa (1247 psia) over a range of mixture ratios from 1.9 to 3.1 using liquid oxygen as the coolant. The results of the testing showed that the leaking LOX did not have a deleterious effect on the chambers in the region of the slots. However, there was unexplained melting in the throat region of both chambers, but not in line with the slots.

  2. Development of direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Steven

    The focus of this dissertation is the development of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) that can operate with hydrocarbon fuels without the need for pre-reforming. The design of an active SOFC anode requires the consideration of a number of factors including the catalytic activity of the electrode towards fuel oxidation and electronic conductivity. This work focuses on a novel system for anode fabrication that allows the catalytically active and electronically conducting components of the anode to be easily varied. The catalytic properties of the SOFC anode were examined and a strong link between SOFC performance and oxidation activity demonstrated. Of the rare-earth catalysts investigated ceria was found to have the highest activity leading to the highest fuel cell power density. This activity was further improved, especially for methane fuel, by doping with a precious metal. Furthermore, it was shown that the catalyst not only increased the rate of reaction but increased the cell Open-Circuit Voltage (OCV) suggesting a change in mechanism that increased the cell efficiency. The necessity for high electronic conductivity and connectivity in the electrode was elucidated by studying the impact of anode copper content on cell performance. Low copper loading led to reduced cell performance due to a lack of conductive pathways from the active electrode region to the external circuit. It was observed that additional conductivity was provided by a thermally deposited carbonaceous phase formed upon exposure to hydrocarbon fuels. The electrochemical characterization of SOFC electrodes is a non-trivial problem. Literature reports on the properties of similar electrodes are inconsistent and often contradictory. Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach, significant problems were found with common experimental procedures used to separate the losses associated the cell cathode from those of the anode. By calculating the effect of test geometry on this separation, it

  3. Mach 2 and Mach 3 mixing and combustion in scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.; Capriotti, D. P.; Byington, C. S.; Greenberg, I.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are being conducted to explore techniques to enhance mixing in scramjet combustors using parallel fuel injection from the base of swept and unswept wall-mounted ramps. Parallel injection may be useful in high speed scramjets due to the thrust contributed by the momentum of expanding fuel that has been heated in the vehicle cooling cycle. The experiments reported herein were conducted using Mach 2 and 3 combustor inlet conditions. Supporting computational and cold flow studies indicated that the observed enhanced mixing for the swept ramp configuration is primarily due to the substantially higher degree of vorticity and entrainment generated by the swept trailing edges.

  4. Hydrogen scramjet with side wall injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Paull, A.; Morris, N.; Stalker, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from an experimental evaluation of a hydrogen-burning wall-injection scramjet engine, performed in the free-piston shock tunnel at the Australian National University. The advantages of scramjet propulsion for high-Mach-number high-altitude flight are reviewed, and the need for an alternative to injection struts is indicated. Pressure profiles and heat-transfer measurements for constant-area and diverging ducts are presented graphically and characterized in detail. The ability of the injected flow to shield the chamber wall from the heat of the freestream flow is demonstrated. The extrapolation of the shock-tunnel results to flight conditions, however, is made difficult by the fact that a significant amount of fuel passes through a quenched zone without burning, seriously degrading overall performance.

  5. Shock Driven Multiphase Instabilities in Scramjet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    Shock driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) arise in many applications from dust production in supernovae to ejecta distribution in explosions. At the limit of small, fast reacting particles the instability evolves similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. However, as additional particle effects such as lag, phase change, and collisions become significant the required parameter space becomes much larger and the instability deviates significantly from the RM instability. In scramjet engines the SDMI arises during a cold start where liquid fuel droplets are injected and processed by shock and expansion waves. In this case the particle evaporation and mixing is important to starting and sustaining combustion, but the particles are large and slow to react, creating significant multiphase effects. This talk will examine multiphase mixing in scramjet relevant conditions in 3D multiphase hydrodynamic simulations using the FLASH code from the University of Chicago FLASH center.

  6. Non-methane hydrocarbon emissions from vehicle fuel caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterman, Stuart A.; Yu, Yungdae; Jia, Chunrong; Godwin, Christopher

    Vehicles emit non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) from a number of sources, including missing, worn or improperly tightened fuel caps. Inspection and maintenance programs and the On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) system will detect some of these deficiencies, however, even properly tightened caps will emit NMHCs due to permeation, diffusion, cracks and gaps in seals, and failures of pressure-relief mechanisms. These emissions have not been previously quantified. In this study, in-use emissions from fuel caps were measured in 213 tests on vehicles of varying age and condition over several seasons, including cold and warm temperatures. Diffusion/permeation models are presented to complement the experimental work. NMHC emissions from fuel caps were detected from all vehicles, of which benzene constituted 2.5%. Emissions averaged 2.0 mg h -1 (median=0.5 mg h -1), and the distribution of emission rates was highly skewed by a small number of vehicles with much higher emissions, e.g., the 90th, 95th and maximum percentile values were 2.7, 5.0, and 62.7 mg h -1, respectively. Emission rates increased substantially if the fuel cap was loose, in hot weather, and with vehicle age and mileage. Overall, emissions from properly functioning caps are small relative to running and refueling losses, though they may be significant if the gas cap is defective or loose. Further reductions in emissions may be achieved by using new low-torque cap designs, improved elastomers, properly tightening fuel caps, and replacing old caps.

  7. Oxidation and formation of deposit precursors in hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, F. R.; Lan, B.; Cotts, D. B.; Buttrill, S. E., Jr.; St.john, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    The oxidation of two jet turbine fuels and some pure hydrocarbons was studied at 130 C with and without the presence of small amounts of N-methyl pyrrole (NMP) or indene. Tendency to form solid-deposit precursors was studied by measuring soluble gum formation as well as dimer and trimer formation using field ionization mass spectrometry. Pure n-dodecane oxidized fastest and gave the smallest amount of procursors. An unstable fuel oil oxidized much slower but formed large amounts of precursors. Stable Jet A fuel oxidized slowest and gave little precursors. Indene either retarded or accelerated the oxidation of n-dodecane, depending on its concentration, but always caused more gum formation. The NMP greatly retarded n-dodecane oxidation but accelerated Jet A oxidation and greatly increased the latter's gum formation. In general, the additive reacted faster and formed most of the gum. Results are interpreted in terms of classical cooxidation theory. The effect of oxygen pressure on gum formation is also reported.

  8. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Foral, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Amoco Oil Company is investigating the direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels via partial oxidation. This report describes work completed in the first quarter of the two-year project (first quarter FY 1990). Task 1 of the work, preparation of the Project Management Plan, has been completed. Work was started and progress made on three other tasks during this quarter: Task 2. Modification of an existing Amoco pilot plant to handle the conditions of this project. Minor modifications were made to increase the maximum operating pressure to 1500 psig. Other more extensive modifications are being designed, including addition of an oxygen compressor and recycle system. Task 3.1. Evaluation of a Los Alamos National Laboratory methane oxidation kinetic model for suitability in guiding the experimental portions of this project. Task 3.2. Process variable (e.g. temperature, pressure, residence time) studies to determine optimal partial oxidation conditions. 1 fig.

  9. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  10. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, Edward J.; Anderson, Brian L.; Wijesinghe, Ananda M.; Viani, Brian E.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

  11. Inhalation of Hydrocarbon Jet Fuel Suppress Central Auditory Nervous System Function.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, O'neil W; Wong, Brian A; McInturf, Shawn M; Reboulet, James E; Ortiz, Pedro A; Mattie, David R

    2015-01-01

    More than 800 million L/d of hydrocarbon fuels is used to power cars, boats, and jet airplanes. The weekly consumption of these fuels necessarily puts the public at risk for repeated inhalation exposure. Recent studies showed that exposure to hydrocarbon jet fuel produces lethality in presynaptic sensory cells, leading to hearing loss, especially in the presence of noise. However, the effects of hydrocarbon jet fuel on the central auditory nervous system (CANS) have not received much attention. It is important to investigate the effects of hydrocarbons on the CANS in order to complete current knowledge regarding the ototoxic profile of such exposures. The objective of the current study was to determine whether inhalation exposure to hydrocarbon jet fuel might affect the functions of the CANS. Male Fischer 344 rats were randomly divided into four groups (control, noise, fuel, and fuel + noise). The structural and functional integrity of presynaptic sensory cells was determined in each group. Neurotransmission in both peripheral and central auditory pathways was simultaneously evaluated in order to identify and differentiate between peripheral and central dysfunctions. There were no detectable effects on pre- and postsynaptic peripheral functions. However, the responsiveness of the brain was significantly depressed and neural transmission time was markedly delayed. The development of CANS dysfunctions in the general public and the military due to cumulative exposure to hydrocarbon fuels may represent a significant but currently unrecognized public health issue.

  12. Conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in thermal protection reactors of hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranov, A. L.; Mikhaylov, A. M.; Korabelnikov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal protection of heat-stressed surfaces of a high-speed vehicle flying in dense layers of atmosphere is one of the topical issues. Not of a less importance is also the problem of hydrocarbon fuel combustion in a supersonic air flow. In the concept under development, it is supposed that in the most high-stressed parts of airframe and engine, catalytic thermochemical reactors will be installed, wherein highly endothermic processes of steam conversion of hydrocarbon fuel take place. Simultaneously with heat absorption, hydrogen generation will occur in the reactors. This paper presents the results of a study of conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in a slit reactor.

  13. Pattern of chemical changes in fugitive hydrocarbon fuels in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I.R.; Alimi, M.H.; Galperin, Y.

    1995-12-01

    This presentation describes a set of chemical tests which have been developed to characterize hydrocarbon fuels released into the environment. The methods examine various homologous series of hydrocarbons including straight chain (paraffins or n-alkanes), branched chain (isoparaffins or isoprenoids), cyclic (naphthenes or abated cyclohexanes), polycyclic (steranes and terpanes) and aromatic structures (BTEX, alkylated benzenes, PAH and alkylated PAH compounds and aromatic steranes). Each one of these groups of hydrocarbons has a different Tolerance to alteration (evaporation, water washing and biodegradation). When used as an analytical system on environmental samples, the data obtained provide information on fuel type recognition patterns and on degradation levels of the various fuels.

  14. Inlet starting predictions for sidewall-compression scramjet inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trexler, Carl A.

    1988-01-01

    While inlet capture, total pressure recovery, and compression are important performance parameters in the design of scramjet inlets, the inlet must be capable of starting. An analytical, inviscid method has been developed that provides first order starting information for sidewall-compression scramjet inlets and trends have been established for some of the parameters that affect inlet starting. These parameters include sidewall contraction ratio, cowl position, Mach number, sweep angle, fuel injection struts, and sidewall and strut compression angles. Results from the parametric study are compared with data from both no-strut and two-strut inlet models.

  15. Volatile Fuel Hydrocarbons and MTBE in the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzarelli, I. M.; Baehr, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (hydrocarbons that result from petroleum products such as oil, gasoline, or diesel fuel) are among the most commonly occurring and widely distributed contaminants in the environment. Volatile hydrocarbons are the lighter fraction of the petroleum hydrocarbons and, together with fuel oxygenates, are most often released from crude oil and liquid petroleum products produced from crude oil. The demand for crude oil stems from the world's ever-growing energy need. From 1970 to 1999, primary energy production of the world grew by 76% (Energy Information Administration, 2001), with fossil fuels (crude oil, natural gas, and coal) accounting for ˜85% of all energy produced worldwide (Figure 1). World crude oil production reached a record 68 million barrels (bbl) per day (1.08×1010 L d-1) in 2000. The world's dependence on oil as an energy source clearly is identified as contributing to global warming and worsening air and water quality. (7K)Figure 1. World primary energy production by source from 1970 to 1999 (Energy Information Administration, 2001). Petroleum products are present in Earth's subsurface as solids, liquids, or gases. This chapter presents a summary of the environmental problems and issues related to the use of liquid petroleum, or oil. The focus is on the sources of volatile hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates and the geochemical behavior of these compounds when they are released into the environment. Although oxygenates currently in commercial use include compounds other than methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE), such as ethanol (ETOH), most of the information presented here focuses on MTBE because of its widespread occurrence. The environmental impact of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons that also originate from petroleum products is described in (Chapter 9.13, Abrajano et al.).Crude oil occurs within the Earth and is a complex mixture of natural compounds composed largely of hydrocarbons containing only hydrogen and carbon atoms. The minor

  16. Hydrocarbon fuel cells. Citations from the American Petroleum Institute data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, D. M.

    1980-10-01

    This bibliography cites worldwide research on hydrocarbon fuel cells. The citations cover applications, design, performance, fabrication, catalysts, and electrochemistry. This updated bibliography contains 130 citations, 2 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  17. Mathematical simulation of hydrocarbon fuel conversion in heat-protection elements of hypersonic aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranov, A. L.; Korabel'nikov, A. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a mathematical model of hydrocarbon fuel conversion in a thermochemical reactor as an element of heat protection of a hypersonic aircraft. The application of this model has made it possible to enrich information obtained in experimental studies.

  18. Biomass-derived Lignin to Jet Fuel Range Hydrocarbons via Aqueous Phase Hydrodeoxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongliang; Ruan, Hao; Pei, Haisheng; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Xiaowen; Tucker, Melvin P.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-09-14

    A catalytic process, involving the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the dilute alkali extracted corn stover lignin catalysed by noble metal catalyst (Ru/Al2O3) and acidic zeolite (H+-Y), to produce lignin-substructure-based hydrocarbons (C7-C18), primarily C12-C18 cyclic structure hydrocarbons in the jet fuel range, was demonstrated.

  19. Direct oxidation of hydrocarbons in a solid-oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seungdoo; Vohs, John M.; Gorte, Raymond J.

    2000-03-01

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of dry hydrocarbon fuels to generate electrical power has the potential to accelerate substantially the use of fuel cells in transportation and distributed-power applications. Most fuel-cell research has involved the use of hydrogen as the fuel, although the practical generation and storage of hydrogen remains an important technological hurdle. Methane has been successfully oxidized electrochemically, but the susceptibility to carbon formation from other hydrocarbons that may be present or poor power densities have prevented the application of this simple fuel in practical applications. Here we report the direct, electrochemical oxidation of various hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, 1-butene, n-butane and toluene) using a solid-oxide fuel cell at 973 and 1,073 K with a composite anode of copper and ceria (or samaria-doped ceria). We demonstrate that the final products of the oxidation are CO2 and water, and that reasonable power densities can be achieved. The observation that a solid-oxide fuel cell can be operated on dry hydrocarbons, including liquid fuels, without reforming, suggests that this type of fuel cell could provide an alternative to hydrogen-based fuel-cell technologies.

  20. Direct oxidation of hydrocarbons in a solid-oxide fuel cell

    PubMed

    Park; Vohs; Gorte

    2000-03-16

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of dry hydrocarbon fuels to generate electrical power has the potential to accelerate substantially the use of fuel cells in transportation and distributed-power applications. Most fuel-cell research has involved the use of hydrogen as the fuel, although the practical generation and storage of hydrogen remains an important technological hurdle. Methane has been successfully oxidized electrochemically, but the susceptibility to carbon formation from other hydrocarbons that may be present or poor power densities have prevented the application of this simple fuel in practical applications. Here we report the direct, electrochemical oxidation of various hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, 1-butene, n-butane and toluene) using a solid-oxide fuel cell at 973 and 1,073 K with a composite anode of copper and ceria (or samaria-doped ceria). We demonstrate that the final products of the oxidation are CO2 and water, and that reasonable power densities can be achieved. The observation that a solid-oxide fuel cell can be operated on dry hydrocarbons, including liquid fuels, without reforming, suggests that this type of fuel cell could provide an alternative to hydrogen-based fuel-cell technologies.

  1. A Hydrocarbon Fuel Flash Vaporization System for a Pulsed Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Experiments were performed in the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Pulsed Detonation Research Facility at Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio. The PDE ...AFRL-MN-EG-TP-2006-7420 A HYDROCARBON FUEL FLASH VAPORIZATION SYSTEM FOR A PULSED DETONATION ENGINE (PREPRINT) K. Colin Tucker...85,7<&/$66,),&$7,212) E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH A Hydrocarbon Fuel Flash Vaporization System for a Pulsed Detonation Engine K

  2. Methods of reforming hydrocarbon fuels using hexaaluminate catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Todd H [Morgantown, WV; Berry, David A [Morgantown, WV; Shekhawat, Dushyant [Morgantown, WV

    2012-03-27

    A metal substituted hexaaluminate catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas of the general formula AB.sub.yAl.sub.12-yO.sub.19-.delta., A being selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and lanthanide metals or mixtures thereof. A dopant or surface modifier selected from a transitions metal, a spinel of an oxygen-ion conductor is incorporated. The dopant may be Ca, Cs, K, La, Sr, Ba, Li, Mg, Ce, Co, Fe, Ir, Rh, Ni, Ru, Cu, Pe, Os, Pd, Cr, Mn, W, Re, Sn, Gd, V, Ti, Ag, Au, and mixtures thereof. The oxygen-ion conductor may be a perovskite selected from M'RhO.sub.3, M'PtO.sub.3, M'PdO.sub.3, M'IrO.sub.3, M'RuO.sub.3 wherein M'=Mg, Sr, Ba, La, Ca; a spinel selected from MRh.sub.2O.sub.4, MPt.sub.2O.sub.4, MPd.sub.2O.sub.4, MIr.sub.2O.sub.4, MRu.sub.2O.sub.4 wherein M=Mg, Sr, Ba, La, Ca and mixtures thereof; a florite is selected from M''O.sub.2.

  3. Surface characterisation of selected sorbent materials for common hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmody, Onuma; Frost, Ray; Xi, Yunfei; Kokot, Serge

    2007-05-01

    The need to find the most efficient material for the clean-up of oil/fuel spills both at sea and on land is of extreme importance. Generally, this requires material selection based upon the adsorption properties of selected sorbent materials such as sand, swelling clays, organo-clays and cotton fibres. These adsorption properties are a function of the surface characterisation where hydrophobic and oleophilic properties are essential. From BET analysis, the adsorption isotherm of the selected materials was Types II and IV in the IUPAC classification scheme. The main adsorption mechanism for these sorbents occurred on the external surface of the material in the pores or capillaries. ESEM studies indicate that cotton capillaries contribute significantly to the adsorption process of oil. In addition, the presence of surface wax on cotton-cellulose fibre facilitated the uptake by: (a) providing a relatively hydrophobic surface for sorption of organics; and (b) providing a low surface energy environment for the capillaries to aid in oil transport. Cotton fibre was observed to have several key properties such as hydrophobicity, good affinity for hydrocarbons, rapid adsorption on contact, and high adsorption and retention through interfibre capillaries. This research provides the basis for selection of cotton-cellulose fibres compared to common and other novel alternatives such as sand and organo-clays, respectively.

  4. Combustion Characteristics of a Hypermixer Scramjet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunami, Tetsuji; Itoh, Katsuhiro; Komuro, Tomoyuki; Sato, Kazuo

    A scramjet engine with a wall-mounted hypermixer injector, which generates streamwise vortices for enhancing supersonic mixing and combustion, is examined at a Mach 8 simulated flight condition in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel (HIEST). The engine and the fuel injector are full scale models of the HyShot-IV flight experiment planned for 2005 by JAXA and University of Queensland (UQ). Main purpose of the present study is to clarify the combustion and operation characteristics of the hypermixer scramjet owing to the ability of the streamwise vortices for mixing enhancement and boundary layer control. For comparison, two injectors with normal and parallel injection without streamwise vortex generation are also examined. The results show the superior performance of the hypermixer injector in scramjet mode obtaining higher pressure rise in a shorter distance compared to the other two injectors. In the case of the hypermixer injector, a 1D analysis of an inviscid nozzle flow shows the increment in the specific impulse due to combustion to be 2,649 and 2,224 sec for the equivalence ratio, Φ=0.3 and 0.6, respectively. At Φ=1.0 and 1.5, sudden rapid combustion of the premixed fuel at the end of the combustor generates a strong pressure wave, which propagates upstream up to the injector location and decades there. As a result, a new quasi-steady combusting flow is established throughout the combustor downstream of the injector. The pressure wave is identified as a kind of detonation wave, which is suggested to propagate upstream mainly through the streamwise vortices. As a driving force of the upstream propagation of the detonation wave, mixing and combustion enhanced through the interaction between the detonation wave and the streamwise vortices are considered.

  5. A flash vaporization system for detonation of hydrocarbon fuels in a pulse detonation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Kelly Colin

    Current research by both the US Air Force and Navy is concentrating on obtaining detonations in a pulse detonation engine (PDE) with low vapor pressure, kerosene based jet fuels. These fuels, however, have a low vapor pressure and the performance of a liquid hydrocarbon fueled PDE is significantly hindered by the presence of fuel droplets. A high pressure, fuel flash vaporization system (FVS) has been designed and built to reduce and eliminate the time required to evaporate the fuel droplets. Four fuels are tested: n-heptane, isooctane, aviation gasoline, and JP-8. The fuels vary in volatility and octane number and present a clear picture on the benefits of flash vaporization. Results show the FVS quickly provided a detonable mixture for all of the fuels tested without coking or clogging the fuel lines. Combustion results validated the model used to predict the fuel and air temperatures required to achieve gaseous mixtures with each fuel. The most significant achievement of the research was the detonation of flash vaporized JP-8 and air. The results show that the flash vaporized JP-8 used 20 percent less fuel to ignite the fuel air mixture twice as fast (8 ms from 16 ms) when compared to the unheated JP-8 combustion data. Likewise, the FVS has been validated as a reliable method to create the droplet free mixtures required for liquid hydrocarbon fueled PDEs.

  6. RAMSCRAM: A flexible ramjet/scramjet engine simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkardt, Leo A.; Franciscus, Leo C.

    1990-01-01

    With the resurgence of interest in high supersonic and hypersonic flight there is a need to simulate airbreathing engines which may be used in this flight regime. To meet this requirement the RAMSCRAM code was developed. The code calculates 1-D flow properties at each component interface and the overall performance of the engine. It uses equilibrium thermodynamics which accounts for dissociation and allows for any fuel or combination of fuels. The program can simulate ramjet, scramjet, rocket, and ducted rocket engines.

  7. Analysis of hydrocarbon fuel properties by means of Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatley, Martin W.

    The project is focused on the determination of Raman spectra of hydrocarbon fuel samples using a spectrometer employing a silicon linear array detector which has a spectral range of 400 nm to 1.1 mum. The spectra are processed using chemometric techniques in order to determine the concentrations of the tracked blend components and analytical values that are used to ensure that desired specifications are achieved. The verification is based on the American Standard Testing Methods procedures for the determination of the motor, research, and road octane numbers, simulated distillation and Reid vapour pressure. Blending is one of the most important steps in the final production of hydrocarbon fuels; as many as ten complex components are mixed to achieve the desired properties of the final product. Traditionally, blending relies on well-established analytical methods such as gas chromatography for component and simulated distillation analysis, knock engines and near infrared spectroscopy for octane analysis. All of these methods are reliable and accurate, but their results are not available in real time but rather with a substantial delay, since it is in the nature of the methods that the sample must be transported from a test site to the site where the instrument is located. Additional time is required for performing the analytical procedure; e.g. the results of a gas chromatography analysis are only available from minutes to hours after the sample has been introduced into the instrument. Consequently, the results, although accurate, become only available after the process of blending has been completed. The thesis describes an implementation of a Raman spectroscopic method, which is novel in the given context, since it allows monitoring and control of the blending process online, in real time. A Raman spectrometer was designed, using a solid state laser for excitation (785 nm, 800 mW), a blazed grating for the diffraction (600 lines-per-millimeter, 750 nm blaze, 635

  8. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels using air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Ramanathan

    Conventional approaches to oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons involve use of high-purity, expensive water soluble peroxide for oxidation of sulfur compounds followed by post-treatment for removal of oxidized sulfones by extraction. Both are associated with higher cost due to handling, storage of oxidants and yield loss with extraction and water separation, making the whole process more expensive. This thesis explores an oxidative desulfurization process using air as an oxidant followed by catalytic decomposition of sulfones thereby eliminating the aforementioned issues. Oxidation of sulfur compounds was realized by a two step process in which peroxides were first generated in-situ by catalytic air oxidation, followed by catalytic oxidation of S compounds using the peroxides generated in-situ completing the two step approach. By this technique it was feasible to oxidize over 90% of sulfur compounds present in real jet (520 ppmw S) and diesel (41 ppmw S) fuels. Screening of bulk and supported CuO based catalysts for peroxide generation using model aromatic compound representing diesel fuel showed that bulk CuO catalyst was more effective in producing peroxides with high yield and selectivity. Testing of three real diesel fuels obtained from different sources for air oxidation over bulk CuO catalyst showed different level of effectiveness for generating peroxides in-situ which was consistent with air oxidation of representative model aromatic compounds. Peroxides generated in-situ was then used as an oxidant to oxidize sulfur compounds present in the fuel over MoO3/SiO2 catalyst. 81% selectivity of peroxides for oxidation of sulfur compounds was observed on MoO3/SiO2 catalyst at 40 °C and under similar conditions MoO3/Al2O3 gave only 41% selectivity. This difference in selectivity might be related to the difference in the nature of active sites of MoO3 on SiO2 and Al2O 3 supports as suggested by H2-TPR and XRD analyses. Testing of supported and bulk Mg

  9. Method And Apparatus For Converting Hydrocarbon Fuel Into Hydrogen Gas And Carbon Dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2001-03-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reforming method is disclosed suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. A first mixture of an oxygen-containing gas and a first fuel is directed into a first tube 108 to produce a first reaction reformate. A second mixture of steam and a second fuel is directed into a second tube 116 annularly disposed about the first tube 108 to produce a second reaction reformate. The first and second reaction reformates are then directed into a reforming zone 144 and subject to a catalytic reforming reaction. In another aspect of the method, a first fuel is combusted with an oxygen-containing gas in a first zone 108 to produce a reformate stream, while a second fuel under steam reforming in a second zone 116. Heat energy from the first zone 108 is transferred to the second zone 116.

  10. Apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrocarbon fuel reformer (200) is disclosed suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. The reformer (200) comprises first and second tubes (208,218). The first tube (208) includes a first catalyst (214) and receives a first mixture of steam and a first fuel. The second tube (218) is annularly disposed about the first tube (208) and receives a second mixture of an oxygen-containing gas and a second fuel. In one embodiment, a third tube (224) is annularly disposed about the second tube (218) and receives a first reaction reformate from the first tube (208) and a second reaction reformate from the second tube (218). A catalyst reforming zone (260) annularly disposed about the third tube (224) may be provided to subject reformate constituents to a shift reaction. In another embodiment, a fractionator is provided to distill first and second fuels from a fuel supply source.

  11. Electrode design for low temperature direct-hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanglin; Zhao, Fei; Liu, Qiang

    2015-10-06

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  12. Electrode Design for Low Temperature Direct-Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Fanglin (Inventor); Zhao, Fei (Inventor); Liu, Qiang (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  13. Thermal effect of hydrocarbon fuels combustion after a sudden change in the specific calorific value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saifullin, E. R.; Larionov, V. M.; Busarov, A. V.; Busarov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Using associated gas and waste oil refineries in thermal power plants, a complex problem due to the variability in fuel composition. This article explores the burning of hydrocarbon fuel in the case of an abrupt change in its specific combustion heat. Results of the analysis allowed developing a technique of stabilizing the rate of heat release, ensuring complete combustion of the fuel and its minimum flow.

  14. NEW MATERIAL NEEDS FOR HYDROCARBON FUEL PROCESSING: Generating Hydrogen for the PEM Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrauto, R.; Hwang, S.; Shore, L.; Ruettinger, W.; Lampert, J.; Giroux, T.; Liu, Y.; Ilinich, O.

    2003-08-01

    The hydrogen economy is fast approaching as petroleum reserves are rapidly consumed. The fuel cell promises to deliver clean and efficient power by combining hydrogen and oxygen in a simple electrochemical device that directly converts chemical energy to electrical energy. Hydrogen, the most plentiful element available, can be extracted from water by electrolysis. One can imagine capturing energy from the sun and wind and/or from the depths of the earth to provide the necessary power for electrolysis. Alternative energy sources such as these are the promise for the future, but for now they are not feasible for power needs across the globe. A transitional solution is required to convert certain hydrocarbon fuels to hydrogen. These fuels must be available through existing infrastructures such as the natural gas pipeline. The present review discusses the catalyst and adsorbent technologies under development for the extraction of hydrogen from natural gas to meet the requirements for the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The primary market is for residential applications, where pipeline natural gas will be the source of H2 used to power the home. Other applications including the reforming of methanol for portable power applications such as laptop computers, cellular phones, and personnel digital equipment are also discussed. Processing natural gas containing sulfur requires many materials, for example, adsorbents for desulfurization, and heterogeneous catalysts for reforming (either autothermal or steam reforming) water gas shift, preferential oxidation of CO, and anode tail gas combustion. All these technologies are discussed for natural gas and to a limited extent for reforming methanol.

  15. Advanced fuel hydrocarbon remediation national test location. Demonstration of hot air vapor extraction for fuel hydrocarbon cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, J.; Lory, E.

    1997-03-01

    Hot air vapor extration (HAVE) is a fast track, innovative environmental cleanup technolgy that uses a combination of thermal, heap pile, and vapor extraction techniques to remove and destroy hydrocarbon contamination in soil. This technology is very effective in cleaning soils contaminated with gasoline, diesel, heavy oil, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH).

  16. Analysis of beamed-energy ramjet/scramjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Powers, M. V.; Zaretzky, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been performed on a laser-heated ramjet/scramjet vehicle concept for propulsion during the air-breathing portion of an orbital launch trajectory. The concept considers axisymmetric, high-thrust vehicles with external inlets and nozzles. Conceptual design and ramjet/scramjet cycle analysis are emphasized, with propulsive energy provided by combustion of on-board fuel. The conventional ramjet/scramjet combustion chamber is replaced by a laser energy absorption chamber. The elimination of on-board propellant can result in very high thrust-to-weight ratios and payload fractions, in a vehicle with a relatively small degree of mechanical complexity. The basic vehicle has a weight of 12,250 lbf, and a diameter of 5 meters, which is close to the size of the Apollo command module. The ramjet calculations are based on a Mach 3 isentropic inlet with a 13.7 degree half-angle conical tip. The scramjet analysis considers conical inlets with 10, 15, and 30 degree half-angles. Flight Mach numbers from 2 to 20 are considered in the calculations.

  17. Improving Catalyst Efficiency in Bio-Based Hydrocarbon Fuels; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This article investigates upgrading biomass pyrolysis vapors to form hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals using catalysts with different concentrations of acid sites. It shows that greater separation of acid sites makes catalysts more efficient at producing hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. The conversion of biomass into liquid transportation fuels has attracted significant attention because of depleting fossil fuel reserves and environmental concerns resulting from the use of fossil fuels. Biomass is a renewable resource, which is abundant worldwide and can potentially be exploited to produce transportation fuels that are less damaging to the environment. This renewable resource consists of cellulose (40–50%), hemicellulose (25–35%), and lignin (16–33%) biopolymers in addition to smaller quantities of inorganic materials such as silica and alkali and alkaline earth metals (calcium and potassium). Fast pyrolysis is an attractive thermochemical technology for converting biomass into precursors for hydrocarbon fuels because it produces up to 75 wt% bio-oil,1 which can be upgraded to feedstocks and/or blendstocks for further refining to finished fuels. Bio-oil that has not been upgraded has limited applications because of the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups, derived from cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, which gives rise to high acidity, high viscosity, low heating value, immiscibility with hydrocarbons and aging during storage. Ex situ catalytic vapor phase upgrading is a promising approach for improving the properties of bio-oil. The goal of this process is to reject oxygen and produce a bio-oil with improved properties for subsequent downstream conversion to hydrocarbons.

  18. Determination of Combustion Product Radicals in a Hydrocarbon Fueled Rocket Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, Lester A.; Allgood, Daniel C.; Junell, Justin C.

    2007-01-01

    The identification of metallic effluent materials in a rocket engine exhaust plume indicates the health of the engine. Since 1989, emission spectroscopy of the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been used for ground testing at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC). This technique allows the identification and quantification of alloys from the metallic elements observed in the plume. With the prospect of hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines, such as Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) or methane (CH4) fueled engines being considered for use in future space flight systems, the contributions of intermediate or final combustion products resulting from the hydrocarbon fuels are of great interest. The effect of several diatomic molecular radicals, such as Carbon Dioxide , Carbon Monoxide, Molecular Carbon, Methylene Radical, Cyanide or Cyano Radical, and Nitric Oxide, needs to be identified and the effects of their band systems on the spectral region from 300 nm to 850 nm determined. Hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines will play a prominent role in future space exploration programs. Although hydrogen fuel provides for higher engine performance, hydrocarbon fuels are denser, safer to handle, and less costly. For hydrocarbon-fueled engines using RP-1 or CH4 , the plume is different from a hydrogen fueled engine due to the presence of several other species, such as CO2, C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO, in the exhaust plume, in addition to the standard H2O and OH. These species occur as intermediate or final combustion products or as a result of mixing of the hot plume with the atmosphere. Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy has emerged as a comprehensive non-intrusive sensing technology which can be applied to a wide variety of engine performance conditions with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Stennis Space Center researchers have been in the forefront of advancing experimental techniques and developing theoretical approaches in order to bring this technology to a more

  19. Spontaneous Ignition Characteristics of Hydrocarbon Fuel-air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Freeman, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Although the subject of spontaneous ignition of liquid fuels has received considerable attention in the past, the role of fuel evaporation in the overall spontaneous ignition process is still unclear. A main purpose of this research is to carry out measurements of ignition delay times, using fuels of current and anticipated future aeronautical interest, at test conditions that are representative of those encountered in modern gas turbine engines. Attention is focused on the fuel injection process, in particlar the measurement and control of man fuel drop size and fuel-air spatial distribution. The experiments are designed to provide accurate information on the role of fuel evaporation processes in determining the overall ignition delay time. The second objective is to examine in detail the theoretical aspects of spontaneous ignition in order to improve upon current knowledge and understanding of the basic processes involved, so that the results of the investigation can find general and widespead application.

  20. Thermal Stability of Distillate Hydrocarbon Fuels. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Kishenkumar Tadisina; Cernansky, Nicholas P.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal stability of fuels is expected to become a severe problem in the future due to the anticipated use of broadened specification and alternative fuels. Future fuels will have higher contents of heteroatomic species which are reactive constituents and are known to influence fuel degradation. To study the degradation chemistry of selected model fuels, n-dodecane and n-dodecane plus heteroatoms were aerated by bubbling air through the fuels amd stressed on a modified Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester facility operating at heater tube temperatures between 200 to 400 C. The resulting samples were fractionated to concentrate the soluble products and then analyzed using gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques to quantify and identify the stable reaction intermediate and product specifically. Heteroatom addition showed that the major soluble products were always the same, with and without heteroatoms, but their distributions varied considerably.

  1. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  2. Energy and climate impacts of producing synthetic hydrocarbon fuels from CO(2).

    PubMed

    van der Giesen, Coen; Kleijn, René; Kramer, Gert Jan

    2014-06-17

    Within the context of carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization there is an increasing interest in using CO2 as a resource to produce sustainable liquid hydrocarbon fuels. When these fuels are produced by solely using solar energy they are labeled as solar fuels. In the recent discourse on solar fuels intuitive arguments are used to support the prospects of these fuels. This paper takes a quantitative approach to investigate some of the claims made in this discussion. We analyze the life cycle performance of various classes of solar fuel processes using different primary energy and CO2 sources. We compare their efficacy with respect to carbon mitigation with ubiquitous fossil-based fuels and conclude that producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels starting from CO2 by using existing technologies requires much more energy than existing fuels. An improvement in life cycle CO2 emissions is only found when solar energy and atmospheric CO2 are used. Producing fuels from CO2 is a very long-term niche at best, not the panacea suggested in the recent public discourse.

  3. Possible use of polyaphronated hydrocarbons at jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sebba, F.; Schetz, J.A. ); Neff, R.B. )

    1987-04-01

    The Air Force is interested in low cost missile propulsion systems which meet the need for increased stand off range and can fly at high speeds at both low and high altitudes. Due to their high performance capabilities, liquid fueled ramjets are important candidates for these missions. They tend to perform well when the combustor length is long enough to enable all of the fuel to be burned before being lost through the exhaust nozzle. When a combustor has to be shortened due to size limitations, liquid fuel performance drops as a result of not burning all of the injected fuel. Proper fuel injection and atomization are essential factors in obtaining high performance in all liquid fueled ramjets and other air breathing combustion systems. Poor fuel atomization results in low combustion efficiency, contributes to combustion instability, and aids in the formation of pollutants. Very fine fuel atomization requires complex fuel control injection systems which are impractical for ramjet applications. The recent developments in the colloid system, polyaphrons, opens up the possibility that fuels prepared in this way may increase the performance of ramjet propulsion systems, particularly those which are limited in combustion efficiency due to short evaporation and residence times, such as is the case for the very compact swirl combustor configurations. Polyaphrons have the potential to induce better atomization thereby decreasing residence times required for individual droplet burning.

  4. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  5. Determination of total and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aviation jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Bernabei, M; Reda, R; Galiero, R; Bocchinfuso, G

    2003-01-24

    The aviation jet fuel widely used in turbine engine aircraft is manufactured from straight-run kerosene. The combustion quality of jet fuel is largely related to the hydrocarbon composition of the fuel itself; paraffins have better burning properties than aromatic compounds, especially naphthalenes and light polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are characterised as soot and smoke producers. For this reason the burning quality of fuel is generally measured as smoke fermation. This evaluation is carried out with UV spectrophotometric determination of total naphthalene hydrocarbons and a chromatographic analysis to determine the total aromatic compounds. These methods can be considered insufficient to evaluate the human health impact of these compounds due to their inability to measure trace (ppm) amounts of each aromatic hyrcarbon and each PAH in accordance with limitations imposed because of their toxicological properties. In this paper two analytical methods are presented. Both are based on a gas chromatographic technique with a mass detector operating in be selected ion monitoring mode. The first method was able to determine more than 60 aromatic hydrocarbons in a fuel sample in a 35-min chromatographic run, while the second was able to carry out the analysis of more than 30 PAHs in a 40-min chromatographic run. The linearity and sensitivity of the methods in measuring these analytes at trace levels are described.

  6. Fiber optic distributed chemical sensor for the real time detection of hydrocarbon fuel leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Kempen, C.; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian

    2015-09-01

    With the increase worldwide demand for hydrocarbon fuels and the vast development of new fuel production and delivery infrastructure installations around the world, there is a growing need for reliable hydrocarbon fuel leak detection technologies to provide safety and reduce environmental risks. Hydrocarbon leaks (gas or liquid) pose an extreme danger and need to be detected very quickly to avoid potential disasters. Gas leaks have the greatest potential for causing damage due to the explosion risk from the dispersion of gas clouds. This paper describes progress towards the development of a fast response, high sensitivity, distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection (HySense™) system based on the use of an optical fiber that uses a hydrocarbon sensitive fluorescent coating to detect the presence of fuel leaks present in close proximity along the length of the sensor fiber. The HySense™ system operates in two modes, leak detection and leak localization, and will trigger an alarm within seconds of exposure contact. The fast and accurate response of the sensor provides reliable fluid leak detection for pipelines, storage tanks, airports, pumps, and valves to detect and minimize any potential catastrophic damage.

  7. Development of Advanced Hydrocarbon Fuels at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, S. D.; Dumbacher, P.; Cole, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    This was a small-scale, hot-fire test series to make initial measurements of performance differences of five new liquid fuels relative to rocket propellant-1 (RP-1). The program was part of a high-energy-density materials development at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the fuels tested were quadricyclane, 1-7 octodiyne, AFRL-1, biclopropylidene, and competitive impulse noncarcinogenic hypergol (CINCH) (di-methyl-aminoethyl-azide). All tests were conducted at MSFC. The first four fuels were provided by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Edwards Air Force Base, CA. The U.S. Army, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, AL, provided the CINCH. The data recorded in all hot-fire tests were used to calculate specific impulse and characteristic exhaust velocity for each fuel, then compared to RP-1 at the same conditions. This was not an exhaustive study, comparing each fuel to RP-1 at an array of mixture ratios, nor did it include important fuel parameters, such as fuel handling or long-term storage. The test hardware was designed for liquid oxygen (lox)/RP-1, then modified for gaseous oxygen/RP-1 to avoid two-phase lox at very small flow rates. All fuels were tested using the same thruster/injector combination designed for RP-1. The results of this test will be used to determine which fuels will be tested in future test programs.

  8. Development of a Premixed Combustion Capability for Scramjet Combustion Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; Rice, Brian E.; Chelliah, Harsha; McDaniel, James C.; Edwards, Jack R.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing engines rely on scramjet combustion processes, which involve high speed, compressible, and highly turbulent flows. The combustion environment and the turbulent flames at the heart of these engines are difficult to simulate and study in the laboratory under well controlled conditions. Typically, wind-tunnel testing is performed that more closely approximates engine testing rather than a careful investigation of the underlying physics that drives the combustion process. The experiments described in this paper, along with companion data sets being developed separately, aim to isolate the chemical kinetic effects from the fuel-air mixing process in a dual-mode scramjet combustion environment. A unique fuel injection approach is taken that produces a nearly uniform fuel-air mixture at the entrance to the combustor. This approach relies on the precombustion shock train upstream of the dual-mode scramjet combustor. A stable ethylene flame anchored on a cavity flameholder with a uniformly mixed combustor inflow has been achieved in these experiments allowing numerous companion studies involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be performed.

  9. On-Line Measurement of Heat of Combustion of Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuel Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Chaturvedi, Sushil K.; Kheireddine, Ali

    1996-01-01

    A method for the on-line measurement of the heat of combustion of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel mixtures has been developed and tested. The method involves combustion of a test gas with a measured quantity of air to achieve a preset concentration of oxygen in the combustion products. This method involves using a controller which maintains the fuel (gas) volumetric flow rate at a level consistent with the desired oxygen concentration in the combustion products. The heat of combustion is determined form a known correlation with the fuel flow rate. An on-line computer accesses the fuel flow data and displays the heat of combustion measurement at desired time intervals. This technique appears to be especially applicable for measuring heats of combustion of hydrocarbon mixtures of unknown composition such as natural gas.

  10. Hydrodeoxygenation processes: advances on catalytic transformations of biomass-derived platform chemicals into hydrocarbon fuels.

    PubMed

    De, Sudipta; Saha, Basudeb; Luque, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass provides an attractive source of renewable carbon that can be sustainably converted into chemicals and fuels. Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) processes have recently received considerable attention to upgrade biomass-derived feedstocks into liquid transportation fuels. The selection and design of HDO catalysts plays an important role to determine the success of the process. This review has been aimed to emphasize recent developments on HDO catalysts in effective transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules into hydrocarbon fuels with reduced oxygen content and improved H/C ratios. Liquid hydrocarbon fuels can be obtained by combining oxygen removal processes (e.g. dehydration, hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, decarbonylation etc.) as well as by increasing the molecular weight via C-C coupling reactions (e.g. aldol condensation, ketonization, oligomerization, hydroxyalkylation etc.). Fundamentals and mechanistic aspects of the use of HDO catalysts in deoxygenation reactions will also be discussed.

  11. Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels

    DOE Data Explorer

    The central feature of the Combustion Chemistry project at LLNL is the development, validation, and application of detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of hydrocarbon and other types of chemical fuels. For the past 30 years, LLNL's Chemical Sciences Division has built hydrocarbon mechanisms for fuels from hydrogen and methane through much larger fuels including heptanes and octanes. Other classes of fuels for which models have been developed include flame suppressants such as halons and organophosphates, and air pollutants such as soot and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur. Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.

  12. Apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrocarbon fuel reformer 100 suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. A first tube 108 has a first tube inlet 110 and a first tube outlet 112. The first tube inlet 110 is adapted for receiving a first mixture including an oxygen-containing gas and a first fuel. A partially oxidized first reaction reformate is directed out of the first tube 108 into a mixing zone 114. A second tube 116 is annularly disposed about the first tube 108 and has a second tube inlet 118 and a second tube outlet 120. The second tube inlet 118 is adapted for receiving a second mixture including steam and a second fuel. A steam reformed second reaction reformate is directed out of the second tube 116 and into the mixing zone 114. From the mixing zone 114, the first and second reaction reformates may be directed into a catalytic reforming zone 144 containing a reforming catalyst 147.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy for the determination of hydrocarbon types in jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchar, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The concentration of hydrocarbon types in conventional jet fuels and synfuels can be measured using a computerized infrared spectrophotometer. The computerized spectrophotometer is calibrated using a fuel of known aromatic and olefinic content. Once calibration is completed, other fuels can be rapidly analyzed using an analytical program built into the computer. The concentration of saturates can be calculated as 100 percent minus the sum of the aromatic and olefinic concentrations. The analysis of a number of jet fuels produced an average standard deviation of 1.76 percent for aromatic types and one of 3.99 percent for olefinic types. Other substances such as oils and organic mixtures can be analyzed for their hydrocarbon content.

  14. Diazido alkanes and diazido alkanols as combustion modifiers for liquid hydrocarbon ramjet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.S.

    1986-07-03

    This invention relates to liquid-hydrocarbon jet fuels and more particularly to azido additives to liquid-hydrocarbon ramjet fuels. In most liquid-fueled combustors such as the ramjet, the fuel is directly introduced into the upstream flow section of the combustion chamber in the form of sprays of droplets. These droplets subsequently mix with the external gas, heat up, gasify, combust, and thereby release heat to provide the propulsion energy. It is therefore obvious that the rates of gasification and mixing would closely affect the chemical heat release rate and, consequently, such important performance parameters as combustion efficiency and the tendency to exhibit combustion instability. Accordingly, and object of this invention is to provide a new, improved jet fuel and provide new additives for jet fuels. A further object of this invention is to provide a more-efficient jet fuel and reduce the ignition time for jet fuels. Still, a further object of this invention is to improve the mixing characteristics of the jet-fuel spray.

  15. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-two jet and diesel fuel samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by a fluorescent indicator adsorption analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Two methods of rapid high performance liquid chromatography were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  16. Method of Generating Hydrocarbon Reagents from Diesel, Natural Gas and Other Logistical Fuels

    DOEpatents

    Herling, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Aardahl, Chris L [Richland, WA; Rozmiarek, Robert T [Middleton, WI; Rappe, Kenneth G [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Holladay, Jamelyn D [Kennewick, WA

    2008-10-14

    The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

  17. Method of generating hydrocarbon reagents from diesel, natural gas and other logistical fuels

    DOEpatents

    Herling, Darrell R.; Aardahl, Chris L.; Rozmiarek, Robert T.; Rappe, Kenneth G.; Wang, Yong; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2010-06-29

    The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

  18. Flow establishment in a generic scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, P. A.; Rogers, R. C.; Weidner, E. H.; Bittner, R. D.

    1990-10-01

    The establishment of a quasi-steady flow in a generic scramjet combustor was studied for the case of a time varying inflow to the combustor. Such transient flow is characteristic of the reflected shock tunnel and expansion tube test facilities. Several numerical simulations of hypervelocity flow through a straight duct combustor with either a side wall step fuel injector or a centrally located strut injector are presented. Comparisons were made between impulsively started but otherwise constant flow conditions (typical of the expansion tube or tailored operations of the reflected shock tunnel) and the relaxing flow produced by the 'undertailored' operations of the reflected shock tunnel. Generally the inviscid flow features, such as the shock pattern and pressure distribution, were unaffected by the time varying inlet conditions and approached steady state in approx. the times indicated by experimental correlations. However, viscous features, such as heat transfer and skin friction, were altered by the relaxing inlet flow conditions.

  19. Two-step catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of fast pyrolysis oil to hydrocarbon liquid fuels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingmin; Zhang, Changsen; Liu, Yonggang; Zhai, Yunpu; Zhang, Ruiqin

    2013-10-01

    Two-step catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fast pyrolysis oil was investigated for translating pyrolysis oil to transportation grade hydrocarbon liquid fuels. At the first mild HDO step, various organic solvents were employed to promote HDO of bio-oil to overcome coke formation using noble catalyst (Ru/C) under mild conditions (300 °C, 10 MPa). At the second deep HDO step, conventional hydrogenation setup and catalyst (NiMo/Al2O3) were used under severe conditions (400 °C, 13 MPa) for obtaining hydrocarbon fuel. Results show that the phenomenon of coke formation is effectively eliminated, and the properties of products have been significantly improved, such as oxygen content decreases from 48 to 0.5 wt% and high heating value increases from 17 to 46 MJ kg(-1). GC-MS analysis indicates that the final products include C11-C27 aliphatic hydrocarbons and aromatic hydrocarbons. In short, the fast pyrolysis oils were successfully translated to hydrocarbon liquid fuels using a two-step catalytic HDO process.

  20. Motor vehicle fuel economy, the forgotten HC control stragegy. [Hydrocarbon (HC)

    SciTech Connect

    Deluchi, M.; Wang, Quanlu; Greene, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    Emissions of hydrocarbons from motor vehicles are recognized as major contributors to ozone pollution in urban areas. Petroleum-based motor fuels contain volatile organic compounds (VOC) which, together with oxides of nitrogen, promote the formation of ozone in the troposphere via complex photochemical reactions. VOC emissions from the tailpipe and evaporation from the fuel and engine systems of highway vehicles are believed to account for about 40% of total VOC emissions in any region. But motor fuels also generate emissions throughout the fuel cycle, from crude oil production to refining, storage, transportation, and handling, that can make significant contributions to the total inventory of VOC emissions. Many of these sources of emissions are directly related to the quantity of fuel produced and handled throughout the fuel cycle. It is, therefore, reasonable to expect that a reduction in total fuel throughput might result in a reduction of VOC emissions. In particular, reducing vehicle fuel consumption by increasing vehicle fuel economy should reduce total fuel throughput, thereby cutting total emissions of VOCS. In this report we identify the sources of VOC emissions throughout the motor fuel cycle, quantify them to the extent possible, and describe their dependence on automobile and light truck fuel economy.

  1. Effect of alcohol addition on the movement of petroleum hydrocarbon fuels in soil.

    PubMed

    Adam, Gillian; Gamoh, Keiji; Morris, David G; Duncan, Harry

    2002-03-08

    Groundwater contamination by fuel spills from aboveground and underground storage tanks has been of growing concern in recent years. This problem has been magnified by the addition of oxygenates, such as ethanol and methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) to fuels to reduce vehicular emissions to the atmosphere. These additives, although beneficial in reducing atmospheric pollution, may, however, increase groundwater contamination due to the co-solvency of petroleum hydrocarbons and by the provision of a preferential substrate for microbial utilisation. With the introduction of ethanol to diesel fuel imminent and the move away from MTBE use in many states of the USA, the environmental implications associated with ethanol additive fuels must be thoroughly investigated. Diesel fuel movement was followed in a 1-m soil column and the effect of ethanol addition to diesel fuel on this movement determined. The addition of 5% ethanol to diesel fuel was found to enhance the downward migration of the diesel fuel components, thus increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A novel method using soil packed HPLC columns allowed the influence of ethanol on individual aromatic hydrocarbon movement to be studied. The levels of ethanol addition investigated were at the current additive level (approx. 25%) for ethanol additive fuels in Brazil and values above (50%) and below (10%) this level. An aqueous ethanol concentration above 10% was required for any movement to occur. At 25% aqueous ethanol, the majority of hydrocarbons were mobilised and the retention behaviour of the soil column lessened. At 50% aqueous ethanol, all the hydrocarbons were found to move unimpeded through the columns. The retention behaviour of the soil was found to change significantly when both organic matter content and silt/clay content was reduced. Unexpectedly, sandy soil with low organic matter and low silt/clay was found to have a retentive behaviour similar to sandy subsoil with moderate silt

  2. BIOGEOCHEMICAL EVIDENCE FOR MICROBIAL COMMUNITY CHANGE IN A JET FUEL HYDROCARBONS-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A glacio-fluvial aquifer located at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, had been contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons released after the crash of a tanker aircraft in October of 1988 Microbial biomass and community structure, associated with the aquifer sediments, were chara...

  3. Methods of discovery and techniques to study endophytic fungi producing fuel-related hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Gary A

    2014-01-17

    One promising area in the search for renewable bio-fuels is the discovery of microorganisms that produce fuel-related hydrocarbons (mycodiesel) that is in stark contrast to yeast fermentation that utilizes expensive sugars or starch to produce ethanol, which is a proven and useful source of fuel, but by no means is it ideal. Recently, a number of endophytic fungi have been isolated and described that make compounds such as mono- terpenoids, alkanes, cyclohexanes, cyclopentanes, and alkyl alcohols/ketones, benzenes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Many of these compounds are either identical to or are closely related to those specific classes of molecules that are found in diesel. Most importantly, these organisms make hydrocarbons while utilizing cellulosic polymers found in all plant-based agricultural wastes. Also discussed are some novel methods and techniques to quantitatively and qualitatively study hydrocarbon production by these microbes. Two models are discussed for identifying potential fuel-related compounds, scaling up production of them and advanced engine testing. Finally, it seems possible that endophytic fungi may have an additional attribute of having contributed to the formation of crude oil in the first place and a description of the paleobiosphere, to test this hypothesis, is in this review.

  4. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF FUEL HYDROCARBONS AT MULTIPLE AIR FORCE BASE DEMONSTRATION SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major initiative to evaluate monitored natural attenuation(MNA) of ground water contaminated with fuel hydrocarbons began in June 1993 and continued through October 2000. During this time site characterization studies, both initial and follow-up, were conducted at 28 Air Forc...

  5. Heterogeneous catalysts for the transformation of fatty acid triglycerides and their derivatives to fuel hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Vadim A.; Khromova, Sofia A.; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2011-10-01

    The results of studies devoted to the catalysts for transformation of fatty acid triglycerides and their derivatives to fuel hydrocarbons are presented and described systematically. Various approaches to the use of heterogeneous catalysts for the production of biofuel from these raw materials are considered. The bibliography includes 134 references.

  6. STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF A SHALLOW SAND AQUIFER CONTAMINATED WITH FUEL HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground-water chemistry and the stable C isotope composition ( 13CDIC) of dissolved C (DIC) were measured in a sand aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Results show that ground water in the upgradient zone was characterized by DIC content of 14-20 mg C/L and 13CDIC...

  7. Molten salt pyrolysis of latex. [synthetic hydrocarbon fuel production using the Guayule shrub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Latex-rich plants such as Guayule or extracts thereof are pyrolyzed in an inert nitrogen atmosphere inorganic salt melts such as a LiCl/KCl eutectic at a temperature of about 500 C. The yield is over 60% of a highly aromatic, combustible hydrocarbon oil suitable for use as a synthetic liquid fuel.

  8. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF FUEL HYDROCARBONS AT MULTIPLE AIR FORCE BASE DEMONSTRATION SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    A major initiative to evaluate monitored natural attenuation (MNA) of ground-water contaminated with fuel hydrocarbons began in June, 1993, and continued through September, 1999. The main emphasis was to evaluate natural degradation mechanisms to reduce dissolved ...

  9. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark G.; Ranaweera, Samantha A.; Henry, William P.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality distillates, gasoline components, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel supported bimetallic ion complex catalyst for conversion, and provides methods of preparing such novel catalysts and use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  10. Microplasma reforming of hydrocarbons for fuel cell power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besser, R. S.; Lindner, P. J.

    The implementation of a microplasma approach for small scale reforming processes is explored as an alternative to more standard catalyst-based processes. Plasmas are a known approach to activating a chemical reaction in place of catalysts, and microplasmas are particularly attractive owing to their extremely high electron and power densities. Their inherent compactness gives them appeal for portable applications, but their modularity leads to scalability for higher capacity. We describe the realization of experimental microplasma reactors based on the microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) structure by silicon micromachining for device fabrication. Experiments were carried out with model hydrocarbons methane and butane in the reactors within a microfluidic flow and analytical setup. We observe several key phenomena, including the ability to liberate hydrogen from the hydrocarbons at temperatures near ambient and sub-Watt input power levels, the tendency toward hydrocarbon decomposition rather than oxidation even in the presence of oxygen, and the need for a neutral carrier to obtain conversion. Mass and energy balances on these experiments revealed conversions up to nearly 50%, but the conversion of electrical power input to chemical reaction enthalpy was only on the order of 1%. These initial, exploratory results were recorded with devices and at process settings without optimization, and are hence promising for an emerging, catalyst-free reforming approach.

  11. Conceptual model of turbulent flameholding for scramjet combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    New concepts and approaches to scramjet combustor design are presented. Blowoff was from failure of the recirculation-zone (RZ) flame to reach the dividing streamline (DS) at the rear stagnation zone. Increased turbulent exchange across the DS helped flameholding due to forward movement of the flame anchor point inside the RZ. Modeling of the blowoff phenomenon was based on a mass conservation concept involving the traverse of a flame element across the RZ and a flow element along the DS. The scale required to achieve flameholding, predicted by the model, showed a strong adverse effect of low pressure and low fuel equivalence ratio, moderate effect of flight Mach number, and little effect of temperature recovery factor. Possible effects of finite rate chemistry on flameholding and flamespreading in scramjets are discussed and recommendations for approaches to engine combustor design as well as for needed research to reduce uncertainties in the concepts are made.

  12. A light hydrocarbon fuel processor producing high-purity hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Daniel G.; Taylor, Kyle; Mason, Dylan

    This paper discusses the design process and presents performance data for a dual fuel (natural gas and LPG) fuel processor for PEM fuel cells delivering between 2 and 8 kW electric power in stationary applications. The fuel processor resulted from a series of design compromises made to address different design constraints. First, the product quality was selected; then, the unit operations needed to achieve that product quality were chosen from the pool of available technologies. Next, the specific equipment needed for each unit operation was selected. Finally, the unit operations were thermally integrated to achieve high thermal efficiency. Early in the design process, it was decided that the fuel processor would deliver high-purity hydrogen. Hydrogen can be separated from other gases by pressure-driven processes based on either selective adsorption or permeation. The pressure requirement made steam reforming (SR) the preferred reforming technology because it does not require compression of combustion air; therefore, steam reforming is more efficient in a high-pressure fuel processor than alternative technologies like autothermal reforming (ATR) or partial oxidation (POX), where the combustion occurs at the pressure of the process stream. A low-temperature pre-reformer reactor is needed upstream of a steam reformer to suppress coke formation; yet, low temperatures facilitate the formation of metal sulfides that deactivate the catalyst. For this reason, a desulfurization unit is needed upstream of the pre-reformer. Hydrogen separation was implemented using a palladium alloy membrane. Packed beds were chosen for the pre-reformer and reformer reactors primarily because of their low cost, relatively simple operation and low maintenance. Commercial, off-the-shelf balance of plant (BOP) components (pumps, valves, and heat exchangers) were used to integrate the unit operations. The fuel processor delivers up to 100 slm hydrogen >99.9% pure with <1 ppm CO, <3 ppm CO 2. The

  13. Design and evaluation of high performance rocket engine injectors for use with hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavli, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using a heavy hydrocarbon fuel as a rocket propellant is examined. A method of predicting performance of a heavy hydrocarbon in terms of vaporization effectiveness is described and compared to other fuels and to experimental test results. Experiments were done at a chamber pressure of 4137 KN/sq M (600 psia) with RP-1, JP-10, and liquefied natural gas as fuels, and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Combustion length effects were explored over a range of 21.6 cm (8 1/2 in) to 55.9 cm (22 in). Four injector types were tested, each over a range of mixture ratios. Further configuration modifications were obtained by reaming each injector several times to provide test data over a range of injector pressure drop.

  14. Hydrocarbons (jet fuel JP-8) induce epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of obesity, reproductive disease and sperm epimutations.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Rebecca; Manikkam, Mohan; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K

    2013-04-01

    Environmental compounds have been shown to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. The current study was designed to determine if a hydrocarbon mixture involving jet fuel (JP-8) promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed during the fetal gonadal development period. The direct exposure F1 generation had an increased incidence of kidney abnormalities in both females and males, prostate and pubertal abnormalities in males, and primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovarian disease in females. The first transgenerational generation is the F3 generation, and the jet fuel lineage had an increased incidence of primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovarian disease in females, and obesity in both females and males. Analysis of the jet fuel lineage F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 33 differential DNA methylation regions, termed epimutations. Observations demonstrate hydrocarbons can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and sperm epimutations, potential biomarkers for ancestral exposures.

  15. Design and evaluation of high performance rocket engine injectors for use with hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavli, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the feasibility of using a heavy hydrocarbon fuel as a rocket propellant is reported herein. A method of predicting performance of a heavy hydrocarbon in terms of vaporization effectiveness is described and compared to other fuels and to experimental test results. The work was done at a chamber pressure of 4137 KN/sq M (600 psia) with RP-1, JP-10, and liquefied natural gas as fuels, and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Combustion length effects were explored over a range of 21.6 cm (8 1/2 in.) to 55.9 cm (22 in.). Four injector types were tested, each over a range of mixture ratios. Further configuration modifications were obtained by 'reaming' each injector several times to provide test data over a range of injector pressure drop.

  16. Risk-based approach for bioremediation of fuel hydrocarbons at a major airport

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemeier, T.H.; Guest, P.R.; Blicker, B.R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a risk-based approach for bioremediation of fuel-hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and ground water at a major airport in Colorado. In situ bioremediation pilot testing, natural attenuation modeling, and full-scale remedial action planning and implementation for soil and ground water contamination has conducted at four airport fuel farms. The sources of fuel contamination were leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) or pipelines transporting Jet A fuel and aviation gasoline. Continuing sources of contamination were present in several small cells of free-phase product and in fuel residuals trapped within the capillary fringe at depths 15 to 20 feet below ground surface. Bioventing pilot tests were conducted to assess the feasibility of using this technology to remediate contaminated soils. The pilot tests included measurement of initial soil gas chemistry at the site, determination of subsurface permeability, and in situ respiration tests to determine fuel biodegradation rates. A product recovery test was also conducted. ES designed and installed four full-scale bioventing systems to remediate the long-term sources of continuing fuel contamination. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected in ground water at concentrations slightly above regulatory guidelines.

  17. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    DOEpatents

    White, Mark G; Liu, Shetian

    2014-12-09

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality gasoline components, aromatic compounds, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel molybdenum-zeolite catalyst in high pressure hydrogen for conversion, as well as a novel rhenium-zeolite catalyst in place of the molybdenum-zeolite catalyst, and provides for use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  18. Direct conversion of solid hydrocarbons in a molten carbonate fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predtechensky, M. R.; Varlamov, Yu. D.; Ul'Yankin, S. N.; Dubov, Yu. D.

    2009-12-01

    Electrical characteristics of a molten carbonate fuel cell allowing direct electrochemical oxidation of dispersed hydrocarbons have been examined. As the fuel, graphite, anthracite, and cannel coal samples were used. Data illustrating the effect of electrolyte temperature, fuel type and dispersion, and also reactant gas mixture composition on the performance characteristics of the fuel cell, were obtained. Correlation between the specific characteristics of the fuel cell and the hydrogen content of fuel material was established. The maximum current-density values were achieved with hydrogen-rich cannel coal. For dispersed fuel samples, interparticle contact losses were found to have influence on the cell-generated voltage. The maximum cell opencircuit voltage was reached with stoichiometric oxygen-carbon dioxide mixture blown into the cathode. Yet, the largest current-density values were obtained when carbon dioxide lean mixtures were used. Even at zero carbon dioxide concentration the range of cathode polarizations was less than that observed with stoichiometric mixture. The processes proceeding in the cathode and anode packs of the fuel cell are believed to be interrelated processes. In a model fuel cell fueled with dispersed coal, current densities up to 140 mA/cm2 and specific powers up to 70 mW/cm2 were achieved.

  19. Photosynthetic terpene hydrocarbon production for fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X; Ort, DR; Yuan, JS

    2015-01-28

    Photosynthetic hydrocarbon production bypasses the traditional biomass hydrolysis process and represents the most direct conversion of sunlight energy into the next-generation biofuels. As a major class of biologically derived hydrocarbons with diverse structures, terpenes are also valuable in producing a variety of fungible bioproducts in addition to the advanced drop-in' biofuels. However, it is highly challenging to achieve the efficient redirection of photosynthetic carbon and reductant into terpene biosynthesis. In this review, we discuss four major scientific and technical barriers for photosynthetic terpene production and recent advances to address these constraints. Collectively, photosynthetic terpene production needs to be optimized in a systematic fashion, in which the photosynthesis improvement, the optimization of terpene biosynthesis pathway, the improvement of key enzymes and the enhancement of sink effect through terpene storage or secretion are all important. New advances in synthetic biology also offer a suite of potential tools to design and engineer photosynthetic terpene platforms. The systemic integration of these solutions may lead to disruptive' technologies to enable biofuels and bioproducts with high efficiency, yield and infrastructure compatibility.

  20. Mechanisms of Combustion of Hydrocarbon/Alcohol Fuel Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    constant strain rate ( 40 vec - 1 ) and constant oxygen mass fraction (0.18) in the oxidizer stream. L ,.. N ..’. .[ °%’ ,°,~. - .° m%’ ." o , r...89 Appendix 1 Study of a preheated fuel and a Preheated oxidizer in a counterfiow burner........................ 93 References...95 1 % -.- N . % * .’% Accesion For NTIS CRA l 0110 TAB Unannoup:ced 0

  1. Propellant feed system of a regeneratively cooled scramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, Takeshi; Masuya, Goro; Wakamatsu, Yoshio )

    1991-04-01

    An expander cycle for an airframe-integrated hydrogen-fueled scramjet is analyzed to study regenerative cooling characteristics and overall specific impulse. Below Mach 10, the specific impulse and thrust coincide with the reference values. At Mach numbers above 10, a reduction of the specific impulse occurs due to the coolant flow rate requirement, which is accompanied by an increase of thrust. It is shown that the thrust may be increased by injecting excess fuel into the combustor to compensate for the decrease of the specific impulse. 9 refs.

  2. Performance Impact Associated with Ni-Based SOFCs Fueled with Higher Hydrocarbon-Doped Coal Syngas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk; Chen, Yun; Song, Xueyan; Zondlo, John

    2015-03-01

    Energy generation strategies demonstrating high efficiency and fuel flexibility are desirable in the contemporary energy market. When integrated with a gasification process, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) can produce electricity at efficiencies exceeding 50 pct by consuming fuels such as coal, biomass, municipal solid waste, or other opportunity wastes. The synthesis gas derived from such fuel may contain trace species (including arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, phosphorus, sulfur, and tars) and low concentration organic species that adversely affect the SOFC performance. This work demonstrates the impact of exposure of the hydrocarbons ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene at various concentrations. The cell performance degradation rate is determined for tests exceeding 500 hours at 1073 K (800 °C). Cell performance is evaluated during operation with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and exposed samples are post-operationally analyzed by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The short-term performance is modeled to predict performances to the desired 40,000-hours operational lifetime for SOFCs. Possible hydrocarbon interactions with the nickel anode are postulated, and acceptable hydrocarbon exposure limits are discussed.

  3. Degradation of Jet Fuel Hydrocarbons by Aquatic Microbial Communities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    in the quiescent test. Assays of total heterotrophs and hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria indicated an initial toxicity odf the fuel mixture followed by a...did stimulate the replication of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. UNCLASSIFIED S11CURITY CLASSIPICATIO1R Oi ?’e PAOR(ne Dote Entlre) * f-- PREFACE This...4 Constituents of the Minimal Salts Broth Used for the Enumeration of Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacteria. ................... 18 5 Total Organic Carbon

  4. Parametric study of combustion oscillation in a single-side expansion scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Liu, Weidong; Sun, Mingbo

    2016-10-01

    As a promising candidate for future air-breathing systems, the viability and efficiency of scramjet propulsion is challenged by a variety of factors including the combustion oscillation in scramjet combustor. A series of comparative experiments focusing on the combustion oscillation issue has been carried out in the present work. The obtained experimental results show that as the global equivalence ratio increases, the combustion oscillation becomes more regular and frequent which is the most intensive in the vicinity of the fuel jet and the periodic combustion oscillation is more possible when the injectors and flame-holding cavity are mounted on the expansion-side wall. In order to avoid the combustion oscillation in scramjet combustor, distributed injection scheme is an effective method which can induce two parts interacting stable flame. In addition, the results reveal that the varying fuel including hydrogen, ethylene and kerosene with different chemical kinetics has a significant effect on the reaction process in scramjet combustor, which can result in stable combustion, periodic oscillation and failed ignition respectively on the same operating condition of this paper. We believe that the present work is helpful to the designing of scramjet propulsion device.

  5. Combustion Enhancement in Scramjet-Operation of a RBCC Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadatake Tomioka, By; Ryohei Kobayashi; Murakami, Atsuo; Shuichi Ueda; Komuro, Tomoyuki; Katsuhiro Itoh, And

    Combination of a scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) flow-pass with embedded rocket engines (the combined system termed as Rocket Based Combined Cycle engine) are expected to be the most effective propulsion system for Booster stage of space launch vehicles. At hypersonic regime, it will be operated at rather high rocket engine output for final acceleration with some Isp gains due to air-breathing effects. In this regime, attaining thrust at this high-speed regime becomes very difficult, so that parallel injection of the fuel for scramjet combustion is favorable as the momentum of the injection can contribute to the thrust production. Thus, embedded rocket chamber was supposed to the operated as fuel rich gas generator at very high output. This configuration was tested at simulated flight Mach number of 7-11 at High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel (HIEST) with detonation tube as the source of the simulated rocket exhaust. However, combustion of the residual fuel in the rocket exhaust with airflow could not be attained. Direct-connect combustor tests were performed to evaluate effectiveness of a combustion enhancement technique termed auxiliary injection, i.e., a portion of fuel to be directly injected into airflow to provide ignition source for the residual fuel. Results of both the engine model tests at HIEST and the direct-connect tests are summarized and presented, and modification to the engine model for combustion enhancement was proposed.

  6. Hydrocarbon Fuel/Combustion-Chamber-Liner Materials Compatibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    these fuels. Cuprous sulfide is the corrosion product. H3 I I I I I £ U i3 Rt~’J / D);,6,.4 .T 2.0, Summary (cont.) Task 1 tests with RP-1 and n...dodecanethiol. The copper cooling channels reacted with the sulfur impurity to form cuprous sulfide (Cu 2S). This corrosive process roughened the copper...1 in the ampules showed a change of color in the liquid phase. The RP-1 loaded into the ampules was a dark pink. After heating during the test, the RP

  7. LOX/hydrocarbon fuel carbon formation and mixing data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, J.

    1983-01-01

    By applying the Priem-Heidmann Generalized-Length vaporization correlation, the computer model developed by the present study predicts the spatial variation of propellant vaporization rate using the injector cold flow results to define the streamtubes. The calculations show that the overall and local propellant vaporization rate and mixture ratio change drastically as the injection element type or the injector operating condition is changed. These results are compared with the regions of carbon formation observed in the photographic combustion testing. The correlation shows that the fuel vaporization rate and the local mixture ratio produced by the injector element have first order effects on the degree of carbon formation.

  8. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are given for the analysis of some jet and diesel fuel samples which were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Thirty-two samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were obtained. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Recently, rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been proposed for hydrocarbon group type analysis, with some suggestion for their use as a replacement of the FIA technique. Two of these methods were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  9. Cryogenic Gellant and Fuel Formulation for Metallized Gelled Propellants: Hydrocarbons and Hydrogen with Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wing; Starkovich, John; Adams, Scott; Palaszewski, Bryan; Davison, William; Burt, William; Thridandam, Hareesh; Hu-Peng, Hsiao; Santy, Myrrl J.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the viability of nanoparticulate gellant materials for gelled hydrocarbons and gelled liquid hydrogen was conducted. The gellants included alkoxides (BTMSE and BTMSH) and silica-based materials. Hexane, ethane, propane and hydrogen were gelled with the newly-formulated materials and their rheological properties were determined: shear stress versus shear rate and their attendant viscosities. Metallized hexane with aluminum particles was also rheologically characterized. The propellant and gellant formulations were selected for the very high surface area and relatively-high energy content of the gellants. These new gellants can therefore improve rocket engine specific impulse over that obtained with traditional cryogenic-fuel gellant materials silicon dioxide, frozen methane, or frozen ethane particles. Significant reductions in the total mass of the gellant were enabled in the fuels. In gelled liquid hydrogen, the total mass of gellant was reduced from 10-40 wt percent of frozen hydrocarbon particles to less that 8 wt percent with the alkoxide.

  10. Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, G. David

    1991-01-01

    The results of dynamic tests using methane and NASA-Z copper test specimen under conditions that simulate those expected in the cooling channels of a regeneratively cooled LOX/hydrocarbon booster engine operating at chamber pressures up to 3000 psi are presented. Methane with less than 0.5 ppm sulfur contamination has little or no effect on cooling channel performance. At higher sulfur concentrations, severe corrosion of the NASA-Z copper alloy occurs and the cuprous sulfide Cu2S, thus formed impedes mass flow rate and heat transfer efficiency. Therefore, it is recommended that the methane specification for this end use set the allowable sulfur content at 0.5 ppm (max). Bulk high purity liquid methane that meets this low sulfur requirement is currently available from only one producer. Pricing, availability, and quality assurance are discussed in detail. Additionally, it was found that dilute sodium cyanide solutions effectively refurbish sulfur corroded cooling channels in only 2 to 5 minutes by completely dissolving all the Cu2S. Sulfur corroded/sodium cyanide refurbished channels are highly roughened and the increased surface roughness leads to significant improvements in heat transfer efficiency with an attendant loss in mass flow rate. Both the sulfur corrosion and refurbishment effects are discussed in detail.

  11. A Monte Carlo simulation method for assessing biotransformation effects on groundwater fuel hydrocarbon plume lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, Walt W.

    2001-02-01

    Biotransformation of dissolved groundwater hydrocarbon plumes emanating from leaking underground fuel tanks should, in principle, result in plume length stabilization over relatively short distances, thus diminishing the environmental risk. However, because the behavior of hydrocarbon plumes is usually poorly constrained at most leaking underground fuel tank sites in terms of release history, groundwater velocity, dispersion, as well as the biotransformation rate, demonstrating such a limitation in plume length is problematic. Biotransformation signatures in the aquifer geochemistry, most notably elevated bicarbonate, may offer a means of constraining the relationship between plume length and the mean biotransformation rate. In this study, modeled plume lengths and spatial bicarbonate differences among a population of synthetic hydrocarbon plumes, generated through Monte Carlo simulation of an analytical solute transport model, are compared to field observations from six underground storage tank (UST) sites at military bases in California. Simulation results indicate that the relationship between plume length and the distribution of bicarbonate is best explained by biotransformation rates that are consistent with ranges commonly reported in the literature. This finding suggests that bicarbonate can indeed provide an independent means for evaluating limitations in hydrocarbon plume length resulting from biotransformation.

  12. Uncertainty analyses of fuel hydrocarbon biodegradation signatures in ground water by probabilistic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    McNab, W.W. Jr.; Dooher, B.P.

    1998-07-01

    Natural attenuation processes, such as biodegradation, may serve as a means for remediating ground water contaminated by fuel hydrocarbons from leaking underground fuel tanks (LUFTs). Quantification of the uncertainties associated with natural attenuation, and hence the capacity to limit plume migration and restore an aquifer, is important. In this study, a probabilistic screening model is developed to quantify uncertainties involved in the impact of biodegradation on hydrocarbon plume behavior. The approach is based on Monte Carlo simulation using an analytical solution to the advective-dispersive solute transport equation, including a first-order degradation term, coupled with mass balance constraints on electron acceptor use. Empirical probability distributions for governing parameters are provided as input to the model. Application of the model to an existing LUFT site illustrates the degree of uncertainty associated with model-predicted hydrocarbon concentrations and geochemical indicators at individual site monitoring wells as well as the role of various parameter assumptions (e.g., hydraulic conductivity, first-order decay coefficient, source term) in influencing forecasts. This information is useful for risk management planning because the degree of confidence that biodegradation will limit the impact of a hydrocarbon plume on potential receptors can be quantified.

  13. Hydrocarbon-fuel/copper combustion chamber liner compatibility, corrosion prevention, and refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, S. D.; Gage, M. L.; Homer, G. D.; Franklin, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of combustion product/combustion chamber compatibility in the case of a LOX/liquid hydrocarbon booster engine based on copper-alloy thrust chamber which is regeneratively cooled by the fuel. It is found that sulfur impurities in the fuel are the primary causes of copper corrosion, through formation of Cu2S; sulfur levels as low as 1 ppm can result in sufficiently severe copper corrosion to degrade cooling channel performance. This corrosion can be completely eliminated, however, through the incorporation of an electrodeposited gold coating on the copper cooling-channel walls.

  14. Diazido alkanes and diazido alkanols as combustion modifiers for liquid hydrocarbon ramjet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.S.; Moriarty, R.M.; Law, C.K.

    1988-05-03

    A liquid hydrocarbon ramjet fuel is described comprising from more than zero to 100 weight percent of a diazido alkanol of the general formula N/sub 3/CH/sub 2/(CH/sub 2/)/sub chi/CHOH(CH/sub 2/)/sub y/CH/sub 2/N/sub 3/ wherein chi is an integer of from 0 to 9, y is an integer of from 0 to 19, chi+y is an integer of from 0 to 19, and chiless than or equal toy, and the balance being a conventional jet fuel.

  15. Formation of oxides of nitrogen in monodisperse spray combustion of hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nizami, A. A.; Singh, S.; Cernansky, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results of exit plane NO/NO(x) emissions from atmospheric monodisperse fuel spray combustion are presented. Six different hydrocarbon fuels were studied: isopropanol, n-propanol, n-octane, iso-octane, n-heptane and methanol. The results indicate an optimum droplet size for minimizing NO/NO(x) production for all of the test fuels. At the optimum droplet diameter, reductions in NO/NO(x) relative to the NO(x) occurred at droplet diameters of 55 and 48 microns respectively, as compared to a 50-micron droplet size for isopropanol. The occurrence of the minimum NO(x) point at different droplet diameters for the different fuels appears to be governed by the extent of prevaporization of the fuel in the spray, and is consistent with theoretical calculations based on each fuel's physical properties. Estimates are also given for the behavior of heavy fuels and of polydisperse fuel sprays in shifting the minimum NO(x) point compared to a monodisperse situation.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exhaust emissions from different reformulated diesel fuels and engine operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás, Esther; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A.; Vázquez, Monica; Zielinska, Barbara

    2009-12-01

    The study of light-duty diesel engine exhaust emissions is important due to their impact on atmospheric chemistry and air pollution. In this study, both the gas and the particulate phase of fuel exhaust were analyzed to investigate the effects of diesel reformulation and engine operating parameters. The research was focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds on particulate phase due to their high toxicity. These were analyzed using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methodology. Although PAH profiles changed for diesel fuels with low-sulfur content and different percentages of aromatic hydrocarbons (5-25%), no significant differences for total PAH concentrations were detected. However, rape oil methyl ester biodiesel showed a greater number of PAH compounds, but in lower concentrations (close to 50%) than the reformulated diesel fuels. In addition, four engine operating conditions were evaluated, and the results showed that, during cold start, higher concentrations were observed for high molecular weight PAHs than during idling cycle and that the acceleration cycles provided higher concentrations than the steady-state conditions. Correlations between particulate PAHs and gas phase products were also observed. The emission of PAH compounds from the incomplete combustion of diesel fuel depended greatly on the source of the fuel and the driving patterns.

  17. Shock Tunnel Studies of Scramjet Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalker, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Work focussed on a large number of preliminary studies of supersonic combustion in a simple combustion duct - thrust nozzle combination, investigating effects of Mach number, equivalence ratio, combustor divergence, fuel injecting angle and other parameters with an influence on the combustion process. This phase lasted for some three or four years, during which strongest emphasis was placed on responding to the request for preliminary experimental information on high enthalpy effects, to support the technology maturation activities of the NASP program. As the need for preliminary data became less urgent, it was possible to conduct more systematic studies of high enthalpy combustion phenomena, and to initiate other projects aimed at improving the facilities and instrumentation used for studying scramjet phenomena at high enthalpies. The combustion studies were particularly directed towards hypersonic combustion, and to the effects of injecting fuel along the combustion chamber wall. A substantial effort was directed towards a study of the effect of scale on the supersonic combustion process. The influence of wave phenomena (both compression waves and expansion waves) on the realization of thrust from a supersonic combustion process was also investigated. The effect of chemical kinetics was looked into, particularly as it affected the composition of the test flow provided by a ground facility. The effect of injection of the fuel through wall orifices was compared with injection from a strut spanning the stream, and the effect of heating the fuel prior to injection was investigated. Studies of fuel-air mixing by shock impingement were also done, as well as mass spectrometer surveys of a combustion wake. The use of hypersonic nozzles with an expansion tube was investigated. A new method was developed for measuring the forces acting of a model in less than one millisecond. Also included in this report are listings of published journal papers and conference presentations.

  18. Horizontal arrangement of anodes of microbial fuel cells enhances remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yueyong; Wang, Xin; Li, Xiaojing; Cheng, Lijuan; Wan, Lili; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-02-01

    With the aim of in situ bioremediation of soil contaminated by hydrocarbons, anodes arranged with two different ways (horizontal or vertical) were compared in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Charge outputs as high as 833 and 762C were achieved in reactors with anodes horizontally arranged (HA) and vertically arranged (VA). Up to 12.5 % of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was removed in HA after 135 days, which was 50.6 % higher than that in VA (8.3 %) and 95.3 % higher than that in the disconnected control (6.4 %). Hydrocarbon fingerprint analysis showed that the degradation rates of both alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in HA were higher than those in VA. Lower mass transport resistance in the HA than that of the VA seems to result in more power and more TPH degradation. Soil pH was increased from 8.26 to 9.12 in HA and from 8.26 to 8.64 in VA, whereas the conductivity was decreased from 1.99 to 1.54 mS/cm in HA and from 1.99 to 1.46 mS/cm in VA accompanied with the removal of TPH. Considering both enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon and generation of charge in HA, the MFC with anodes horizontally arranged is a promising configuration for future applications.

  19. Further shock tunnel studies of scramjet phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Paull, A.; Morris, N. A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Scramjet phenomena were studied using the shock tunnel T3 at the Australian National University. Simple two dimensional models were used with a combination of wall and central injectors. Silane as an additive to hydrogen fuel was studied over a range of temperatures and pressures to evaluate its effect as an ignition aid. The film cooling effect of surface injected hydrogen was measured over a wide range of equivalence. Heat transfer measurements without injection were repeated to confirm previous indications of heating rates lower than simple flat plate predictions for laminar boundary layers in equilibrium flow. The previous results were reproduced and the discrepancies are discussed in terms of the model geometry and departures of the flow from equilibrium. In the thrust producing mode, attempts were made to increase specific impulse with wall injection. Some preliminary tests were also performed on shock induced ignition, to investigate the possibility in flight of injecting fuel upstream of the combustion chamber, where it could mix but not burn.

  20. Hydrocarbon fuel effects in solid-oxide fuel cell operation: an experimental and modeling study of n-hexane pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Katie L; Dean, Anthony M

    2007-08-21

    Pyrolysis experiments of n-hexane were performed and the product distribution and fuel consumption were measured as a function of temperature. The experimental temperatures ranged from 550-675 degrees C, with a pressure of approximately 1 atm, and residence times of approximately 5 s. N-Hexane was used as a model compound to represent the linear alkanes that might be found in practical hydrocarbon fuels. Under these conditions, high fuel conversion was observed at the higher temperatures and a wide range of products were formed. The experimental observations were compared to predictions from a plug-flow model using a reaction mechanism consisting of 205 species and 1403 reactions. The hydrogen abstraction and isomerization rate coefficients in this model were based on CBS-QB3 calculations. The only model modification was adjustment of the A-factor of the initiation rates to match conversion at one temperature. This model was able to successfully predict the observed trends in both product selectivities as well as fuel conversion over the temperature range. The mechanism was also used to capture the trends previously observed in n-butane pyrolysis under similar experimental conditions. Significant differences in the sensitivity coefficients for the hexane and butane systems are discussed in terms of the competition between beta-scission and isomerization of the initial radicals formed. The kinetic model predicts that n-hexane will be completely converted within 0.1 s in the higher temperature environment ( approximately 800 degrees C) of the anode channel of a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This result clearly illustrates the need to explicitly account for gas-phase reactions in SOFC models for those cases where hydrocarbons, especially those larger than methane, are fed directly to an SOFC.

  1. Laser-induced breakdown emission in hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Carter, Campbell; Do, Hyungrok

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved emission measurements of laser-induced breakdown plasmas have been carried out to investigate the effect that gas species might have on the kinetics, particularly in excited states, and the resulting plasma properties. For this purpose, fuel-oxygen (O2)-carbon dioxide (CO2) mixtures with either helium (He) or nitrogen (N2) balance are prepared while maintaining their atomic compositions. The fuels tested in this study are methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10). The breakdown is produced in the mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/He, C2H4/O2/He, C3H8/CO2/O2/He and C4H10/CO2/O2/He or CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) at room conditions using the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (with pulse duration of 10 ns). The temporal evolution of plasma temperature is deduced from the ratio of two oxygen lines (777 nm and 823 nm) through Boltzmann analysis, while the evolution of electron number density is estimated based on Stark broadening of the Balmer-alpha (H α ) line at 656 nm and the measured plasma temperature. From the results, the temporal evolution of emission spectra and decay rates of atomic line-intensities are found to be almost identical between the breakdown plasma in the different mixtures given balancing gases. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of plasma temperature and electron number density are also found to be independent of the species compositions. Therefore, this behavior—of the breakdown emissions and plasma properties in the different mixtures with identical atomic composition—may be because the breakdown gases reach similar thermodynamic and physiochemical states immediately after the breakdown.

  2. Method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide within a reformer 10 is disclosed. According to the method, a stream including an oxygen-containing gas is directed adjacent to a first vessel 18 and the oxygen-containing gas is heated. A stream including unburned fuel is introduced into the oxygen-containing gas stream to form a mixture including oxygen-containing gas and fuel. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and unburned fuel is directed tangentially into a partial oxidation reaction zone 24 within the first vessel 18. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and fuel is further directed through the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 to produce a heated reformate stream including hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide. Steam may also be mixed with the oxygen-containing gas and fuel, and the reformate stream from the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 directed into a steam reforming zone 26. High- and low-temperature shift reaction zones 64,76 may be employed for further fuel processing.

  3. Physical and chemical comparison of soot in hydrocarbon and biodiesel fuel diffusion flames: A study of model and commercial fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matti Maricq, M.

    2011-01-15

    Data are presented to compare soot formation in both surrogate and practical fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel and petroleum fuel diffusion flames. The approach here uses differential mobility analysis to follow the size distributions and electrical charge of soot particles as they evolve in the flame, and laser ablation particle mass spectrometry to elucidate their composition. Qualitatively, these soot properties exhibit a remarkably similar development along the flames. The size distributions begin as a single mode of precursor nanoparticles, evolve through a bimodal phase marking the onset of aggregate formation, and end in a self preserving mode of fractal-like particles. Both biodiesel and hydrocarbon fuels yield a common soot composition dominated by C{sub x}H{sub y}{sup +} ions, stabilomer PAHs, and fullerenes in the positive ion mass spectrum, and C{sub x}{sup -} and C{sub 2x}H{sup -} in the negative ion spectrum. These ion intensities initially grow with height in the diffusion flames, but then decline during later stages, consistent with soot carbonization. There are important quantitative differences between fuels. The surrogate biodiesel fuel methyl butanoate substantially reduces soot levels, but soot formation and evolution in this flame are delayed relative to both soy and petroleum fuels. In contrast, soots from soy and hexadecane flames exhibit nearly quantitative agreement in their size distribution and composition profiles with height, suggesting similar soot precursor chemistry. (author)

  4. Effects Of Electric Field On Hydrocarbon-Fueled Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Z.-G.; Hegde, U.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed that flames are susceptible to electric fields that are much weaker than the breakdown field strength of the flame gases. When an external electric field is imposed on a flame, the ions generated in the flame reaction zone drift in the direction of the electric forces exerted on them. The moving ions collide with the neutral species and change the velocity distribution in the affected region. This is often referred to as ionic wind effect. In addition, the removal of ions from the flame reaction zone can alter the chemical reaction pathway of the flame. On the other hand, the presence of space charges carried by moving ions affects the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame often changes its shape, location and color once an external electric field is applied. The interplay between the flame movement and the change of electric field makes it difficult to determine the flame location for a given configuration of electrodes and fuel source. In normal gravity, the buoyancy-induced flow often complicates the problem and hinders detailed study of the interaction between the flame and the electric field. In this work, the microgravity environment established at the 2.2 Second Drop Tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center is utilized to effectively remove the buoyant acceleration. The interaction between the flame and the electric field is studied in a one-dimensional domain. A specially designed electrode makes flame current measurements possible; thus, the mobility of ions, ion density, and ionic wind effect can be evaluated.

  5. Scramjet Isolator Modeling and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Engineering and Management AFIT/DS/ENY/11-19 Abstract The scramjet isolator is a duct in which pressure increases from the inlet to the combustor via a shock... combustor , and the exhaust nozzle which can be seen in Figure 1.1. In the inlet, the flow is initially slowed across a series of shocks prior to...entering the isolator. The isolator allows the flow pressure to increase to that of the combustor . This pressure increase is accomplished across a series of

  6. Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer

    DOEpatents

    Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Hager, Charles A.

    1998-01-01

    An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier.

  7. Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer

    DOEpatents

    Dederer, J.T.; Hager, C.A.

    1998-03-31

    An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier. 10 figs.

  8. Techno-Economic Basis for Coproduct Manufacturing To Enable Hydrocarbon Fuel Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Humbird, David; Tao, Ling; Dowe, Nancy; Guarnieri, Michael T.; Linger, Jeffrey G.; Karp, Eric M.; Salvachua, Davinia; Vardon, Derek R.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-06-06

    Biorefinery process development relies on techno-economic analysis (TEA) to identify primary cost drivers, prioritize research directions, and mitigate technical risk for scale-up through development of detailed process designs. Here, we conduct TEA of a model 2000 dry metric ton-per-day lignocellulosic biorefinery that employs a two-step pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis to produce biomass-derived sugars, followed by biological lipid production, lipid recovery, and catalytic hydrotreating to produce renewable diesel blendstock (RDB). On the basis of projected near-term technical feasibility of these steps, we predict that RDB could be produced at a minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) of USD $9.55/gasoline-gallon-equivalent (GGE), predicated on the need for improvements in the lipid productivity and yield beyond current benchmark performance. This cost is significant given the limitations in scale and high costs for aerobic cultivation of oleaginous microbes and subsequent lipid extraction/recovery. In light of this predicted cost, we developed an alternative pathway which demonstrates that RDB costs could be substantially reduced in the near term if upgradeable fractions of biomass, in this case hemicellulose-derived sugars, are diverted to coproducts of sufficient value and market size; here, we use succinic acid as an example coproduct. The coproduction model predicts an MFSP of USD $5.28/GGE when leaving conversion and yield parameters unchanged for the fuel production pathway, leading to a change in biorefinery RDB capacity from 24 to 15 MM GGE/year and 0.13 MM tons of succinic acid per year. Additional analysis demonstrates that beyond the near-term projections assumed in the models here, further reductions in the MFSP toward $2-3/GGE (which would be competitive with fossil-based hydrocarbon fuels) are possible with additional transformational improvements in the fuel and coproduct trains, especially in terms of carbon efficiency to both fuels and

  9. A novel layered perovskite as symmetric electrode for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ling; Chen, Kongfa; Liu, Yuanxu; He, Beibei

    2017-02-01

    Layered perovskite oxides are well known to possess significant electronic, magnetic and electrochemical properties. Herein, we highlight a novel layered perovskite PrBaMn1.5Fe0.5O5+δ (PBMFO) as electrodes of symmetrical solid oxide fuel cells (SSOFCs). The layered PBMFO shows high electrical conductivity of 112.5 and 7.4 S cm-1 at 800 °C in air and 5% H2/Ar, respectively. The single cell with PBMFO symmetric electrodes achieves peak power density of 0.54 W cm-2 at 800 °C using humidified hydrogen as fuel. Moreover, PBMFO electrodes demonstrate good redox stability and high coking tolerance against hydrocarbon fuel.

  10. Infrared measurements of a scramjet exhaust. [to determine combustion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. A.; Slack, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Diagnostic 2 - 5 mm infrared spectra of a hydrogen burning scramjet exhaust were measured with an interferometer spectrometer. Exhaust gas temperatures and water vapor partial pressures were determined from the observed intensity and spectral profile of the H2O 2.7 mm infrared emission band. Overall engine combustion efficiencies were derived by combining these measurements with the known engine operating conditions. Efficiencies fall (70 - 50 percent) as fuel equivalence ratios rise (0.4 - 1.0). Data analysis techniques and sensitivity studies are also presented.

  11. Bioelectrochemical stimulation of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in saline soil using U-tube microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Cai, Zhang; Zhou, Qixing; Zhang, Zhineng; Chen, Cuihong

    2012-02-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach to decontaminate soils polluted by petroleum hydrocarbons. However, this technique usually requires a long time due to the slow degradation rate by bacteria. By applying U-tube microbial fuel cells (MFCs) designed here, the degradation rate of petroleum hydrocarbons close to the anode (<1 cm) was enhanced by 120% from 6.9 ± 2.5% to 15.2 ± 0.6% with simultaneous 125 ± 7 C of charge output (0.85 ± 0.05 mW/m(2) , 1 kΩ) in the tested period (25 days). Hydrocarbon fingerprint analysis showed that the degradation rate of both alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was accelerated. The decrease of initial water content from 33% to 28% and 23% resulted in a decrease on charge output and hydrocarbon degradation rate, which could be attributed to the increase of internal resistance. A salt accumulation was observed in each reactor due to the evaporation of water from the air-cathode, possibly inhibited the activity of exoelectrogenic bacteria (EB) and resulted in the elimination of the current at the end of the tested period. The number of hydrocarbon degradation bacteria (HDB) in soil close to the anode increased by nearly two orders of magnitude in the MFC assisted system (373 ± 56 × 10(3)  CFU/g-soil) than that in the disconnected control (8 ± 2 × 10(3)  CFU/g-soil), providing a solid evidence for in situ biostimulation of HDB growth by colonization of EB in the same system.

  12. Self-potential and Complex Conductivity Monitoring of In Situ Hydrocarbon Remediation in Microbial Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Revil, A.; Ren, Z.; Karaoulis, M.; Mendonca, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater in both non-aqueous phase liquid and dissolved forms generated from spills and leaks is a wide spread environmental issue. Traditional cleanup of hydrocarbon contamination in soils and ground water using physical, chemical, and biological remedial techniques is often expensive and ineffective. Recent studies show that the microbial fuel cell (MFC) can simultaneously enhance biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil and groundwater and yield electricity. Non-invasive geophysical techniques such as self-potential (SP) and complex conductivity (induced polarization) have shown the potential to detect and characterize the nature of electron transport mechanism of in situ bioremediation of organic contamination plumes. In this study, we deployed both SP and complex conductivity in lab scale MFCs to monitor time-laps geophysical response of degradation of hydrocarbons by MFC. Two different sizes of MFC reactors were used in this study (DI=15 cm cylinder reactor and 94.5cm x 43.5 cm rectangle reactor), and the initial hydrocarbon concentration is 15 g diesel/kg soil. SP and complex conductivity measurements were measured using non-polarizing Ag/AgCl electrodes. Sensitivity study was also performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to test different electrode configurations. The SP measurements showed stronger anomalies adjacent to the MFC than locations afar, and both real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity are greater in areas close to MFC than areas further away and control samples without MFC. The joint use of SP and complex conductivity could in situ evaluate the dynamic changes of electrochemical parameters during this bioremediation process at spatiotemporal scales unachievable with traditional sampling methods. The joint inversion of these two methods to evaluate the efficiency of MFC enhanced hydrocarbon remediation in the subsurface.

  13. Plasma-Enhanced Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Fuel Blends Using Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelli, Mark; Mungal, M Godfrey

    2014-10-28

    This project had as its goals the study of fundamental physical and chemical processes relevant to the sustained premixed and non-premixed jet ignition/combustion of low grade fuels or fuels under adverse flow conditions using non-equilibrium pulsed nanosecond discharges.

  14. Assessing fuel spill risks in polar waters: Temporal dynamics and behaviour of hydrocarbons from Antarctic diesel, marine gas oil and residual fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathryn E; King, Catherine K; Kotzakoulakis, Konstantinos; George, Simon C; Harrison, Peter L

    2016-09-15

    As part of risk assessment of fuel oil spills in Antarctic and subantarctic waters, this study describes partitioning of hydrocarbons from three fuels (Special Antarctic Blend diesel, SAB; marine gas oil, MGO; and intermediate grade fuel oil, IFO 180) into seawater at 0 and 5°C and subsequent depletion over 7days. Initial total hydrocarbon content (THC) of water accommodated fraction (WAF) in seawater was highest for SAB. Rates of THC loss and proportions in equivalent carbon number fractions differed between fuels and over time. THC was most persistent in IFO 180 WAFs and most rapidly depleted in MGO WAF, with depletion for SAB WAF strongly affected by temperature. Concentration and composition remained proportionate in dilution series over time. This study significantly enhances our understanding of fuel behaviour in Antarctic and subantarctic waters, enabling improved predictions for estimates of sensitivities of marine organisms to toxic contaminants from fuels in the region.

  15. Emission characteristics for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from solid fuels burned in domestic stoves in rural China

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, Guofeng; TAO, Shu; Chen, Yuanchen; Zhang, Yanyan; Wei, Siye; Xue, Miao; Wang, Bin; WANG, Rong; LV, Yan; LI, Wei; SHEN, Huizhong; HUANG, Ye; CHEN, Han

    2014-01-01

    Emission characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from residential combustion of crop residues, woody material, coal, and biomass pellets in domestic stoves in rural China are compared in term of emission factors (EFs), influencing factors, composition profiles, isomer ratios and phase distributions. The EFs of PAHs vary by two orders of magnitude among fuel types suggesting that a detailed fuel categorization is useful in the development of an emission inventory and potential in emission abatement of PAHs by replacing dirty fuels with relatively cleaner ones. The influence of fuel moisture in biomass burning is non-linear. Biofuels with very low moisture display relatively high emissions as do fuels with very high moisture. Bituminous coals and brushwood yield relatively large fractions of high molecular PAHs. The emission factor of Benzo(a)pyrene equivalent quantity for raw bituminous coal is as high as 52 mg/kg, which is 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than the other fuels. For source diagnosis, high molecular weight isomers are more informative than low molecular weight ones and multiple ratios could be used together whenever possible. PMID:24245776

  16. Waste polypropylene plastic conversion into liquid hydrocarbon fuel for producing electricity and energies.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Rashid, Mohammad Mamunor; Molla, Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Thermal degradation of polypropylene (PP) waste plastic is batched process studied for the purpose of converting waste PP into liquid hydrocarbon fuel and useful chemicals. The stainless steel reactor is used for conversion to fuel; this reactor chamber has a diameter of 6 inches, height of 18 inches and a temperature input capacity of 500 degrees C. The temperature of 150-370 degrees C was used for PP conversion into fuel. We have also used 1 kg PP waste plastic for conversion into fuel and HZSM-5 catalyst of 5% by preference was used by total weight of sample. Yield percentages obtained from PP to fuel are 92%, 2% light gas and 6% residue. Experimental finish time was 5.25 hours. By gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry instrumental analysis, the PP to fuel carbon range is found to be C3-C25,and the low sulfur level is detected by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) test method to be <1.0 ppm.

  17. Emission characteristics for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from solid fuels burned in domestic stoves in rural China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guofeng; Tao, Shu; Chen, Yuanchen; Zhang, Yanyan; Wei, Siye; Xue, Miao; Wang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Lu, Yan; Li, Wei; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han

    2013-12-17

    Emission characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from residential combustion of crop residues, woody material, coal, and biomass pellets in domestic stoves in rural China are compared in term of emission factors (EFs), influencing factors, composition profiles, isomer ratios and phase distributions. The EFs of PAHs vary by 2 orders of magnitude among fuel types suggesting that a detailed fuel categorization is useful in the development of an emission inventory and potential in emission abatement of PAHs by replacing dirty fuels with relatively cleaner ones. The influence of fuel moisture in biomass burning is nonlinear. Biofuels with very low moisture display relatively high emissions as do fuels with very high moisture. Bituminous coals and brushwood yield relatively large fractions of high molecular PAHs. The emission factor of benzo(a)pyrene equivalent quantity for raw bituminous coal is as high as 52 mg/kg, which is 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the other fuels. For source diagnosis, high molecular weight isomers are more informative than low molecular weight ones and multiple ratios could be used together whenever possible.

  18. Design of "model-friendly" turbulent non-premixed jet burners for C2+ hydrocarbon fuels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayao; Shaddix, Christopher R; Schefer, Robert W

    2011-07-01

    Experimental measurements in laboratory-scale turbulent burners with well-controlled boundary and flow configurations can provide valuable data for validating models of turbulence-chemistry interactions applicable to the design and analysis of practical combustors. This paper reports on the design of two canonical nonpremixed turbulent jet burners for use with undiluted gaseous and liquid hydrocarbon fuels, respectively. Previous burners of this type have only been developed for fuels composed of H(2), CO, and/or methane, often with substantial dilution. While both new burners are composed of concentric tubes with annular pilot flames, the liquid-fuel burner has an additional fuel vaporization step and an electrically heated fuel vapor delivery system. The performance of these burners is demonstrated by interrogating four ethylene flames and one flame fueled by a simple JP-8 surrogate. Through visual observation, it is found that the visible flame lengths show good agreement with standard empirical correlations. Rayleigh line imaging demonstrates that the pilot flame provides a spatially homogeneous flow of hot products along the edge of the fuel jet. Planar imaging of OH laser-induced fluorescence reveals a lack of local flame extinction in the high-strain near-burner region for fuel jet Reynolds numbers (Re) less than 20,000, and increasingly common extinction events for higher jet velocities. Planar imaging of soot laser-induced incandescence shows that the soot layers in these flames are relatively thin and are entrained into vortical flow structures in fuel-rich regions inside of the flame sheet.

  19. Scramjet Tests in a Shock Tunnel at Flight Mach 7, 10, and 15 Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. C.; Shih, A. T.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Foelsche, R. O.

    2001-01-01

    Tests of the Hyper-X scramjet engine flowpath have been conducted in the HYPULSE shock tunnel at conditions duplicating the stagnation enthalpy at flight Mach 7, 10, and 15. For the tests at Mach 7 and 10 HYPULSE was operated as a reflected-shock tunnel; at the Mach 15 condition, HYPULSE was operated as a shock-expansion tunnel. The test conditions matched the stagnation enthalpy of a scramjet engine on an aerospace vehicle accelerating through the atmosphere along a 1000 psf dynamic pressure trajectory. Test parameter variation included fuel equivalence ratios from lean (0.8) to rich (1.5+); fuel composition from pure hydrogen to mixtures of 2% and 5% silane in hydrogen by volume; and inflow pressure and Mach number made by changing the scramjet model mounting angle in the HYPULSE test chamber. Data sources were wall pressures and heat flux distributions and schlieren and fuel plume imaging in the combustor/nozzle sections. Data are presented for calibration of the facility nozzles and the scramjet engine model. Comparisons of pressure distributions and flowpath streamtube performance estimates are made for the three Mach numbers tested.

  20. Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for the production of hydrocarbon fuels with high selectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghong; Cheng, Kang; Kang, Jincan; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Ye

    2014-05-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a key reaction in the utilization of non-petroleum carbon resources, such as methane (natural gas, shale gas, and biogas), coal, and biomass, for the sustainable production of clean liquid fuels from synthesis gas. Selectivity control is one of the biggest challenges in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This Minireview focuses on the development of new catalysts with controllable product selectivities. Recent attempts to increase the selectivity to C5+ hydrocarbons by preparing catalysts with well-defined active phases or with new supports or by optimizing the interaction between the promoter and the active phase are briefly highlighted. Advances in developing bifunctional catalysts capable of catalyzing both CO hydrogenation to heavier hydrocarbons and hydrocracking/isomerization of heavier hydrocarbons are critically reviewed. It is demonstrated that the control of the secondary hydrocracking reactions by using core-shell nanostructures or solid-acid materials, such as mesoporous zeolites and carbon nanotubes with acid functional groups, is an effective strategy to tune the product selectivity of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Very promising selectivities to gasoline- and diesel-range hydrocarbons have been attained over some bifunctional catalysts.

  1. Scramjet isolator modeling and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutzel, John Robert

    The scramjet isolator is a duct in which pressure increases from the inlet to the combustor via a shock train. The shock train leading edge (LE) location must be controlled in an operational scramjet. A LE location measurement algorithm, dynamic model, and control algorithm were developed and validated with 500 frame per second (FPS) shadowgraph images in this research. The test apparatus consisted of a direct connect cold-flow high-speed wind tunnel with an adjustable ramp mounted in the tunnel floor. Ramp adjustments changed the tunnel cross-sectional area which changed the tunnel back pressure and LE location. Wall-mounted pressure transducers and a high-speed camera were used for data collection. The LE location measurement algorithm is the first with results validated using 500 FPS shadowgraph images to measure the LE location with root mean square (RMS) errors less than 20% of a duct height, D, although the transducers were separated by 50% of D. The developed and validated dynamic model is the first with error RMS values less than 24% of D. Finally, the first control algorithm capable of controlling the LE location within 50% of D was developed and validated.

  2. Hydrochemical and Isotopic Evidence of Natural Attenuation at the Gas Station Contaminated with Fuel Hydrocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, K.; Oh, I.; Suk, H.; Lee, K.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater flow, hydrochemistry and the carbon isotope composition (d13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were measured to know the effect of natural attenuation which is induced by biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon at the abandoned gas station contaminated fuel hydrocarbons. The aquifer sediment consists of 4 to 5 m of unconsolidated and weathered soils overlying granite. The monitoring results of water level showed the immediate response of that to rainfall. This implies that the site is an unconfined aquifer or is located at the near of groundwater recharge area. The contaminant transport modeling using GMS showed that the contaminants, BTEX, transported to two main directions, south and southwest from UST and pipeline. These results were proved by the filed observation of the BTEX from the groundwater seepage at the streams of south and southwest area. The geochemical indicator of natural attenuation, red iron precipitate, was also observed at the groundwater seepage. The hydrochemical indicators, Fe(II), Mn(II), sufides, and methane, of terminal electron accepting processes represented the sulfate reducing and methanogenesis environment of the site. d13C values of DIC ranged from -20.2 to -9.3 permil and increased in the source zone by the microbial degradation of hydrocarbon under methanogenic condition. The enrichment of isotopically heavy C is caused by the production of light 12CH4 from microbial respiration. The molar ratio of Ca to HCO3 is about 2.5 and this indicates the contribution of microbial oxidation of fuel hydrocarbon to DIC in groundwater. The geochemical modeling using PHREEQC showed the oversaturation of siderite, rhodocrosite and goethite and the saturation index of calcite increased as the increase of bicarbonate, indicating the enhanced microbial degradation. From the research results, the mineralogical, hydrological and microbiological factors can exert influence on groundwater chemistry and d13C of DIC.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from the combustion of alternative fuels in a gas turbine engine.

    PubMed

    Christie, Simon; Raper, David; Lee, David S; Williams, Paul I; Rye, Lucas; Blakey, Simon; Wilson, Chris W; Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald; Whitefield, Philip D

    2012-06-05

    We report on the particulate-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the exhaust of a test-bed gas turbine engine when powered by Jet A-1 aviation fuel and a number of alternative fuels: Sasol fully synthetic jet fuel (FSJF), Shell gas-to-liquid (GTL) kerosene, and Jet A-1/GTL 50:50 blended kerosene. The concentration of PAH compounds in the exhaust emissions vary greatly between fuels. Combustion of FSJF produces the greatest total concentration of PAH compounds while combustion of GTL produces the least. However, when PAHs in the exhaust sample are measured in terms of the regulatory marker compound benzo[a]pyrene, then all of the alternative fuels emit a lower concentration of PAH in comparison to Jet A-1. Emissions from the combustion of Jet A-1/GTL blended kerosene were found to have a disproportionately low concentration of PAHs and appear to inherit a greater proportion of the GTL emission characteristics than would be expected from volume fraction alone. The data imply the presence of a nonlinear relation between fuel blend composition and the emission of PAH compounds. For each of the fuels, the speciation of PAH compounds present in the exhaust emissions were found to be remarkably similar (R(2) = 0.94-0.62), and the results do provide evidence to support the premise that PAH speciation is to some extent indicative of the emission source. In contrast, no correlation was found between the PAH species present in the fuel with those subsequently emitted in the exhaust. The results strongly suggests that local air quality measured in terms of the particulate-bound PAH burden could be significantly improved by the use of GTL kerosene either blended with or in place of Jet A-1 kerosene.

  4. A Materials Compatibility and Thermal Stability Analysis of Common Hydrocarbon Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. L.; Stiegemeier, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    A materials compatibility and thermal stability investigation was conducted using five common liquid hydrocarbon fuels and two structural materials. The tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center Heated Tube Facility under environmental conditions similar to those encountered in regeneratively cooled rocket engines. Scanning-electron microscopic analysis in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was utilized to characterize the condition of the tube inner wall surface and any carbon deposition or corrosion that was formed during selected runs. Results show that the carbon deposition process in stainless steel tubes was relatively insensitive to fuel type or test condition. The deposition rates were comparable for all fuels and none of the stainless steel test pieces showed any signs of corrosion. For tests conducted with copper tubing, the sulfur content of the fuel had a significant impact on both the condition of the tube wall and carbon deposition rates. Carbon deposition rates for the lowest sulfur fuels (2 ppm) were slightly higher than those recorded in the stainless steel tubes with no corrosion observed on the inner wall surface. For slightly higher sulfur content (25 ppm) fuels, nodules that intruded into the flow area were observed to form on the inner wall surface. These nodules induced moderate tube pressure drop increases. The highest sulfur content fuels (400 ppm) produced extensive wall pitting and dendritic copper sulfide growth that was continuous along the entire tube wall surface. The result of this tube degradation was the inability to maintain flow rate due to rapidly increasing test section pressure drops. Accompanying this corrosion were carbon deposition rates an order of magnitude greater than those observed in comparable stainless steel tests. The results of this investigation indicate that trace impurities in fuels (i.e. sulfur) can significantly impact the carbon deposition process and produce unacceptable

  5. Pioneering scramjet developments by Antonio Ferri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdos, John I.; Nucci, Louis M.

    1992-01-01

    The concept is summarized of a diffusive burning supersonic combustion ramjet engine (scramjet) envisioned by Antonio Ferri and some of the salient technologies are highlighted as developed by General Applied Science Labs, PIBAL, and NYU, under his direction.

  6. Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

    2012-08-19

    The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

  7. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1986-01-01

    In previous tests of liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastropic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed here.

  8. Recycling Carbon Dioxide into Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels: Electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Christopher Ronald

    Great quantities of hydrocarbon fuels will be needed for the foreseeable future, even if electricity based energy carriers begin to partially replace liquid hydrocarbons in the transportation sector. Fossil fuels and biomass are the most common feedstocks for production of hydrocarbon fuels. However, using renewable or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. The purpose of this work was to develop critical components of a system that recycles CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The concept is examined at several scales, beginning with a broad scope analysis of large-scale sustainable energy systems and ultimately studying electrolysis of CO 2 and H2O in high temperature solid oxide cells as the heart of the energy conversion, in the form of three experimental studies. The contributions of these studies include discoveries about electrochemistry and materials that could significantly improve the overall energy use and economics of the CO2-to-fuels system. The broad scale study begins by assessing the sustainability and practicality of the various energy carriers that could replace petroleum-derived hydrocarbon fuels, including other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and storage of electricity on-board vehicles in batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels. Any energy carrier can store the energy of any energy source. This sets the context for CO2 recycling -- sustainable energy sources like solar and wind power can be used to provide the most energy-dense, convenient fuels which can be readily used in the existing infrastructure. The many ways to recycle CO2 into hydrocarbons, based on thermolysis, thermochemical loops, electrolysis, and photoelectrolysis of CO2 and/or H 2O, are critically reviewed. A process based on high temperature co

  9. Hydrocarbons and fuels analyses with the supersonic gas chromatography mass spectrometry--the novel concept of isomer abundance analysis.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Gordin, Alexander; Amirav, Aviv

    2008-06-27

    Hydrocarbon analysis with standard GC-MS is confronted by the limited range of volatile compounds amenable for analysis and by the similarity of electron ionization mass spectra for many compounds which show weak or no molecular ions for heavy hydrocarbons. The use of GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (Supersonic GC-MS) significantly extends the range of heavy hydrocarbons that can be analyzed, and provides trustworthy enhanced molecular ion to all hydrocarbons. In addition, unique isomer mass spectral features are obtained in the ionization of vibrationally cold hydrocarbons. The availability of molecular ions for all hydrocarbons results in the ability to obtain unique chromatographic isomer distribution patterns that can serve as a new method for fuel characterization and identification. Examples of the applicability and use of this novel isomer abundance analysis (IAA) method to diesel fuel, kerosene and oil analyses are shown. It is suggested that in similarity to the "three ions method" for identification purposes, three isomer abundance patterns can serve for fuel characterization. The applications of the Supersonic GC-MS for engine motor oil analysis and transformer oil analysis are also demonstrated and discussed, including the capability to achieve fast 1-2s sampling without separation for oil and fuel fingerprinting. The relatively fast analysis of biodiesel is described, demonstrating the provision of molecular ions to heavy triglycerides. Isomer abundance analysis with the Supersonic GC-MS could find broad range of applications including petrochemicals and fuel analysis, arson analysis, environmental oil/fuel spill analysis, fuel adulteration analysis and motor oil analysis.

  10. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in diesel exhaust particulate matter and diesel fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Obuchi, A; Aoyama, H; Ohi, A; Ohuchi, H

    1984-11-16

    Clean-up procedures were developed for a method for determining the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in diesel exhaust particulate matter and in diesel fuel oils using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). They were based mainly on the elimination of insoluble matter and aliphatic compounds that affect the performance of HPLC, from the dichloromethane extracts of particulate matter or from oils, with the aid of a disposable preparation column containing reversed-phase packings (Sep-Pak C18). Using these procedures, it is possible to detect 1 ng of benzo(a)pyrene in 30 mg of particulate matter with more than a 97% recovery or 0.5 ng in 50 microliters of oil with 91% recovery. Examples of analyses are given for particulate matter emitted from a diesel test engine and for diesel fuel oils, such as gas oil, residual oil and coal-liquefied oil.

  11. Hydrocarbon-based polymer electrolyte cerium composite membranes for improved proton exchange membrane fuel cell durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyejin; Han, Myungseong; Choi, Young-Woo; Bae, Byungchan

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbon-based cerium composite membranes were prepared for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications to increase oxidative stability. Different amounts of cerium ions were impregnated in sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (SPES) membranes and their physicochemical properties were investigated according to the cerium content. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma analyses confirmed the presence of cerium ions in the composite membranes and 1H NMR indicated the successful coordination of sulfonic acid groups with the metal ions. Increasing amounts of cerium ions resulted in decreases in the proton conductivity and water uptake, but enhanced oxidative stability. The oxidative stability of the composite membranes was proven via a hydrogen peroxide exposure experiment which mimicked fuel cell operating conditions. In addition, more than 2200 h was achieved with the composite membrane under in situ accelerated open circuit voltage (OCV) durability testing (DOE protocol), whereas the corresponding pristine SPES membrane attained only 670 h.

  12. Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate by plasma flame made of microwave plasma and burning hydrocarbon fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S. C.; Uhm, H. S.; Hong, Y. C.; Park, Y. G.; Park, J. S.

    2008-06-01

    Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) in liquid phase was studied by making use of a microwave plasma burner, exhibiting a safe removal capability of stockpiled chemical weapons. The microwave plasma burner consisted of a fuel injector and a plasma flame exit connected in series to a microwave plasma torch. The burner flames were sustained by injecting hydrocarbon fuels into the microwave plasma torch in air discharge. The Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated near perfect elimination of DMMP in the microwave plasma burner. This was confirmed by gas chromatography spectra as supporting data, revealing the disappearance of even intermediary compounds in the process of DMMP destruction. The experimental results and the physical configuration of the microwave plasma burner may provide an effective means of on-site removal of chemical warfare agents found on a battlefield.

  13. Heat Transfer and Thermal Stability Research for Advanced Hydrocarbon Fuel Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Stiegemeier, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    In recent years there has been increased interest in the development of a new generation of high performance boost rocket engines. These efforts, which will represent a substantial advancement in boost engine technology over that developed for the Space Shuttle Main Engines in the early 1970s, are being pursued both at NASA and the United States Air Force. NASA, under its Space Launch Initiative s Next Generation Launch Technology Program, is investigating the feasibility of developing a highly reliable, long-life, liquid oxygen/kerosene (RP-1) rocket engine for launch vehicles. One of the top technical risks to any engine program employing hydrocarbon fuels is the potential for fuel thermal stability and material compatibility problems to occur under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions required for regenerative fuel cooling of the engine combustion chamber and nozzle. Decreased heat transfer due to carbon deposits forming on wetted fuel components, corrosion of materials common in engine construction (copper based alloys), and corrosion induced pressure drop increases have all been observed in laboratory tests simulating rocket engine cooling channels. To mitigate these risks, the knowledge of how these fuels behave in high temperature environments must be obtained. Currently, due to the complexity of the physical and chemical process occurring, the only way to accomplish this is empirically. Heated tube testing is a well-established method of experimentally determining the thermal stability and heat transfer characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels. The popularity of this method stems from the low cost incurred in testing when compared to hot fire engine tests, the ability to have greater control over experimental conditions, and the accessibility of the test section, facilitating easy instrumentation. These benefits make heated tube testing the best alternative to hot fire engine testing for thermal stability and heat transfer research. This investigation

  14. Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate by plasma flame made of microwave plasma and burning hydrocarbon fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S. C.; Uhm, H. S.; Hong, Y. C.; Park, Y. G.; Park, J. S.

    2008-06-15

    Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) in liquid phase was studied by making use of a microwave plasma burner, exhibiting a safe removal capability of stockpiled chemical weapons. The microwave plasma burner consisted of a fuel injector and a plasma flame exit connected in series to a microwave plasma torch. The burner flames were sustained by injecting hydrocarbon fuels into the microwave plasma torch in air discharge. The Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated near perfect elimination of DMMP in the microwave plasma burner. This was confirmed by gas chromatography spectra as supporting data, revealing the disappearance of even intermediary compounds in the process of DMMP destruction. The experimental results and the physical configuration of the microwave plasma burner may provide an effective means of on-site removal of chemical warfare agents found on a battlefield.

  15. Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

  16. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

    1998-05-19

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

  17. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Robert T.; Jackson, Kenneth J.; Duba, Alfred G.; Chen, Ching-I

    1998-01-01

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

  18. Molecular and isotopic evidence for fossil fuel aromatic hydrocarbons in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtfouse, E.; Budzinski, F.H.; Garrigues, P.

    1996-10-01

    The origin of organic molecules occurring in complex media such as soils and sediments is still an enigma. In soils, for example, the occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a major concern because these potentially toxic compounds may ultimately be transferred into food and drinking water. At present, two main hypotheses can be made for the origin of PAH in soils. PAH, or their precursors, can be synthesized by modem plants, within soil biomass and humic substance degradation. Alternatively, PAH may derive from fossil fuels and associated combustion products. In the present study, soils have been cultivated for 23 years with maize in order to label the organic matter with naturally {sup 13}C-enriched maize-derived carbon. {sup 13}C, {sup 14}C and molecular analysis of aromatic fractions from those soils show that the main part of PAH are ancient, most probably derived from fossil fuel and their combustion products.

  19. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels with an evaluation of a propane heat transfer correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, P. A.; Aukerman, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A high pressure fuel coking testing apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition limits and carbon decomposition rates in heated copper tubes for hydrocarbon fuels. A commercial propane (90% grade) and chemically pure (CP) propane were tested. Heat transfer to supercritical propane was evaluated at 136 atm, bulk fluid velocities of 6 to 30 m/s, and tube wall temperatures in the range of 422 to 811 K. A forced convection heat transfer correlation developed in a previous test effort verified a prediction of most of the experimental data within a + or - 30% range, with good agreement for the CP propane data. No significant differences were apparent in the predictions derived from the correlation when the carbon resistance was included with the film resistance. A post-test scanning electron microprobe analysis indicated occurrences of migration and interdiffusion of copper into the carbon deposit.

  20. Assessing the potential for improved scramjet performance through application of electromagnetic flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Martin Forrester

    Sustained hypersonic flight using scramjet propulsion is the key technology bridging the gap between turbojets and the exoatmospheric environment where a rocket is required. Recent efforts have focused on electromagnetic (EM) flow control to mitigate the problems of high thermomechanical loads and low propulsion efficiencies associated with scramjet propulsion. This research effort is the first flight-scale, three-dimensional computational analysis of a realistic scramjet to determine how EM flow control can improve scramjet performance. Development of a quasi-one dimensional design tool culminated in the first open source geometry of an entire scramjet flowpath. This geometry was then tested extensively with the Air Force Research Laboratory's three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and EM coupled computational code. As part of improving the model fidelity, a loosely coupled algorithm was developed to incorporate thermochemistry. This resulted in the only open-source model of fuel injection, mixing and combustion in a magnetogasdynamic (MGD) flow controlled engine. In addition, a control volume analysis tool with an electron beam ionization model was presented for the first time in the context of the established computational method used. Local EM flow control within the internal inlet greatly impacted drag forces and wall heat transfer but was only marginally successful in raising the average pressure entering the combustor. The use of an MGD accelerator to locally increase flow momentum was an effective approach to improve flow into the scramjet's isolator. Combustor-based MGD generators proved superior to the inlet generator with respect to power density and overall engine efficiency. MGD acceleration was shown to be ineffective in improving overall performance, with all of the bypass engines having approximately 33% more drag than baseline and none of them achieving a self-powered state.

  1. Emission calculations for a scramjet powered hypersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lezberg, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations of exhaust emissions from a scramjet powered hypersonic transport burning hydrogen fuel were performed over a range of Mach numbers of 5 to 12 to provide input data for wake mixing calculations and forecasts of future levels of pollutants in the stratosphere. The calculations were performed utilizing a one-dimensional chemical kinetics computer program for the combustor and exhaust nozzle of a fixed geometry dual-mode scramjet engine. Inlet conditions to the combustor and engine size was based on a vehicle of 227,000 kg (500,000 lb) gross take of weight with engines sized for Mach 8 cruise. Nitric oxide emissions were very high for stoichiometric engine operation but for Mach 6 cruise at reduced equivalence ratio are in the range predicted for an advanced supersonic transport. Combustor designs which utilize fuel staging and rapid expansion to minimize residence time at high combustion temperatures were found to be effective in preventing nitric oxide formation from reaching equilibrium concentrations.

  2. A mild, chemical conversion of cellulose to hexene and other liquid hydrocarbon fuels and additives

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A unique biomass fractionation is used to feed a novel chemical reduction process that converts carbohydrates with 100% carbon conversion into hydrocarbon fuels. Six strategic goals have been accomplished: (1) Lignin is cleanly removed in a single step, (2) The carbon chain of the sugar monomers remains intact, (3) Each reaction occurs at mild conditions and gives essentially quantitative yield, (4) Each reaction is catalytic, (5) Initial reactions occur in an aqueous medium, which (6) allows the use of wet feedstocks. Catalytic recycling of the chemical reducing agents thus provides the equivalent of an efficient biomass reduction. Conversion of cellulose (1) to hexenes (8) sequentially via sorbitol (4) and 2-iodohexane (6) typifies the process. Step 2 of the process is highly tunable and can directly produce about 80% hydrocarbon oligomers, C{sub 12}H{sub 22} (12) and C{sub 18}H{sub 32} (13). Oxygenate fuel additives such as 2-hexanol (14) are also available by further reactions of hexene.

  3. Raman Gas Species Measurements in Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Engine Injector Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph; Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Trinh, Huu P.; Dobson, Chris C.; Eskridge, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    Rocket engine propellent injector development at NASA-Marshall includes experimental analysis using optical techniques, such as Raman, fluorescence, or Mie scattering. For the application of spontaneous Raman scattering to hydrocarbon-fueled flows a technique needs to be developed to remove the interfering polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fluorescence from the relatively weak Raman signals. A current application of such a technique is to the analysis of the mixing and combustion performance of multijet, impinging-jet candidate fuel injectors for the baseline Mars ascent engine, which will burn methane and liquid oxygen produced in-situ on Mars to reduce the propellent mass transported to Mars for future manned Mars missions. The Raman technique takes advantage of the strongly polarized nature of Raman scattering. It is shown to be discernable from unpolarized fluorescence interference by subtracting one polarized image from another. Both of these polarized images are obtained from a single laser pulse by using a polarization-separating calcite rhomb mounted in the imaging spectrograph. A demonstration in a propane-air flame is presented, as well as a high pressure demonstration in the NASA-Marshall Modular Combustion Test Artice, using the liquid methane-liquid oxygen propellant system

  4. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (Phb) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Mohagheghi, Ali; Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heidi; Johnson, David K.

    2015-03-22

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. In recent years a great effort has been made in bacterial production of PHB, yet the production cost of the polymer is still much higher than conventional petrochemical plastics. The high cost of PHB is because the cost of the substrates can account for as much as half of the total product cost in large scale fermentation. Thus searching for cheaper and better substrates is very necessary for PHB production. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB by Cupriavidus necator from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified hydrolysate slurry from pretreated corn stover. Good cell growth was observed on slurry saccharified with advanced enzymes and 40~60% of PHB was accumulated in the cells. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by pretreatment and saccharification of biomass, will be discussed.

  5. REFORMING OF LIQUID HYDROCARBONS IN A NOVEL HYDROGEN-SELECTIVE MEMBRANE-BASED FUEL PROCESSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2003-06-30

    We propose to develop an inorganic metal-metal composite membrane to study reforming of liquid hydrocarbons and methanol by equilibrium shift in membrane-reactor configuration, viewed as fuel processor. Based on our current understanding and experience in the Pd-ceramic composite membrane, we propose to further develop this membrane to a Pd and Pd-Ag alloy membrane on microporous stainless steel support to provide structural reliability from distortion due to thermal cycling. Because of the metal-metal composite structure, we believe that the associated end-seal problem in the Pd-ceramic composite membrane in tubular configuration would not be an issue at all. We plan to test this membrane as membrane-reactor-separator for reforming liquid hydrocarbons and methanol for simultaneous production and separation of high-purity hydrogen for PEM fuel cell applications. To improve the robustness of the membrane film and deep penetration into the pores, we have used osmotic pressure field in the electroless plating process. Using this novel method, we deposited thin Pd-film on the inside of microporous stainless steel tube and the deposited film appears to robust and defect free. Work is in progress to evaluate the hydrogen perm-selectivity of the Pd-stainless steel membrane.

  6. Thermal-structural Design Study of an Airframe-integrated Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Design concepts for the cooled structures assembly for the Langley Scramjet engine, for engine subsystems, and for the aircraft/engine interface were developed and evaluated. Results show that the objectives for the Scramjet engine can be met. A thermal protection system was defined that makes it possible to attain a life of 100 hours and 1000 cycles, which is the specified goal. With stoichiometric combustion, the fuel provides an adequate heat sink for cooling the engine at Mach numbers up to 9 at the minimum fuel flow condition. The mechanical design is feasible for manufacture using conventional materials. For the cooled structures in a six-module engine, the mass per unit capture area is 1328 kg/sq m (259 lb/sq ft). The total mass of a six-module engine assembly including the fuel system is 1577 kg (3477 lb).

  7. Catalytic cracking of non-edible sunflower oil over ZSM-5 for hydrocarbon bio-jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianhui; Wei, Lin; Julson, James; Qiao, Qiquan; Dubey, Ashish; Anderson, Gary

    2015-03-25

    Non-edible sunflower oils that were extracted from sunflower residual wastes were catalytically cracked over a ZSM-5 catalyst in a fixed-bed reactor at three different reaction temperatures: 450°C, 500°C and 550°C. The catalyst was characterized using XRD, FT-IR, BET and SEM. Characterizations of the upgraded sunflower oils, hydrocarbon fuels, distillation residues and non-condensable gases were carried out. The effect of the reaction temperature on the yield and quality of liquid products was discussed. The results showed that the reaction temperature affected the hydrocarbon fuel yield but had a minor influence on its properties. The highest conversion efficiency from sunflower oils to hydrocarbon fuels was 30.1%, which was obtained at 550°C. The reaction temperature affected the component content of the non-condensable gases. The non-condensable gases generated at 550°C contained the highest content of light hydrocarbons (C1-C5), CO, CO2 and H2. Compared to raw sunflower oils, the properties of hydrocarbon fuels including the dynamic viscosity, pH, moisture content, density, oxygen content and heating value were improved.

  8. Hydrocarbon emission fingerprints from contemporary vehicle/engine technologies with conventional and new fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Larisse; Duane, Matthew; Manfredi, Urbano; Astorga, Covadonga; Martini, Giorgio; Carriero, Massimo; Krasenbrink, Alois; Larsen, B. R.

    2010-06-01

    The present paper presents results from the analysis of 29 individual C 2-C 9 hydrocarbons (HCs) specified in the European Commission Ozone Directive. The 29 HCs are measured in exhaust from common, contemporary vehicle/engine/fuel technologies for which very little or no data is available in the literature. The obtained HC emission fingerprints are compared with fingerprints deriving from technologies that are being phased out in Europe. Based on the total of 138 emission tests, thirteen type-specific fingerprints are extracted (Mean ± SD percentage contributions from individual HCs to the total mass of the 29 HCs), essential for receptor modelling source apportionment. The different types represent exhaust from Euro3 and Euro4 light-duty (LD) diesel and petrol-vehicles, Euro3 heavy-duty (HD) diesel exhaust, and exhaust from 2-stroke preEuro, Euro1 and Euro2 mopeds. The fuels comprise liquefied petroleum gas, petrol/ethanol blends (0-85% ethanol), and mineral diesel in various blends (0-100%) with fatty acid methyl esters, rapeseed methyl esters palm oil methyl esters, soybean oil methyl or sunflower oil methyl esters. Type-specific tracer compounds (markers) are identified for the various vehicle/engine/fuel technologies. An important finding is an insignificant effect on the HC fingerprints of varying the test driving cycle, indicating that combining HC fingerprints from different emission studies for receptor modelling purposes would be a robust approach. The obtained results are discussed in the context of atmospheric ozone formation and health implications from emissions (mg km -1 for LD and mopeds and mg kW h -1 for HD, all normalised to fuel consumption: mg dm -3 fuel) of the harmful HCs, benzene and 1,3-butadiene. Another important finding is a strong linear correlation of the regulated "total" hydrocarbon emissions (tot-HC) with the ozone formation potential of the 29 HCs (ΣPO 3 = (1.66 ± 0.04) × tot-RH; r2 = 0.93). Tot-HC is routinely monitored in

  9. Microbial activities in hydrocarbon-laden wastewaters: Impact on diesel fuel stability and the biocorrosion of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Liang, Renxing; Duncan, Kathleen E; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Davidova, Irene; Yakimov, Michail M; Suflita, Joseph M

    2017-02-21

    Anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation not only diminishes fuel quality, but also exacerbates the biocorrosion of the metallic infrastructure. While successional events in marine microbial ecosystems impacted by petroleum are well documented, far less is known about the response of communities chronically exposed to hydrocarbons. Shipboard oily wastewater was used to assess the biotransformation of different diesel fuels and their propensity to impact carbon steel corrosion. When amended with sulfate and an F76 military diesel fuel, the sulfate removal rate in the assay mixtures was elevated (26.8μM/d) relative to incubations receiving a hydroprocessed biofuel (16.1μM/d) or a fuel-unamended control (17.8μM/d). Microbial community analysis revealed the predominance of Anaerolineae and Deltaproteobacteria in F76-amended incubations, in contrast to the Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria in the original wastewater. The dominant Smithella-like sequences suggested the potential for syntrophic hydrocarbon metabolism. The general corrosion rate was relatively low (0.83 - 1.29±0.12mpy) and independent of the particular fuel, but pitting corrosion was more pronounced in F76-amended incubations. Desulfovibrionaceae constituted 50-77% of the sessile organisms on carbon steel coupons. Thus, chronically exposed microflora in oily wastewater were differentially acclimated to the syntrophic metabolism of traditional hydrocarbons but tended to resist isoalkane-laden biofuels.

  10. Impact of hydrocarbons from a diesel fuel on the germination and early growth of subantarctic plants.

    PubMed

    Macoustra, Gabriella K; King, Catherine K; Wasley, Jane; Robinson, Sharon A; Jolley, Dianne F

    2015-07-01

    Special Antarctic Blend (SAB) is a diesel fuel dominated by aliphatic hydrocarbons that is commonly used in Antarctic and subantarctic regions. The past and present use of SAB fuel at Australia's scientific research stations has resulted in multiple spills, contaminating soils in these pristine areas. Despite this, no soil quality guidelines or remediation targets have been developed for the region, primarily due to the lack of established indigenous test species and subsequent biological effects data. In this study, twelve plant species native to subantarctic regions were collected from Macquarie Island and evaluated to determine their suitably for use in laboratory-based toxicity testing, using germination success and seedling growth (shoot and root length) as endpoints. Two soil types (low and high organic carbon (OC)) were investigated to reflect the variable OC content found in soils on Macquarie Island. These soils were spiked with SAB fuel and aged for 14 days to generate a concentration series of SAB-contaminated soils. Exposure doses were quantified as the concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH, nC9-nC18) on a soil dry mass basis. Seven species successfully germinated on control soils under laboratory conditions, and four of these species (Colobanthus muscoides Hook.f., Deschampsia chapmanii Petrie, Epilobium pendunculare A.Cunn. and Luzula crinita Hook.f.) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of germination when exposed to SAB-contaminated soils. Contaminated soils with low OC were generally more toxic to plants than high organic carbon soils. Increasing soil-TPH concentrations significantly inhibited shoot and root growth, and root length was identified as the most sensitive endpoint. Although the test species were tolerant to SAB-contaminated soils in germination assays, development of early life stages (up to 28 days) were generally more sensitive indicator of exposure effects, and may be more useful endpoints for future testing.

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon body residues and lysosomal membrane destabilization in mussels exposed to the Dubai Star bunker fuel oil (intermediate fuel oil 380) spill in San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Stanton, Beckye; McBride, Toby; Anderson, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Following the spill of bunker fuel oil (intermediate fuel oil 380, approximately 1500-3000 L) into San Francisco Bay in October 2009, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in mussels from moderately oiled areas increased up to 87 554 ng/g (dry wt) and, 3 mo later, decreased to concentrations found in mussels collected prior to oiling, with a biological half-life of approximately 16 d. Lysosomal membrane destabilization increased in mussels with higher PAH body burdens.

  12. Topical absorption and toxicity studies of jet fuel hydrocarbons in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Faqir

    Kerosene-based fuels have been used for many decades. Over 2 million military and civilian personnel each year are occupationally exposed to various jet fuel mixtures. Dermatitis is one of the major health concerns associated with these exposures. In the past, separate absorption and toxicity studies have been conducted to find the etiology of such skin disorders. There was a need for integrated absorption and toxicity studies to define the causative constituents of jet fuel responsible for skin irritation. The focus of this thesis was to study the percutaneous absorption and to identify the hydrocarbons (HC) causing irritation in jet fuels so that preventive measures could be taken in the future. The initial study was conducted to understand the possible mechanism for additive interactions on hydrocarbon absorption/disposition in silastic, porcine skin and isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF) models. The influence of JP-8 (100) additives (MDA, BHT, 8Q405) on the dermal kinetics of 14C-naphthalene and 14C/3H-dodecane as markers of HC absorption was evaluated. This study indicated that individual and combination of additives influenced marker disposition in different membranes. MDA was a significant suppressor while BHT was a significant enhancer of naphthalene absorption in IPPSF. The 8Q405 significantly reduced naphthalene content in dosed silastic and skin indicating a direct interaction between additive and marker HC. Similarly, the individual MDA and BHT significantly retained naphthalene in the stratum corneum of porcine skin, but the combination of both of these additives statistically decreased the marker retention in the stratum corneum suggesting a potential biological interaction. This study concluded that all components of a chemical mixture should be assessed since the effects of single components administered alone or as pairs may be confounded when all are present in the complete mixture. However, this study indicated that the marker HC

  13. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  14. Physiological tolerance and stoichiometric potential of cyanobacteria for hydrocarbon fuel production.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Jari; Knoop, Henning; Stanford, Natalie J; Guerrero, Fernando; Akhtar, M Kalim; Aro, Eva-Mari; Steuer, Ralf; Jones, Patrik R

    2012-11-30

    Cyanobacteria are capable of directly converting sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into hydrocarbon fuel or precursors thereof. Many biological and non-biological factors will influence the ability of such a production system to become economically sustainable. We evaluated two factors in engineerable cyanobacteria which could potentially limit economic sustainability: (i) tolerance of the host to the intended end-product, and (ii) stoichiometric potential for production. Alcohols, when externally added, inhibited growth the most, followed by aldehydes and acids, whilst alkanes were the least inhibitory. The growth inhibition became progressively greater with increasing chain-length for alcohols, whilst the intermediate C6 alkane caused more inhibition than both C3 and C11 alkane. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was more tolerant to some of the tested chemicals than Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, particularly ethanol and undecane. Stoichiometric evaluation of the potential yields suggested that there is no difference in the potential productivity of harvestable energy between any of the studied fuels, with the exception of ethylene, for which maximal stoichiometric yield is considerably lower. In summary, it was concluded that alkanes would constitute the best choice metabolic end-product for fuel production using cyanobacteria if high-yielding strains can be developed.

  15. [Experimental study on the characteristics polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions of diesel engine burnt by different fuels].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong; An, Yu-Guang; Xu, Guang-Ju; Wang, Xiao-Zhe

    2011-07-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured by glass fiber filter and XAD-2 collector, ultrasonic extraction, soxhlet extraction and GC-MS analysis equipment. The exhaust emission of the DI single cylinder diesel engine fueled with pure diesel, biodiesel and biodiesel blends of 50% (B50) were measured. The results indicate that the particle-phase PAHs emissions of diesel engine decrease with the increasing of load. The gas-phase PAHs emissions of diesel engine decrease with the increasing of load in the beginning and it turns to going up with further increasing of load. The particle-phase and gas-phase PAHs emissions of biodiesel decrease and mean concentration are lower than that of diesel. The total PAHs emission concentration of biodisesl is 41.1-70.1 microg/m3. Total PAHs mean concentration emissions of biodiesel is decreased 33.3% than that of diesel. The mass proportion of three-ring PAHs emissions of those 3 kinds tested fuels is about 44% in the total PAHs. Biodiesel can increase the proportion of three-ring PAHs. Toxic equivalence of PAHs emissions of biodiesel are greatly lower than that of diesel. It is less harmful to human than diesel fuel.

  16. Method And Apparatus For Converting Hydrocarbon Fuel Into Hydrogen Gas And Carbon Dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2000-09-26

    A method is disclosed for synthesizing hydrogen gas from hydrocarbon fuel. A first mixture of steam and a first fuel is directed into a first tube 208 to subject the first mixture to a first steam reforming reaction in the presence of a first catalyst 214. A stream of oxygen-containing gas is pre-heated by transferring heat energy from product gases. A second mixture of the pre-heated oxygen-containing gas and a second fuel is directed into a second tube 218 disposed about the first tube 208 to subject the second mixture to a partial oxidation reaction and to provide heat energy for transfer to the first tube 208. A first reaction reformate from the first tube 208 and a second reaction reformate from the second tube 218 are directed into a third tube 224 disposed about the second tube 218 to subject the first and second reaction reformates to a second steam reforming reaction, wherein heat energy is transferred to the third tube 224 from the second tube 218.

  17. Numerical Studies on the Performance of Scramjet Combustor with Alternating Wedge-Shaped Strut Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Gautam; Pandey, K. M.

    2017-04-01

    Numerical analysis of the supersonic combustion and flow structure through a scramjet engine at Mach 7 with alternating wedge fuel injection and with three angle of attack (α=-3°, α=0°, α=3°) have been studied in the present research article. The configuration used here is slight modification of the Rabadan et al. scramjet model. Steady two dimensional (2D) Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation and Shear stress transport (SST) based on k-ω turbulent model is used to predict the shock structure and combustion phenomenon inside the scramjet combustor. All the simulations are done by using Ansys 14-Fluent code. The combustion model used here is the combination of eddy dissipation and finite rate chemistry models since this model avoids Arrhenius calculations in which reaction rates are controlled by turbulence. Present results show that the geometry with negative angle of attack (α=-3°) have lowest ignition delay and it improves the performance of scramjet combustor as compared to geometry with α=0°, α=3°. The combustion phenomena and efficiency is also found to be stronger and highest in case of α=-3°.

  18. Technology Roadmap for Dual-Mode Scramjet Propulsion to Support Space-Access Vision Vehicle Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Auslender, Aaron H.; Guy, R. Wayne; McClinton, Charles R.; Welch, Sharon S.

    2002-01-01

    Third-generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV) systems are envisioned that utilize airbreathing and combined-cycle propulsion to take advantage of potential performance benefits over conventional rocket propulsion and address goals of reducing the cost and enhancing the safety of systems to reach earth orbit. The dual-mode scramjet (DMSJ) forms the core of combined-cycle or combination-cycle propulsion systems for single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles and provides most of the orbital ascent energy. These concepts are also relevant to two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) systems with an airbreathing first or second stage. Foundation technology investments in scramjet propulsion are driven by the goal to develop efficient Mach 3-15 concepts with sufficient performance and operability to meet operational system goals. A brief historical review of NASA scramjet development is presented along with a summary of current technology efforts and a proposed roadmap. The technology addresses hydrogen-fueled combustor development, hypervelocity scramjets, multi-speed flowpath performance and operability, propulsion-airframe integration, and analysis and diagnostic tools.

  19. Pylon effects on a scramjet cavity flameholder flowfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeborn, Andrew B.

    Cavity flameholders in supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) combustors, while effective, fail to take advantage of the full combustor volume. Adding a pylon to the leading edge of a cavity flameholder generates a flowfield increasing mass exchange between the cavity and main combustor flow, increasing the mixing interface between flameholder products and main combustor flow, and exhibiting minimal Reynolds number effects. To demonstrate this modified flowfield driven by supersonic expansion behind the pylon, pylon-cavity flameholder flowfield data were obtained through a combination of wind tunnel experimentation and steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flowfield effects of the pylon-cavity were examined at a Mach number of two and Reynolds numbers from approximately 32 million m-1 to 55 million m -1. Addition of the pylon resulted in approximately three times the mass exchange between the cavity and overlying flow. Both CFD and particle image velocimetry data showed strong upward flow behind the pylon, increasing exposure and exchange of cavity fluid with the main combustor flow. Reynolds number effects were weak within the range of test conditions. Assuming a suitably reacting fuel-air mixture, the addition of a pylon offers the scramjet designer an attractive option to take advantage of a greater proportion of combustor volume and improve combustor performance.

  20. A role of hydrocarbon reaction for NO{sub x} formation and reduction in fuel-rich pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Kamikawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Kenji; Orita, Hisayuki

    2010-08-15

    We have investigated an index for modeling a NO{sub x} reaction mechanism of pulverized coal combustion. The reaction mechanism of coal nitrogen was examined by drop-tube furnace experiments under various burning conditions. We proposed the gas phase stoichiometric ratio (SRgas) as a key index to evaluate NO{sub x} concentration in fuel-rich flames. The SRgas was defined as: SRgas {identical_to} amount of fuel required for stoichiometry combustion/amount of gasified fuel where, the amount of gasified fuel was defined as the amount of fuel which had been released to the gas phase by pyrolysis, oxidation and gasification reactions. When SRgas < 1.0, NO{sub x} concentration was strongly influenced by the value of SRgas. In this condition, the NO{sub x} concentration was hardly influenced by coal type, particle diameter, or reaction time. We developed a model to analyze NO{sub x} and XN(HCN, NH{sub 3}) concentrations for pulverized coal/air combustion and coal/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} combustion, based on the index. NO{sub x} and XN concentrations did not reproduce the experimental results without considering reactions between hydrocarbons and NO{sub x}. The hydrocarbon reaction was important for both NO{sub x} and XN, especially for air combustion. In the present model, an empirical formula was used to estimate the total concentration of hydrocarbons in coal flame. The reaction of heavy hydrocarbons which had plural aromatic rings was very important to analyze the reaction mechanism of hydrocarbons for coal combustion in detail. When burning temperature and SRgas were the same, total hydrocarbon concentration in a coal flame was larger than that of a light gaseous hydrocarbon flame. Total hydrocarbon concentration in oxy-fuel combustion was lower than that in air combustion. We verified the proposed model by experimental results obtained for a drop-tube furnace and a laboratory-scale furnace that had an installed low-NO{sub x} burner. (author)

  1. Ignition problems in scramjet testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Tohru

    1995-05-01

    Ignition of H{sub 2} in heated air containing H{sub 2}O, radicals, and dust was investigated for scramjet testing. Using a reduced kinetic model for H{sub 2}{minus}O{sub 2} systems, the effects of H{sub 2}O and radicals in nozzles are discussed in relation to engine testing with vitiation heaters. Analysis using linearized rate-equations suggested that the addition of O atoms was 1.5 times more effective than the addition of H atoms for ignition. This result can be applied to the problem of premature ignition caused by residual radicals and to plasma-jet igniters. Thermal and chemical effects of dust, inevitable in storage air heaters, were studied next. The effects of heat capacity and size of dust were expressed in terms of an exponential integral function. It was found that the radical termination on the surface of dust produces an effect equivalent to heat loss. The inhibition of ignition by dust may result, if the mass fraction of dust becomes 10{sup {minus}3}.

  2. Stabilization of liquid hydrocarbon fuel combustion by using a programmable microwave discharge in a subsonic airflow

    SciTech Connect

    Kopyl, P. V.; Surkont, O. S.; Shibkov, V. M.; Shibkova, L. V.

    2012-06-15

    Under conditions of a programmable discharge (a surface microwave discharge combined with a dc discharge), plasma-enhanced combustion of alcohol injected into a subsonic (M = 0.3-0.9) airflow in the drop (spray) phase is stabilized. It is shown that the appearance of the discharge, its current-voltage characteristic, the emission spectrum, the total emission intensity, the heat flux, the electron density, the hydroxyl emission intensity, and the time dependences of the discharge current and especially discharge voltage change substantially during the transition from the airflow discharge to stabilized combustion of the liquid hydrocarbon fuel. After combustion stabilization, more than 80% of liquid alcohol can burn out, depending on the input power, and the flame temperature reaches {approx}2000 K.

  3. Study of the physical properties of petrolatum-stabilized magnesium-hydrocarbon slurry fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinns, Murray L; Goodman, Irving A

    1954-01-01

    Magnesium-hydrocarbon slurries containing a moderate proportion of petrolatum have physical properties such that they offer promise as experimental aircraft fuels. The settling of the magnesium is greatly retarded by the petrolatum, and the slurries can easily be remixed to their original condition after storage. Successive batches which have closely similar properties can be prepared readily. The apparent viscosity of these slurries increased rapidly with increasing magnesium concentration, with increasing petrolatum concentration, and with decreasing temperature. As the apparent viscosity increased, the extent of settling and the ease of remixing both decreased. Although no quantitative correlation was found between the properties of the slurry and those of the petrolatum, and no one petrolatum gave slurries which were best in all respects, one of the five petrolatum used was judged to be superior to the others.

  4. Systems and methods for optically measuring properties of hydrocarbon fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Adler-Golden, S.; Bernstein, L.S.; Bien, F.; Gersh, M.E.; Goldstein, N.

    1998-10-13

    A system and method for optical interrogation and measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel gas includes a light source generating light at near-visible wavelengths. A cell containing the gas is optically coupled to the light source which is in turn partially transmitted by the sample. A spectrometer disperses the transmitted light and captures an image thereof. The image is captured by a low-cost silicon-based two-dimensional CCD array. The captured spectral image is processed by electronics for determining energy or BTU content and composition of the gas. The innovative optical approach provides a relatively inexpensive, durable, maintenance-free sensor and method which is reliable in the field and relatively simple to calibrate. In view of the above, accurate monitoring is possible at a plurality of locations along the distribution chain leading to more efficient distribution. 14 figs.

  5. Systems and methods for optically measuring properties of hydrocarbon fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Adler-Golden, Steven; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Bien, Fritz; Gersh, Michael E.; Goldstein, Neil

    1998-10-13

    A system and method for optical interrogation and measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel gas includes a light source generating light at near-visible wavelengths. A cell containing the gas is optically coupled to the light source which is in turn partially transmitted by the sample. A spectrometer disperses the transmitted light and captures an image thereof. The image is captured by a low-cost silicon-based two-dimensional CCD array. The captured spectral image is processed by electronics for determining energy or BTU content and composition of the gas. The innovative optical approach provides a relatively inexpensive, durable, maintenance-free sensor and method which is reliable in the field and relatively simple to calibrate. In view of the above, accurate monitoring is possible at a plurality of locations along the distribution chain leading to more efficient distribution.

  6. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  7. The effect of aliphatic fuel constituents on the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gamerdinger, A.P.

    1995-12-01

    In petroleum-derived waste, n-alkanes are often codeposited with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The impact of aliphatic fuel constituents on the biodegradation of the more toxic PAHs is considered. Biodegradation of naphthalene by a Coryneform bacteria was examined in biphasic, slurry systems containing and aliphatic solvent in addition to the aqueous phase. The effect of solvent hydrophobicity was evaluated by varying the solvent treatment; a homologous series of n-alkanes was used. Relative to an aqueous system (no solvent), the extent of naphthalene degradation was enhanced in the presence of decane, dodecane, and hexadecane. Biodegradation was apparent, but decreased in the presence of octane, and was completely absent in the presence of hexane. The impact of aliphatic constituents on PAH biodegradation is a function of solvent hydrophobicity. The results indicate that the presence of multiple chemical constituents in complex systems modifies bioavailability and biodegradation.

  8. Dual-Pump CARS Measurements in the University of Virginia's Dual-Mode Scramjet: Configuration "A"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Gallo, Emanuela; Danehy, Paul M.; Rockwell, Robert; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe efforts to obtain canonical data sets to assist computational modelers in their development of models for the prediction of mixing and combustion in scramjet combustors operating in the ramjet-scramjet transition regime. The CARS technique is employed to acquire temporally and spatially resolved measurements of temperature and species mole-fraction at four planes, one upstream of an H2 fuel injector and three downstream. The technique is described and results are presented for cases with and without chemical reaction. The vibrational energy mode in the heated airstream of the combustor was observed to be frozen at near facility heater conditions and significant nonuniformities in temperature were observed, attributed to nonuniformities of temperature exiting the heater. The measurements downstream of fuel injection show development of mixing and combustion, and are already proving useful to the modelers.

  9. Hydropyrolysis of biomass to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Final report. Biomass Alternative-Fuels Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R K; Bodle, W W; Yuen, P C

    1982-10-01

    The ojective of the study is to provide a process design and cost estimates for a biomass hydropyrolysis plant and to establish its economic viability for commercial applications. A plant site, size, product slate, and the most probable feedstock or combination of feedstocks were determined. A base case design was made by adapting IGT's HYFLEX process to Hawaiian biomass feedstocks. The HYFLEX process was developed by IGT to produce liquid and/or gaseous fuels from carbonaceous materials. The essence of the process is the simultaneous extraction of valuable oil and gaseous products from cellulosic biomass feedstocks without forming a heavy hard-to-handle tar. By controlling rection time and temperature, the product slate can be varied according to feedstock and market demand. An optimum design and a final assessment of the applicability of the HYFLEX process to the conversion of Hawaiian biomass was made. In order to determine what feedstocks could be available in Hawaii to meet the demands of the proposed hydropyrolysis plant, various biomass sources were studied. These included sugarcane and pineapple wastes, indigenous and cultivated trees and indigenous and cultivated shrubs and grasses.

  10. Experimental investigation of the ignition and flammability limits of various hydrocarbon fuels in a two-dimensional solid-fuel ramjet. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wooldridge, R.C.

    1987-06-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effects of inlet step height on ignition and flammability limits and recirculation-zone and boundary-layer combustion phenomena of various hydrocarbon fuels. A windowed two-dimensional solid-fuel ramjet (SFRJ) was utilized. Hydrocarbon fuels were burned under conditions similar to the actual flight were studied using a variable geometry inlet, an automatic data acquisition system, and high speed motion pictures of the interior of the combustion chamber at the recirculation zone and the boundary layer development region. Data was obtained at a mass flux of 0.2 1bm/in2-sec at a nominal air inlet temperature of 1000 R with pressures ranging from 100 to 150 psia.

  11. Biodegradation pattern of hydrocarbons from a fuel oil-type complex residue by an emulsifier-producing microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Nievas, M L; Commendatore, M G; Esteves, J L; Bucalá, V

    2008-06-15

    The biodegradation of a hazardous waste (bilge waste), a fuel oil-type complex residue from normal ship operations, was studied in a batch bioreactor using a microbial consortium in seawater medium. Experiments with initial concentrations of 0.18 and 0.53% (v/v) of bilge waste were carried out. In order to study the biodegradation kinetics, the mass of n-alkanes, resolved hydrocarbons and unresolved complex mixture (UCM) hydrocarbons were assessed by gas chromatography (GC). Emulsification was detected in both experiments, possibly linked to the n-alkanes depletion, with differences in emulsification start times and extents according to the initial hydrocarbon concentration. Both facts influenced the hydrocarbon biodegradation kinetics. A sequential biodegradation of n-alkanes and UMC was found for the higher hydrocarbon content. Being the former growth associated, while UCM biodegradation was a non-growing process showing enzymatic-type biodegradation kinetics. For the lower hydrocarbon concentration, simultaneous biodegradation of n-alkanes and UMC were found before emulsification. Nevertheless, certain UCM biodegradation was observed after the medium emulsification. According to the observed kinetics, three main types of hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, biodegradable UCM and recalcitrant UCM) were found adequate to represent the multicomponent substrate (bilge waste) for future modelling of the biodegradation process.

  12. Shock Tunnel Studies of Scramjet Phenomena 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Reports by the research staff and graduate students of the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Queensland are collected and presented. These reports cover various studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology and the operation of advanced hypervelocity shock-expansion tubes. The report topics include the experimental studies of mixing and combustion in a scramjet flow path, the measurement of integrated thrust and skin friction, and the development of a free-piston-driven expansion tunnel capable of delivering a test gas at superorbital velocities.

  13. Lifecycle analysis of renewable natural gas and hydrocarbon fuels from wastewater treatment plants’ sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Uisung; Han, Jeongwoo; Urgun Demirtas, Meltem; Wang, Michael; Tao, Ling

    2016-09-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) produce sludge as a byproduct when they treat wastewater. In the United States, over 8 million dry tons of sludge are produced annually just from publicly owned WWTPs. Sludge is commonly treated in anaerobic digesters, which generate biogas; the biogas is then largely flared to reduce emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Because sludge is quite homogeneous and has a high energy content, it is a good potential feedstock for other conversion processes that make biofuels, bioproducts, and power. For example, biogas from anaerobic digesters can be used to generate renewable natural gas (RNG), which can be further processed to produce compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG). Sludge can be directly converted into hydrocarbon liquid fuels via thermochemical processes such as hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). Currently, the environmental impacts of converting sludge into energy are largely unknown, and only a few studies have focused on the environmental impacts of RNG produced from existing anaerobic digesters. As biofuels from sludge generate high interest, however, existing anaerobic digesters could be upgraded to technology with more economic potential and more environmental benefits. The environmental impacts of using a different anaerobic digestion (AD) technology to convert sludge into energy have yet to be analyzed. In addition, no studies are available about the direct conversion of sludge into liquid fuels. In order to estimate the energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions impacts of these alternative pathways (sludge-to-RNG and sludge-to-liquid), this study performed a lifecycle analysis (LCA) using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET®) model. The energy uses and GHG emissions associated with the RNG and hydrocarbon liquid are analyzed relative to the current typical sludge management case, which consists of a single-stage mesophilic

  14. Emission of Oxygenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Indoor Solid Fuel Combustion

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guofeng; Tao, Shu; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yifeng; Ding, Junnan; Xue, Miao; Min, Yujia; Zhu, Chen; Shen, Huizhong; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Xilong; Russell, Armistead G.

    2011-01-01

    Indoor solid fuel combustion is a dominant source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) and the latter are believed to be more toxic than the former. However, there is limited quantitative information on the emissions of OPAHs from solid fuel combustion. In this study, emission factors of OPAHs (EFOPAH) for nine commonly used crop residues and five coals burnt in typical residential stoves widely used in rural China were measured under simulated kitchen conditions. The total EFOPAH ranged from 2.8±0.2 to 8.1±2.2 mg/kg for tested crop residues and from 0.043 to 71 mg/kg for various coals and 9-fluorenone was the most abundant specie. The EFOPAH for indoor crop residue burning were 1~2 orders of magnitude higher than those from open burning, and they were affected by fuel properties and combustion conditions, like moisture and combustion efficiency. For both crop residues and coals, significantly positive correlations were found between EFs for the individual OPAHs and the parent PAHs. An oxygenation rate, Ro, was defined as the ratio of the EFs between the oxygenated and parent PAH species to describe the formation potential of OPAHs. For the studied OPAH/PAH pairs, mean Ro values were 0.16 ~ 0.89 for crop residues and 0.03 ~ 0.25 for coals. Ro for crop residues burned in the cooking stove were much higher than those for open burning and much lower than those in ambient air, indicating the influence of secondary formation of OPAH and loss of PAHs. In comparison with parent PAHs, OPAHs showed a higher tendency to be associated with particulate matter (PM), especially fine PM, and the dominate size ranges were 0.7 ~ 2.1 µm for crop residues and high caking coals and < 0.7 µm for the tested low caking briquettes. PMID:21375317

  15. Development of a Raman spectroscopy technique to detect alternate transportation fuel hydrocarbon intermediates in complex combustion environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ekoto, Isaac W.; Barlow, Robert S.

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectra for important hydrocarbon fuels and combustion intermediates were recorded over a range of low-to-moderate flame temperatures using the multiscalar measurement facility located at Sandia/CA. Recorded spectra were extrapolated to higher flame temperatures and then converted into empirical spectral libraries that can readily be incorporated into existing post-processing analysis models that account for crosstalk from overlapping hydrocarbon channel signal. Performance testing of the developed libraries and reduction methods was conducted through an examination of results from well-characterized laminar reference flames, and was found to provide good agreement. The diagnostic development allows for temporally and spatially resolved flame measurements of speciated hydrocarbon concentrations whose parent is more chemically complex than methane. Such data are needed to validate increasingly complex flame simulations.

  16. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a C/C and a C/C-SiC material system fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for HIFiRE 8, a joint Australia / AFRL hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kPa. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and the C/C-SiC were tested in the NASA Langley Direct Connect Rig (DCR) at Mach 5 and Mach 6 enthalpy for several minutes. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used in some of the tests to increase the surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel for approximately 350degF. The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for 3 cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  17. Valorization of Waste Lipids through Hydrothermal Catalytic Conversion to Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels with in Situ Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongwook; Vardon, Derek R.; Murali, Dheeptha; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate hydrothermal (300 degrees C, 10 MPa) catalytic conversion of real waste lipids (e.g., waste vegetable oil, sewer trap grease) to liquid hydrocarbon fuels without net need for external chemical inputs (e.g., H2 gas, methanol). A supported bimetallic catalyst (Pt-Re/C; 5 wt % of each metal) previously shown to catalyze both aqueous phase reforming of glycerol (a triacylglyceride lipid hydrolysis coproduct) to H2 gas and conversion of oleic and stearic acid, model unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, to linear alkanes was applied to process real waste lipid feedstocks in water. For reactions conducted with an initially inert headspace gas (N2), waste vegetable oil (WVO) was fully converted into linear hydrocarbons (C15-C17) and other hydrolyzed byproducts within 4.5 h, and H2 gas production was observed. Addition of H2 to the initial reactor headspace accelerated conversion, but net H2 production was still observed, in agreement with results obtained for aqueous mixtures containing model fatty acids and glycerol. Conversion to liquid hydrocarbons with net H2 production was also observed for a range of other waste lipid feedstocks (animal fat residuals, sewer trap grease, dry distiller's grain oil, coffee oil residual). These findings demonstrate potential for valorization of waste lipids through conversion to hydrocarbons that are more compatible with current petroleum-based liquid fuels than the biodiesel and biogas products of conventional waste lipid processing technologies.

  18. Method and apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H.J.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for converting hydrocarbon fuel or an alcohol into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide. The apparatus includes a first vessel having a partial oxidation reaction zone and a separate steam reforming reaction zone that is distinct from the partial oxidation reaction zone. The first vessel has a first vessel inlet at the partial oxidation reaction zone and a first vessel outlet at the steam reforming zone. The reformer also includes a helical tube extending about the first vessel. The helical tube has a first end connected to an oxygen-containing source and a second end connected to the first vessel at the partial oxidation reaction zone. Oxygen gas from an oxygen-containing source can be directed through the helical tube to the first vessel. A second vessel having a second vessel inlet and second vessel outlet is annularly disposed about the first vessel. The helical tube is disposed between the first vessel and the second vessel and gases from the first vessel can be directed through second vessel.

  19. Using sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) for bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    PubMed

    Sherafatmand, Mohammad; Ng, How Yong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was explored to bioremediate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water originated from soil. The results showed consistent power generations of 6.02±0.34 and 3.63±0.37 mW/m(2) under an external resistance of 1500 Ω by the aerobic and anaerobic SMFC, respectively. Although the power generations were low, they had relatively low internal resistances (i.e., 436.6±69.4 and 522.1±1.8 Ω for the aerobic and anaerobic SMFC, respectively) in comparison with the literature. Nevertheless, the significant benefit of this system was its bioremediation capabilities, achieving 41.7%, 31.4% and 36.2% removal of naphthalene, acenaphthene and phenanthrene, respectively, in the aerobic environment and 76.9%, 52.5% and 36.8%, respectively, in the anaerobic environment. These results demonstrated the ability of SMFCs in stimulating microorganisms for bioremediation of complex and recalcitrant PAHs.

  20. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program has been planned at the NASA Lewis Research Center to build confidence in the feasibility of liquid oxygen cooling for hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines. Although liquid oxygen cooling has previously been incorporated in test hardware, more runtime is necessary to gain confidence in this concept. In the previous tests, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot-gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastrophic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed in this report. Four thrust chambers, three with cracks and one without, should be tested. The axial location of the cracks should be varied parametrically. Each chamber should be instrumented to determine the effects of the cracks, as well as the overall performance and durability of the chambers.

  1. Simultaneous determination of hydrocarbon renewable diesel, biodiesel and petroleum diesel contents in diesel fuel blends using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Julio Cesar Laurentino; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2013-11-07

    Highly polluting fuels based on non-renewable resources such as fossil fuels need to be replaced with potentially less polluting renewable fuels derived from vegetable or animal biomass, these so-called biofuels, are a reality nowadays and many countries have started the challenge of increasing the use of different types of biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel (fatty acid alkyl esters), often mixed with petroleum derivatives, such as gasoline and diesel, respectively. The quantitative determination of these fuel blends using simple, fast and low cost methods based on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods has been reported. However, advanced biofuels based on a mixture of hydrocarbons or a single hydrocarbon molecule, such as farnesane (2,6,10-trimethyldodecane), a hydrocarbon renewable diesel, can also be used in mixtures with biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel and the use of NIR spectroscopy for the quantitative determination of a ternary fuel blend of these two hydrocarbon-based fuels and biodiesel can be a useful tool for quality control. This work presents a development of an analytical method for the quantitative determination of hydrocarbon renewable diesel (farnesane), biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel blends using NIR spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods, such as partial least squares (PLS) and support vector machines (SVM). This development leads to a more accurate, simpler, faster and cheaper method when compared to the standard reference method ASTM D6866 and with the main advantage of providing the individual quantification of two different biofuels in a mixture with petroleum diesel fuel. Using the developed PLS model the three fuel blend components were determined simultaneously with values of root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.25%, 0.19% and 0.38% for hydrocarbon renewable diesel, biodiesel and petroleum diesel, respectively, the values obtained were in agreement with those suggested by

  2. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the diesel engine by adding light cycle oil to premium diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chen, Chung-Bang

    2006-06-01

    Diesel fuels governed by U.S. regulations are based on the index of the total aromatic contents. Three diesel fuels, containing various fractions of light cycle oil (LCO) and various sulfur, total polyaromatic, and total aromatic contents, were used in a heavy-duty diesel engine (HDDE) under transient cycle test to assess the feasibility of using current indices in managing the emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from HDDE. The mean sulfur content in LCO is 20.8 times as much as that of premium diesel fuel (PDF). The mean total polyaromatic content in LCO is 28.7 times as much as that of PDF, and the mean total aromatic content in LCO is 2.53 times as much as that of PDF. The total polyaromatic hydrocarbon emission factors in the exhaust from the diesel engine, as determined using PDF L3.5 (3.5% LCO and 96.5% PDF), L7.5 (7.5% LCO and 92.5% PDF), and L15 (15% LCO and 85% PDF) were 14.3, 25.8, 44, and 101 mg L(-1), respectively. The total benzo(a)pyrene equivalent (BaPeq) emission factors in the exhaust from PDF, L3.5, L7.5, and L15 were 0.0402, 0.121, 0.219, and 0.548 mg L(-1), respectively. Results indicated that using L3.5 instead of PDF will result in an 80.4% and a 201% increase of emission for total PAHs and total BaPeq, respectively. The relationships between the total polyaromatic hydrocarbon emission factor and the two emission control indices, including fuel polyaromatic content and fuel aromatic content, suggest that both indices could be used feasibly to regulate total PAH emissions. These results strongly suggest that LCO used in the traveling diesel vehicles significantly influences PAH emissions.

  3. State Relationships of Laminar Permanently-Blue Opposed-Jet Hydrocarbon-Fueled Diffusion Flames. Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure and state relationships of laminar soot-free (permanently-blue) diffusion flames at various strain rates were studied experimentally using an opposed-jet configuration, motivated by the importance of soot-free hydrocarbon-fueled diffusion flames for many practical applications. Measurements of gas velocities, temperatures and compositions were carried out along the stagnation stream line. Flame conditions studied included propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled opposed-jet diffusion flames having a stoichiometric mixture fractions of 0.7 and strain rates of 60-240 s (exp -1) at normal temperature and pressure. It was found that oxygen leakage to fuel-rich conditions and carbon monoxide leakage to fuel-lean conditions both increased as strain rates increased. Furthermore, increased strain rates caused increased fuel concentrations near the flame sheet, decreased peak gas temperatures, and decreased concentrations of carbon dioxide and water vapor throughout the flames. State relationships for major gas species and gas temperatures for these flames were found to exist over broad ranges of strain rates. In addition, current measurements, as well as previous measurements and predictions of ethylene-fueled permanently-blue diffusion flames, all having a stoichiometric mixture fraction of 0.7, were combined to establish generalized state relationships for permanently-blue diffusion flames for this stoichiometric mixture fraction. The combined measurements and predictions support relatively universal generalized state relationships for N2, CO2, H2O and fuel over a broad range of strain rates and fuel types. State relationships for O2 in the fuel-rich region, and for CO in the fuel-lean region, however, are functions of strain rate and fuel type. State relationships for H2 and temperature exhibit less universality, mainly due to the increased experimental uncertainties for these variables. The existence of state relationships for soot-free hydrocarbon-fueled

  4. Validation of scramjet exhaust simulation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, H. B.; Konopka, W.; Leng, J.

    1976-01-01

    Scramjet/airframe integration design philosophy for hypersonic aircraft results in configurations having lower aft surfaces that serve as exhaust nozzles. There is a strong coupling between the exhaust plume and the aerodynamics of the vehicle, making accurate simulation of the engine exhaust mandatory. The experimental verification of the simulation procedure is described. The detonation tube simulator was used to produce an exact simulation of the scramjet exhaust for a Mach 8 flight condition. The pressure distributions produced by the exact exhaust flow were then duplicated by a cool mixture Argon and Freon 13B1. Such a substitute gas mixture validated by the detonation tube technique could be used in conventional wind tunnel tests. The results presented show the substitute gas simulation technique to be valid for shockless expansions.

  5. Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

  6. Combustion efficiency and altitude operational limits of three liquid hydrocarbon fuels having high volumetric energy content in a J33 single combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stricker, Edward G

    1950-01-01

    Combustion efficiency and altitude operational limits were determined in a J33 single combustor for AN-F-58 fuel and three liquid hydrocarbon fuels having high volumetric energy content (decalin, tetralin, and monomethylnaphthalene) at simulated altitude and combustor inlet-air conditions. At the conditions investigated, the combustion efficiency for the four fuels generally decreased with an increase in volumetric energy content. The altitude operational limits for decalin and tetralin fuels were higher than for AN-F-58 fuel; monomethylnaphthalene fuel gave the lowest altitude operational limit.

  7. Three-dimensional geologic modeling to determine the spatial attributes of hydrocarbon contamination, Noval Facility Fuel Farm, El Centro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Mutch, S.; Padgett, D.; Roche, L. )

    1994-04-01

    An investigation was conducted at the Naval Air Facility located in El Centro (NAFEC), to determine the vertical and horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the facilities fuel farm. The fuel products are the result of tank and pipeline leakage, past tank cleaning, and past disposal of fuel dispensing and filter cleaning practices. Subsurface soil and groundwater data was collected via soil borings, monitoring wells, and CPT probes. Soil, groundwater, and analytical data were integrated using the LYNX geoscience modeling system (GMS). Interactive sessions with the data visualizer helped guide the modeling and identify data gaps. Modeling results indicate a continuous surface confining clay layer to a depth of about 12 to 15 ft. Groundwater is confined beneath this clay layer and monitoring wells indicate about 3 to 5 ft of artesian head. Hydrocarbon contamination is concentrated within this clay layer from about 5 to 12 ft below the ground surface. Residual fuel products located in the groundwater are attributed to slow leakage through the confirming clay layer. LYNX was also used to compute volumes of contaminated soil to aid in remediation cost analysis. Preliminary figures indicate about 60,000 yards[sup 3] of contaminated soil. Since the contamination is primarily confined to relatively impermeable clayey soils, site remediation will likely be ex-situ land farming.

  8. Rocket-Plume Spectroscopy Simulation for Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.

    2010-01-01

    The UV-Vis spectroscopic system for plume diagnostics monitors rocket engine health by using several analytical tools developed at Stennis Space Center (SSC), including the rocket plume spectroscopy simulation code (RPSSC), to identify and quantify the alloys from the metallic elements observed in engine plumes. Because the hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engine is likely to contain C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO in addition to OH and H2O, the relevant electronic bands of these molecules in the spectral range of 300 to 850 nm in the RPSSC have been included. SSC incorporated several enhancements and modifications to the original line-by-line spectral simulation computer program implemented for plume spectral data analysis and quantification in 1994. These changes made the program applicable to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the Diagnostic Testbed Facility Thruster (DTFT) exhaust plume spectral data. Modifications included updating the molecular and spectral parameters for OH, adding spectral parameter input files optimized for the 10 elements of interest in the spectral range from 320 to 430 nm and linking the output to graphing and analysis packages. Additionally, the ability to handle the non-uniform wavelength interval at which the spectral computations are made was added. This allowed a precise superposition of wavelengths at which the spectral measurements have been made with the wavelengths at which the spectral computations are done by using the line-by-line (LBL) code. To account for hydrocarbon combustion products in the plume, which might interfere with detection and quantification of metallic elements in the spectral region of 300 to 850 nm, the spectroscopic code has been enhanced to include the carbon-based combustion species of C2, CO, and CH. In addition, CN and NO have spectral bands in 300 to 850 nm and, while these molecules are not direct products of hydrocarbon-oxygen combustion systems, they can show up if nitrogen or a nitrogen compound is present

  9. History of fuel consumption inferred from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments from the south Lianhuan Lake, northeast China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Zang, Shuying

    2012-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants of global concern. The current study uses differences in PAH profiles in 1 cm core sediment samples from south Lianhuan Lake, Heilongjiang Province, China to evaluate historical changes in fuel sources. Individual core segments were dated using (137)Cs techniques and concentrations of 16 priority PAHs were measured. Principal components analysis with multivariate linear regression and PAH profiles of specific combustion sources were used to identify historical fuel use. During the early 1940s to the early 1970s, PAHs concentrations increases with the increased combustion of coal, and relatively high petroleum source could be linked to the establishment of the Daqing Oil Field. The source apportionment suggested that coal combustion replaced wood burning and became the dominant fuel since the 1940s and petroleum source increased. These results were coincidence with the rapid economic growth occurring in China.

  10. Microbial Deterioration of Hydrocarbon Fuels from Oil Shale, Coal and Petroleum. III. Inhibition of Fungi by Fuels from Coal.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-16

    Petroleum Fungi Microbial deterioration JP.5 Yeast Microbial contamination Synthetic fuel Cladosporium resinae Inhibition 0. ABSTRACT (Contine an reverse aid...Marked inhibition of two principal fuel contaminants, Cladosporium resinae and a yeast (Candida sp.), also occurred with coal-derived fuel produced...from Phillips Petroleum Co. All fuels were stored at 40 C after receipt by the Naval Research Laboratory. Microorganisms The fungus, Cladosporium resinae

  11. Functional mathematical model of a hydrogen-driven combustion chamber for a scramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, A. F.

    2015-09-01

    A functional mathematical model of a hydrogen-driven combustion chamber for a scramjet is described. The model is constructed with the use of one-dimensional steady gas-dynamic equations and parametrization of the channel configuration and the governing parameters (fuel injection into the flow, fuel burnout along the channel, dissipation of kinetic energy, removal of some part of energy generated by gases for modeling cooling of channel walls by the fuel) with allowance for real thermophysical properties of the gases. Through parametric calculations, it is found that fuel injection in three cross sections of the channel consisting of segments with weak and strong expansion ensures a supersonic velocity of combustion products in the range of free-stream Mach numbers M∞ = 6-12. It is demonstrated that the angle between the velocity vectors of the gaseous hydrogen flow and the main gas flow can be fairly large in the case of distributed injection of the fuel. This allows effective control of the mixing process. It is proposed to use the exergy of combustion products as a criterion of the efficiency of heat supply in the combustion chamber. Based on the calculated values of exergy, the critical free-stream Mach number that still allows scramjet operation is estimated.

  12. Microbial community structure of a heavy fuel oil-degrading marine consortium: linking microbial dynamics with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon utilization.

    PubMed

    Vila, Joaquim; María Nieto, José; Mertens, Jelle; Springael, Dirk; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2010-08-01

    A marine microbial consortium obtained from a beach contaminated by the Prestige oil spill proved highly efficient in removing the different hydrocarbon families present in this heavy fuel oil. Seawater cultures showed a complete removal of all the linear and branched alkanes, an extensive attack on three to five-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs; including anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene] (30-100%), and a considerable depletion of their alkyl derivatives. Community dynamics analysis revealed that Alcanivorax species, known alkane degraders, predominated in the initial stages. This was followed by an increase in Alphaproteobacteria (i.e. Maricaulis, Roseovarius), which coincided with the depletion of low molecular PAHs. Finally, these were succeeded by Gammaproteobacteria (mainly Marinobacter and Methylophaga), which were involved in the degradation of the high molecular-weight PAHs. The role of these populations in the removal of the specific components was confirmed by the analysis of subcultures established using the aliphatic or the aromatic fraction of the fuel oil, or single PAHs, as carbon sources. The genus Marinobacter seemed to play a major role in the degradation of a variety of hydrocarbons, as several members of this group were isolated from the different enrichment cultures and grew on plates with hexadecane or single PAHs as sole carbon sources.

  13. Layered oxygen-deficient double perovskite as an efficient and stable anode for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sengodan, Sivaprakash; Choi, Sihyuk; Jun, Areum; Shin, Tae Ho; Ju, Young-Wan; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Jeeyoung; Irvine, John T S; Kim, Guntae

    2015-02-01

    Different layered perovskite-related oxides are known to exhibit important electronic, magnetic and electrochemical properties. Owing to their excellent mixed-ionic and electronic conductivity and fast oxygen kinetics, cation layered double perovskite oxides such as PrBaCo2O5 in particular have exhibited excellent properties as solid oxide fuel cell oxygen electrodes. Here, we show for the first time that related layered materials can be used as high-performance fuel electrodes. Good redox stability with tolerance to coking and sulphur contamination from hydrocarbon fuels is demonstrated for the layered perovskite anode PrBaMn2O5+δ (PBMO). The PBMO anode is fabricated by in situ annealing of Pr0.5Ba0.5MnO3-δ in fuel conditions and actual fuel cell operation is demonstrated. At 800 °C, layered PBMO shows high electrical conductivity of 8.16 S cm(-1) in 5% H2 and demonstrates peak power densities of 1.7 and 1.3 W cm(-2) at 850 °C using humidified hydrogen and propane fuels, respectively.

  14. A new alternative fuel for reduction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and particulate matter emissions from diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chung-Shin; Lin, Hsun-Yu; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Wu, Tser-Son; Chen, Kung-Fu

    2007-04-01

    This study investigated the emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), carcinogenic potential of PAH and particulate matter (PM), brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC), and power from diesel engines under transient cycle testing of six test fuels: premium diesel fuel (PDF), B100 (100% palm biodiesel), B20 (20% palm biodiesel + 80% PDF), BP9505 (95% paraffinic fuel + 5% palm biodiesel), BP8020 (80% paraffinic fuel + 20% palm biodiesel), and BP100 (100% paraffinic fuel; Table 1). Experimental results indicated that B100, BP9505, BP8020, and BP100 were much safer when stored than PDF. However, we must use additives so that B100 and BP100 will not gel as quickly in a cold zone. Using B100, BP9505, and BP8020 instead of PDF reduced PM, THC, and CO emissions dramatically but increased CO2 slightly because of more complete combustion. The CO2-increased fraction of BP9505 was the lowest among test blends. Furthermore, using B100, B20, BP9505, and BP8020 as alternative fuels reduced total PAHs and total benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration (total BaPeq) emissions significantly. BP9505 had the lowest decreased fractions of power and torque and increased fraction of BSFC. These experimental results implied that BP9505 is feasible for traveling diesel vehicles. Moreover, paraffinic fuel will likely be a new alternative fuel in the future. Using BP9505 instead of PDF decreased PM (22.8%), THC (13.4%), CO (25.3%), total PAHs (88.9%), and total BaPeq (88.1%) emissions significantly.

  15. Alleviation of Facility/Engine Interactions in an Open-Jet Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Emami, Saied

    2001-01-01

    Results of a series of shakedown tests to eliminate facility/engine interactions in an open-jet scramjet test facility are presented. The tests were conducted with the NASA DFX (Dual-Fuel eXperimental scramjet) engine in the NASA Langley Combustion Heated Scramjet Test Facility (CHSTF) in support of the Hyper-X program, The majority of the tests were conducted at a total enthalpy and pressure corresponding to Mach 5 flight at a dynamic pressure of 734 psf. The DFX is the largest engine ever tested in the CHSTF. Blockage, in terms of the projected engine area relative to the nozzle exit area, is 81% with the engine forebody leading edge aligned with the upper edge of the facility nozzle such that it ingests the nozzle boundary layer. The blockage increases to 95% with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. down in the core flow. Previous engines successfully tested in the CHSTF have had blockages of no more than 51%. Oil flow studies along with facility and engine pressure measurements were used to define flow behavior. These results guided modifications to existing aeroappliances and the design of new aeroappliances. These changes allowed fueled tests to be conducted without facility interaction effects in the data with the engine forebody leading edge positioned to ingest the facility nozzle boundary layer. Interaction effects were also reduced for tests with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. into the core flow, however some interaction effects were still evident in the engine data. A new shroud and diffuser have been designed with the goal of allowing fueled tests to be conducted with the engine forebody leading edge positioned in the core without facility interaction effects in the data. Evaluation tests of the new shroud and diffuser will be conducted once ongoing fueled engine tests have been completed.

  16. Hydrocarbons identified in extracts from estuarine water accommodated no. 2 fuel oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Walker, A. L.; Bieri, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented on a computerized gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analysis of methylene chloride and n-heptane extracts of a No. 2 fuel oil accommodated estuarine water sample. The analytical method is briefly described, and the limitations on the identifications are categorized. Some attempt was made to determine major and trace constituents in the water accommodate. Altogether 66 hydrocarbon compounds were identified specifically, and 75 compounds were partially identified. Seven compounds could be recognized as major constituents of the water accommodated oil and ten were present only as traces. The aromatic compounds found were alkyl benzenes, naphthalene, tetralin, indane, biphenyl, fluorene, anthracene, and some of their alkyl substituted isomers in the range of carbon numbers C7 to C15. Four n-alkanes, C10 to C13, were found along with four other assorted hydrocarbons.

  17. Ab initio Calculation of Thermodynamic Data for Oxygenated Hydrocarbon Fuels and Radial Breakdown Species: R(OMe)n

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, A; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Bozzelli, J; Glaude, P-A

    2001-03-23

    There has long been interest in the use of oxygenated hydrocarbon additives to conventional fuels. These oxygenates have been shown to reduce soot emissions in diesel engines and CO emissions in spark-ignition engines; and often allow diesel operation with decreased NO{sub x}. The current widely used additive, MTBE is targeted for elimination as a gasoline additive due to its damaging effects on the environment. This creates a need for alternative oxygenated additives; and more importantly, amplifies the importance to fully understand the thermochemical and kinetic properties on these oxyhydrocarbons fuels and for their intermediate and radical breakdown products. We use CBS-Q and density-functional methods with isodesmic reactions (with group balance when possible) to compute thermodynamic quantities for these species. We have studied hydrocarbons with multiple substituted methoxy groups. In several cases, multioxygenated species are evaluated that may have potential use as new oxygenated fuel additives. Thermodynamic quantities (H{sub 298}{sup 0}, S{sub 298}{sup 0}, C{sub p}(T)) as well as group additivity contributions for the new oxygenated groups are reported. We also report trends in bond-energies with increasing methoxy substitution.

  18. Evaluation of scramjet nozzle configurations and film cooling for reduction of wall heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, N. R.; Northam, G. B.; Stouffer, S. D.; Capriotti, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments on relaminarization, or reverse transition of turbulent flow, have been conducted with a scramjet combustor and nozzle model. The Mach-2.7 direct-connect scramjet combustor employed swept-ramp fuel injectors, and the entering flow simulated Mach-6 to Mach-7 flight conditions. Tests were also conducted without combustor fuel to produce a higher nozzle entrance Mach number and lower pressures. Additional tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of film cooling on the cowl region. At each test condition studied, the entrance radius had no significant effect on the measured downstream wall heating rates. Analysis of the data when fuel was injected into the combustor shows good agreement with turbulent theory; for the tests without fuel injection and combustion, the data downstream of the nozzle entrance radius are intermediate to the calculated turbulent and laminar solutions. Results of film-cooling tests, conducted with both hydrogen and nitrogen injectants, showed that, per unit mass, the hydrogen was approximately three to four times more effective than nitrogen in reducing the downstream wall heating rates.

  19. Thermal behavior in the cracking reaction zone of scramjet cooling channels at different channel aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Silong; Feng, Yu; Jiang, Yuguang; Qin, Jiang; Bao, Wen; Han, Jiecai; Haidn, Oskar J.

    2016-10-01

    To study the thermal behavior in the cracking reaction zone of regeneratively cooled scramjet cooling channels at different aspect ratios, 3-D model of fuel flow in terms of the fuel's real properties and cracking reaction is built and validated through experiments. The whole cooling channel is divided into non-cracking and cracking reaction zones. Only the cracking reaction zone is studied in this article. The simulation results indicate that the fuel conversion presents a similar distribution with temperature because the fuel conversion in scramjet cooling channels is co-decided by the temperature and velocity but the temperature plays the dominate role. For the cases given in this paper, increasing the channel aspect ratio will increase the pressure drop and it is not beneficial for reducing the wall temperature because of the much severer thermal stratification, larger conversion non-uniformity, the corresponding M-shape velocity profile which will cause local heat transfer deterioration and the decreased chemical heat absorption. And the decreased chemical heat absorption caused by stronger temperature and conversion non-uniformities is bad for the utilization of chemical heat sink, chemical recuperation process and the ignition performance.

  20. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 11 for thrid quarter FY 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Foral, M.J.

    1990-12-31

    The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

  1. Thermodynamic study of characteristics of the converter with separated supply of hydrocarbon fuel for thermo-oxidative and steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassina, I. A.; Malkov, Yu. P.; Molchanov, O. N.; Stepanov, S. G.; Troshchinenko, G. A.; Zasypkin, I. M.

    2014-04-01

    Thermodynamic studies of the converter characteristics were performed to produce hydrogen-containing syngas from hydrocarbon fuel (kerosene) with its separated supply for thermo-oxidative and steam reforming. It is demonstrated that the optimal conditions of the converter performance correlate with the oxidant ratio of α > 0.5 at the heattransfer wall temperature of 1200 K. Hydrogen content in the final syngas reaches 60 % by volume, free carbon (soot) deposition in reforming products is excluded, and there is no need to apply walls water cooling in the converter.

  2. Numerical simulation and modeling of combustion in scramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Ryan James

    In the last fifteen years the development of a viable scramjet has quickly approached the following long term goals: responsive sub-orbital space access; long-range, prompt global strike; and high-speed transportation. Nonetheless, there are significant challenges that need to be resolved. These challenges include high skin friction drag and high heat transfer rates, inherent to vehicles in sustained, hypersonic flight. Another challenge is sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation and modeling was performed to provide insight into reducing skin friction drag and sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation was used to investigate boundary layer combustion, which has been shown to reduce skin friction drag. The objective of the numerical simulations was to quantify the effect of fuel injection parameters on boundary layer combustion and ultimately on the change in the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate. A qualitative analysis of the results suggest that the reduction in the skin friction coefficient depends on multiple parameters and potentially an interaction between parameters. Sustained combustion can be achieved through a stabilized detonation wave. Additionally, stabilizing a detonation wave will yield rapid combustion. This will allow for a shorter and lighter-weight engine system, resulting in less required combustor cooling. A stabilized detonation wave was numerically modeled for various inlet and geometric cases. The effect of fuel concentration, inlet Mach number, and geometric configuration on the stability of a detonation wave was quantified. Correlations were established between fuel concentration, inlet speed, geometric configuration and parameters characterizing the detonation wave. A linear relationship was quantified between the fuel concentration and the parameters characterizing the detonation wave.

  3. Effect of Sulfur and Hydrocarbon Fuels on Titanate/Ceria SOFC Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, O.A.; Pedersen, L.R.; Stevenson, J.W.

    2005-01-27

    The purpose of the project is to develop low-cost, high-performance anodes that offer low polarization resistance as well as improved tolerance for nonidealities in anode environment such as redox cycles, sulfur and other poisons, and hydrocarbons.

  4. Preflame zone structure and main features of fuel conversion in atmospheric pressure premixed laminar hydrocarbon flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ksandopulo, G.I.

    1995-08-25

    This report describes the structure study of the premixed hydrocarbon-oxidizer Bunsen flames burning at the atmospheric pressure and also the ones with some inhibitors added. Studies were performed on hexane, propane, methane, acetylene, and hexene flames.

  5. Recent Advances in Detailed Chemical Kinetic Models for Large Hydrocarbon and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Herbinet, O; Mehl, M

    2009-03-30

    n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for these two primary reference fuels for diesel, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Also, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. Methyl decanoate and methyl stearate are large methyl esters that are closely related to biodiesel fuels, and kinetic models for these molecules have also been developed. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the fuel molecule size and structure on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  6. Generation of Comprehensive Surrogate Kinetic Models and Validation Databases for Simulating Large Molecular Weight Hydrocarbon Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-25

    kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Combustion of n-Alkane Hydrocarbons from n-Octane to n-Hexadecane”, Combust Flame (2009) 156:181-199. [19] Sarathy... enthalpy of reaction and the adiabatic flame temperature which in turn strongly influence flame velocity as well as other flame phenomena. Though a... reaction temperature and, in addition to providing general validation data, those pathways that contribute to the formation of poly aromatic hydrocarbons

  7. A highly efficient engineering tool for three-dimensional scramjet flowfield and heat transfer computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamath, Pradeep S.; Hawkins, Richard W.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Mcclinton, Charles R.

    1991-01-01

    The SIMPLE-based parabolic flow code, SHIP3D, was under development for use as a parametric design and analysis tool for scramjets. Some capabilities and applications of the code are demonstrated, and a report on its current status is given. The focus is on the combustor for which the code was mostly used. Recently, it was also applied to nozzle flows. Code validation results are presented for combustor unit problems involving film cooling, transverse fuel injection, and nozzle test. A parametric study of a film cooled or transpiration cooled Mach 16 combustor is also conducted to illustrate the application of the code to a design problem.

  8. Thermocatalytic CO{sub 2}-Free Production of Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon Fuels - Final Report for the Period August 1999 - September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Nazim Muradov, Ph.D.

    2000-10-01

    The overall objective of this work is to develop a novel process for CO{sub 2}-free production of hydrogen via thermocatalytic decomposition (pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels as a viable alternative to the conventional processes of methane steam reforming or partial oxidation. The objective of Phase I work was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of CO{sub 2}-free production of hydrogen and carbon from different hydrocarbons, including methane, propane and gasoline.

  9. Methylol polyesters of C12-C22 hydrocarbon substituted succinic anhydride or acid, their preparation and use as additives for lubricants and fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, A.; Ryer, J.; Shaub, H.; Winans, E.D.

    1980-06-24

    Methylol polyester derivatives of C12-C22 hydrocarbon substituted succinic anhydride or acid which are the equimolar reaction products of said C12-C22 hydrocarbon substituted succinic anhydride or acid and a cyclic poly(Methylol) compound provide activity: in fuels as rust inhibitors; in automatic transmission fluids as copper corrosion inhibitors; and, in automotive, industrial and lubricating oils as sludge dispersants , rust-inhibitors, friction reducers (Lubricity agents) and copper alloy corrosion inhibitors.

  10. Hyper-X Research Vehicle - Artist Concept in Flight with Scramjet Engine Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is an artist's depiction of a Hyper-X research vehicle under scramjet power in free-flight following separation from its booster rocket. The X-43A was developed to flight test a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet propulsion system at speeds from Mach 7 up to Mach 10 (7 to 10 times the speed of sound, which varies with temperature and altitude). Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need

  11. A survey of Opportunities for Microbial Conversion of Biomass to Hydrocarbon Compatible Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, Iva; Jones, Susanne B.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Dai, Ziyu; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2010-09-01

    Biomass is uniquely able to supply renewable and sustainable liquid transportation fuels. In the near term, the Biomass program has a 2012 goal of cost competitive cellulosic ethanol. However, beyond 2012, there will be an increasing need to provide liquid transportation fuels that are more compatible with the existing infrastructure and can supply fuel into all transportation sectors, including aviation and heavy road transport. Microbial organisms are capable of producing a wide variety of fuel and fuel precursors such as higher alcohols, ethers, esters, fatty acids, alkenes and alkanes. This report surveys liquid fuels and fuel precurors that can be produced from microbial processes, but are not yet ready for commercialization using cellulosic feedstocks. Organisms, current research and commercial activities, and economics are addressed. Significant improvements to yields and process intensification are needed to make these routes economic. Specifically, high productivity, titer and efficient conversion are the key factors for success.

  12. Doped CeO2-LaFeO3 composite oxide as an active anode for direct hydrocarbon-type solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Tae Ho; Ida, Shintaro; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2011-12-07

    Direct utilization of hydrocarbon and other renewable fuels is one of the most important issues concerning solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Mixed ionic and electronic conductors (MIECs) have been explored as anode materials for direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs. However, electrical conductivity of the most often reported MIEC oxide electrodes is still not satisfactory. As a result, mixed-conducting oxides with high electrical conductivity and catalytic activity are attracting considerable interest as an alternative anode material for noncoke depositing anodes. In this study, we examine the oxide composite Ce(Mn,Fe)O(2)-La(Sr)Fe(Mn)O(3) for use as an oxide anode in direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs. High performance was demonstrated for this composite oxide anode in direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs, showing high maximum power density of approximately 1 W cm(-2) at 1073 K when propane and butane were used as fuel. The high power density of the cell results from the high electrical conductivity of the composite oxide in hydrocarbon and the high surface activity in relation to direct hydrocarbon oxidation.

  13. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Mittal, A.; Mohagheghi, A.; Johnson, D. K.

    2014-04-01

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. Cupriavidus necator is the microorganism that has been most extensively studied and used for PHB production on an industrial scale; However the substrates used for producing PHB are mainly fructose, glucose, sucrose, fatty acids, glycerol, etc., which are expensive. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified slurry from pretreated corn stover. The strain was first investigated in shake flasks for its ability to utilize glucose, xylose and acetate. In addition, the strain was also grown on pretreated lignocellulose hydrolyzate slurry and evaluated in terms of cell growth, sugar utilization, PHB accumulation, etc. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by the pretreatment and saccharification process of biomass, was also studied.

  14. Speciated hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions from an internal combustion engine operating on methyl tertiary butyl ether-containing fuels.

    PubMed

    Poulopoulos, S G; Philippopoulos, C J

    2001-07-01

    In the present work, engine and tailpipe (after a three-way catalytic converter) emissions from an internal combustion engine operating on two oxygenated blend fuels [containing 2 and 11% weight/weight (w/w) methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE)] and on a nonoxygenated base fuel were characterized. The engine (OPEL 1.6 L) was operated under various conditions, in the range of 0-20 HP. Total unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, methane, hexane, ethylene, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-propanol, benzene, toluene, 1,3-butadiene, acetic acid, and MTBE were measured at each engine operating condition. As concerns the total HC emissions, the use of MTBE was beneficial from 1.90 to 3.81 HP, which were by far the most polluting conditions. Moreover, CO emissions in tailpipe exhaust were decreased in the whole operation range with increasing MTBE in the fuel. The greatest advantage of MTBE addition to gasoline was the decrease in ethylene, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and acetic acid emissions in engine exhaust, especially when MTBE content in the fuel was increased to 11% w/w. In tailpipe exhaust, the catalyst operation diminished the observed differences. Ethylene, methane, and acetaldehyde were the main compounds present in exhaust gases. Ethylene was easily oxidized over the catalyst, while acetaldehyde and methane were quite resistant to oxidation.

  15. NASCRIN - NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF SCRAMJET INLET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASCRIN program was developed for analyzing two-dimensional flow fields in supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) inlets. NASCRIN solves the two-dimensional Euler or Navier-Stokes equations in conservative form by an unsplit, explicit, two-step finite-difference method. A more recent explicit-implicit, two-step scheme has also been incorporated in the code for viscous flow analysis. An algebraic, two-layer eddy-viscosity model is used for the turbulent flow calculations. NASCRIN can analyze both inviscid and viscous flows with no struts, one strut, or multiple struts embedded in the flow field. NASCRIN can be used in a quasi-three-dimensional sense for some scramjet inlets under certain simplifying assumptions. Although developed for supersonic internal flow, NASCRIN may be adapted to a variety of other flow problems. In particular, it should be readily adaptable to subsonic inflow with supersonic outflow, supersonic inflow with subsonic outflow, or fully subsonic flow. The NASCRIN program is available for batch execution on the CDC CYBER 203. The vectorized FORTRAN version was developed in 1983. NASCRIN has a central memory requirement of approximately 300K words for a grid size of about 3,000 points.

  16. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC and C/C for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for use as lightweight hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a carbon/carbon (C/C) and a carbon/carbon-silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) material fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) 8, a joint Australia / Air Force Research Laboratory hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kilopascals. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and C/C-SiC materials were installed downstream of a hydrogen-fueled, dual-mode scramjet combustor and tested for several minutes at conditions simulating flight at Mach 5 and Mach 6. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used during some of the tests to reduce heat loss from the back surface and thus increase the heated surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel approximately 177 C (350 F). The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for three cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  17. Numerical investigation of combustion field of hypervelocity scramjet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shikong; Li, Jiang; Qin, Fei; Huang, Zhiwei; Xue, Rui

    2016-12-01

    A numerical study of the ground testing of a hydrogen-fueled scramjet engine was undertaken using the commercial computational-fluid-dynamics code CFD++. The simulated Mach number was 12. A 7-species, 9-reaction-step hydrogen-air chemistry kinetics system was adopted for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulation. The two-equation SST turbulence model, which takes into account the wall functions, was used to handle the turbulence-chemistry interactions. The results were validated by experimentally measuring the wall pressure distribution, and the values obtained proved to be in good agreement. The flow pattern at non-reaction/reaction is presented, as are the results of analyzing the supersonic premix/non-premix flame structure, the reaction heat release distribution in different modes, and the change in the equivalence ratio. In this study, we realize the working mode of a hypervelocity engine and provide some suggestions for the combustion organization of the engine as well as offer insight into the potential for exploiting the processes of combustion and flow.

  18. Development and fabrication of structural components for a scramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1990-01-01

    A program broadly directed toward design and development of long-life (100 hours and 1,000 cycles with a goal of 1,000 hours and 10,000 cycles) hydrogen-cooled structures for application to scramjets is presented. Previous phases of the program resulted in an overall engine design and analytical and experimental characterization of selected candidate materials and concepts. The latter efforts indicated that the basic life goals for the program can be reached with available means. The main objective of this effort was an integrated, experimental evaluation of the results of the previous program phases. The fuel injection strut was selected for this purpose, including fabrication development and fabrication of a full-scale strut. Testing of the completed strut was to be performed in a NASA-Langley wind tunnel. In addition, conceptual designs were formulated for a heat transfer test unit and a flat panel structural test unit. Tooling and fabrication procedures required to fabricate the strut were developed, and fabrication and delivery to NASA of all strut components, including major subassemblies, were completed.

  19. Numerical study of the performance of a model scramjet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhumadi, Ayad

    A computational parametric investigation was conducted to study the effect of variations to several geometric parameters on the performance of a two-dimensional model scramjet engine (square cross section area for 3-D model). Geometric parameters included backstep location, height, and angle and fuel injector angle, diameter, and location. Two- and three-dimensional geometries have been studied, using a finite-volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (FLUENT) with structured grids with sizes between 50,000 and 90,000 cells for the two-dimensional geometry and with structured hexahedral grid sizes between 650,000 and 949,725 cells for the three-dimensional geometry. Otherwise, identical values of program inputs were utilized for the two- and three-dimensional simulations. Performance parameters investigated were combustion efficiency, thrust, pressure losses, and the equivalence ratio for the hydrogen-air combustor. A set of values for independent variables was identified which resulted in maximum thrust, minimum pressure losses, and an equivalence ratio close to unity.

  20. Advanced fuel hydrocarbon remediation national test location - biocell treatment of petroleum contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, J.; Lory, E.

    1997-03-01

    Biocells are engineered systems that use naturally occurring microbes to degrade fuels and oils into simpler, nonhazardous, and nontoxic compounds. Biocells are able to treat soils contaminated with petroleum based fuels and lubricants, including diesel, jet fuel, and lubricating and hydraulic oils. The microbes use the contaminants as a food source and thus destroy them. By carefully monitoring and controlling air and moisture levels, degradation rates can be increased and total treatment time reduced over natural systems.

  1. Fuel Plume Image Mixing Analysis Formulation With Proper Treatment of Non-Constant Velocity Flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekkes, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    A previously developed technique allows an estimate of integral mixing to be obtained from an image of laser scattered light from particle seeded fuel in the hypervelocity flow through a scramjet combustor. This previous mixing analysis formulation contains an assumption of a constant velocity flowfield across the plane of the fuel plume image. For high-speed scramjet combustors, the velocity flowfield is quite uniform and an assumption of constant velocity works well. Applying this same mixing analysis technique to fuel plume images obtained from a mid-speed scramjet combustor makes it desirable to remove the constant velocity assumption. This is due to the non-uniform velocity flowfields present in mid-speed scramjet combustors. A new formulation of the mixing analysis methodology is developed and presented so that the technique can be applied to a mid-speed scramjet combustor without the need to assume a constant velocity flowfield.

  2. CFD prediction of the reacting flow field inside a subscale scramjet combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitsomboon, T.; Northam, G. B.; Rogers, R. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD code has been used to calculate the reacting flowfield inside a hydrogen-fueled, subscale scramjet combustor. Pilot fuel was injected transversely upstream of the combustor and the primary fuel was injected transversely downstream of a backward facing step. A finite rate combustion model with two-step kinetics was used. The CFD code used the explicit MacCormack algorithm with point-implicit treatment of the chemistry source terms. Turbulent mixing of the jets with the airstream was simulated by a simple mixing length scheme, whereas near wall turbulence was accounted for by the Baldwin-Lomax model. Computed results were compared with experimental wall pressure measurements.

  3. High-rate solar photocatalytic conversion of CO2 and water vapor to hydrocarbon fuels.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Oomman K; Paulose, Maggie; Latempa, Thomas J; Grimes, Craig A

    2009-02-01

    Efficient solar conversion of carbon dioxide and water vapor to methane and other hydrocarbons is achieved using nitrogen-doped titania nanotube arrays, with a wall thickness low enough to facilitate effective carrier transfer to the adsorbing species, surface-loaded with nanodimensional islands of cocatalysts platinum and/or copper. All experiments are conducted in outdoor sunlight at University Park, PA. Intermediate reaction products, hydrogen and carbon monoxide, are also detected with their relative concentrations underlying hydrocarbon production rates and dependent upon the nature of the cocatalysts on the nanotube array surface. Using outdoor global AM 1.5 sunlight, 100 mW/cm(2), a hydrocarbon production rate of 111 ppm cm(-2) h(-1), or approximately 160 microL/(g h), is obtained when the nanotube array samples are loaded with both Cu and Pt nanoparticles. This rate of CO(2) to hydrocarbon production obtained under outdoor sunlight is at least 20 times higher than previous published reports, which were conducted under laboratory conditions using UV illumination.

  4. Hydrocarbon Release During Fuel Storage and Transfer at Gas Stations: Environmental and Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Hilpert, Markus; Mora, Bernat Adria; Ni, Jian; Rule, Ana M; Nachman, Keeve E

    2015-12-01

    At gas stations, fuel is stored and transferred between tanker trucks, storage tanks, and vehicle tanks. During both storage and transfer, a small fraction of unburned fuel is typically released to the environment unless pollution prevention technology is used. While the fraction may be small, the cumulative release can be substantial because of the large quantities of fuel sold. The cumulative release of unburned fuel is a public health concern because gas stations are widely distributed in residential areas and because fuel contains toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. We review the pathways through which gasoline is chronically released to atmospheric, aqueous, and subsurface environments, and how these releases may adversely affect human health. Adoption of suitable pollution prevention technology should not only be based on equipment and maintenance cost but also on energy- and health care-saving benefits.

  5. Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.S.; Anh, D.H.; Chung, S.H.

    2008-08-15

    Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

  6. Group-type hydrocarbon standards for high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of middistillate fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterson, D. A.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    A new high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for group-type analysis of middistillate fuels is described. It uses a refractive index detector and standards that are prepared by reacting a portion of the fuel sample with sulfuric acid. A complete analysis of a middistillate fuel for saturates and aromatics (including the preparation of the standard) requires about 15 min if standards for several fuels are prepared simultaneously. From model fuel studies, the method was found to be accurate to within 0.4 vol% saturates or aromatics, and provides a precision of + or - 0.4 vol%. Olefin determinations require an additional 15 min of analysis time. However, this determination is needed only for those fuels displaying a significant olefin response at 200 nm (obtained routinely during the saturated/aromatics analysis procedure). The olefin determination uses the responses of the olefins and the corresponding saturates, as well as the average value of their refractive index sensitivity ratios (1.1). Studied indicated that, although the relative error in the olefins result could reach 10 percent by using this average sensitivity ratio, it was 5 percent for the fuels used in this study. Olefin concentrations as low as 0.1 vol% have been determined using this method.

  7. Numerical simulation of scramjet inlet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    1986-01-01

    A computer program was developed to analyze supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) inlet flow fields. The program solves the three-dimensional Euler or Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations in full conservation form by either the fully explicit or explicit-implicit, predictor-corrector method of MacCormack. Turbulence is modeled by an algebraic eddy-viscosity model. The analysis allows inclusion of end effects which can significantly affect the inlet flow field. Detailed laminar and turbulent flow results are presented for a symmetric-wedge corner, and comparisons are made with the available experimental results to allow assessment of the program. Results are then presented for two inlet configurations for which experimental results exist at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  8. Assessment of turbulent models for scramjet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindir, M. M.; Harsha, P. T.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of several turbulence models applied to the prediction of scramjet combustor flows is described. These models include the basic two equation model, the multiple dissipation length scale variant of the two equation model, and the algebraic stress model (ASM). Predictions were made of planar backward facing step flows and axisymmetric sudden expansion flows using each of these approaches. The formulation of each of these models are discussed, and the application of the different approaches to supersonic flows is described. A modified version of the ASM is found to provide the best prediction of the planar backward facing step flow in the region near the recirculation zone, while the basic ASM provides the best results downstream of the recirculation. Aspects of the interaction of numerica modeling and turbulences modeling as they affect the assessment of turbulence models are discussed.

  9. Dual-Pump CARS Measurements in the University of Virginia's Dual-Mode Scramjet: Configuration "C"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cantu, Luca; Gallo, Emanuela; Danehy, Paul M.; Rockwell, Robert; Goyne, Christopher; McDaniel, James

    2013-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted at the University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility in configuration C of the dual-mode scramjet. This is a continuation of previously published works on configuration A. The scramjet is hydrogen fueled and operated at two equivalence ratios, one representative of the scram mode and the other of the ram mode. Dual-pump CARS was used to acquire the mole fractions of the major species as well as the rotational and vibrational temperatures of N2. Developments in methods and uncertainties in fitting CARS spectra for vibrational temperature are discussed. Mean quantities and the standard deviation of the turbulent fluctuations at multiple planes in the flow path are presented. In the scram case the combustion of fuel is completed before the end of the measurement domain, while for the ram case the measurement domain extends into the region where the flow is accelerating and combustion is almost completed. Higher vibrational than rotational temperature is observed in those parts of the hot combustion plume where there is substantial H2 (and hence chemical reaction) present.

  10. Numerically simulated comparative performance of a scramjet and shcramjet at Mach 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jonathan

    This study investigates the design and aeropropulsive performance of a complete, hydrogen powered, shock-induced combustion ramjet (shcramjet) at a flight Mach number of 11 and altitude of 34.5 km. The design includes a Prandtl-Meyer compression inlet, cantilevered ramp fuel injectors, a shock-inducing wedge and a divergent nozzle. Numerical studies are undertaken using the WARP code that solves the three-dimensional Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations closed by the Wilcox k-o turbulence model and the Jachimowski H2/air chemical kinetics model. Studies of fuel injection properties, mixing duct length, combustor wedge and nozzle geometry are completed to maximize the overall performance of the vehicle. The final shcramjet configuration generates a specific impulse of 1110 s. A comparison is undertaken with a scramjet vehicle at identical flight conditions and using many of the same components. The comparable scramjet generates a higher specific impulse of 1450 s although it is significantly larger and therefore heavier.

  11. Understanding of catalyst deactivation caused by sulfur poisoning and carbon deposition in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chao

    2011-12-01

    The present work was conducted to develop a better understanding on the catalyst deactivation in steam reforming of sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon fuels for hydrogen production. Steam reforming of Norpar13 (a liquid hydrocarbon fuel from Exxon Mobile) without and with sulfur was performed on various metal catalysts (Rh, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Ni) supported on different materials (Al2O3, CeO2, SiO2, MgO, and CeO2- Al2O3). A number of characterization techniques were applied to study the physicochemical properties of these catalysts before and after the reactions. Especially, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was intensively used to investigate the nature of sulfur and carbon species in the used catalysts to reveal the catalyst deactivation mechanism. Among the tested noble metal catalysts (Rh, Ru, Pt, and Pd), Rh catalyst is the most sulfur tolerant. Al2O3 and CeO2 are much better than SiO2 and MgO as the supports for the Rh catalyst to reform sulfur-containing hydrocarbons. The good sulfur tolerance of Rh/Al2O3 can be attributed to the acidic nature of the Al2O3 support and its small Rh crystallites (1-3 nm) as these characteristics facilitate the formation of electron-deficient Rh particles with high sulfur tolerance. The good catalytic performance of Rh/CeO2 in the presence of sulfur can be ascribed to the promotion effect of CeO2 on carbon gasification, which significantly reduced the carbon deposition on the Rh/CeO2catalyst. Steam reforming of Norpar13 in the absence and presence of sulfur was further carried out over CeO2-Al2O3 supported monometallic Ni and Rh and bimetallic Rh-Ni catalysts at 550 and 800 °C. Both monometallic catalysts rapidly deactivated at 550 °C, iv and showed poor sulfur tolerance. Although ineffective for the Ni catalyst, increasing the temperature to 800 °C dramatically improved the sulfur tolerance of the Rh catalyst. Sulfur K-edge XANES revealed that metal sulfide and organic sulfide are the dominant sulfur

  12. The Use of a Flash Vaporization System With Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Peng , D . Y ., and Robinson , D . B ., “A New Two-Constant Equation of State,” Ind . Eng . Chem ., Fundam ...msec) Pr es su re ( b ar ) Manifold Pressure Head Pressure Figure 4. Premixed manifold and head pressure traces (absolute) for 15 Hz test...program uses the thermo physical properties of hydrocarbon mixtures database and computes the vapor-liquid equilibrium using the Peng - Robinson

  13. Hydrocarbon type analysis of jet fuels by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Hunter, P.M.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes the application of NMR spectroscopy to the chemical characterization without prior chromatographic separation of jet fuels and various fuel blends containing varying amounts of paraffinic and aromatic constituents. Equations are derived by which the total percent paraffins and aromatics as well as percent monoaromatics and diaromatics can be calculated. Computer programs for the various calculations are included. The results obtained by NMR are compared to those obtained by MS.

  14. Effect of fuel nitrogen and hydrogen content on emissions in hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Wolfbrandt, G.

    1981-01-01

    How the emissions of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide are affected by: (1) the decreased hydrogen content and (2) the increased organic nitrogen content of coal derived fuels is investigated. Previous CRT experimental work in a two stage flame tube has shown the effectiveness of rich lean two stage combustion in reducing fuel nitrogen conversion to nitrogen oxides. Previous theoretical work gave preliminary indications that emissions trends from the flame tube experiment could be predicted by a two stage, well stirred reactor combustor model using a detailed chemical mechanism for propane oxidation and nitrogen oxide formation. Additional computations are reported and comparisons with experimental results for two additional fuels and a wide range of operating conditions are given. Fuels used in the modeling are pure propane, a propane toluene mixture and pure toluene. These give hydrogen contents 18, 11 and 9 percent by weight, respectively. Fuel bound nitrogen contents of 0.5 and 1.0 percent were used. Results are presented for oxides of nitrogen and also carbon monoxide concentrations as a function of primary equivalence ratio, hydrogen content and fuel bound nitrogen content.

  15. Natural attenuation of fuel hydrocarbon contaminants: Hydraulic conductivity dependency of biodegradation rates in a field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-07-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  16. Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbon Contaminants: Correlation of Biodegradation with Hydraulic Conductivity in a Field Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-10-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, USA. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  17. Results of the NASP Ames Integrated Mixing Hypersonic Engine (AIMHYE) Scramjet Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the test techniques and results from the National Aerospace Plane Government Work Package 53, the Ames Integrated Mixing Hypersonic Engine (AIMHYE) Scramjet Test program conducted in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Combustion Driven Shock Tunnel. This was a series of near full-scale scramjet combustor tests with the objective to obtain high speed combustor and nozzle data from an engine with injector configurations similar to the NASP E21 and E22a designs. The experimental test approach was to use a large combustor model (80-100% throat height) designed and fabricated for testing in the semi-free jet mode. The conditions tested were similar to the "blue book" conditions at Mach 12, 14, and 16. GWP 53 validated use of large, long test time impulse facilities, specifically the Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel, for high Mach number scramjet propulsion testing an integrated test rig (inlet, combustor, and nozzle). Discussion of key features of the test program will include: effects of the 2-D combustor inlet pressure profile; performance of large injectors' fueling system that included nozzlettes, base injection, and film cooling; and heat transfer measurements to the combustor. Significant instrumentation development and application efforts include the following: combustor force balance application for measurement of combustor drag for comparison with integrated point measurements of skin friction; nozzle metric strip for measuring thrust with comparison to integrated pressure measurements; and nonintrusive optical fiber-based diode laser absorption measurements of combustion products for determination of combustor performance. Direct measurements will be reported for specific test article configurations and compared with CFD solutions.

  18. Understanding the role of multifunctional nanoengineered particulate additives on supercritical pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels/propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Hyung Sub

    This dissertation aims to understand the fundamental effects of colloidal nanostructured materials on the supercritical pyrolysis, injection, ignition, and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels/propellants. As a fuel additive, functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) without or with the decoration of metal catalysts, such as platinum (Pt) or polyoxometalates (POM) nanoparticles, were examined against conventional materials including nanometer sized fumed silica and aluminum particles. Supercritical pyrolysis experiments were performed as a function of temperature, residence time, and particle type, using a high pressure and temperature flow reactor designed to provide isothermal and isobaric flow conditions. Supercritical pyrolysis results showed that the addition of FGS-based particles at a loading concentration of 50 ppmw increased the conversion rates and reduced apparent activation energies for methylcyclohexane (MCH) and n-dodecane (n-C12H26) fuels. For example, conversion rates, and formations of C1-C5 n-alkanes and C2-C6 1-alkenes were significantly increased by 43.5 %, 59.1 %, and 50.0 % for MCH decomposition using FGS 19 (50 ppmw) at a temperature of 820 K and reduced pressure of 1.36. In addition, FGS decorated with 20 wt % Pt (20wt%Pt FGS) at a loading concentration of 50 ppmw exhibited additional enhancement in the conversion rate of n-C12H26 by up to 24.0 % compared to FGS. Especially, FGS-based particles seem to alter initiation mechanisms, which could result in higher hydrogen formation. Hydrogen selectivities for both MCH and n-C12H26 decompositions were observed to increase by nearly a factor of 2 and 10, respectively. Supercritical injection and combustion experiments were conducted using a high pressure and temperature windowed combustion chamber coupled to the flow reactor through a feed system. Supercritical injection/combustion experiments indicated that the presence of a small amount of particles (100 ppmw) in the fuel affected the injection, ignition

  19. Production of hydrocarbon fuels from pyrolysis of soybean oils using a basic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junming; Jiang, Jianchun; Sun, Yunjuan; Chen, Jie

    2010-12-01

    Triglycerides obtained from animals and plants have attracted great attention from researchers for developing an environmental friendly and high-quality fuel, free of nitrogen and sulfur. In the present work, the production of biofuel by catalytic cracking of soybean oil over a basic catalyst in a continuous pyrolysis reactor at atmospheric pressure has been studied. Experiments were designed to study the effect of different types of catalysts on the yield and acid value of the diesel and gasoline fractions from the pyrolytic oil. It was found that basic catalyst gave a product with relatively low acid number. These pyrolytic oils were also further reacted with alcohol in order to decrease their acid value. After esterification, the physico-chemical properties of these biofuels were characterized, and compared with Chinese specifications for conventional diesel fuels. The results showed that esterification of pyrolytic oil from triglycerides represents an alternative technique for producing biofuels from soybean oils with characteristics similar to those of petroleum fuels.

  20. Atmospheric Chemistry of Hydrocarbon Fuels. Volume 2. Outdoor Chamber Data Tabulations. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    measurements of temperature, WV intensity, and (in some cases) dew point. 1 "* Initial concentrations of NO, N02 , toval hydrocarbon, and (for n- butane...RATE ID LABEL DESCRIPTION (ML/ MTN ) 1790 D-1790 DASIBI 1790 OZONE MONITOR 4600 B-NOX-1 BENDIX 8101BX NOX ANALYZER) SN300038-2 1600 BK6800-2 BECKMAN...3 1505 3245 4, 3 1515 3255 14, NO DATA WAKEN S S AFF- 55 JP-1O, DYNAMIC 1980,DEC 10-12 DAY 1 (DEC 10) 705: BAG FILLED WITH PURE AIR. 705: DEW PT

  1. A quantum chemistry study on thermochemical properties of high energy-density endothermic hydrocarbon fuel JP-10.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiao-Mei; Xie, Hu-Jun; Yue, Lei; Lu, Xiao-Xing; Fang, Wen-Jun

    2014-04-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the M06-2X/6-31++G(d,p) level have been performed to explore the molecular structure, electronic structure, C-H bond dissociation enthalpy, and reaction enthalpies for five isodesmic reactions of a high energy-density endothermic hydrocarbon fuel JP-10. On the basis of the calculations, it is found that the carbonium ion C-6 isomer formed from the catalytic cracking at the C₆ site of JP-10 has the lowest energy, and the R-5 radical generated from the thermal cracking at the C₅ site of JP-10 is the most stable isomer. Furthermore, a series of hypothetical and isodesmic work reactions containing similar bond environments are used to calculate the reaction enthalpies for target compounds. For the same isodesmic reaction, the reaction enthalpy of each carbon site radical has also been calculated. The present work is of fundamental significance and strategic importance to provide some valuable insights into the component design and energy utilization of advanced endothermic fuels.

  2. Biomass Conversion to Produce Hydrocarbon Liquid Fuel Via Hot-vapor Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydrotreating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C; French, Richard J; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-12-25

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. The protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.

  3. Biomass Conversion to Produce Hydrocarbon Liquid Fuel Via Hot-vapor Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydrotreating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C.; French, Richard J.; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. The protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research. PMID:28060311

  4. Biomass conversion to produce hydrocarbon liquid fuel via hot-vapor filtered fast pyrolysis and catalytic hydrotreating

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C.; French, Richard J.; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-12-25

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. As a result, the protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.

  5. Biomass conversion to produce hydrocarbon liquid fuel via hot-vapor filtered fast pyrolysis and catalytic hydrotreating

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C.; French, Richard J.; ...

    2016-12-25

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and themore » processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. As a result, the protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.« less

  6. Biomass Conversion to Produce Hydrocarbon Liquid Fuel Via Hot-vapor Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydrotreating

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C.; French, Richard J.; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. The protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.

  7. Performance Investigation and Characterization of Scramjet and Dual-Mode Scramjet Flow-Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The following compilation documents significant deliverables under this grant. Note that this summary is extracted from a larger report provided to the Hyper-X office last year at the conclusion of the grant. Current status is documented of the ongoing JANNAF (Joint-Army-Navy-NASA-AirForce) Scramjet Test standards activity from the standpoint of the Analysis SubGroup of which the PI was requested by NASA to be chairman. Also included are some representative contributions to date from the Principle investigator relating to this activity.

  8. Renewable hydrocarbons for jet fuels from biomass and plastics via microwave-induced pyrolysis and hydrogenation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuesong

    This dissertation aims to enhance the production of aromatic hydrocarbons in the catalytic microwave-induced pyrolysis, and maximize the production of renewable cycloalkanes for jet fuels in the hydrogenation process. In the process, ZSM-5 catalyst as the highly efficient catalyst was employed for catalyzing the pyrolytic volatiles from thermal decomposition of cellulose (a model compound of lignocellulosic biomass). A central composite experiment design (CCD) was used to optimize the product yields as a function of independent factors (e.g. catalytic temperature and catalyst to feed mass ratio). The low-density polyethylene (a mode compound of waste plastics) was then carried out in the catalytic microwave-induced pyrolysis in the presence of ZSM-5 catalyst. Thereafter, the catalytic microwave-induced co-pyrolysis of cellulose with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was conducted over ZSM-5 catalyst. The results showed that the production of aromatic hydrocarbons was significantly enhanced and the coke formation was also considerably reduced comparing with the catalytic microwave pyrolysis of cellulose or LDPE alone. Moreover, practical lignocellulosic biomass (Douglas fir sawdust pellets) was converted into aromatics-enriched bio-oil by catalytic microwave pyrolysis. The bio-oil was subsequently hydrogenated by using the Raney Ni catalyst. A liquid-liquid extraction step was implemented to recover the liquid organics and remove the water content. Over 20% carbon yield of liquid product regarding lignocellulosic biomass was obtained. Up to 90% selectivity in the liquid product belongs to jet fuel range cycloalkanes. As the integrated processes was developed, catalytic microwave pyrolysis of cellulose with LDPE was conducted to improve aromatic production. After the liquid-liquid extraction by the optimal solvent (n-heptane), over 40% carbon yield of hydrogenated organics based on cellulose and LDPE were achieved in the hydrogenation process. As such, real

  9. Relationship between heavy fuel oil phytotoxicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in Salicornia fragilis.

    PubMed

    Meudec, Anna; Poupart, Nathalie; Dussauze, Jacques; Deslandes, Eric

    2007-08-01

    Greenhouse experiments were carried out to study the effects of heavy fuel oil contamination on the growth and the development of Salicornia fragilis Ball and Tutin, a salt-marsh edible species. Plants were sampled in spring at the "Aber du Conquet" (Finistère, France), and artificially exposed by coating shoot sections with N degrees 6 fuel oil or by mixing it in their substratum. The impact of petroleum on plant development was followed by phytotoxicity assessments and PAH shoots assays. The plants exhibited visual symptoms of stress, i.e. chlorosis, yellowing, growth reduction and perturbations in developmental parameters. The contamination of plants by shoot coating appeared to be less than through soil. Moreover, the increase of the degree of pollution induced more marked effects on plants, likely because of the physical effects of fuel. However, bioaccumulation of PAHs in shoot tissues was also found to be significant, even at very low levels of contamination, and highly related to the conditions of exposure to oil. The strong relationships between the PAH contents of Salicornia plants and growth reduction suggest a chemical toxicity of fuel oil, compounds like PAHs being known to inhibit physiological processes in plants.

  10. Microbial Deterioration of Hydrocarbon Fuels from Oil Shale, Coal, and Petroleum. I. Exploratory Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-20

    Cladosporium resinae , a yeast (Candida) and a bacterium (Pseudomonas) which normally grow well in association with petroleum JP-5 were used as test organisms...microorganisms that could thrive in the presence of synthetic fuels. This endeavor produced a strain of C. resinae that grew as well with oil shale JP-5

  11. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUID HYDROCARBON WEATHERING AT SOME JP-4 FUEL RELEASE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fuel weathering study was conducted for database entries to estimate natural light, nonaqueousphase
    liquid weathering and source-term reduction rates for use in natural attenuation models. A range of BTEX
    weathering rates from mobile LNAPL plumes at eight field sites with...

  12. Exploratory fuel-cell research: I. Direct-hydrocarbon polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. II. Mathematical modeling of fuel-cell cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Michael L.

    1996-12-01

    A strong need exists today for more efficient energy-conversion systems. Our reliance on limited fuel resources, such as petroleum for the majority of our energy needs makes it imperative that we utilize these resources as efficiently as possible. Higher-efficiency energy conversion also means less pollution, since less fuel is consumed and less exhaust created for the same energy output. Additionally, for many industrialized nations, such as the United States which must rely on petroleum imports, it is also imperative from a national-security standpoint to reduce the consumption of these precious resources. A substantial reduction of U.S. oil imports would result in a significant reduction of our trade deficit, as well as costly military spending to protect overseas petroleum resources. Therefore, energy-conversion devices which may utilize alternative fuels are also in strong demand. This paper describes research on fuel cells for transportation.

  13. Stabilization of hydrocarbon fuel combustion by non-stationary electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozulin, V. S.; Tretyakov, P. K.; Tupikin, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The research results of a non-stationary weak electric field effect on diffusion combustion of gas hydrocarbons are presented in the paper. The main attention was focused on the study of electric field parameters effect on a flame stabilization. The two field types were considered: pulse-periodic and with variable direction of an electric vector. In the experiments the direct photography and the video shooting were used, as well as the spectrozonal photography of the own flame luminescence (at the wavelengths of excited OH* and CH* radicals emission). It was shown that the stabilization zone tends to the place of the largest electric field strength. The rotation of the electric vector leads to the flame stabilization in the electrodes plane and the local intensification of combustion.

  14. Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-27

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQRC 10 E...Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB, CA 93524-7680 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force...is a common requirement for aircraft, rockets, and hypersonic vehicles. The Aerospace Fuels Quality Test and Model Development (AFQTMoDev) project

  15. Study of the Effect of Hydrocarbon Type Biodegradation on Fuel Specification Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    34. Growth of bacteria in different concentrations of DiEGME. Figure 35. Growth Effect of Percentage Levels of Biodiesel in Jet A Figure 36. Growth...Effect of Low Level Biodiesel in Jet A Figure 37. Degradation of FAME Biodiesel by P. aeruginosa Figure 38. Acinetobacter cells (marked by the...that it is crucial for DLA, the AF and DoD to further investigate the effects of biodiesel in fuel even when this biofuel might be present at trace

  16. Real Gas Effects on the Performance of Hydrocarbon-fueled Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results for a single-pulse detonation tube wherein the effects of high temperature dissociation and the subsequent recombination influence the sensible heat release available for providing propulsive thrust. The study involved the use of ethylene and air at equivalence ratios of 0.7 and 1.0. The real gas effects on the sensible heat release were found to be significantly large so as to have an impact on the thrust, impulse and fuel consumption of a PDE.

  17. Plasma Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels in Non-Thermal Plasma-Liquid Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-30

    and advantageous of non- equilibrium chemically reacting plasmas. The main ideas are related to possibilities of cost-effective non-thermal plasma...properties of non- equilibrium plasma in heterogeneous gas-liquid systems; characteristics of plasma reforming of ethanol-water mixtures in plasma...thermodynamically equilibrium , has characteristics of high ionization by higher energetic density. This has merits of good rate of fuel decomposition but demerits

  18. Quantitating the Absorption, Partitioning and Toxicity of Hydrocarbon Components of JP-8 Jet Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-24

    with the skin. AFOSR Jet Fuel Toxicology Workshop. Tucson, AZ. October, 2004. 5. Basak SC, Riviere JE, Baynes RE, Xia XR, Gute BD. A hierarchical QSAR ... Toxicology Workshop, Tucson, AZ, 2005. 12. Basak SC, Riviere J, Baynes R, Gute BD: Theoretical descriptor based QSARs in predicting skin penetration of...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Center for Chemical Toxicology Research and Pharmacokinetics College of Veterinary

  19. Calculation of Free-Atom Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Engine Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Satyajit

    2006-01-01

    Free atom fractions (Beta) of nine elements are calculated in the exhaust plume of CH4- oxygen and RP-1-oxygen fueled rocket engines using free energy minimization method. The Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) computer program developed by the Glenn Research Center, NASA is used for this purpose. Data on variation of Beta in both fuels as a function of temperature (1600 K - 3100 K) and oxygen to fuel ratios (1.75 to 2.25 by weight) is presented in both tabular and graphical forms. Recommendation is made for the Beta value for a tenth element, Palladium. The CEA computer code was also run to compare with experimentally determined Beta values reported in literature for some of these elements. A reasonable agreement, within a factor of three, between the calculated and reported values is observed. Values reported in this work will be used as a first approximation for pilot rocket engine testing studies at the Stennis Space Center for at least six elements Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe and Ni - until experimental values are generated. The current estimates will be improved when more complete thermodynamic data on the remaining four elements Ag, Co, Mn and Pd are added to the database. A critique of the CEA code is also included.

  20. The effect of salinity, redox mediators and temperature on anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Adelaja, Oluwaseun; Keshavarz, Tajalli; Kyazze, Godfrey

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) need to be robust if they are to be applied in the field for bioremediation. This study investigated the effect of temperature (20-50°C), salinity (0.5-2.5% (w/v) as sodium chloride), the use of redox mediators (riboflavin and anthraquinone-2-sulphonate, AQS) and prolonged fed-batch operation (60 days) on biodegradation of a petroleum hydrocarbon mix (i.e. phenanthrene and benzene) in MFCs. The performance criteria were degradation efficiency, % COD removal and electrochemical performance. Good electrochemical and degradation performance were maintained up to a salinity of 1.5% (w/v) but deteriorated by 35-fold and 4-fold respectively as salinity was raised to 2.5%w/v. Degradation rates and maximum power density were both improved by approximately 2-fold at 40°C compared to MFC performance at 30°C but decreased sharply by 4-fold when operating temperature was raised to 50°C. The optimum reactor performance obtained at 40°C was 1.15 mW/m(2) maximum power density, 89.1% COD removal and a degradation efficiency of 97.10%; at moderately saline (1% w/v) conditions the maximum power density was 1.06 mW/m(2), 79.1% COD removal and 91.6% degradation efficiency. This work suggests the possible application of MFC technology in the effective treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated site and refinery effluents.

  1. Investigation of "6X" Scramjet Inlet Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    This work represents an initial attempt to determine what, if any, issues arise from scaling demonstration supersonic combustion scramjets to a flight scale making the engine a viable candidate for both military weapon and civilian access to space applications. The original vehicle sizes tested and flown to date, were designed to prove a concept. With the proven designs, use of the technology for applications as weapon systems or space flight are only possible at six to ten times the original scale. To determine effects of scaling, computations were performed with hypersonic inlets designed to operate a nominal Mach 4 and Mach 5 conditions that are possible within the eight foot high temperature tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The total pressure recovery for these inlets is about 70%, while maintaining self start conditions, and providing operable inflow to combustors. Based on this study, the primary scaling effect detected is the strength of a vortex created along the cowl edge causing adverse boundary layer growth in the inlet.

  2. Turbulent transport models for scramjet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindir, M. M.; Harsha, P. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulence modeling approaches were examined from the standpoint of their capability to predict the complex flowfield features observed in scramjet combustions. Thus, for example, the accuracy of each turbulence model, with respect to the prediction of recirculating flows, was examined. It was observed that for large diameter ratio axisymmetric sudden expansion flows, a choice of turbulence model was not critical because of the domination of their flowfields by pressure forces. For low diameter ratio axisymmetric sudden expansions and planar backward-facing steps flows, where turbulent shear stresses are of greater significance, the algebraic Reynolds stress approach, modified to increase its sensitivity to streamline curvature, was found to provide the best results. Results of the study also showed that strongly swirling flows provide a stringent test of turbulence model assumptions. Thus, although flows with very high swirl are not of great practical interest, they are useful for turbulence model development. Finally, it was also noted that numerical flowfields solution techniques have a strong interrelation with turbulence models, particularly with the turbulent transport models which involve source-dominated transport equations.

  3. Calculated Effects of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Karen E.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    1995-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the NASA Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. The study was conducted for standard facility conditions corresponding to Mach 6, 7, and 8 flight simulations. The analytically determined levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility are compared with experimentally measured levels. Results of the analysis indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, which corroborates the measured levels. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate how nitric oxide affects scramjet performance in terms of combustor pressure rise, heat release, and thrust performance. Results indicate minimal effects on engine performance for the test conditions of this investigation.

  4. Renewable liquid fuels from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Christopher J.

    Diminishing fossil fuel reserves and growing concerns about global warming require the development of sustainable sources of energy. Fuels for use in the transportation sector must have specific physical properties that allow for efficient distribution, storage, and combustion; these requirements are currently fulfilled by petroleum-derived liquid fuels. The focus of this work has been the development of two new biofuels that have the potential to become widely used transportation fuels from carbohydrate intermediates. Our first biofuel has cetane numbers ranging from 63 to 97 and is comprised of C7 to C15 straight chain alkanes. These alkanes can be blended with diesel like fuels or with P-series biofuel. Production involves a solid base catalyzed aldol condensation with mixed Mg-Al-oxide between furfural or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and acetone, followed by hydrogenation over Pd/Al2O3, and finally hydrogenation/dehydration over Pt/SiO2-Al2O3. Water was the solvent for all process steps, except for the hydrogenation/dehydration stage where hexadecane was co-fed to spontaneously separate out all alkane products and eliminate the need for energy intensive distillation. A later optimization identified Pd/MgO-ZrO2 as a hydrothermally stable bifunctional catalyst to replace Pd/Al2O3 and the hydrothermally unstable Mg-Al-oxide catalysts along with optimizing process parameters, such as temperature and molar ratios of reactants to maximize yields to heavier alkanes. Our second biofuel involved creating an improved process to produce HMF through the acid-catalyzed dehydration of fructose in a biphasic reactor. Additionally, we developed a technique to further convert HMF into 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) by hydrogenolysis of C-O bonds over a copper-ruthenium catalyst. DMF has many properties that make it a superior blending agent to ethanol: it has a high research octane number at 119, a 40% higher energy density than ethanol, 20 K higher boiling point, and is insoluble in

  5. Economic implications of incorporating emission controls to mitigate air pollutants emitted from a modeled hydrocarbon-fuel biorefinery in the United States: Economic implications of air emission controls for a hydrocarbon-fuel biorefinery

    DOE PAGES

    Bhatt, Arpit; Zhang, Yimin; Davis, Ryan; ...

    2016-07-15

    The implementation of the US Renewable Fuel Standard is expected to increase the construction and operation of new biofuel facilities. Allowing this industry to grow without adversely affecting air quality is an important sustainability goal sought by multiple stakeholders. However, little is known about how the emission controls potentially required to comply with air quality regulations might impact biorefinery cost and deployment strategies such as siting and sizing. In this study, we use a baseline design for a lignocellulosic hydrocarbon biofuel production process to assess how the integration of emission controls impacts the minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) of themore » biofuel produced. We evaluate the change in MFSP for two cases as compared to the baseline design by incorporating (i) emission controls that ensure compliance with applicable federal air regulations and (ii) advanced control options that could be used to achieve potential best available control technology (BACT) emission limits. Our results indicate that compliance with federal air regulations can be achieved with minimal impact on biofuel cost (~$0.02 per gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) higher than the baseline price of $5.10 GGE-1). However, if air emissions must be further reduced to meet potential BACT emission limits, the cost could increase nontrivially. For example, the MFSP could increase to $5.50 GGE-1 by adopting advanced emission controls to meet potential boiler BACT limits. Given tradeoffs among emission control costs, permitting requirements, and economies of scale, these results could help inform decisions about biorefinery siting and sizing and mitigate risks associated with air permitting.« less

  6. Crosslinked structurally-tuned polymeric ionic liquids as stationary phases for the analysis of hydrocarbons in kerosene and diesel fuels by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Park, Rodney A; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-04-01

    Structurally-tuned ionic liquids (ILs) have been previously applied as the second dimension column in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and have demonstrated high selectivity in the separation of individual aliphatic hydrocarbons from other aliphatic hydrocarbons. However, the maximum operating temperatures of these stationary phases limit the separation of analytes with high boiling points. In order to address this issue, a series of polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based stationary phases were prepared in this study using imidazolium-based IL monomers via in-column free radical polymerization. The IL monomers were functionalized with long alkyl chain substituents to provide the needed selectivity for the separation of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Columns were prepared with different film thicknesses to identify the best performing stationary phase for the separation of kerosene. The bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([NTf2](-))-based PIL stationary phase with larger film thickness (0.28μm) exhibited higher selectivity for aliphatic hydrocarbons and showed a maximum allowable operating temperature of 300°C. PIL-based stationary phases containing varied amount of IL-based crosslinker were prepared to study the effect of the crosslinker on the selectivity and thermal stability of the resulting stationary phase. The optimal resolution of aliphatic hydrocarbons was achieved when 50% (w/w) of crosslinker was incorporated into the PIL-based stationary phase. The resulting stationary phase exhibited good selectivity for different groups of aliphatic hydrocarbons even after being conditioned at 325°C. Finally, the crosslinked PIL-based stationary phase was compared with SUPELCOWAX 10 and DB-17 columns for the separation of aliphatic hydrocarbons in diesel fuel. Better resolution of aliphatic hydrocarbons was obtained when employing the crosslinked PIL-based stationary phase as the second dimension column.

  7. Biomass fuels and coke plants are important sources of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzene and toluene.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruifang; Li, Junnan; Chen, Laiguo; Xu, Zhencheng; He, Dechun; Zhou, Yuanxiu; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Wei, Fusheng; Li, Jihua

    2014-11-01

    Large amounts of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene and toluene (BT) might be emitted from incomplete combustion reactions in both coal tar factories and biomass fuels in rural China. The health effects arising from exposure to PAHs and BT are a concern for residents of rural areas close to coal tar plants. To assess the environmental risk and major exposure sources, 100 coke plant workers and 25 farmers in Qujing, China were recruited. The levels of 10 mono-hydroxylated PAHs (OH-PAHs), four BT metabolites and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the urine collected from the subjects were measured. The 8-OHdG levels in the urine were determined to evaluate the oxidative DNA damage induced by the PAHs and BT. The results showed that the levels of the OH-PAHs, particularly those of 1-hydroxynathalene and 1-hydroxypyrene, in the farmers were 1-7 times higher than those in the workers. The concentrations of the BT metabolites were comparable between the workers and farmers. Although the exact work location within a coke oven plant might affect the levels of the OH-PAHs, one-way ANOVA revealed no significant differences for either the OH-PAHs levels or the BT concentrations among the three groups working at different work sites. The geometric mean concentration (9.17 µg/g creatinine) of 8-OHdG was significantly higher in the farmers than in the plant workers (6.27 µg/g creatinine). The levels of 8-OHdG did not correlate with the total concentrations of OH-PAHs and the total levels of BT metabolites. Incompletely combusted biomass fuels might be the major exposure source, contributing more PAHs and BT to the local residents of Qujing. The estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of naphthalene and fluorene for all of the workers and most of the farmers were below the reference doses (RfDs) recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), except for the pyrene levels in two farmers. However, the EDIs of benzene in the workers and local

  8. Shock Tunnel Studies of Scramjet Phenomena 1995. Supplement 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Stalker, R. J.; Paull, A.

    1997-01-01

    Reports by the research staff and graduate students of the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Queensland are collected and presented. These reports cover various studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology and the operation of advanced hypervelocity shock-expansion tubes. The report topics include the experimental studies of mixing and combustion in a scramjet flow path, the measurement of integrated thrust and skin friction, and the development of a free-piston-driven expansion tunnel capable delivering a test gas at super orbital velocities.

  9. Method and composition for modifying burning of sulfur in coals and hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, F.L.

    1981-06-23

    Efficiency of internal combustion engine performance, I.E. Improved mileage per gallon, and improved performance, E.G. Lower exhaust temperature, is increased by the addition of carotenoids, beta-carotene in particular, to diesel fuel before use, and the combustion of coal is improved, I.E. higher btu/lb results, sulfur in emission from such coal combustion is reduced, and sulfur in ash is increased, by the addition of squalene, squalane , carotenoids, beta-carotene in particular, hemoglobin and chlorophyll to the coal before burning.

  10. A Flash Vaporization System for Detonation of Hydrocarbon Fuels in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    electrode of NGK spark plug. Circle denotes 1.17 cm long center electrode. Arrow is at point weld failed between two materials of center electrode...the fuel and oxygen are completely consumed producing only H2O and CO2 during the reaction. If the ratio is less than stoichiometric (φ < 1) then...length of the mixer was 0.53 m with two 0.46 m long pipes welded within the mixer body. The average velocity entering the mixer was 27.5 m/s and the

  11. Advanced cooling techniques for high-pressure hydrocarbon-fueled engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The regenerative cooling limits (maximum chamber pressure) for 02/hydrocarbon gas generator and staged combustion cycle rocket engines over a thrust range of 89,000 N (20,000lbf) to 2,669,000 N (600,000 lbf) for a reusable life of 250 missions were defined. Maximum chamber pressure limits were first determined for the three propellant combinations (O2/CH4, O2/C3H8, and O2/RP-1 without a carbon layer (unenhanced designs). Chamber pressure cooling enhancement limits were then established for seven thermal barriers. The thermal barriers evaluated for these designs were: carbon layer, ceramic coating, graphite liner, film cooling, transpiration cooling, zoned combustion, and a combination of two of the above. All fluid barriers were assessed a 3 percent performance loss. Sensitivity studies were then conducted to determine the influence of cycle life and RP-1 decomposition temperature on chamber pressure limits. Chamber and nozzle design parameters are presented for the unenahanced and enhanced designs. The maximum regenerative cooled chamber pressure limits were attained with the O2/CH4 propellant combination. The O2/RP-1 designs relied on a carbon layer and liquid gas injection chamber contours, short chamber, to be competitive with the other two propellant combinations. This was attributed to the low decomposition temperature of RP-1.

  12. Self-doped Ti(3+)-TiO2 as a photocatalyst for the reduction of CO2 into a hydrocarbon fuel under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sasan, Koroush; Zuo, Fan; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Pingyun

    2015-08-28

    Self-doped TiO2 shows visible light photocatalytic activity, while commercial TiO2 (P25) is only UV responsive. The incorporation of Ti(3+) into TiO2 structures narrows the band gap (2.90 eV), leading to significantly increased photocatalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 into a renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH4) in the presence of water vapour under visible light irradiation.

  13. Revisiting kinetic boundary conditions at the surface of fuel droplet hydrocarbons: An atomistic computational fluid dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    The role of boundary conditions at the interface for both Boltzmann equation and the set of Navier-Stokes equations have been suggested to be important for studying of multiphase flows such as evaporation/condensation process which doesn’t always obey the equilibrium conditions. Here we present aspects of transition-state theory (TST) alongside with kinetic gas theory (KGT) relevant to the study of quasi-equilibrium interfacial phenomena and the equilibrium gas phase processes, respectively. A two-state mathematical model for long-chain hydrocarbons which have multi-structural specifications is introduced to clarify how kinetics and thermodynamics affect evaporation/condensation process at the surface of fuel droplet, liquid and gas phases and then show how experimental observations for a number of n-alkane may be reproduced using a hybrid framework TST and KGT with physically reasonable parameters controlling the interface, gas and liquid phases. The importance of internal activation dynamics at the surface of n-alkane droplets is established during the evaporation/condensation process. PMID:27215897

  14. Revisiting kinetic boundary conditions at the surface of fuel droplet hydrocarbons: An atomistic computational fluid dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Rasoul

    2016-05-24

    The role of boundary conditions at the interface for both Boltzmann equation and the set of Navier-Stokes equations have been suggested to be important for studying of multiphase flows such as evaporation/condensation process which doesn't always obey the equilibrium conditions. Here we present aspects of transition-state theory (TST) alongside with kinetic gas theory (KGT) relevant to the study of quasi-equilibrium interfacial phenomena and the equilibrium gas phase processes, respectively. A two-state mathematical model for long-chain hydrocarbons which have multi-structural specifications is introduced to clarify how kinetics and thermodynamics affect evaporation/condensation process at the surface of fuel droplet, liquid and gas phases and then show how experimental observations for a number of n-alkane may be reproduced using a hybrid framework TST and KGT with physically reasonable parameters controlling the interface, gas and liquid phases. The importance of internal activation dynamics at the surface of n-alkane droplets is established during the evaporation/condensation process.

  15. Photocatalytic conversion of CO(2) into renewable hydrocarbon fuels: state-of-the-art accomplishment, challenges, and prospects.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenguang; Zhou, Yong; Zou, Zhigang

    2014-07-16

    Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 into hydrocarbon fuels, an artificial photosynthesis, is based on the simulation of natural photosynthesis in green plants, whereby O2 and carbohydrates are produced from H2 O and CO2 using sunlight as an energy source. It couples the reductive half-reaction of CO2 fixation with a matched oxidative half-reaction such as water oxidation, to achieve a carbon neutral cycle, which is like killing two birds with one stone in terms of saving the environment and supplying future energy. The present review provides an overview and highlights recent state-of-the-art accomplishments of overcoming the drawback of low photoconversion efficiency and selectivity through the design of highly active photocatalysts from the point of adsorption of reactants, charge separation and transport, light harvesting, and CO2 activation. It specifically includes: i) band-structure engineering, ii) nanostructuralization, iii) surface oxygen vacancy engineering, iv) macro-/meso-/microporous structuralization, v) exposed facet engineering, vi) co-catalysts, vii) the development of a Z-scheme system. The challenges and prospects for future development of this field are also present.

  16. Leaf-architectured 3D Hierarchical Artificial Photosynthetic System of Perovskite Titanates Towards CO2 Photoreduction Into Hydrocarbon Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Han; Guo, Jianjun; Li, Peng; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di; Ye, Jinhua

    2013-04-01

    The development of an ``artificial photosynthetic system'' (APS) having both the analogous important structural elements and reaction features of photosynthesis to achieve solar-driven water splitting and CO2 reduction is highly challenging. Here, we demonstrate a design strategy for a promising 3D APS architecture as an efficient mass flow/light harvesting network relying on the morphological replacement of a concept prototype-leaf's 3D architecture into perovskite titanates for CO2 photoreduction into hydrocarbon fuels (CO and CH4). The process uses artificial sunlight as the energy source, water as an electron donor and CO2 as the carbon source, mimicking what real leaves do. To our knowledge this is the first example utilizing biological systems as ``architecture-directing agents'' for APS towards CO2 photoreduction, which hints at a more general principle for APS architectures with a great variety of optimized biological geometries. This research would have great significance for the potential realization of global carbon neutral cycle.

  17. Effect of fuel and kiln type on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in smoked shrimp, a Beninese food condiment.

    PubMed

    Kpoclou, Euloge Yénoukounmè; Anihouvi, Victor Bienvenu; Azokpota, Paulin; Soumanou, Mohamed Mansourou; Douny, Caroline; Brose, François; Hounhouigan, Djidjoho Joseph; Scippo, Marie-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Smoked shrimp is a food condiment widely used in Beninese local cooking practices. A previous study revealed that this product is highly contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The present study explored possibilities to reduce PAH levels in shrimp smoked using cottage industry smoking techniques with barrel and chorkor kilns, by replacing wood by charcoal from Acacia auriculiformis and Mangifera indica, as fuels. Results showed that only shrimp smoked using acacia charcoal in a chorkor kiln had PAH levels (benzo[a]pyrene = 5 µg kg(-1) and sum of benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, benzo[a]anthracene and benzo[b]fluoranthene = 28 µg kg(-1)) in accordance with a European standard of 5 and 30 µg kg(-1), respectively, and suitable physicochemical characteristics for good storage (moisture content = 11.9% ± 1.5%; water activity = 0.46 ± 0.03). However, further investigations still needs to be done to reduce the duration of product contact with combustion gasses in order to reduce the PAH content of smoked shrimp to safer levels, largely below standards.

  18. Leaf-architectured 3D Hierarchical Artificial Photosynthetic System of Perovskite Titanates Towards CO2 Photoreduction Into Hydrocarbon Fuels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Han; Guo, Jianjun; Li, Peng; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di; Ye, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    The development of an “artificial photosynthetic system” (APS) having both the analogous important structural elements and reaction features of photosynthesis to achieve solar-driven water splitting and CO2 reduction is highly challenging. Here, we demonstrate a design strategy for a promising 3D APS architecture as an efficient mass flow/light harvesting network relying on the morphological replacement of a concept prototype-leaf's 3D architecture into perovskite titanates for CO2 photoreduction into hydrocarbon fuels (CO and CH4). The process uses artificial sunlight as the energy source, water as an electron donor and CO2 as the carbon source, mimicking what real leaves do. To our knowledge this is the first example utilizing biological systems as “architecture-directing agents” for APS towards CO2 photoreduction, which hints at a more general principle for APS architectures with a great variety of optimized biological geometries. This research would have great significance for the potential realization of global carbon neutral cycle. PMID:23588925

  19. Exposure and size distribution of nitrated and oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among the population using different household fuels.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guofeng; Chen, Yuanchen; Du, Wei; Lin, Nan; Wang, Xilong; Cheng, Hefa; Liu, Junfeng; Xue, Chunyu; Liu, Guangqing; Zeng, Eddy Y; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) derivatives like nitrated and oxygenated PAHs are of growing concerns because of considerably higher toxicity and important roles during atmospheric chemical reactions. Residential solid fuel combustion is likely to be one large primary source of these pollutants in developing countries. In this study, inhalation exposure to nitrated and oxygenated PAH derivatives was evaluated among rural residents using carried samplers. The exposure levels of individual nitrated PAHs ranged from 4.04 (9-nitrated phenanthrene) to 89.8 (9-nitrated anthracene) pg/m(3), and of oxy-PAHs were 0.570 (benzo[a]anthracene-7, 12-dione) to 7.99 (Benzanthrone) ng/m(3), generally higher in wood user than that in anthracite user. A majority of derivatives in particle presented in PM2.5 (80% for nitrated naphthalene and over 90% for other targets) and even fine PM1.0. Mass fractions of PAH derivatives in fine and ultra-fine particles were significantly higher than the fractions of corresponding parent PAHs, indicating more adverse health outcomes induced by these derivatives. The inhalation exposure levels for residents adopting wood gasifier burners was significantly lower than the documented results for those burning wood in typical built-in brick stoves, and comparable to those using LPG and electricity, which provided vital information for clean stove development and intervention programs.

  20. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  1. Diagnostic development for determining the joint temperature/soot statistics in hydrocarbon-fueled pool fires : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Casteneda, Jaime N.; Frederickson, Kraig; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2009-09-01

    A joint temperature/soot laser-based optical diagnostic was developed for the determination of the joint temperature/soot probability density function (PDF) for hydrocarbon-fueled meter-scale turbulent pool fires. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort was in support of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program which seeks to produce computational models for the simulation of fire environments for risk assessment and analysis. The development of this laser-based optical diagnostic is motivated by the need for highly-resolved spatio-temporal information for which traditional diagnostic probes, such as thermocouples, are ill-suited. The in-flame gas temperature is determined from the shape of the nitrogen Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signature and the soot volume fraction is extracted from the intensity of the Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII) image of the CARS probed region. The current state of the diagnostic will be discussed including the uncertainty and physical limits of the measurements as well as the future applications of this probe.

  2. Revisiting kinetic boundary conditions at the surface of fuel droplet hydrocarbons: An atomistic computational fluid dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Rasoul

    2016-05-01

    The role of boundary conditions at the interface for both Boltzmann equation and the set of Navier-Stokes equations have been suggested to be important for studying of multiphase flows such as evaporation/condensation process which doesn’t always obey the equilibrium conditions. Here we present aspects of transition-state theory (TST) alongside with kinetic gas theory (KGT) relevant to the study of quasi-equilibrium interfacial phenomena and the equilibrium gas phase processes, respectively. A two-state mathematical model for long-chain hydrocarbons which have multi-structural specifications is introduced to clarify how kinetics and thermodynamics affect evaporation/condensation process at the surface of fuel droplet, liquid and gas phases and then show how experimental observations for a number of n-alkane may be reproduced using a hybrid framework TST and KGT with physically reasonable parameters controlling the interface, gas and liquid phases. The importance of internal activation dynamics at the surface of n-alkane droplets is established during the evaporation/condensation process.

  3. Enhancement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in estuarine invertebrates by surface runoff at a decommissioned military fuel depot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miles, A.K.; Roster, N.

    1999-01-01

    Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined in blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) and shore crabs (Hemigrapsus sp.) at a recently closed military fuel depot in central San Francisco Bay, California. In April 1996, during a period of above average precipitation, specimens were collected at the depot, near the depot, and at sites 10 and 20 km south of the depot. Four weeks after the rains ended, blue mussels were again collected at the depot, and at two additional sites in the central Bay region. In April, total PAHs in mussels from the depot were significantly higher only than that in mussels collected 20 km from the depot; however, seven specific, substituted PAHs were higher at the depot than at all other sites. In June, only two of the 38 PAHs common in mussels in April were detected at the depot; these concentrations were comparable to ambient concentrations in mussels at the Bay. It seemed that bioavailability of PAHs at the depot was enhanced by rainfall, probably due to the mobilization of PAHs via groundwater into the Bay. Concentrations in mussels from chronically contaminated sites were about five times higher than mussels collected from the depot. Low PAH concentrations were detected in shore crabs near the depot, and the highest levels were not associated with the depot. Observed PAH concentrations are discussed in relation to upper trophic organisms.

  4. Overview of NATO Background on Scramjet Technology. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Bouchez, Marc; McClinton, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present overview is to summarize the current knowledge of the NATO contributors. All the topics will be addressed in this chapter, with references and some examples. This background enhances the level of knowledge of the NATO scramjet community, which will be used for writing the specific chapters of the Report. Some previous overviews have been published on scramjet technology worldwide. NASA, DOD, the U.S. industry and global community have studied scramjet-powered hypersonic vehicles for over 40 years. Within the U.S. alone, NASA, DOD (DARPA, U.S. Navy and USAF), and industry have participated in hypersonic technology development. Over this time NASA Langley Research Center continuously studied hypersonic system design, aerothermodynamics, scramjet propulsion, propulsion-airframe integration, high temperature materials and structural architectures, and associated facilities, instrumentation and test methods. These modestly funded programs were substantially augmented during the National Aero-Space Plane (X-30) Program, which spent more than $3B between 1984 and 1995, and brought the DOD and other NASA Centers, universities and industry back into hypersonics. In addition, significant progress was achieved in all technologies required for hypersonic flight, and much of that technology was transferred into other programs, such as X-33, DC-X, X-37, X-43, etc. In addition, technology transfer impacted numerous other industries, including automotive, medical, sports and aerospace.

  5. The effect of kerosene injection on ignition probability of local ignition in a scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Heng; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu

    2017-03-01

    The spark ignition of kerosene is investigated in a scramjet combustor with a flight condition of Ma 4, 17 km. Based plentiful of experimental data, the ignition probabilities of the local ignition have been acquired for different injection setups. The ignition probability distributions show that the injection pressure and injection location have a distinct effect on spark ignition. The injection pressure has both upper and lower limit for local ignition. Generally, the larger mass flow rate will reduce the ignition probability. The ignition position also affects the ignition near the lower pressure limit. The reason is supposed to be the cavity swallow effect on upstream jet spray near the leading edge, which will make the cavity fuel rich. The corner recirculation zone near the front wall of the cavity plays a significant role in the stabilization of local flame.

  6. A conceptual design of shock-eliminating clover combustor for large scale scramjet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Zhao, Yu-xin; Zhao, Guo-yan; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    A new concept of shock-eliminating clover combustor is proposed for large scale scramjet engine to fulfill the requirements of fuel penetration, total pressure recovery and cooling. To generate the circular-to-clover transition shape of the combustor, the streamline tracing technique is used based on an axisymmetric expansion parent flowfield calculated using the method of characteristics. The combustor is examined using inviscid and viscous numerical simulations and a pure circular shape is calculated for comparison. The results showed that the combustor avoids the shock wave generation and produces low total pressure losses in a wide range of flight condition with various Mach number. The flameholding device for this combustor is briefly discussed.

  7. Thermal-structural design study of an airframe-integrated Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killackey, J. J.; Katinsky, E. A.; Tepper, S.; Vuigner, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    Design concepts are developed and evaluated for a cooled structures assembly for the Scramjet engine, for engine subsystems mass, volume, and operating requirements, and for the aircraft/engine interface. A thermal protection system was defined that makes it possible to attain a life of 100 hours and 1000 cycles. The coolant equivalence ratio at the Mach 10 maximum thermal loading condition is 0.6, indicating a capacity for airframe cooling. The mechanical design is feasible for manufacture using conventional materials. For the cooled structures in a six-module engine, the mass per unit capture area is 12.4 KN/sq m. The total weight of a six-module engine assembly including the fuel system is 14.73 KN.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Reacting Flow Characteristics in a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deyong; Song, Wenyan; Ye, Jingfeng; Tao, Bo; Wang, Yanhua

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a hydrogen-fueled dual-mode scramjet combustor was investigated experimentally. Clean and dry air was supplied to the combustor through a Mach 2 nozzle with a total temperature of 800 K and a total pressure of 800 kPa. The high enthalpy air was provided by an electricity resistance heater. Room temperature hydrogen was injected with sonic speed from injector orifices vertically, and downstream the injector a tandem cavity flame holder was mounted. Except wall pressure profiles, velocity and temperature profiles in and at exit of the combustor were also measured using hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), respectively. Results showed that combustion occurred mainly at the bottom side of the combustor. And there were also an extreme disparity of the velocity and temperature profiles along the Y-direction, i.e. the transverse direction.

  9. Ramjet/scramjet plus rocket propulsion for a heavy-lift Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Edward

    1993-10-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen-fueled ramjet/scramjet engines for improving the performance and reducing the operating cost of a second-generation Space Shuttle is examined. For a heavy-lift capability, a two-stage system would be necessary. This could consist of a central Trans Atmospheric Vehicle (TAV) with a hypersonic booster attached to each side. A wheeled ground-based launcher could make the takeoff of such a system possible. By using data from the NASP project and the present Space Shuttle, it is shown that a TAV, which is about 20 percent longer than a Boeing 747, could take a payload of about 200,000 pounds to an earth orbit.

  10. SCRAM - AN ENGINEER'S TOOL FOR PREDICTION OF AIRFRAME INTEGRATED SCRAMJET PERFORMANCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    This program determines the one-dimensional performance for an airframe integrated supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet). The supersonic combustion ramjet cycle, which uses hydrogen for fuel and atmospheric air for oxidation, is essential for the development of a propulsion system for single-stage-to-orbit aerospace vehicles. These vehicles are intended to be launched horizontally, as opposed to vertical launching for current space vehicles. In addition, they must achieve hypersonic flight to Mach 25 prior to orbital insertion into low Earth orbit. The propulsion system of these vehicles must be reusable, efficient, and cost effective. The scramjet cycle analysis code performs nose-to-tail, hydrogen fueled, Airframe Integrated Scramjet (AIS) simulation in a real gas flow with equilibrium thermodynamic properties. This allows ready generation of preliminary estimates for SCRAM cycle performance. SCRAM is a reliable, efficient, and speedy design tool that is useable on all standard computers down to IBM PC-AT compatible machines. Developed in the Hypersonic Propulsion Branch at NASA Langley Research Center for the Hypersonic Research Engine and Langley 3-Strut engine programs, the current version of this code has been modified by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility of the Ames Research Center for the purpose of supporting the Langley Strutless Parametric engine and National AeroSpace Plane (NASP) engine test programs. The current version of SCRAM optimizes the tradeoffs between the needs for computational speed, accuracy, and future modifications. The program utilizes a five station geometry model, with variable step size between each station, to analyze a vehicle nose-to-tail mass capture stream tube control-volume with real gas equilibrium flow properties. SCRAM applies the laws of Conservation of Mass, Momentum, and Energy across each step to calculate the changing flow parameters along the control volume. The code incorporates an integral boundary layer

  11. Scramjet Combustor Simulations Using Reduced Chemical Kinetics for Practical Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    Stochastic Simulation of an HCCI Engine Using an Automatically Reduced Mechanism,� ICE, Vol. 37-2, 2001 Fall Technical Conference...Christopher J. Montgomery, and Wei Zhao Reaction Engineering International (REI) 77 West 200 South, Suite 210 Salt Lake City, UT 84101 Dean R...DOUGLAS L. DAVIS CAPT. BRIAN C. MCDONALD AFRL/PRAS, Project Engineer Branch Chief Propulsion Sciences Branch Propulsion

  12. Pylon Fuel Injector Design for a Scramjet Combustor (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Combustor by Application of Laser Diagnostics,” AIAA Paper 2002-5203, Oct. 2002. 22Sunami, T., Magre, P., Bresson , A., Grisch, F., Orain, M., and Kodera, M...Asymmetric Nozzles,” AIAA Paper 96-0200, Jan. 1996. 25Haimovitch, Y., Gartenberg, E., Roberts , A., and Northam, G., “Effects of Internal Nozzle

  13. Motor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, L.D.

    1982-07-13

    Liquid hydrocarbon fuel compositions are provided containing antiknock quantities of ashless antiknock agents comprising selected furyl compounds including furfuryl alcohol, furfuryl amine, furfuryl esters, and alkyl furoates.

  14. Fossil fuel and hydrocarbon conversion using hydrogen-rich plasmas. Topical report February 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Experiments were made on use of H and CH plasmas for converting waste materials and heavy oils to H-rich transportation fuels. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted with an industrial microwave generator and a commercial microwave oven. A continuously circulating reactor was constructed for conducting experiments on flowing oils. Experiments on decomposition of scrap tires showed that microwave plasmas can be used to decompose scrap tires into potentially useful liquid products. In a batch experiment using a commercial microwave oven, about 20% of the tire was converted to liquid products in about 9 minutes. Methane was decomposed in a microwave plasma to yield a liquid products composed of various compound types; GC/MS analyses identified unsaturated compounds including benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, methyl and ethyl naphthalene, small amounts of larger aromatic rings, and olefinic compounds. Experiments on a crude oil in a continuously flowing reactor showed that distillate materials are produced using H and CH plasmas. Also, the recycle oils had an overall carbon aromaticity lower than that of starting feed material, indicating that some hydrogenation and methanation had taken place in the recycle oils.

  15. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOEpatents

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  16. Characteristics of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of multi air jets within scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Fallah, Keivan; Pourmirzaagha, H.

    2017-03-01

    In this article, three-dimensional simulation is performed to investigate the effects of micro air jets on mixing performances of cascaded hydrogen jets within a scramjet combustor. In order to compare the efficiency of this technique, constant total fuel rate is injected through one, four, eight and sixteen arrays of portholes in a Mach 4.0 crossflow with a fuel global equivalence ratio of 0.5. In this method, micro air jets are released within fuel portholes to augment the penetration in upward direction. Extensive studies were performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Numerical studies on various air and fuel arrangements are done and the mixing rate and penetration are comprehensively investigated. Also, the flow feature of the fuel and air jets for different configuration is revealed. According to the obtained results, the influence of the micro air jets is significant and the presence of micro air jets increases the mixing rate about 116%, 77%, 56% and 41% for single, 4, 8 and 16 multi fuel jets, respectively. The maximum mixing rate of the hydrogen jet is obtained when the air jets are injected within the sixteen multi fuel jets. According to the circulation analysis of the flow for different air and fuel arrangements, it was found that the effects of air jets on flow structure are varied in various conditions and the presence of the micro jet highly intensifies the circulation in the case of 8 and 16 multi fuel jets.

  17. Chemical recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether: from greenhouse gas to renewable, environmentally carbon neutral fuels and synthetic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Prakash, G K Surya

    2009-01-16

    Nature's photosynthesis uses the sun's energy with chlorophyll in plants as a catalyst to recycle carbon dioxide and water into new plant life. Only given sufficient geological time can new fossil fuels be formed naturally. In contrast, chemical recycling of carbon dioxide from natural and industrial sources as well as varied human activities or even from the air itself to methanol or dimethyl ether (DME) and their varied products can be achieved via its capture and subsequent reductive hydrogenative conversion. The present Perspective reviews this new approach and our research in the field over the last 15 years. Carbon recycling represents a significant aspect of our proposed Methanol Economy. Any available energy source (alternative energies such as solar, wind, geothermal, and atomic energy) can be used for the production of needed hydrogen and chemical conversion of CO(2). Improved new methods for the efficient reductive conversion of CO(2) to methanol and/or DME that we have developed include bireforming with methane and ways of catalytic or electrochemical conversions. Liquid methanol is preferable to highly volatile and potentially explosive hydrogen for energy storage and transportation. Together with the derived DME, they are excellent transportation fuels for internal combustion engines (ICE) and fuel cells as well as convenient starting materials for synthetic hydrocarbons and their varied products. Carbon dioxide thus can be chemically transformed from a detrimental greenhouse gas causing global warming into a valuable, renewable and inexhaustible carbon source of the future allowing environmentally neutral use of carbon fuels and derived hydrocarbon products.

  18. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-12-09

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm(-1) in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm(-2) using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm(-2). To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode.

  19. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-12-01

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm-1 in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm-2 using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm-2. To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode.

  20. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-01-01

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm−1 in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm−2 using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm−2. To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode. PMID:26648509

  1. Fuel oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Substances called hydrocarbons are the harmful ingredients in fuel oil. ... Gummin DD. Hydrocarbons. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 152. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. ...

  2. The large-amplitude combustion oscillation in a single-side expansion scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Liu, Weidong; Sun, Mingbo

    2015-12-01

    The combustion oscillation in scramjet combustor is believed not existing and ignored for a long time. Compared with the flame pulsation, the large-amplitude combustion oscillation in scramjet combustor is indeed unfamiliar and difficult to be observed. In this study, the specifically designed experiments are carried out to investigate this unusual phenomenon in a single-side expansion scramjet combustor. The entrance parameter of combustor corresponds to scramjet flight Mach number 4.0 with a total temperature of 947 K. The obtained results show that the large-amplitude combustion oscillation can exist in scramjet combustor, which is not occasional and can be reproduced. Under the given conditions of this study, moreover, the large-amplitude combustion oscillation is regular and periodic, whose principal frequency is about 126 Hz. The proceeding of the combustion oscillation is accompanied by the transformation of the flame-holding pattern and combustion mode transition between scramjet mode combustion and ramjet mode combustion.

  3. Numerical Investigation of the Mixing Process in Inlet-fuelled Scramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehre, R. M.; Peterson, D.; Wheatley, V.; Boyce, R. R.

    For decades, researchers have pursued the development of supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) engines. The scramjet is an airbreathing hypersonic propulsion system that utilizes atmospheric oxygen for combustion. Hence, the oxidizer does not have to be carried on-board, which makes scramjets more efficient than rockets and thus very attractive for hypersonic transportation or access-to-space systems. However, hypersonic speeds cause, amongst other challenges, very short residence times within the scramjet combustor. Therefore, achieving a high combustion efficiency poses a major challenge. The combustion efficiency is closely coupled with the mixing efficiency, since most scramjets are mixing limited. Thus, extensive studies focusing on mixing enhancement have been conducted in the past. Different injector shapes and angles [1, 2], flame holding devices [3] and mixing enhancing hypermixers [4] have been investigated in scramjets.

  4. A Priori Analysis of Flamelet-Based Modeling for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; McDaniel, James C.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    An a priori investigation of the applicability of flamelet-based combustion models to dual-mode scramjet combustion was performed utilizing Reynolds-averaged simulations (RAS). For this purpose, the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR) flowpath, fueled with a JP-7 fuel surrogate and operating in dual- and scram-mode was considered. The chemistry of the JP-7 fuel surrogate was modeled using a 22 species, 18-step chemical reaction mechanism. Simulation results were compared to experimentally-obtained, time-averaged, wall pressure measurements to validate the RAS solutions. The analysis of the dual-mode operation of this flowpath showed regions of predominately non-premixed, high-Damkohler number, combustion. Regions of premixed combustion were also present but associated with only a small fraction of the total heat-release in the flow. This is in contrast to the scram-mode operation, where a comparable amount of heat is released from non-premixed and premixed combustion modes. Representative flamelet boundary conditions were estimated by analyzing probability density functions for temperature and pressure for pure fuel and oxidizer conditions. The results of the present study reveal the potential for a flamelet model to accurately model the combustion processes in the HDCR and likely other high-speed flowpaths of engineering interest.

  5. Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 into hydrocarbon solar fuels over g-C3N4-Pt nanocomposite photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaguo; Wang, Ke; Xiao, Wei; Cheng, Bei

    2014-06-21

    Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 into renewable hydrocarbon fuels is an alternative way to develop reproducible energy, which is also a promising way to solve the problem of the greenhouse effect. In this work, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was synthesized by directly heating thiourea at 550 °C and then a certain amount of Pt was deposited on it to form g-C3N4-Pt nanocomposites used as catalysts for photocatalytic reduction of CO2 under simulated solar irradiation. The main products of photocatalysis were CH4, CH3OH and HCHO. The deposited Pt acted as an effective cocatalyst, which not only influenced the selectivity of the product generation, but also affected the activity of the reaction. The yield of CH4 first increased upon increasing the amount of Pt deposited on the g-C3N4 from 0 to 1 wt%, then decreased at 2 wt% Pt loading. The production rates of CH3OH and HCHO also increased with the content of Pt increasing from 0 to 0.75 wt% and the maximum yield was observed at 0.75 wt%. The Pt nanoparticles (NPs) could facilitate the transfer and enrichment of photogenerated electrons from g-C3N4 to its surface for photocatalytic reduction of CO2. At the same time, Pt was also used a catalyst to promote the oxidation of products. The transient photocurrent response further confirmed the proposed photocatalytic reduction mechanism of CO2. This work indicates that the deposition of Pt is a good strategy to improve the photoactivity and selectivity of g-C3N4 for CO2 reduction.

  6. Evaluation of immunoassay-based field test kits for the detection of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.C.; Palausky, M.A.; Counts, R.W.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this project are to identify, experimentally evaluate and implement the use of alternative field screening methods that are specific for environmental contaminants of interest and concern to the Department of Energy. Immunochemical techniques are rapidly becoming a significant component in the arsenal of field screening methods. Analytical results obtained by immunoassay have been shown to correlate well with those obtained by traditional laboratory methods. Also, the use of immunoassay-based field screening methods can significantly reduce the cost and time required for environmental assessment. The authors are currently evaluating the effectiveness of several immunoassay-based test kits for detecting petroleum fuel hydrocarbons in soil. Evaluations of two kits, one a semiquantitative assay and the other a quantitative assay, have been completed. The samples analyzed were either solvent or soil spiked with either a mixture of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the three isomers of xylene (BTEX), or gasoline. The kits performed well and according to the manufacturers` claims. Of the 50 assays made with the semiquantitative test, the concentrations of 44 samples were correctly determined. The other six samples were determined to be false positives. A soil matrix effect was observed that could account for some of the false positive results. Experimental results using the quantitative test with BTEX (68 assays) correlated well with those expected; R{sup 2} of 0.976 to 0.983 with slopes of 0.94 to 0.97. With gasoline (38 assays) R{sup 2} values of 0.957 to 0.987 and slopes of 0.76 to 0.78 were obtained. The lower slopes with gasoline are indicative of the lower immunoreactivity of that particular sample of gasoline relative to BTEX.

  7. The Effect of Pulsed Injection on Shear Layer Dynamics in a Scramjet Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leslie

    One of the greatest problems that scramjet research faces is fuel air mixing. The residence time for a scramjet engine, or the time it takes for a volume of air to completely pass through the engine, is on the order of 0.1 ms. In that extremely short period of time fuel must be injected and fully mirco-mixed at stoichiometric ratios with the combustion chamber airflow. The fuel-air mixture must then be combusted and expanded through the nozzle to produce thrust. The goal of this research is to develop a new more efficient method of fuel air mixing within a scramjet combustion chamber. A possible way to speed up the mixing process of parallel injection without incurring the total pressure losses that would occur in normal injection is to inject the fuel from the rear side of a backward facing step. Backward facing steps in supersonic flow produce a Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan followed by a shear layer. The instabilities in this shear layer have dominant resonant frequencies. It is believed that if fuel is injected in pulses that impinge on the shear layer at these dominant resonant frequencies that the shear layer will resonate. When the shear layer resonates the vortices that form in the shear layer will grow in magnitude, thus mixing the injected fuel with the air. To test this hypothesis a new test section was designed and built that features a one inch step under which an injector can be housed. This new test section was installed in the supersonic facility at the University of Kansas. Two injectors were also designed that each feature a face plate, one with eight injection ports arranged in a ring and one with 5 injection ports. Between the face plate and a back plate there is a cavity that houses a rotating valve that is powered by a pneumatic motor. Five valves were built: one with 8 teeth, one with 16 teeth, one with 5 teeth that are the same size as the gaps between the teeth, one with 5 teeth where the teeth are 50% larger than the gaps, and one with 5

  8. Progress in Applying Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy to Scramjet Isolators and Combustors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2146 PROGRESS IN APPLYING TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY TO SCRAMJET ISOLATORS AND COMBUSTORS Michael S... COMBUSTORS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael S. Brown, Skip Williams...paths -- scramjet engines in particular. In this report we summarize our progress in applying TDLAS to scramjet isolators and combustors . 15

  9. Suppression of Combustor-Inlet Interaction in a Scramjet Engine under Mach 4 Flight Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kan; Kanda, Takeshi; Tomioka, Sadatake; Tani, Kouichiro; Sakuranaka, Noboru; Mitani, Tohru

    A sidewall-compression-type scramjet engine was tested under Mach 4 flight conditions. The tested engine had an inlet, a constant cross-sectional area isolator, a constant cross-sectional area combustor, a diverging combustor, and an internal nozzle. In a previous study under the same flight conditions, the maximum thrust increment using fuel injection within the constant-area combustor was 1,380 N at an equivalence ratio of 0.31, and further fuel injection resulted in combustor-inlet interaction (designated as CII). To suppress the CII in the present study, we attempted (1) two-stage fuel injection within the constant-area combustor and the diverging combustor and (2) a boundary layer bleed on the top wall. The former was to suppress heat release around the first-stage fuel injectors in the constant-area combustor, and the latter was to decrease interaction length by decreasing the boundary layer thickness on the top wall. In the case of two-stage fuel injection, the maximum thrust increment was 2,230 N at an equivalence ratio of 0.63. In the case of the boundary layer bleed, on the other hand, the maximum thrust increment was 2,300 N at an equivalence ratio of 0.66. Thus, two-stage fuel injection and boundary layer bleed led to 62% and 67% higher maximum thrust increments than that obtained in the previous study, respectively. Finally, both the two-stage fuel injection and boundary layer bleed were applied simultaneously to obtain the best thrust performance, and the maximum thrust increment was 2,560 N at an equivalence ratio of 0.95. As a result, we obtained an 86% higher maximum thrust increment than that in the previous study. The thrust achievement factor, which was defined as the ratio of the maximum thrusts obtained from experiment and theoretical prediction, under this condition was estimated as 70%.

  10. Numerical Investigation of Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor with Large Upstream Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohieldin, T. O.; Tiwari, S. N.; Reubush, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Dual-mode scramjet combustor configuration with significant upstream interaction is investigated numerically, The possibility of scaling the domain to accelerate the convergence and reduce the computational time is explored. The supersonic combustor configuration was selected to provide an understanding of key features of upstream interaction and to identify physical and numerical issues relating to modeling of dual-mode configurations. The numerical analysis was performed with vitiated air at freestream Math number of 2.5 using hydrogen as the sonic injectant. Results are presented for two-dimensional models and a three-dimensional jet-to-jet symmetric geometry. Comparisons are made with experimental results. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional results show substantial oblique shock train reaching upstream of the fuel injectors. Flow characteristics slow numerical convergence, while the upstream interaction slowly increases with further iterations. As the flow field develops, the symmetric assumption breaks down. A large separation zone develops and extends further upstream of the step. This asymmetric flow structure is not seen in the experimental data. Results obtained using a sub-scale domain (both two-dimensional and three-dimensional) qualitatively recover the flow physics obtained from full-scale simulations. All results show that numerical modeling using a scaled geometry provides good agreement with full-scale numerical results and experimental results for this configuration. This study supports the argument that numerical scaling is useful in simulating dual-mode scramjet combustor flowfields and could provide an excellent convergence acceleration technique for dual-mode simulations.

  11. Navier-Stokes calculations of scramjet-nozzle-afterbody flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive computational fluid dynamics effort was conducted from 1987 to 1990 to properly design a nozzle and lower aft end of a generic hypersonic vehicle powered by a scramjet engine. The interference of the exhaust on the control surfaces of the vehicle can have adverse effects on its stability. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computations were performed, where the exhaust gas was assumed to be air behaving as a perfect gas. Then the exhaust was simulated by a mixture of Freon-12 and argon, which required solving the Navier-Stokes equations for four species: (nitrogen, oxygen, Freon-12, and argon). This allowed gamma to be a field variable during the mixing of the multispecies gases. Two different mixing models were used and comparisons between them as well as the perfect gas air calculations were made to assess their relative merits. Finally, the three dimensional Navier-Stokes computations were made for the full-span scramjet nozzle afterbody module.

  12. Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, C.C.

    1986-12-01

    Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

  13. Numerical Investigation of a Model Scramjet Combustor Using DDES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Junsu; Sung, Hong-Gye

    2017-04-01

    Non-reactive flows moving through a model scramjet were investigated using a delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES), which is a hybrid scheme combining Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes scheme and a large eddy simulation. The three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations were solved numerically on a structural grid using finite volume methods. An in-house was developed. This code used a monotonic upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL) with an advection upstream splitting method by pressure weight function (AUSMPW+) for space. In addition, a 4th order Runge-Kutta scheme was used with preconditioning for time integration. The geometries and boundary conditions of a scramjet combustor operated by DLR, a German aerospace center, were considered. The profiles of the lower wall pressure and axial velocity obtained from a time-averaged solution were compared with experimental results. Also, the mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery factor were provided in order to inspect the performance of the combustor.

  14. Hysteresis of mode transition in a dual-struts based scramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhang; Shaohua, Zhu; Bing, Chen; Xu, Xu

    2016-11-01

    Tests and numerical simulations were performed to investigate the combustion performance of a dual-staged scramjet combustor. High enthalpy vitiated inflow at a total temperature of 1231 K was supplied using a hydrogen-combustion heater. The inlet Mach number was 2.0. Liquid kerosene was injected into the combustor using the dual crossed struts. Three-dimensional Reynolds averaged reacting flow was solved using a two-equation k-ω SST turbulence model to calculate the effect of turbulent stress, and a partial-premixed flamelet model to model the effects of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The discrete phase model was utilized to simulate the fuel atomization and vaporization. For simplicity, the n-decane was chosen as the surrogate fuel with a reaction mechanism of 40 species and 141 steps. The predicted wall pressure profiles at three fuel injection schemes basically captured the axial varying trend of the experimental data. With the downstream equivalence ratio held constant, the upstream equivalence ratio was numerically increased from 0.1 to 0.4 until a steady combustion was obtained. Subsequently, the upstream equivalence ratio was decreased from 0.4 to 0.1 once again. Two ramjet modes with different wall pressure profiles and corresponding flow structures were captured under the identical upstream equivalence ratio of 0.1, illustrating an obvious hysteresis phenomenon. The mechanism of this hysteresis was explained by the transition hysteresis of the pre-combustion shock train in the isolator.

  15. Aspects of High-Resolution Gas Chromatography as Applied to the Analysis of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Other Complex Organic Mixtures. Volume 2. Survey of Sample Insertion Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    AD-A158 772 ASPECTS OF HIGH-RESOL.UTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY S 1ll APPLIED0 TO THE ANALYSIS 0..(U)1 DAYTON UNIV ON RESEARCH INST W A RUSEY ET AL. JUN...RESOLUTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY AS APPLIED TO THE ANALYSIS OF HYDROCARBON FUELS AND OTHER COMPLEX ORGANIC MIXTURES Volume II - Survey of Sample Insertion...NO. NO. 45433-6563 62203F 3048 05 91 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) (cont’ d on reverse) ASPECTS OF HIGH-RESOLUTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY T

  16. Evaluation and Prediction of Henry’s Law Constants and Aqueous Solubilities for Solvents and Hydrocarbon Fuel Components. Volume 2. Experimental Henry’s Law Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    HYDROCARBON FUEL COMPONENTS VOL II: EXPERIMENTAL HENRY’S LAW DATA N G.B. HOWE, M.E. MULLINS, T.N. ROGERS N RESEARCH TRIANGLE INSTITUTE P.O. BOX 12194 RESEARCH...constants agreed reasonably well (within 10 percent) with the batch air-stripping results and other reported experimental values. Measurements were conducted...OF THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED ITEM 19. ABSTRACT (Cont’d) in dilute aqueous solutions., Volume II: Experimental Henry’s Law Data (Volume Ii of 11I) This

  17. Performance and cost evaluation of internal combustion engines for the destruction of hydrocarbon vapors from fuel-contaminated soils. Report for 18 October 1993-14 January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Archabal, S.R.; Downey, D.C.

    1994-12-01

    This document describes the performance and costs associated with a modified internal combustion engine (ICE) used for the destruction of hydrocarbon vapors extracted from fuel contaminated soils. During the period of 18 October 1993 to 14 January 1994, an ICE treatment system manufactured by VR Systems Inc. in Anaheim, California was tested at the Patrick Air Force Base (AFB), Florida, active Base Exchange (BX) service station. The purpose of this test was to independently measure both the performance and the cost of ICE operation, and to determine how this technology can be most effectively used to complement the bioventing technology.

  18. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure contraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  19. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure constraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  20. Scramjet Performance Assessment Using Water Absorption Diagnostics (U)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple path measurements of temperature and H2O concentration will be presented for the AIMHYE test entries in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. Monitoring the progress of high temperature chemical reactions that define scramjet combustor efficiencies is a task uniquely suited to nonintrusive optical diagnostics. One application strategy to overcome the many challenges and limitations of nonintrusive measurements is to use laser absorption spectroscopy coupled with optical fibers. Absorption spectroscopic techniques with rapidly tunable lasers are capable of making simultaneous measurements of mole fraction, temperature, pressure, and velocity. The scramjet water absorption diagnostic was used to measure combustor efficiency and was compared to thrust measurements using a nozzle force balance and integrated nozzle pressures to develop a direct technique for evaluating integrated scramjet performance. Tests were initially performed with a diode laser tuning over a water absorption feature at 1391.7 nm. A second diode laser later became available at a wavelength near 1343.3 nm covering an additional water absorption feature and was incorporated in the system for a two-wavelength technique. Both temperature and mole fraction can be inferred from the lineshape analysis using this approach. Additional high temperature spectroscopy research was conducted to reduce uncertainties in the scramjet application. The lasers are optical fiber coupled to ports at the combustor exit and in the nozzle region. The output from the two diode lasers were combined in a single fiber, and the resultant two-wavelength beam was subsequently split into four legs. Each leg was directed through 60 meters of optical fiber to four combustor exit locations for measurement of beam intensity after absorption by the water within the flow. Absorption results will be compared to 1D combustor analysis using RJPA and nozzle CFD computations as well as to data from a nozzle metric

  1. Study of Magnetogasdynamic Flow Acceleration in a Scramjet Nozzle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    direction along the electrodes to be parallel with the flow. At the end of the electrodes, the vectors push the flow toward the wall. The x-y midplane...accelerated case features long regions of slower Mach number along the walls. This is probably due to a combination of the Lorentz forces pushing ...Institute of Tecnology , WPAFB, OH, March 2004. 8. Einstein, A. Relativity, The Special and General Theory . Three Rivers Press, 1961. 9. “Ramjet, Scramjet

  2. Design and Testing of a Labview- Controlled Catalytic Packed- Bed Reactor System For Production of Hydrocarbon Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Street, J.; Yu, F.; Warnock, J.; Wooten, J.; Columbus, E.; White, M. G.

    2012-05-01

    Gasified woody biomass (producer gas) was converted over a Mo/H+ZSM-5 catalyst to produce gasolinerange hydrocarbons. The effect of contaminants in the producer gas showed that key retardants in the system included ammonia and oxygen. The production of gasoline-range hydrocarbons derived from producer gas was studied and compared with gasoline-range hydrocarbon production from two control syngas mixes. Certain mole ratios of syngas mixes were introduced into the system to evaluate whether or not the heat created from the exothermic reaction could be properly controlled. Contaminant-free syngas was used to determine hydrocarbon production with similar mole values of the producer gas from the gasifier. Contaminant-free syngas was also used to test an ideal contaminant-free synthesis gas situation to mimic our particular downdraft gasifier. Producer gas was used in this study to determine the feasibility of using producer gas to create gasoline-range hydrocarbons on an industrial scale using a specific Mo/H+ZSM-5 catalyst. It was determined that after removing the ammonia, other contaminants poisoned the catalyst and retarded the hydrocarbon production process as well.

  3. X-43A: The First Flight of a Scramjet Powered Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corpening, Griff

    2004-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the X-43A Scramjet engine is shown. The topics include: 1) Scramjets; 2) Overview of X-43A; 3) What Happened the 1st Time; 4) Return to Flight; and 5) What Happened the 2nd Time.

  4. Urinary Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (OH-PAH) Metabolite Concentrations and the Effect of GST Polymorphisms Among US Air Force Personnel Exposed to Jet Fuel

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ema G.; Smith, Kristen; Maule, Alexis L.; Sjodin, Andreas; Li, Zheng; Romanoff, Lovisa; Kelsey, Karl; Proctor, Susan; McClean, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between inhalation exposure to jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) and urinary metabolites among US Air Force (USAF) personnel, and investigate the role of glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms. Methods Personal air samples were collected from 37 full-time USAF personnel during 4 consecutive workdays and analyzed for JP-8 constituents and total hydrocarbons. Pre- and postshift urine samples were collected each day and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon urinary metabolites. Results Work shift exposure to total hydrocarbons was significantly associated with postshift urinary 1-naphthol (β = 0.17; P = <0.0001), 2-naphthol (β = 0.09; P = 0.005), and 2-hydroxyfluorene concentrations (β = 0.08; P = 0.006), and a significant gene-environment interaction was observed with glutathione S-transferase mu-1. Conclusions USAF personnel experience inhalation exposure to JP-8, which is associated with absorption of JP-8 constituents while performing typical job-related tasks, and in our data the glutathione S-transferase mu-1 polymorphism was associated with differential metabolism of naphthalene. PMID:24806557

  5. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  6. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  7. Self-doped Ti3+-TiO2 as a photocatalyst for the reduction of CO2 into a hydrocarbon fuel under visible light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasan, Koroush; Zuo, Fan; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Pingyun

    2015-08-01

    Self-doped TiO2 shows visible light photocatalytic activity, while commercial TiO2 (P25) is only UV responsive. The incorporation of Ti3+ into TiO2 structures narrows the band gap (2.90 eV), leading to significantly increased photocatalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 into a renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH4) in the presence of water vapour under visible light irradiation.Self-doped TiO2 shows visible light photocatalytic activity, while commercial TiO2 (P25) is only UV responsive. The incorporation of Ti3+ into TiO2 structures narrows the band gap (2.90 eV), leading to significantly increased photocatalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 into a renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH4) in the presence of water vapour under visible light irradiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, XPS, XRD and SEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02974k

  8. Effect of fuel composition and engine operating conditions on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from a fleet of heavy-duty diesel buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, McKenzie C. H.; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia; Ristovski, Zoran D.; Rohan Jayaratne, E.

    Emissions from 12 in-service heavy-duty buses powered by low- (LSD) and ultra low-sulfur (ULSD) diesel fuels were measured with the aim to characterize the profile of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the exhaust and to identify the effect of different types of fuels on the emissions. To mimic on-road conditions as much as possible, sampling was conducted on a chassis dynamometer at four driving modes, namely: mode 7 or idle (0% power), mode 11 (25% power), mode 10 (50% power) and mode 8 (100% power). Irrespective of the type of fuel used, naphthalene, acenaphthene, acenaphthylene, anthracene, phenanthrene, fluorene, fluoranthene and pyrene were found to be the dominant PAHs in the exhaust emissions of the buses. However, the PAH composition in the exhausts of ULSD buses were up to 91±6% less than those in the LSD buses. In particular, three- and four-ringed PAHs were more abundant in the later than in the former. Lowering of fuel sulfur content not only reduced PAH emission, but also decreased the benzo(a)pyrene equivalent (BAP eq) and hence the toxicity of the exhaust. Result from multicriteria decision-making and multivariate data analysis techniques showed that the use of ULSD afforded cleaner exhaust compositions and emissions with characteristics that are distinct from those obtained by the use of LSD.

  9. Preliminary calibration of a generic scramjet combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. A.; Morgan, R. G.; Rogers, R. C.; Wendt, M.; Brescianini, C.; Paull, A.; Kelly, G.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a preliminary investigation of the combustion of hydrogen fuel at hypersonic flow conditions are provided. The tests were performed in a generic, constant-area combustor model with test gas supplied by a free-piston-driven reflected-shock tunnel. Static pressure measurements along the combustor wall indicated that burning did occur for combustor inlet conditions of P(static) approximately equal to 19kPa, T(static) approximately equal to 1080 K, and U approximately equal to 3630 m/s with a fuel equivalence ratio approximately equal to 0.9. These inlet conditions were obtained by operating the tunnel with stagnation enthalpy approximately equal to 8.1 MJ/kg, stagnation pressure approximately equal to 52 MPa, and a contoured nozzle with a nominal exit Mach number of 5.5.

  10. Quantitative analysis of fuel-related hydrocarbons in surface water and wastewater samples by solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Langenfeld, J J; Hawthorne, S B; Miller, D J

    1996-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) parameters were examined on water contaminated with hydrocarbons including benzene and alkylbenzenes, n-alkanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Absorption equilibration times ranged from several minutes for low molecular weight compounds such as benzene to 5 h for high molecular weight compounds such as benzo[a]pyrene. Under equilibrium conditions, SPME analysis with GC/FID was linear over 3-6 orders of magnitude, with linear correlation coefficients (r(2)) greater than 0.96. Experimentally determined FID detection limits ranged from ∼30 ppt (w/w hydrocarbon/sample water) for high molecular weight PAHs (e.g., MW > 202) to ∼1 ppb for low molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons. Experimental distribution constants (K) were different with 100- and 7-μm poly(dimethylsiloxane) fibers, and poor correlations with previously published values suggest that K depends on the fiber coating thickness and the sorbent preparation method. The sensitivity of SPME analysis is not significantly enhanced by larger sample volumes, since increasing the water volume (e.g., from 1 to 100 mL) has little effect on the number of analyte molecules absorbed by the fiber, especially for compounds with K < 500. Water sample storage should utilize silanized glassware, since hydrocarbon losses up to 70% could be attributed to unsilanized glassware walls when samples were stored for 48 h. Hydrocarbon losses at part-per-billion concentrations also occurred with surface waters due to partitioning onto part-per-thousand concentrations of suspended solids. Quantitative determinations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons (e.g., in gasoline-contaminated water) can be performed using GC/MS with deuterated internal standard or standard addition calibration as long as the target components or standards had unique ions for quantitation or sufficient chromatographic resolution from interferences. SPME analysis gave good quantitative performance with

  11. Quantitative analysis of fuel-related hydrocarbons in surface water and wastewater samples by solid-phase microextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Langenfeld, J.J.; Hawthorne, S.B.; Miller, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) parameters were examined on water contaminated with hydrocarbons including benzene and alkylbenzenes, n-alkanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Absorption equilibration times ranged from several minutes for low molecular weight compounds such as benzene to 5 h for high molecular weight compounds such as benzo[a]pyrene. Under equilibrium conditions, SPME analysis with GC/FID was linear over 3-6 orders of magnitude, with linear correlation coefficients (r{sup 2}) greater than 0.96. Experimentally determined FID detection limits ranged from nearly 30 ppt (w/w hydrocarbon/sample water) for high molecular weight PAHs (e. g., MW > 202) to nearly 1 ppb for low molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons. Experimental distribution constants (K) were different with 100- and 7-{mu}m poly(dimethylsiloxane) fibers, and poor correlations with previously published values suggest that K depends on the fiber coating thickness and the sorbent preparation method. SPME analysis gave good quantitative performance with surface waters having high suspended sediment contents, as well as with coal gasification wastewater which contained matrix organics at 10{sup 6} -fold higher concentrations than the target aromatic hydrocarbons. Good agreement was obtained between a 45-min SPME and methylene chloride extraction for the determination of PAH concentrations in creosote-contaminated water. 17 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Conversion Pathway: Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons The 2017 Design Case

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass collection, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL conducted a campaign to quantify the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from standing in the field or stand to the throat of the biomass conversion process. The goal of this program was to establish the current costs based on conventional equipment and processes, design improvements to the current system, and to mark annual improvements based on higher efficiencies or better designs. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a delivered biomass logistics cost of $35/dry ton. This goal was successfully achieved in 2012 by implementing field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model. Looking forward to 2017, the programmatic target is to supply biomass to the conversion facilities at a total cost of $80/dry ton and on specification with in-feed requirements. The goal of the 2017 Design Case is to enable expansion of biofuels production beyond highly productive resource areas by breaking the reliance of cost-competitive biofuel production on a single, abundant, low-cost feedstock. If this goal is not achieved, biofuel plants are destined to be small and/or clustered in select regions of the country that have a lock on low-cost feedstock. To put the 2017 cost target into perspective of past accomplishments of the cellulosic ethanol pathway, the $80 target encompasses total delivered feedstock cost, including both grower payment and logistics costs, while meeting all

  13. Determination of diesel fuel and motor oil in water and wastes by a modified diesel-range organics total petroleum hydrocarbon method

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, W.M.; Dhaliwal, J.S.; Perera, S.K.; Baumann, F.J.

    1996-03-01

    The American Petroleum Institute method for determination of diesel-range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) by gas-liquid chromatography with flame ionization detection was modified to allow simultaneous determination of motor oil. Motor oil elutes as a broad hump of unresolved alkanes and can be distinguished readily from diesel fuel and other fuel oils by its profile. The boiling point ranges for No. 2 diesel fuel and motor oil are C{sub 10{minus}} C{sub 21} and C{sub 21}-C{sub 38}, respectively, and these ranges define TPHs in diesel fuel (TPH-D) and motor oil (TPH-M). By this convention, less than 6% of No. 2 diesel is characterized as TPH-M, and less than 9% of motor oil is quantitated as TPH-D. Inlet discrimination was observed when motor oil was injected with a splitless injector. Accurate motor oil quantitation with splitless sample introduction requires calibration with the product or triacontane, which has a similar response factor. Detector response to motor oil (and other petroleum products) and a homologous series of n-alkanes was nearly constant when on-column injection was used. Instrument detection limit for motor oil was about 0.5 {mu}g (splitless injection, total area under the curve), and the widest linear range (up to 100 {mu}g) was obtained by subtracting the solvent chromatogram. Procedures for isolation of motor oil from oil-in-water (O/W) and water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions are described. Method detection limits for diesel fuel and motor oil in purified water were 0.041 and 1.5 mg/L, respectively. 11 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Survey of cotton (Gossypium sp.) for non-polar, extractable hydrocarbons for use as petrochemicals and liquid fuels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ontogenetic study of a commercial cotton cultivar (FiberMax 1320), grown dryland, revealed that the dry weight (DW) of leaves reached a maximum at the 1st flower stage, and then declined as bolls opened. However, % pentane soluble hydrocarbon (HC) yield continued to increase throughout the growi...

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their genotoxicity in exhaust emissions from a diesel engine during extended low-load operation on diesel and biodiesel fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtisek-Lom, Michal; Pechout, Martin; Dittrich, Luboš; Beránek, Vít; Kotek, Martin; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Vodička, Petr; Milcová, Alena; Rossnerová, Andrea; Ambrož, Antonín; Topinka, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the effects of emissions including carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (cPAH) of a conventional diesel engine without a particle filter. Experiments were carried on during extended idle and during a loaded operation immediately following the extended idle. Extended low-load operation of diesel engines due to idling and creep at border crossings, loading areas and in severe congestion has been known to deteriorate the combustion and catalytic device performance and to increase the emissions of particulate matter (PM). A conventional diesel engine was coupled to a dynamometer and operated on diesel fuel and neat biodiesel alternately at idle speed and 2% of rated power and at 30% and 100% load at intermediate speed. Exhaust was sampled on fiber filters, from which the content of elemental and organic carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including cPAH and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been determined. The emissions of cPAH and B[a]P have increased 4-6 times on diesel fuel and by 4-21% on biodiesel during extended idling relative to a short idle and 8-12 times on diesel fuel and 2-20 times on biodiesel during subsequent operation at full load relative to stabilized operation at full load. The total "excess" cPAH emissions after the transition to full load were on the same order of magnitude as the total "excess" cPAH during extended idling. The absolute levels of PAH, cPAH and B[a]P emissions under all operating conditions were lower on biodiesel compared to diesel fuel. Genotoxicity of organic extracts of particles was analysed by acellular assay with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and was consistently higher for diesel than for biodiesel. The exhaust generated during extended idle and subsequent full load exhibited the highest genotoxicity for both fuels. These two regimes are characterized by significant formation of cPAH as well as other DNA reactive compounds substantially contributing to the total genotoxicity. Oxidative

  16. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  17. Design of three-dimensional scramjet inlets for hypersonic propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J. M.; Weidner, E. H.

    1986-01-01

    The paper outlines an approach to the design of three-dimensional inlets for scramjet engines. The basis of the techniques used is the method of streamline tracing through an inviscid axisymmetric flow field. A technique is described for making a smooth change of cross-section shape from rectangular to circular. A feature is the considerable use of computer-graphics to provide a 'user-oriented' procedure which can produce promising design configurations for subsequent analysis with CFD codes. An example is given to demonstrate the capabilities of the design techniques.

  18. Enhanced capability of the Combustion-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, Kenneth E.; Andrews, Earl H.; Eggers, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Combustion-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (CHSTF) is described together with its modifications. The expanded simulation capabilities of the facility are documented. Nozzle exit surveys and tunnel calibration information are presented. It is noted that these modifications included a new heat-sink nickel liner heater, a new Mach 4.7 nozzle, and a new 70-ft vacuum sphere exhaust system. It is found that the facility in the air ejector mode of operation performed similarly to that prior to the addition of the vacuum sphere ducting.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in household air pollution from solid fuel combustion among the female population of Xuanwei and Fuyuan counties, China.

    PubMed

    Downward, George S; Hu, Wei; Rothman, Nat; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Guoping; Wei, Fusheng; Chapman, Robert S; Portengen, Lutzen; Qing, Lan; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-12-16

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from burning "smoky" (bituminous) coal has been implicated as a cause of the high lung cancer incidence in the counties of Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China. Little is known about variations in PAH exposure from throughout the region nor how fuel source and stove design affects exposure. Indoor and personal PAH exposure resulting from solid fuel combustion in Xuanwei and Fuyuan was investigated using repeated 24 h particle bound and gas-phase PAH measurements, which were collected from 163 female residents of Xuanwei and Fuyuan. 549 particle bound (283 indoor and 266 personal) and 193 gas phase (all personal) PAH measurements were collected. Mixed effect models indicated that PAH exposure was up to 6 times higher when burning smoky coal than smokeless coal and varied by up to a factor of 3 between different smoky coal geographic sources. PAH measurements from unventilated firepits were up to 5 times that of ventilated stoves. Exposure also varied between different room sizes and season of measurement. These findings indicate that PAH exposure is modulated by a variety of factors, including fuel type, coal source, and stove design. These findings may provide valuable insight into potential causes of lung cancer in the area.

  20. Study of the aromatic hydrocarbons poisoning of platinum cathodes on proton exchange membrane fuel cell spatial performance using a segmented cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2016-11-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are produced and used in many industrial processes, which makes them hazardous air pollutants. Currently, air is the most convenient oxidant for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), and air quality is an important consideration because airborne contaminants can negatively affect fuel cell performance. The effects of exposing the cathode of PEMFCs to benzene and naphthalene were investigated using a segmented cell system. The introduction of 2 ppm C6H6 resulted in moderate performance loss of 40-45 mV at 0.2 A cm-2 and 100-110 mV at 1.0 A cm-2 due to benzene adsorption on Pt and its subsequent electrooxidation to CO2 under operating conditions and cell voltages of 0.5-0.8 V. In contrast, PEMFC poisoning by ∼2 ppm of naphthalene led to a decrease in cell performance from 0.66 to 0.13 V at 1.0 A cm-2, which was caused by the strong adsorption of C10H8 onto Pt at cell voltages of 0.2-1.0 V. Naphthalene desorption and hydrogenation only occurred at potentials below 0.2 V. The PEMFCs' performance loss due to each contaminant was recoverable, and the obtained results demonstrated that the fuel cells' exposure to benzene and naphthalene should be limited to concentrations less than 2 ppm.

  1. Simultaneous NOx and hydrocarbon emissions control for lean-burn engines using low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell at open circuit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ta-Jen; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiang; Wu, Chung-Ying

    2012-02-21

    The high fuel efficiency of lean-burn engines is associated with high temperature and excess oxygen during combustion and thus is associated with high-concentration NO(x) emission. This work reveals that very high concentration of NO(x) in the exhaust can be reduced and hydrocarbons (HCs) can be simultaneously oxidized using a low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). An SOFC unit is constructed with Ni-YSZ as the anode, YSZ as the electrolyte, and La(0.6)Sr(0.4)CoO(3) (LSC)-Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95) as the cathode, with or without adding vanadium to LSC. SOFC operation at 450 °C and open circuit can effectively treat NO(x) over the cathode at a very high concentration in the simulated exhaust. Higher NO(x) concentration up to 5000 ppm can result in a larger NO(x) to N(2) rate. Moreover, a higher oxygen concentration promotes NO conversion. Complete oxidation of HCs can be achieved by adding silver to the LSC current collecting layer. The SOFC-based emissions control system can treat NO(x) and HCs simultaneously, and can be operated without consuming the anode fuel (a reductant) at near the engine exhaust temperature to eliminate the need for reductant refilling and extra heating.

  2. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Combustion Processes in Scramjet Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potturi, Amarnatha Sarma

    Flows through scramjet configurations are simulated using hybrid large-eddy simulation / Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes techniques. Present study is performed in three parts: parametric studies to determine the sensitivities of the predictions to modeling and algorithmic variations; formulation, implementation, and testing of several subgrid closures aimed at modeling filtered species production rates, which account for turbulence-chemistry interactions in a finite rate chemistry large-eddy simulation framework; and as a final assessment of the complete methodology, cavity-stabilized ethylene combustion is simulated. Throughout the present study, emphasis is placed on characterizing facility-specific effects, since they can have a significant influence on the numerical solution. In Part One, non-reactive and reactive flows through a model scramjet combustor with a wedge shaped injector are simulated. Different grids, flux reconstruction methods, reaction mechanisms, and inflow boundary conditions are used. To enhance fuel-air mixing, a synthetic eddy method is used to generate turbulence in the injector boundary layers and the hydrogen jets. The results show that in all the cases a lifted flame is predicted with varying standoff distances, heat releases, and shapes. In Part Two, the subgrid closures for modeling the filtered species production rates are tested on two different scramjet configurations with fundamentally different flow patterns and flame structures, one with the wedge shaped injector placed at the center of the combustor section (first, used in Part One), another with a three-dimensional ramp injector located on the upper wall of the combustor section (second). While the impact of these closures on the flow through the first configuration is insignificant, they have a more pronounced effect on the flow through the second configuration. Error analysis and performance quantification of these closures reveal that, relative to a baseline model, two of

  3. Review of HxPyOz-Catalyzed H + OH Recombination in Scramjet Nozzle Expansions; and Possible Phosphoric Acid Enhancement of Scramjet Flameholding, from Extinction of H3PO4 + H2 - Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Recent detailed articles by Twarowski indicate that small quantities of phosphorus oxides and acids in the fuel-rich combustion products of H2 + phosphine (PH3) + air should significantly catalyze H, OH and O recombination kinetics during high-speed nozzle expansions -- to reform H2O, release heat, and approach equilibrium more rapidly and closely than uncatalyzed kinetics. This paper is an initial feasibility study to determine (a) if addition of phosphoric acid vapor (H3PO4) to a H2 fuel jet -- which is much safer than using PH3 -- will allow combustion in a high-speed scramjet engine test without adverse effects on localized flameholding, and (b) if phosphorus-containing exhaust emissions are environmentally acceptable. A well-characterized axisymmetric straight-tube opposed jet burner (OJB) tool is used to evaluate H3PO4 addition effects on the air velocity extinction limit (flame strength) of a H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flame. Addition of nitric oxide (NO), also believed to promote catalytic H-atom recombination, was evaluated for comparison. Two to five mass percent H3PO4 in the H2 jet increased flame strength 4.2%, whereas airside addition decreased it 1%. Adding 5% NO to the H2 caused a 2% decrease. Products of H-atom attack on H3PO4 produced an intense green chemiluminescence near the stagnation point. The resultant exothermic production of phosphorus oxides and acids, with accelerated H-atom recombination, released sufficient heat near the stagnation point to increase flame strength. In conclusion, the addition of H3PO4 vapor (or more reactive P sources) to hydrogen in scramjet engine tests may positively affect flameholding stability in the combustor and thrust production during supersonic expansion -- a possible dual benefit with system design / performance implications. Finally, a preliminary assessment of possible environmental effects indicates that scramjet exhaust emissions should consist of phosphoric acid aerosol, with gradual

  4. High performance liquid chromatographic hydrocarbon group-type analyses of mid-distillates employing fuel-derived fractions as standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, G. T.; Otterson, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Two high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods have been developed for the determination of saturates, olefins and aromatics in petroleum and shale derived mid-distillate fuels. In one method the fuel to be analyzed is reacted with sulfuric acid, to remove a substantial portion of the aromatics, which provides a reacted fuel fraction for use in group type quantitation. The second involves the removal of a substantial portion of the saturates fraction from the HPLC system to permit the determination of olefin concentrations as low as 0.3 volume percent, and to improve the accuracy and precision of olefins determinations. Each method was evaluated using model compound mixtures and real fuel samples.

  5. Expanded operational capabilities of the Langley Mach 7 Scramjet test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S. R.; Guy, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental research program conducted to expand the operational capabilities of the NASA Langley Mach 7 Scramjet Test Facility is described. Previous scramjet testing in this facility was limited to a single simulated flight condition of Mach 6.9 at an altitude of 115,300 ft. The arc heater research demonstrates the potential of the facility for scramjet testing at simulated flight conditions from Mach 4 (at altitudes from 77,000 to 114,000 ft) to Mach 7 (at latitudes from 108,000 to 149,000 ft). Arc heater electrical characteristics, operational problems, measurements of nitrogen oxide contaminants, and total-temperature profiles are discussed.

  6. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels. Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Abhijit; Sahir, Asad; Tan, Eric; Humbird, David; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Meyer, Pimphan; Ross, Jeff; Sexton, Danielle; Yap, Raymond; Lukas, John Lukas

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructurecompatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis.

  7. Actions of Mycobacterium sp. strain AP1 on the saturated- and aromatic-hydrocarbon fractions of fuel oil in a marine medium.

    PubMed

    Vila, Joaquim; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2009-10-01

    The pyrene-degrading Mycobacterium sp. strain AP1 grew in nutrient-supplemented artificial seawater with a heavy fuel oil as the sole carbon source, causing the complete removal of all linear (C(12) to C(40)) and branched alkanes from the aliphatic fraction, as well as an extensive degradation of the three- and four-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) phenanthrene (95%), anthracene (80%), fluoranthene (80%), pyrene (75%), and benzo(a)anthracene (30%). Alkylated PAHs, which are more abundant in crude oils than the nonsubstituted compounds, were selectively attacked at extents that varied from more than 90% for dimethylnaphthalenes, methylphenanthrenes, methylfluorenes, and methyldibenzothiophenes to about 30% for monomethylated fluoranthenes/pyrenes and trimethylated phenanthrenes and dibenzothiophenes. Identification of key metabolites indicated the utilization of phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene by known assimilatory metabolic routes, while other components were cooxidized. Detection of mono- and dimethylated phthalic acids demonstrated ring cleavage and further oxidation of alkyl PAHs. The extensive degradation of the alkanes, the two-, three-, and four-ring PAHs, and their 1-, 2-, and 3-methyl derivatives from a complex mixture of hydrocarbons by Mycobacterium sp. strain AP1 illustrates the great substrate versatility of alkane- and PAH-degrading mycobacteria.

  8. Soil- and groundwater-quality data for petroleum hydrocarbon compounds within Fuels Area C, Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, David A.; Rowe, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Ellsworth Air Force Base is an Air Combat Command located approximately 10 miles northeast of Rapid City, South Dakota. Ellsworth Air Force Base occupies about 6,000 acres within Meade and Pennington Counties, and includes runways, airfield operations, industrial areas, housing, and recreational facilities. Fuels Area C within Ellsworth Air Force Base is a fuels storage area that is used to support the mission of the base. In fall of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, Ellsworth Air Force Base, to estimate groundwater-flow direction, select locations for permanent monitoring wells, and install and sample monitoring wells for petroleum hydrocarbon compounds within Fuels Area C. Nine monitoring wells were installed for the study within Fuels Area C during November 4–7, 2014. Soil core samples were collected during installation of eight of the monitoring wells and analyzed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes, naphthalene,m- and p-xylene, o-xylene, and gasoline- and diesel-range organic compounds. Groundwater samples were collected from seven of the nine wells (two of the monitoring wells did not contain enough water to sample or were dry) during November 19–21, 2014, and analyzed for select physical properties, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes, naphthalene, m- and p-xylene, o-xylene, and gasoline- and diesel-range organic compounds. This report describes the nine monitoring well locations and presents the soil- and groundwater-quality data collected in 2014 for this study.

  9. Impact of using fishing boat fuel with high poly aromatic content on the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Li, Hsing-Wang; Chen, Chung-Ban; Fang, Guor-Cheng; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    Because of the fishery subsidy policy, the fishing boat fuel oil (FBFO) exemption from commodity taxes, business taxes and air pollution control fees, resulted in the price of FBFO was ˜50% lower than premium diesel fuel (PDF) in Taiwan. It is estimated that ˜650,000 kL FBFO was illegally used by traveling diesel-vehicles (TDVs) with a heavy-duty diesel engine (HDDE), which accounted for ˜16.3% of the total diesel fuel consumed by TDVs. In this study, sulfur, poly aromatic and total-aromatic contents in both FBFO and PDF were measured and compared. Exhaust emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their carcinogenic potencies (BaP eq) from a HDDE under transient cycle testing for both FBFO and PDF were compared and discussed. Finally, the impact caused by the illegal use of FBFO on the air quality was examined. Results show that the mean sulfur-, poly aromatic and aromatic-contents in FBFO were 43.0, 3.89 and 1.04 times higher than that of PDF, respectively. Emission factors of total-PAHs and total-BaP eq obtained by utilizing FBFO were 51.5 and 0.235 mg L -1-Fuel, which were 3.41 and 5.82 times in magnitude higher than obtained by PDF, respectively. The estimated annual emissions of total-PAHs and total-BaP eq to the ambient environment due to the illegally used FBFO were 23.6 and 0.126 metric tons, respectively, which resulted in a 17.9% and a 25.0% increment of annual emissions from all mobile sources, respectively. These results indicated that the FBFO used illegally by TDVs had a significant impact on PAH emissions to the ambient environment.

  10. Massively parallel computation of three-dimensional scramjet combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. H.; Le, J. L.

    Recent progress of computational study of scramjet combustor has been described in Refs 1-3. However, detailed flow properties, especially the lateral properties and the sidewall effects are not considered. In this paper, a parallel simulation of an experimental dual-mode scramjet combustor configuration is presented, considering the jet-to-jet symmetry and the full-duct modeling. Turbulence is modeled with the k-ɛ two-equation turbulence model and a 7-specie, 8-equation kinetics model is used to model hydrogen/air combustion. The conservation form of the Navier-Stokes equations with finite-rate chemistry reactions is solved using a diagonal implicit finite-volume method. For the two cases, the three-dimension flow-fields with equivalence ratio Φ=0.0 and 0.35 have been respectively simulated on the COW and MPP. Wall pressure comparisons between CFD and experiments (CARDC and NAL) show fair agreement for the jet-to-jet case. For the full-duct modeling, more detailed flow properties are obtained. The fuelpenetrating heights of the injectors are different because of the effects of the sidewall boundary layer and the shock wave in the combustor. According to numerical results, if adjusting the locations of the injectors, the combustion efficiency could be improved.

  11. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Performance with Real Gas Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul; Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The theoretical performance of a scramjet propulsion system incorporating an magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) energy bypass scheme is calculated. The one-dimensional analysis developed earlier, in which the theoretical performance is calculated neglecting skin friction and using a sudden-freezing approximation for the nozzle flow, is modified to incorporate the method of Van Driest for turbulent skin friction and a finite-rate chemistry calculation in the nozzle. Unlike in the earlier design, in which four ramp compressions occurred in the pitch plane, in the present design the first two ramp compressions occur in the pitch plane and the next two compressions occur in the yaw plane. The results for the simplified design of a spaceliner show that (1) the present design produces higher specific impulses than the earlier design, (2) skin friction substantially reduces thrust and specific impulse, and (3) the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is still better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Results suggest that the energy management with MHD principles offers the possibility of improving the performance of the scramjet. The technical issues needing further studies are identified.

  12. An experimental investigation of mixing enhancement in a simulated scramjet combustor by use of swirling jets. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, Donna Karen

    1993-01-01

    It is desired to maintain supersonic flow through the combustor of supersonic airbreathing engines to reduce static temperatures and total pressure losses inherent in reducing flow to subsonic speeds. Due to the supersonic speeds through the combustor, mixing of the fuel and air must by rapid for complete combustion to occur within a reasonable streamwise distance. It was proposed that the addition of swirl to the fuel jet prior to injection might enhance the mixing of the fuel with the air. The effects of swirl on the mixing of a 30 deg wall jet into a Mach 2 flow were experimentally investigated. Swirl was introduced into the fuel stream by tangential injection into a cylindrical swirl chamber. The flow was then accelerated through a convergent-divergent nozzle with an area ratio of two, and supersonically injected into the Mach 2 flow such that the static pressure of the fuel matched the effective back pressure of the main flow. Two different cases with swirl and one without swirl were investigated, with both helium and air simulating the fuel. Rayleigh scattering was used to visualize the flow and seeding the fuel with water allowed it to be traced through the main flow. Using histograms of the pure molecular Rayleigh scattering images, the helium concentration in the jet-mixing region of the flow was monitored and found to decrease slightly with swirl, indicating better mixing. Thresholding the water-seeded images allowed the jet-mixing region to be isolated and showed a slight increase in this area with swirl. Penetration, however, was slightly less with swirl. Rescaling the data for equal mass flow rates allowed comparison for a scramjet application of a combustor with a single injector and the desire to fuel to a specified fuel-to-oxidant ratio. These results showed a substantial increase in the spreading area with swirl, an increase in the mixing occurring in this area, and slightly better penetration.

  13. Influencing factors on the mode transition in a dual-mode scramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhang; Bing, Chen; Gang, Liu; Baoxi, Wei; Xu, Xu

    2014-10-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to characterize the effects of fuel type, injector configuration, inflow total temperature and fuel injection distribution on the mode transition in a dual-mode scramjet combustor. High enthalpy vitiated air was heated to three total temperatures by the hydrogen-oxygen combustion, entering the isolator entrance at a Mach number of 2.0. Fuel was injected through a four-hole aero-ramp or transverse injector, and ignited by a gas-pilot flame. At an inflow stagnation condition of P0=0.85 MPa and T0=1200 K, three combustion modes, namely Pure Scram Mode, Dual-Mode Scram Mode and Dual-Mode Ram Mode, were classified through the wall pressure distributions, one-dimensional performance analysis, and optical visualization. Two critical fuel equivalence ratios were selected to divide three combustion modes. At the lower transition point, ERlc, the transition from Pure Scram Mode to Dual-Mode Scram Mode occurred corresponding to a normalized wall pressure at x/H=2.5 of 0.23; while at the upper transition point, ERuc, the transition from Dual-Mode Scram Mode to Dual-Mode Ram Mode occurred corresponding to a normalized wall pressure at x/H=2.5 of 0.34. The transition width, ERw, was defined as the difference of two transition points. In this limited range, the combustor was operating in the Dual-Mode Scram Mode. The ERuc was estimated based on the Rayleigh flow relation, and the applicability of the analytic equation was testified through a series of experiments with different boundary conditions. The experimental results showed that two transition points in the ethylene case were higher in ER than in the hydrogen case, and the measured ERuc of two fuels were all 2.5 times larger than the predicted values. However, two fuels had little difference on the transition width. Due to the angled injection, two transition points in the aero-ramp case were higher in ER than in the transverse injector case; while the influence of injector

  14. Application of 266-nm and 355-nm Nd:YAG laser radiation for the investigation of fuel-rich sooting hydrocarbon flames by raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Egermann, Jan; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2004-10-10

    We describe the use of linear Raman scattering for the investigation of fuel-rich sooting flames. In comparison, the frequency-tripled and -quadrupled fundamental wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser have been used as an excitation source for study of the applicability of these laser wavelengths for analysis of sooting flames. The results obtained show that, for the investigation of strongly sooting flames, 266-nm excitation is better than 355-nm excitation. Although the entire fluorescence intensity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) decreases with rising excitation wavelength, there is increased interference with the Raman signals by displacement of the spectral region of the Raman signals toward the fluorescence maximum of the laser-induced fluorescence emissions. Besides the broadband signals of PAHs, narrowband emissions of laser-produced C2 occur in the spectra of sooting flames and affect the Raman signals. These C2 emission bands are completely depolarized and can be separated by polarization-resolved detection. A comparison of the laser-induced fluorescence emissions of an ethylene flame with those of a methane flame shows the same spectral features, but the intensity of the emissions is larger by a factor of 5 for the ethylene fuel. Using 266-nm radiation for Raman signal excitation makes possible measurements in the ethylene flame also.

  15. Diode Laser-Based Detection of Combustor Instabilities with Application to a Scramjet Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    combustion instability has focused primarily on subsonic turbulent combustors [7]. NOx emission regulations on gas turbines have driven the use of...Optical Access Laser Beam Location ermocouple eholder) Static Pressure Taps (Open circles)holders Combustor w, direct-connect scramjet flowpath. 4.8 s...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2055 DIODE LASER-BASED DETECTION OF COMBUSTOR INSTABILITIES WITH APPLICATION TO A SCRAMJET ENGINE (POSTPRINT) Campbell

  16. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  17. Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

    2007-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

  18. Development of a Test to Evaluate Aerothermal Response of Materials to Hypersonic Flow Using a Scramjet Wind Tunnel (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    materials under hypersonic flow conditions was developed and evaluated. A direct-connect scramjet combustor rig, de- signed based on the needs for...hypersonic flight and de- scribed elsewhere,10 was explored for use as a wind tunnel. A methodology to introduce samples into the flow path of the combustor ...Scramjet Direct-Connect Rig Gruber et al.10 have designed and fabricated a di- rect-connect full-scale scramjet combustor test facility for studies on

  19. Biomonitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in pregnant women in Trujillo, Peru — Comparison of different fuel types used for cooking☆

    PubMed Central

    Adetona, Olorunfemi; Li, Zheng; Sjödin, Andreas; Romanoff, Lovisa C.; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Needham, Larry L.; Hall, Daniel B.; Cassidy, Brandon E.; Naeher, Luke P.

    2016-01-01

    Women and children in developing countries are often exposed to high levels of air pollution including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which may negatively impact their health, due to household combustion of biomass fuel for cooking and heating. We compared creatinine adjusted hydroxy-PAH (OH-PAH) concentrations in pregnant women in Trujillo, Peru who cook with wood to levels measured in those who cook with kerosene, liquefied petroleum gas or a combination of fuels. Seventy-nine women were recruited for the study between May and July 2004 in the first trimester of their pregnancy. Urine samples were collected from the subjects in the first, second and third trimesters for OH-PAH analyses. The concentrations of the OH-PAHs were compared across the type of fuel used for cooking and pregnancy trimesters. The relationships between OH-PAHs levels in the first trimester and concurrently measured personal exposures to PM2.5, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide together with their indoor and outdoor air concentrations were also investigated. Women cooking with wood or kerosene had the highest creatinine adjusted OH-PAH concentrations compared with those using gas, coal briquette or a combination of fuels. Concentrations of creatinine adjusted 2-hydroxy-fluorene, 3-hydroxy-fluorene, 1-hydroxy-fluorene, 2-hydroxy-phenanthrene and 4-hydroxy-phenanthrene were significantly higher (p<0.05) in women who used wood or kerosene alone compared with women who used liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), coal briquette or a combination of fuels. An increase in the concentrations of creatinine adjusted 9-hydroxy-fluorene, 1-hydroxy-phenanthrene, 2-hydroxy-phenanthrene, 4-hydroxy-phenanthrene and 1-hydroxy-pyrene in the third trimesters was also observed. Weak positive correlation (Spearman correlation coefficient, ρ<0.4; p<0.05) was observed between all first trimester creatinine adjusted OH-PAHs and indoor (kitchen and living room), and personal 48-h TWA PM2.5. Women who cooked

  20. Numerical Simulation of Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, C. G.; Riggins, D. W.; Bittner, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a numerical investigation of a three-dimensional dual-mode scramjet isolator-combustor flow-field are presented. Specifically, the effect of wall cooling on upstream interaction and flow-structure is examined for a case assuming jet-to-jet symmetry within the combustor. Comparisons are made with available experimental wall pressures. The full half-duct for the isolator-combustor is then modeled in order to study the influence of side-walls. Large scale three-dimensionality is observed in the flow with massive separation forward on the side-walls of the duct. A brief review of convergence-acceleration techniques useful in dual-mode simulations is presented, followed by recommendations regarding the development of a reliable and unambiguous experimental data base for guiding CFD code assessments in this area.

  1. Experiments on Cruise Propulsion with a Hydrogen Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalker, R. J.; Paull, A.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of drag have been made in a shock tunnel on a simple integrated vehicle engine combination for hypersonic cruise with hydrogen scramjet propulsion. The test flow Mach number was 6.4, and the velocity was 2.45 kms(exp -1). Zero Drag, which is the necessary condition for cruise, was achieved as the equivalence ratio approached one. It was found that an analysis using established aerodynamic concept was adequate for predicting drag in the case of no combustion. When combustion occurred results of direct connect experiments provided was qualitative guide to the measured levels of drag, and indicated that thrust nozzle combustion was taking place. An heuristic analysis is used to point to the important effect this may have on propulsive lift.

  2. Flow enthalpy effects on scramjet mixing and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, D. W.; Mcclinton, C. R.; Rogers, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The present analysis of the 3D characteristics of the mixing processes in a scramjet combustor gives attention to the streamwise, vorticity-driven macromixing, as well as shear-driven small-scale mixing, in both an unconfined Mach 6 airstream and a high-enthalpy (Mach-17) confined, Mach 6 airstream. The results obtained indicate that mixing is substantially lower for the high-enthalpy case. The effect of residence time on jet mixing is discussed in view of the production and decay of the axial vorticity, cross-flow velocities, and mean-flow velocities of these confined flows. The effective distance travelled by a fluid particle in the cross-flow, over the combustor length, is used to explain axial vorticity's contribution to mixing.

  3. Investigation of the feasibility of CARS measurements in scramjet combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, J. A.; Hall, R. J.; Eckbreth, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of analytical and experimental investigations to determine the feasibility of using coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) to measure temperature and species concentration in supersonic combustion experiments. The CARS spectra of H2O, O2 and H2 were measured in laboratory flames. Computer code calculated spectra agree very well with the measured spectra. Temperature, and O2 and H2 concentration profiles have been determined from CARS spectra in a laboratory H2 air flat diffusion flame. Temperature measurements agree with radiation corrected thermocouple measurements within 5 to 10 percent, depending on species concentration. The feasibility of measuring O2 concentrations up to 10 percent, from the spectral shape was demonstrated. H2 concentrations determined from CARS intensities agree with spontaneous Raman measurements within a factor of two. Finally, a conceptual design was formulated for diagnostics in the Langley Research Center scramjet combustion facility.

  4. Shock Train/Boundary-Layer Interaction in Rectangular Scramjet Isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Jonathan Simon

    Numerous studies of the dual-mode scramjet isolator, a critical component in preventing inlet unstart and/or vehicle loss by containing a collection of flow disturbances called a shock train, have been performed since the dual-mode propulsion cycle was introduced in the 1960s. Low momentum corner flow and other three-dimensional effects inherent to rectangular isolators have, however, been largely ignored in experimental studies of the boundary layer separation driven isolator shock train dynamics. Furthermore, the use of two dimensional diagnostic techniques in past works, be it single-perspective line-of-sight schlieren/shadowgraphy or single axis wall pressure measurements, have been unable to resolve the three-dimensional flow features inside the rectangular isolator. These flow characteristics need to be thoroughly understood if robust dual-mode scramjet designs are to be fielded. The work presented in this thesis is focused on experimentally analyzing shock train/boundary layer interactions from multiple perspectives in aspect ratio 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 rectangular isolators with inflow Mach numbers ranging from 2.4 to 2.7. Secondary steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics studies are performed to compare to the experimental results and to provide additional perspectives of the flow field. Specific issues that remain unresolved after decades of isolator shock train studies that are addressed in this work include the three-dimensional formation of the isolator shock train front, the spatial and temporal low momentum corner flow separation scales, the transient behavior of shock train/boundary layer interaction at specific coordinates along the isolator's lateral axis, and effects of the rectangular geometry on semi-empirical relations for shock train length prediction. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  5. Highly efficient visible light photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbon fuels by Cu-nanoparticle decorated graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Shown, Indrajit; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Chang, Yu-Chung; Lin, Chang-Hui; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Ganguly, Abhijit; Wang, Chen-Hao; Chang, Jan-Kai; Wu, Chih-I; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2014-11-12

    The production of renewable solar fuel through CO2 photoreduction, namely artificial photosynthesis, has gained tremendous attention in recent times due to the limited availability of fossil-fuel resources and global climate change caused by rising anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere. In this study, graphene oxide (GO) decorated with copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs), hereafter referred to as Cu/GO, has been used to enhance photocatalytic CO2 reduction under visible-light. A rapid one-pot microwave process was used to prepare the Cu/GO hybrids with various Cu contents. The attributes of metallic copper nanoparticles (∼4-5 nm in size) in the GO hybrid are shown to significantly enhance the photocatalytic activity of GO, primarily through the suppression of electron-hole pair recombination, further reduction of GO's bandgap, and modification of its work function. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy studies indicate a charge transfer from GO to Cu. A strong interaction is observed between the metal content of the Cu/GO hybrids and the rates of formation and selectivity of the products. A factor of greater than 60 times enhancement in CO2 to fuel catalytic efficiency has been demonstrated using Cu/GO-2 (10 wt % Cu) compared with that using pristine GO.

  6. Design and multifidelity analysis of dual mode scramjet compression system using coupled NPSS and fluent simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Nandakumar

    Hypersonic airbreathing engines mark a potential future development of the aerospace industry and immense efforts have been taken in gaining knowledge in them for the past decades. The physical phenomenon occurring at the hypersonic flow regime makes the design and performance prediction of a scramjet engine hard. Though cutting-edge simulation tools fight their way toward accurate prediction of the environment, the time consumed by the entire process in designing and analyzing a scramjet engine and its component may be exorbitant. A multi-fidelity approach for designing a scramjet with a cruising Mach number of 6 is detailed in this research where high-order simulations are applied according to the physics involved in the component. Two state-of-the-art simulation tools were used to take the aerodynamic and propulsion disciplines into account for realistic prediction of the individual components as well as the entire scramjet. The specific goal of this research is to create a virtual environment to design and analyze a hypersonic, two-dimensional, planar inlet and isolator to check its operability for a dual-mode scramjet engine. The dual mode scramjet engine starts at a Mach number of 3.5 where it operates as a ramjet and accelerates to Mach 6 to be operated as a scramjet engine. The intercomponent interaction between the compression components with the rest of the engine is studied by varying the fidelity of the numerical simulation according to the complexity of the situation. Efforts have been taken to track the transition Mach number as it switches from ramjet to scramjet. A complete scramjet assembly was built using the Numerical Propulsion Simulation System (NPSS) and the performance of the engine was evaluated for various scenarios. Different numerical techniques were opted for varying the fidelity of the analysis with the highest fidelity consisting of 2D RANS CFD simulation. The interaction between the NPSS elements with the CFD solver is governed by the

  7. Reductions in Emissions of Carbonaceous Particulate Matter and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Combustion of Biomass Pellets in Comparisonwith Raw Fuel Burning

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, Guofeng; TAO, Shu; WEI, Siye; ZHANG, Yanyan; WANG, Rong; WANG, Bin; LI, Wei; SHEN, Huizhong; HUANG, Ye; CHEN, Yuanchen; CHEN, Han; YANG, Yifeng; WANG, Wei; WEI, Wen; WANG, Xilong; LIU, Wenxing; WANG, Xuejun; SIMONICH, Staci L. Massey

    2012-01-01

    Biomass pellets are emerging as a cleaner alternative to traditional biomass fuels. The potential benefits of using biomass pellets include improving energy utilization efficiency and reducing emissions of air pollutants. To assess the environmental, climate, and health significance of replacing traditional fuels with biomass pellets, it is critical to measure the emission factors (EFs) of various pollutants from pellet burning. However, only a few field measurements have been conducted on the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the combustion of pellets. In this study, pine wood and corn straw pellets were burned in a pellet burner (2.6 kW) and the EFs of CO, organic carbon, elemental carbon, PM, and PAHs (EFCO, EFOC, EFEC, EFPM, and EFPAH) were determined. The average EFCO, EFOC, EFEC, and EFPM were 1520±1170, 8.68±11.4, 11.2±8.7, and 188±87 mg/MJ for corn straw pellets, and 266±137, 5.74±7.17, 2.02±1.57, and 71.0±54.0 mg/MJ for pine wood pellets, respectively. Total carbonaceous carbon constituted 8 to 14% of the PM mass emitted. The measured values of EFPAH for the two pellets were 1.02±0.64 and 0.506±0.360 mg/MJ, respectively. The secondary side air supply in the pellet burner did not change the EFs of most pollutants significantly (p > 0.05). The only exceptions were EFOC and EFPM for pine wood pellets because of reduced combustion temperatures with the increased air supply. In comparison with EFs for the raw pine wood and corn straw, EFCO, EFOC, EFEC, and EFPM for pellets were significantly lower than those for raw fuels (p < 0.05). However, the differences in EFPAH were not significant (p > 0.05). Based on the measured EFs and thermal efficiencies, it was estimated that 95, 98, 98, 88, and 71% reductions in the total emissions of CO, OC, EC, PM, and PAHs could be achieved by replacing the raw biomass fuels combusted in traditional cooking stoves with pellets burned in modern

  8. Reductions in emissions of carbonaceous particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of biomass pellets in comparison with raw fuel burning.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guofeng; Tao, Shu; Wei, Siye; Zhang, Yanyan; Wang, Rong; Wang, Bin; Li, Wei; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Chen, Yuanchen; Chen, Han; Yang, Yifeng; Wang, Wei; Wei, Wen; Wang, Xilong; Liu, Wenxing; Wang, Xuejun; Masse Simonich, Staci L y

    2012-06-05

    Biomass pellets are emerging as a cleaner alternative to traditional biomass fuels. The potential benefits of using biomass pellets include improving energy utilization efficiency and reducing emissions of air pollutants. To assess the environmental, climate, and health significance of replacing traditional fuels with biomass pellets, it is critical to measure the emission factors (EFs) of various pollutants from pellet burning. However, only a few field measurements have been conducted on the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the combustion of pellets. In this study, pine wood and corn straw pellets were burned in a pellet burner (2.6 kW), and the EFs of CO, organic carbon, elemental carbon, PM, and PAHs (EF(CO), EF(OC), EF(EC), EF(PM), and EF(PAH)) were determined. The average EF(CO), EF(OC), EF(EC), and EF(PM) were 1520 ± 1170, 8.68 ± 11.4, 11.2 ± 8.7, and 188 ± 87 mg/MJ for corn straw pellets and 266 ± 137, 5.74 ± 7.17, 2.02 ± 1.57, and 71.0 ± 54.0 mg/MJ for pine wood pellets, respectively. Total carbonaceous carbon constituted 8 to 14% of the PM mass emitted. The measured values of EF(PAH) for the two pellets were 1.02 ± 0.64 and 0.506 ± 0.360 mg/MJ, respectively. The secondary side air supply in the pellet burner did not change the EFs of most pollutants significantly (p > 0.05). The only exceptions were EF(OC) and EF(PM) for pine wood pellets because of reduced combustion temperatures with the increased air supply. In comparison with EFs for the raw pine wood and corn straw, EF(CO), EF(OC), EF(EC), and EF(PM) for pellets were significantly lower than those for raw fuels (p < 0.05). However, the differences in EF(PAH) were not significant (p > 0.05). Based on the measured EFs and thermal efficiencies, it was estimated that 95, 98, 98, 88, and 71% reductions in the total emissions of CO, OC, EC, PM, and PAHs could be achieved by replacing the raw biomass fuels combusted in

  9. Effects on aerosol size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the heavy-duty diesel generator fueled with feedstock palm-biodiesel blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Tsai, Cheng-Hsien; Yang, Chi-Ru; Wu, C. H. Jim; Wu, Tzi-Yi; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    Biodiesels are promoted as alternatives to fossil fuels and their applications in diesel engine have been studied extensively. However, the size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and generator particulate material (GPM) emitted from heavy-duty diesel generator fueled with biodiesel blends has seldom been addressed. Seven different biodiesel blends with volume fractions of biodiesel ranging from 0% to 30% were studied. Experimental results indicate that the mean reductions of sum of PAHi/GPM 0.056-18 (generator particulate material with aerodynamic diameter 0.056-18 μm) and BaP eqi [=(benzo[ a]pyrene equivalent)i]/GPM 0.056-18 of B5, B10, B15, B20, B25 and B30 are (-8.21%, -5.72%), (-36.7%, -29.7%), (-1.25%, 2.32%), (16.2%, 18.6%), (33.4%, 35.0%) and (40.5%, 42.4), respectively, compared with B0. Both PAHi/GPMi and BaP eqi/GPMi in stage 1 (0.056 - 0.166 μm) and stage 2 (0.166 - 0.31 μm) of all test fuels are higher than those in the other stages due to higher specific surface area of smaller particles. It is also observed that there are more highly toxic PAHs in stage 2. It should be noticed that the trend of particle-phase PAH contents is different from the trend of particle-phase PAH concentration and opposite to the trend of total GPM 0.056-18 emission. The differences are due to a higher number of particles with diameters between 0.056 and 0.31 μm. The above results indicate that fuel blends with less than 15% biodiesel would increase PAH content at particle size between 0.056 and 0.31 μm. Therefore, the blending fraction should be between 15% and 30%. Moreover, particle-size control is needed in future emission regulations which would necessitate further improvements in combustion quality. Besides, researches on health effects of biodiesel blends are needed as well.

  10. Rapid method for hydrocarbon-type analysis of heavy oils and synthetic fuels by pyrolysis thin layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.A.; George, A.E.

    1982-09-01

    This work describes a rapid method for hydrocargon-type analysis applying thin layer chromatography (TLC) to the pentane-soluble fraction *malthenes) of the petroleum and synthetic fuels boiling above 200/sup 0/C. The principal component types encountered in this paper are saturates (SA), aromatics (AR), (mono and di together) polynuclear aromatics (PNA) and polar material (PO). The method uses a Iatroscan TLC pyrolyzer which combines the resolution capabilities of TLC with the possibility of quantification by using a flame-ionization detector (FID). Comparison of the results with those obtained by the API-60 procedure is presented.

  11. Dispersion modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and production of coke in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shu; Li, Xinrong; Yang, Yu; Coveney, Raymond M; Lu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Haitao; Shen, Weiran

    2006-08-01

    A USEPA, procedure, ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex Long-Term), was applied to model the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from various sources including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and biomass into the atmosphere of Tianjin, China. Benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) were calculated for risk assessment. Model results were provisionally validated for concentrations and profiles based on the observed data at two monitoring stations. The dominant emission sources in the area were domestic coal combustion, coke production, and biomass burning. Mainly because of the difference in the emission heights, the contributions of various sources to the average concentrations at receptors differ from proportions emitted. The shares of domestic coal increased from approximately 43% at the sources to 56% at the receptors, while the contributions of coking industry decreased from approximately 23% at the sources to 7% at the receptors. The spatial distributions of gaseous and particulate PAHs were similar, with higher concentrations occurring within urban districts because of domestic coal combustion. With relatively smaller contributions, the other minor sources had limited influences on the overall spatial distribution. The calculated average BaPeq value in air was 2.54 +/- 2.87 ng/m3 on an annual basis. Although only 2.3% of the area in Tianjin exceeded the national standard of 10 ng/m3, 41% of the entire population lives within this area.

  12. Dispersion modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and production of coke in Tianjin, China

    SciTech Connect

    Shu Tao; Xinrong Li; Yu Yang; Raymond M. Coveney, Jr.; Xiaoxia Lu; Haitao Chen; Weiran Shen

    2006-08-01

    A USEPA procedure, ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex Long-Term), was applied to model the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from various sources including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and biomass into the atmosphere of Tianjin, China. Benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) were calculated for risk assessment. Model results were provisionally validated for concentrations and profiles based on the observed data at two monitoring stations. The dominant emission sources in the area were domestic coal combustion, coke production, and biomass burning. Mainly because of the difference in the emission heights, the contributions of various sources to the average concentrations at receptors differ from proportions emitted. The shares of domestic coal increased from {approximately} 43% at the sources to 56% at the receptors, while the contributions of coking industry decreased from {approximately} 23% at the sources to 7% at the receptors. The spatial distributions of gaseous and particulate PAHs were similar, with higher concentrations occurring within urban districts because of domestic coal combustion. With relatively smaller contributions, the other minor sources had limited influences on the overall spatial distribution. The calculated average BaPeq value in air was 2.54 {+-} 2.87 ng/m{sup 3} on an annual basis. Although only 2.3% of the area in Tianjin exceeded the national standard of 10 ng/m{sup 3}, 41% of the entire population lives within this area. 37 refs., 9 figs.

  13. LDRD final report on "fundamentals of synthetic conversion of CO2 to simple hydrocarbon fuels" (LDRD 113486).

    SciTech Connect

    Maravelias, Christos T.; Kemp, Richard Alan; Mavrikakis, Manos; Miller, James Edward; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2009-11-01

    Energy production is inextricably linked to national security and poses the danger of altering the environment in potentially catastrophic ways. There is no greater problem than sustainable energy production. Our purpose was to attack this problem by examining processes, technology, and science needed for recycling CO{sub 2} back into transportation fuels. This approach can be thought of as 'bio-inspired' as nature employs the same basic inputs, CO{sub 2}/energy/water, to produce biomass. We addressed two key deficiencies apparent in current efforts. First, a detailed process analysis comparing the potential for chemical and conventional engineering methods to provide a route for the conversion of CO{sub 2} and water to fuel has been completed. No apparent 'showstoppers' are apparent in the synthetic route. Opportunities to improve current processes have also been identified and examined. Second, we have also specifically addressed the fundamental science of the direct production of methanol from CO{sub 2} using H{sub 2} as a reductant.

  14. Inhalation exposure and risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) among the rural population adopting wood gasifier stoves compared to different fuel-stove users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Nan; Chen, Yuanchen; Du, Wei; Shen, Guofeng; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Tianbo; Wang, Xilong; Cheng, Hefa; Liu, Junfeng; Xue, Chunyu; Liu, Guangqing; Zeng, Eddy Y.; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2016-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatica hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of compounds with carcinogenic potentials and residential solid fuel combustion is one major source of PAHs in most developing countries. Replacement of traditional stoves with improved ones is believed to be a practical approach to reduce pollutant emissions, however, field assessments on the performance and consequent impacts on air quality and human health after adopting improved stoves are rare. The study is the first time to quantify inhalation exposure to PAHs among the residents who adopted wood gasifier stoves. The results were compared to those still burning coals in the region and compared to exposure levels for different fuel/stove users in literature. The results showed that the PAHs exposure levels for the wood gasifier stove users were significantly lower than the values for those using traditional wood stoves reported in literature, and the daily exposure concentrations of BaPeq (Benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration) can be reduced by 48%-91% if traditional wood stoves were replaced by wood gasifier stoves. The corresponding Incremental Lifetime Cancer Risk (ILCR) decreased approximately four times from 1.94 × 10-4 to 5.17 × 10-5. The average concentration of the total 26 PAHs for the wood users was 1091 ± 722 ng/m3, which was comparable to 1060 ± 927 ng/m3 for those using anthracite coals, but the composition profiles were considerably different. The average BaPeq were 116 and 25.8 ng/m3 for the wood and coal users, respectively, and the corresponding ILCR of the anthracite coal users was 1.69 × 10-5, which was nearly one third of those using the wood gasifier stoves. The wood users exposed to not only high levels of high molecular weight PAHs, but relatively high fractions of particulate phase PAHs in small particles compared to the coal users, resulting in high exposure risks.

  15. Economic implications of incorporating emission controls to mitigate air pollutants emitted from a modeled hydrocarbon-fuel biorefinery in the United States

    DOE PAGES

    Bhatt, Arpit; Zhang, Yimin; Davis, Ryan; ...

    2016-07-15

    The implementation of the US Renewable Fuel Standard is expected to increase the construction and operation of new biofuel facilities. Allowing this industry to grow without adversely affecting air quality is an important sustainability goal sought by multiple stakeholders. However, little is known about how the emission controls potentially required to comply with air quality regulations might impact biorefinery cost and deployment strategies such as siting and sizing. In this study, we use a baseline design for a lignocellulosic hydrocarbon biofuel production process to assess how the integration of emission controls impacts the minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) of themore » biofuel produced. We evaluate the change in MFSP for two cases as compared to the baseline design by incorporating (i) emission controls that ensure compliance with applicable federal air regulations and (ii) advanced control options that could be used to achieve potential best available control technology (BACT) emission limits. Our results indicate that compliance with federal air regulations can be achieved with minimal impact on biofuel cost (~$0.02 per gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) higher than the baseline price of $5.10 GGE-1). However, if air emissions must be further reduced to meet potential BACT emission limits, the cost could increase nontrivially. For example, the MFSP could increase to $5.50 GGE-1 by adopting advanced emission controls to meet potential boiler BACT limits. Finally, given tradeoffs among emission control costs, permitting requirements, and economies of scale, these results could help inform decisions about biorefinery siting and sizing and mitigate risks associated with air permitting.« less

  16. Economic implications of incorporating emission controls to mitigate air pollutants emitted from a modeled hydrocarbon-fuel biorefinery in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Arpit; Zhang, Yimin; Davis, Ryan; Eberle, Annika; Heath, Garvin

    2016-07-15

    The implementation of the US Renewable Fuel Standard is expected to increase the construction and operation of new biofuel facilities. Allowing this industry to grow without adversely affecting air quality is an important sustainability goal sought by multiple stakeholders. However, little is known about how the emission controls potentially required to comply with air quality regulations might impact biorefinery cost and deployment strategies such as siting and sizing. In this study, we use a baseline design for a lignocellulosic hydrocarbon biofuel production process to assess how the integration of emission controls impacts the minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) of the biofuel produced. We evaluate the change in MFSP for two cases as compared to the baseline design by incorporating (i) emission controls that ensure compliance with applicable federal air regulations and (ii) advanced control options that could be used to achieve potential best available control technology (BACT) emission limits. Our results indicate that compliance with federal air regulations can be achieved with minimal impact on biofuel cost (~$0.02 per gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) higher than the baseline price of $5.10 GGE-1). However, if air emissions must be further reduced to meet potential BACT emission limits, the cost could increase nontrivially. For example, the MFSP could increase to $5.50 GGE-1 by adopting advanced emission controls to meet potential boiler BACT limits. Finally, given tradeoffs among emission control costs, permitting requirements, and economies of scale, these results could help inform decisions about biorefinery siting and sizing and mitigate risks associated with air permitting.

  17. AN EQUIVALENT ELECTRIC CIRCUIT APPROACH TO THE STUDY OF HYDROCARBON OXIDATION KINETICS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HYDROCARBONS, *OXIDATION), (*PROPANE, OXIDATION), (*FUEL CELLS, ELECTROCHEMISTRY), ELECTRIC DOUBLE LAYER, PLATINUM, ELECTRODES, REACTION KINETICS, ACETIC ACID , ELECTROLYTES, HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS, FLUORINE COMPOUNDS

  18. Resolution and quantification of complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in heavy fuel oil sample by means of GC × GC-TOFMS combined to multivariate curve resolution.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Radović, Jagoš R; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Diez, Sergi; Bayona, Josep Maria; Tauler, Roma

    2011-12-15

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) combined to multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) is proposed for the resolution and quantification of very complex mixtures of compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in heavy fuel oil (HFO). Different GC × GC-TOFMS data slices acquired during the analysis of HFO samples and PAH standards were simultaneously analyzed using the MCR-ALS method to resolve the pure component elution profiles in the two chromatographic dimensions as well as their pure mass spectra. Outstandingly, retention time shifts within and between GC × GC runs were not affecting the results obtained using the proposed strategy and proper resolution of strongly coeluted compounds, baseline and background contributions was achieved. Calibration curves built up with standard samples of PAHs allowed the quantification of ten of them in HFO aromatic fractions. Relative errors in their estimated concentrations were in all cases below 6%. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by commercial software provided with GC × GC-TOFMS instruments and to Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC). Inspection of these results showed improvement in terms of data fitting, elution process description, concentration relative errors and relative standard deviations.

  19. Performance and cost evaluation of ULTROX d-tox(trademark) UV/oxidation system for the treatment of hydrocarbon vapors from fuel-contaminated soils. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Archabal, S.R.; Downey, D.C.; Malone, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    This technology demonstration was completed to determine the feasibility of using an ultraviolet (UV) oxidizing catalyst in the presence of ozone to treat non-chlorinated, fuel hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The soil vapor extraction (SVE) and treatment demonstration was conducted at the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site SS-20 located at Myrtle Beach Air Force Base (AFB), Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Site SS-20, locally known as the MOGAS site, was previously investigated under the IRP and known to be contaminated with gasoline residuals. This demonstration was conducted from 10 November to 20 December 1996 and was performed as part of an ongoing innovative technologies evaluation program sponsored by the Air Force in order to promote cost-effective vapor treatment technologies at contaminated sites. The technology demonstration was performed in accordance with the `Treatability Study Test Design for ULTROX(registered) UV/Oxidation System Pilot Scale Treatability Testing at Myrtle Beach AFB, Myrtle Beach, SC.` (Zimpro, ULTROX Division, September, 1995) as approved by the Air Force and regulatory agencies.

  20. Polyelectrolyte gels comprising a lipophilic, cost-effective aluminate as fluorine-free absorbents for chlorinated hydrocarbons and diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Wrede, Michael; Ganza, Viktoria; Bucher, Janina; Straub, Bernd F

    2012-07-25

    Superabsorbent polymers comprising a lipophilic, halogen-free, and cost-effective aluminate ("altebate") anion have been synthesized. The polyelectrolytes are based on octadecyl acrylate monomers, 0.8-1 mol % ethylene dimethacrylate cross-linker, and 5 mol % N-3-acroyloxypropyl trialkylammonium altebate. At 30 °C, swelling degrees of 70 (chlorobenzene), 102 (CHCl3), 130 (THF), 163 (ClCH2CH2Cl), 171 (dichlorobenzene), and 208 (CH2Cl2) have been determined. The polyelectrolyte absorbs reversibly diesel fuel with a swelling degree of 34, even in the presence of water. Swelling times and critical swelling temperatures have also been determined. The challenges for the development of oil absorbents are discussed.