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Sample records for hydrodynamic shell convection

  1. HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF H ENTRAINMENT AT THE TOP OF He-SHELL FLASH CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Paul R.; Lin, Pei-Hung; Herwig, Falk E-mail: fherwig@uvic.ca

    2015-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional, fully compressible gas-dynamics simulations in 4π geometry of He-shell flash convection with proton-rich fuel entrainment at the upper boundary. This work is motivated by the insufficiently understood observed consequences of the H-ingestion flash in post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars (Sakurai's object) and metal-poor AGB stars. Our investigation is focused on the entrainment process at the top convection boundary and on the subsequent advection of H-rich material into deeper layers, and we therefore ignore the burning of the proton-rich fuel in this study. We find that for our deep convection zone, coherent convective motions of near global scale appear to dominate the flow. At the top boundary convective shear flows are stable against Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. However, such shear instabilities are induced by the boundary-layer separation in large-scale, opposing flows. This links the global nature of thick shell convection with the entrainment process. We establish the quantitative dependence of the entrainment rate on grid resolution. With our numerical technique, simulations with 1024{sup 3} cells or more are required to reach a numerical fidelity appropriate for this problem. However, only the result from the 1536{sup 3} simulation provides a clear indication that we approach convergence with regard to the entrainment rate. Our results demonstrate that our method, which is described in detail, can provide quantitative results related to entrainment and convective boundary mixing in deep stellar interior environments with very stiff convective boundaries. For the representative case we study in detail, we find an entrainment rate of 4.38 ± 1.48 × 10{sup –13} M {sub ☉} s{sup –1}.

  2. Idealized hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent oxygen-burning shell convection in 4π geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Andrassy, R.; Sandalski, S.; Davis, A.; Woodward, P.; Herwig, F.

    2017-03-01

    This work investigates the properties of convection in stars with particular emphasis on entrainment across the upper convective boundary (CB). Idealized simulations of turbulent convection in the O-burning shell of a massive star are performed in 4π geometry on 7683 and 15363 grids, driven by a representative heating rate. A heating series is also performed on the 7683 grid. The 15363 simulation exhibits an entrainment rate at the upper CB of 1.33 × 10-6 M⊙ s-1. The 7683 simulation with the same heating rate agrees within 17 per cent. The entrainment rate at the upper CB is found to scale linearly with the driving luminosity and with the cube of the shear velocity at the upper boundary, while the radial rms fluid velocity scales with the cube root of the driving luminosity, as expected. The mixing is analysed in a 1D diffusion framework, resulting in a simple model for CB mixing. The analysis confirms that limiting the MLT mixing length to the distance to the CB in 1D simulations better represents the spherically averaged radial velocity profiles from the 3D simulations and provide an improved determination of the reference diffusion coefficient D0 for the exponential diffusion CB mixing model in 1D. From the 3D simulation data, we adopt as the CB the location of the maximum gradient in the horizontal velocity component which has 2σ spatial fluctuations of ≈0.17HP. The exponentially decaying diffusion CB mixing model with f = 0.03 reproduces the spherically averaged 3D abundance profiles.

  3. Spherical-shell boundaries for two-dimensional compressible convection in a star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J.; Baraffe, I.; Goffrey, T.; Geroux, C.; Viallet, M.; Folini, D.; Constantino, T.; Popov, M.; Walder, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Studies of stellar convection typically use a spherical-shell geometry. The radial extent of the shell and the boundary conditions applied are based on the model of the star investigated. We study the impact of different two-dimensional spherical shells on compressible convection. Realistic profiles for density and temperature from an established one-dimensional stellar evolution code are used to produce a model of a large stellar convection zone representative of a young low-mass star, like our sun at 106 years of age. Aims: We analyze how the radial extent of the spherical shell changes the convective dynamics that result in the deep interior of the young sun model, far from the surface. In the near-surface layers, simple small-scale convection develops from the profiles of temperature and density. A central radiative zone below the convection zone provides a lower boundary on the convection zone. The inclusion of either of these physically distinct layers in the spherical shell can potentially affect the characteristics of deep convection. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of compressible convection using the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC). Because MUSIC has been designed to use realistic stellar models produced from one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, MUSIC simulations are capable of seamlessly modeling a whole star. Simulations in two-dimensional spherical shells that have different radial extents are performed over tens or even hundreds of convective turnover times, permitting the collection of well-converged statistics. Results: To measure the impact of the spherical-shell geometry and our treatment of boundaries, we evaluate basic statistics of the convective turnover time, the convective velocity, and the overshooting layer. These quantities are selected for their relevance to one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, so that our results are focused toward studies exploiting the so

  4. Convection in pulsating stars. I - Nonlinear hydrodynamics. II - RR Lyrae convection and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellingwerf, R. F.

    1982-11-01

    A nonlinear, nonlocal, time-dependent treatment of convection suitable for use in models of cool giant stars is presented. Local conservation equations plus a diffusive transport equation are used to derive the convective hydrodynamic equations for the case in which turbulent pressure, energy, and viscosity cannot be ignored. The effects of convective overshooting, superadiabatic gradients, convection/pulsation interaction, and time dependence enter this treatment in a natural way. Methods of treating turbulent viscosity and acoustic losses are discussed. Also, an efficient computational scheme for computing the derivatives needed for an implicit hydrodynamic code is outlined. Application to RR Lyrae star envelopes will be presented in a companion paper.

  5. Off-shell hydrodynamics from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, Michael; Glorioso, Paolo; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yifan

    2016-02-18

    In this article, we outline a program for obtaining an action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics by considering the holographic Wilsonian renormalization group applied to systems with a gravity dual. As a first step, in this paper we restrict to systems with a non-dissipative horizon. By integrating out gapped degrees of freedom in the bulk gravitational system between an asymptotic boundary and a horizon, we are led to a formulation of hydrodynamics where the dynamical variables are not standard velocity and temperature fields, but the relative embedding of the boundary and horizon hypersurfaces. At zeroth order, this action reduces to that proposed by Dubovsky et al. as an off-shell formulation of ideal fluid dynamics.

  6. Off-shell hydrodynamics from holography

    DOE PAGES

    Crossley, Michael; Glorioso, Paolo; Liu, Hong; ...

    2016-02-18

    In this article, we outline a program for obtaining an action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics by considering the holographic Wilsonian renormalization group applied to systems with a gravity dual. As a first step, in this paper we restrict to systems with a non-dissipative horizon. By integrating out gapped degrees of freedom in the bulk gravitational system between an asymptotic boundary and a horizon, we are led to a formulation of hydrodynamics where the dynamical variables are not standard velocity and temperature fields, but the relative embedding of the boundary and horizon hypersurfaces. At zeroth order, this action reduces tomore » that proposed by Dubovsky et al. as an off-shell formulation of ideal fluid dynamics.« less

  7. Thermo-electro-hydrodynamic convection under microgravity: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Yoshikawa, Harunori N.; Tadie Fogaing, Mireille; Travnikov, Vadim; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Futterer, Birgit; Egbers, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies on thermo-electro-hydrodynamic (TEHD) convection are reviewed with focus on investigations motivated by the analogy with natural convection. TEHD convection originates in the action of the dielectrophoretic force generated by an alternating electric voltage applied to a dielectric fluid with a temperature gradient. This electrohydrodynamic force is analogous to Archimedean thermal buoyancy and can be regarded as a thermal buoyancy force in electric effective gravity. The review is concerned with TEHD convection in plane, cylindrical, and spherical capacitors under microgravity conditions, where the electric gravity can induce convection without any complexities arising from geometry or the buoyancy force due to the Earth’s gravity. We will highlight the convection in spherical geometry, comparing developed theories and numerical simulations with the GEOFLOW experiments performed on board the International Space Station (ISS).

  8. Critical stability of almost adiabatic convection in a rapidly rotating thick spherical shell

    SciTech Connect

    Starchenko, S. V.; Kotelnikova, M. S.

    2013-02-15

    In this work, the convection equations in the almost adiabatic approximation is studied for which the choice of physical parameters is primarily based on possible applications to the hydrodynamics of the deep interiors of the Earth and planets and moons of the terrestrial group. The initial system of partial differential equations (PDEs) was simplified to a single second-order ordinary differential equation for the pressure or vertical velocity component to investigate the linear stability of convection. The critical frequencies, modified Rayleigh numbers, and distributions of convection are obtained at various possible Prandtl numbers and in different thick fluid shells. An analytical WKB-type solution was obtained for the case when the inner radius of the shell is much smaller than the outer radius and convective sources are concentrated along the inner boundary.

  9. Low Mach Number Modeling of Convection in Helium Shells on Sub-Chandrasekhar White Dwarfs. I. Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingale, M.; Nonaka, A.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Malone, C. M.; Orvedahl, R. J.

    2013-02-01

    We assess the robustness of a low Mach number hydrodynamics algorithm for modeling helium shell convection on the surface of a white dwarf in the context of the sub-Chandrasekhar model for Type Ia supernovae. We use the low Mach number stellar hydrodynamics code, MAESTRO, to perform three-dimensional, spatially adaptive simulations of convection leading up to the point of the ignition of a burning front. We show that the low Mach number hydrodynamics model provides a robust description of the system.

  10. Spatial symmetry breaking in rapidly rotating convective spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Many problems in geophysical and astrophysical convection systems are characterized by fast rotation and spherical shell geometry. The combined effects of Coriolis forces and spherical shell geometry produce a unique spatial symmetry for the convection pattern in a rapidly rotating spherical shell. In this paper, we first discuss the general spatial symmetries for rotating spherical shell convection. A special model, a spherical shell heated from below, is then used to illustrate how and when the spatial symmetries are broken. Symmetry breaking occurs via a sequence of spatial transitions from the primary conducting state to the complex multiple-layered columnar structure. It is argued that, because of the dominant effects of rotation, the sequence of spatial transitions identified from this particular model is likely to be generally valid. Applications of the spatial symmetry breaking to planetary convection problems are also discussed.

  11. Onset and Cessation of Thermal Convection within Titan's Ice Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.

    2015-12-01

    The onset of thermal convection within the outer ice shell of Titan is believed to be at the origin of methane outgassing on Titan (Tobie et al., 2006), a possible factor in Titan's resurfacing processes (Mitri et al., 2008), and to have a major role in the evolution and tectonic activity of this Saturnian icy satellite (Tobie et al., 2005; Mitri and Showman, 2008; Mitri et al., 2010). Recent measurements of the gravity field (Iess et al., 2010, 2012) and the modeling of the shape and topography (Zebker et al., 2009; Mitri et al., 2014) have recently improved our knowledge of the thermal state and structure of Titan's outer ice shell. Mitri et al. (2014) found that Titan's surface topography is consistent with an isostatically compensated ice shell of variable thickness, likely at the present in a thermally conductive state (see also Nimmo and Bills, 2010; Hemingway et al., 2013), overlying a relatively dense (~1200-1350 kg m-3) subsurface ocean. As Titan's ice shell is not currently experiencing thermal convection it is likely that the ice shell could have experienced during its history both the onset and the cessation of thermal convection; thermal convection could be present within the ice shell for limited times or in fact be episodic. We investigate the evolution of Titan's outer ice shell from the crystallization of the underlying ocean with a focus on the onset and cessation of thermal convection. To simulate convection in a growing ice shell, we numerically solve the thermal convection equations for a Newtonian rheology in a two dimensional Cartesian domain using finite element method, with a moving bottom boundary to ocean crystallization. We discuss how the crystallization process affects the onset of convection and in which conditions the cessation of thermal convection may occur. The geological consequences of the changes of the thermal state and structure of the outer ice shell will also be discussed.

  12. The influence of subsurface hydrodynamics on convective precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. S. M. M.; Sulis, M.; Kollet, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial hydrological cycle comprises complex processes in the subsurface, land surface, and atmosphere, which are connected via complex non-linear feedback mechanisms. The influence of subsurface hydrodynamics on land surface mass and energy fluxes has been the subject of previous studies. Several studies have also investigated the soil moisture-precipitation feedback, neglecting however the connection with groundwater dynamics. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of subsurface hydrodynamics on convective precipitation events via shallow soil moisture and land surface processes. A scale-consistent Terrestrial System Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP) that consists of an atmospheric model (COSMO), a land surface model (CLM), and a three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater-surface water flow model (ParFlow), is used to simulate hourly mass and energy fluxes over days with convective rainfall events over the Rur catchment, Germany. In order to isolate the effect of groundwater dynamics on convective precipitation, two different model configurations with identical initial conditions are considered. The first configuration allows the groundwater table to evolve through time, while a spatially distributed, temporally constant groundwater table is prescribed as a lower boundary condition in the second configuration. The simulation results suggest that groundwater dynamics influence land surface soil moisture, which in turn affects the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height by modifying atmospheric thermals. It is demonstrated that because of this sensitivity of ABL height to soil moisture-temperature feedback, the onset and magnitude of convective precipitation is influenced by subsurface hydrodynamics. Thus, the results provide insight into the soil moisture-precipitation feedback including groundwater dynamics in a physically consistent manner by closing the water cycle from aquifers to the atmosphere.

  13. Chiral Symmetry Breaking in Crystal Growth: Is Hydrodynamic Convection Relevant?

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.; Tharrington, A.; Wu, X.

    1996-09-01

    The effects of mechanical stirring on nucleation and chiral symmetry breaking have been investigated for a simple inorganic molecule, sodium chlorate. In contrast to earlier findings, our experiments suggest that hydrodynamic convection may have little to do with the observed symmetry breaking. Rather the effect can be reasonably accounted for by mechanical damage to incipient crystals. The catastrophic events, creating numerous small {open_quote}{open_quote}secondary{close_quote}{close_quote} crystals, produce statistical domination of one chiral species over the other. A number of observations using different mixing methods support this conclusion. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Chiral Symmetry Breaking in Crystal Growth: Is Hydrodynamic Convection Relevant?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, B.; Tharrington, A.; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    1996-01-01

    The effects of mechanical stirring on nucleation and chiral symmetry breaking have been investigated for a simple inorganic molecule, sodium chlorate (NaClO3). In contrast to earlier findings, our experiment suggests that the symmetry breaking may have little to do with hydrodynamic convection. Rather the effect can be reasonably accounted for by mechanical damage to incipient crystals. The catastrophic events, creating numerous small 'secondary' crystals, produce statistical domination of one chiral species over the other. Our conclusion is supported by a number of observations using different mixing mechanisms.

  15. Can the Ice I Shells of Icy Satellites Convect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.

    2001-11-01

    It has been recently been argued by Ruiz (Nature 412, 409-411) that the dominant non-Newtonian creep mechanisms of water ice make the ice shell above Callisto's ocean stable against solid-state convective overturn, based on the convective scaling relationships of V.S. Solomatov. The argument is actually broader, and applies to all radiogenically heated ice I shells in the outer solar system, and by extrapolation to midsized icy satellites as well. Conductive heat transport and internal melting are predicted to be, or have been, widespread in the outer solar system. Convection, and the tectonics that result, would then only occur in ice I shells whose viscosities are lowered by tidal flexing, e.g., Europa (McKinnon, GRL 26, 951-954), Ganymede, or Triton. This analysis is, while correct, incomplete. At low stresses, where non-Newtonian viscosities can be arbitrarily large, convective instabilities may arise in the diffusional creep regime. Lattice diffusion creep has not been directly observed in water ice, but measurements of diffusion coefficients imply Newtonian viscosities low enough (for warm enough ice) that convection is expected above Callisto's internal liquid layer for plausible ice grain sizes (less than 5 mm). Convective heat flows will exceed steady-state radiogenic values unless the convective adiabat is cooler than the minimum melting temperature (251 K). In convective equilibrium, Callisto's stagnant lid is quite thick (about 100 km), and compatible with the lack of active geology, but the existence of the ocean requires an antifreeze.

  16. Overlimiting current through ion concentration polarization layer: Hydrodynamic convection effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Inhee; Kim, Sung Jae

    2013-11-01

    In this presentation, we experimentally investigated an effect of the hydrodymanic convective flow on an ion transport through nanoporous membrane in a micro/nanofluidic system. The convective motion of ions in an ion concentration polarization zone was controlled by external hydrodynamic inflows adjacent to the nanoporous membrane. The ion depletion region (which is regarded as a high electrical resistance) is spatially confined to a triangular shape with an additional hydrodymanic convective flow, resulting in a significant alternation in classical liming current value. Furthermore, the extreme spatial confinement can completely eliminate the limiting current region at higher flow rate so that one can obtain high current value which turns to be high power efficiency. Therefore, this mechanism would be utilized as minimizing power consumption for various electrochemical membrane systems such as fuel-cell, electro-desalination system and nanofluidic preconcentrator, etc. This work is supported by Basic Science Research Program (2013R1A1A1008125) and Future-based Technology Development Program (Nano Fields) (2009-0082952) through the NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning.

  17. Thermo-Chemical Convection in Europa's Icy Shell with Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, L.; Showman, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    Europa's icy surface displays numerous pits, uplifts, and chaos terrains that have been suggested to result from solid-state thermal convection in the ice shell, perhaps aided by partial melting. However, numerical simulations of thermal convection show that plumes have insufficient buoyancy to produce surface deformation. Here we present numerical simulations of thermochemical convection to test the hypothesis that convection with salinity can produce Europa's pits and domes. Our simulations show that domes (200-300 m) and pits (300-400 m) comparable to the observations can be produced in an ice shell of 15 km thick with 5-10% compositional density variation if the maximum viscosity is less than 10(exp 18) Pa sec. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  18. Thermal convection in ice I shells of Titan and Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Showman, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    Domes and flow-like features present on Titan are the surface manifestation of internal processes in the ice. And Enceladus exhibits a diversity of tectonized terrains. It has been suggested that refreezing of a liquid sublayer in the interior of Enceladus might cause its tectonic structures (Squyres et al., 1983), although Nimmo and Pappalardo (2006) proposed that the tectonism at the active south pole may result from an ice upwelling. Modest internal heat production variations can force an ice shell to switch between a conductive and convective state (Mitri and Showman, 2005; McKinnon, 2006). In the presence of an internal ocean, a conductive-convective transition can produce radial expansion of a cooling ice shell. Because these conductive-convective transitions cause a discontinuous jump in the heat flux delivered to the surface (Mitri and Showman 2005), the satellite expansion can occur much more quickly than it would in the absence of such a transition. The rapidity of these switches implies that stress buildup, hence extensive fractures, could occur. We explore this hypothesis for Titan and Enceladus. We present results of numerical simulations of convection in the ice I shells, with Newtonian rheology and temperature-dependent viscosity. We show that the thermal convection can occur under a range of conditions in the ice shells of Titan and Enceladus. Because of the dependence of Rayleigh number Ra on d3/η where d is the thickness of the ice shell and η is the viscosity at the base of the ice shell, and because the ammonia in the liquid layer strongly depresses the melting temperature, Ra is equal to its critical value for two thicknesses: for relatively thin ice shell with warm, low-viscosity base (Onset I) and for thick ice shell with cold, high-viscosity base (Onset II). Assuming that Enceladus has an internal ocean, we demonstrate that Onset I leads to sufficient thickening to produce tectonic stress of ~500 bars and fractures of several tens of km

  19. A compressible high-order unstructured spectral difference code for stratified convection in rotating spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Chunlei; Miesch, Mark S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel and powerful Compressible High-ORder Unstructured Spectral-difference (CHORUS) code for simulating thermal convection and related fluid dynamics in the interiors of stars and planets. The computational geometries are treated as rotating spherical shells filled with stratified gas. The hydrodynamic equations are discretized by a robust and efficient high-order Spectral Difference Method (SDM) on unstructured meshes. The computational stencil of the spectral difference method is compact and advantageous for parallel processing. CHORUS demonstrates excellent parallel performance for all test cases reported in this paper, scaling up to 12 000 cores on the Yellowstone High-Performance Computing cluster at NCAR. The code is verified by defining two benchmark cases for global convection in Jupiter and the Sun. CHORUS results are compared with results from the ASH code and good agreement is found. The CHORUS code creates new opportunities for simulating such varied phenomena as multi-scale solar convection, core convection, and convection in rapidly-rotating, oblate stars.

  20. Weakly non-Boussinesq convection in a gaseous spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korre, Lydia; Brummell, Nicholas; Garaud, Pascale

    2017-09-01

    We examine the dynamics associated with weakly compressible convection in a spherical shell by running 3D direct numerical simulations using the Boussinesq formalism [Spiegel and Veronis, Astrophys. J. 131, 442 (1960), 10.1086/146849]. Motivated by problems in astrophysics, we assume the existence of a finite adiabatic temperature gradient ∇ Tad and use mixed boundary conditions for the temperature with fixed flux at the inner boundary and fixed temperature at the outer boundary. This setup is intrinsically more asymmetric than the more standard case of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in liquids between parallel plates with fixed temperature boundary conditions. Conditions where there is substantial asymmetry can cause a dramatic change in the nature of convection and we demonstrate that this is the case here. The flows can become pressure- rather than buoyancy-dominated, leading to anomalous heat transport by upflows. Counterintuitively, the background temperature gradient ∇ T ¯ can develop a subadiabatic layer (where g .∇ T ¯convection remains vigorous at every point across the shell. This indicates a high degree of nonlocality.

  1. Helium Shells on Sub-Chandrasekhar White Dwarfs: Ignition and Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Adam M.; Zingale, Michael; Nonaka, Andrew; Almgren, Ann; Bell, John

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs accreting an envelope of helium allow for a range of explosive phenomena that could yield a variety of observable transients. Helium novae, so-called "point" Ia supernovae (.Ia SNe), rapid decline type Ia, and normal type Ia supernovae are all potential outcomes of helium accretion onto sub-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs. In this talk we outline why these systems have received a great deal of scrutiny recently and present our 3D models of convective nuclear burning in the helium envelope. We focus on thin, low-mass envelopes that are the best candidates for yielding normal type Ia supernovae. The envelope is modeled with the low-Mach hydrodynamics code Maestro. Maestro is optimized for modeling sub-sonic convective flow over long timescales while still being able to capture local compressibility effects due to nuclear burning as well as large-scale adjustments of stellar hydrostatic equilibrium. With it we model the convective burning in low-mass helium shells for carbon/oxygen white dwarf cores of 0.8, 1.0, 1.1, and 1.2 solar masses. For a suite of models we characterize the geometry, timing, and thermodynamics of ignition as well as the envelope's convective properties. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the viability of these systems as transient progenitors with a focus on normal type Ia supernovae.

  2. Hydrodynamic stability in the presence of a stochastic source: convection as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, Jared; Foldes, Juraj; Glatt-Holtz, Nathan; Richards, Geordie

    2016-11-01

    We quantify the stability of a conductive state in Rayleigh-Benard convection when the fluid is driven not only by an enforced temperature gradient, but also by a mean zero stochastic (in time) internal heat source, a modeled system applicable to situations such as convection in stars, nuclear reactors, and the earth's mantle. We explore the effects of such a mean zero forcing on the onset of convection. The methods applied to the convection problem here, are applicable to any other question of hydrodynamic stability where a stochastic forcing is present.

  3. Three-dimensional natural convection in a narrow spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Egbers, Christoph

    The convective motions in a shallow fluid layer between two concentric spheres in the presence of a constant axial force field have been studied numerically. The aspect ratio of the fluid layer to inner radius is beta =0.08, the Prandtl number Pra =37.5. A three-dimensional time-dependent numerical code is used to solve the governing equations in primitive variables. Convection in the sphe rical shell has then a highly three-dimensional nature. Characteristic flow patterns with a large number of banana-type cells, oriented in north-south direction and aligned in the azimuthal direction, are formed on the northern hemisphere, which grow gradually into the equatorial region accompanied by the generation of new cells as the Rayleigh number is increased. Various characteristics of these flows as well as their transient evolution are investigated for Rayleigh numbers up to 20 000.

  4. Stagnant lid convection in the outer shell of icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chloe; Deschamps, Frédéric; Tackley, Paul; Lowman, Julian; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    In the past decade, from both theoretical studies and spacecraft missions measurements, the internal structure of large icy moons including a subsurface ocean has gained an increasing support. The exact thickness of subsurface ocean, if present, depends on the detailed thermal evolution of each moon, and on its primordial composition. A crucial process is the heat transfer through the outer ice I layer, which controls the cooling of the satelitte interior. Convection is the most likely and efficient way to transfer heat through this layer, but the regime of convection (and therefore the heat transfer) depends on the rheology of the fluid. The viscosity of ice is strongly temperature dependent and thermal convection in the outer ice shell follows a stagnant lid regime : it means that a conductive stagnant lid forms at the top of the system, and convection is confined in a sublayer. Previous numerical studies including strongly temperature-dependent viscosities have already been performed in 2D Cartesian geometry allowing the determination of scaling laws relating the mean temperature and heat flux to the vigor of convection (described by the Rayleigh number) and the ratio of the top to the bottom viscosity, but 3D spherical geometry may provide a more accurate description of convection within the outer ice layer of icy moons. In this work, we model the heat transfer in spherical shells for a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity fluid heated from below. We use StagYY to run simulations for different ratios of the inner to outer radii of the ice layer (f), Rayleigh number (Ra), and thermal viscosity contrast (Δη). The inversion of the results of more than 30 numerical experiments allows the determination of scaling laws for the temperature of the well-mixed interior and surface heat flux. In particular, we find that depending on the curvature, the stagnant lid regime does not appear for the same values of the Rayleigh number and the viscosity contrast. These

  5. Studying 3D Spherical Shell Convection using ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euen, G.; King, S. D.; Liu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling convection in spherical geometries is crucial to gain an understanding of planet-scale mantle processes. However, modeling 3D spherical shells is computationally challenging. Few studies have been done using full 3D spherical shells. Here I present test cases for modeling 3D spherical shells using ASPECT. These cases are based on previous work using CitcomS done by Zhong et al., 2008. The cases were run on the BlueRidge and NewRiver clusters at ARC at Virginia Tech. Cases were run using varying numbers of processors and 2-5 global mesh refinements. Each added refinement increases the number of cells by a factor of 8. Two global refinements corresponds to 6,144 cells, three refinements have 49,152 cells, four refinements have 393,216 cells, and five refinements have 3,145,728 cells. To make these results comparable to Zhong et al., 2008 all adaptive mesh refinement was turned off. Cases ran very sporadically at first, with three major error types emerging. However, after ASPECT version 1.5.0 was released and the latest version was cloned from Github and built July 10 th -15 th , 2016, the cases ran with no errors. It should be noted that 2D spherical cases ran with no errors throughout the testing. ASPECT results matched well with the Zhong et al., 2008 results. We will present results varying the refinement and number of processors to demonstrate scaling and efficiency of the code for spherical problems.

  6. Low Mach Number Modeling of Convection in Helium Shells on Sub-Chandrasekhar White Dwarfs. II. Bulk Properties of Simple Models

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, A. M.; Zingale, M.; Nonaka, A.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.

    2016-08-10

    The dynamics of helium shell convection driven by nuclear burning establish the conditions for runaway in the sub-Chandrasekhar-mass, double-detonation model for SNe Ia, as well as for a variety of other explosive phenomena. In this paper, we explore these convection dynamics for a range of white dwarf core and helium shell masses in three dimensions using the low Mach number hydrodynamics code MAESTRO. We present calculations of the bulk properties of this evolution, including time-series evolution of global diagnostics, lateral averages of the 3D state, and the global 3D state. We find a variety of outcomes, including quasi-equilibrium, localized runaway, and convective runaway. Finally, our results suggest that the double-detonation progenitor model is promising and that 3D dynamic convection plays a key role.

  7. Low Mach Number Modeling of Convection in Helium Shells on Sub-Chandrasekhar White Dwarfs. II. Bulk Properties of Simple Models

    DOE PAGES

    Jacobs, A. M.; Zingale, M.; Nonaka, A.; ...

    2016-08-10

    The dynamics of helium shell convection driven by nuclear burning establish the conditions for runaway in the sub-Chandrasekhar-mass, double-detonation model for SNe Ia, as well as for a variety of other explosive phenomena. In this paper, we explore these convection dynamics for a range of white dwarf core and helium shell masses in three dimensions using the low Mach number hydrodynamics code MAESTRO. We present calculations of the bulk properties of this evolution, including time-series evolution of global diagnostics, lateral averages of the 3D state, and the global 3D state. We find a variety of outcomes, including quasi-equilibrium, localized runaway,more » and convective runaway. Finally, our results suggest that the double-detonation progenitor model is promising and that 3D dynamic convection plays a key role.« less

  8. Low Mach Number Modeling of Convection in Helium Shells on Sub-Chandrasekhar White Dwarfs. II. Bulk Properties of Simple Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, A. M.; Zingale, M.; Nonaka, A.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of helium shell convection driven by nuclear burning establish the conditions for runaway in the sub-Chandrasekhar-mass, double-detonation model for SNe Ia, as well as for a variety of other explosive phenomena. We explore these convection dynamics for a range of white dwarf core and helium shell masses in three dimensions using the low Mach number hydrodynamics code MAESTRO. We present calculations of the bulk properties of this evolution, including time-series evolution of global diagnostics, lateral averages of the 3D state, and the global 3D state. We find a variety of outcomes, including quasi-equilibrium, localized runaway, and convective runaway. Our results suggest that the double-detonation progenitor model is promising and that 3D dynamic convection plays a key role.

  9. Time-implicit hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interiors: Application to turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallet, M.

    2012-12-01

    The talk described the first results on turbulent convection in the envelope of a red giant star obtained with the MUSIC code, a new multi-dimensional time-implicit code devoted to stellar interiors (Viallet, Baraffe & Walder, A&A, 2011). Currently, most of our physical understanding of stellar interiors and evolution largely relies on one-dimensional calculations. The description of complex physical processes like time-dependent turbulent convection, rotation or MHD processes mostly relies on simplified, phenomenological approaches, with a predictive power hampered by the use of several free parameters. These approaches have now reached their limits in the understanding of stellar structure and evolution. The development of multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations becomes crucial to progress in the field of stellar physics and to meet the enormous observational efforts aimed at producing data of unprecedented quality (COROT, Kepler GAIA). The MUSIC code solves the hydrodynamical equations in spherical geometry and is based on the finite volume method. The talk presented implicit large eddy simulations of the turbulent convection in a cold giant envelope both in 2D and 3D and covering 80% in radius of the stellar structure. The computational domain includes both the convective envelope and a significant fraction of the radiative zone, allowing for convective penetration. These simulations provide valuable insight to improve the description of turbulent convection in 1D models

  10. Experiment and Simulation Study of Hydrodynamic Dispersion and Finger Dynamics for Convective Dissolution of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; DiCarlo, D. A.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage in deep geological formations has the potential to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions from industrial point sources. Dissolution of CO2 into the brine, resulting in stable stratification, has been identified as the key to long-term storage security. Here we present new analogue laboratory experiment method, advanced image processing method and optimized simulation method to characterize CO2 convective dissolution trapping process and gravitational finger behaviors, in order to study the effect of hydrodynamic dispersion on the CO2 convective dissolution process, as well as to study the effect of control physical parameters on the gravitational finger dynamics. Figure 1 shows the image processing method to analyze the finger dynamics. Understanding the effect of hydrodynamic dispersion and the finger dynamics are essential to evaluate whether convective dissolution occurs, as well as to predict how fast it occurs at the geological CO2 storage field scale. The effect of hydrodynamics dispersion and the finger dynamics can be applied to estimate the security of geological CO2 storage fields, in turn. Optimiezed simulation work is conducted to predict the CO2 dissolution rate at geological CO2 storage field. The large experimental assembly will allow us to quantify in detail for the first time the relationship between convective dissolution rate and the controlling factors of the system, including permeability and driven force, which could be essential to trapping process at Bravo Dome geological CO2 storage field. We complement the homogeneous experiments with a detailed study of the scaling law of the convective flux with dispersion effect. The advanced image processing method with Fourier's transform method allow us to understand the finger dynamics and corresponding control factors in porous media, for the first time. By applying the dispersion effect and finger dynamics we found from the experimental study, we optimize the simulation

  11. New numerical solutions of three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic convection. [in stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hossain, Murshed; Mullan, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical solutions of three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics (including sound waves) in a stratified medium with open boundaries are presented. Convergent/divergent points play a controlling role in the flows, which are dominated by a single frequency related to the mean sound crossing time. Superposed on these rapid compressive flows, slower eddy-like flows eventually create convective transport. The solutions contain small structures stacked on top of larger ones, with vertical scales equal to the local pressure scale heights, H sub p. Although convective transport starts later in the evolution, vertical scales of H sub p are apparently selected at much earlier times by nonlinear compressive effects.

  12. A NEW STELLAR MIXING PROCESS OPERATING BELOW SHELL CONVECTION ZONES FOLLOWING OFF-CENTER IGNITION

    SciTech Connect

    Mocak, M.; Siess, L.; Meakin, Casey A.; Mueller, E.

    2011-12-10

    During most stages of stellar evolution the nuclear burning of lighter to heavier elements results in a radial composition profile which is stabilizing against buoyant acceleration, with light material residing above heavier material. However, under some circumstances, such as off-center ignition, the composition profile resulting from nuclear burning can be destabilizing and characterized by an outwardly increasing mean molecular weight. The potential for instabilities under these circumstances and the consequences that they may have on stellar structural evolution remain largely unexplored. In this paper we study the development and evolution of instabilities associated with unstable composition gradients in regions that are initially stable according to linear Schwarzschild and Ledoux criteria. In particular, we study the development of turbulent flow under a variety of stellar evolution conditions with multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation; the phases studied include the core helium flash in a 1.25 M{sub Sun} star, the core carbon flash in a 9.3 M{sub Sun} star, and oxygen shell burning in a 23 M{sub Sun} star. The results of our simulations reveal a mixing process associated with regions having outwardly increasing mean molecular weight that reside below convection zones. The mixing is not due to overshooting from the convection zone, nor is it due directly to thermohaline mixing which operates on a timescale several orders of magnitude larger than the simulated flows. Instead, the mixing appears to be due to the presence of a wave field induced in the stable layers residing beneath the convection zone which enhances the mixing rate by many orders of magnitude and allows a thermohaline type mixing process to operate on a dynamical, rather than thermal, timescale. The mixing manifests itself in the form of overdense and cold blob-like structures originating from density fluctuations at the lower boundary of convective shell and 'shooting' down into the core

  13. AN AZIMUTHAL DYNAMO WAVE IN SPHERICAL SHELL CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Elizabeth; Käpylä, Petri J.; Mantere, Maarit J.; Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-10

    We report the discovery of an azimuthal dynamo wave of a low-order (m = 1) mode in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent convection in spherical shells. Such waves are predicted by mean-field dynamo theory and have been obtained previously in mean-field models. An azimuthal dynamo wave has been proposed as a possible explanation for the persistent drifts of spots observed on several rapidly rotating stars, as revealed through photometry and Doppler imaging. However, this has been judged unlikely because evidence for such waves from DNS has been lacking. Here we present DNS of large-scale magnetic fields showing a retrograde m = 1 mode. Its pattern speed is nearly independent of latitude and does not reflect the speed of the differential rotation at any depth. The extrema of magnetic m = 1 structures coincide reasonably well with the maxima of m = 2 structures of the temperature. These results provide direct support for the observed drifts being due to an azimuthal dynamo wave.

  14. A lattice Boltzmann study of non-hydrodynamic effects in shell models of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzi, R.; Biferale, L.; Sbragaglia, M.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.

    2004-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann scheme simulating the dynamics of shell models of turbulence is developed. The influence of high-order kinetic modes (ghosts) on the dissipative properties of turbulence dynamics is studied. It is analytically found that when ghost fields relax on the same timescale as the hydrodynamic ones, their major effect is a net enhancement of the fluid viscosity. The bare fluid viscosity is recovered by letting ghost fields evolve on a much longer timescale. Analytical results are borne out by high-resolution numerical simulations. These simulations indicate that the hydrodynamic manifold is very robust towards large fluctuations of non-hydrodynamic fields.

  15. Hot Spot of Enceladus: Role of Thermal Convection and Tidal Internal Heating in the Ice Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Showman, A. P.

    2007-12-01

    The south pole of Enceladus is geologically active at the present time, with elevated surface temperatures, fractures, and jets of water and fine grained particles. We explore whether thermal convection can occur in Enceladus' ice shell and the spatial localization of tidal heating within convective plumes. To determine whether concentrated dissipation can occur in convective plumes, we develop a two-dimensional model to compute the volumetric dissipation rate for an idealized, vertically oriented, isolated convective plume obeying a Maxwellian viscoelastic compressible rheology. We apply the model to the Enceladus ice shell, and we investigate the consequences for partial melting and resurfacing processes. Calculations by us and others have demonstrated that thermal convection can occur in the ice shell of Enceladus under a range of conditions. Here, we show that tidal heating is strongly temperature dependent in a convective ice plume and could produce elevated temperatures and local partial melting in the ice shell of Enceladus. Our calculation provides the first quantitative verification of the hypothesis by Sotin et al. (2002) and others that the tidal dissipation rate is a strong function of temperature inside a convective plume. Localized tidal heating in a thermal plume could explain the concentrated activity at the south pole and its associated heat transport (2-7 GW).

  16. Hydrodynamics, shell shape, behavior and survivorship in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea.

    PubMed

    Denny, M W; Blanchette, C A

    2000-09-01

    On wave-swept rocky shores, limpets are subjected to water velocities in excess of 20 m s(-1), which may impose large hydrodynamic forces. Despite the extreme severity of this flow environment, predictions from conical models suggest that limpets' shells are typically far from the optimal shape that would minimize the risk of dislodgment, a deviation that is allowed by the high tenacity of the limpets' adhesive system. In this study, we test this conclusion using an actual limpet. The shell of Lottia gigantea differs substantially from the hydrodynamic optimum in that its apex is displaced anteriorly to form a plough, which is used to defend the limpet's territory. The hydrodynamic effects of this shape are similar to those observed in conical models: the animal experiences an increased lift when facing into the flow and a decreased lift when the flow is at its back. However, neither effect has a substantial impact on the risk of dislodgment. When the animal is stationary, its adhesion to the substratum is very strong, and its risk of being dislodged is small regardless of its orientation to the flow and despite its sub-optimal shape. In contrast, when the animal is crawling rapidly, its adhesion is substantially decreased, and it would probably be dislodged by rapid flow even if the shell were shaped optimally. The risk of dislodgment by waves is therefore functionally independent of shell shape. In essence, despite the extremely high water velocities to which this species is subjected, its shell has had the 'permission' of the flow environment to respond to other selective factors, in particular those associated with its aggressive, territorial behavior. The result is a shell that is both a potent territorial weapon and a functional (albeit less than optimal) hydrodynamic shape.

  17. Hysteresis of dynamos in rotating spherical shell convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feudel, F.; Tuckerman, L. S.; Zaks, M.; Hollerbach, R.

    2017-05-01

    Bifurcations of dynamos in rotating and buoyancy-driven spherical Rayleigh-Bénard convection in an electrically conducting fluid are investigated numerically. Both nonmagnetic and magnetic solution branches comprised of rotating waves are traced by path-following techniques, and their bifurcations and interconnections for different Ekman numbers are determined. In particular, the question of whether the dynamo branches bifurcate super- or subcritically and whether a direct link to the primary pure convective states exists is answered.

  18. Effects of compressibility on the temperature jump at the interface of layered, spherical-shell convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, David A.; Zhang, Shuxia; Langenberger, Sherri E.

    1988-01-01

    Large temperature jumps at the interface of layered convection are important to the argument used against the likelihood of separate circulations in the upper and lower mantles. This problem was studied within the framework of a compressible, constant viscosity spherical-shell model. Both mechanical and thermal coupling configurations are considered. Although the temperature jumps are reduced by compressibility, their magnitudes remain quite large, in the case of mechanical coupling. For thermal coupling, the temperature jumps become smaller but still are substantial, between 500 to 1000 C. In layered spherical-shell convection, flows in the lower mantle are several times greater than the surface velocities.

  19. Why Europa's icy shell may convect, but ice sheets do not: a glaciological perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassis, J. N.

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa is covered in an icy shell that lies over a liquid ocean. Geological evidence and numerical models suggest that Europa's icy shell convects, providing the possibility that Europa may experience a form of plate tectonics and could even harbor life in its subsurface ocean. The hypothesis that Europa convects is supported by both models and geological evidence. Surprisingly, when we apply similar calculations and (assumptions) used by planetary scientists to infer convection in icy moons like Europa we find that these models also predict that vigorous convection should also occur in portions of our own terrestrial ice sheets and ice shelves where we have firm evidence to the contrary. We can explain the lack of convection within our own ice sheets by recognizing that instead of the diffusion creep limited rheology frequently invoked by planetary scientists, terrestrial ice undergoes power-law creep down to very low strain rates. Glaciological studies find that power-law creep is required to explain the structure of vertical strain rate near ice sheet divides and shape of the ice sheets near an ice divide. However, when we now apply a rheology that is consistent with terrestrial ice sheet dynamics to icy moon conditions, we find conditions are far less favorable for convection in icy moons, with only a very limited parameter regime where convection can occur. Given the many unknowns (grain size, impurities etc.) it is challenging to draw strong conclusions about the behavior of icy moons . Nonetheless, the lack of convection in terrestrial ice sheets provides an important constraint on the dynamics of icy moons and models that explain convection of icy moons should also explain the lack of convection on terrestrial ice sheets.

  20. Bifurcations of rotating waves in rotating spherical shell convection.

    PubMed

    Feudel, F; Tuckerman, L S; Gellert, M; Seehafer, N

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics and bifurcations of convective waves in rotating and buoyancy-driven spherical Rayleigh-Bénard convection are investigated numerically. The solution branches that arise as rotating waves (RWs) are traced by means of path-following methods, by varying the Rayleigh number as a control parameter for different rotation rates. The dependence of the azimuthal drift frequency of the RWs on the Ekman and Rayleigh numbers is determined and discussed. The influence of the rotation rate on the generation and stability of secondary branches is demonstrated. Multistability is typical in the parameter range considered.

  1. Impact of tidal heating on the onset of convection in Enceladus' ice shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, Marie; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gael; Cadek, Ondrej

    2013-04-01

    Observations of Enceladus by the Cassini spacecraft indicated that its south pole is very active, with jets of water vapor and ice emanating from warm tectonic ridges. Convective processes in the ice shell are commonly advocated to explain the enhanced activity at the south pole. The conditions under which convection may occur on Enceladus are, however, still puzzling. According to the estimation of Barr and McKinnon (2007) based on scaling laws, convection may initiate in Enceladus' ice shell only for grain size smaller than 0.3 mm, which is very small compared to the grain size observed on Earth in polar ice sheets for similar temperature and stress conditions (2-4mm). Moreover, Bahounková et al. (2012) showed that such enhanced activity periods associated with thermal convection and internal melting should be brief (~ 1 - 10Myrs) and should be followed by relatively long periods of inactivity (~ 100Myrs), with a probable cessation of thermal convection. In order to constrain the likelihood and periodicity of enhanced activity periods, the conditions under which thermal convection may restart are needed to be investigated. In particular, the goal is to understand how tidal heating, especially during periods of elevated eccentricity, may influence the onset of convection. To answer this question, 3D simulations of thermal convection including a self-consistent computation of tidal dissipation using the code Antigone (Bahounková et al., 2010, 2012) were performed, a composite non-Newtonian rheology (Goldsby and Kohlstedt, 2001) and Maxwell-like rheology mimicking Andrade model were considered. Our simulations show that the onset of convection may occur in Enceladus' ice shell only for ice grain size smaller or equal than 0.5 mm in absence of tidal heating. Tidal dissipation shifts the critical grain size for convection up to values of 1-1.5 mm. The convection is initiated in the polar region due to enhanced tidal dissipation in this area and remains in the

  2. Electrical Resistivity Imaging and Hydrodynamic Modeling of Convective Fingering in a Sabkha Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Remke; Eustice, Brian; Hyndman, David; Wood, Warren; Simmons, Craig

    2014-05-01

    Free convection, or fluid motion driven by density differences, is an important groundwater flow mechanism that can enhance transport and mixing of heat and solutes in the subsurface. Various issues of environmental and societal relevance are exacerbated convective mixing; it has been studied in the context of dense contaminant plumes, nuclear waste disposal, greenhouse gas sequestration, the impacts of sea level rise and saline intrusion on drinking water resources. The basic theory behind convective flow in porous media is well understood, but important questions regarding this process in natural systems remain unanswered. Most previous research on this topic has focused on theory and modeling, with only limited attention to experimental studies and field measurements. The few published studies present single snapshots, making it difficult to quantify transient changes in these systems. Non-invasive electrical methods have the potential to exploit the relation between solute concentrations and electrical conductance of a fluid, and thereby estimate fluid salinity differences in time and space. We present the results of a two-year experimental study at a shallow sabkha aquifer in the United Arab Emirates, about 50 km southwest of the city of Abu Dhabi along the coast of the Arabian Gulf, that was designed to explore the transient nature of free convection. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data documented the presence of convective fingers following a significant rainfall event. One year later, the complex fingering pattern had completely disappeared. This observation is supported by analysis of the aquifer solute budget as well as hydrodynamic modeling of the system. The transient dynamics of the gravitational instabilities in the modeling results are in agreement with the timing observed in the time-lapse ERT data. Our experimental observations and modeling are consistent with the hypothesis that the instabilities arose from a dense brine that infiltrated

  3. Grain size evolution in convective ice shells: Application to Europa and the other icy satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, P.; Tobie, G.; Sotin, C.

    2006-12-01

    On the basis of a physical model of grain size evolution, we determine the grain size spatial distribution within a convective ice shell and its effect on the convective instabilities. Our physical model is constrained from grain size measurements along ice cores on Earth's polar ice sheets and is self-consistently coupled to a 2D thermal convection code. For grain sizes ranging from 1 to 10 mm and for stresses lower than 0.01 MPa, which is typical of both convective ice shells and Earth's polar ice sheets, the deformation of ice should be governed by intracrystalline dislocation slip mainly on the basal plane and accommodated by GBM (Grain Boundary Migration) associated with normal grain growth or rotation recrystallization. In these conditions, the viscosity of ice is expected to be grain size and stress dependent, with grain size and stress exponents ranging between 1 and 2. Our simulations indicate that the grain size distribution in the convective sublayer is strongly heterogeneous with values ranging from 1 mm to several tens of centimeter. We will show how the grain size distribution and the convective instabilities are sensitive to the rheological assumptions and the presence of non-water impurities. Improving our knowledge of ice rheology from laboratory experiments and Earth field analysis in conditions similar to icy moons is required to better understanding how grain-scale processes control large-scale dynamical processes.

  4. Differential Rotation and Angular Momentum Transport Caused by Thermal Convection in a Rotating Spherical Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehiro, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.; Yamada, M.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate generation mechanisms of differential rotation and angular momentum transport caused by Boussinesq thermal convection in a rotating spherical shell based on weakly nonlinear numerical calculations for various values of the Prandtl and Ekman numbers under a setup similar to the solar convection layer. When the Prandtl number is of order unity or less and the rotation rate of the system is small (the Ekman number is larger than O(10-2)), the structure of thermal convection is not governed by the Taylor-Proudman theorem; banana-type convection cells emerge which follow the spherical shell boundaries rather than the rotation axis. Due to the Coriolis effect, the velocity field associated with those types of convection cells accompanies the Reynolds stress which transports angular momentum from high-latitudes to the equatorial region horizontally, and equatorial prograde flows are produced. The surface and internal distributions of differential rotation realized in this regime are quite similar to those observed in the Sun with helioseismology. These results may suggest that we should apply larger values of the eddy diffusivities than those believed so far when we use a low resolution numerical model for thermal convection in the solar interior.

  5. Reynolds stress and heat flux in spherical shell convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Mantere, M. J.; Guerrero, G.; Brandenburg, A.; Chatterjee, P.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Turbulent fluxes of angular momentum and enthalpy or heat due to rotationally affected convection play a key role in determining differential rotation of stars. Their dependence on latitude and depth has been determined in the past from convection simulations in Cartesian or spherical simulations. Here we perform a systematic comparison between the two geometries as a function of the rotation rate. Aims: Here we want to extend the earlier studies by using spherical wedges to obtain turbulent angular momentum and heat transport as functions of the rotation rate from stratified convection. We compare results from spherical and Cartesian models in the same parameter regime in order to study whether restricted geometry introduces artefacts into the results. In particular, we want to clarify whether the sharp equatorial profile of the horizontal Reynolds stress found in earlier Cartesian models is also reproduced in spherical geometry. Methods: We employ direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection in spherical and Cartesian geometries. In order to alleviate the computational cost in the spherical runs, and to reach as high spatial resolution as possible, we model only parts of the latitude and longitude. The rotational influence, measured by the Coriolis number or inverse Rossby number, is varied from zero to roughly seven, which is the regime that is likely to be realised in the solar convection zone. Cartesian simulations are performed in overlapping parameter regimes. Results: For slow rotation we find that the radial and latitudinal turbulent angular momentum fluxes are directed inward and equatorward, respectively. In the rapid rotation regime the radial flux changes sign in accordance with earlier numerical results, but in contradiction with theory. The latitudinal flux remains mostly equatorward and develops a maximum close to the equator. In Cartesian simulations this peak can be explained by the strong "banana cells". Their effect in the

  6. Convection-Enhanced Biopatterning with Recirculation of Hydrodynamically Confined Nanoliter Volumes of Reagents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We present a new methodology for efficient and high-quality patterning of biological reagents for surface-based biological assays. The method relies on hydrodynamically confined nanoliter volumes of reagents to interact with the substrate at the micrometer-length scale. We study the interplay between diffusion, advection, and surface chemistry and present the design of a noncontact scanning microfluidic device to efficiently present reagents on surfaces. By leveraging convective flows, recirculation, and mixing of a processing liquid, this device overcomes limitations of existing biopatterning approaches, such as passive diffusion of analytes, uncontrolled wetting, and drying artifacts. We demonstrate the deposition of analytes, showing a 2- to 5-fold increase in deposition rate together with a 10-fold reduction in analyte consumption while ensuring less than 6% variation in pattern homogeneity on a standard biological substrate. In addition, we demonstrate the recirculation of a processing liquid using a microfluidic probe (MFP) in the context of a surface assay for (i) probing 12 independent areas with a single microliter of processing liquid and (ii) processing a 2 mm2 surface to create 170 antibody spots of 50 × 100 μm2 area using 1.6 μL of liquid. We observe high pattern quality, conservative usage of reagents, micrometer precision of localization and convection-enhanced fast deposition. Such a device and method may facilitate quantitative biological assays and spur the development of the next generation of protein microarrays. PMID:26837532

  7. Convection-Enhanced Biopatterning with Recirculation of Hydrodynamically Confined Nanoliter Volumes of Reagents.

    PubMed

    Autebert, Julien; Cors, Julien F; Taylor, David P; Kaigala, Govind V

    2016-03-15

    We present a new methodology for efficient and high-quality patterning of biological reagents for surface-based biological assays. The method relies on hydrodynamically confined nanoliter volumes of reagents to interact with the substrate at the micrometer-length scale. We study the interplay between diffusion, advection, and surface chemistry and present the design of a noncontact scanning microfluidic device to efficiently present reagents on surfaces. By leveraging convective flows, recirculation, and mixing of a processing liquid, this device overcomes limitations of existing biopatterning approaches, such as passive diffusion of analytes, uncontrolled wetting, and drying artifacts. We demonstrate the deposition of analytes, showing a 2- to 5-fold increase in deposition rate together with a 10-fold reduction in analyte consumption while ensuring less than 6% variation in pattern homogeneity on a standard biological substrate. In addition, we demonstrate the recirculation of a processing liquid using a microfluidic probe (MFP) in the context of a surface assay for (i) probing 12 independent areas with a single microliter of processing liquid and (ii) processing a 2 mm(2) surface to create 170 antibody spots of 50 × 100 μm(2) area using 1.6 μL of liquid. We observe high pattern quality, conservative usage of reagents, micrometer precision of localization and convection-enhanced fast deposition. Such a device and method may facilitate quantitative biological assays and spur the development of the next generation of protein microarrays.

  8. Influence of hydrodynamic slip on convective transport in flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Nidhil M. A.; Kumar, Anuj; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2017-02-01

    The presence of a finite tangential velocity on a hydrodynamically slipping surface is known to reduce vorticity production in bluff body flows substantially while at the same time enhancing its convection downstream and into the wake. Here, we investigate the effect of hydrodynamic slippage on the convective heat transfer (scalar transport) from a heated isothermal circular cylinder placed in a uniform cross-flow of an incompressible fluid through analytical and simulation techniques. At low Reynolds (Re≪ 1 ) and high Péclet (Pe≫ 1 ) numbers, our theoretical analysis based on Oseen and thermal boundary layer equations allows for an explicit determination of the dependence of the thermal transport on the non-dimensional slip length l_s . In this case, the surface-averaged Nusselt number, Nu transitions gradually between the asymptotic limits of Nu ˜ Pe^{1/3} and Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for no-slip (l_s → 0 ) and shear-free (l_s → ∞) boundaries, respectively. Boundary layer analysis also shows that the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} holds for a shear-free cylinder surface in the asymptotic limit of Re≫ 1 so that the corresponding heat transfer rate becomes independent of the fluid viscosity. At finite Re, results from our two-dimensional simulations confirm the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for a shear-free boundary over the range 0.1 ≤ Re≤ 10^3 and 0.1≤ Pr≤ 10 . A gradual transition from the lower asymptotic limit corresponding to a no-slip surface, to the upper limit for a shear-free boundary, with l_s , is observed in both the maximum slip velocity and the Nu. The local time-averaged Nusselt number Nu_{θ } for a shear-free surface exceeds the one for a no-slip surface all along the cylinder boundary except over the downstream portion where unsteady separation and flow reversal lead to an appreciable rise in the local heat transfer rates, especially at high Re and Pr. At a Reynolds number of 10^3 , the formation of secondary recirculating eddy pairs results in

  9. Influence of hydrodynamic slip on convective transport in flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Nidhil M. A.; Kumar, Anuj; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2017-06-01

    The presence of a finite tangential velocity on a hydrodynamically slipping surface is known to reduce vorticity production in bluff body flows substantially while at the same time enhancing its convection downstream and into the wake. Here, we investigate the effect of hydrodynamic slippage on the convective heat transfer (scalar transport) from a heated isothermal circular cylinder placed in a uniform cross-flow of an incompressible fluid through analytical and simulation techniques. At low Reynolds (Re≪ 1) and high Péclet (Pe≫ 1) numbers, our theoretical analysis based on Oseen and thermal boundary layer equations allows for an explicit determination of the dependence of the thermal transport on the non-dimensional slip length l_s. In this case, the surface-averaged Nusselt number, Nu transitions gradually between the asymptotic limits of Nu ˜ Pe^{1/3} and Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for no-slip (l_s → 0) and shear-free (l_s → ∞) boundaries, respectively. Boundary layer analysis also shows that the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} holds for a shear-free cylinder surface in the asymptotic limit of Re≫ 1 so that the corresponding heat transfer rate becomes independent of the fluid viscosity. At finite Re, results from our two-dimensional simulations confirm the scaling Nu ˜ Pe^{1/2} for a shear-free boundary over the range 0.1 ≤ Re ≤ 10^3 and 0.1≤ Pr ≤ 10. A gradual transition from the lower asymptotic limit corresponding to a no-slip surface, to the upper limit for a shear-free boundary, with l_s, is observed in both the maximum slip velocity and the Nu. The local time-averaged Nusselt number Nu_{θ } for a shear-free surface exceeds the one for a no-slip surface all along the cylinder boundary except over the downstream portion where unsteady separation and flow reversal lead to an appreciable rise in the local heat transfer rates, especially at high Re and Pr. At a Reynolds number of 10^3, the formation of secondary recirculating eddy pairs results in

  10. Inertial Effects on Thermochemically Driven Convection and Hydromagnetic Dynamos in Spherical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkanin, J.; Kyselica, J.; Guba, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mechanisms of rotating convection play a fundamental role in the generation of the Earth's magnetic field. In order to get a better understanding of these mechanisms, we investigate the isolated problems of rotating thermal,chemical and thermochemical convection, and then thermally, chemically and thermochemically driven hydromagnetic dynamos in spherical shells. The underlying model equations describe the evolution of the flow, thermal and compositional fields in the first case, and flow, thermal, compositional and magnetic fields in the second case within the Boussinesq approximation. A uniform distribution of heat sources within the shell are assumed. The effects of solidification at the inner core boundary are accounted for by prescribing the latent heat and solutal fluxes at the bottom of the shell. In the limit of small Ekman and Prandtl numbers, we provide asymptotic results for the onset of convection and dynamos, in which case the system can be approximated to leading order by an inertial-wave convection and dynamos. The full set of governing equations is then solved numerically.

  11. Convection-driven spherical shell dynamos at varying Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Olspert, N.; Warnecke, J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Stellar convection zones are characterized by vigorous high-Reynolds number turbulence at low Prandtl numbers. Aims: We study the dynamo and differential rotation regimes at varying levels of viscous, thermal, and magnetic diffusion. Methods: We perform three-dimensional simulations of stratified fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic convection in rotating spherical wedges at various thermal and magnetic Prandtl numbers (from 0.25 to 2 and from 0.25 to 5, respectively). Differential rotation and large-scale magnetic fields are produced self-consistently. Results: We find that for high thermal diffusivity, the rotation profiles show a monotonically increasing angular velocity from the bottom of the convection zone to the top and from the poles toward the equator. For sufficiently rapid rotation, a region of negative radial shear develops at mid-latitudes as the thermal diffusivity is decreased, corresponding to an increase of the Prandtl number. This coincides with and results in a change of the dynamo mode from poleward propagating activity belts to equatorward propagating ones. Furthermore, the clearly cyclic solutions disappear at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers and give way to irregular sign changes or quasi-stationary states. The total (mean and fluctuating) magnetic energy increases as a function of the magnetic Reynolds number in the range studied here (5-151), but the energies of the mean magnetic fields level off at high magnetic Reynolds numbers. The differential rotation is strongly affected by the magnetic fields and almost vanishes at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers. In some of our most turbulent cases, however, we find that two regimes are possible, where either differential rotation is strong and mean magnetic fields are relatively weak, or vice versa. Conclusions: Our simulations indicate a strong nonlinear feedback of magnetic fields on differential rotation, leading to qualitative changes in the behaviors of large

  12. Magneto-Hydrodynamic Damping of Convection During Vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger Growth of HgCdTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watring, D. A.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    In order to quantify the effects of convection on segregation, Hg(0.8)Cd(0.2)Te crystals were grown by the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method in the presence of an applied axial magnetic field of 50 kG. The influence of convection, by magneto-hydrodynamic damping, on mass transfer in the melt and segregation at the solid-liquid interface was investigated by measuring the axial and radial compositional variations in the grown samples. The reduction of convective mixing in the melt through the application of the magnetic field is found to decrease radial segregation to the diffusion-limited regime. It was also found that the suppression of the convective cell near the solid-liquid interface results in an increase in the slope of the diffusion-controlled solute boundary layer, which can lead to constitutional supercooling.

  13. Impact of tidal heating on the onset of convection in Enceladus’s ice shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běhounková, Marie; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gaël; Čadek, Ondřej

    2013-09-01

    By performing 3D simulations of thermal convection and tidal dissipation, we investigated the effect of tidal heating on the onset of convection in Enceladus’s ice shell. We considered a composite non-Newtonian rheology including diffusion, grain-size-sensitive and dislocation creeps, and we defined an effective tidal viscosity reproducing the dissipation function as predicted by the Andrade rheology. For simulations with no or moderate tidal heating, the onset of convection requires ice grain sizes smaller than or equal to 0.5-0.6 mm. For simulations including significant tidal heating (>10-6 W m-3), the critical grain size for the onset of convection is shifted up to values of 1-1.5 mm. Whatever the width of the internal ocean, convection is initiated in the polar region due to enhanced tidal dissipation at high latitudes. For a given eccentricity value, the onset of convection depends on the ocean width, as tidal flexing and hence tidal heat production is controlled by the ocean width. For heating rates larger than 5-9 × 10-7 W m-3, we systematically observe the occurrence of melting in our simulations, whatever the grain size and for both convecting and non-convecting cases. Grain sizes smaller than 1.5 mm, required to initiate convection, may be obtained either by the presence of a few percent of impurities limiting the grain growth by pinning effects or by the increase of stress and hence dynamic recrystallization associated with tidally-induced melting events.

  14. Hydrodynamic theory for nematic shells: The interplay among curvature, flow, and alignment.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Gaetano; Vergori, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    We derive the hydrodynamic equations for nematic liquid crystals lying on curved substrates. We invoke the Lagrange-Rayleigh variational principle to adapt the Ericksen-Leslie theory to two-dimensional nematics in which a degenerate anchoring of the molecules on the substrate is enforced. The only constitutive assumptions in this scheme concern the free-energy density, given by the two-dimensional Frank potential, and the density of dissipation which is required to satisfy appropriate invariance requirements. The resulting equations of motion couple the velocity field, the director alignment, and the curvature of the shell. To illustrate our findings, we consider the effect of a simple shear flow on the alignment of a nematic lying on a cylindrical shell.

  15. Hydrodynamic theory for nematic shells: The interplay among curvature, flow, and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Gaetano; Vergori, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    We derive the hydrodynamic equations for nematic liquid crystals lying on curved substrates. We invoke the Lagrange-Rayleigh variational principle to adapt the Ericksen-Leslie theory to two-dimensional nematics in which a degenerate anchoring of the molecules on the substrate is enforced. The only constitutive assumptions in this scheme concern the free-energy density, given by the two-dimensional Frank potential, and the density of dissipation which is required to satisfy appropriate invariance requirements. The resulting equations of motion couple the velocity field, the director alignment, and the curvature of the shell. To illustrate our findings, we consider the effect of a simple shear flow on the alignment of a nematic lying on a cylindrical shell.

  16. Convection in a differentially heated rotating spherical shell of Boussinesq fluid with radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babalola, David

    In this study we investigate the flow of a Boussinesq fluid contained in a rotating, differentially heated spherical shell. Previous work, on the spherical shell of Boussinesq fluid, differentially heated the shell by prescribing temperature on the inner boundary of the shell, setting the temperature deviation from the reference temperature to vary proportionally with -cos 2θ, from the equator to the pole. We change the model to include an energy balance equation at the earth's surface, which incorporates latitudinal solar radiation distribution and ice-albedo feedback mechanism with moving ice boundary. For the fluid velocity, on the inner boundary, two conditions are considered: stress-free and no-slip. However, the model under consideration contains only simple representations of a small number of climate variables and thus is not a climate model per se but rather a tool to aid in understanding how changes in these variables may affect our planet's climate. The solution of the model is followed as the differential heating is changed, using the pseudo arc-length continuation method, which is a reliable method that can successfully follow a solution curve even at a turning point. Our main result is in regards to hysteresis phenomenon that is associated with transition from one to multiple convective cells, in a differentially heated, co-rotating spherical shell. In particular, we find that hysteresis can be observed without transition from one to multiple convective cells. Another important observation is that the transition to multiple convective cells is significantly suppressed altogether, in the case of stress-free boundary conditions on the fluid velocity. Also, the results of this study will be related to our present-day climate.

  17. Optical response of cylindrical multilayers in the context of hydrodynamic convection-diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tianyu; Shi, Yi; Lu, Lizhen; Chen, Feng; Ma, Xikui; Mittra, Raj

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we generalize the cascading scattering matrix algorithm for calculating the optical response of concentric multilayered structures comprised of either plasmonic metal or dielectric, within the framework of hydrodynamic convection-diffusion model of electrodynamics. Two additional boundary conditions, namely, the continuity of first order pressure of free electron density and the continuity of normal components of free charge velocity, respectively, are adopted in order to handle the behaviour at interfaces involving metals. Scattering matrices at interfaces can be readily obtained and cascaded to obtain the modal coefficients in each layer by expanding electromagnetic waves in harmonic modes with cylindrical vector wave functions. We have validated the proposed method by analyzing the optical responses of several configurations of nanostructures, including a bi-metallic nanocylinder and a hyperlens. We found that nonlocal effects can be important for small structures, when the characteristic size is comparable to the Fermi wavelength. The proposed method shows its capability and flexibility to solve hybrid metal-dielectric multilayer structures even when the number of layers is large. Although we have discussed our method in the context of the retarded radiation regime, it can be applied in quasi-static scenarios without any difficulties. Furthermore, it may be extended to solve similar problems in other areas of physics, such as acoustics.

  18. Global 3D radiation-hydrodynamics models of AGB stars. Effects of convection and radial pulsations on atmospheric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytag, B.; Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with increasing spatial resolution reveal new layers of complexity of atmospheric processes on a variety of scales. Aims: To analyze the physical mechanisms that cause asymmetries and surface structures in observed images, we use detailed 3D dynamical simulations of AGB stars; these simulations self-consistently describe convection and pulsations. Methods: We used the CO5BOLD radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce an exploratory grid of global "star-in-a-box" models of the outer convective envelope and the inner atmosphere of AGB stars to study convection, pulsations, and shock waves and their dependence on stellar and numerical parameters. Results: The model dynamics are governed by the interaction of long-lasting giant convection cells, short-lived surface granules, and strong, radial, fundamental-mode pulsations. Radial pulsations and shorter wavelength, traveling, acoustic waves induce shocks on various scales in the atmosphere. Convection, waves, and shocks all contribute to the dynamical pressure and, thus, to an increase of the stellar radius and to a levitation of material into layers where dust can form. Consequently, the resulting relation of pulsation period and stellar radius is shifted toward larger radii compared to that of non-linear 1D models. The dependence of pulsation period on luminosity agrees well with observed relations. The interaction of the pulsation mode with the non-stationary convective flow causes occasional amplitude changes and phase shifts. The regularity of the pulsations decreases with decreasing gravity as the relative size of convection cells increases. The model stars do not have a well-defined surface. Instead, the light is emitted from a very extended inhomogeneous atmosphere with a complex dynamic pattern of high-contrast features. Conclusions: Our models self-consistently describe convection, convectively generated acoustic noise, fundamental-mode radial

  19. Stagnant-lid convection in large versus small-core spherical shells: implications for modeling the Moon and Galilean satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, J. M.; Lowman, J. P.; Deschamps, F.; Tackley, P.

    2016-12-01

    Convection in the silicate mantles of rocky planets and moons or cryo-shells of icy satellites, occurs in a range of geometries defined by the ratio of the bounding radii of the convecting layer. Previous studies have mapped the onset of stagnant-lid convection (SLC) in variable curvature three-dimensional shells featuring different thermal viscosity contrasts and thermal energy input. While parameterizations were determined for shells with core-to-surface radii ratios (f) greater than or equal to 0.5, stagnant-lid cases were not found for shells with f < 0.5. In the present study we analyze the onset of stagnant-lid convection for a variety of curvatures including relatively small core shells with f=0.3 or 0.4 for both purely bottom heated and bimodally heated systems. We first distill the effect of curvature employing a temperature dependent Frank-Kamenetskii rheology in a 2D spherical annulus. The mobility M, the ratio of rms-surface to rms-volume averaged velocity is used to determine the onset of SLC (defined by M < 0.01). Contrary to convection in a plane-layer, as viscosity contrast is first increased, spherical shells exhibit a curvature dependent decrease in convective vigour before effective Rayleigh number monotonically increases. We identify the parameters that allow for a transition to stagnant-lid convection in small core bodies and show a divergence in the diagnostics found for 2D annulus and 3D spherical shell convection as f is decreased. Finally, we discuss the effect of curvature on stresses at the base of the stagnant-lid and show that stress increases in small core bodies when all other parameters are held fixed. Our findings are relevant to understanding and accurately modeling the processes that may exist in bodies that have been inferred to possess relatively small cores, such as the Moon and Galilean satellites.

  20. On the effect of laterally varying boundary heat flux on rapidly rotating spherical shell convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Swarandeep; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2017-08-01

    The onset of convection in a rotating spherical shell subject to laterally varying heat flux at the outer boundary is considered in this paper. The focus is on the geophysically relevant regime of rapid rotation (low Ekman number) where the natural length scale of convection is significantly smaller than the length scale imposed by the boundary heat flux pattern. Contrary to earlier studies at a higher Ekman number, we find a substantial reduction in the onset Rayleigh number Rac with increasing lateral variation. The decrease in Rac is shown to be closely correlated to the equatorial heat flux surplus in the steady, basic state solution. The consistency of such a correlation makes the estimation of Rac possible without solving the full stability problem. The steady baroclinic flow has a strong cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry in the kinetic helicity only for equatorially symmetric lateral variations, with possible implications for dynamo action. Equatorially antisymmetric variations, on the other hand, break the symmetry of the mean flow, in turn negating its helicity. Analysis of the perturbation solution reveals strongly localized clusters through which convection rolls drift in and out at a frequency higher than that for the reference case with homogeneous boundary heat flux. Large lateral variations produce a marked decrease in the azimuthal length scale of columns, which indicates that small-scale motions are essential to the transport of heat in rapidly rotating, localized convection. With an equatorially antisymmetric heat flux pattern, convection in individual clusters goes through an asynchronous wax-wane cycle whose frequency is much lower than the drift rate of the columns. These continual variations in convection intensity may in turn result in fluctuations in the magnetic field intensity, an effect that needs to be considered in dynamo models. Finally, there is a notable analogy between the role of a laterally varying boundary heat flux and the role of a

  1. Experiments on Thermal Convection in Rotating Spherical Shells With Radial Gravity: The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments designed to study the fluid dynamics of buoyancy driven circulations in rotating spherical shells were conducted on the United States Microgravity Laboratory 2 spacelab mission. These experiments address several aspects of prototypical global convection relevant to large scale motions on the Sun, Earth, and on the giant planets. The key feature is the consistent modeling of radially directed gravity in spherical geometry by using dielectric polarization forces. Imagery of the planforms of thermally driven flows for rapidly-rotating regimes shows an initial separation and eventual merger of equatorial and polar convection as the heating (i.e. the Rayleigh number) is increased. At low rotation rates, multiple-states of motion for the same external parameters were observed.

  2. Geoid and topography for infinite Prandtl number convection in a spherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G.; Zebib, A.

    1988-01-01

    Geoid anomalies and surface and lower-boundary topographies are calculated for numerically generated thermal convection for an infinite Prandtl number, Boussinesq, axisymmetric spherical fluid shell with constant gravity and viscosity, for heating both entirely from below and entirely from within. Convection solutions are obtained for Rayleigh numbers Ra up to 20 times the critical Ra in heating from below and 27 times critical for heating from within. Geoid parallels surface undulations, and boundary deformation generally increases with increasing cell wavelength. Dimensionless geoid and topography in heating from below are about 5 times greater than in heating from within. Values for heating from within correlate more closely with geophysical data than values from heating from below, suggesting a predominance of internal heating in the mantle. The study emphasizes that dynamically induced topography and geoid are sensitive to the mode of heating in the earth's mantle.

  3. Stagnant lid convection in spherical shells: parameterizations and implications for icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, C.; Deschamps, F.; Tackley, P. J.; Sanchez Valle, C.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of subsurface oceans in large icy moons has gained increasing support during the past decade, both from theoretical studies and from spacecraft missions measurements (e.g., magnetic data). The exact thickness of subsurface ocean, if present, depends on the detailed thermal evolution of each moon, and on its primordial composition. It has been shown that the presence of volatiles (including ammonia and methanol) in small volume fraction strongly opposes the cristallization of the primordial ocean. Also crucial is the heat transfer through the outer ice I layer, which controls the cooling of the satelitte interior. Convection is likely the most efficient way to transfer heat through this layer, but the regime of convection (and therefore the heat transfer) depends on the rheology of the fluid. In the case of ice, viscosity is strongly temperature dependent and thermal convection in the outer ice shell follows a stagnant lid regime: a stagnant lid forms at the top of the system, and convection is confined in a sublayer. Previous numerical studies including strongly temperature-dependent viscosities have already been performed in 2D Cartesian geometry allowing the determination of scaling laws relating the mean temperature and heat flux to the vigor of convection (described by the Rayleigh number) and the ratio of the top to the bottom viscosity, but 3D spherical geometry may provide a more accurate description of convection within the outer ice layer of icy moons. In this work, we model the heat transfer in spherical shells for a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity fluid heated from below. We use StagYY to run simulations for different ratios of the inner to outer radii of the ice layer (f), Rayleigh number (Ra), and thermal viscosity contrast (Δη). The inversion of the results of more than 30 numerical experiments allows the determination of scaling laws for the temperature of the well-mixed interior and surface heat flux. In particular, we find

  4. Thermal convection of an internally heated infinite Prandtl number fluid in a spherical shell. [earth core-mantle-surface model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Zebib, A.

    1980-01-01

    A Galerkin technique is used to study the finite-amplitude axisymmetric steady convective motions of an infinite Prandtl number Boussinesq fluid in a spherical shell. Two types of heating are considered: in one case, convection is driven both by internal heat sources in the fluid and by an externally imposed temperature drop across the shell boundaries; in the other case, only internal heat sources drive convection and the lower boundary of the shell is adiabatic. Two distinct classes of axisymmetric steady states are found to be possible: states characterized by temperature and radial velocity fields that are symmetric about an equatorial plane; and a class of solutions that does not possess any symmetry properties about the equatorial plane.

  5. Thermal convection of an internally heated infinite Prandtl number fluid in a spherical shell. [earth core-mantle-surface model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Zebib, A.

    1980-01-01

    A Galerkin technique is used to study the finite-amplitude axisymmetric steady convective motions of an infinite Prandtl number Boussinesq fluid in a spherical shell. Two types of heating are considered: in one case, convection is driven both by internal heat sources in the fluid and by an externally imposed temperature drop across the shell boundaries; in the other case, only internal heat sources drive convection and the lower boundary of the shell is adiabatic. Two distinct classes of axisymmetric steady states are found to be possible: states characterized by temperature and radial velocity fields that are symmetric about an equatorial plane; and a class of solutions that does not possess any symmetry properties about the equatorial plane.

  6. Geodynamic Modeling of Planetary Ice-Oceans: Evolution of Ice-Shell Thickness in Convecting Two-Phase Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allu Peddinti, D.; McNamara, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Along with the newly unveiled icy surface of Pluto, several icy planetary bodies show indications of an active surface perhaps underlain by liquid oceans of some size. This augments the interest to explore the evolution of an ice-ocean system and its surface implications. The geologically young surface of the Jovian moon Europa lends much speculation to variations in ice-shell thickness over time. Along with the observed surface features, it suggests the possibility of episodic convection and conduction within the ice-shell as it evolved. What factors would control the growth of the ice-shell as it forms? If and how would those factors determine the thickness of the ice-shell and consequently the heat transfer? Would parameters such as tidal heating or initial temperature affect how the ice-shell grows and to what significance? We perform numerical experiments using geodynamical models of the two-phase ice-water system to study the evolution of planetary ice-oceans such as that of Europa. The models evolve self-consistently from an initial liquid ocean as it cools with time. The effects of presence, absence and magnitude of tidal heating on ice-shell thickness are studied in different models. The vigor of convection changes as the ice-shell continues to thicken. Initial modeling results track changes in the growth rate of the ice-shell as the vigor of the convection changes. The magnitude and temporal location of the rate change varies with different properties of tidal heating and values of initial temperature. A comparative study of models is presented to demonstrate how as the ice-shell is forming, its growth rate and convection are affected by processes such as tidal heating.

  7. The effects of convection and oxygen presence on thermal testing of thin-shelled transportation packages

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.R.

    1995-11-01

    Several experiments were performed in an attempt to determine the effects of both convection and oxygen levels during hypothetical thermal accident testing of thin-shelled Celotex{trademark}-based packages in furnaces. Obsolete DT-22 packages were used and experiments were performed in two separate furnaces, one gas-fired and one electric, each of which has previously been used for this type of testing. Oxygen levels were varied and measured in the gas-fired furnace, while the electric furnace was operated in a standard manner. The gas-fired furnace is constructed so as to induce a very strong convective field within. After testing, the packages were evaluated by several methods to determine the effects of the thermal testing on the package. In general, there were no differences found for the packages tested in the two different furnaces or for packages tested in the same furnace under different conditions. Therefore, after careful consideration, it is concluded that thermal testing can still be performed in electric furnaces in which the oxygen supply is not refurbished and there is no forced convection heat transfer.

  8. Heat transfer in the thermo-electro-hydrodynamic convection under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Fogaing, M Tadie; Yoshikawa, H N; Crumeyrolle, O; Mutabazi, I

    2014-04-01

    This article deals with the thermal convection in a dielectric fluid confined in a finite-length plane capacitor with a temperature gradient under microgravity conditions. The dielectrophoretic force resulting from differential polarization of the fluid plays the role of buoyancy force associated with an electric effective gravity. It induces the convection when the Rayleigh number based on this electric gravity exceeds a critical value. Two-dimensional numerical simulation for a geometry with a large aspect ratio is used to determine the convective flow in the saturated state. The Nusselt number Nu is computed for a wide range of Prandtl number (0.01 ≤ Pr ≤ 10(3)) and its dependence on the distance from the critical condition is determined. A correlation between Nu and Pr in the vicinity of criticality is obtained and compared with that of the Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The behavior of the convection is analyzed in detail from an energetic viewpoint: electrostatic energy, power inputs by different components of the electric gravity and viscous and thermal dissipations are computed.

  9. Refined similarity hypotheses in shell models of homogeneous turbulence and turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Ching, Emily S C; Guo, H; Lo, T S

    2008-08-01

    A major challenge in turbulence research is to understand from first principles the origin of the anomalous scaling of velocity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number turbulent flows. One important idea was proposed by Kolmogorov [J. Fluid Mech. 13, 82 (1962)], which attributes the anomaly to variations of the locally averaged energy dissipation rate. Kraichnan later pointed out [J. Fluid Mech. 62, 305 (1973)] that the locally averaged energy dissipation rate is not an inertial-range quantity and a proper inertial-range quantity would be the local energy transfer rate. As a result, Kraichnan's idea attributes the anomaly to variations of the local energy transfer rate. These ideas, generally known as refined similarity hypotheses, can also be extended to study the anomalous scaling of fluctuations of an active scalar, such as the temperature in turbulent convection. We examine the validity of these refined similarity hypotheses and their extensions to an active scalar in shell models of homogeneous turbulence and turbulent convection. We find that Kraichnan's refined similarity hypothesis and its extension are valid.

  10. Investigating ice shell convection with a lower boundary defined by changes in phase and composition: Implications for Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, M. K.; McNamara, A. K.; Greeley, R.

    2009-12-01

    Models of solid-state convection typically employ a spatially-fixed lower boundary with a velocity boundary condition that impedes material flow across it. Oftentimes, such a boundary condition is justified due to the large density contrast that the boundary represents; for example, a fixed, no-flow lower boundary condition is an appropriate approximation for the Earth's core-mantle boundary due to the large density difference between silicate rock and iron. Less extreme density contrasts are not well approximated by a fixed lower boundary. For example, although the boundary between Earth's upper and lower mantles represents a sharp density contrast due to a phase change between ringwoodite and perovskite, it is not strong enough to restrict flow across it. It is unclear what type of lower boundary is most appropriate for modeling convection within an ice shell floating on a saline water ocean such as hypothesized for Europa. It is important to determine whether material is expected to advect across the ice-water boundary and to determine whether significant vertical topography exists along the boundary (i.e., variation in ice shell thickness) because both will affect the vigor and wavelength of convection and, more importantly, the ability of the convective ice shell to produce plumes. To investigate this, we perform two sets of numerical convection calculations, each identical except for the treatment of the lower boundary. The control set employs a fixed, no-flow lower boundary, and the test set utilizes thermochemical convection to allow for the self-consistent generation of a lower boundary. We examine various density contrasts between ice and water to reflect uncertainty in ocean salinity. We report how the treatment of the lower boundary influences mass flux, vigor and wavelength of convection, and the formation or inhibition of plumes.

  11. Planetary Ice-Oceans: Numerical Modeling Study of Ice-Shell Growth in Convecting Two-Phase Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allu Peddinti, Divya; McNamara, Allen

    2017-04-01

    Several icy bodies in the Solar system such as the icy moons Europa and Enceladus exhibit signs of subsurface oceans underneath an ice-shell. For Europa, the geologically young surface, the presence of surface features and the aligned surface chemistry pose interesting questions about formation of the ice-shell and its interaction with the ocean below. This also ties in with its astrobiological potential and implications for similar ice-ocean systems elsewhere in the cosmos. The overall thickness of the H2O layer on Europa is estimated to be 100-150 km while the thickness of the ice-shell is debated. Additionally, Europa is subject to tidal heating due to interaction with Jupiter's immense gravity field. It is of interest to understand how the ice-shell thickness varies in the presence of tidal internal heating and the localization of heating in different regions of the ice-shell. Thus this study aims to determine the effect of tidal internal heating on the growth rate of the ice-shell over time. We perform geodynamic modeling of the ice-ocean system in order to understand how the ice-shell thickness changes with time. The convection code employs the ice Ih-water phase diagram in order to model the two-phase convecting ice-ocean system. All the models begin from an initial warm thick ocean that cools from the top. The numerical experiments analyze three cases: case 1 with no tidal internal heating in the system, case 2 with constant tidal internal heating in the ice and case 3 with viscosity-dependent tidal internal heating in the ice. We track the ice-shell thickness as a function of time as the system cools. Modeling results so far have identified that the shell growth rate changes substantially at a point in time that coincides with a change in the planform of ice-convection cells. Additionally, the velocity vs depth plots indicate a shift from a conduction dominant to a convection dominant ice regime. We compare the three different cases to provide a

  12. Ammonite shell shape covaries with facies and hydrodynamics: Iterative evolution as a response to changes in basinal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, David K.; Landman, Neil H.; Chamberlain, John A., Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Shell shape varies within many ammonoid species, and some ammonoid lineages appear to have evolved in concert with changes in their environment. We report variation within an Upper Cretaceous ammonoid species that correlates with facies differences and is consistent with a hydrodynamic explanation. In the Turner Sandy Member of the Carlile Shale (Turonian) of South Dakota and Wyoming, more compressed morphs of Scaphites whitfieldi Cobban are found in nearshore sandy facies, whereas more depressed morphs occur in offshore muds. We measured drag forces on models of juvenile and adult shells that differed in lateral compression of the shell. Plots of drag coefficient as a function of Reynolds number indicate that thinner, more compressed morphs swam more efficiently at higher velocities and depressed morphs swam more efficiently at low velocities. Higher swimming velocities may be essential for life in nearshore sandy environments, which have higher ambient current velocities. Shelled cephalopods swim most efficiently at low swimming speeds; therefore, lower velocity, more energetically economical swimming should be preferred in more quiescent offshore settings. An analysis of power consumption supports this interpretation. Correlated changes in shell compression and environmental factors, here observed within a species, have been documented in numerous ammonite lineages. These iterative evolutionary changes within lineages may be similarly explained by selection for shell morphologies appropriate to environments that fluctuate cyclically with sea level.

  13. Mantle convection and the distribution of geochemical reservoirs in the silicate shell of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walzer, Uwe; Hendel, Roland

    2010-05-01

    We present a dynamic 3-D spherical-shell model of mantle convection and the evolution of the chemical reservoirs of the Earth`s silicate shell. Chemical differentiation, convection, stirring and thermal evolution constitute an inseparable dynamic system. Our model is based on the solution of the balance equations of mass, momentum, energy, angular momentum, and four sums of the number of atoms of the pairs 238U-206Pb, 235U-207Pb, 232Th-208Pb, and 40K-40Ar. Similar to the present model, the continental crust of the real Earth was not produced entirely at the start of the evolution but developed episodically in batches [1-7]. The details of the continental distribution of the model are largely stochastic, but the spectral properties are quite similar to the present real Earth. The calculated Figures reveal that the modeled present-day mantle has no chemical stratification but we find a marble-cake structure. If we compare the observational results of the present-day proportion of depleted MORB mantle with the model then we find a similar order of magnitude. The MORB source dominates under the lithosphere. In our model, there are nowhere pure unblended reservoirs in the mantle. It is, however, remarkable that, in spite of 4500 Ma of solid-state mantle convection, certain strong concentrations of distributed chemical reservoirs continue to persist in certain volumes, although without sharp abundance boundaries. We deal with the question of predictable and stochastic portions of the phenomena. Although the convective flow patterns and the chemical differentiation of oceanic plateaus are coupled, the evolution of time-dependent Rayleigh number, Rat , is relatively well predictable and the stochastic parts of the Rat(t)-curves are small. Regarding the juvenile growth rates of the total mass of the continents, predictions are possible only in the first epoch of the evolution. Later on, the distribution of the continental-growth episodes is increasingly stochastic

  14. Mixing by thermal convection in a spherical shell and the persistence of mantle reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, L. H.; Heien, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of mixing in the mantle is fundamental to understanding the origins of the isotopic heterogeneity observed in oceanic islands and at mid-ocean ridges. The mantle is homogenized by convection, as the stretching and folding common to all kinematic mixing disperses heterogeneity. Mid-ocean ridges exhibit a degree of global homogeneity (while also showing some long-lived heterogeneity on all scales.) Oceanic islands indicate sources that have been distinct from the MORB source for a significant fraction of Earth's history. Thus it has long been a goal of computational geodynamics to understand the factors controlling the rate and efficacy of mantle mixing. The time and spatial scales of mixing are influenced by the kinematics of flow, plate motion, viscosity variations, compositional heterogeneity, and phase transitions. Chaotic mixing is observed in time-varying 2-D flows; by contrast, the factors controlling mixing in 3-D remain somewhat poorly understood. We test the use of a new mantle convection code, ASPECT, to investigate mixing in convection in 2-D annulus and in a 3-D spherical shell. ASPECT is an adaptive mesh finite element code based on the Deal.II library and developed and distributed by the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG). We run a suite of models at various Rayleigh numbers. Each model runs long enough to eliminate any transient behavior associated with our choice of initial conditions; when the model achieves a quasi-steady state, we introduce massless, passive tracer particles to enable visualization of mixing. The particles are tracked over time as they disperse, allowing the use of quantitative measures of mixing such as the Lyapunov exponent and configurational entropy. Stirring may be rapid on a regional scale, while heterogeneities at the global scale are retained because of isolation across long-wavelength cells. Essentially, the regions that exhibit high rates of stretching and thinning have the most

  15. Hydrodynamically induced fluid transfer and non-convective double-diffusion in microgravity sliding solvent diffusion cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollmann, Konrad W.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Luttges, Marvin W.

    1994-01-01

    Microgravity can provide a diffusion-dominated environment for double-diffusion and diffusion-reaction experiments otherwise disrupted by buoyant convection or sedimentation. In sliding solvent diffusion cells, a diffusion interface between two liquid columns is achieved by aligning two offset sliding wells. Fluid in contact with the sliding lid of the cavities is subjected to an applied shear stress. The momentum change by the start/stop action of the well creates an additional hydrodynamical force. In microgravity, these viscous and inertial forces are sufficiently large to deform the diffusion interface and induce hydrodynamic transfer between the wells. A series of KC-135 parabolic flight experiments were conducted to characterize these effects and establish baseline data for microgravity diffusion experiments. Flow visualizations show the diffusion interface to be deformed in a sinusoidal fashion following well alignment. After the wells were separated again in a second sliding movement, the total induced liquid transfer was determined and normalized by the well aspect ratio. The normalized transfer decreased linearly with Reynolds number from 3.3 to 4.0% (w/v) for Re = 0.4 (Stokes flow) to a minimum of 1.0% for Re = 23 to 30. Reynolds numbers that provide minimum induced transfers are characterized by an interface that is highly deformed and unsuitable for diffusion measurements. Flat diffusion interfaces acceptable for diffusion measurements are obtained with Reynolds numbers on the order of 7 to 10. Microgravity experiments aboard a sounding rocket flight verified counterdiffusion of different solutes to be diffusion dominated. Ground control experiments showed enhanced mixing by double-diffusive convection. Careful selection of experimental parameters improves initial conditions and minimizes induced transfer rates.

  16. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Excitation of convective motions and surface hydrodynamic soliton-type waves in liquid crystals by a Gaussian laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopyan, R. S.; Alaverdyan, R. B.; Arakelyan, A. G.; Nersisyan, S. Ts; Chilingaryan, Yu S.

    2004-03-01

    The possibility of exciting convective motions with a toroidal symmetry in a disordered liquid-crystal cell with an open surface, which is locally heated by a Gaussian laser beam, is demonstrated experimentally. A perturbation of the free surface of the liquid crystal and a convective hydrodynamic motion are determined by temperature gradients. It is shown that a radial distribution of the director of a nematic liquid crystal appears in the convection region. Under certain experimental conditions, soliton-type hydrodynamic orientation waves are observed at the free surface of a nematic liquid crystal. It is found experimentally that the velocity of these waves is determined solely by the liquid-crystal parameters and is independent of the incident laser-radiation power.

  17. Equatorial symmetry of Boussinesq convective solutions in a rotating spherical shell allowing rotation of the inner and outer spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Michio

    2014-08-15

    We investigate properties of convective solutions of the Boussinesq thermal convection in a moderately rotating spherical shell allowing the respective rotation of the inner and outer spheres due to the viscous torque of the fluid. The ratio of the inner and outer radii of the spheres, the Prandtl number, and the Taylor number are fixed to 0.4, 1, and 500{sup 2}, respectively. The Rayleigh number is varied from 2.6 × 10{sup 4} to 3.4 × 10{sup 4}. In this parameter range, the behaviours of obtained asymptotic convective solutions are almost similar to those in the system whose inner and outer spheres are restricted to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, although the difference is found in the transition process to chaotic solutions. The convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one to an equatorially symmetric chaotic one, and further to an equatorially asymmetric chaotic one, as the Rayleigh number is increased. This is in contrast to the transition in the system whose inner and outer spheres are assumed to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, where the convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one, to an equatorially asymmetric quasi-periodic one, and to equatorially asymmetric chaotic one. The inner sphere rotates in the retrograde direction on average in the parameter range; however, it sometimes undergoes the prograde rotation when the convective solution becomes chaotic.

  18. The effects of near-core convective shells on the gravity modes of the subdwarf B pulsator KIC 10553698A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, H.; Moravveji, E.; Aerts, C.; Safari, H.; Vučković, M.

    2017-02-01

    KIC 10553698A is a hot pulsating subdwarf B (sdB) star observed by the Kepler satellite. It exhibits dipole (l = 1) and quadrupole (l = 2) gravity modes with a clear period spacing structure. The seismic properties of the KIC 10553698A provide a test of stellar evolution models, and offer a unique opportunity to determine mixing processes. We consider mixing due to convective overshooting beyond the boundary of the helium burning core. Very small overshooting (f = 10-6) results in a progressive increase in the size of convective core. However, moderate (f = 10-2) and small (f = 10-5) overshooting both lead to the occurrence of inert outer convective shells in the near-core region. We illustrate that the chemical stratifications induced by convective shells are able to change the g-mode period spacing pattern of an sdB star appreciably. The mean period spacing and trapping of the gravity modes in the model with moderate and small core overshooting are fully consistent with the period-spacing trends observed in KIC 10553698A. Atomic diffusion driven by gravitational settling as well as thermal and chemical gradients is applied to reach a better match with the observed period spacings. Models that include small or very small overshooting with atomic diffusion have a decreased lifetime of the extreme horizontal branch phase and produce chemical stratification induced by convective shells during helium burning phase. In addition of being consistent with asteroseismology, their calculated values of the R2 parameter are more compatible with the observed R2 values.

  19. Geological evidence for solid-state convection in Europa's ice shell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pappalardo, R.T.; Head, J.W.; Greeley, R.; Sullivan, R.J.; Pilcher, C.; Schubert, G.; Moore, W.B.; Carr, M.H.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Belton, M.J.S.; Goldsby, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The ice-rich surface of the jovian satellite Europa is sparsely cratered, suggesting that this moon might be geologically active today. Moreover, models of the satellite's interior indicate that tidal interactions with Jupiter might produce enough heat to maintain a subsurface liquid water layer. But the mechanisms of interior heat loss and resurfacing are currently unclear, as is the question of whether Europa has (or had at one time) a liquid water ocean. Here we report on the morphology and geological interpretation of distinct surface features-pits, domes and spots-discovered in high-resolution images of Europa obtained by the Galileo spacecraft. The features are interpreted as the surface manifestation of diapirs, relatively warm localized ice masses that have risen buoyantly through the subsurface. We find that the formation of the features can be explained by thermally induced solid-state convection within an ice shell, possibly overlying a liquid water layer. Our results are consistent with the possibility that Europa has a liquid water ocean beneath a surface layer of ice, but further tests and observations are needed to demonstrate this conclusively.

  20. Geological evidence for solid-state convection in Europa's ice shell.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, R T; Head, J W; Greeley, R; Sullivan, R J; Pilcher, C; Schubert, G; Moore, W B; Carr, M H; Moore, J M; Belton, M J; Goldsby, D L

    1998-01-22

    The ice-rich surface of the jovian satellite Europa is sparsely cratered, suggesting that this moon might be geologically active today. Moreover, models of the satellite's interior indicate that tidal interactions with Jupiter might produce enough heat to maintain a subsurface liquid water layer. But the mechanisms of interior heat loss and resurfacing are currently unclear, as is the question of whether Europa has (or had at one time) a liquid water ocean. Here we report on the morphology and geological interpretation of distinct surface features-pits, domes and spots-discovered in high-resolution images of Europa obtained by the Galileo spacecraft. The features are interpreted as the surface manifestation of diapirs, relatively warm localized ice masses that have risen buoyantly through the subsurface. We find that the formation of the features can be explained by thermally induced solid-state convection within an ice shell, possibly overlying a liquid water layer. Our results are consistent with the possibility that Europa has a liquid water ocean beneath a surface layer of ice, but further tests and observations are needed to demonstrate this conclusively.

  1. Finite element modeling of shell shape in the freshwater turtle Pseudemys concinna reveals a trade-off between mechanical strength and hydrodynamic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel; Stayton, C Tristan

    2011-10-01

    Aquatic species can experience different selective pressures on morphology in different flow regimes. Species inhabiting lotic regimes often adapt to these conditions by evolving low-drag (i.e., streamlined) morphologies that reduce the likelihood of dislodgment or displacement. However, hydrodynamic factors are not the only selective pressures influencing organismal morphology and shapes well suited to flow conditions may compromise performance in other roles. We investigated the possibility of morphological trade-offs in the turtle Pseudemys concinna. Individuals living in lotic environments have flatter, more streamlined shells than those living in lentic environments; however, this flatter shape may also make the shells less capable of resisting predator-induced loads. We tested the idea that "lotic" shell shapes are weaker than "lentic" shell shapes, concomitantly examining effects of sex. Geometric morphometric data were used to transform an existing finite element shell model into a series of models corresponding to the shapes of individual turtles. Models were assigned identical material properties and loaded under identical conditions, and the stresses produced by a series of eight loads were extracted to describe the strength of the shells. "Lotic" shell shapes produced significantly higher stresses than "lentic" shell shapes, indicating that the former is weaker than the latter. Females had significantly stronger shell shapes than males, although these differences were less consistent than differences between flow regimes. We conclude that, despite the potential for many-to-one mapping of shell shape onto strength, P. concinna experiences a trade-off in shell shape between hydrodynamic and mechanical performance. This trade-off may be evident in many other turtle species or any other aquatic species that also depend on a shell for defense. However, evolution of body size may provide an avenue of escape from this trade-off in some cases, as changes in

  2. Characterizing the convective velocity fields in massive stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M.

    2014-11-01

    We apply the mathematical formalism of vector spherical harmonics decomposition to convective stellar velocity fields from multidimensional hydrodynamics simulations and show that the resulting power spectra furnish a robust and stable statistical description of stellar convective turbulence. Analysis of the power spectra helps identify key physical parameters of the convective process such as the dominant scale of the turbulent motions that influence the structure of massive evolved pre-supernova stars. We introduce the numerical method that can be used to calculate vector spherical harmonics power spectra from two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) convective shell simulation data. Using this method we study the properties of oxygen shell burning and convection for a 15 M {sub ☉} star simulated by the hydrodynamics code FLASH in 2D and 3D. We discuss the importance of realistic initial conditions to achieving successful core-collapse supernova explosions in multidimensional simulations. We show that the calculated power spectra can be used to generate realizations of the velocity fields of presupernova convective shells. We find that the slope of the solenoidal mode power spectrum remains mostly constant throughout the evolution of convection in the oxygen shell in both 2D and 3D simulations. We also find that the characteristic radial scales of the convective elements are smaller in 3D than in 2D, while the angular scales are larger in 3D.

  3. Hydrodynamic and Thermal Slip Effect on Double-Diffusive Free Convective Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid Past a Flat Vertical Plate in the Moving Free Stream

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Waqar A.; Uddin, Md Jashim; Ismail, A. I. Md.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip boundary conditions on the double-diffusive free convective flow of a nanofluid along a semi-infinite flat solid vertical plate are investigated numerically. It is assumed that free stream is moving. The governing boundary layer equations are non-dimensionalized and transformed into a system of nonlinear, coupled similarity equations. The effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, solute and nanofluid concentration as well as on the reduced Nusselt number, reduced Sherwood number and the reduced nanoparticle Sherwood number are investigated and presented graphically. To the best of our knowledge, the effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip boundary conditions have not been investigated yet. It is found that the reduced local Nusselt, local solute and the local nanofluid Sherwood numbers increase with hydrodynamic slip and decrease with thermal slip parameters. PMID:23533566

  4. Hydrodynamic and thermal slip effect on double-diffusive free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate in the moving free stream.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waqar A; Uddin, Md Jashim; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    The effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip boundary conditions on the double-diffusive free convective flow of a nanofluid along a semi-infinite flat solid vertical plate are investigated numerically. It is assumed that free stream is moving. The governing boundary layer equations are non-dimensionalized and transformed into a system of nonlinear, coupled similarity equations. The effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, solute and nanofluid concentration as well as on the reduced Nusselt number, reduced Sherwood number and the reduced nanoparticle Sherwood number are investigated and presented graphically. To the best of our knowledge, the effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip boundary conditions have not been investigated yet. It is found that the reduced local Nusselt, local solute and the local nanofluid Sherwood numbers increase with hydrodynamic slip and decrease with thermal slip parameters.

  5. Hydrodynamic performance of an annular liquid jet: Production of spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    An annular jet flow of liquid surrounding a flow of gas at its core is extremely unstable. Axisymmetric oscillations arise spontaneously, and grow with such rapidity along the axial dimension that a pinch-off of the liquid and an encapsulation of the core gas occurs within as few as four jet diameters. The shells which result thereby may be described as thick-wall bubbles, for which van der Waals forces are unimportant. A description is given of the fluid dynamic processes by which the shells are formed, and of means for preserving and promoting the geometrical of the product. The forming of metallic shells is mentioned.

  6. Characterizing Kinematics of Passive Tracer Paths in Simulations of Mantle Convection in a 3D Spherical Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. A.; Schröder, S.; Heien, E. M.; Turcotte, D. L.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical evidence from mantle-derived basalt at mid-ocean ridges and oceanic islands reveal a spectrum of heterogeneity in the mantle, with much of the MORB source largely homogeneous, while other regions may remain isolated for billions of years. Heterogeneity appears in MORB at all scales, as would be expected from sampling a marble-cake structure in the upper mantle. The origin of these diverse mantle reservoirs is poorly understood. In particular, although stirring has been studied extensively in 2D models of mantle convection and in 3D flows in a Cartesian box, the kinematics of mixing due to thermal convection in a 3D spherical shell is not well-characterized. To quantitatively investigate the mechanisms of stirring, we use the finite element model CitComS to carry out a series of models of convection in a spherical shell at low to moderate Rayleigh number. We use passive tracers as proxies for geochemical heterogeneity. We investigate both low-Rayleigh number isoviscous flows for which the pattern of convection reaches steady state, as well as the influence on stirring of the transition to time-varying flows. For each model, after the initial transient has passed, a field of particles is added and advected forward in time. We modified the passive tracer advection in CitcomS to enable precise long-term tracking of individual tracers. The particle paths are then visualized and quantitative measures of mixing are applied, such as the divergence of initial neighbors. Regions where particles do not intermix are located and residence times are calculated to determine the stability of the isolated regions.

  7. Convection, nucleosynthesis, and core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazan, Grant; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We use a piecewise parabolic method hydrodynamics code (PROMETHEUS) to study convective burning in two dimensions in an oxygen shell prior to core collapse. Significant mixing beyond convective boundaries determined by mixing-length theory brings fuel (C-12) into the convective regon, causing hot spots of nuclear burning. Plumes dominate the velocity structure. Finite perturbations arise in a region in which O-16 will be explosively burned to Ni-56 when the star explodes; the resulting instabilities and mixing are likely to distribute Ni-56 throughout the supernova envelope. Inhomogeneities in Y(sub e) may be large enough to affect core collapse and will affect explosive nucleosynthesis. The nature of convective burning is dramatically different from that assumed in one-dimensional simulations; quantitative estimates of nucleosynthetic yields, core masses, and the approach to core collapse will be affected.

  8. Turbulent convection in rapidly rotating spherical shells: A model for equatorial and high latitude jets on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2007-04-01

    The origin of zonal jets on the jovian planets has long been a topic of scientific debate. In this paper we show that deep convection in a spherical shell can generate zonal flow comparable to that observed on Jupiter and Saturn, including a broad prograde equatorial jet and multiple alternating jets at higher latitudes. We present fully turbulent, 3D spherical numerical simulations of rapidly rotating convection with different spherical shell geometries. The resulting global flow fields tend to be segregated into three regions (north, equatorial, and south), bounded by the tangent cylinder that circumscribes the inner boundary equator. In all of our simulations a strong prograde equatorial jet forms outside the tangent cylinder, whereas multiple jets form in the northern and southern hemispheres, inside the tangent cylinder. The jet scaling of our numerical models and of Jupiter and Saturn is consistent with the theory of geostrophic turbulence, which we extend to include the effect of spherical shell geometry. Zonal flow in a spherical shell is distinguished from that in a full sphere or a shallow layer by the effect of the tangent cylinder, which marks a reversal in the sign of the planetary β-parameter and a jump in the Rhines length. This jump is manifest in the numerical simulations as a sharp equatorward increase in jet widths—a transition that is also observed on Jupiter and Saturn. The location of this transition gives an estimate of the depth of zonal flow, which seems to be consistent with current models of the jovian and saturnian interiors.

  9. Observation of early shell-dopant mix in OMEGA direct-drive implosions and comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Tregillis, I. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Obrey, K. D.; Batha, S.; Johns, H.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.

    2014-05-15

    Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved x-ray image data from direct-drive implosions on OMEGA were interpreted with the aid of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Neither clean calculations nor those using a turbulent mix model can explain fully the observed migration of shell-dopant material (titanium) into the core. Shell-dopant migration was observed via time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, and spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray images of capsule implosions and resultant dopant emissions. The titanium emission was centrally peaked in narrowband x-ray images. In post-processed clean simulations, the peak titanium emission forms in a ring in self-emission images as the capsule implodes. Post-processed simulations with mix reproduce trends in time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, as well having centrally peaked Ti emission in synthetic multiple monochromatic imager. However, mix simulations still do not transport Ti to the core as is observed in the experiment. This suggests that phenomena in addition to the turbulent mix must be responsible for the transport of Ti. Simple diffusion estimates are unable to explain the early Ti mix into the core. Mechanisms suggested for further study are capsule surface roughness, illumination non-uniformity, and shock entrainment.

  10. The effects of convection and oxygen presence on thermal testing of thin-shelled Celotex{trademark}-based packages

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.R.

    1994-06-01

    Several experiments were performed in an attempt to determine the effects of both convection and oxygen levels during hypothetical thermal accident testing of thin-shelled Celotex{trademark}-based packages in furnaces. Obsolete DT-22 packages were used and experiments were performed in two separate fumaces, one gas-fired and one electric, each of which has previously been used for this type of testing. Oxygen levels were varied and measured in the gas-fired furnace while the electric fumace was operated in a standard manner. The gas-fired fumace is constructed so as to induce a very strong convective field within. After testing, the packages were evaluated by several methods to determine the effects of the thermal testing on the package. In general, there were no differences found for the packages tested in the two different furnaces or for packages tested in the same furnace under different conditions. Therefore, after careful consideration, it is concluded that thermal testing can still be performed in electric furnaces in which the oxygen supply is not refurbished and there is no forced convection heat transfer.

  11. Spacelab experiments on convection in a rotating spherical shell with radial gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, Juri; Hart, John E.; Glatzmaier, Gary A.

    1987-01-01

    Data from the geophysical fluid flow cell experiment on Spacelab 3 revealed the diverse forms of fluid motion that can occur in geometrically simple models of global convection with rotation and radial gravity. The following types of convection were observed: midlatitude waves interacting with the low-latitude columnar convection rolls or 'banana cells', spiral waves' near the poles when latitudinal heating gradients are present on the bounding surfaces, and 'triangular waves' coupling midlatitude and equatorial disturbances under similar differential heating. It is believed that concepts based on the Taylor-Proudman theorem have a central role in many flows realized in the rapidly rotating experiments when H is approximately 0; however, the resulting banana cells are subject to secondary instabilities that produce intricate time dependence and eventually turbulent flows in which only hints of the simpler patterns are recognizable.

  12. Scaling of hydrodynamics and swimming kinematics of shelled Antarctic sea butterfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Webster, Donald; Yen, Jeannette

    2016-11-01

    A portable tomographic PIV system was used to study fluid dynamics and kinematics of pteropods (aquatic snails nicknamed 'sea butterflies') in Antarctica. These pteropods (Limacina helicina antarctica) swim with a pair of parapodia (or "wings") via a unique flapping propulsion mechanism that incorporates similar techniques as observed in small flying insects. The swimming velocity is typically 14 - 30 mm/s for pteropod size ranging 1.5 - 5 mm, and the pteropod shell pitches forward-and-backward at 1.9 - 3 Hz. It has been shown that pitching motion of the shell effectively positions the parapodia such that they flap downwards during both power and recovery strokes. The non-dimensional variables characterizing the motion of swimming pteropods are flapping, translating, and pitching Reynolds numbers (i.e. Ref, ReU, and ReΩ) . We found that the relationship between these Reynolds numbers show an existence of a critical ReΩ, below which pteropods fail to swim successfully. We explore the importance of this critical ReΩ by changing the viscosity of the seawater using methylcellulose. At higher viscosity, our results indicate that pteropods do not swim with optimal propulsion efficiency. Finally, we examine the wake signature of swimming pteropod, consisting of a pair of vortex rings, in the modified viscosity environment.

  13. The Role of Convective Shell Thickness on Dynamo Scaling Laws for Magnetic Field Morphology: Implications for the Ice Giants and Future Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, S.; Tian, B. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Previous dynamo scaling law studies (Christensen and Aubert, 2006) have demonstrated that the morphology of a planet's magnetic field is determined by the local Rossby number (Rol): a non-dimensional diagnostic variable that quantifies the ratio of inertial forces to Coriolis forces on the average length scale of the flow. Dynamos with Rol < 0.1 produce dipolar dominated magnetic fields whereas dynamos with Rol > 0.1 produce multipolar magnetic fields. Scaling studies have also determined the dependence of the local Rossby number on non-dimensional parameters governing the system - specifically the Ekman, Prandtl, magnetic Prandtl and flux-based Rayleigh numbers (Olson and Christensen, 2006). However, those studies focused on the specific convective shell thickness of the Earth's core and hence could not determine the influence of convective shell thickness on the local Rossby number. Aubert et al. (2009) investigated the role of convective shell thickness on dynamo scaling laws in order to investigate the palaeo-evolution of the geodynamo. Due to the focus of that study, they varied the ratio of the inner to outer core radii (rio) from 0 to 0.35 and found Rol scales with (1+rio). Here we consider a larger range of convective shell thicknesses and find an exponential dependence of rio on the local Rossby number. Our results are consistent with Aubert et al. (2009) for their small rio values. With this new scaling dependence on convective shell thickness, we find that Uranus and Neptune reside deeply in the multipolar regime, whereas without the dependence on rio, they resided near Rol =0.1; i.e. on the boundary between dipolar and multipolar fields and close to where Earth resides in the parameter space. We also find that Earth will reside more deeply in the multipolar regime, and hence not produce a stable dipolar field once the inner core has grown such that rio = 0.4.

  14. Container-scale hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic modes in liquid metal rotating convection experiments with and without an imposed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal convection, constrained by rapid rotation and/or large-scale magnetic fields, is observed almost everywhere in the universe: stars, galaxies, and planetary interiors. However, little is known about the essential behaviors of turbulent convection in liquid metals and even less is known about the essential dynamics of planetary cores and stellar convection zones inuenced by background rotation and imposed magnetic fields. To address this decit, we present novel results of a mixed laboratory-numerical investigation of Rayleigh-Benard convection in a cylindrical cavity subject to rotation and/or an imposed magnetic field, using the liquid metal gallium as the working fluid. A broad variety of cell-sized modes are observed experimentally and captured numerically and these modes can be either? steady, oscillatory, or precessing. This work shows that the convection-driven cell-sized modes that can develop in liquid metals are remarkably different from the canonical flows that develop in the fluids used in present day dynamo models.

  15. Scaling relationships and physics for mixed heating convection in planetary interiors: Isoviscous spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Matthew B.; Lenardic, Adrian; Moore, William B.

    2016-10-01

    We use a suite of 3-D numerical experiments to test and expand 2-D planar isoviscous scaling relationships of Moore (2008) for mixed heating convection in spherical geometry mantles over a range of Rayleigh numbers (Ra). The internal temperature scaling of Moore (2008), when modified to account for spherical geometry, matches our experimental results to a high degree of fit. The heat flux through the boundary layers scale as a linear combination of internal (Q) and basal heating, and the modified theory predictions match our experimental results. Our results indicate that boundary layer thickness and surface heat flux are not controlled by a local boundary layer stability condition (in agreement with the results of Moore (2008)) and are instead strongly influenced by boundary layer interactions. Subadiabatic mantle temperature gradients, in spherical 3-D, are well described by a vertical velocity scaling based on discrete drips as opposed to a scaling based on coherent sinking sheets, which was found to describe 2-D planar results. Root-mean-square (RMS) velocities are asymptotic for both low Q and high Q, with a region of rapid adjustment between asymptotes for moderate Q. RMS velocities are highest in the low Q asymptote and decrease as internal heating is applied. The scaling laws derived by Moore (2008), and extended here, are robust and highlight the importance of differing boundary layer processes acting over variable Q and moderate Ra.

  16. Stagnant lid convection in bottom-heated thin 3-D spherical shells: Influence of curvature and implications for dwarf planets and icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, C.; Deschamps, F.; Lowman, J. P.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Tackley, P. J.

    2014-08-01

    Because the viscosity of ice is strongly temperature dependent, convection in the ice layers of icy moons and dwarf planets likely operates in the stagnant lid regime, in which a rigid lid forms at the top of the fluid and reduces the heat transfer. A detailed modeling of the thermal history and radial structure of icy moons and dwarf planets thus requires an accurate description of stagnant lid convection. We performed numerical experiments of stagnant lid convection in 3-D spherical geometries for various ice shell curvatures f (measured as the ratio between the inner and outer radii), effective Rayleigh number Ram, and viscosity contrast Δη. From our results, we derived scaling laws for the average temperature of the well-mixed interior, θm, and the heat flux transported through the shell. The nondimensional temperature difference across the bottom thermal boundary layer is well described by (1-θm)=1.23γ/f1.5, where γ is a parameter that controls the magnitude of the viscosity contrast. The nondimensional heat flux at the bottom of the shell, Fbot, scales as Fbot=1.46Ram0.27γ1.21/f1.78. Our models also show that the development of the stagnant lid regime depends on f. For given values of Ram and Δη, the stagnant lid is less developed as the shell's curvature increases (i.e., as f decreases), leading to improved heat transfer. Therefore, as the outer ice shells of icy moons and dwarf planets grow, the effects of a stagnant lid are less pronounced.

  17. Near isotropic behavior of turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Dinesh; Pandey, Ambrish; Kumar, Abhishek; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the anisotropy in turbulent convection in a three-dimensional (3D) box using direct numerical simulation. We compute the anisotropic parameter A =u⊥2/(2 u∥2) , where u⊥ and u∥ are the components of velocity perpendicular and parallel to the buoyancy direction, the shell and ring spectra, and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We observe that the flow is nearly isotropic for the Prandtl number Pr ≈1 , but the anisotropy increases with the Prandtl number. For Pr =∞ ,A ≈0.3 , anisotropy is not very significant even in extreme cases. We also observe that u∥ feeds energy to u⊥ via pressure. The computation of shell-to-shell energy transfers reveals that the energy transfer in turbulent convection is local and forward, similar to hydrodynamic turbulence. These results are consistent with the Kolmogorov's spectrum observed by Kumar et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 023016 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.023016] for turbulent convection.

  18. Necessary conditions to neglect the hydrodynamics of an upper gas phase in a two-fluid system Marangoni convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Leonardo; Kelly, Robert

    2001-11-01

    A two-fluid layer model is used to verify the validity of one-fluid models, usually used when the layers involve gas over liquid and motion in the gas layer is neglected, in studying the stationary and oscillatory thermocapillary instabilities subject to either prescribed temperature or heat flux boundary conditions. The interface is allowed to deform and, though buoyancy forces are neglected, gravitational acceleration is included in the balance of normal stresses. This work is an extension of Golovin et al's (1) results including different boundary conditions and depth ratios and allowing oscillatory instabilities to occur. (1) A.A. Golovin, A.A. Nepomnyashchy and L.M. Pismen, Pattern formation in large-scale Marangoni convection with deformable interface, Physica D 81 (1995), 117-147.

  19. Complex spatiotemporal convection patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, W.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reviews recent efforts to describe complex patterns in isotropic fluids (Rayleigh-Bénard convection) as well as in anisotropic liquid crystals (electro-hydrodynamic convection) when driven away from equilibrium. A numerical scheme for solving the full hydrodynamic equations is presented that allows surprisingly well for a detailed comparison with experiments. The approach can also be useful for a systematic construction of models (order parameter equations).

  20. Stability of thermal boundary layers for convection in spherical shell : Application to the dynamics of Earth mantle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchoiselle, L.; Deschamps, F.; Tackley, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Improving the knowledge of convection into mantle of terrestrial planets required a better understanding of its physical and chemical state. Recently, with the help of massive computational resources, significant progresses were achieved in the numerical modeling of planetary mantles convection. Models with a high degree of complexity (including realistic viscosity laws, mixed mode of heating, spherical geometry, thermo-chemical convection, …) are now available. Among the parameters that recently became accessible, spherical geometry is a key ingredient because it affects the relative strength of the top and bottom thermal boundary layers. Despite these progresses, many details of planetary mantles convection remain unclear and so far, no model of Earth's mantle convection fits all available geophysical, geochemical, and geological constraints. Using STAGYY, which solve the usual conservative equations of mass, energy and momentum, we explored the on a yin-yang grid, we explored the influence of various parameters on convection in spherical geometry. First, we have performed several numerical experiments on varying important parameters including the Rayleigh number, the curvature (ratio between radius of the core and the planet one), the mode of heating (only from below or with an internal heating component), rheology (isoviscous or temperature dependence). In particular, we studied the evolution of the style of convection, average temperature, heat flux and critical Rayleigh number depending on these parameters. We have then built scaling laws between the parameters and observables, for instance between the Nusselt and Rayleigh number, and between the temperature and curvature factor. Our results suggest that extrapolations previously made from Cartesian models may not be valid in spherical geometry. In particular, the dependence of temperature on curvature differs significantly from that expected by Cartesian scaling laws. In addition, it also depends on the

  1. Nonlinear hydrodynamics. Lecture 9

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1983-03-14

    A very sophisticated method for calculating the stability and pulsations of stars which make contact with actual observations of the stellar behavior, hydrodynamic calculations are very simple in principle. Conservation of mass can be accounted for by having mass shells that are fixed with their mass for all time. Motions of these shells can be calculated by taking the difference between the external force of gravity and that from the local pressure gradient. The conservation of energy can be coupled to this momentum conservation equation to give the current temperatures, densities, pressures, and opacities at the shell centers, as well as the positions, velocities, and accelerations of the mass shell interfaces. Energy flow across these interfaces can be calculated from the current conditions, and this energy is partitioned between internal energy and the work done on or by the mass shell. We discuss here only the purely radial case for hydrodynamics because it is very useful for stellar pulsation studies.

  2. Space-laboratory and numerical simulations of thermal convection in a rotating hemispherical shell with radial gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, John E.; Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Toomre, Juri

    1986-01-01

    The flight of the Spacelab 3 microgravity laboratory onboard the Space Shuttle Challenger in May 1985 enabled electroconvection experiments to be conducted using the goephysical fluid flow cell instrument. Experimental results are presented which illustrate the variety of convection achieved by varying the imposed radial and latitudinal temperature gradients, rotation rates, and the strength of the electrostatic gravity. These results are compared with those obtained from nonlinear three-dimensional simulations and good agreement is found.

  3. Dual effects of buoyancy and enstrophy transfer on scaling behavior of a shell model proposed for homogeneous turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yu; Liu, Peiqing; Guo, Hao

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we explain why the Bolgiano-Obukhov (BO) scaling behavior is unavailable by the SabraT model proposed for turbulent thermal convection in the range of 1 < δ < 2, which is extended from the Sabra model by coupling temperature with velocity in the equations of motion as an external forcing, i.e., buoyancy. Numerical studies show that SabraT model is mainly governed by the enstrophy budget equation, at which the buoyancy is not always relevant to the statistical properties and the effect of buoyancy is dependent on the parameter γ that measures the ratio of enstrophy to energy. When buoyancy is important, BO scaling is expected using theoretical arguments, such as dimensional analysis. Instead of BO scaling, a new γ-dependent scaling behavior is setup in the buoyancy relevant regime, which is found to equivalently deviate from the enstrophy cascade scaling and BO scaling. This deviation is mainly discussed by two dimensionless parameters, which respectively measure the deviation of the energy/enstrophy transfer flux rate and the injected energy/enstrophy due to buoyancy from dimensional analysis. The introduced buoyancy plays as a relative small perturbed forcing on the Sabra model without changing much its intrinsical statistical properties, i.e., dimensional analysis is not always validated in both Sabra and SabraT models.

  4. Hydrodynamic test problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B

    2005-06-02

    We present test problems that can be used to check the hydrodynamic implementation in computer codes designed to model the implosion of a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule. The problems are simplified, yet one of them is three-dimensional. It consists of a nearly-spherical incompressible imploding shell subjected to an exponentially decaying pressure on its outer surface. We present a semi-analytic solution for the time-evolution of that shell with arbitrary small three-dimensional perturbations on its inner and outer surfaces. The perturbations on the shell surfaces are intended to model the imperfections that are created during capsule manufacturing.

  5. 3D hydrodynamic simulations of carbon burning in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, A.; Meakin, C.; Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Georgy, C.; Viallet, M.; Walkington, I.

    2017-10-01

    We present the first detailed 3D hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of turbulent convection of carbon burning in massive stars. Simulations begin with radial profiles mapped from a carbon-burning shell within a 15 M⊙ 1D stellar evolution model. We consider models with 1283, 2563, 5123, and 10243 zones. The turbulent flow properties of these carbon-burning simulations are very similar to the oxygen-burning case. We performed a mean field analysis of the kinetic energy budgets within the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes framework. For the upper convective boundary region, we find that the numerical dissipation is insensitive to resolution for linear mesh resolutions above 512 grid points. For the stiffer, more stratified lower boundary, our highest resolution model still shows signs of decreasing sub-grid dissipation suggesting it is not yet numerically converged. We find that the widths of the upper and lower boundaries are roughly 30 per cent and 10 per cent of the local pressure scaleheights, respectively. The shape of the boundaries is significantly different from those used in stellar evolution models. As in past oxygen-shell-burning simulations, we observe entrainment at both boundaries in our carbon-shell-burning simulations. In the large Péclet number regime found in the advanced phases, the entrainment rate is roughly inversely proportional to the bulk Richardson number, RiB (∝RiB-α, 0.5 ≲ α ≲ 1.0). We thus suggest the use of RiB as a means to take into account the results of 3D hydrodynamics simulations in new 1D prescriptions of convective boundary mixing.

  6. Modelling compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul J.

    2008-12-01

    Here it is documented how an existing code for modelling mantle convection in a cartesian domain, Stag3D, has been converted to model a 3D spherical shell by using the recently introduced yin-yang grid. StagYY is thus the latest evolution of a code that has been in continuous use and development for about 15 years so incorporates much physics and several features including compressibility, phase transitions, compositional variations, non-linear rheology, parallelisation, tracers to track composition, partial melting and melt migration, and the ability to also model spherical patches, cartesian boxes, and various 2D geometries by changing one input switch. StagYY uses a multigrid solver to obtain a velocity-pressure solution at each timestep on a staggered grid, a finite-volume scheme for advection of temperature and tracers to track composition. Convergence of multigrid solvers in the presence of realistically large viscosity variations has always been a problem; here a new pressure interpolation scheme is presented that can dramatically improve the robustness of the iterations to large viscosity variations, with up to 19 orders of magnitude variation in presented tests. Benchmark tests show that StagYY produces results that are consistent with those produced by other codes. Performance tests show reasonable scaling on a parallel Beowulf cluster up to 64 CPUs, with up to 1.2 billion unknowns solved for in a few minutes. StagYY is designed to be a stand-alone application with no libraries required and if MPI is installed it can be run in parallel. Technical issues and goals for the future are discussed.

  7. Three-Dimensional Simulations of the Convective Urca Process in Pre-Supernova White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willcox, Donald E.; Townsley, Dean; Zingale, Michael; Calder, Alan

    2017-01-01

    A significant source of uncertainty in modeling the progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is the dynamics of the convective Urca process in which beta decay and electron capture reactions remove energy from and decrease the buoyancy of carbon-fueled convection in the progenitor white dwarf. The details of the Urca process during this simmering phase have long remained computationally intractable in three-dimensional simulations because of the very low convective velocities and the associated timestep constraints of compressible hydrodynamics methods. We report on recent work simulating the A=23 (Ne/Na) Urca process in convecting white dwarfs in three dimensions using the low-Mach hydrodynamics code MAESTRO. We simulate white dwarf models inspired by one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations at the stage when the outer edge of the convection zone driven by core carbon burning reaches the A=23 Urca shell. We compare our methods and results to those of previous work in one and two dimensions, discussing the implications of three dimensional turbulence. We also comment on the prospect of our results informing one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations and the Type Ia supernovae progenitor problem.This work was supported in part by the Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-87ER40317.

  8. Phenomenology of turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra; Chatterjee, Anando; Kumar, Abhishek; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    We simulate Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in which a fluid is confined between two thermally conducting plates. We report results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of RBC turbulence on 40963 grid, the highest resolution hitherto reported, on 65536 cores of Cray XC40, Shaheen II, at KAUST. The non-dimensional parameters of our simulation are: the Rayleigh number Ra = 1 . 1 ×1011 (the highest ever for a pseudo-spectral simulation) and Prandtl number of unity. We present energy flux diagnostics of shell-to-shell (in wave number space) transfer. Furthermore, noting that convective flows are anisotropic due to buoyancy, we quantify anisotropy by subdividing each wavenumber shell into rings and quantify ring energy spectrum. An outstanding question in convective turbulence is the wavenumber scaling of the energy spectrum. Our pseudo-spectral simulations of turbulent thermal convection coupled with novel energy transfer diagnostics have provided a definitive answer to this question. We conclude that convective turbulence exhibits behavior similar to fluid turbulence, that is, Kolmogorov's k - 5 / 3 spectrum with forward and local energy transfers, along with a nearly isotropic energy distribution. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  9. Linking 1D evolutionary to 3D hydrodynamical simulations of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, A.; Meakin, C.; Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Georgy, C.; Viallet, M.

    2016-03-01

    Stellar evolution models of massive stars are important for many areas of astrophysics, for example nucleosynthesis yields, supernova progenitor models and understanding physics under extreme conditions. Turbulence occurs in stars primarily due to nuclear burning at different mass coordinates within the star. The understanding and correct treatment of turbulence and turbulent mixing at convective boundaries in stellar models has been studied for decades but still lacks a definitive solution. This paper presents initial results of a study on convective boundary mixing (CBM) in massive stars. The ‘stiffness’ of a convective boundary can be quantified using the bulk Richardson number ({{Ri}}{{B}}), the ratio of the potential energy for restoration of the boundary to the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies. A ‘stiff’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ {10}4) will suppress CBM, whereas in the opposite case a ‘soft’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ 10) will be more susceptible to CBM. One of the key results obtained so far is that lower convective boundaries (closer to the centre) of nuclear burning shells are ‘stiffer’ than the corresponding upper boundaries, implying limited CBM at lower shell boundaries. This is in agreement with 3D hydrodynamic simulations carried out by Meakin and Arnett (2007 Astrophys. J. 667 448-75). This result also has implications for new CBM prescriptions in massive stars as well as for nuclear burning flame front propagation in super-asymptotic giant branch stars and also the onset of novae.

  10. Constraining the Rocket Efficiency in Hydrodynamic Simulations of Direct-Drive Cryogenic Implosions by Simultaneous Measurements of the CD Burnthrough and the Shell Trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved imaging of the soft x rays emitted by the coronal plasma of a directly driven imploding cryogenic target on the OMEGA Laser System is used to measure the shell trajectory and the time to ablate the outer CD layer. These simultaneous measurements constrain both the shell velocity and the mass ablation rate. Two simulations have been performed and compared to the measurements: (1) including cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and nonlocal thermal transport models and (2) using a flux limiter adapted to match the measured shell trajectory. Good agreement with both the trajectory and mass ablation rate is found with CBET and nonlocal models. While the modified flux limiter matches the trajectory (by construction), the CD burnthrough occurs ~ 200 ps later than in experiments. This demonstrates that by adapting a flux limiter, both the shell velocity and the mass ablation rate cannot be reproduced simultaneously. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. II. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION IN FULL AMPLITUDE RADIAL PULSATION

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2013-07-10

    We have developed a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and radial pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light curves. Previous multi-dimensional calculations were prevented from reaching full amplitude because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We have removed this difficulty by defining our radial coordinate flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remain constant for every time step throughout the pulsation cycle. We have used our new code to perform two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the interaction of radial pulsation and convection. We have made comparisons between light curves from our 2D convective simulations with observed light curves and find that our 2D simulated light curves are better able to match the observed light curve shape near the red edge of the RR Lyrae instability strip than light curves from previous one-dimensional time-dependent convective models.

  12. Hydrodynamical comparison test of solar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, K.; Kim, Y.-C.

    2012-12-01

    We present three dimensional radiation-hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations for solar surface convection based on three most recent solar mixtures: Grevesse & Sauval (1998), Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval (2005), and Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval & Scott (2009). The outer convection zone of the Sun is an extremely turbulent region composed of partly ionized compressible gases at high temperature. The super-adiabatic layer (SAL) is the transition region where the transport of energy changes drastically from convection to radiation. In order to describe physical processes accurately, a realistic treatment of radiation should be considered as well as convection. However, newly updated solar mixtures that are established from radiation-hydrodynamics do not generate properly internal structures estimated by helioseismology. In order to address this fundamental problem, solar models are constructed consistently based on each mixture and used as initial configurations for radiation-hydrodynamical simulations. From our simulations, we find that the turbulent flows in each model are statistically similar in the SAL.

  13. Convection and chaos in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes some of the progress made in understanding the phenomena of various hydrodynamic instabilities for the past 30 years. Among them the exact results for the onset of Rayleigh-Benard convection are discussed. Approximate techniques like the amplitude equations and few-mode truncations are treated at length. The reviews of the routes to chaos in dynamical systems and the characteristics of the chaotic state are also discussed here. Finally, certain features of the Taylor Couette instability and the effect of parametric modulation on hydrodynamic instabilities are also included. This book also discusses the results at all stages of experiments. Contents: Onset of Convection: Rayleigh-Benard Geometry for Simple Fluids; Amplitude Equations; Few-Mode Truncation: Lorentz Model; Characteristics of Chaotic Behavior, Routes to Chaos; On Experiments; Thermohaline Systems; Onset of Convection; Binary Liquids; Nonlinear Effects; Taylor-Couette flow; Magnetohydrodynamic Convection; Modulated Systems.

  14. Stationary convection in a cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberoff, L.; Hernandez, M.

    1983-02-01

    It is shown that viscosity and thermal conductivity leads to large-scale steady convection in a cylindrical current-carrying plasma, under the influence of a magnetic field satisfying (B/sub theta//B/sub z/)>>1. This state is the analog in a plasma of stationary convection in ordinary hydrodynamics.

  15. Modeling W44 as a Supernova Remnant in a Density Gradient with a Partially Formed Dense Shell and Thermal Conduction in the Hot Interior. II. The Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Cox, Donald P.; Maciejewski, Witold; Smith, Randall K.; Plewa, Tomasz; Pawl, Andrew; Różyczka, MichaŁ

    1999-10-01

    In a previous paper, we presented the analytical background for a new model for W44; in this paper, we report hydrocode experiments verifying many of the details. Our model remnant is evolving in a moderately dense (~6 cm-3), ambient medium having a substantial density gradient. At the observed age (~20,000 yr), the shock is radiative over much of the surface, with expansion speeds of only ~130-200 km s-1 for the dense and rare ends, respectively. With these speeds, the remnant has a cool periphery and does not produce a limb-brightened X-ray image. It has thermal conduction within its hot interior, resulting in a nonnegligible density there, and its center is X-ray luminous. The combined effect creates a ``center-filled'' X-ray image. A thin, very dense cool shell has formed over the denser half of the remnant's surface, and its radio synchrotron emission derives from the highly compressed cosmic rays and swept up magnetic field, producing the usual ``shell-type'' image associated with radiative remnants. This combination of emission patterns results in the remnant being characterized as having a ``thermal composite morphology.'' Our previous paper demonstrated that the intensities and qualitative distributions of the anticipated optical, IR line, X-ray, radio synchrotron, and gamma-ray emissions from the model are comparable to those actually observed in W44. In this paper we first use a two-dimensional hydrocode to follow the remnant evolution in a density gradient, verifying that the spatial and velocity structure of the H I shell are a good match to the observations, without the complications suggested by Koo & Heiles, and demonstrating that the remnant's asymmetry does not substantially affect the distribution of X-ray emitting material. We also calculate the distribution of radio-continuum emission expected from the compression of the ambient magnetic field and cosmic rays into the dense shell (the van der Laan mechanism) and examine the role of surface

  16. Hydrodynamic Hunters.

    PubMed

    Jashnsaz, Hossein; Al Juboori, Mohammed; Weistuch, Corey; Miller, Nicholas; Nguyen, Tyler; Meyerhoff, Viktoria; McCoy, Bryan; Perkins, Stephanie; Wallgren, Ross; Ray, Bruce D; Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Anderson, Gregory G; Pressé, Steve

    2017-03-28

    The Gram-negative Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (BV) is a model bacterial predator that hunts other bacteria and may serve as a living antibiotic. Despite over 50 years since its discovery, it is suggested that BV probably collides into its prey at random. It remains unclear to what degree, if any, BV uses chemical cues to target its prey. The targeted search problem by the predator for its prey in three dimensions is a difficult problem: it requires the predator to sensitively detect prey and forecast its mobile prey's future position on the basis of previously detected signal. Here instead we find that rather than chemically detecting prey, hydrodynamics forces BV into regions high in prey density, thereby improving its odds of a chance collision with prey and ultimately reducing BV's search space for prey. We do so by showing that BV's dynamics are strongly influenced by self-generated hydrodynamic flow fields forcing BV onto surfaces and, for large enough defects on surfaces, forcing BV in orbital motion around these defects. Key experimental controls and calculations recapitulate the hydrodynamic origin of these behaviors. While BV's prey (Escherichia coli) are too small to trap BV in hydrodynamic orbit, the prey are also susceptible to their own hydrodynamic fields, substantially confining them to surfaces and defects where mobile predator and prey density is now dramatically enhanced. Colocalization, driven by hydrodynamics, ultimately reduces BV's search space for prey from three to two dimensions (on surfaces) even down to a single dimension (around defects). We conclude that BV's search for individual prey remains random, as suggested in the literature, but confined, however-by generic hydrodynamic forces-to reduced dimensionality.

  17. Ship Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  18. Ship Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  19. A Study of Detrainment from Deep Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, I. B.; Krueger, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in the results of Global Climate Model simulations has been attributed to errors and simplifications in how parameterizations of convection coarsely represent the processes of entrainment, detrainment, and mixing between convective clouds and their environment. Using simulations of convection we studied these processes at a resolution high enough to explicitly resolve them. Two of several recently developed analysis techniques that allow insight into these processes at their appropriate scale are an Eulerian method of directly measuring entrainment and detrainment, and a Lagrangian method that uses particle trajectories to map convective mass flux over height and a cloud variable of interest. The authors of the Eulerian technique used it to show that the dynamics of shells of cold, humid air that surround shallow convective updrafts have important effects on the properties of air entrained and detrained from the updrafts. There is some evidence for the existence of such shells around deep convective updrafts as well, and that detrainment is more important than entrainment in determining the ultimate effect of the deep convection on the large scale environment. We present results from analyzing a simulation of deep convection through the Eulerian method as well as using Lagrangian particle trajectories to illustrate the role of the shell in the process of detrainment and mixing between deep convection and its environment.

  20. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish

  1. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  2. Quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto; Kobayashi, Michikazu; Takeuchi, Hiromitsu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum hydrodynamics in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) has been recently one of the most important topics in low temperature physics. In these systems, a macroscopic wave function (order parameter) appears because of Bose-Einstein condensation, which creates quantized vortices. Turbulence consisting of quantized vortices is called quantum turbulence (QT). The study of quantized vortices and QT has increased in intensity for two reasons. The first is that recent studies of QT are considerably advanced over older studies, which were chiefly limited to thermal counterflow in 4He, which has no analog with classical traditional turbulence, whereas new studies on QT are focused on a comparison between QT and classical turbulence. The second reason is the realization of atomic BECs in 1995, for which modern optical techniques enable the direct control and visualization of the condensate and can even change the interaction; such direct control is impossible in other quantum condensates like superfluid helium and superconductors. Our group has made many important theoretical and numerical contributions to the field of quantum hydrodynamics of both superfluid helium and atomic BECs. In this article, we review some of the important topics in detail. The topics of quantum hydrodynamics are diverse, so we have not attempted to cover all these topics in this article. We also ensure that the scope of this article does not overlap with our recent review article (arXiv:1004.5458), “Quantized vortices in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates”, and other review articles.

  3. Large Scale Supernova Structure from Pre- and Post-Explosion Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Patrick A.; Vance, Gregory; Ellinger, Carola; Fryer, Chris

    2017-06-01

    We present results of 3D supernova simulations with initial conditions drawn from 3D models of late stage stellar convection. Simulations are performed with the supernova-optimized smooth particle hydrodynamics code SNSPH and postprocessed using a 522 isotope nuclear reaction network. The simulations also have a non-fixed central compact object that is free to accrete momentum from fall back material. It has been established that neutrino-driven convection can produce large asymmetries in the explosion, but the effects caused by convective anisotropies in late burning shells in the progenitor star and time-varying gravitational potential after the explosion are less well explored. We find that convective motions can result in highly asymmetric overturn of deep layers that are not susceptible to large effects from explosion generated Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmeyer-Meshkov instabilities. Such overturn can produce regions with a strong alpha-rich freezeout and high iron abundances morphologically similar to the iron-rich structure in the southeast quadrant of Cassiopeia A.

  4. Hydrodynamic simulations of clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, Achim; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Rätzel, D.; Oskinova, Lidia M.

    2008-04-01

    Clumps in hot star winds can originate from shock compression due to the line driven instability. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations reveal a radial wind structure consisting of highly compressed shells separated by voids, and colliding with fast clouds. Two-dimensional simulations are still largely missing, despite first attempts. Clumpiness dramatically affects the radiative transfer and thus all wind diagnostics in the UV, optical, and in X-rays. The microturbulence approximation applied hitherto is currently superseded by a more sophisticated radiative transfer in stochastic media. Besides clumps, i.e. jumps in the density stratification, so-called kinks in the velocity law, i.e. jumps in dv/dr, play an eminent role in hot star winds. Kinks are a new type of radiative-acoustic shock, and propagate at super-Abbottic speed.

  5. Does Grain Growth Stop Convection in the Icy Galilean Satellites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, A. C.; McKinnon, W. B.

    2005-08-01

    The composite Newtonian/non-Newtonian rheology of ice I implies that the conditions required to trigger convection in an initially conductive ice I shell depend on the ice grain size (d) [Barr and Pappalardo, JGR in press, 2005]. For the icy Galilean satellites, volume diffusion accommodates initial plume growth if d<0.5 mm. Non-Newtonian GBS dominates for d>0.5 mm for sufficient thermal perturbations. The critical ice shell thickness for convection exceeds the depth to the ice I - III phase transition if d>2 cm. Vigorous convection can only occur if the grain size is small and deformation is accommodated by volume diffusion [McKinnon, Icarus in press, 2005]. If the ice grain size is sufficient for convection by GBS, convection is sluggish at best. If the grains in the shells grow to values greater than 2 cm, convection will cease. What is the likelihood that the grain size in the ice shells remains small enough to permit convection over geological time scales? We estimate ice grain sizes in a convecting shell using the empirical observation from polar ice sheets that d ˜ A σ -1, where A is a thermal activation term, and σ is shear stress [De La Chappelle et al., JGR 103, 1998], due to a balance between dynamic recrystallization and dislocation generation during flow by GBS. We use a composite volume diffusion/GBS rheology for ice I in the convection model Citcom [Barr et al., JGR, 109, 2004] to determine convective strain rates and grain sizes expected in the shells. When GBS accommodates convective strain, we find good agreement between input and predicted steady state grain sizes. Therefore, a balance between grain growth and recrystallization during flow by GBS may allow sluggish convection to persist in ice I shells with a relatively large grain size.

  6. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Douglas Scott

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of ~ 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for γ-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of ~ 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches ~60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  7. Hydrodynamic supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Genty, G; Dudley, J M; Akhmediev, N

    2013-08-02

    We report the experimental observation of multi-bound-soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) in the context of hydrodynamic surface gravity waves. Higher-order N-soliton solutions with N=2, 3 are studied in detail and shown to be associated with self-focusing in the wave group dynamics and the generation of a steep localized carrier wave underneath the group envelope. We also show that for larger input soliton numbers, the wave group experiences irreversible spectral broadening, which we refer to as a hydrodynamic supercontinuum by analogy with optics. This process is shown to be associated with the fission of the initial multisoliton into individual fundamental solitons due to higher-order nonlinear perturbations to the NLS. Numerical simulations using an extended NLS model described by the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation, show excellent agreement with experiment and highlight the universal role that higher-order nonlinear perturbations to the NLS play in supercontinuum generation.

  8. Thermal Vibrational Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershuni, G. Z.; Lyubimov, D. V.

    1998-08-01

    Recent increasing awareness of the ways in which vibrational effects can affect low-gravity experiments have renewed interest in the study of thermal vibrational convection across a wide range of fields. For example, in applications where vibrational effects are used to provide active control of heat and mass transfer, such as in heat exchangers, stirrers, mineral separators and crystal growth, a sound understanding of the fundamental theory is required. In Thermal Vibrational Convection, the authors present the theory of vibrational effects caused by a static gravity field, and of fluid flows which appear under vibration in fluid-filled cavities. The first part of the book discusses fluid-filled cavities where the fluid motion only appears in the presence of temperature non-uniformities, while the second considers those situations where the vibrational effects are caused by a non-uniform field. Throughout, the authors concentrate on consideration of high frequency vibrations, where averaging methods can be successfully applied in the study of the phenomena. Written by two of the pioneers in this field, Thermal Vibrational Convection will be of great interest to scientists and engineers working in the many areas that are concerned with vibration, and its effect on heat and mass transfer. These include hydrodynamics, hydro-mechanics, low gravity physics and mechanics, and geophysics. The rigorous approach adopted in presenting the theory of this fascinating and highly topical area will facilitate a greater understanding of the phenomena involved, and will lead to the development of more and better-designed experiments.

  9. Supergranular Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-12-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Here the opacity is so large that heat flux transport is mainly by convection rather than by photon diffusion. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection , Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni

  10. Penetrative convective flows induced by internal heating and mantle compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machetel, Philippe; Yuen, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Penetrative convective flows induced in a spherical shell by combined effects of internal heating and mantle compressibility are investigated using mathematical and numerical formulations for compressible spherical shell convection. Isothermal stress-free boundary conditions applied at the top and the bottom of the shell are solved using a time-dependent finite difference code in a temperature, vorticity, stream function formulation for Rayleigh numbers ranging from the critical Rc up to 2000 Rc. Results indicate that compressibility, together with internal heating, could be a mechanism capable of generating spontaneously layered convection and local melting in the mantle and that non-Boussinesq effects must be considered in interpretations of geophysical phenomena.

  11. Shell model for buoyancy-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Verma, Mahendra K

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a unified shell model for stably stratified and convective turbulence. Numerical simulation of this model for stably stratified flow shows Bolgiano-Obukhbov scaling in which the kinetic energy spectrum varies as k(-11/5). The shell model of convective turbulence yields Kolmogorov's spectrum. These results are consistent with the energy flux and energy feed due to buoyancy, and are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations of Kumar et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 023016 (2014)].

  12. Non-Newtonian Convection and Compositional Buoyancy: Advances in Modeling Convection and Dome Formation on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Barr, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Numerical modeling of non-Newtonian convection in ice shows that convection controlled by grain boundary sliding rheology may occur in Europa. This modeling confirms that thermal convection alone cannot produce significant dome elevations. Domes may instead be produced by diapirs initiated by thermal convection that in turn induces compositional segregation. Exclusion of impurities from warm upwellings would allow sufficient buoyancy for icy plumes to account for the observed approximately 100 m topography of domes, provided the ice shell has a small effective elastic thickness (approximately 0.2 to 0.5 km) and contains low eutectic-point impurities at the few percent level.

  13. Non-Newtonian Convection and Compositional Buoyancy: Advances in Modeling Convection and Dome Formation on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Barr, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Numerical modeling of non-Newtonian convection in ice shows that convection controlled by grain boundary sliding rheology may occur in Europa. This modeling confirms that thermal convection alone cannot produce significant dome elevations. Domes may instead be produced by diapirs initiated by thermal convection that in turn induces compositional segregation. Exclusion of impurities from warm upwellings would allow sufficient buoyancy for icy plumes to account for the observed approximately 100 m topography of domes, provided the ice shell has a small effective elastic thickness (approximately 0.2 to 0.5 km) and contains low eutectic-point impurities at the few percent level.

  14. Hydrodynamic efficiencies in implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Michel; Fabre, Edouard; Boudenne, Jean-Michel; Michard, Alain; Fews, P.

    1990-04-01

    Experiments on the implosion of high aspect ratio glass microballoons, filled with an equimolar mixture of 10 atmosphere D-T gas, aimed at determining hydrodynamic efficiencies, the characteristics (density and temperature) of the wall, are described. Experimental results for kinetic and thermal variations, obtained for 350 and 450 micrometer targets, at an absorbed laser power of about 120 J, are compared with values given by simulations with the FILM code. The comparison is made at the time of shock reflection on the internal wall of the shell. The use of X spectroscopy in such experiments is discussed.

  15. Chromatin hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Robijn; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Rabin, Yitzhak; Zidovska, Alexandra

    2014-05-06

    Following recent observations of large scale correlated motion of chromatin inside the nuclei of live differentiated cells, we present a hydrodynamic theory-the two-fluid model-in which the content of a nucleus is described as a chromatin solution with the nucleoplasm playing the role of the solvent and the chromatin fiber that of a solute. This system is subject to both passive thermal fluctuations and active scalar and vector events that are associated with free energy consumption, such as ATP hydrolysis. Scalar events drive the longitudinal viscoelastic modes (where the chromatin fiber moves relative to the solvent) while vector events generate the transverse modes (where the chromatin fiber moves together with the solvent). Using linear response methods, we derive explicit expressions for the response functions that connect the chromatin density and velocity correlation functions to the corresponding correlation functions of the active sources and the complex viscoelastic moduli of the chromatin solution. We then derive general expressions for the flow spectral density of the chromatin velocity field. We use the theory to analyze experimental results recently obtained by one of the present authors and her co-workers. We find that the time dependence of the experimental data for both native and ATP-depleted chromatin can be well-fitted using a simple model-the Maxwell fluid-for the complex modulus, although there is some discrepancy in terms of the wavevector dependence. Thermal fluctuations of ATP-depleted cells are predominantly longitudinal. ATP-active cells exhibit intense transverse long wavelength velocity fluctuations driven by force dipoles. Fluctuations with wavenumbers larger than a few inverse microns are dominated by concentration fluctuations with the same spectrum as thermal fluctuations but with increased intensity.

  16. THE C-FLAME QUENCHING BY CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY MIXING IN SUPER-AGB STARS AND THE FORMATION OF HYBRID C/O/Ne WHITE DWARFS AND SN PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Denissenkov, P. A.; Herwig, F.; Truran, J. W.; Paxton, B. E-mail: fherwig@uvic.ca

    2013-07-20

    After off-center C ignition in the cores of super asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) stars, the C flame propagates all the way down to the center, trailing behind it the C-shell convective zone, and thus building a degenerate ONe core. This standard picture is obtained in stellar evolution simulations if the bottom C-shell convection boundary is assumed to be a discontinuity associated with a strict interpretation of the Schwarzschild condition for convective instability. However, this boundary is prone to additional mixing processes, such as thermohaline convection and convective boundary mixing. Using hydrodynamic simulations, we show that contrary to previous results, thermohaline mixing is too inefficient to interfere with the C-flame propagation. However, even a small amount of convective boundary mixing removes the physical conditions required for the C-flame propagation all the way to the center. This result holds even if we allow for some turbulent heat transport in the CBM region. As a result, SAGB stars build in their interiors hybrid C-O-Ne degenerate cores composed of a relatively large CO core (M{sub CO} Almost-Equal-To 0.2 M{sub Sun }) surrounded by a thick ONe zone ({Delta}M{sub ONe} {approx}> 0.85 M{sub Sun }) with another thin CO layer above. If exposed by mass loss, these cores will become hybrid C-O-Ne white dwarfs. Otherwise, the ignition of C-rich material in the central core, surrounded by the thick ONe zone, may trigger a thermonuclear supernova (SN) explosion. The quenching of the C-flame may have implications for the ignition mechanism of SN Ia in the double-degenerate merger scenario.

  17. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  18. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  19. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1995-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  20. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1996-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  1. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  2. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  3. Modelling of stellar convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, Friedrich; Muthsam, Herbert J.

    2017-07-01

    The review considers the modelling process for stellar convection rather than specific astrophysical results. For achieving reasonable depth and length we deal with hydrodynamics only, omitting MHD. A historically oriented introduction offers first glimpses on the physics of stellar convection. Examination of its basic properties shows that two very different kinds of modelling keep being needed: low dimensional models (mixing length, Reynolds stress, etc.) and "full" 3D simulations. A list of affordable and not affordable tasks for the latter is given. Various low dimensional modelling approaches are put in a hierarchy and basic principles which they should respect are formulated. In 3D simulations of low Mach number convection the inclusion of then unimportant sound waves with their rapid time variation is numerically impossible. We describe a number of approaches where the Navier-Stokes equations are modified for their elimination (anelastic approximation, etc.). We then turn to working with the full Navier-Stokes equations and deal with numerical principles for faithful and efficient numerics. Spatial differentiation as well as time marching aspects are considered. A list of codes allows assessing the state of the art. An important recent development is the treatment of even the low Mach number problem without prior modification of the basic equation (obviating side effects) by specifically designed numerical methods. Finally, we review a number of important trends such as how to further develop low-dimensional models, how to use 3D models for that purpose, what effect recent hardware developments may have on 3D modelling, and others.

  4. Advances in shell side boiling of refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Ralph L.

    The design of shell and tube evaporators used in air conditioning and refrigeration applications is discussed. The heat exchanger geometry of interest involves evaporation or condensation on the shell side of a horizontal tube bundle. Enhanced heat transfer geometries are typically used for shell side evaporation and for forced convection to water on the tube side. Refrigerant boiling data and forced convection refrigerant boiling correlations are described. The refrigerants of interest include R-11, 12, 22, 123, and 134a. Thermal design methods for sizing of the evaporator and condenser are outlined. A computer model for prediction of the evaporator performance is described.

  5. Anisotropic bead models for molecular hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Richard W.; Zwanzig, Robert

    1989-05-01

    Some qualitative effects of slip hydrodynamic boundary conditions can be incorporated into bead models by replacing the scalar friction constant of a bead with a friction tensor. Translational and rotational diffusion coefficients are calculated analytically and exactly for polygons, analytically but approximately for spherical shells, and numerically by the method of Bloomfield and de la Torre. The calculated diffusion constants of benzene agree with experiment; such agreement is not possible using scalar friction constants. Some comments are made about the transition from overall slip to stick hydrodynamic behavior when tensor friction constants are used.

  6. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  7. Formation of Ganymede's grooved terrain by convection-driven resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Noah P.; Barr, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The heat flux and strain rate inferred for grooved terrain formation on Ganymede can be produced in a convecting ice shell 10-100 km thick with weak near-surface ice. Smooth linear grooves may have formed by convection-driven lithospheric spreading and long-wavelength compressional folds may form atop convective downwellings, and would possibly be detectable with mapping from ESA's upcoming Jupiter-Icy Moon Explorer Mission.

  8. ISS COLUMBUS laboratory experiment `GeoFlow I and II' -fluid physics research in microgravity environment to study convection phenomena inside deep Earth and mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futterer, Birgit; Egbers, Christoph; Chossat, Pascal; Hollerbach, Rainer; Breuer, Doris; Feudel, Fred; Mutabazi, Innocent; Tuckerman, Laurette

    Overall driving mechanism of flow in inner Earth is convection in its gravitational buoyancy field. A lot of effort has been involved in theoretical prediction and numerical simulation of both the geodynamo, which is maintained by convection, and mantle convection, which is the main cause for plate tectonics. Especially resolution of convective patterns and heat transfer mechanisms has been in focus to reach the real, highly turbulent conditions inside Earth. To study specific phenomena experimentally different approaches has been observed, against the background of magneto-hydrodynamic but also on the pure hydrodynamic physics of fluids. With the experiment `GeoFlow' (Geophysical Flow Simulation) instability and transition of convection in spherical shells under the influence of central-symmetry buoyancy force field are traced for a wide range of rotation regimes within the limits between non-rotating and rapid rotating spheres. The special set-up of high voltage potential between inner and outer sphere and use of a dielectric fluid as working fluid induce an electro-hydrodynamic force, which is comparable to gravitational buoyancy force inside Earth. To reduce overall gravity in a laboratory this technique requires microgravity conditions. The `GeoFlow I' experiment was accomplished on International Space Station's module COLUM-BUS inside Fluid Science Laboratory FSL und supported by EADS Astrium, Friedrichshafen, User Support und Operations Centre E-USOC in Madrid, Microgravity Advanced Research and Support Centre MARS in Naples, as well as COLUMBUS Control Center COL-CC Munich. Running from August 2008 until January 2009 it delivered 100.000 images from FSL's optical diagnostics module; here more precisely the Wollaston shearing interferometry was used. Here we present the experimental alignment with numerical prediction for the non-rotating and rapid rotation case. The non-rotating case is characterized by a co-existence of several stationary supercritical

  9. Nucleation and chiral symmetry breaking under controlled hydrodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiao-Lun; Martin, Brian; Tharrington, Arnold

    1994-01-01

    The effects of hydrodynamic convection on nucleation and broken chiral symmetry have been investigated for a simple inorganic molecule, sodium chlorate (NaClO3). Our experiment suggests that the symmetry breaking is a result of hydrodynamic amplification of rare nucleation events. The effect is more pronounced when the primary nucleation occurs on the solute-vapor interface, where mixing in the surface sublayer becomes important. The transition from the achiral to the chiral states appears to be smooth as the hydrodynamic parameters, such as flow rate, are varied.

  10. Constructing stable 3D hydrodynamical models of giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions require stable models of stars as initial conditions. Such initial models, however, are difficult to construct for giant stars because of the wide range in spatial scales of the hydrostatic equilibrium and in dynamical timescales between the core and the envelope of the giant. They are needed for, e.g., modeling the common envelope phase where a giant envelope encompasses both the giant core and a companion star. Here, we present a new method of approximating and reconstructing giant profiles from a stellar evolution code to produce stable models for multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We determine typical stellar stratification profiles with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code mesa. After an appropriate mapping, hydrodynamical simulations are conducted using the moving-mesh code arepo. The giant profiles are approximated by replacing the core of the giant with a point mass and by constructing a suitable continuation of the profile to the center. Different reconstruction methods are tested that can specifically control the convective behaviour of the model. After mapping to a grid, a relaxation procedure that includes damping of spurious velocities yields stable models in three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. Initially convectively stable configurations lead to stable hydrodynamical models while for stratifications that are convectively unstable in the stellar evolution code, simulations recover the convective behaviour of the initial model and show large convective plumes with Mach numbers up to 0.8. Examples are shown for a 2 M⊙ red giant and a 0.67 M⊙ asymptotic giant branch star. A detailed analysis shows that the improved method reliably provides stable models of giant envelopes that can be used as initial conditions for subsequent hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interactions involving giant stars.

  11. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  12. Analytical models for hydrodynamics of the steam superheating surfaces of a TGMP-344A boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikina, G. A.; Remeeva, A. R.

    2009-10-01

    A model with distributed parameters for describing the hydrodynamic processes in the convective steam superheater of a TGMP-344A boiler, which reflects the possibility that hydraulic pulsations will occur, is considered. A computer program is proposed that allows the frequency characteristics of hydrodynamic processes in complex systems to be estimated using recurrence relations.

  13. A Simple Demonstration of Convective Effects on Reaction-Diffusion Systems: A Burning Cigarette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pojman, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a demonstration that provides an introduction to nonequilibrium reaction-diffusion systems and the coupling of hydrodynamics to chemical reactions. Experiments that demonstrate autocatalytic behavior that are effected by gravity and convection are included. (KR)

  14. A Simple Demonstration of Convective Effects on Reaction-Diffusion Systems: A Burning Cigarette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pojman, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a demonstration that provides an introduction to nonequilibrium reaction-diffusion systems and the coupling of hydrodynamics to chemical reactions. Experiments that demonstrate autocatalytic behavior that are effected by gravity and convection are included. (KR)

  15. Convective quenching of field reversals in accretion disc dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Matthew S. B.; Yerger, Evan; Blaes, Omer; Salvesen, Greg; Hirose, Shigenobu

    2017-05-01

    Vertically stratified shearing box simulations of magnetorotational turbulence commonly exhibit a so-called butterfly diagram of quasi-periodic azimuthal field reversals. However, in the presence of hydrodynamic convection, field reversals no longer occur. Instead, the azimuthal field strength fluctuates quasi-periodically while maintaining the same polarity, which can either be symmetric or antisymmetric about the disc mid-plane. Using data from the simulations of Hirose et al., we demonstrate that the lack of field reversals in the presence of convection is due to hydrodynamic mixing of magnetic field from the more strongly magnetized upper layers into the mid-plane, which then annihilate field reversals that are starting there. Our convective simulations differ in several respects from those reported in previous work by others, in which stronger magnetization likely plays a more important role than convection.

  16. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-12-27

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation. 14 figs.

  17. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  18. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  19. Convection in ice I with non-Newtonian rheology: Application to the icy Galilean satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy Courtright

    2004-12-01

    Observations from the Galileo spacecraft suggest that the Jovian icy satellites Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto have liquid water oceans beneath their icy surfaces. The outer ice I shells of the satellites represent a barrier between their surfaces and their oceans and serve to decouple fluid motions in their deep interiors from their surfaces. Understanding heat and mass transport by convection within the outer ice I shells of the satellites is crucial to understanding their geophysical and astrobiological evolution. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that deformation in ice I is accommodated by several different creep mechanisms. Newtonian deformation creep accommodates strain in warm ice with small grain sizes. However, deformation in ice with larger grain sizes is controlled by grain-size-sensitive and dislocation creep, which are non-Newtonian. Previous studies of convection have not considered this complex rheological behavior. This thesis revisits basic geophysical questions regarding heat and mass transport in the ice I shells of the satellites using a composite Newtonian/ non-Newtonian rheology for ice I. The composite rheology is implemented in a numerical convection model developed for Earth's mantle to study the behavior of an ice I shell during the onset of convection and in the stagnant lid convection regime. The conditions required to trigger convection in a conductive ice I shell depend on the grain size of the ice, and the amplitude and wavelength of temperature perturbation issued to the ice shell. If convection occurs, the efficiency of heat and mass transport is dependent on the ice grain size as well. If convection occurs, fluid motions in the ice shells enhance the nutrient flux delivered to their oceans, and coupled with resurfacing events, may provide a sustainable biogeochemical cycle. The results of this thesis suggest that evolution of ice grain size in the satellites and the details of how tidal dissipation perturbs the ice shell to

  20. Convection in Icy Satellites: Implications for Habitability and Planetary Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-state convection and endogenic resurfacing in the outer ice shells of the icy Galilean satellites (especially Europa) may contribute to the habitability of their internal oceans and to the detectability of any biospheres by spacecraft. If convection occurs in an ice I layer, fluid motions are confined beneath a thick stagnant lid of cold, immobile ice that is too stiff to participate in convection. The thickness of the stagnant lid varies from 30 to 50% of the total thickness of the ice shell, depending on the grain size of ice. Upward convective motions deliver approximately 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 13) kg yr(sup -1) of ice to the base of the stagnant lid, where resurfacing events driven by compositional or tidal effects (such as the formation of domes or ridges on Europa, or formation of grooved terrain on Ganymede) may deliver materials from the stagnant lid onto the surface. Conversely, downward convective motions deliver the same mass of ice from the base of the stagnant lid to the bottom of the satellites ice shells. Materials from the satellites surfaces may be delivered to their oceans by downward convective motions if material from the surface can reach the base of the stagnant lid during resurfacing events. Triggering convection from an initially conductive ice shell requires modest amplitude (a few to tens of kelvins) temperature anomalies to soften the ice to permit convection, which may require tidal heating. Therefore, tidal heating, compositional buoyancy, and solid-state convection in combination may be required to permit mass transport between the surfaces and oceans of icy satellites. Callisto and probably Ganymede have thick stagnant lids with geologically inactive surfaces today, so forward contamination of their surfaces is not a significant issue. Active convection and breaching of the stagnant lid is a possibility on Europa today, so is of relevance to planetary protection policy.

  1. Two-Dimensional Simulations of Plastic-Shell, Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, P.B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Elbaz, Y.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Keck, R.L.; Keller, D.E.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Srebro, Y.; Town, R.P.J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2005-02-18

    Multidimensional hydrodynamic properties of high-adiabat direct-drive plastic-shell implosions on the OMEGA laser system are investigated using the multidimensional hydrodynamic code, DRACO. Multimode simulations including the effects of nonuniform illumination and target roughness indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining target performance.

  2. Double Diffusive Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Mixed Convective Slip Flow along a Radiating Moving Vertical Flat Plate with Convective Boundary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mohammad M.; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J.; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, , local Nusselt number, , and local Sherwood number are shown and explained through tables. PMID:25343360

  3. Double diffusive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convective slip flow along a radiating moving vertical flat plate with convective boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Mohammad M; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, [Formula: see text], local Nusselt number, [Formula: see text], and local Sherwood number [Formula: see text] are shown and explained through tables.

  4. CONVECTIVE-REACTIVE PROTON-{sup 12}C COMBUSTION IN SAKURAI'S OBJECT (V4334 SAGITTARII) AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EVOLUTION AND YIELDS FROM THE FIRST GENERATIONS OF STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Herwig, Falk; Pignatari, Marco; Woodward, Paul R.; Porter, David H.; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Fryer, Chris L.; Bennett, Michael; Hirschi, Raphael

    2011-02-01

    Depending on mass and metallicity as well as evolutionary phase, stars occasionally experience convective-reactive nucleosynthesis episodes. We specifically investigate the situation when nucleosynthetically unprocessed, H-rich material is convectively mixed with an He-burning zone, for example in a convectively unstable shell on top of electron-degenerate cores in asymptotic giant branch stars, young white dwarfs, or X-ray bursting neutron stars. Such episodes are frequently encountered in stellar evolution models of stars of extremely low or zero metal content, such as the first stars. We have carried out detailed nucleosynthesis simulations based on stellar evolution models and informed by hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on the convective-reactive episode in the very late thermal pulse star Sakurai's object (V4334 Sagittarii). Asplund et al. determined the abundances of 28 elements, many of which are highly non-solar, ranging from H, He, and Li all the way to Ba and La, plus the C isotopic ratio. Our simulations show that the mixing evolution according to standard, one-dimensional stellar evolution models implies neutron densities in the He intershell ({approx}< few 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) that are too low to obtain a significant neutron capture nucleosynthesis on the heavy elements. We have carried out three-dimensional hydrodynamic He-shell flash convection simulations in 4{pi} geometry to study the entrainment of H-rich material. Guided by these simulations we assume that the ingestion process of H into the He-shell convection zone leads only after some delay time to a sufficient entropy barrier that splits the convection zone into the original one driven by He burning and a new one driven by the rapid burning of ingested H. By making such mixing assumptions that are motivated by our hydrodynamic simulations we obtain significantly higher neutron densities ({approx} few 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) and reproduce the key observed abundance trends found in Sakurai

  5. Convective-reactive Proton-12C Combustion in Sakurai's Object (V4334 Sagittarii) and Implications for the Evolution and Yields from the First Generations of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwig, Falk; Pignatari, Marco; Woodward, Paul R.; Porter, David H.; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Fryer, Chris L.; Bennett, Michael; Hirschi, Raphael

    2011-02-01

    Depending on mass and metallicity as well as evolutionary phase, stars occasionally experience convective-reactive nucleosynthesis episodes. We specifically investigate the situation when nucleosynthetically unprocessed, H-rich material is convectively mixed with an He-burning zone, for example in a convectively unstable shell on top of electron-degenerate cores in asymptotic giant branch stars, young white dwarfs, or X-ray bursting neutron stars. Such episodes are frequently encountered in stellar evolution models of stars of extremely low or zero metal content, such as the first stars. We have carried out detailed nucleosynthesis simulations based on stellar evolution models and informed by hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on the convective-reactive episode in the very late thermal pulse star Sakurai's object (V4334 Sagittarii). Asplund et al. determined the abundances of 28 elements, many of which are highly non-solar, ranging from H, He, and Li all the way to Ba and La, plus the C isotopic ratio. Our simulations show that the mixing evolution according to standard, one-dimensional stellar evolution models implies neutron densities in the He intershell (lsim few 1011 cm-3) that are too low to obtain a significant neutron capture nucleosynthesis on the heavy elements. We have carried out three-dimensional hydrodynamic He-shell flash convection simulations in 4π geometry to study the entrainment of H-rich material. Guided by these simulations we assume that the ingestion process of H into the He-shell convection zone leads only after some delay time to a sufficient entropy barrier that splits the convection zone into the original one driven by He burning and a new one driven by the rapid burning of ingested H. By making such mixing assumptions that are motivated by our hydrodynamic simulations we obtain significantly higher neutron densities (~ few 1015 cm-3) and reproduce the key observed abundance trends found in Sakurai's object. These include an

  6. Shell models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accurate dissipation rate. Using modern computers it is difficult to attain an inertial range of three decades with direct numerical simulations, whereas eight are possible using shell models. In this review we set up a general mathematical framework allowing the description of any MHD shell model. The variety of the latter, with their advantages and weaknesses, is introduced. Finally we consider a number of applications, dealing with free-decaying MHD turbulence, dynamo action, Alfvén waves and the Hall effect.

  7. Preheat of radiative shock in double-shell ignition targets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. W.; He, X. T.; Pei, W. B.; Li, J. H.; Zheng, W. D.; Zhu, S. P.; Kang, W.

    2013-08-15

    For the double-shell ignition target, the nonuniform preheat of the inner shell by high-energy x rays, especially the M-band line radiation and L-shell radiation from the Au hohlraum, aggravates the hydrodynamic instability that causes shell disruption. In this paper, for the first time, we propose another preheating mechanism due to the radiative shock formed in the CH foam, and also confirm and validate such preheat of radiative shock by numerical results. We also give an estimate of the improved double-shell in which the CH foam is replaced by the metallic foam to mitigate the hydrodynamic instabilities, and find that the radiative shock formed in the metallic foam produces a much stronger radiation field to preheat the inner shell, which plays a role in better controlling the instabilities. In double-shells, the preheat of radiative shock, as a potential effect on the instabilities, should be seriously realized and underlined.

  8. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Remington, B A; Arnett, D; Fryxell, B A; Drake, R P

    1998-11-10

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, they are attempting to rigorously scale the physics of the laboratory in supernova. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to hydrodynamics on the SN-size scales is presented and requirements established. Initial results were reported in [1]. Next the appropriate conditions are generated on the NOVA laser. 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates is generated. This scales the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D vs. 3D difference in growth at the He-H interface of Sn 1987A.

  9. Convection and Mixing in Classical Novae Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursi, L. J.; Calder, A. C.; Alexakis, A.; Truran, J. W.; Zingale, M.; Times, F. X.; Ricker, P. M.; Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.; Rosner, R.; MacNeice, P.

    2002-06-01

    To explain observed abundances from classical nova outbursts, and to help explain their energetics, nova models must incorporate a mechanism that will dredge up the heavier white dwarf material into the lighter accreted atmosphere. One proposed mechanism relies on the fluid motions from an early convective phase to do the mixing. We present recent work investigating two aspects of this mechanism. We examine results from two-dimensional simulations of classical nova precursor models that demonstrate the beginning of a convective phase during the `simmering' of a nova precursor. We use a new hydrostatic equilibrium hydrodynamics module recently developed for the adaptive-mesh code FLASH. The two-dimensional models are based on the one-dimensional models of Ami Glasner (Glasner et al. 1997), and were evolved with FLASH from a pre-convective state to the onset of convection. The onset of convection induces a velocity field near the C,O/H,He interface, which can then cause mixing through interactions with gravity waves. We show results from simulations of these wind-wave interactions, and estimate whether the `wind' caused by the convection could induce sufficient dredge-up to power a classical novae. This research has been supported by the US. Department of Energy under grant no. B341495 to the ASCI Flash Center at the University of Chicago

  10. Theory and Simulations of Rotating Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Adrian J.; Dempsey, Adam M.; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-08-01

    We study thermal convection in a rotating fluid in order to better understand the properties of convection zones in rotating stars and planets. We first derive a mixing-length theory for rapidly rotating convection, arriving at the results of Stevenson via simple physical arguments. The theory predicts the properties of convection as a function of the imposed heat flux and rotation rate, independent of microscopic diffusivities. In particular, it predicts the mean temperature gradient, the rms velocity and temperature fluctuations, and the size of the eddies that dominate heat transport. We test all of these predictions with high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of Boussinesq convection in a Cartesian box. The results agree remarkably well with the theory across more than two orders of magnitude in rotation rate. For example, the temperature gradient is predicted to scale as the rotation rate to the four-fifths power at fixed flux, and the simulations yield 0.75 ± 0.06. We conclude that the mixing-length theory is a solid foundation for understanding the properties of convection zones in rotating stars and planets.

  11. Theory and simulations of rotating convection

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Adrian J.; Dempsey, Adam M.; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-08-10

    We study thermal convection in a rotating fluid in order to better understand the properties of convection zones in rotating stars and planets. We first derive a mixing-length theory for rapidly rotating convection, arriving at the results of Stevenson via simple physical arguments. The theory predicts the properties of convection as a function of the imposed heat flux and rotation rate, independent of microscopic diffusivities. In particular, it predicts the mean temperature gradient, the rms velocity and temperature fluctuations, and the size of the eddies that dominate heat transport. We test all of these predictions with high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of Boussinesq convection in a Cartesian box. The results agree remarkably well with the theory across more than two orders of magnitude in rotation rate. For example, the temperature gradient is predicted to scale as the rotation rate to the four-fifths power at fixed flux, and the simulations yield 0.75 ± 0.06. We conclude that the mixing-length theory is a solid foundation for understanding the properties of convection zones in rotating stars and planets.

  12. HYDRODYNAMIC COMPRESSIVE FORGING.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HYDRODYNAMICS), (*FORGING, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, LUBRICANTS, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), DIES, TENSILE PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , STRAIN...MECHANICS), BERYLLIUM ALLOYS , NICKEL ALLOYS , CASTING ALLOYS , PRESSURE, FAILURE(MECHANICS).

  13. Experimental and numerical study on unsteady natural convection heat transfer in helically coiled tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshat, E.; Hossainpour, S.; Bahiraee, F.

    2014-06-01

    Both of experimental and numerical investigations were performed to understand unsteady natural convection from outer surface of helical coils. Four helical coils with two different curvature ratios were used. Each coil was mounted in the shell both vertically and horizontally. The cold water was entered the coil and the hot water in the shell was cooling by unsteady natural convection. A CFD code was developed to simulate natural convection heat transfer. Equations of tube and shell are solved simultaneously. Statistical analyses have been done on data points of temperature and natural convection Nusselt number. It was revealed that shell-side fluid temperature and the Nusselt number of the outer surface of coils are functions of in-tube fluid mass flow rate, specific heat of fluids and geometrical parameters including length, inner diameter of the tube and the volume of the shell, and time.

  14. Differential rotation in solar convective dynamo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan and Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  15. Shell model for buoyancy-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a unified shell model for stably stratified and convective turbulence. Numerical simulation of this model for stably stratified flow shows Bolgiano-Obukhbov scaling in which the kinetic energy spectrum varies as k-11 /5. The shell model of convective turbulence yields Kolmogorov's spectrum. These results are consistent with the energy flux and energy feed due to buoyancy, and are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations of Kumar et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 023016 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.023016].

  16. Radiation hydrodynamics integrated in the PLUTO code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Stefan M.; Stute, Matthias; Kley, Wilhelm; Mignone, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Aims: The transport of energy through radiation is very important in many astrophysical phenomena. In dynamical problems the time-dependent equations of radiation hydrodynamics have to be solved. We present a newly developed radiation-hydrodynamics module specifically designed for the versatile magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PLUTO. Methods: The solver is based on the flux-limited diffusion approximation in the two-temperature approach. All equations are solved in the co-moving frame in the frequency-independent (gray) approximation. The hydrodynamics is solved by the different Godunov schemes implemented in PLUTO, and for the radiation transport we use a fully implicit scheme. The resulting system of linear equations is solved either using the successive over-relaxation (SOR) method (for testing purposes) or using matrix solvers that are available in the PETSc library. We state in detail the methodology and describe several test cases to verify the correctness of our implementation. The solver works in standard coordinate systems, such as Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical, and also for non-equidistant grids. Results: We present a new radiation-hydrodynamics solver coupled to the MHD-code PLUTO that is a modern, versatile, and efficient new module for treating complex radiation hydrodynamical problems in astrophysics. As test cases, either purely radiative situations, or full radiation-hydrodynamical setups (including radiative shocks and convection in accretion disks) were successfully studied. The new module scales very well on parallel computers using MPI. For problems in star or planet formation, we added the possibility of irradiation by a central source.

  17. Henri Bénard: Thermal convection and vortex shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    We present in this article the work of Henri Bénard (1874-1939), a French physicist who began the systematic experimental study of two hydrodynamic systems: the thermal convection of fluids heated from below (the Rayleigh-Bénard convection and the Bénard-Marangoni convection) and the periodical vortex shedding behind a bluff body in a flow (the Bénard-Kármán vortex street). Across his scientific biography, we review the interplay between experiments and theory in these two major subjects of fluid mechanics.

  18. Hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocák, Miroslav; Müller, Ewald; Weiss, Achim; Kifonidis, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    We desribe and discuss hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash using an initial model of a 1.25 M⊙ star with a metallicity of 0.02 near at its peak. Past research concerned with the dynamics of the core helium flash is inconclusive. Its results range from a confirmation of the standard picture, where the star remains in hydrostatic equilibrium during the flash (Deupree 1996), to a disruption or a significant mass loss of the star (Edwards 1969; Cole & Deupree 1980). However, the most recent multidimensional hydrodynamic study (Dearborn et al. 2006) suggests a quiescent behavior of the core helium flash and seems to rule out an explosive scenario. Here we present partial results of a new comprehensive study of the core helium flash, which seem to confirm this qualitative behavior and give a better insight into operation of the convection zone powered by helium burning during the flash. The hydrodynamic evolution is followed on a computational grid in spherical coordinates using our new version of the multi-dimensional hydrodynamic code HERAKLES, which is based on a direct Eulerian implementation of the piecewise parabolic method.

  19. Top Driven Asymmetric Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, C.; Anderson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The role of the decoupling in the low-velocity zone is crucial for understanding the mechanisms governing plate tectonics and mantle convection. Mantle convection models fail to integrate plate kinematics and thermodynamics of the mantle. We computed the volume of the plates lost along subduction zones, which is about 306 km3/yr (±15). Mass balance predicts that slabs are compensated by broad passive upwellings beneath oceans, mainly at oceanic ridges and backarc basins. These may correspond to the broad low wavespeed regions found in the upper mantle by tomography. However, W-directed slabs enter the mantle more than 3 times faster (232 km3/yr ±15) than the opposite E- or NE-directed subduction zones (74 km3/yr ±15). This is consistent with the westward drift of the outer shell relative to the underlying mantle, which accounts for the steep dip of W-directed slabs, and the asymmetry between the flanks of oceanic ridges, and the directions of ridge migration. The larger recycling volumes along W-directed subduction zones implies i) asymmetry of the cooling of the underlying mantle and ii) it constrains the "easterly" directed component of the upwelling replacement mantle. In this model, mantle convection is tuned by polarized decoupling of the advecting and shearing upper boundary layer. Return mantle flow can be envisaged as a result of passive volume balance rather than as a thermal buoyancy driven upwelling.

  20. Three-dimensional spherical models of layered and whole mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Schubert, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    We present numerical calculations of three-dimensional spherical shell thermal convection for constant viscosity and stratified viscosity models of whole-layer and two-layer mantle convection. These four examples are intended to provide theoretical guidance for determining the style of convection that is occurring in Earth's mantle. An impermeable interface between the upper and lower convecting shells in the two-layer solutions is placed at a depth of 670 km to coincide with the mantle seismic discontinuity that divides the upper and lower mantle. The interface results in an internal thermal boundary layer that raises the mean temperature in the lower shell by about 1400 K compared to the whole-layer solutions. The patterns of convection in the upper part of the whole-layer solutions are dominated by narrow arcuate sheetlike downflows in a background of weak upflow. In contrast, the upper shells of the two-layer solutions have complicated networks of convective rolls with the upflows and downflows having very similar structure. The structure of convection in the lower shells is similar to that in the lower part of the whole-layer solutions. Based on the horizontal structure of subduction zones on Earth's surface and on tomographic images of temperature variations in Earth's mantle, we conclude that the style of convection in Earth's mantle is more like that of the whole-mantle models.

  1. Three-dimensional spherical models of layered and whole mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Schubert, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    We present numerical calculations of three-dimensional spherical shell thermal convection for constant viscosity and stratified viscosity models of whole-layer and two-layer mantle convection. These four examples are intended to provide theoretical guidance for determining the style of convection that is occurring in Earth's mantle. An impermeable interface between the upper and lower convecting shells in the two-layer solutions is placed at a depth of 670 km to coincide with the mantle seismic discontinuity that divides the upper and lower mantle. The interface results in an internal thermal boundary layer that raises the mean temperature in the lower shell by about 1400 K compared to the whole-layer solutions. The patterns of convection in the upper part of the whole-layer solutions are dominated by narrow arcuate sheetlike downflows in a background of weak upflow. In contrast, the upper shells of the two-layer solutions have complicated networks of convective rolls with the upflows and downflows having very similar structure. The structure of convection in the lower shells is similar to that in the lower part of the whole-layer solutions. Based on the horizontal structure of subduction zones on Earth's surface and on tomographic images of temperature variations in Earth's mantle, we conclude that the style of convection in Earth's mantle is more like that of the whole-mantle models.

  2. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  3. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  4. Hydrodynamical Interaction of Mildly Relativistic Ejecta with an Ambient Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    The hydrodynamical interaction of spherical ejecta freely expanding at mildly relativistic speeds into an ambient cold medium is studied in semianalytical and numerical ways to investigate how ejecta produced in energetic stellar explosions dissipate their kinetic energy through the interaction with the surrounding medium. We especially focus on the case in which the circumstellar medium (CSM) is well represented by a steady wind at a constant mass-loss rate, having been ejected from the stellar surface prior to the explosion. As a result of the hydrodynamical interaction, the ejecta and CSM are swept by the reverse and forward shocks, leading to the formation of a geometrically thin shell. We present a semianalytical model describing the dynamical evolution of the shell and compare the results with numerical simulations. The shell can give rise to bright emission as it gradually becomes transparent to photons. We develop an emission model for the expected emission from the optically thick shell, in which photons in the shell gradually diffuse out to the interstellar space. Then we investigate the possibility that radiation powered by the hydrodynamical interaction is the origin of an underluminous class of gamma-ray bursts.

  5. Convection in Oblate Late-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2015-08-01

    In this talk, we present recent investigations of the convection, oblateness and differential rota-tion in rapidly rotating late-type stars with a novel and powerful Compressible High-ORder Un-structured Spectral-difference (CHORUS) code (J. Comput. Physics Vol. 290, 190-211, 2015). Recent observations have revealed the drastic effects of rapid rotation on stellar structure, including centrifugal deformation and gravity darkening. The centrifugal force counteracts gravity, causing the equatorial region to expand. Consequently, rapidly rotating stars are oblate and cannot be described by an one-dimensional spherically symmetric model. If convection establishes a substantial differential rotation, as in the envelopes of late-type stars, this can considerably increase the oblateness. We have successfully extended the CHORUS code to model rapidly rotating stars on fixed unstructured grids. In the CHORUS code, the hydrodynamic equations are discretized by a robust and efficient high-order Spectral Difference Method (SDM). The discretization stencil of the spectral difference method is compact and advantageous for parallel processing. CHORUS has been verified by comparing to spherical anelastic convection simulations on benchmark problems. This talk will be centred on the first global simulations by CHORUS for convection in oblate stars with different rotating rates. We quantify the influence of the oblateness on the mean flows and the thermal structure of the convection zone through these new simulations and implications of these results for stellar observations will be discussed.

  6. A laboratory model of planetary and stellar convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Toomre, J.; Deane, A. E.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Glatzmaier, G. A.; Fichtl, G. H.; Leslie, F.; Fowlis, W. W.; Gilman, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on thermal convection in a rotating, differentially-heated spherical shell with a radial buoyancy force were conducted in an orbiting microgravity laboratory. A variety of convective structures, or planforms, were observed depending on the magnitude of the rotation and the nature of the imposed heating distribution. The results are in agreement with numerical simulations that can be conducted at modest parameter values, and suggest possible regimes of motion in rotating planets and stars.

  7. Mimicking semi-convection by convective overshooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caloi, V.; Mazzitelli, I.

    1990-12-01

    This paper investigates the behavior of so called 'semiconvection' (described by Schwarzschild, 1970; Castellani et al., 1971), of stars burning He in a convective core but exibiting an apparent spontaneous capability to partially mix into the core the matter from outside the formal boundaries of the convective region. A simple numerical algorithm based on a small and ad hoc amount of convective overshooting is presented which, if properly tuned, can mimick the effect of semiconvection in the computation of those stellar evolutionary phases in which a convective helium burning core is present. Using this algorithm, the time-consuming numerical procedures involved in the evaluation of the correct chemical profiles at the boundaries of the formally convective He core can be avoided.

  8. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  9. Particle Mesh Hydrodynamics for Astrophysics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, Philippe; Cottet, Georges-Henri; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We present a particle method for the simulation of three dimensional compressible hydrodynamics based on a hybrid Particle-Mesh discretization of the governing equations. The method is rooted on the regularization of particle locations as in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The rSPH method was recently introduced to remedy problems associated with the distortion of computational elements in SPH, by periodically re-initializing the particle positions and by using high order interpolation kernels. In the PMH formulation, the particles solely handle the convective part of the compressible Euler equations. The particle quantities are then interpolated onto a mesh, where the pressure terms are computed. PMH, like SPH, is free of the convection CFL condition while at the same time it is more efficient as derivatives are computed on a mesh rather than particle-particle interactions. PMH does not detract from the adaptive character of SPH and allows for control of its accuracy. We present simulations of a benchmark astrophysics problem demonstrating the capabilities of this approach.

  10. Postexplosion hydrodynamics of supernovae in red supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Woosley, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    Shock propagation, mixing, and clumping are studied in the explosion of red supergiants as Type II supernovae using a two-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code. We show that extensive Rayleigh-Talor instabilities develop in the ejecta in the wake of the reverse shock wave. In all cases, the shell structure of the progenitor is obliterated to leave a clumpy, well-mixed supernova remnant. However, the occurrence of mass loss during the lifetime of the progenitor can significantly reduce the amount of mixing. These results are independent of the Type II supernova explosion mechanism.

  11. Hydrodynamic aspects of fish olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan P.L

    2008-01-01

    Flow into and around the olfactory chamber of a fish determines how odorant from the fish's immediate environment is transported to the sensory surface (olfactory epithelium) lining the chamber. Diffusion times in water are long, even over comparatively short distances (millimetres). Therefore, transport from the external environment to the olfactory epithelium must be controlled by processes that rely on convection (i.e. the bulk flow of fluid). These include the beating of cilia lining the olfactory chamber and the relatively inexpensive pumping action of accessory sacs. Flow through the chamber may also be induced by an external flow. Flow over the olfactory epithelium appears to be laminar. Odorant transfer to the olfactory epithelium may be facilitated in several ways: if the olfactory organs are mounted on stalks that penetrate the boundary layer; by the steep velocity gradients generated by beating cilia; by devices that deflect flow into the olfactory chamber; by parallel arrays of olfactory lamellae; by mechanical agitation of the chamber (or olfactory stalks); and by vortices. Overall, however, our knowledge of the hydrodynamics of fish olfaction is far from complete. Several areas of future research are outlined. PMID:18184629

  12. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J. O.

    1999-06-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane et al., Astrophys. J.478, L75 (1997) The Nova laser is used to shock two-layer targets, producing Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the interfaces between the layers, analogous to instabilities seen at the interfaces of SN 1987A. Because the hydrodynamics in the laser experiments at intermediate times (3-40 ns) and in SN 1987A at intermediate times (5 s-104 s) are well described by the Euler equations, the hydrodynamics scale between the two regimes. The experiments are modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS, thus serving as a benchmark for PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike and bubble velocities in the experiment using potential flow theory and a modified Ott thin shell theory is presented. A numerical study of 2D vs. 3D differences in instability growth at the O-He and He-H interface of SN 1987A, and the design for analogous laser experiments are presented. We discuss further work to incorporate more features of the SN in the experiments, including spherical geometry, multiple layers and density gradients. Past and ongoing work in laboratory and laser astrophysics is reviewed, including experimental work on supernova remnants (SNRs). A numerical study of RM instability in SNRs is presented.

  13. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R. P.; Fryxell, B. A.; Teyssier, R.; Moore, K.

    1999-05-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane et al. [Astrophys. J. 478, L75 (1997) and B. A. Remington et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1994 (1997)]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few ×103 s. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to the SN-size scales is presented. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES [J. T. Larson and S. M. Lane, J. Quant. Spect. Rad. Trans. 51, 179 (1994)] and CALE [R. T. Barton, Numerical Astrophysics (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985), pp. 482-497], and the supernova code PROMETHEUS [P. R. Woodward and P. Collela, J. Comp. Phys. 54, 115 (1984)]. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike-and-bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin-shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D versus 3D differences in perturbation growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  14. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R.P.; Fryxell, B.A.; Teyssier, R.

    1999-05-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane {ital et al.} [Astrophys. J. {bold 478}, L75 (1997) and B. A. Remington {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 4}, 1994 (1997)]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10{endash}15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth due to the Richtmyer{endash}Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few {times}10{sup 3}s. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to the SN-size scales is presented. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES [J. T. Larson and S. M. Lane, J. Quant. Spect. Rad. Trans. {bold 51}, 179 (1994)] and CALE [R. T. Barton, {ital Numerical Astrophysics} (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985), pp. 482{endash}497], and the supernova code PROMETHEUS [P. R. Woodward and P. Collela, J. Comp. Phys. {bold 54}, 115 (1984)]. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike-and-bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin-shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D versus 3D differences in perturbation growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  15. CONVECTIVE OVERSHOOT MIXING IN MODELS OF THE STELLAR INTERIOR

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2013-04-01

    Convective overshoot mixing plays an important role in stellar structure and evolution. However, overshoot mixing is also a long-standing problem; it is one of the most uncertain factors in stellar physics. As is well known, convective overshoot mixing is determined by the radial turbulent flux of the chemical component. In this paper, a local model of the radial turbulent flux of the chemical component is established based on hydrodynamic equations and some model assumptions and is tested in stellar models. The main conclusions are as follows. (1) The local model shows that convective overshoot mixing could be regarded as a diffusion process and the diffusion coefficient for different chemical elements is the same. However, if the non-local terms i.e., the gradient of the third-order moments, are taken into account, the diffusion coefficient for each chemical element should in general be different. (2) The diffusion coefficient of convective/overshoot mixing shows different behaviors in the convection zone and in the overshoot region because the characteristic length scale of the mixing is large in the convection zone and small in the overshoot region. Overshoot mixing should be regarded as a weak mixing process. (3) The diffusion coefficient of mixing is tested in stellar models, and it is found that a single choice of our central mixing parameter leads to consistent results for a solar convective envelope model as well as for core convection models of stars with masses from 2 M to 10 M.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Mechanically- and Convectively-Driven Turbulence in Planetary Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, Alexander Michael

    2017-08-01

    The energy for driving turbulent flows in planetary fluid layers comes from a combination of thermocompositional sources and the motion of the boundary in contact with the fluid through mechanisms like precessional, tidal, and librational forcing. Characterizing the resulting turbulent fluid motions are necessary for understanding many aspects of the planet's dynamics and evolution including the generation of magnetic fields in the electrically conducting fluid layers and dissipation in the oceans. Although such flows are strongly inertial they are also strongly influenced by the Coriolis force whose source is in the rotation of the body and tends to constrain the inertial effects and provide support for fluid instabilities that might in-turn generate turbulence. Furthermore, the magnetic fields generated by the electrically conducting fluids act back on the fluid through the Lorentz force that also tends to constrain the flow. The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the characteristics of turbulent flows under the influence of mechanical, convective, rotational and magnetic forcing. In order to investigate the response of the fluid to mechanical forcing, I have modified a unique set of laboratory experiments that allows me to quantify the generation of turbulence driven by the periodic oscillations of the fluid containing boundary through tides and libration. These laboratory experiments replicate the fundamental ingredients found in planetary environments and are necessary for the excitation of instabilities that drive the turbulent fluid motions. For librational forcing, a rigid ellipsoidal container and ellipsoidal shell of isothermal unstratified fluid is made to rotate with a superimposed oscillation while, for tidal forcing, an elastic ellipsoidal container of isothermal unstratified fluid is made to rotate while an independently rotating perturbance also flexes the elastic container. By varying the strength and frequencies of these oscillations the

  17. Mobile Lid Convection Beneath Enceladus' South Polar Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Amy C.

    2008-01-01

    Enceladus' south polar region has a large heat flux, 55-110 milliwatts per square meter (or higher), that is spatially associated with cryovolcanic and tectonic activity. Tidal dissipation and vigorous convection in the underlying ice shell are possible sources of heat; however, prior predictions of the heat flux carried by stagnant lid convection range from F(sub conv) 15 to 30 milliwatts per square meter, too low to explain the observed heat flux. The high heat flux and increased cryovolcanic and tectonic activity suggest that near-surface ice in the region has become rheologically and mechanically weakened enough to permit convective plumes to reach close to the surface. If the yield strength of Enceladus' lithosphere is less than 1-10 kPa, convection may instead occur in the mobile lid" regime, which is characterized by large heat fluxes and large horizontal velocities in the near-surface ice. I show that model ice shells with effective surface viscosities between 10(exp 16) and 10(exp 17) Pa s and basal viscosities between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 15) Pa s have convective heat fluxes comparable to that observed by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer. If this style of convection is occurring, the south polar terrain should be spreading horizontally with v1-10 millimeter per year and should be resurfaced in 0.1-10 Ma. On the basis of Cassini imaging data, the south polar terrain is 0.5 Ma old, consistent with the mobile lid hypothesis. Maxwell viscoelastic tidal dissipation in such ice shells is not capable of generating enough heat to balance convective heat transport. However, tidal heat may also be generated in the near-surface along faults as suggested by Nimmo et al. and/or viscous dissipation within the ice shell may occur by other processes not accounted for by the canonical Maxwell dissipation model.

  18. Mobile Lid Convection Beneath Enceladus' South Polar Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Amy C.

    2008-01-01

    Enceladus' south polar region has a large heat flux, 55-110 milliwatts per square meter (or higher), that is spatially associated with cryovolcanic and tectonic activity. Tidal dissipation and vigorous convection in the underlying ice shell are possible sources of heat; however, prior predictions of the heat flux carried by stagnant lid convection range from F(sub conv) 15 to 30 milliwatts per square meter, too low to explain the observed heat flux. The high heat flux and increased cryovolcanic and tectonic activity suggest that near-surface ice in the region has become rheologically and mechanically weakened enough to permit convective plumes to reach close to the surface. If the yield strength of Enceladus' lithosphere is less than 1-10 kPa, convection may instead occur in the mobile lid" regime, which is characterized by large heat fluxes and large horizontal velocities in the near-surface ice. I show that model ice shells with effective surface viscosities between 10(exp 16) and 10(exp 17) Pa s and basal viscosities between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 15) Pa s have convective heat fluxes comparable to that observed by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer. If this style of convection is occurring, the south polar terrain should be spreading horizontally with v1-10 millimeter per year and should be resurfaced in 0.1-10 Ma. On the basis of Cassini imaging data, the south polar terrain is 0.5 Ma old, consistent with the mobile lid hypothesis. Maxwell viscoelastic tidal dissipation in such ice shells is not capable of generating enough heat to balance convective heat transport. However, tidal heat may also be generated in the near-surface along faults as suggested by Nimmo et al. and/or viscous dissipation within the ice shell may occur by other processes not accounted for by the canonical Maxwell dissipation model.

  19. Shelled opisthobranchs.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Paula M

    2002-01-01

    In his contributions to the monographic series "Manual of Conchology", Henry Pilsbry reviewed the subgroup Tectibranchiata, comprising those opisthobranch snails that (at least primitively) still possess a shell (Pilsbry, 1894-1896). Exemplified by the Cephalaspidea (bubble shells), others included in this group at Pilsbry's time and since were Anaspidea (sea hares) and the shelled members of Notaspidea (side-gilled slugs) and Sacoglossa (leaf slugs). Pilsbry (and others since his time) considered tectibranchs to be the "root stock" from which more advanced gastropods such as Nudibranchia and Pulmonata were derived. Tectibranch systematics is firmly based on conchology and most species were originally described from empty shells. However, soft-anatomical characters were acknowledged quite early on as equally important in tectibranchs, due to the reduction of their shells and their evolutionary proximity to unshelled gastropods. Today, Tectibranchiata is not recognized as a natural taxon although the word "tectibranch" (like "prosobranch" and "mesogastropod") continues in vernacular use. Shelled opisthobranchs have been redistributed among various taxa, including several new ones--the unresolved basal opisthobranchs (Architectibranchia) and the "lower Heterobranchia", an enigmatic and currently much-studied group of families considered basal to all of Euthyneura (Opisthobranchia and landsnails (Pulmonata)). Despite their polyphyletic status, shelled opisthobranchs remain important subjects in evolutionary studies of gastropods--as the most basal members of nearly every opisthobranch clade and as organisms with mosaic combinations of primitive and derived features within evolutionary "trends" (e.g., loss of the shell, detorsion, concentration of the nervous system, ecological specialization, etc.). Although they play a pivotal role, the shelled opisthobranchs have received minimal attention in more comprehensive gastropod studies, often relegated to token

  20. Angular Momentum Transport in Turbulent Compressible Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, N. E.; Brummell, N. H.; Toomre, J.

    1996-05-01

    We consider the dynamics of compressible convection within a curved local segment of a rotating spherical shell, aiming to resolve the disparity between the differential rotation profiles predicted by previous laminar simulations (angular velocity constant on cylinders) and those deduced from helioseismic inversion of the observed frequency splitting of p modes. By limiting the horizontal extent of the domain under study, we can utilize the available spatial degrees of freedom on current supercomputers to attain more turbulent flows than in the full shell. Our previous study of three-dimensional convection within a slab geometry of an f-plane neglected the effects of curvature, and thus did not admit the generation of Rossby waves. These waves propagate in the longitudinal direction and thus produce rather different spectral characteristics and mean flows in the north-south and east-west directions. By considering motions in a curvilinear geometry in which the Coriolis parameter varies with latitude, we admit the possibility of Rossby waves which couple to the turbulent convection. Here we present simulations with Rayleigh numbers in excess of 10(6) , and Prandtl numbers less than 0.1 in such a curved local segment of a spherical shell using a newly developed code based on compact finite differences. This computational domain takes the form of a curved, periodic channel in longitude with stress-free sidewalls in latitude and radius. Despite the differences in geometry and boundary conditions, the flows maintain similarities with those of our previous f-plane simulations. The surface flows form broad, laminar networks which mask the much more turbulent flows of the interior. The dynamics within this turbulent region is controlled by the interactions of a tangled web of strong vortex tubes. These interactions are further complicated by the effects of curvature. The differential rotation generated by the turbulent convection typically increases with depth and attains

  1. Leo Kadanoff's legacy for turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef

    Rayleigh-Benard (RB) convection -- the buoyancy-driven flow of a fluid heated from below and cooled from above -- is a classical problem in fluid dynamics. It played a crucial role in the development of stability theory in hydrodynamics (Rayleigh, Chandrasekhar) and had been paradigmatic in pattern formation and in the study of spatial-temporal chaos (Ahlers, Libchaber, and many other). It was Leo Kadanoff and his associates in Chicago who, in the 1980s and 1990s, propagated the RB system as paradigmatic for the physics of fully developed turbulence and contributed tremendously to today's understanding of thermally driven turbulence. He and his experimental coworkers (Libchaber et al.) revealed the importance of the thermal plumes and the large-scale wind, and elucidated the interplay between thermal boundary layers and bulk. His scaling analysis laid the basis for our present understanding of turbulent convection, which I will review in this talk, highlighting Leo's trailblazing contributions. Kadanoff session.

  2. Driving factors of electro-convective instability in concentration polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Rjal, Ramadan; Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Until recently, based on the analysis pertaining to a perfectly charge selective interface, electro-convective instability in concentration polarization was attributed to the nonequilibrium mechanism related to the extended space charge which forms next to that of the electric double layer near the limiting current. More recently it was shown that imperfect charge selectivity of the interface makes equilibrium instability possible, driven by either equilibrium electro-osmosis or bulk electro-convection, or both. In this paper we identify and analyze the major surface and bulk factors affecting the electro-convective instability. These factors, some known previously under the names of diffusio-osmosis, electro-osmosis, or bulk electro-convection, and some newly identified in this paper are manifestations of the electric force and pressure gradient, balanced by the viscous force acting in various locations in solution. The contribution of these factors to hydrodynamic stability in concentration polarization is analyzed for a varying charge selectivity of the interface.

  3. Resurgence in extended hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniceto, Inês; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been understood that the hydrodynamic series generated by the Müller-Israel-Stewart theory is divergent and that this large-order behavior is consistent with the theory of resurgence. Furthermore, it was observed that the physical origin of this is the presence of a purely damped nonhydrodynamic mode. It is very interesting to ask whether this picture persists in cases where the spectrum of nonhydrodynamic modes is richer. We take the first step in this direction by considering the simplest hydrodynamic theory which, instead of the purely damped mode, contains a pair of nonhydrodynamic modes of complex conjugate frequencies. This mimics the pattern of black brane quasinormal modes which appear on the gravity side of the AdS/CFT description of N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma. We find that the resulting hydrodynamic series is divergent in a way consistent with resurgence and precisely encodes information about the nonhydrodynamic modes of the theory.

  4. Hydrodynamic Vortex on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzo, Clodoaldo Grotta; de Barros Viglioni, Humberto Henrique

    2017-04-01

    The equations of motion for a system of point vortices on an oriented Riemannian surface of finite topological type are presented. The equations are obtained from a Green's function on the surface. The uniqueness of the Green's function is established under hydrodynamic conditions at the surface's boundaries and ends. The hydrodynamic force on a point vortex is computed using a new weak formulation of Euler's equation adapted to the point vortex context. An analogy between the hydrodynamic force on a massive point vortex and the electromagnetic force on a massive electric charge is presented as well as the equations of motion for massive vortices. Any noncompact Riemann surface admits a unique Riemannian metric such that a single vortex in the surface does not move ("Steady Vortex Metric"). Some examples of surfaces with steady vortex metric isometrically embedded in R^3 are presented.

  5. White Dwarf Convection Preceding Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Malone, C. M.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.

    2010-01-01

    In the single degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae, a Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf `simmers' for centuries preceding the ultimate explosion. During this period, reactions near the center drive convection throughout most of the interior of the white dwarf. The details of this convective flow determine how the first flames in the white dwarf ignite. Simulating this phase is difficult because the flows are highly subsonic. Using the low Mach number hydrodynamics code, MAESTRO, we present 3-d, full star models of the final hours of this convective phase, up to the point of ignition of a Type Ia supernova. We discuss the details of the convective velocity field and the locations of the initial hot spots. Finally, we show some preliminary results with rotation. Support for this work came from the DOE/Office of Nuclear Physics, grant No. DE-FG02-06ER41448 (Stony Brook), the SciDAC Program of the DOE Office of Mathematics, Information, and Computational Sciences under the DOE under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL), and the DOE SciDAC program, under grant No. DE-FC02-06ER41438 (UCSC). We made use of the jaguar machine via a DOE INCITE allocation at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computational Facility.

  6. Acoustic-hydrodynamic-flame coupling—A new perspective for zero and low Mach number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulikkottil, V. V.; Sujith, R. I.

    2017-04-01

    A combustion chamber has a hydrodynamic field that convects the incoming fuel and oxidizer into the chamber, thereby causing the mixture to react and produce heat energy. This heat energy can, in turn, modify the hydrodynamic and acoustic fields by acting as a source and thereby, establish a positive feedback loop. Subsequent growth in the amplitude of the acoustic field variables and their eventual saturation to a limit cycle is generally known as thermo-acoustic instability. Mathematical representation of these phenomena, by a set of equations, is the subject of this paper. In contrast to the ad hoc models, an explanation of the flame-acoustic-hydrodynamic coupling, based on fundamental laws of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, is presented in this paper. In this paper, we use a convection reaction diffusion equation, which, in turn, is derived from the fundamental laws of conservation to explain the flame-acoustic coupling. The advantage of this approach is that the physical variables such as hydrodynamic velocity and heat release rate are coupled based on the conservation of energy and not based on an ad hoc model. Our approach shows that the acoustic-hydrodynamic interaction arises from the convection of acoustic velocity fluctuations by the hydrodynamic field and vice versa. This is a linear mechanism, mathematically represented as a convection operator. This mechanism resembles the non-normal mechanism studied in hydrodynamic theory. We propose that this mechanism could relate the instability mechanisms of hydrodynamic and thermo-acoustic systems. Furthermore, the acoustic-hydrodynamic interaction is shown to be responsible for the convection of entropy disturbances from the inlet of the chamber. The theory proposed in this paper also unifies the observations in the fields of low Mach number flows and zero Mach number flows. In contrast to the previous findings, where compressibility is shown to be causing different physics for zero and low Mach

  7. Hydrodynamics of bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlt, Jochen; Duncan, William J.; Poon, Wilson C. K.

    2005-08-01

    Suspensions of motile E. coli bacteria serve as a model system to experimentally study the hydrodynamics of active particle suspensions. Colloidal probe particles are localised within a suspension of motile bacteria by use of optical tweezers and their uctuations are monitored. The activity of the bacteria effects the fluctuations of the probe particles and their correlation, revealing information about the hydrodynamics of the suspension. We highlight experimental problems that make the interpretation of 'single probe' experiments (as reported before in literature) diffcult and present some preliminary results for 'dual probe' cross-correlation experiments.

  8. Convection in large icy satellites with self-consistent grain-size evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, A. C.; McKinnon, W. B.

    2005-12-01

    The viscosity of ice I is grain-size dependent for temperature and stress conditions appropriate for ice I shells of midsized and large icy satellites. Satellite thermal evolution, heat flux, critical shell thickness for convection, brittle/ductile transition depth, and potential surface deformation are grain size-dependent. We estimate grain sizes in a convecting shell using the empirical observation from polar ice sheets that d ~ A σ-1, where A is a thermal activation term, and σ is shear stress [De La Chappelle et al., JGR 103, 1998] due to dynamic recrystallization. We use a composite volume diffusion/GBS rheology for ice I in the convection model Citcom [Barr et al., JGR, 2004] to self-consistently model strain rates and grain sizes in convecting shells. Estimates of grain size are reasonable if the grain-growth time scale is less than the convective overturn time scale (~ 105 - 107 yr for large icy satellites), and the shell is free of impurities that limit grain growth. For large icy satellites, the composite rheology and uniform grain size predict sluggish convection unless the grain size is small (<1 mm). Convection can only occur if d < 2 cm [Barr and Pappalardo, JGR, in press, 2005], and then only for d < 2-4 mm if initial thermal perturbations are small [McKinnon, Icarus, in press]. Dynamic recrystallization predicts, for example, d ~ 1 mm in the convecting interior and d ~ 10 cm in the stagnant lid for an ice shell 50 km thick. Compared with models with a similar but uniform grain size in the convective region, heat fluxes are larger, and shallower brittle/ductile transition depths.

  9. Tharmocapillary convection in a liquid bridge under microgravity condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K. N.

    The paper highlights the onset of the oscillatory thermocapillary convection in a liquid bridge, subjected to g-jitters. Thermocapillary convection refers to motion driven by the application of a temperature gradient along the interface. The temperature gradient may be large enough to cause oscillations in the basic state of the fluid. The appearance of the oscillatory thermocapillary convection couples with the solidification processes leads to the striations and results into the degradation of the crystals. The vast majority of the liquid bridge investigations performed aboard on the sounding rockets or the space shuttles [1, 2] focused on the float zone processes because the process has been regarded as a candidate for the space based manufacturing of semiconductor materials. The half zone consists of the liquid bridge held between two solid, planar end walls across which a temperature gradient is applied. Thus the basic state of thermocapillary convection consists of a single toroidal roll with the surface motion directed downwards from the hot upper disc to the cold lower one. The interface deformation caused by the gravity jitters depends on the volume of the liquid bridge and cause changes in the physical properties of the liquid, which ultimately influence the basic state of the fluid [3]. The paper discusses thermocapillary convection in a liquid bridge in a microgravity environment. The onset of thermocapillary convection is broadly studied in terms of hydrodynamic instability [4], which requires a traveling wave as the oscillatory mode. Discussions are emphasized in the pattern and oscillatory modes associated with transition process. REFERENCES [1] Grodzka, P.G. and Bannister, T.C., Heat flow and convection demonstration experiments abord Appolo 14, Science (Washington, D.C.), Vol.176, May 1972, pp. 506-508. [2] Bannister, T C., etal, NASA, TMX-64772, 1973 [3] Shukla, K. N., Thermal Convection in a Cylindrical Enclosure, AIAA --2004-1321, 2004 [4

  10. Oscillatory thermocapillary convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundrane, Michael R.; Zebib, Abdelfattah

    1994-01-01

    We study thermocapillary and buoyant thermocapillary convection in rectangular cavities with aspect ratio A = 4 and Pr = 0.015. Two separate problems are considered. The first is combined buoyant thermocapillary convection with a nondeforming interface. We establish neutral curves for transition to oscillatory convection in the Re-Gr plane. It is shown that while pure buoyant convection exhibits oscillatory behavior for Gr is greater than Gr(sub cr) (where Gr(sub cr) is defined for the pure buoyant problem), pure thermocapillary convection is steady within the range of parameters tested. In the second problem, we consider the influence of surface deformation on the pure thermocapillary problem. For the range of parameters considered, thermocapillary convection remained steady.

  11. Hydrodynamics studies of cyclic voltammetry for electrochemical micro biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesokan, B. J.; Quan, X.; Evgrafov, A.; Sørensen, M. P.; Heiskanen, A.; Boisen, A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of flow rate on the electrical current response to the applied voltage in a micro electrochemical system. To accomplish this, we considered an ion-transport model that is governed by the Nernst-Planck equation coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations for hydrodynamics. The Butler-Volmer relation provides the boundary conditions, which represent reaction kinetics at the electrode-electrolyte interface. The result shows that convection drastically affects the rate of surface kinetics. At a physically sufficient high flow rates and lower scan rates, the current response is limited by the convection due to fresh ions being brought to the electrode surface and immediately taken away before any surface reaction. However, at high flow and scan rates, the Faradaic current overrides current due to convection. The model also allows predicting the effect of varying electrolyte concentration and scan rates respectively.

  12. Skew resisting hydrodynamic seal

    DOEpatents

    Conroy, William T.; Dietle, Lannie L.; Gobeli, Jeffrey D.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.

    2001-01-01

    A novel hydrodynamically lubricated compression type rotary seal that is suitable for lubricant retention and environmental exclusion. Particularly, the seal geometry ensures constraint of a hydrodynamic seal in a manner preventing skew-induced wear and provides adequate room within the seal gland to accommodate thermal expansion. The seal accommodates large as-manufactured variations in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the sealing material, provides a relatively stiff integral spring effect to minimize pressure-induced shuttling of the seal within the gland, and also maintains interfacial contact pressure within the dynamic sealing interface in an optimum range for efficient hydrodynamic lubrication and environment exclusion. The seal geometry also provides for complete support about the circumference of the seal to receive environmental pressure, as compared the interrupted character of seal support set forth in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,873,576 and 6,036,192 and provides a hydrodynamic seal which is suitable for use with non-Newtonian lubricants.

  13. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  14. Hydrodynamics of the Dirac spectrum

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yizhuang; Warchoł, Piotr; Zahed, Ismail

    2015-12-15

    We discuss a hydrodynamical description of the eigenvalues of the Dirac spectrum in even dimensions in the vacuum and in the large N (volume) limit. The linearized hydrodynamics supports sound waves. The hydrodynamical relaxation of the eigenvalues is captured by a hydrodynamical (tunneling) minimum configuration which follows from a pertinent form of Euler equation. As a result, the relaxation from a phase of unbroken chiral symmetry to a phase of broken chiral symmetry occurs over a time set by the speed of sound.

  15. Turbulent Chemical Diffusion in Convectively Bounded Carbon Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Schwab, Josiah; Quataert, Eliot; Bildsten, Lars; Timmes, F. X.; Burns, Keaton J.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2016-11-01

    It has been proposed that mixing induced by convective overshoot can disrupt the inward propagation of carbon deflagrations in super-asymptotic giant branch stars. To test this theory, we study an idealized model of convectively bounded carbon flames with 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the Boussinesq equations using the pseudo-spectral code Dedalus. Because the flame propagation timescale is much longer than the convection timescale, we approximate the flame as fixed in space, and only consider its effects on the buoyancy of the fluid. By evolving a passive scalar field, we derive a turbulent chemical diffusivity produced by the convection as a function of height, {D}{{t}}(z). Convection can stall a flame if the chemical mixing timescale, set by the turbulent chemical diffusivity, {D}{{t}}, is shorter than the flame propagation timescale, set by the thermal diffusivity, κ, i.e., when {D}{{t}}\\gt κ . However, we find {D}{{t}}\\lt κ for most of the flame because convective plumes are not dense enough to penetrate into the flame. Extrapolating to realistic stellar conditions, this implies that convective mixing cannot stall a carbon flame and that “hybrid carbon-oxygen-neon” white dwarfs are not a typical product of stellar evolution.

  16. Shell Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Bill

    1982-01-01

    The author critiques the program design and educational aspects of the Shell Games, a program developed by Apple Computer, Inc., which can be used by the teacher to design objective tests for adaptation to specific assessment needs. (For related articles, see EC 142 959-962.) (Author)

  17. Shell Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Bill

    1982-01-01

    The author critiques the program design and educational aspects of the Shell Games, a program developed by Apple Computer, Inc., which can be used by the teacher to design objective tests for adaptation to specific assessment needs. (For related articles, see EC 142 959-962.) (Author)

  18. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. L.; Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres, which are used for inertial-confinement fusion targets, are formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a drop-tower furnace. The modelling of this gel-to-sphere transformation has consisted of three phases: gel thermochemistry, furnance-to-gel heat transfer, and gravity-driven degradation of the concentricity of the molten shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the free-falling gel particle was modelled with forced convection. The gel mass, dimensions, and specific heat as well as furnace temperature profile and furnace gas conductivity, were controlled variables. This model has been experimentally verified. In the third phase, a mathematical model was developed to describe the gravity-driven degradation of concentricity in molten glass shells.

  19. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. L.; Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres, which are used for inertial-confinement fusion targets, are formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a drop-tower furnace. The modelling of this gel-to-sphere transformation has consisted of three phases: gel thermochemistry, furnance-to-gel heat transfer, and gravity-driven degradation of the concentricity of the molten shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the free-falling gel particle was modelled with forced convection. The gel mass, dimensions, and specific heat as well as furnace temperature profile and furnace gas conductivity, were controlled variables. This model has been experimentally verified. In the third phase, a mathematical model was developed to describe the gravity-driven degradation of concentricity in molten glass shells.

  20. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  1. Convection and downbursts

    Treesearch

    Joseph J. Charney; Brian E. Potter

    2017-01-01

    Convection and downbursts are connected meteorological phenomena with the potential to affect fire behavior and thereby alter the evolution of a wildland fire. Meteorological phenomena related to convection and downbursts are often discussed in the context of fire behavior and smoke. The physical mechanisms that contribute to these phenomena are interrelated, but the...

  2. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  3. Examining the Impact of Prandtl Number and Surface Convection Models on Deep Solar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, B. D.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent motions within the solar convection zone play a central role in the generation and maintenance of the Sun's magnetic field. This magnetic field reverses its polarity every 11 years and serves as the source of powerful space weather events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which can affect artificial satellites and power grids. The structure and inductive properties are linked to the amplitude (i.e. speed) of convective motion. Using the NASA Pleiades supercomputer, a 3D fluids code simulates these processes by evolving the Navier-Stokes equations in time and under an anelastic constraint. This code simulates the fluxes describing heat transport in the sun in a global spherical-shell geometry. Such global models can explicitly capture the large-scale motions in the deep convection zone but heat transport from unresolved small-scale convection in the surface layers must be parameterized. Here we consider two models for heat transport by surface convection, including a conventional turbulent thermal diffusion as well as an imposed flux that carries heat through the surface in a manner that is independent of the deep convection and the entropy stratification it establishes. For both models, we investigate the scaling of convective amplitude with decreasing diffusion (increasing Rayleigh number). If the Prandtl number is fixed, we find that the amplitude of convective motions increases with decreasing diffusion, possibly reaching an asymptotic value in the low diffusion limit. However, if only the thermal diffusion is decreased (keeping the viscosity fixed), we find that the amplitude of convection decreases with decreasing diffusion. Such a high-Prandtl-number, high-Peclet-number limit may be relevant for the Sun if magnetic fields mix momentum, effectively acting as an enhanced viscosity. In this case, our results suggest that the amplitude of large-scale convection in the Sun may be substantially less than in current models that employ an

  4. Onset of Convection in Ice I with Composite Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Rheology: Application to the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Ice I exhibits a complex rheology at temperature and pressure conditions appropriate for the interiors of the ice I shells of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. We use numerical methods and existing parameterizations of the critical Rayleigh number to determine the conditions required to trigger convection in an ice I shell with the stress-, temperature- and grain size- dependent rheology measured in laboratory experiments by Goldsby and Kohlstedt [2001]. The critical Rayleigh number depends on the ice grain size and the amplitude and wavelength of temperature perturbation issued to an initially conductive ice I shell. If the shells have an assumed uniform grain size less than 0.4 mm, deformation during initial plume growth is accommodated by Newtonian volume diffusion. If the ice grain size is between 0.4 mm and 3 cm, deformation during plume growth is accommodated by weakly non-Newtonian grain boundary sliding, where the critical ice shell thickness for convection depends on the amplitude of temperature perturbation to the _0.5 power. If the ice grain size exceeds 2 cm, convection can not occur in the ice I shells of the Galilean satellites regardless of the amplitude or wavelength of temperature perturbation. If the grain size in a convecting ice I shell evolves to effective values greater than 2 cm, convection will cease. If the ice shell has a grain size large enough to permit flow by dislocation creep, the ice is too stiff to permit convection, even in the thickest possible ice I shell. Consideration of the composite rheology implies that estimates of the grain size in the satellites and knowledge of their initial thermal states are required when judging the convective instability of their ice I shells.

  5. Onset of Convection in Ice I with Composite Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Rheology: Application to the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Ice I exhibits a complex rheology at temperature and pressure conditions appropriate for the interiors of the ice I shells of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. We use numerical methods and existing parameterizations of the critical Rayleigh number to determine the conditions required to trigger convection in an ice I shell with the stress-, temperature- and grain size- dependent rheology measured in laboratory experiments by Goldsby and Kohlstedt [2001]. The critical Rayleigh number depends on the ice grain size and the amplitude and wavelength of temperature perturbation issued to an initially conductive ice I shell. If the shells have an assumed uniform grain size less than 0.4 mm, deformation during initial plume growth is accommodated by Newtonian volume diffusion. If the ice grain size is between 0.4 mm and 3 cm, deformation during plume growth is accommodated by weakly non-Newtonian grain boundary sliding, where the critical ice shell thickness for convection depends on the amplitude of temperature perturbation to the _0.5 power. If the ice grain size exceeds 2 cm, convection can not occur in the ice I shells of the Galilean satellites regardless of the amplitude or wavelength of temperature perturbation. If the grain size in a convecting ice I shell evolves to effective values greater than 2 cm, convection will cease. If the ice shell has a grain size large enough to permit flow by dislocation creep, the ice is too stiff to permit convection, even in the thickest possible ice I shell. Consideration of the composite rheology implies that estimates of the grain size in the satellites and knowledge of their initial thermal states are required when judging the convective instability of their ice I shells.

  6. A three-dimensional convective dynamo solution with rotating and finitely conducting inner core and mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Roberts, Paul H.

    We present the first three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, self-consistent numerical solution of the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equations that describe thermal convection and magnetic field generation in a rapidly rotating spherical fluid shell with a solid conducting inner core. This solution, which serves as a crude analog for the geodynamo, is a self-sustaining supercritical dynamo that has maintained a magnetic field for three magnetic diffusion times, roughly 40 000 years. Fluid velocity in the outer core reaches a maximum of 0.4 cm s -1, and at times the magnetic field can be as large as 560 gauss. Magnetic energy is usually about 4000 times greater than the kinetic energy of the convection that maintains it. Viscous and magnetic coupling to both the inner core below and the mantle above cause time-dependent variations in their respective rotation rates; the inner core usually rotates faster than the mantle and decadal variations in the length of the day of the mantle are similar to those observed for the Earth. The pattern and amplitude of the radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and its secular variation are also similar to the Earth's. The maximum amplitudes of the longitudinally averaged temperature gradient, shear flow, helicity, and magnetic field oscillate between the northern and southern hemispheres on a time scale of a few thousand years. However, only once in many attempts does the field succeed in reversing its polarity because the field in the inner core, which has the opposite polarity to the field in most of the outer core, usually does not have enough time to reverse before the field in the outer core changes again. One successful magnetic field reversal occurs near the end of our simulation.

  7. Global tectonics from mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, N.

    2015-12-01

    The motions of the surface of the Earth are described using the theory of Plate Tectonics. Despite the fact that this theory has shaped modern geosciences it has some limitations, and among them the impossibility to evaluate the forces at the origin of the surface displacements and deformations. Hence important questions remain difficult to solve like the origin of the sizes of plates, forces driving mountain building or supercontinent dispersal... Tremendous progresses have been made in the past 15 years in mantle convection modelling. Especially, modern convection codes can solve for motion equations with complex material properties. Since the early 2000's, the development of pseudo-plastic rheologies contributed to produce convection models with plate-like behaviour: plates naturally emerge and interact with the flow in a self-organized manner. Using such models in 3D spherical geometry (computed with StagYY - Tackley, 2008), I will show that important questions on the global tectonics of the planet can be addressed now: the distribution of seafloor ages, the distribution of plate area, the lifetime of small and large plates or modes of plate reorganizations. Tackley, P.J., Modellng compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter, 171, 7-18 (2008).

  8. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  9. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  10. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  11. Superluminous Supernovae hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, M.

    2017-07-01

    We use our radiation hydrodynamic code in order to simulate magnetar powered Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe). It is assumed that a central rapidly rotating magnetar deposits all its rotational energy into the ejecta where is added to the usual power. The magnetar luminosity and spin-down timescale are adopted as the free parameters of the model. For the case of ASASSN-15lh, which has been claimed as the most luminous supernova ever discovered, we have found physically plausible magnetar parameters can reproduce the overall shape of the bolometric light curve (LC) provided the progenitor mass is ≍ 8M⊙. The ejecta dynamics of this event shows signs of the magnetar energy input which deviates the expansion from the usually assumed homologous behaviour. Our numerical experiments lead us to conclude that the hydrodynamical modeling is necessary in order to derive the properties of powerful magnetars driving SLSNe.

  12. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  13. Layered Thermohaline Convection in Hypersaline GeothermalSystems

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Pruess, Karsten

    1997-01-05

    Thermohaline convection occurs in hypersaline geothermal systems due to thermal and salinity effects on liquid density. Because of its importance in oceanography, thermohaline convection in viscous liquids has received more attention than thermohaline convection in porous media. The fingered and layered convection patterns observed in viscous liquid thermohaline convection have been hypothesized to occur also in porous media. However, the extension of convective dynamics from viscous liquid systems to porous media systems is complicated by the presence of the solid matrix in porous media. The solid grains cause thermal retardation, hydrodynamic dispersion, and permeability effects. We present simulations of thermohaline convection in model systems based on the Salton Sea Geothermal System, California, that serve to point out the general dynamics of porous media thermohaline convection in the diffusive regime, and the effects of porosity and permeability, in particular. We use the TOUGH2 simulator with residual formulation and fully coupled solution technique for solving the strongly coupled equations governing thermohaline convection in porous media. We incorporate a model for brine density that takes into account the effects of NaCl and CaCl2. Simulations show that in forced convection, the increased pore velocity and thermal retardation in low-porosity regions enhances brine transport relative to heat transport. In thermohaline convection, the heat and brine transport are strongly coupled and enhanced transport of brine over heat cannot occur because buoyancy caused by heat and brine together drive the flow. Random permeability heterogeneity has a limited effect if the scale of flow is much larger than the scale of permeability heterogeneity. For the system studied here, layered thermohaline convection persists for more than one million years for a variety of initial conditions. Our simulations suggest that layered thermohaline convection is possible in

  14. Hydrodynamic Design Optimization Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    appreciated. The authors would also like to thank David Walden and Francis Noblesse of Code 50 for being instrumental in defining this project, Wesley...and efficiently during the early stage of the design process. The Computational Fluid Dynamics ( CFD ) group at George Mason University has an...specific design constraints. In order to apply CFD -based tool to the hydrodynamic design optimization of ship hull forms, an initial hull form is

  15. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-08-07

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms.

  16. Hydrodynamic blade guide

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Davis, Pete J.; Landram, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    A saw having a self-pumped hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing for retaining the saw blade in a centered position in the saw kerf (width of cut made by the saw). The hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing utilizes pockets or grooves incorporated into the sides of the blade. The saw kerf in the workpiece provides the guide or bearing stator surface. Both sides of the blade entrain cutting fluid as the blade enters the kerf in the workpiece, and the trapped fluid provides pressure between the blade and the workpiece as an inverse function of the gap between the blade surface and the workpiece surface. If the blade wanders from the center of the kerf, then one gap will increase and one gap will decrease and the consequent pressure difference between the two sides of the blade will cause the blade to re-center itself in the kerf. Saws using the hydrodynamic blade guide or bearing have particular application in slicing slabs from boules of single crystal materials, for example, as well as for cutting other difficult to saw materials such as ceramics, glass, and brittle composite materials.

  17. Hydrodynamics of insect spermatozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, On Shun; Lauga, Eric

    2010-11-01

    Microorganism motility plays important roles in many biological processes including reproduction. Many microorganisms propel themselves by propagating traveling waves along their flagella. Depending on the species, propagation of planar waves (e.g. Ceratium) and helical waves (e.g. Trichomonas) were observed in eukaryotic flagellar motion, and hydrodynamic models for both were proposed in the past. However, the motility of insect spermatozoa remains largely unexplored. An interesting morphological feature of such cells, first observed in Tenebrio molitor and Bacillus rossius, is the double helical deformation pattern along the flagella, which is characterized by the presence of two superimposed helical flagellar waves (one with a large amplitude and low frequency, and the other with a small amplitude and high frequency). Here we present the first hydrodynamic investigation of the locomotion of insect spermatozoa. The swimming kinematics, trajectories and hydrodynamic efficiency of the swimmer are computed based on the prescribed double helical deformation pattern. We then compare our theoretical predictions with experimental measurements, and explore the dependence of the swimming performance on the geometric and dynamical parameters.

  18. Hydrodynamics of fossil fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Thomas; Altringham, John; Peakall, Jeffrey; Wignall, Paul; Dorrell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    From their earliest origins, fishes have developed a suite of adaptations for locomotion in water, which determine performance and ultimately fitness. Even without data from behaviour, soft tissue and extant relatives, it is possible to infer a wealth of palaeobiological and palaeoecological information. As in extant species, aspects of gross morphology such as streamlining, fin position and tail type are optimized even in the earliest fishes, indicating similar life strategies have been present throughout their evolutionary history. As hydrodynamical studies become more sophisticated, increasingly complex fluid movement can be modelled, including vortex formation and boundary layer control. Drag-reducing riblets ornamenting the scales of fast-moving sharks have been subjected to particularly intense research, but this has not been extended to extinct forms. Riblets are a convergent adaptation seen in many Palaeozoic fishes, and probably served a similar hydrodynamic purpose. Conversely, structures which appear to increase skin friction may act as turbulisors, reducing overall drag while serving a protective function. Here, we examine the diverse adaptions that contribute to drag reduction in modern fishes and review the few attempts to elucidate the hydrodynamics of extinct forms. PMID:24943377

  19. Shell worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  20. Magneto-convection.

    PubMed

    Stein, Robert F

    2012-07-13

    Convection is the transport of energy by bulk mass motions. Magnetic fields alter convection via the Lorentz force, while convection moves the fields via the curl(v×B) term in the induction equation. Recent ground-based and satellite telescopes have increased our knowledge of the solar magnetic fields on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Magneto-convection modelling has also greatly improved recently as computers become more powerful. Three-dimensional simulations with radiative transfer and non-ideal equations of state are being performed. Flux emergence from the convection zone through the visible surface (and into the chromosphere and corona) has been modelled. Local, convectively driven dynamo action has been studied. The alteration in the appearance of granules and the formation of pores and sunspots has been investigated. Magneto-convection calculations have improved our ability to interpret solar observations, especially the inversion of Stokes spectra to obtain the magnetic field and the use of helioseismology to determine the subsurface structure of the Sun.

  1. Observing Convective Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-06-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  2. Gas distribution and starbursts in shell galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, Melinda L.; Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Detailed maps of most elliptical galaxies reveal that, whereas the greatest part of their luminous mass originates from a smooth distribution with a surface brightness approximated by a de Vaucouleurs law, a small percentage of their light is contributed by low surface brightness distortions termed 'fine structures'. The sharp-edged features called 'shells' are successfully reproduced by merger and infall models involving accretion from less massive companions. In this context, dwarf spheroidal and compact disk galaxies are likely progenitors of these stellar phenomena. However, it is probable that the sources of shell-forming material also contain significant amounts of gas. This component may play an important role in constraining the formation and evolution of shell galaxies. To investigate the effects of the gaseous component, numerical simulations were performed to study the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies containing both gas and stars by more massive primaries, and the evolution of the ensuing debris. The calculations were performed with a hybrid N-body/hydrodynamics code. Collisionless matter is evolved using a conventional N-body technique and gas is treated using smoothed particle hydrodynamics in which self-gravitating fluid elements are represented as particles evolving according to Lagrangian hydrodynamic equations. An isothermal equation of state is employed so the gas remains at a temperature 104 K. Owing to the large mass ratio between the primary and companion, the primary is modeled as a rigid potential and the self-gravity of both galaxies is neglected.

  3. Convection in Ice I with Composite Newtonian/Non-Newtonian Rheology: Application to the Icy Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Amy C.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2005-01-01

    Ice I exhibits a complex rheology at temperature and pressure conditions appropriate for the interiors of the outer ice I shells of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. We use numerical methods to determine the conditions required to trigger convection in an ice I shell with a stress-, temperature-, and grain-size-dependent rheology measured in laboratory experiments by Goldsby and Kohlstedt [2001] (henceforth GK2001). Triggering convection from an initially conductive ice shell with a non-Newtonian rheology for ice I requires that a finite-amplitude temperature perturbation be issued to the ice shell [2]. Here, we characterize the amplitude and wavelength of temperature perturbation required to initiate convection in the outer ice I shells of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto using the GK2001 rheology for a range of ice grain sizes.

  4. A two-column formalism for time-dependent modelling of stellar convection. I. Description of the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stökl, A.

    2008-11-01

    Context: In spite of all the advances in multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, investigations of stellar evolution and stellar pulsations still depend on one-dimensional computations. This paper devises an alternative to the mixing-length theory or turbulence models usually adopted in modelling convective transport in such studies. Aims: The present work attempts to develop a time-dependent description of convection, which reflects the essential physics of convection and that is only moderately dependent on numerical parameters and far less time consuming than existing multi-dimensional hydrodynamics computations. Methods: Assuming that the most extensive convective patterns generate the majority of convective transport, the convective velocity field is described using two parallel, radial columns to represent up- and downstream flows. Horizontal exchange, in the form of fluid flow and radiation, over their connecting interface couples the two columns and allows a simple circulating motion. The main parameters of this convective description have straightforward geometrical meanings, namely the diameter of the columns (corresponding to the size of the convective cells) and the ratio of the cross-section between up- and downdrafts. For this geometrical setup, the time-dependent solution of the equations of radiation hydrodynamics is computed from an implicit scheme that has the advantage of being unaffected by the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy time-step limit. This implementation is part of the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code). Results: To demonstrate the approach, results for convection zones in Cepheids are presented. The convective energy transport and convective velocities agree with expectations for Cepheids and the scheme reproduces both the kinetic energy flux and convective overshoot. A study of the parameter influence shows that the type of solution derived for these stars is in fact fairly robust with respect to the constitutive numerical

  5. Electro-convective versus electroosmotic instability in concentration polarization.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2007-10-31

    Electro-convection is reviewed as a mechanism of mixing in the diffusion layer of a strong electrolyte adjacent to a charge-selective solid, such as an ion exchange (electrodialysis) membrane or an electrode. Two types of electro-convection in strong electrolytes may be distinguished: bulk electro-convection, due to the action of the electric field upon the residual space charge of a quasi-electro-neutral bulk solution, and convection induced by electroosmotic slip, due to electric forces acting in the thin electric double layer of either quasi-equilibrium or non-equilibrium type near the solid/liquid interface. According to recent studies, the latter appears to be the likely source of mixing in the diffusion layer, leading to 'over-limiting' conductance in electrodialysis. Electro-convection near a planar uniform charge selective solid/liquid interface sets on as a result of hydrodynamic instability of one-dimensional steady state electric conduction through such an interface. We compare the results of linear stability analysis obtained for instabilities of this kind appearing in the full electro-convective and limiting non-equilibrium electroosmotic formulations. The short- and long-wave aspects of these instabilities are discussed along with the wave number selection principles.

  6. Spreading of ultrarelativistically expanding shell: An application to GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Siutsou, I. A.; Vereshchagin, G. V.

    2014-02-01

    Optically thick energy dominated plasma created in the source of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) expands radially with acceleration and forms a shell with constant width measured in the laboratory frame. When strong Lorentz factor gradients are present within the shell it is supposed to spread at sufficiently large radii. There are two possible mechanisms of spreading: hydrodynamical and thermal ones. We consider both mechanisms evaluating the amount of spreading that occurs during expansion up to the moment when the expanding shell becomes transparent for photons. We compute the hydrodynamical spreading of an ultrarelativistically expanding shell. In the case of thermal spreading we compute the velocity spread as a function of two parameters: comoving temperature and bulk Lorentz factor of relativistic Maxwellian distribution. Based on this result we determine the value of thermal spreading of relativistically expanding shell. We found that thermal spreading is negligible for typical GRB parameters. Instead hydrodynamical spreading appears to be significant, with the shell width reaching ˜1010 cm for total energy E=1054 erg and baryonic loading B=10-2. Within the fireshell model such spreading will result in the duration of Proper Gamma-Ray Bursts up to several seconds.

  7. Fossil dust shells around luminous supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.

    1975-01-01

    The observed frequency with which infrared excesses appear in F, G, and K supergiants of luminosity class Ia supports the idea that these excesses arise in a 'fossil' circumstellar dust shell that was formed during a prior M-super-giant phase of evolution. The required leftward evolution of the star on the H-R diagram would then imply that the Ledoux, rather than the Schwarzschild, criterion for convective mixing is the correct criterion to use in stellar evolution calculations.

  8. Fossil dust shells around luminous supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.

    1975-01-01

    The observed frequency with which infrared excesses appear in F, G, and K supergiants of luminosity class Ia supports the idea that these excesses arise in a 'fossil' circumstellar dust shell that was formed during a prior M-super-giant phase of evolution. The required leftward evolution of the star on the H-R diagram would then imply that the Ledoux, rather than the Schwarzschild, criterion for convective mixing is the correct criterion to use in stellar evolution calculations.

  9. Pcr by Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) allows for highly sensitive and specific amplification of DNA. It is the backbone of many genetic experiments and tests. Recently, three labs independently uncovered a novel and simple way to perform a PCR reaction. Instead of repetitive heating and cooling, a temperature gradient across the reaction vessel drives thermal convection. By convection, the reaction liquid circulates between hot and cold regions of the chamber. The convection triggers DNA amplification as the DNA melts into two single strands in the hot region and replicates into twice the amount in the cold region. The amplification progresses exponentially as the convection moves on. We review the characteristics of the different approaches and show the benefits and prospects of the method.

  10. Convective Instability in Ice I: Application to Callisto and Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory experiments measuring ice rheology suggest that it deforms under the influence of several nonNewtonian creep mechanisms, where the viscosity depends on both strain rate and temperature [Goldsby & Kohlstedt, 2001]. Whether or not a fluid with a purely temperature-dependent viscosity convects can be determined by comparing the Rayleigh number of the system to the critical Rayleigh number (Racr), which depends on rheological, thermal, and physical parameters of the fluid layer. However, in a nonNewtonian fluid where viscosity depends on the strain rate (i.e. velocity), convection can only occur if a temperature or velocity perturbation is issued to the system to lower the viscosity and permit fluid motions. Therefore, whether convection occurs in an ice I layer depends on initial conditions, in addition to rheological, thermal, and physical properties of the layer. We show new results for a scaling between the critical Rayleigh number and perturbation amplitude for grain boundary sliding rheology. This scaling can be used to determine the conditions required to initiate convection in the ice I shell of a generic icy satellite. We use this scaling to judge the convective instability of Ganymede and Callisto's ice shells in the absence of tidal dissipation.

  11. Mesoscale/convective interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, P. A.; Sun, W. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A novel cumulus parameterization scheme (CPS) has been developed in order to account for mesoscale/convective-scale interaction which considers both the mesoscale and convective scale mass and moisture budgets, under the assumption that the heating rate is a maximum for given environmental conditions. The basis of the CPS is a detailed, quasi-one-dimensional cloud model that calculates mass and moisture fluxes similar to those calculated by the Schlesinger (1978) three-dimensional model.

  12. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    1996-11-01

    This book deals with flows over propellers operating behind ships, and the hydrodynamic forces and movements that the propeller generates on the shaft and on the ship hull. The first part of the book is devoted to fundamentals of the flow about hydrofoil sections and wings, and to propellers in uniform flow, with guidance for design and pragmatic analysis of performance. The second part covers the development of unsteady forces arising from operation in nonuniform hull wakes. A final chapter discusses the optimization of efficiency of compound propulsors. Researchers in ocean technology and naval architecture will find this book appealing.

  13. Incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ellero, Marco Serrano, Mar; Espanol, Pep

    2007-10-01

    We present a smoothed particle hydrodynamic model for incompressible fluids. As opposed to solving a pressure Poisson equation in order to get a divergence-free velocity field, here incompressibility is achieved by requiring as a kinematic constraint that the volume of the fluid particles is constant. We use Lagrangian multipliers to enforce this restriction. These Lagrange multipliers play the role of non-thermodynamic pressures whose actual values are fixed through the kinematic restriction. We use the SHAKE methodology familiar in constrained molecular dynamics as an efficient method for finding the non-thermodynamic pressure satisfying the constraints. The model is tested for several flow configurations.

  14. Characterizing convective cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drager, Aryeh J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2017-06-01

    Cold pools produced by convective storms play an important role in Earth's climate system. However, a common framework does not exist for objectively identifying convective cold pools in observations and models. The present study investigates convective cold pools within a simulation of tropical continental convection that uses a cloud-resolving model with a coupled land-surface model. Multiple variables are assessed for their potential in identifying convective cold pool boundaries, and a novel technique is developed and tested for identifying and tracking cold pools in numerical model simulations. This algorithm is based on surface rainfall rates and radial gradients in the density potential temperature field. The algorithm successfully identifies near-surface cold pool boundaries and is able to distinguish between connected cold pools. Once cold pools have been identified and tracked, composites of cold pool evolution are then constructed, and average cold pool properties are investigated. Wet patches are found to develop within the centers of cold pools where the ground has been soaked with rainwater. These wet patches help to maintain cool surface temperatures and reduce cold pool dissipation, which has implications for the development of subsequent convection.

  15. Hydrodynamics of Relativistic Fireballs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piran, Tsvi; Shemi, Amotz; Narayan, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Many models of gamma-ray bursts involve a fireball, which is an optically thick concentration of radiation energy with a high ratio of energy density to rest mass. We examine analytically and numerically the evolution of a relativistic fireball. We show that, after an early rearrangement phase, most of the matter and energy in the fireball is concentrated within a narrow shell. The shell propagates at nearly the speed of light, with a frozen radial profile, and according to a simple set of scaling laws. The spectrum of the escaping radiation is harder at early times and softer later on. Depending on the initial energy-to-mass ratio, the final outcome of a fireball is either photons with roughly the initial temperature or ultrarelativistic baryons. In the latter case, the energy could be converted back to gamma-rays via interaction with surrounding material.

  16. How to fake hydrodynamic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romatschke, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Flow signatures in experimental data from relativistic ion collisions, are usually interpreted as a fingerprint of the presence of a hydrodynamic phase during the evolution of these systems. I review some theoretical ideas to 'fake' this hydrodynamic behavior in p+A and A+A collisions. I find that transverse flow and femtoscopic measurements can easily be forged through non-hydrodynamic evolution, while large elliptic flow requires some non-vanishing interactions in the hot phase.

  17. Hydrodynamic synchronization of flagellar oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we highlight the physics of synchronization in collections of beating cilia and flagella. We survey the nonlinear dynamics of synchronization in collections of noisy oscillators. This framework is applied to flagellar synchronization by hydrodynamic interactions. The time-reversibility of hydrodynamics at low Reynolds numbers requires swimming strokes that break time-reversal symmetry to facilitate hydrodynamic synchronization. We discuss different physical mechanisms for flagellar synchronization, which break this symmetry in different ways.

  18. Kinetic simulation of hydrodynamic equivalent capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Thomas; Le, Ari; Schmitt, Mark; Herrmann, Hans

    2016-10-01

    We have carried out simulations of direct-drive hydrodynamic equivalent capsule implosion experiments conducted on Omega laser facility at the Laboratory of Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester. The capsules had a glass shell (SiO2) 4.87 μm with an inner diameter of 1086 μm. One was filled with deuterium (D) and tritium (T) at 6.635 and 2.475 atmospheric pressure respectively. The other capsule with D, T, and He-3 at 2.475, 2.475, and 5.55 atmospheric pressure respectively. The capsules were imploded with 60 laser beams with a square pulse length of 0.6ns of total energy of 15.6 kJ. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic calculations with HYDRA and kinetic particle/hybrid simulations with LSP are carried out for the post-shot analysis. HYDRA outputs at 0.6ns are linked to LSP, in which the electrons are treated as a fluid while all the ion dynamics is simulated by the standard particle-in-cell technique. Additionally, simulations with the new photon package in LSP are initiated at the beginning of the implosion to include the implosion phase of the capsule. The simulation results of density, temperature, and velocity profiles of the electrons, D, T, He-3, and SiO2species are compared with HYDRA. Detail comparisons among the kinetic simulations, rad-hydro simulations, and experimental results of neutron yield, yield ratio, fusion burn histories, and shell convergence will be presented to assess plasma kinetic effects. Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W7405-ENG-36.

  19. The effects of convective overshooting on naked helium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing-Zhi; Zhu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Lü, Guo-Liang

    2016-09-01

    Using stellar evolutionary models, we investigate the effects of convective overshooting on naked helium stars. We find that a larger value of overshooting parameter δov results in a larger convective core, which prolongs the lifetimes of naked helium stars on the helium main sequence and leads to higher effective temperatures and luminosities. For naked helium stars with masses lower than about 0.8 M⊙, they hardly become giant stars as a result of a weak burning shell. However, naked helium stars with masses between about 0.8 M⊙ and 1.1 M⊙ can evolve into giant branch phases, and finally become carbon oxygen white dwarfs.

  20. Molecular Hydrodynamics from Memory Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as t-3 /2 . We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, which is at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. Lastly, we discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales, and the crossover between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius.

  1. TURBULENT CONVECTION IN STELLAR INTERIORS. III. MEAN-FIELD ANALYSIS AND STRATIFICATION EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Viallet, Maxime; Meakin, Casey; Mocak, Miroslav; Arnett, David

    2013-05-20

    We present three-dimensional implicit large eddy simulations of the turbulent convection in the envelope of a 5 M{sub Sun} red giant star and in the oxygen-burning shell of a 23 M{sub Sun} supernova progenitor. The numerical models are analyzed in the framework of one-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The effects of pressure fluctuations are more important in the red giant model, owing to larger stratification of the convective zone. We show how this impacts different terms in the mean-field equations. We clarify the driving sources of kinetic energy, and show that the rate of turbulent dissipation is comparable to the convective luminosity. Although our flows have low Mach numbers and are nearly adiabatic, our analysis is general and can be applied to photospheric convection as well. The robustness of our analysis of turbulent convection is supported by the insensitivity of the mean-field balances to linear mesh resolution. We find robust results for the turbulent convection zone and the stable layers in the oxygen-burning shell model, and robust results everywhere in the red giant model, but the mean fields are not well converged in the narrow boundary regions (which contain steep gradients) in the oxygen-burning shell model. This last result illustrates the importance of unresolved physics at the convective boundary, which governs the mixing there.

  2. Mix and hydrodynamic instabilities on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Martinez, D.; Milovich, J. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Pickworth, L.; Pino, J. E.; Raman, K.; Tipton, R.; Weber, C. R.; Baker, K. L.; Bachmann, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gharibyan, N.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatarik, R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S.; Kroll, J. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; Masse, L.; Moore, A. S.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Stadermann, M.; Tommasini, R.; Widmayer, C. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; Crippen, J.; Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Rice, N.; Wilde, C. H.; Volegov, P. L.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2017-06-01

    Several new platforms have been developed to experimentally measure hydrodynamic instabilities in all phases of indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosions on National Ignition Facility. At the ablation front, instability growth of pre-imposed modulations was measured with a face-on, x-ray radiography platform in the linear regime using the Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. Modulation growth of "native roughness" modulations and engineering features (fill tubes and capsule support membranes) were measured in conditions relevant to layered DT implosions. A new experimental platform was developed to measure instability growth at the ablator-ice interface. In the deceleration phase of implosions, several experimental platforms were developed to measure both low-mode asymmetries and high-mode perturbations near peak compression with x-ray and nuclear techniques. In one innovative technique, the self-emission from the hot spot was enhanced with argon dopant to "self-backlight" the shell in-flight. To stabilize instability growth, new "adiabat-shaping" techniques were developed using the HGR platform and applied in layered DT implosions.

  3. Mix and hydrodynamic instabilities on NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; ...

    2017-06-01

    Several new platforms have been developed to experimentally measure hydrodynamic instabilities in all phases of indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosions on National Ignition Facility. At the ablation front, instability growth of pre-imposed modulations was measured with a face-on, x-ray radiography platform in the linear regime using the Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. Modulation growth of "native roughness" modulations and engineering features (fill tubes and capsule support membranes) were measured in conditions relevant to layered DT implosions. A new experimental platform was developed to measure instability growth at the ablator-ice interface. Here in the deceleration phase of implosions, several experimental platformsmore » were developed to measure both low-mode asymmetries and high-mode perturbations near peak compression with x-ray and nuclear techniques. In one innovative technique, the self-emission from the hot spot was enhanced with argon dopant to "self-backlight" the shell in-flight. To stabilize instability growth, new "adiabat-shaping" techniques were developed using the HGR platform and applied in layered DT implosions.« less

  4. Formation of Ganymede's Grooved Terrain by Convection-Driven Resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, N. P.; Barr, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Over half the surface of Ganymede, Jupiter's largest icy moon, is covered in grooved terrain, which is composed of 10-100 km wide swaths of sub-parallel ridges and troughs [1]. Convection in Ganymede's ice shell was originally suggested as a driving mechanism for grooved terrain formation [2] but subsequent work has argued that convective stresses were too weak to deform the surface [3] and that Ganymede's ice shell was thin and conductive during groove terrain formation [4]. However, the heat flow [5] and strain rate [6] inferred for grooved terrain formation resemble the conditions observed at the active Enceladus South Polar Terrain (SPT), where 'sluggish lid' convection may be occurring [7]. During 'sluggish lid' convection, thermal buoyancy stresses exceed the lithospheric yield stress, allowing convection to reach the surface and drive deformation [8]. Previous work shows that the heat flows and strain rates associated with sluggish lid convection are consistent with the observed heat flow and surface age of the Enceladus SPT [7, 9]. Here we use numerical models of convection in Ganymede's ice shell to show that convection can provide the heat flow and strain rate inferred for grooved terrain formation. We use the finite element model CITCOM [10] to model convection for a wide range of ice shell conditions. We use a newtonian temperature-dependent viscosity consistent with deformation by volume diffusion [11]. We impose a limited viscosity contrast between the surface and base of the ice shell to mimic the effect of an upper surface whose yield stress is less than the critical stress for sluggish lid convection [7, 12] due to impact fracturing [13], tidal flexing, and/or shallow tidal heating. We find that ice shells 10 to 80 km thick are consistent with the heat flow and strain rate inferred for grooved terrain formation. Regions above convective upwellings are consistent with conditions inferred at groove lanes. Regions above downwellings are consistent

  5. Hydrodynamics of pronuclear migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Microtubule (MT) filaments play a key role in many processes involved in cell devision including spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and pronuclear positioning. We present a direct numerical technique to simulate MT dynamics in such processes. Our method includes hydrodynamically mediated interactions between MTs and other cytoskeletal objects, using singularity methods for Stokes flow. Long-ranged many-body hydrodynamic interactions are computed using a highly efficient and scalable fast multipole method, enabling the simulation of thousands of MTs. Our simulation method also takes into account the flexibility of MTs using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory as well as their dynamic instability. Using this technique, we simulate pronuclear migration in single-celled Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Two different positioning mechanisms, based on the interactions of MTs with the motor proteins and the cell cortex, are explored: cytoplasmic pulling and cortical pushing. We find that although the pronuclear complex migrates towards the center of the cell in both models, the generated cytoplasmic flows are fundamentally different. This suggest that cytoplasmic flow visualization during pronuclear migration can be utilized to differentiate between the two mechanisms.

  6. Hydrodynamics of Bacterial Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A.; Libchaber, A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of the last several decades, the study of microbial communities has identified countless examples of cooperation between microorganisms. Generally—as in the case of quorum sensing—cooperation is coordinated by a chemical signal that diffuses through the community. Less well understood is a second class of cooperation that is mediated through physical interactions between individuals. To better understand how the bacteria use hydrodynamics to manipulate their environment and coordinate their actions, we study the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus. These bacteria live in the diffusive boundary layer just above the muddy bottoms of ponds. As buried organic material decays, sulfide diffuses out of the mud. Oxygen from the pond diffuses into the boundary layer from above. These bacteria form communities—called veils— which are able to transport nutrients through the boundary layer faster than diffusion, thereby increasing their metabolic rate. In these communities, bacteria attach to surfaces and swim in place. As millions of bacteria beat their flagella, the community induces a macroscopic fluid flow, which mix the boundary layer. Here we present experimental observations and mathematical models that elucidate the hydrodynamics linking the behavior of an individual bacterium to the collective dynamics of the community. We begin by characterizing the flow of water around an individual bacterium swimming in place. We then discuss the flow of water and nutrients around a small number of individuals. Finally, we present observations and models detailing the macroscopic dynamics of a Thiovulum veil.

  7. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  8. Pilot-Wave Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Yves Couder, Emmanuel Fort, and coworkers recently discovered that a millimetric droplet sustained on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath may self-propel through a resonant interaction with its own wave field. This article reviews experimental evidence indicating that the walking droplets exhibit certain features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic, quantum realm. It then reviews theoretical descriptions of this hydrodynamic pilot-wave system that yield insight into the origins of its quantum-like behavior. Quantization arises from the dynamic constraint imposed on the droplet by its pilot-wave field, and multimodal statistics appear to be a feature of chaotic pilot-wave dynamics. I attempt to assess the potential and limitations of this hydrodynamic system as a quantum analog. This fluid system is compared to quantum pilot-wave theories, shown to be markedly different from Bohmian mechanics and more closely related to de Broglie's original conception of quantum dynamics, his double-solution theory, and its relatively recent extensions through researchers in stochastic electrodynamics.

  9. Hindered Convection of Macromolecules in Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kosto, Kimberly B.; Deen, William M.

    2005-01-01

    Hindered convection of macromolecules in gels was studied by measuring the sieving coefficient (Θ) of narrow fractions of Ficoll (Stokes-Einstein radius, rs = 2.7–5.9 nm) in agarose and agarose-dextran membranes, along with the Darcy permeability (κ). To provide a wide range of κ, varying amounts of dextran (volume fractions ≤ 0.011) were covalently attached to agarose gels with volume fractions of 0.040 or 0.080. As expected, Θ decreased with increasing rs or with increasing concentrations of either agarose or dextran. For each molecular size, Θ plotted as a function of κ fell on a single curve for all gel compositions studied. The dependence of Θ on κ and rs was predicted well by a hydrodynamic theory based on flow normal to the axes of equally spaced, parallel fibers. Values of the convective hindrance factor (Kc, the ratio of solute to fluid velocity), calculated from Θ and previous equilibrium partitioning data, were unexpectedly large; although Kc ≤ 1.1 in the fiber theory, its apparent value ranged generally from 1.5 to 3. This seemingly anomalous result was explained on the basis of membrane heterogeneity. Convective hindrances in the synthetic gels were quite similar to those in glomerular basement membrane, when compared on the basis of similar solid volume fractions and values of κ. Overall, the results suggest that convective hindrances can be predicted fairly well from a knowledge of κ, even in synthetic or biological gels of complex composition. PMID:15516521

  10. NIF Double Shell outer-shell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Daughton, W. S.; Wilson, D. C.; Dodd, E. S.; Renner, D. B.; Cardenas, T.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    At the core of the Double Shell concept is the kinetic energy transfer from the outer shell to the inner shell via collision. This collision sets both the implosion shape of the inner shell, from imprinting of the shape of the outer shell, as well as the maximum energy available to compress the DT fuel. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to control the time-dependent shape of the outer shell, such that the outer shell is nominally round at the collision time. We present the experiment results from our sub-scale ( 1 MJ) NIF outer-shell only shape tuning campaign, where we vary shape by changing a turn-on time delay between the same pulse shape on the inner and outer cone beams. This type of shape tuning is unique to this platform and only possible since the Double Shell design uses a single-shock drive (4.5 ns reverse ramp pulse). The outer-shell only targets used a 5.75 mm diameter standard near-vacuum NIF hohlraum with 0.032 mg/cc He gas fill, and a Be capsule with 0.4% uniform Cu dopant, with 242 um thick ablator. We also present results from a third outer-shell only shot used to measure shell trajectory, which is critical in determining the shell impact time. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  11. First Observations of Nonhydrodynamic Mix at the Fuel-Shell Interface in Shock-Driven Inertial Confinement Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Amendt, P.; Delettrez, J.; Bellei, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Betti, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Landen, O.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Wilks, S.; Greenwood, A.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-04-01

    A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with 3He gas. These implosions were found to produce D3He-proton shock yields comparable to implosions of identical shells filled with a hydroequivalent 50:50 D3He gas mixture. Standard hydrodynamic mixing cannot explain this observation, as hydrodynamic modeling including mix predicts a yield an order of magnitude lower than was observed. Instead, these results can be attributed to ion diffusive mix at the fuel-shell interface.

  12. First Observations of Nonhydrodynamic Mix at the Fuel-Shell Interface in Shock-Driven Inertial Confinement Implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; ...

    2014-04-01

    A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with 3He gas. These implosions were found to produce D3He-proton shock yields comparable to implosions of identical shells filled with a hydroequivalent 50:50 D3He gas mixture. Standard hydrodynamic mixing cannot explain this observation, as hydrodynamic modeling including mix predicts a yield an order of magnitude lower than was observed. Instead, these results can be attributed to ion diffusive mix at the fuel-shell interface.

  13. First observations of nonhydrodynamic mix at the fuel-shell interface in shock-driven inertial confinement implosions.

    PubMed

    Rinderknecht, H G; Sio, H; Li, C K; Zylstra, A B; Rosenberg, M J; Amendt, P; Delettrez, J; Bellei, C; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Betti, R; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C; Landen, O; Smalyuk, V A; Wilks, S; Greenwood, A; Nikroo, A

    2014-04-04

    A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with 3He gas. These implosions were found to produce D3He-proton shock yields comparable to implosions of identical shells filled with a hydroequivalent 50∶50 D3He gas mixture. Standard hydrodynamic mixing cannot explain this observation, as hydrodynamic modeling including mix predicts a yield an order of magnitude lower than was observed. Instead, these results can be attributed to ion diffusive mix at the fuel-shell interface.

  14. Turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with freely moving boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang

    In thermal convection, coherent flow structures emerge at high Rayleigh numbers as a result of intrinsic hydrodynamic instability and self-organization. They range from small-scale thermal plumes that are produced near both the top and the bottom boundaries to large-scale circulations across the entire convective volume. These flow structures exert viscous forces upon any boundary. Such forces will affect a boundary which is free to deform or change position. In our experiment, we study the dynamics of a free boundary that floats on the upper surface of a convective fluid. This seemingly passive boundary is subjected solely to viscous stress underneath. However, the boundary thermally insulates the fluid, modifying the bulk flow. As a consequence, the interaction between the free boundary and the convective fluid results in rich dynamics including periodic evolution of thr flow structures and predictable motions of the free boundary. Here I present two sets of experiments on thermal convection with freely moving top boundary. The first experiment is conducted in a rectangular geometry. We discover that as the sizes of the free boundary increases, the convection system transits from a nearly-periodic oscillation state into a local trapped state. A phenomenological numerical model explains this dynamcal transition. The second set of experiment is conducted in an annular geometry, where a periodic boundary condition is satisfied for both the flow structures and the free boundary. In a long time scale, persistent rotations of the free boundary along the circular path inside the convection cell are observed. In short time scales, the free boundary rotates in a hopping fashion. Consequently, through temperature distribution measurements, we observe the regular evolutions of the flow patterns in the convective fluid.

  15. Non-linear hydrodynamical simulations of delta Scuti star pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M. R.; Guzik, J. A.; McNamara, B. J.

    1998-12-01

    We present the initial results of non-linear hydrodynamic simulations of the pulsation modes of delta Scuti stars. These models use the Ostlie and Cox (1993) Lagrangian hydrodynamic code, adapted to use the most recent OPAL (1996) opacities, the Stellingwerf (1974) periodic relaxation method of obtaining stable limit cycle pulsations, and time-dependent convection. Initial tests of first- and second-overtone pulsation models are consistent with the models of Bono, et al (1997) showing asymmetric lightcurves for first overtone rather than fundamental pulsations. Future modeling work will test several stellar models with varying masses, ages, metal and helium abundances and envelope abundance gradients. Ultimately, we hope to determine the role that abundances and, more specifically, helium abundance gradients in delta Scuti envelopes play in light curve shape. This work will be applied to a test sample of known radially-pulsating delta Scuti field stars and the newly-discovered delta Scuti/SX Phoenicis variables in the Galactic Bulge.

  16. Dynamic forces between bubbles and surfaces and hydrodynamic boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Manor, Ofer; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C

    2008-10-21

    A bubble attached to the end of an atomic force microscope cantilever and driven toward or away from a flat mica surface across an aqueous film is used to characterize the dynamic force that arises from hydrodynamic drainage and electrical double layer interactions across the nanometer thick intervening aqueous film. The hydrodynamic response of the air/water interface can range from a classical fully immobile, no-slip surface in the presence of added surfactants to a partially mobile interface in an electrolyte solution without added surfactants. A model that includes the convection and diffusion of trace surface contaminants can account for the observed behavior presented. This model predicts quantitatively different interfacial dynamics to the Navier slip model that can also be used to fit dynamic force data with a post hoc choice of a slip length.

  17. Neutrino signature of supernova hydrodynamical instabilities in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Tamborra, Irene; Hanke, Florian; Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Raffelt, Georg

    2013-09-20

    The first full-scale three-dimensional core-collapse supernova (SN) simulations with sophisticated neutrino transport show pronounced effects of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) for two high-mass progenitors (20 and 27 M([Symbol: see text])). In a low-mass progenitor (11.2 M([Symbol: see text])), large-scale convection is the dominant nonradial hydrodynamic instability in the postshock accretion layer. The SASI-associated modulation of the neutrino signal (80 Hz in our two examples) will be clearly detectable in IceCube or the future Hyper-Kamiokande detector, depending on progenitor properties, distance, and observer location relative to the main SASI sloshing direction. The neutrino signal from the next galactic SN can, therefore, diagnose the nature of the hydrodynamic instability.

  18. DYNAMICS OF TURBULENT CONVECTION AND CONVECTIVE OVERSHOOT IN A MODERATE-MASS STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2016-04-10

    We present results of realistic three-dimensional (3D) radiative hydrodynamic simulations of the outer layers of a moderate-mass star (1.47 M {sub ⊙}), including the full convection zone, the overshoot region, and the top layers of the radiative zone. The simulation results show that the surface granulation has a broad range of scales, from 2 to 12 Mm, and that large granules are organized in well-defined clusters, consisting of several granules. Comparison of the mean structure profiles from 3D simulations with the corresponding one-dimensional (1D) standard stellar model shows an increase of the stellar radius by ∼800 km, as well as significant changes in the thermodynamic structure and turbulent properties of the ionization zones. Convective downdrafts in the intergranular lanes between granulation clusters reach speeds of more than 20 km s{sup −1}, penetrate through the whole convection zone, hit the radiative zone, and form an 8 Mm thick overshoot layer. Contrary to semi-empirical overshooting models, our results show that the 3D dynamic overshoot region consists of two layers: a nearly adiabatic extension of the convection zone and a deeper layer of enhanced subadiabatic stratification. This layer is formed because of heating caused by the braking of the overshooting convective plumes. This effect has to be taken into account in stellar modeling and the interpretation of asteroseismology data. In particular, we demonstrate that the deviations of the mean structure of the 3D model from the 1D standard model of the same mass and composition are qualitatively similar to the deviations for the Sun found by helioseismology.

  19. Dynamics of Turbulent Convection and Convective Overshoot in a Moderate-mass Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present results of realistic three-dimensional (3D) radiative hydrodynamic simulations of the outer layers of a moderate-mass star (1.47 M ⊙), including the full convection zone, the overshoot region, and the top layers of the radiative zone. The simulation results show that the surface granulation has a broad range of scales, from 2 to 12 Mm, and that large granules are organized in well-defined clusters, consisting of several granules. Comparison of the mean structure profiles from 3D simulations with the corresponding one-dimensional (1D) standard stellar model shows an increase of the stellar radius by ˜800 km, as well as significant changes in the thermodynamic structure and turbulent properties of the ionization zones. Convective downdrafts in the intergranular lanes between granulation clusters reach speeds of more than 20 km s-1, penetrate through the whole convection zone, hit the radiative zone, and form an 8 Mm thick overshoot layer. Contrary to semi-empirical overshooting models, our results show that the 3D dynamic overshoot region consists of two layers: a nearly adiabatic extension of the convection zone and a deeper layer of enhanced subadiabatic stratification. This layer is formed because of heating caused by the braking of the overshooting convective plumes. This effect has to be taken into account in stellar modeling and the interpretation of asteroseismology data. In particular, we demonstrate that the deviations of the mean structure of the 3D model from the 1D standard model of the same mass and composition are qualitatively similar to the deviations for the Sun found by helioseismology.

  20. Adiabatic heating and convection in a porous medium filled with a near-critical fluid.

    PubMed

    Soboleva, E B

    2009-04-01

    Dynamics and heat transfer in a porous medium filled with a fluid phase at parameters near the gas-liquid critical point are studied. A two-dimensional numerical solver based on the hydrodynamic model for a porous medium with a high compressible fluid phase including the van der Waals equation of state is used. In weightlessness, adiabatic heating of fluid phase under the step-temperature heat supply is investigated analytically and numerically. In terrestrial conditions, gravity-driven convection in vertical rectangular cells generated by lateral heating in unsteady and steady-state regimes is simulated. The effects of high compressibility of near-critical fluid phase on convection are studied. Convective motions and heat transfer in horizontal rectangular cells consisting of two porous layers at different porosity and permeability heated from below are simulated as well. Adiabatic heating subjected to hydrostatic compressibility effects, the onset and development of convection, and convective structures in a steady-state regime are analyzed.

  1. Supergranulation, a convective phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-08-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection ,Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J., Srikanth, R., 2004, MNRAS, 347, 1279-12814) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J

  2. Anomalously weak solar convection.

    PubMed

    Hanasoge, Shravan M; Duvall, Thomas L; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2012-07-24

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(-2) at r/R([symbol: see text]) = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  3. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(exp -2) at r/R-solar = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  4. Convective quasi-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J.-I.; Plant, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The concept of convective quasi-equilibrium (CQE) is a key ingredient in order to understand the role of deep moist convection in the atmosphere. It has been used as a guiding principle to develop almost all convective parameterizations and provides a basic theoretical framework for large-scale tropical dynamics. The CQE concept as originally proposed by Arakawa and Schubert (1974) is systematically reviewed from wider perspectives. Various interpretations and extensions of Arakawa and Schubert's CQE are considered both in terms of a thermodynamic analogy and as a dynamical balance. The thermodynamic interpretations can be more emphatically embraced as a homeostasis. The dynamic balance interpretations can be best understood by analogy with the slow manifold. Various criticisms of CQE can be avoided by taking the dynamic balance interpretation. Possible limits of CQE are also discussed, including the importance of triggering in many convective situations, as well as the possible self-organized criticality of tropical convection. However, the most intriguing aspect of the CQE concept is that in spite of many observational tests supporting and interpreting it in many different senses, it has never been established in a robust manner based on a systematic analysis of the cloud work function budget by observations as was originally defined.

  5. Observing convective aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Christopher; Wing, Allison; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Turner, David; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-04-01

    Convective self-aggregation was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad a distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  6. Convection in White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Judith L.; Shipman, H.; Dalessio, J.; M, M.

    2012-01-01

    Convection is one of the largest sources of theoretical uncertainty in our understanding of stellar physics. Current studies of convective energy transport are based on the mixing length theory. Originally intended to depict turbulent flows in engineering situations, MLT enjoys moderate success in describing stellar convection. However, problems arising from MLT's incompleteness are apparent in studies ranging from determinations of the ages of massive stars, to understanding the structure F and early A stars, to predicting the pulsation periods of solar stars, to understanding the atmosphere of Titan. As an example for white dwarfs, Bergeron et al. (1995) show that model parameters such as flux, line profiles, energy distribution, color indices, and equivalent widths are extremely sensitive to the assumed MLT parameterization. The authors find systematic uncertainties ranging from 25% for effective temperatures to 11% for mass and radius. The WET is engaged in a long term project to empirically determine the physical properties of convection in the atmospheres of pulsating white dwarfs. The technique, outlined by Montgomery et al. (2010), uses information from nonlinear (non-sinusoidal) pulse shapes of the target star to empirically probe the physical properties of its convection zone. Approximately two thirds of all white dwarfs show nonlinear characteristics in their light curves. We present current results from WET targets in 2008-2011.

  7. Convection in containerless processing.

    PubMed

    Hyers, Robert W; Matson, Douglas M; Kelton, Kenneth F; Rogers, Jan R

    2004-11-01

    Different containerless processing techniques have different strengths and weaknesses. Applying more than one technique allows various parts of a problem to be solved separately. For two research projects, one on phase selection in steels and the other on nucleation and growth of quasicrystals, a combination of experiments using electrostatic levitation (ESL) and electromagnetic levitation (EML) is appropriate. In both experiments, convection is an important variable. The convective conditions achievable with each method are compared for two very different materials: a low-viscosity, high-temperature stainless steel, and a high-viscosity, low-temperature quasicrystal-forming alloy. It is clear that the techniques are complementary when convection is a parameter to be explored in the experiments. For a number of reasons, including the sample size, temperature, and reactivity, direct measurement of the convective velocity is not feasible. Therefore, we must rely on computation techniques to estimate convection in these experiments. These models are an essential part of almost any microgravity investigation. The methods employed and results obtained for the projects levitation observation of dendrite evolution in steel ternary alloy rapid solidification (LODESTARS) and quasicrystalline undercooled alloys for space investigation (QUASI) are explained.

  8. Aspects of causal viscous hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalerao, R. S.; Gupta, Sourendu

    2008-01-15

    We investigate the phenomenology of freely expanding fluids, with different material properties, evolving through the Israel-Stewart (IS) causal viscous hydrodynamics, and compare our results with those obtained in the relativistic Eckart-Landau-Navier-Stokes (ELNS) acausal viscous hydrodynamics. Through the analysis of scaling invariants we give a definition of thermalization time that can be self-consistently determined in viscous hydrodynamics. Next we construct the solutions for one-dimensional boost-invariant flows. Expansion of viscous fluids is slower than that of one-dimensional ideal fluids, resulting in entropy production. At late times, these flows are reasonably well approximated by solutions obtained in ELNS hydrodynamics. Estimates of initial energy densities from observed final values are strongly dependent on the dynamics one chooses. For the same material, and the same final state, IS hydrodynamics gives the smallest initial energy density. We also study fluctuations about these one-dimensional boost-invariant backgrounds; they are damped in ELNS hydrodynamics but can become sound waves in IS hydrodynamics. The difference is obvious in power spectra due to clear signals of wave-interference in IS hydrodynamics, which is completely absent in ELNS dynamics.

  9. General formulation of transverse hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Florkowski, Wojciech

    2008-06-15

    General formulation of hydrodynamics describing transversally thermalized matter created at the early stages of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Similarities and differences with the standard three-dimensionally thermalized relativistic hydrodynamics are discussed. The role of the conservation laws as well as the thermodynamic consistency of two-dimensional thermodynamic variables characterizing transversally thermalized matter is emphasized.

  10. Hydrodynamics of Peristaltic Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios; Hart, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    A curious class of animals called salps live in marine environments and self-propel by ejecting vortex rings much like jellyfish and squid. However, unlike other jetting creatures that siphon and eject water from one side of their body, salps produce vortex rings by pumping water through siphons on opposite ends of their hollow cylindrical bodies. In the simplest cases, it seems like some species of salp can successfully move by contracting just two siphons connected by an elastic body. When thought of as a chain of timed contractions, salp propulsion is reminiscent of peristaltic pumping applied to marine locomotion. Inspired by salps, we investigate the hydrodynamics of peristaltic propulsion, focusing on the scaling relationships that determine flow rate, thrust production, and energy usage in a model system. We discuss possible actuation methods for a model peristaltic vehicle, considering both the material and geometrical requirements for such a system.

  11. Hydrodynamics, resurgence, and transasymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başar, Gökçe; Dunne, Gerald V.

    2015-12-01

    The second order hydrodynamical description of a homogeneous conformal plasma that undergoes a boost-invariant expansion is given by a single nonlinear ordinary differential equation, whose resurgent asymptotic properties we study, developing further the recent work of Heller and Spalinski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 072501 (2015)]. Resurgence clearly identifies the nonhydrodynamic modes that are exponentially suppressed at late times, analogous to the quasinormal modes in gravitational language, organizing these modes in terms of a trans-series expansion. These modes are analogs of instantons in semiclassical expansions, where the damping rate plays the role of the instanton action. We show that this system displays the generic features of resurgence, with explicit quantitative relations between the fluctuations about different orders of these nonhydrodynamic modes. The imaginary part of the trans-series parameter is identified with the Stokes constant, and the real part with the freedom associated with initial conditions.

  12. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well polarized flocks. The continuum equations are derived by coarse graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. When the inertia is large, we find a novel instability that signals the transition to complex spatio-temporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks. This work was supported by the NSF Awards DMR-1305184 and DGE-1068780 at Syracuse University and NSF Award PHY11-25915 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Grant No. 2919 at the KITP at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

  13. Hydrocyclone separation hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.A.; Ruzanov, S.R.; Lunyushkina, I.A.

    1987-10-20

    The lack of an adequate hydrodynamic model for a hydrocyclone has so far been the main obstacle to devising a general method for designing such apparatus. The authors present a method of calculating the liquid flow in the working zone. The results have been used to calculate the separating power in application to dilute suspensions. The Navier-Stokes equations and the equation of continuity are used in examining the behavior together with assumptions based on experiment: the conditions for stationary axisymmetric flow, constant turbulent viscosity, and a constant radial profile for the tangential low speed at all the heights. The boundary conditions are those for liquid slip at the side walls and absence of vortex drainage at the axis. The results enable one to choose the dimensions for particular separations.

  14. Synchronization and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas; Qian, Bian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Cilia and flagella commonly beat in a coordinated manner. Examples include the flagella that Volvox colonies use to move, the cilia that sweep foreign particles up out of the human airway, and the nodal cilia that set up the flow that determines the left-right axis in developing vertebrate embryos. In this talk we present an experimental study of how hydrodynamic interactions can lead to coordination in a simple idealized system: two nearby paddles driven with fixed torques in a highly viscous fluid. The paddles attain a synchronized state in which they rotate together with a phase difference of 90 degrees. We discuss how synchronization depends on system parameters and present numerical calculations using the method of regularized stokeslets.

  15. Hydrodynamics of foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, Stoyan I.

    2017-08-01

    This brief review article is devoted to all the aspects related to hydrodynamics of foams. For this reason, we focused at first on the methods for studying the basic structural units of the foams—the foam films (FF) and the Plateau borders (PB), thus reviewing the literature about their drainage. After this, we scrutinized in detail the Derjaguin's works on the electrostatic disjoining pressure along with its Langmuir's interpretation, the microscopic and macroscopic approaches in the theory of the van der Waals disjoining pressure, the DLVO theory, the steric disjoining pressure of de Gennes, and the more recent works on non-DLVO forces. The basic methods for studying of foam drainage are presented as well. Engineering and other applications of foam are reviewed as well. All these aspects are presented from retrospective and perspective viewpoints.

  16. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    SciTech Connect

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael; Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  17. Natural convection: Fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakac, S.; Aung, W.; Viskanta, R.

    Among the topics discussed are: stability solutions for laminar external boundary region flows; natural convection in plane layers and cavities with volumetric energy sources; and turbulence modelling equations. Consideration is also given to: natural convection in enclosures containing tube bundles; natural limiting behaviors in porous media cavity flows; numerical solutions in laminar and turbulent natural convection; and heat transfer in the critical region of binary mixtures. Additional topics discussed include: natural convective cooling of electronic equipment; natural convection suppression in solar collectors; and laser induced buoyancy and forced convection in vertical tubes.

  18. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  19. Mercury removal using ground and calcined mussel shell.

    PubMed

    Peña-Rodríguez, Susana; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María J; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2013-12-01

    We determined mercury retention on calcined and ground mussel shell, in presence and absence of phosphate, using batch and stirred flow chamber experiments. In batch experiments the calcined shell exhibited higher Hg adsorption, with good fitting to Freundlich equation (R2: 0.925-0.978); the presence of phosphate increased Hg adsorption; mercury desorption was 13% or lower, diminishing up to 2% under the presence of phosphates. In stirred flow chamber experiments calcined shell retained more Hg than ground shells (6300 vs. 4000-5200 micromol/kg); Hg retention increased an additional 40% on calcined shell and up to an additional 70% on ground shells when phosphates were present; mercury desorption was quite similar in all shell types (20%-34%), increasing up to 49%-60% in ground shells when phosphates were present. The higher Hg adsorption on calcined shell would be related to its calcite and dolomite concentrations; mercury-phosphate interactions would cause the increase in Hg retention when phosphates are present. Data on Hg desorption suggest that Hg retention was not easily reversible after batch experiments, increasing in the stirred flow chamber due to convective flow. Calcined and ground mussel shells could be recycled removing Hg from water, with the presence of phosphates in solution improving efficacy.

  20. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  1. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  2. Convective heat transport in compressible fluids.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Akira; Onuki, Akira

    2002-07-01

    We present hydrodynamic equations of compressible fluids in gravity as a generalization of those in the Boussinesq approximation used for nearly incompressible fluids. They account for adiabatic processes taking place throughout the cell (the piston effect) and those taking place within plumes (the adiabatic temperature gradient effect). Performing two-dimensional numerical analysis, we reveal some unique features of plume generation and convection in transient and steady states of compressible fluids. As the critical point is approached, the overall temperature changes induced by plume arrivals at the boundary walls are amplified, giving rise to overshoot behavior in transient states and significant noise in the temperature in steady states. The velocity field is suggested to assume a logarithmic profile within boundary layers. Random reversal of macroscopic shear flow is examined in a cell with unit aspect ratio. We also present a simple scaling theory for moderate Rayleigh numbers.

  3. Magnetospheric convection at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    The unusual configuration of the Uranian magnetosphere leads to differences in the relative effects of solar wind induced magnetospheric convection and plasma corotation from those at the other planets. At the present epoch the orientation of the rotation axis of Uranus with respect to the solar wind flow direction leads to a decoupling of the convective and corotational flows, allowing plasma from the tail to move unimpeded through the inner magnetosphere. As Uranus progresses in its orbit around the sun, corotation plays a gradually more important role and the plasma residence times within the magnetosphere increase. When the rotation axis finally becomes perpendicular to the solar wind flow, corotation is dominant.

  4. Convectively Driven Heat Flux Heterogeneity in Europa's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, Bryan; Schubert, G.; Palguta, J.

    2006-09-01

    Features on the surface of Europa may reflect non-uniform heating in an underlying ocean due to variations in heat flux at the mantle surface. Pore water convection can generate a spatially heterogeneous heat flux in a fractured, permeable mantle, as illustrated in 2-D computer simulations of the thermal evolution of Europa. The model uses three layers - core, silicate mantle, and H2O (liquid and frozen). Processes active in the model include radiogenic heating, tidal dissipative heating (TDH), thermal diffusion, latent heat of melting and pore water convection. Starting from a cold Europa, radiogenic heating and TDH produce a temperature profile ranging from a peak near 1150 oC in the deep interior to 15 oC at the mantle surface, overlain by an 80 km deep ocean layer at 3 oC, capped by an ice shell approximately 20 km thick. This structure provides initial conditions for our pore water convection simulation. Mantle permeability is based on Earth values. An initial, very strong flow gives way to a weaker quasi-steady pattern of convection in the mantle's porosity. Plumes rise from the mantle at a roughly 10o spacing, through the ocean layer up to the base of the ice. These are typically 50 - 100 km wide at the base of the ice. Plume heat flux is 10-12 W/m2 during the initial transient, but later drops to about 0.5 - 1.5 W/m2. Heating at the base of the ice shell is spatially heterogeneous, but only strong enough to produce significant melt-through during the initial transient. However, strong spatial heterogeneity of basal heating of the ice shell could significantly influence convection in the ice phase. This work was supported by a grant from the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory and by the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program.

  5. Enceladus's south polar thermal anomaly in light of weak thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besserer, Jonathan; Golabek, Gregor J.; Rozel, Antoine; Tackley, Paul J.

    2014-05-01

    The south polar thermal anomaly of Enceladus, contrasting with older and colder northern regions, suggests an asymmetrical heat transfer in the satellite's ice shell. Most of the current models that explain such a distribution prescribe an a priori asymmetry by mean of a mechanical or topographical anomaly in or below the south polar ice shell. We present here a series of simulations with a 2D-spherical convection model to investigate the possibility of self-consistently generating a localized mechanical anomaly in the ice shell. We focus on the non-Newtonian character of ice rheology, and on the stability of a single-plume (i.e. localized convection) and low-degree convection regimes. We show that the non-Newtonian rheology favors a localized (tidally heated) convection surrounded by a conductive ice mantle, even with a global, liquid water ocean at the base of the ice shell. We find that the single-plume state is very unlikely to remain stable if the rheology is Newtonian. The proposed thermal regime for Enceladus's ice shell is therefore weak, single-plume thermal convection focused at the south pole (e.g., remnant of a formerly more vigorous convection). Such weak-to-sub-critical regimes may be important for icy satellites, as recently pointed out by Solomatov (2012, PEPI). We will discuss the effects of ice plasticity on heat focusing in Enceladus's South Polar Terrain, together with the possibility of an ice shell a factor ~2 thinner than previously thought (Hemingway et al., AGU 2013; Stevenson et al., AGU 2013).

  6. Dynamo Action in Fully Convective Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Matthew K.; Basri, Gibor

    2007-11-01

    Recent observations indicate that fully convective stars can effectively build magnetic fields without the aid of a tachocline of shear, that those fields can possess large-scale components, and that they may sense the effects of rotation. Motivated by these puzzles, we present global three-dimensional simulations of convection and dynamo action in the interiors of fully convective M-dwarfs of 0.3 solar masses. We use the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, adopting a spherical computational domain that extends from 0.08-0.96 times the overall stellar radius. We find that such fully convective stars can generate magnetic fields of several kG strength, roughly in equipartition with the convective flows. Differential rotation is established in hydrodynamic progenitor calculations, but essentially eliminated in MHD simulations because of strong Maxwell stresses exerted by the magnetic fields. Despite the absence of interior angular velocity contrasts, the magnetic fields possess strong mean (axisymmetric) components, which we attribute partly to the very strong influence of rotation upon the slowly overturning flows.

  7. Convective effects in float-zone and Czochralski melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. P.

    1986-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of crystal-growth melts is a relatively new research area. Numerical modeling of these processes is necessary. The work discussed herein is in two parts: numerical simulations of the flow in a Czochralski melt, and also of that in a float zone. In addition, for the float-zone case, energy stability theory will be used to determine stability bounds for the onset of oscillatory thermo-capillary flow. Convective effects in crystal-growth melts arise from a variety of mechanisms. Temperature gradients both in the direction of gravity and normal to it give rise to convection due to buoyancy effects. Rotation of the crucible and/or crystal causes a forced convection which may augment or oppose the buoyancy-driven flow. Finally, thermo-capillary forces (due to the variation of surface tension with temperature) drive surface motions which in turn generate convection in the bulk fluid. All of these mechanisms are present in either Czochralski or float-zone growth. The objective of the Czochralski modeling is to develop an accurate numerical simulation of the flow in a Czochralski silicon melt and to investigate the effects of various parameters on the flow properties. Like some earlier investigations, the intent is to simulate the effects of buoyancy, forced and thermo-capillary convection, including unsteady effects. Unlike earlier work, the aim is to include the effects of a variable free surface and freezing interface and, possibly incorporate nonaxisymmetric effects.

  8. Extended Subadiabatic Layer in Simulations of Overshooting Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, Petri J.; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Brandenburg, Axel; Arlt, Rainer; Käpylä, Maarit J.; Lagg, Andreas; Olspert, Nigul; Warnecke, Jörn

    2017-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of hydrodynamic overshooting convection in local Cartesian domains. We find that a substantial fraction of the lower part of the convection zone (CZ) is stably stratified according to the Schwarzschild criterion while the enthalpy flux is outward directed. This occurs when the heat conduction profile at the bottom of the CZ is smoothly varying, based either on a Kramers-like opacity prescription as a function of temperature and density or a static profile of a similar shape. We show that the subadiabatic layer arises due to nonlocal energy transport by buoyantly driven downflows in the upper parts of the CZ. Analysis of the force balance of the upflows and downflows confirms that convection is driven by cooling at the surface. We find that the commonly used prescription for the convective enthalpy flux being proportional to the negative entropy gradient does not hold in the stably stratified layers where the flux is positive. We demonstrate the existence of a non-gradient contribution to the enthalpy flux, which is estimated to be important throughout the convective layer. A quantitative analysis of downflows indicates a transition from a tree-like structure where smaller downdrafts merge into larger ones in the upper parts to a structure in the deeper parts where a height-independent number of strong downdrafts persist. This change of flow topology occurs when a substantial subadiabatic layer is present in the lower part of the CZ.

  9. Laboratory experiments on planetary and stellar convection performed on Spacelab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Toomre, J.; Deane, A. E.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Glatzmaier, G. A.; Fichtl, G. H.; Leslie, F.; Fowlis, W. W.; Gilman, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on thermal convection in a rotating, differentially heated hemispherical shell with a radial buoyancy force were conducted in an orbiting microgravity laboratory. A variety of convective structures, or planforms, were observed, depending on the magnitude of the rotation and the nature of the imposed heating distribution. The results are compared with numerical simulations that can be conducted at the more modest heating rates, and suggest possible regimes of motion in rotating planets and stars.

  10. Thermonuclear .Ia Supernovae from Helium Shell Detonations: Explosion Models and Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ken J.; Kasen, Dan; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Bildsten, Lars; Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-06-01

    During the early evolution of an AM Canum Venaticorum system, helium is accreted onto the surface of a white dwarf under conditions suitable for unstable thermonuclear ignition. The turbulent motions induced by the convective burning phase in the He envelope become strong enough to influence the propagation of burning fronts and may result in the onset of a detonation. Such an outcome would yield radioactive isotopes and a faint rapidly rising thermonuclear ".Ia" supernova. In this paper, we present hydrodynamic explosion models and observable outcomes of these He shell detonations for a range of initial core and envelope masses. The peak UVOIR bolometric luminosities range by a factor of 10 (from 5 × 1041 to 5 × 1042 erg s-1), and the R-band peak varies from M R,peak = -15 to -18. The rise times in all bands are very rapid (<10 days), but the decline rate is slower in the red than in the blue due to a secondary near-IR brightening. The nucleosynthesis primarily yields heavy α-chain elements (40Ca through 56Ni) and unburnt He. Thus, the spectra around peak light lack signs of intermediate-mass elements and are dominated by Ca II and Ti II features, with the caveat that our radiative transfer code does not include the nonthermal effects necessary to produce He features.

  11. Hydrodynamical noise and Gubser flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li; Grönqvist, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamical noise is introduced on top of Gubser's analytical solution to viscous hydrodynamics. With respect to the ultra-central collision events of Pb-Pb, p-Pb and p-p at the LHC energies, we solve the evolution of noisy fluid systems and calculate the radial flow velocity correlations. We show that the absolute amplitude of the hydrodynamical noise is determined by the multiplicity of the collision event. The evolution of azimuthal anisotropies, which is related to the generation of harmonic flow, receives finite enhancements from hydrodynamical noise. Although it is strongest in the p-p systems, the effect of hydrodynamical noise on flow harmonics is found to be negligible, especially in the ultra-central Pb-Pb collisions. For the short-range correlations, hydrodynamical noise contributes to the formation of a near-side peak on top of the correlation structure originated from initial state fluctuations. The shape of the peak is affected by the strength of hydrodynamical noise, whose height and width grow from the Pb-Pb system to the p-Pb and p-p systems.

  12. Hydrodynamical processes in planet-forming accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai

    Understanding the physics of accretion flows in circumstellar disk provides the foundation to any theory of planet formation. The last few years have witnessed dramatic a revision in the fundamental fluid dynamics of protoplanetary accretion disks. There is growing evidence that the key to answering some of the most pressing questions, such as the origin of disk turbulence, mass transport, and planetesimal formation, may lie within, and intimately linked to, purely hydrodynamical processes in protoplanetary disks. Recent studies, including those from the proposal team, have discovered and highlighted the significance of several new hydrodynamical instabilities in the planet-forming regions of these disks. These include, but not limited to: the vertical shear instability, active between 10 to 100 AU; the zombie vortex instability, operating in regions interior to about 1AU; and the convective over-stability at intermediate radii. Secondary Rossbywave and elliptic instabilities may also be triggered, feeding off the structures that emerge from the above primary instabilities. The result of these hydrodynamic processes range from small-scale turbulence that transports angular momentum, to large-scale vortices that concentrate dust particles and enhance planetesimal formation. Hydrodynamic processes pertain to a wide range of disk conditions, meaning that at least one of these processes are active at any given disk location and evolutionary epoch. This remains true even after planet formation, which affects their subsequent orbital evolution. Hydrodynamical processes also have direct observable consequences. For example, vortices have being invoked to explain recent ALMA images of asymmetric `dust-traps' in transition disks. Hydrodynamic activities thus play a crucial role at every stage of planet formation and disk evolution. We propose to develop theoretical models of the above hydrodynamic processes under physical disk conditions by properly accounting for disk

  13. Limit of Predictability in Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, L.; Coltice, N.; Rolf, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    . Lorenz, B. E. N., Norake, D. & Meteorologiake, I. A study of the predictability of a 28-variable atmospheric model. Tellus XXVII, 322-333 (1965). 2. Tackley, P. J. Modelling compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 171, 7-18 (2008).

  14. Recent development of hydrodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of recent development in hydrodynamic modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions. First, I briefly discuss about current situation of hydrodynamic modeling by showing results from the integrated dynamical approach in which Monte-Carlo calculation of initial conditions, quark-gluon fluid dynamics and hadronic cascading are combined. In particular, I focus on rescattering effects of strange hadrons on final observables. Next I highlight three topics in recent development in hydrodynamic modeling. These include (1) medium response to jet propagation in di-jet asymmetric events, (2) causal hydrodynamic fluctuation and its application to Bjorken expansion and (3) chiral magnetic wave from anomalous hydrodynamic simulations. (1) Recent CMS data suggest the existence of QGP response to propagation of jets. To investigate this phenomenon, we solve hydrodynamic equations with source term which exhibits deposition of energy and momentum from jets. We find a large number of low momentum particles are emitted at large angle from jet axis. This gives a novel interpretation of the CMS data. (2) It has been claimed that a matter created even in p-p/p-A collisions may behave like a fluid. However, fluctuation effects would be important in such a small system. We formulate relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics and apply it to Bjorken expansion. We found the final multiplicity fluctuates around the mean value even if initial condition is fixed. This effect is relatively important in peripheral A-A collisions and p-p/p-A collisions. (3) Anomalous transport of the quark-gluon fluid is predicted when extremely high magnetic field is applied. We investigate this possibility by solving anomalous hydrodynamic equations. We found the difference of the elliptic flow parameter between positive and negative particles appears due to the chiral magnetic wave. Finally, I provide some personal perspective of hydrodynamic modeling of high energy nuclear collisions

  15. Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsy, G. M.

    1990-01-01

    Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection was studied in 2D and 3D. Fluid motion caused by thermally induced tension gradients on the free surface of a fluid is termed thermocapillary convection. It is well-known that in containerless processing of materials in space, thermocapillary convection is a dominant mechanism of fluid flow. Welding and crystal growth processes are terrestrial applications where thermocapillary convection has direct relevance.

  16. Salt-Enhanced Hydrothermal Convection in Europa's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, B. J.; Schubert, G.; Palguta, J.

    2006-12-01

    Features on the surface of Europa may reflect non-uniform heating in an underlying ocean due to variations in mantle heat flux. Pore water convection can generate a spatially heterogeneous heat flux, as illustrated in two dimensional computer simulations of the thermal evolution of Europa. The Europan ocean and mantle are likely to contain significant amounts of salts, which may influence hydrothermal convection. Our model uses three layers: core, silicate mantle, and H2O. Processes active in the model include radiogenic heating, tidal dissipative heating (TDH), thermal diffusion, latent heat of melting, pore water convection and salt transport. Starting from a cold uniform body, radiogenic heating and TDH produce a temperature profile ranging from a peak near 1150 oC in the deep interior to 15 oC at the mantle surface, overlain by an 80 km deep ocean layer at 3 oC, capped by an ice shell approximately 20 km thick. This structure provides initial conditions for our pore water convection simulation. For no-salt conditions, an initial, very strong flow gives way to a weaker quasi-steady pattern of convection in the mantle's porosity. Plumes rise from the mantle at a roughly 10o spacing, through the ocean layer up to the base of the ice. These are typically 50 to 100 km wide at the base of the ice. Plume heat flux is 10-12 W/m2 during the initial transient, but later drops to about 1.0 W/m2. Heating at the base of the ice shell is spatially heterogeneous, but only strong enough to produce significant melt-through during the initial transient. The addition of salt produces an enduring time- dependent convective pattern, with episodic bursts of heat flux. This work was supported by a grant from the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory and by the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program.

  17. Application of a Theory and Simulation-based Convective Boundary Mixing Model for AGB Star Evolution and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battino, U.; Pignatari, M.; Ritter, C.; Herwig, F.; Denisenkov, P.; Den Hartogh, J. W.; Trappitsch, R.; Hirschi, R.; Freytag, B.; Thielemann, F.; Paxton, B.

    2016-08-01

    The s-process nucleosynthesis in Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars depends on the modeling of convective boundaries. We present models and s-process simulations that adopt a treatment of convective boundaries based on the results of hydrodynamic simulations and on the theory of mixing due to gravity waves in the vicinity of convective boundaries. Hydrodynamics simulations suggest the presence of convective boundary mixing (CBM) at the bottom of the thermal pulse-driven convective zone. Similarly, convection-induced mixing processes are proposed for the mixing below the convective envelope during third dredge-up (TDU), where the {}13{{C}} pocket for the s process in AGB stars forms. In this work, we apply a CBM model motivated by simulations and theory to models with initial mass M = 2 and M=3 {M}⊙ , and with initial metal content Z = 0.01 and Z = 0.02. As reported previously, the He-intershell abundances of {}12{{C}} and {}16{{O}} are increased by CBM at the bottom of the pulse-driven convection zone. This mixing is affecting the {}22{Ne}(α, n){}25{Mg} activation and the s-process efficiency in the {}13{{C}}-pocket. In our model, CBM at the bottom of the convective envelope during the TDU represents gravity wave mixing. Furthermore, we take into account the fact that hydrodynamic simulations indicate a declining mixing efficiency that is already about a pressure scale height from the convective boundaries, compared to mixing-length theory. We obtain the formation of the {}13{{C}}-pocket with a mass of ≈ {10}-4 {M}⊙ . The final s-process abundances are characterized by 0.36\\lt [{{s}}/{Fe}]\\lt 0.78 and the heavy-to-light s-process ratio is -0.23\\lt [{hs}/{ls}]\\lt 0.45. Finally, we compare our results with stellar observations, presolar grain measurements and previous work.

  18. Convection dominated problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, J.; Morgan, K.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1986-01-01

    The paper surveys the last ten years of activity of the INME Swansea, dealing with problems of convection dominated flow. The basic explicit/implicit characteristic Galerkin process and its application to adaptive mesh refinement used in the solution of realistic problems is focused on.

  19. Constraining relativistic viscous hydrodynamical evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2009-04-15

    We show that by requiring positivity of the longitudinal pressure it is possible to constrain the initial conditions one can use in second-order viscous hydrodynamical simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We demonstrate this explicitly for (0+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics and discuss how the constraint extends to higher dimensions. Additionally, we present an analytic approximation to the solution of (0+1)-dimensional second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution equations appropriate to describe the evolution of matter in an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision.

  20. Special Relativistic Hydrodynamics with Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2016-12-01

    Special relativistic hydrodynamics with weak gravity has hitherto been unknown in the literature. Whether such an asymmetric combination is possible has been unclear. Here, the hydrodynamic equations with Poisson-type gravity, considering fully relativistic velocity and pressure under the weak gravity and the action-at-a-distance limit, are consistently derived from Einstein’s theory of general relativity. An analysis is made in the maximal slicing, where the Poisson’s equation becomes much simpler than our previous study in the zero-shear gauge. Also presented is the hydrodynamic equations in the first post-Newtonian approximation, now under the general hypersurface condition. Our formulation includes the anisotropic stress.

  1. Neutrino heating, convection, and the mechanism of Type-II supernova explosions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, H.-T.; Mueller, E.

    1996-02-01

    The role of neutrino heating and convective processes in the explosion mechanism of Type-II supernovae is investigated by one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the long-time evolution of the collapsed stellar core after the bounce at nuclear matter density and after the associated formation of the supernova shock. The parameters describing the neutrino emission from the collapsed stellar core are systematically varied. The possibility to obtain explosions turns out to be very sensitive to the physical conditions in and at the protoneutron star, in particular to its contraction and to the neutrino cooling inside of the gain radius. Yet, above a certain threshold for the core neutrino luminosity, stable and energetic explosions can be obtained in spherical symmetry, provided the energy deposition by neutrinos remains strong for a sufficiently long period. The explosion energy and time scale critically depend on the neutrino fluxes during the shock revival phase and on their temporal decay during the first few 100ms after shock formation. The threshold luminosity is a very sensitive function of the shock stagnation radius, because small radii of the stalled prompt shock lead to significantly higher neutrino loss from the hot and compact postshock layers, cause the region of neutrino heating to be very narrow, and reduce the heating time scale of the matter due to the high infall velocity. Repeating the simulations in two dimensions we find that strong convective processes occur in the collapsed stellar core in two spatially separate regions. One region of convection lies inside the neutrinosphere and another one is located in the neutrino-heated layer below the shock front. The convective mixing around the neutrinosphere is mainly driven by the negative lepton gradient, which is maintained by rapid loss of leptons from the semitransparent layers at the neutrinosphere. This considerably speeds up the deleptonization of the outer layers of the collapsed

  2. Steady state model for the thermal regimes of shells of airships and hot air balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchev, Oleg A.

    1992-10-01

    A steady state model of the temperature regime of airships and hot air balloons shells is developed. The model includes three governing equations: the equation of the temperature field of airships or balloons shell, the integral equation for the radiative fluxes on the internal surface of the shell, and the integral equation for the natural convective heat exchange between the shell and the internal gas. In the model the following radiative fluxes on the shell external surface are considered: the direct and the earth reflected solar radiation, the diffuse solar radiation, the infrared radiation of the earth surface and that of the atmosphere. For the calculations of the infrared external radiation the model of the plane layer of the atmosphere is used. The convective heat transfer on the external surface of the shell is considered for the cases of the forced and the natural convection. To solve the mentioned set of the equations the numerical iterative procedure is developed. The model and the numerical procedure are used for the simulation study of the temperature fields of an airship shell under the forced and the natural convective heat transfer.

  3. Convective Sedimentation of Colloidal Particles in a Bowl.

    PubMed

    Stiles; Kagan

    1999-08-01

    A physical model, which regards a colloidal dispersion as a single fluid continuum, is used to investigate cellular convection accompanying gravitational sedimentation in a hemispherical bowl with a thin cylindrical shaft along its vertical axis of symmetry. We have adapted the stream-function-vorticity form of the Navier-Stokes equations to describe momentum conservation in axially symmetric containers. These hydrodynamic equations have been coupled to the mass balance equation for binary hydrodynamic diffusion in the presence of a vertical gravitational field. Using finite-element software we have solved the equations governing coupled diffusive and hydrodynamic flow. A rapidly intensifying horizontal toroidal vortex develops around the axis of the bowl. This vortex is characterized by downward barycentric flow along the curved surface of the bowl and upward flow in the vicinity of its axis. We find that after a short period of time this large-scale cellular convection associated with the curved boundary of the bowl greatly enhances the rate of sedimentation. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Anomalously weak solar convection

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20–100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10-2 at r/R⊙ = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient. PMID:22665774

  5. Hydrodynamics of micropipette aspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Drury, J L; Dembo, M

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of human neutrophils during micropipette aspiration are frequently analyzed by approximating these cells as simple slippery droplets of viscous fluid. Here, we present computations that reveal the detailed predictions of the simplest and most idealized case of such a scheme; namely, the case where the fluid of the droplet is homogeneous and Newtonian, and the surface tension of the droplet is constant. We have investigated the behavior of this model as a function of surface tension, droplet radius, viscosity, aspiration pressure, and pipette radius. In addition, we have tabulated a dimensionless factor, M, which can be utilized to calculate the apparent viscosity of the slippery droplet. Computations were carried out using a low Reynolds number hydrodynamics transport code based on the finite-element method. Although idealized and simplistic, we find that the slippery droplet model predicts many observed features of neutrophil aspiration. However, there are certain features that are not observed in neutrophils. In particular, the model predicts dilation of the membrane past the point of being continuous, as well as a reentrant jet at high aspiration pressures. PMID:9876128

  6. Astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2009-04-01

    The paper presents a detailed review of the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with particular focus on its astrophysical applications. We start by introducing the basic ideas and concepts and thereby outline all ingredients that are necessary for a practical implementation of the method in a working SPH code. Much of SPH's success relies on its excellent conservation properties and therefore the numerical conservation of physical invariants receives much attention throughout this review. The self-consistent derivation of the SPH equations from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid is the common theme of the remainder of the text. We derive a modern, Newtonian SPH formulation from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid. It accounts for changes of the local resolution lengths which result in corrective, so-called "grad-h-terms". We extend this strategy to special relativity for which we derive the corresponding grad-h equation set. The variational approach is further applied to a general-relativistic fluid evolving in a fixed, curved background space-time. Particular care is taken to explicitly derive all relevant equations in a coherent way.

  7. Engineering Hydrodynamic AUV Hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J.

    2016-12-01

    AUV stands for autonomous underwater vehicle. AUVs are used in oceanography and are similar to gliders. MBARIs AUVs as well as other AUVs map the ocean floor which is very important. They also measure physical characteristics of the water, such as temperature and salinity. My science fair project for 4th grade was a STEM activity in which I built and tested 3 different AUV bodies. I wanted to find out which design was the most hydrodynamic. I tested three different lengths of AUV hulls to see which AUV would glide the farthest. The first was 6 inches. The second was 12 inches and the third was 18 inches. I used clay for the nosecone and cut a ruler into two and made it the fin. Each AUV used the same nosecone and fin. I tested all three designs in a pool. I used biomimicry to create my hypothesis. When I was researching I found that long slim animals swim fastest. So, my hypothesis is the longer AUV will glide farthest. In the end I was right. The longer AUV did glide the farthest.

  8. Spin hydrodynamic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, R.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Chudo, H.; Okayasu, S.; Ieda, J.; Takahashi, S.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generation is the conversion of fluid kinetic energy into electricity. Such conversion, which has been applied to various types of electric power generation, is driven by the Lorentz force acting on charged particles and thus a magnetic field is necessary. On the other hand, recent studies of spintronics have revealed the similarity between the function of a magnetic field and that of spin-orbit interactions in condensed matter. This suggests the existence of an undiscovered route to realize the conversion of fluid dynamics into electricity without using magnetic fields. Here we show electric voltage generation from fluid dynamics free from magnetic fields; we excited liquid-metal flows in a narrow channel and observed longitudinal voltage generation in the liquid. This voltage has nothing to do with electrification or thermoelectric effects, but turned out to follow a universal scaling rule based on a spin-mediated scenario. The result shows that the observed voltage is caused by spin-current generation from a fluid motion: spin hydrodynamic generation. The observed phenomenon allows us to make mechanical spin-current and electric generators, opening a door to fluid spintronics.

  9. Lotic Water Hydrodynamic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Judi, David Ryan; Tasseff, Byron Alexander

    2015-01-23

    Water-related natural disasters, for example, floods and droughts, are among the most frequent and costly natural hazards, both socially and economically. Many of these floods are a result of excess rainfall collecting in streams and rivers, and subsequently overtopping banks and flowing overland into urban environments. Floods can cause physical damage to critical infrastructure and present health risks through the spread of waterborne diseases. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed Lotic, a state-of-the-art surface water hydrodynamic model, to simulate propagation of flood waves originating from a variety of events. Lotic is a two-dimensional (2D) flood model that has been used primarily for simulations in which overland water flows are characterized by movement in two dimensions, such as flood waves expected from rainfall-runoff events, storm surge, and tsunamis. In 2013, LANL developers enhanced Lotic through several development efforts. These developments included enhancements to the 2D simulation engine, including numerical formulation, computational efficiency developments, and visualization. Stakeholders can use simulation results to estimate infrastructure damage and cascading consequences within other sets of infrastructure, as well as to inform the development of flood mitigation strategies.

  10. Imaging of Compressed Pure-CH Shells and CH Shells with Titanium-Doped Layers on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Yaakobi, B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    1999-11-01

    The compressed shell integrity of spherical targets has been studied using the 60-beam, 30-kJ UV, OMEGA laser system. The emission from the hot core has been imaged through the cold shell at two narrow, x-ray energy bands, absorbing and nonabsorbing by the shell, allowing nonuniformities in the core emission and the cold shell areal density to be measured. Images of the target have been obtained using a pinhole-array with K-edge filters. The x-ray energies used are around 2.8 and 4.5 keV for pure-CH shells, and around 4.5 and 6 keV for titanium-doped layers. Additional images of the shell are obtained with a framed monochromatic x-ray microscope and a time-integrated crystal-spectrometer/pinhole-array combination. We will present measurements of the compressed shell integrity at the stagnation stage of spherical implosions by varying the position of the titanium-doped layer within the shell, by varying the thickness of the CH shell, and by using two different laser pulse shapes. The experimental results will be compared with 2-D (ORCHID) hydrodynamic simulations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  11. Reciprocal relations in dissipationless hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikovsky, L. A.

    2014-12-15

    Hidden symmetry in dissipationless terms of arbitrary hydrodynamics equations is recognized. We demonstrate that all fluxes are generated by a single function and derive conventional Euler equations using the proposed formalism.

  12. Experimental Observation of Thin-shell Instability in a Collisionless Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, H.; Doria, D.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Romagnani, L.; Bret, A.; Cerchez, M.; Giesecke, A. L.; Ianni, E.; Kar, S.; Notley, M.; Prasad, R.; Quinn, K.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the experimental observation of the instability of a plasma shell, which formed during the expansion of a laser-ablated plasma into a rarefied ambient medium. By means of a proton radiography technique, the evolution of the instability is temporally and spatially resolved on a timescale much shorter than the hydrodynamic one. The density of the thin shell exceeds that of the surrounding plasma, which lets electrons diffuse outward. An ambipolar electric field grows on both sides of the thin shell that is antiparallel to the density gradient. Ripples in the thin shell result in a spatially varying balance between the thermal pressure force mediated by this field and the ram pressure force that is exerted on it by the inflowing plasma. This mismatch amplifies the ripples by the same mechanism that drives the hydrodynamic nonlinear thin-shell instability (NTSI). Our results thus constitute the first experimental verification that the NTSI can develop in colliding flows.

  13. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  14. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  15. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-11-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  16. Thermocapillary Convection in Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this video is to understand the effects of surface tension on fluid convection. The fluid system chosen is the liquid sessile droplet to show the importance in single crystal growth, the spray drying and cooling of metal, and the advance droplet radiators of the space stations radiators. A cross sectional representation of a hemispherical liquid droplet under ideal conditions is used to show internal fluid motion. A direct simulation of buoyancy-dominant convection and surface tension-dominant convection is graphically displayed. The clear differences between two mechanisms of fluid transport, thermocapillary convection, and bouncy dominant convection is illustrated.

  17. Investigating the effect of solubility and density gradients on local hydrodynamics and drug dissolution in the USP 4 dissolution apparatus.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Deirdre M; Liu, Bo; Corrigan, Owen I

    2011-10-31

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of solubility and related solution density gradients, on hydrodynamics and dissolution rate in a low velocity pulsing flow, in the USP 4 flow-through dissolution apparatus. The paddle apparatus, flow-through apparatus and a free convection system were used in dissolution testing, using benzoic acid (BA) and lactose monohydrate (LM), representing slightly and freely soluble model compounds, respectively. A flow rate of 8 ml min(-1) (22.6 mm diameter cell) was used in the flow-through apparatus. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to analyze the effect of the dissolved compounds on local hydrodynamics. A higher dissolution rate of both BA and LM was obtained in the free convection system compared to the flow-through apparatus, with highest dissolution rate from both compounds in the paddle apparatus. The effect of downward flow arising from natural convection had a significant effect for the more soluble compound, LM, on local fluid velocities, whereas flow reversal induced by the forced convection environment was a significant feature impacting on the hydrodynamics in the BA species transfer simulation. The effect of solution density on local hydrodynamics needs to be considered when selecting dissolution conditions in the USP 4 dissolution apparatus.

  18. CFD modelling of shell-side asphaltenes deposition in a shell and tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emani, Sampath; Ramasamy, M.; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku

    2017-07-01

    Asphaltenes are identified as the main cause of crude oil fouling in the shell and tube exchangers. There are occasions where the crude oil flows through the shell side of the heat exchangers and some fouling is reported in the shell side of those heat exchangers. Understanding the fouling phenomena in the shell sides requires the knowledge on the irregular fluid flow paths and most susceptible locations of particles deposition. In the present work, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of shear stress and surface roughness on shell-side asphaltenes deposition in a shell and tube heat exchanger through Computational Fluid Dynamics approach. The hydrodynamics of asphaltenes particles and the effect of various forces on the asphaltenes deposition on the heat transfer surfaces has been investigated through a Lagrangian based discrete-phase model. From the CFD analysis, the net mass deposition of the asphaltenes particles reduces with an increase in surface roughness from 0 to 0.04 mm and wall shear stress from 0 to 0.04 Pa for flow velocity 1 m/s, respectively. The asphaltenes mass deposition becomes constant with further increase in wall shear stress and surface roughness.

  19. The Interplay between Proto--Neutron Star Convection and Neutrino Transport in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, A.; Calder, A. C.; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.; Guidry, M. W.; Strayer, M. R.; Umar, A. S.

    1998-01-01

    We couple two-dimensional hydrodynamics to realistic one-dimensional multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport to investigate proto-neutron star convection in core-collapse supernovae, and more specifically, the interplay between its development and neutrino transport. Our initial conditions, time-dependent boundary conditions, and neutrino distributions for computing neutrino heating, cooling, and deleptonization rates are obtained from one-dimensional simulations that implement multigroup flux-limited diffusion and one-dimensional hydrodynamics. The development and evolution of proto-neutron star convection are investigated for both 15 and 25 M⊙ models, representative of the two classes of stars with compact and extended iron cores, respectively. For both models, in the absence of neutrino transport, the angle-averaged radial and angular convection velocities in the initial Ledoux unstable region below the shock after bounce achieve their peak values in ~20 ms, after which they decrease as the convection in this region dissipates. The dissipation occurs as the gradients are smoothed out by convection. This initial proto-neutron star convection episode seeds additional convectively unstable regions farther out beneath the shock. The additional proto-neutron star convection is driven by successive negative entropy gradients that develop as the shock, in propagating out after core bounce, is successively strengthened and weakened by the oscillating inner core. The convection beneath the shock distorts its sphericity, but on the average the shock radius is not boosted significantly relative to its radius in our corresponding one-dimensional models. In the presence of neutrino transport, proto-neutron star convection velocities are too small relative to bulk inflow velocities to result in any significant convective transport of entropy and leptons. This is evident in our two-dimensional entropy snapshots, which in this case appear spherically symmetric

  20. Multiple shells in IRC+10216: shell properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauron, N.; Huggins, P. J.

    2000-07-01

    We report on the properties of the multiple shells in the circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216, using deep optical imaging, including data from the Hubble Space Telescope. The intensity profiles confirm the presence of thin ( ~ 0farcs5 -3'' ec), limb-brightened shells in the envelope, seen in stellar and ambient Galactic light scattered by dust. The shells are spaced at irregular intervals of ~ 5'' ec-20'' ec, corresponding to time scales of 200-800 yr, although intervals as short as ~ 1'' ec (40 yr) are seen close to the star. The location of the main shells shows a good correlation with high-resolution, molecular line maps of the inner envelope, indicating that the dust and gas are well coupled. The shell/intershell density contrast is typically ~ 3, and we find that the shells form the dominant mass component of the circumstellar envelope. The shells exhibit important evolutionary effects: the thickness increases with increasing radius, with an effective dispersion velocity of 0.7 km s-1 and there is evidence for shell interactions. Despite the presence of bipolar structure close to the star, the global shell pattern favors a roughly isotropic, episodic mass loss mechanism, with a range of time scales. Based on observations made with the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, operated by CNRS, NRCC and UH, and on dearchived observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555

  1. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  2. Limits to optimization: fluid dynamics, adhesive strength and the evolution of shape in limpet shells.

    PubMed

    Denny, M W

    2000-09-01

    Limpets are commonly found on wave-swept rocky shores, where they may be subjected to water velocities in excess of 20 m s(-1). These extreme flows can impose large forces (lift and drag), challenging the animal's ability to adhere to the substratum. It is commonly thought that the conical shape of limpet shells has evolved in part to reduce these hydrodynamic forces while providing a large aperture for adhesion. This study documents how lift and drag actually vary with the shape of limpet-like models and uses these data to explore the potential of hydrodynamic forces to serve as a selective factor in the evolution of limpet shell morphology. At a low ratio of shell height to shell radius, lift is the dominant force, while at high ratios of height to radius drag is dominant. The risk of dislodgment is minimized when the ratio of height to radius is 1.06 and the apex is in the center of the shell. Real limpets are seldom optimally shaped, however, with a typical height-to-radius ratio of 0.68 and an apex well anterior of the shell's center. The disparity between the actual and the hydrodynamically optimal shape of shells may be due to the high tenacity of limpets' adhesive system. Most limpets adhere to the substratum so strongly that they are unlikely to be dislodged by lift or drag regardless of the shape of their shell. The evolution of a tenacious adhesion system (perhaps in response to predation) has thus preempted selection for a hydrodynamically optimal shell, allowing the shell to respond to alternative selective factors.

  3. Design and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles with gold shells for single particle optical tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jitkang

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of iron oxide core, gold shell nanoparticles are studied in this thesis. Firstly, nanoparticles with 18 +/- 1.7 nm diameter iron oxide cores with ˜5 nm thick gold shells were synthesized via a new seed-mediated electroless deposition method. The nanoparticles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and could be reversibly collected by a permanent magnet. These nanoparticles displayed a sharp localized surface plasmon resonance peak at 605 nm, as predicted by scattering theory, and their large scattering cross-section allowed them to be individually resolved in darkfield optical microscopy while undergoing Brownian motion in aqueous suspension. Later, commercially available 38 +/- 3.8 nm diameter spherical iron oxide nanoparticles (from Ocean Nanotech, Inc) were employed to make core-shell particles. These particles were decorated with cationic poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) which further promotes the attachment of small gold clusters. After gold seeding, the average hydrodynamic diameter of the core-shell particles is 172 +/- 65.9 nm. The magnetophoretic motion of these particles was guided by a piece of magnetized mu-metal. Individual particle trajectories were observed by darkfield optical microscopy. The typical magnetophoretic velocity achieved was within the range of 1--10 mum/sec. Random walk analysis performed on these particles while undergoing Brownian motion confirmed that individual particles were indeed being imaged. The particle size variation within the observed sample obtained through random walk analysis was within the size distribution obtained by dynamic light scattering. When the current to the solenoid used to magnetize the mu-metal was turned off, all the collected core-shell particles were readily redispersed by diffusion back into the surrounding environment. A Peclet number analysis was performed to probe the convective motion of nanospheres and nanorods under the influence of

  4. Radiation Hydrodynamics: Numerical Aspects and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfi, Ernst A.

    Introduction General Remarks on the Numerical Method Time Scales Length Scales Interaction Between Matter and Radiation Moving Fronts Basic Equations Radiation Hydrodynamics (RHD) Coupling Terms Closure Condition Opacity Equation of State Transport Theorem Solution Strategy Integral Form of the RHD Equations Symbolic Notation Moving Coordinates Implicit Discretization Time-centering Adaptive RHD Equations Discretization of Gradients and Divergence Terms Diffusion Advection Initial Conditions Boundary Conditions Artificial Viscosity Discrete RHD Equations Radiative Closure Condition Radiative Boundary Conditions Eddington Factor Adaptive Grids Basic Grid Properties Desired Resolution Spatial and Temporal Smoothing Grid Equation Grid Boundary Conditions Grid Motion Remarks on the Grid Equation First Example: Simple Test Function Second Example: Shock Tube Problem Initial Grid Distributions Further Computational Needs Rational Spline Interpolation CPU-Time Requirements Iteration Procedure and Matrix Inversion Structure of the Jacobi Matrix Time-Step Control Computational Examples Evolution of Supernova Remnants (SNRs) Nonlinear Stellar Pulsations Protostellar Collapse Dust-Driven Winds Radiative Transfer Discussion Internal Accuracy Problems Advantages and Disadvantages of the implict formulation Nuclear and Chemical Networks and Convection Multidimensional Versions Improvements and Further Recommendations References

  5. Natural convective mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; de La Cruz, Luis; del Castillo, Luis

    1998-11-01

    Natural convective mixing flows. Eduardo Ramos and Luis M. de La Cruz, National University of Mexico and Luis Del Castillo San Luis Potosi University. The possibility of mixing a fluid with a natural convective flow is analysed by solving numerically the mass, momentum and energy equations in a cubic container. Two opposite vertical walls of the container are assumed to have temperatures that oscillate as functions of time. The phase of the oscillations is chosen in such a way that alternating corrotating vortices are formed in the cavity. The mixing efficiency of this kind of flow is examined with a Lagrangian tracking technique. This work was partially financed by CONACyT-Mexico project number GE0044

  6. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  7. The Solar Convection Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Kurt T.

    2000-01-01

    I helped to complete a research project with NASA scientists Dr. David Hathaway (my mentor), Rick Bogart, and John Beck from the SOHO/SOI collaboration. Our published paper in 'Solar Physics' was titled 'The Solar Convection Spectrum' (April 2000). Two of my undergraduate students were named on the paper--Gavrav Khutri and Josh Petitto. Gavrav also wrote a short paper for the National Conference of Undergraduate Research Proceedings in 1998 using a preliminary result. Our main result was that we show no evidence of a scale of convection named 'mesogranulation'. Instead, we see only direct evidence for the well-known scales of convection known as graduation and supergranulation. We are also completing work on vertical versus horizontal flow fluxes at the solar surface. I continue to work on phase relationships of solar activity indicators, but I have not yet written a paper with my students on this topic. Along with my research results, I have developed and augmented undergraduate courses at Birmingham-Southern College by myself and with other faculty. We have included new labs and observations, speakers from NASA and elsewhere, new subject material related to NASA and space science. I have done a great deal of work in outreach, mostly as President and other offices in the Birmingham Astronomical Society. My work includes speaking, attracting speakers, giving workshops, and governing.

  8. The Solar Convection Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Kurt T.

    2000-01-01

    I helped to complete a research project with NASA scientists Dr. David Hathaway (my mentor), Rick Bogart, and John Beck from the SOHO/SOI collaboration. Our published paper in 'Solar Physics' was titled 'The Solar Convection Spectrum' (April 2000). Two of my undergraduate students were named on the paper--Gavrav Khutri and Josh Petitto. Gavrav also wrote a short paper for the National Conference of Undergraduate Research Proceedings in 1998 using a preliminary result. Our main result was that we show no evidence of a scale of convection named 'mesogranulation'. Instead, we see only direct evidence for the well-known scales of convection known as graduation and supergranulation. We are also completing work on vertical versus horizontal flow fluxes at the solar surface. I continue to work on phase relationships of solar activity indicators, but I have not yet written a paper with my students on this topic. Along with my research results, I have developed and augmented undergraduate courses at Birmingham-Southern College by myself and with other faculty. We have included new labs and observations, speakers from NASA and elsewhere, new subject material related to NASA and space science. I have done a great deal of work in outreach, mostly as President and other offices in the Birmingham Astronomical Society. My work includes speaking, attracting speakers, giving workshops, and governing.

  9. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF CONVECTIVELY DRIVEN WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts, C.; Rogers, T. M.

    2015-06-20

    We demonstrate observational evidence for the occurrence of convectively driven internal gravity waves (IGWs) in young massive O-type stars observed with high-precision CoRoT space photometry. This evidence results from a comparison between velocity spectra based on two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of IGWs in a differentially rotating massive star and the observed spectra. We also show that the velocity spectra caused by IGWs may lead to detectable line-profile variability and explain the occurrence of macroturbulence in the observed line profiles of OB stars. Our findings provide predictions that can readily be tested by including a sample of bright, slowly and rapidly rotating OB-type stars in the scientific program of the K2 mission accompanied by high-precision spectroscopy and their confrontation with multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of IGWs for various masses and ages.

  10. Hydrodynamic model of temperature change in open ionic channels.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D P; Eisenberg, R S; Jerome, J W; Shu, C W

    1995-01-01

    Most theories of open ionic channels ignore heat generated by current flow, but that heat is known to be significant when analogous currents flow in semiconductors, so a generalization of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory of channels, called the hydrodynamic model, is needed. The hydrodynamic theory is a combination of the Poisson and Euler field equations of electrostatics and fluid dynamics, conservation laws that describe diffusive and convective flow of mass, heat, and charge (i.e., current), and their coupling. That is to say, it is a kinetic theory of solute and solvent flow, allowing heat and current flow as well, taking into account density changes, temperature changes, and electrical potential gradients. We integrate the equations with an essentially nonoscillatory shock-capturing numerical scheme previously shown to be stable and accurate. Our calculations show that 1) a significant amount of electrical energy is exchanged with the permeating ions; 2) the local temperature of the ions rises some tens of degrees, and this temperature rise significantly alters for ionic flux in a channel 25 A long, such as gramicidin-A; and 3) a critical parameter, called the saturation velocity, determines whether ionic motion is overdamped (Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory), is an intermediate regime (called the adiabatic approximation in semiconductor theory), or is altogether unrestricted (requiring the full hydrodynamic model). It seems that significant temperature changes are likely to accompany current flow in the open ionic channel. PMID:8599638

  11. Analysis of hydrodynamic losses for various types of aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starobin, I. M.; Lupachev, S. P.; Dolgopolov, R. V.; Zaiko, V. M.; Kas'yanov, V. A.; Mungalov, D. D.; Morov, G. V.

    1985-05-01

    The creation of an automated computer-controlled hydraulic stand made it possible to measure the main hydrodynamic parameters of the flow through the investigated HVP and to determine the coefficients of Eq. (2) of fluid flow in the test chamber of the stand. The coefficients found can serve as a criterion of a comparative assessment of the hydrodynamics of HVPs. An analysis of the coefficients showed that the main contribution to pressure losses across ball and disc valves is made by viscous and convective effects. An analysis of inertial losses confirmed the presence of oscillations of the ball closing elements of the AKCh-3-06 valve around the props of the stroke limiters and made it possible to assess them quantitatively. For leaflet valves the contribution of inertial losses to the total pressure losses is more considerable than in the case of disc and ball valves both in the regime of an increase of power of the output and in the regime of a constant power. The mechanical properties of the material of leaflet valves have an effect on the hydrodynamic characteristics. The advantage of the investigated leaflet valves consists not only in that they have smaller total hydraulic losses compared with the other valves, but also in that they provide a high amplitude of pulsations of the blood stream in the case of insufficient contractility of the heart.

  12. A convective forecast experiment of global tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, Nicolas; Giering, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Modeling jointly the deep convective motions in the mantle and the deformation of the lithosphere in a self-consistent way is a long-standing quest, for which significant advances have been made in the late 1990's. The complexities used in lithospheric models are making their way into the models of mantle convection (density variations, pseudo-plasticity, elasticity, free surface), hence global models of mantle motions can now display tectonics at their surface, evolving self-consistantly and showing some of the most important properties of plate tectonics on Earth (boundaries, types of boundaries, plate sizes, seafloor spreading properties, continental drift). The goal of this work is to experiment the forecasting power of such convection models with plate-like behavior, being here StagYY (Tackley, 2008). We generate initial conditions for a 3D spherical model in the past (50Ma and younger), using models with imposed plate velocities from 200Ma. By doing this, we introduce errors in the initial conditions that propagate afterwards. From these initial conditions, we run the convection models free, without imposing any sort of motion, letting the self-organization take place. We compare the forecast to the present-day plate velocities and plate boundaries. To investigate the optimal parameterization, and also have a flavor of the sensitivity of the results to rheological parameters, we compute the derivatives of the misfit of the surface velocities relative to the yield stress, the magnitude of the viscosity jump at 660km and the properties of a weak crust. These derivates are computed thanks to the tangent linear model of StagYY, that is built through the automatic differentiation software TAF (Giering and Kaminski, 2003). References Tackley, P. J., Modeling compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 171, 7-18 (2008). Giering, R., Kaminski, T., Applying TAF

  13. The hydrodynamics of colloidal gelation.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsigmond; Wang, Gang; Swan, James

    2015-12-14

    Colloidal gels are formed during arrested phase separation. Sub-micron, mutually attractive particles aggregate to form a system spanning network with high interfacial area, far from equilibrium. Models for microstructural evolution during colloidal gelation have often struggled to match experimental results with long standing questions regarding the role of hydrodynamic interactions. In nearly all models, these interactions are neglected entirely. In the present work, we report simulations of gelation with and without hydrodynamic interactions between the suspended particles executed in HOOMD-blue. The disparities between these simulations are striking and mirror the experimental-theoretical mismatch in the literature. The hydrodynamic simulations agree with experimental observations, however. We explore a simple model of the competing transport processes in gelation that anticipates these disparities, and conclude that hydrodynamic forces are essential. Near the gel boundary, there exists a competition between compaction of individual aggregates which suppresses gelation and coagulation of aggregates which enhances it. The time scale for compaction is mildly slowed by hydrodynamic interactions, while the time scale for coagulation is greatly accelerated. This enhancement to coagulation leads to a shift in the gel boundary to lower strengths of attraction and lower particle concentrations when compared to models that neglect hydrodynamic interactions. Away from the gel boundary, differences in the nearest neighbor distribution and fractal dimension persist within gels produced by both simulation methods. This result necessitates a fundamental rethinking of how dynamic, discrete element models for gelation kinetics are developed as well as how collective hydrodynamic interactions influence the arrest of attractive colloidal dispersions.

  14. Measurement of the shell decompression in direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Davis, A. K.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Radha, P. B.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-05-01

    A series of direct-drive implosions performed on OMEGA were used to isolate the effect of an adiabat on the in-flight shell thickness. The maximum in-flight shell thickness was measured to decrease from 75 ±2 to 60 ±2 μ m when the adiabat of the shell was reduced from 6 to 4.5, but when decreasing the adiabat further (1.8), the shell thickness increased to 75 ±2 μ m due to the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Hydrodynamic simulations suggest that a laser imprint is the dominant seed for these nonuniformities.

  15. Rossby numbers of fully convective and partially convective stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landin, Natália R.; Mendes, Luiz T. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the stellar magnetic activity in the theoretical point of view, through the use of stellar structure and evolution models. We present theoretical values of convective turnover times and Rossby numbers for low-mass stars, calculated with the ATON stellar structure and evolution code. We concentrate our analysis on fully convective and partially convective stars motivated by recent observations of X-ray emission of slowly rotating fully convective stars, which suggest that the presence of a tachocline is not a central key for magnetic fields generation. We investigate the behavior of the convective turnover time evolution, as well as its radial profile inside the star. A discussion about the location where the convective turnover time is calculated in the stellar interior is also addressed. Our theoretical results are compared to observational data from low-mass stars.

  16. Natural solutal convection in magnetic fluids: First-order phase transition aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Aleksey S.

    2016-10-01

    Concentration stratification of magnetic fluids under the action of external magnetic field can disturb mechanical equilibrium in the system and cause intensive solutal convection. The current paper is devoted to the study of free solutal convection in magnetic fluids undergoing first-order phase transition. Simulation of solutal convection in OpenFOAM package makes it possible to compare numeric results with physical experiment observations. The numeric simulation of convective hydrodynamic flows was carried out in the framework of several theories of first-order phase transition in ferrocolloids. The numerical results are compared with experimental observations in order to choose the theory which predicts most accurately the concentration stratification in magnetic fluids undergoing magneto-controllable first-order phase transition.

  17. The Magnitude of Viscous Dissipation in Strongly Stratified Two-dimensional Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Laura K.; Browning, Matthew K.

    2017-08-01

    Convection in astrophysical systems must be maintained against dissipation. Although the effects of dissipation are often assumed to be negligible, theory suggests that in strongly stratified convecting fluids, the dissipative heating rate can exceed the luminosity carried by convection. Here, we explore this possibility using a series of numerical simulations. We consider two-dimensional numerical models of hydrodynamic convection in a Cartesian layer under the anelastic approximation and demonstrate that the dissipative heating rate can indeed exceed the imposed luminosity. We establish a theoretical expression for the ratio of the dissipative heating rate to the luminosity emerging at the upper boundary, in terms only of the depth of the layer and the thermal scale height. In particular, we show that this ratio is independent of the diffusivities and confirm this with a series of numerical simulations. Our results suggest that dissipative heating may significantly alter the internal dynamics of stars and planets.

  18. Classification Shell Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etzold, Carol

    1983-01-01

    Discusses shell classification exercises. Through keying students advanced from the "I know what a shell looks like" stage to become involved in the classification process: observing, labeling, making decisions about categories, and identifying marine animals. (Author/JN)

  19. Visualization of Flow Behavior in Earth Mantle Convection.

    PubMed

    Schroder, S; Peterson, J A; Obermaier, H; Kellogg, L H; Joy, K I; Hagen, H

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental characteristic of fluid flow is that it causes mixing: introduce a dye into a flow, and it will disperse. Mixing can be used as a method to visualize and characterize flow. Because mixing is a process that occurs over time, it is a 4D problem that presents a challenge for computation, visualization, and analysis. Motivated by a mixing problem in geophysics, we introduce a combination of methods to analyze, transform, and finally visualize mixing in simulations of convection in a self-gravitating 3D spherical shell representing convection in the Earth's mantle. Geophysicists use tools such as the finite element model CitcomS to simulate convection, and introduce massless, passive tracers to model mixing. The output of geophysical flow simulation is hard to analyze for domain experts because of overall data size and complexity. In addition, information overload and occlusion are problems when visualizing a whole-earth model. To address the large size of the data, we rearrange the simulation data using intelligent indexing for fast file access and efficient caching. To address information overload and interpret mixing, we compute tracer concentration statistics, which are used to characterize mixing in mantle convection models. Our visualization uses a specially tailored version of Direct Volume Rendering. The most important adjustment is the use of constant opacity. Because of this special area of application, i. e. the rendering of a spherical shell, many computations for volume rendering can be optimized. These optimizations are essential to a smooth animation of the time-dependent simulation data. Our results show how our system can be used to quickly assess the simulation output and test hypotheses regarding Earth's mantle convection. The integrated processing pipeline helps geoscientists to focus on their main task of analyzing mantle homogenization.

  20. Initiation of Convection in a Classical Nova Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursi, L. J.; Calder, A. C.; Ricker, P. M.; Truran, J. W.; Zingale, M.; Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.; Rosner, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Tufo, H.; MacNeice, P.

    2001-12-01

    Classical Novae result from the explosive thermonuclear burning of material accreted from a companion star onto the surface of a white dwarf. Observed abundances and explosion energies estimated from observations indicate that there must be significant mixing of the heavier material of the white dwarf (C/O) into the lighter accreted material (H/He). Accordingly, nova models must incorporate a mechanism that will dredge up the heavier white dwarf material, and fluid motions from an early convection phase is one proposed mechanism. We present results from two-dimensional simulations of classical nova precursor models that demonstrate the beginning of a convective phase during the `simmering' of a Nova precursor. We use a new hydrostatic equilibrium hydrodynamics module recently developed for the adaptive-mesh code FLASH. The two-dimensional models are based on the one-dimensional models of Ami Glasner (Glasner et al. 1997), and were evolved with FLASH from a pre-convective state to the onset of convection. In addition, we present the details of the hydrostatic equilibrium module and the hydrostatic boundary conditions used in the simulations. This research has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant no. B341495 to the ASCI Flash Center at the University of Chicago.

  1. Group-invariant solutions of hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Coggeshall, S.V.

    1993-08-01

    Using the property of invariance under Lie groups of transformations, the equations of hydrodynamics are transformed from partial differential equations to ordinary differential equations, for which special analytic solutions can be found. These particular solutions can be used for (1) numerical benchmarks, (2) the basis for analytic models, and (3) insight into more general solutions. Additionally, group transformations can be used to construct new solutions from existing ones. A space-time projective group is used to generate complicated solutions from simpler solutions. Discussion of these procedures is presented along with examples of analytic of 1,2 and 3-D hydrodynamics.

  2. Semi-convective layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, F.; Kupka, F.; Egbers, Ch.; Neben, M.; Hücker, S.; Bahr, C.; Schmitt, M.

    2017-05-01

    Semi-convective mixing, as an example of double-diffusive convection, is of general importance in multi-component fluid mixing processes. In astrophysics it occurs when the mean molecular weight gradient caused by a mixture of light material on top of heavier one counteracts the convective instability caused by a temperature gradient. Direct numerical simulations of double-diffusive fluid flows in a realistic stellar or planetary parameter space are currently non-feasible. Hence, a model describing incompressible semi-convection was developed, which allows to investigate semi-convective layer formation. A detailed parameter study with varying Rayleigh number and stability parameter has been performed for the giant planet case. We conclude that semi-convective layering may not play that important role as suggested in earlier works for the planetary case.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Non-Newtonian Convection in Ice: Application to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations of solid state convection in Europa's ice shell have so far been limited to consideration of Newtonian flow laws, where the viscosity of ice is strongly dependent upon temperature, predicting that a stagnant lid should form at the top (10-40%) of a convecting ice shell. Such large thicknesses seem to contradict estimates of the effective elastic thickness of Europa s ice shell during its geologically active period. Recent laboratory experiments characterize the rheology of ice as the sum of contributions from several temperature and strain rate-dependent creep mechanisms. We present the results of numerical simulations of convection within Europa s ice shell using the finite-element model Citcom, applying the non-Newtonian rheology of grain boundry sliding. Our calculations suggest a shallower brittle/ductile transition and larger interior convective velocities compared to Newtonian rheology. The flow field is time-dependent, with small, localized upwellings and downwellings at the thermal boundary layers that have minimal topographic expression at the surface.

  4. Hydrodynamic shocks in microroller suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmotte, Blaise; Driscoll, Michelle; Chaikin, Paul; Donev, Aleksandar

    2017-09-01

    We combine experiments, large-scale simulations, and continuum models to study the emergence of coherent structures in a suspension of magnetically driven microrollers sedimented near a floor. Collective hydrodynamic effects are predominant in this system, leading to strong density-velocity coupling. We characterize a uniform suspension and show that density waves propagate freely in all directions in a dispersive fashion. When sharp density gradients are introduced in the suspension, we observe the formation of a shock. Unlike Burgers' shocklike structures observed in other active and driven confined hydrodynamic systems, the shock front in our system has a well-defined finite width and moves rapidly compared to the mean suspension velocity. We introduce a continuum model demonstrating that the finite width of the front is due to far-field nonlocal hydrodynamic interactions and governed by a geometric parameter, the average particle height above the floor.

  5. Numerical Hydrodynamics in Special Relativity.

    PubMed

    Martí, José Maria; Müller, Ewald

    2003-01-01

    This review is concerned with a discussion of numerical methods for the solution of the equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD). Particular emphasis is put on a comprehensive review of the application of high-resolution shock-capturing methods in SRHD. Results of a set of demanding test bench simulations obtained with different numerical SRHD methods are compared. Three applications (astrophysical jets, gamma-ray bursts and heavy ion collisions) of relativistic flows are discussed. An evaluation of various SRHD methods is presented, and future developments in SRHD are analyzed involving extension to general relativistic hydrodynamics and relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics. The review further provides FORTRAN programs to compute the exact solution of a 1D relativistic Riemann problem with zero and nonzero tangential velocities, and to simulate 1D relativistic flows in Cartesian Eulerian coordinates using the exact SRHD Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction.

  6. Some aspects of the hydrodynamics of the microencapsulation route to NIF mandrels

    SciTech Connect

    Gresho, P M

    1998-10-20

    Spherical plastic shells for use as mandrels for the fabrication of ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) target capsules can be produced by solution-based microencapsulation techniques. The specifications for these mandrels in terms of sphericity are extremely rigorous, and it is clear that various aspects of the solution hydrodynamics associated with their production are important in controlling the quality of the final product. This paper explores what we know (and need to know) about the hydrodynamics of the microencapsulation process in order to lay the foundation for process improvements as well as identify inherent limits.

  7. Modeling Early Galaxies Using Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    This simulation uses a flux-limited diffusion solver to explore the radiation hydrodynamics of early galaxies, in particular, the ionizing radiation created by Population III stars. At the time of this rendering, the simulation has evolved to a redshift of 3.5. The simulation volume is 11.2 comoving megaparsecs, and has a uniform grid of 10243 cells, with over 1 billion dark matter and star particles. This animation shows a combined view of the baryon density, dark matter density, radiation energy and emissivity from this simulation. The multi-variate rendering is particularly useful because is shows both the baryonic matter ("normal") and dark matter, and the pressure and temperature variables are properties of only the baryonic matter. Visible in the gas density are "bubbles", or shells, created by the radiation feedback from young stars. Seeing the bubbles from feedback provides confirmation of the physics model implemented. Features such as these are difficult to identify algorithmically, but easily found when viewing the visualization. Simulation was performed on Kraken at the National Institute for Computational Sciences. Visualization was produced using resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory.

  8. Plasma convection in Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    The magnetosphere of Neptune changes its magnetic configuration continuously as the planet rotates, leading to a strong modulation of the convection electric field. Even though the corotation speed is considerably larger, the modulation causes the small convection speed to have a cumulative effect, much like the acceleration of particles in a cyclotron. A model calculation shows that plasma on one side of the planet convects out of the magnetosphere in a few planetary rotations, while on the other side it convects slowly planetward. The observation of nitrogen ions from a Triton plasma torus may provide a critical test of the model.

  9. Hydrodynamics of giant planet formation. II - Model equations and critical mass. III - Jupiter's nucleated instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wuchterl, G. )

    1991-05-01

    A spherically symmetric protoplanetary model with a growing rigid core and a gaseous envelope of solar composition is used to investigate the character and evolution of the nucleated instability; the model equations formulated are used to follow the static evolution of a protogiant planet in the 'Kyoto' solar nebula, lying at Jupiter's solar distance, to its critical core mass. Convective energy transfer has been formulated for inclusion in implicit radiation hydrodynamical computations. It is established that collapse need not occur at the critical mass, which in agreement with earlier investigations is found to be of the order of 13.1 earth masses. This model is then used as an initial condition for a radiation hydrodynamical calculation of the nucleated instability. It is found that nonlinear hydrodynamic waves are excited by a kappa mechanism, and that an outflow is driven. 56 refs.

  10. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  11. Hydrodynamic interactions in protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Niewieczerzał, Szymon

    2009-03-01

    We incorporate hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) in a coarse-grained and structure-based model of proteins by employing the Rotne-Prager hydrodynamic tensor. We study several small proteins and demonstrate that HIs facilitate folding. We also study HIV-1 protease and show that HIs make the flap closing dynamics faster. The HIs are found to affect time correlation functions in the vicinity of the native state even though they have no impact on same time characteristics of the structure fluctuations around the native state.

  12. Hydrodynamic behavior of fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltzius, Pierre

    1987-02-01

    Measurements of the radius of gyration RG and the hydrodynamic radius RH of colloidal silica aggregates are reported. These aggregates have fractal geometry and RH is proportional to RG for 500 Å<=RH<=7000 Å, with a ratio RH/RG=0.72+/-0.02. The results are compared with predictions for macromolecules of various shapes. The proportionality of the two radii can be understood with use of the pair correlation function of fractal objects and hydrodynamic interactions on the Oseen level. The value of the ratio remains to be explained.

  13. Relativistic hydrodynamics of cosmological sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P. ); McKinney, J. )

    1999-09-01

    We have extended previous numerical calculations of Newtonian cosmological sheets to include self-consistent interactions with the background metric by solving the complete Einstein field equations together with the relativistic perfect fluid hydrodynamics equations. The initial data are parametrized and constructed using the gauge invariant perturbation formalism to specify the free conformal variables for the constraints. Numerical evolutions of initially horizon scale fluctuations are compared with results from perturbation theory and the Zel[close quote]dovich solution for a range of gravitational field strengths, and we discuss the nonlinear hydrodynamic, optical, and geometric characteristics of the sheet structures. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  14. Zoned mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis; Van Der Hilst, Rob D

    2002-11-15

    We review the present state of our understanding of mantle convection with respect to geochemical and geophysical evidence and we suggest a model for mantle convection and its evolution over the Earth's history that can reconcile this evidence. Whole-mantle convection, even with material segregated within the D" region just above the core-mantle boundary, is incompatible with the budget of argon and helium and with the inventory of heat sources required by the thermal evolution of the Earth. We show that the deep-mantle composition in lithophilic incompatible elements is inconsistent with the storage of old plates of ordinary oceanic lithosphere, i.e. with the concept of a plate graveyard. Isotopic inventories indicate that the deep-mantle composition is not correctly accounted for by continental debris, primitive material or subducted slabs containing normal oceanic crust. Seismological observations have begun to hint at compositional heterogeneity in the bottom 1000 km or so of the mantle, but there is no compelling evidence in support of an interface between deep and shallow mantle at mid-depth. We suggest that in a system of thermochemical convection, lithospheric plates subduct to a depth that depends - in a complicated fashion - on their composition and thermal structure. The thermal structure of the sinking plates is primarily determined by the direction and rate of convergence, the age of the lithosphere at the trench, the sinking rate and the variation of these parameters over time (i.e. plate-tectonic history) and is not the same for all subduction systems. The sinking rate in the mantle is determined by a combination of thermal (negative) and compositional buoyancy and as regards the latter we consider in particular the effect of the loading of plates with basaltic plateaux produced by plume heads. Barren oceanic plates are relatively buoyant and may be recycled preferentially in the shallow mantle. Oceanic plateau-laden plates have a more pronounced

  15. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    PubMed Central

    Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068–3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only. PMID:27616934

  16. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falsaperla, Paolo; Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-08-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068-3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only.

  17. Cross-diffusion-driven hydrodynamic instabilities in a double-layer system: General classification and nonlinear simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budroni, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Cross diffusion, whereby a flux of a given species entrains the diffusive transport of another species, can trigger buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface of initially stable stratifications. Starting from a simple three-component case, we introduce a theoretical framework to classify cross-diffusion-induced hydrodynamic phenomena in two-layer stratifications under the action of the gravitational field. A cross-diffusion-convection (CDC) model is derived by coupling the fickian diffusion formalism to Stokes equations. In order to isolate the effect of cross-diffusion in the convective destabilization of a double-layer system, we impose a starting concentration jump of one species in the bottom layer while the other one is homogeneously distributed over the spatial domain. This initial configuration avoids the concurrence of classic Rayleigh-Taylor or differential-diffusion convective instabilities, and it also allows us to activate selectively the cross-diffusion feedback by which the heterogeneously distributed species influences the diffusive transport of the other species. We identify two types of hydrodynamic modes [the negative cross-diffusion-driven convection (NCC) and the positive cross-diffusion-driven convection (PCC)], corresponding to the sign of this operational cross-diffusion term. By studying the space-time density profiles along the gravitational axis we obtain analytical conditions for the onset of convection in terms of two important parameters only: the operational cross-diffusivity and the buoyancy ratio, giving the relative contribution of the two species to the global density. The general classification of the NCC and PCC scenarios in such parameter space is supported by numerical simulations of the fully nonlinear CDC problem. The resulting convective patterns compare favorably with recent experimental results found in microemulsion systems.

  18. Cross-diffusion-driven hydrodynamic instabilities in a double-layer system: General classification and nonlinear simulations.

    PubMed

    Budroni, M A

    2015-12-01

    Cross diffusion, whereby a flux of a given species entrains the diffusive transport of another species, can trigger buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface of initially stable stratifications. Starting from a simple three-component case, we introduce a theoretical framework to classify cross-diffusion-induced hydrodynamic phenomena in two-layer stratifications under the action of the gravitational field. A cross-diffusion-convection (CDC) model is derived by coupling the fickian diffusion formalism to Stokes equations. In order to isolate the effect of cross-diffusion in the convective destabilization of a double-layer system, we impose a starting concentration jump of one species in the bottom layer while the other one is homogeneously distributed over the spatial domain. This initial configuration avoids the concurrence of classic Rayleigh-Taylor or differential-diffusion convective instabilities, and it also allows us to activate selectively the cross-diffusion feedback by which the heterogeneously distributed species influences the diffusive transport of the other species. We identify two types of hydrodynamic modes [the negative cross-diffusion-driven convection (NCC) and the positive cross-diffusion-driven convection (PCC)], corresponding to the sign of this operational cross-diffusion term. By studying the space-time density profiles along the gravitational axis we obtain analytical conditions for the onset of convection in terms of two important parameters only: the operational cross-diffusivity and the buoyancy ratio, giving the relative contribution of the two species to the global density. The general classification of the NCC and PCC scenarios in such parameter space is supported by numerical simulations of the fully nonlinear CDC problem. The resulting convective patterns compare favorably with recent experimental results found in microemulsion systems.

  19. Hydrodynamic Enhancements of Dissolution from Drug Particles: In vivo vs. In vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, James; Wang, Yanxing

    2013-11-01

    Absorption of drug molecules into the blood stream is generally limited by dissolution-rate in the intestines. Dissolution occurs via diffusion enhanced by a response to the hydrodynamic flow environment, a process that is very different in the human intestine than in a USP-II dissolution apparatus, commonly used by drug companies to validate new drug formulations. Whereas in vivo hydrodynamics are driven by the motility of intestinal wall muscles, the USP-II apparatus is a rotating paddle to mix drug particles during dissolution testing. These differences are of current interest to agencies that regulate drug product development. Through lattice-Boltzmann-based computer simulation of point particles transported through human intestine, we analyze the hydrodynamic parameters associated with convection that quantify the extent to which in vitro dissolution tests are or are not relevant to in vivo hydrodynamics. . We show that for drug particles less that ~100-200 microns, effects of convection are negligible in the intestines. However, we discover a previously unappreciated phenomenon that significantly enhances dissolution-rate and that distinguishes in vitro from in vivo dissolution: the fluid shear rate at the particle. Supported by NSF and AstraZeneca.

  20. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection with a variable gravity and Keplerian rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, William H.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal convection was proposed as a possible mechanism for generation and maintenance of turbulence in the inner accretion disk regime of the primordial solar nebula. It is of fundamental interest to design experiments with the basic physical features of the solar nebula conditions cannot be produced in the laboratory, numerical simulations of hydrodynamic flows, which have been very successful in describing aerodynamic flows, can be suitable modified to provide experimental data for solar nebula modelling. The goals are to modify an extant, proven hydrodynamics code with the most important features of the solar nebula and other thin accretion disks: bouyancy terms to generate convection, internal heating representing the release of gravitational potential energy, a variable gravity linearly proportional the the distance from the vertical midplane due to centrifugal balance, rapid rotation with axis aligned with gravity, and Keplerian rotational shear; to determine the effect that these features have on the turbulent convection by introducing them individually and to determine the cumulative nature of the turbulent convection for accretion disk conditions; and to model the convection and the turbulence. In this manner, prior solar nebula models can be tested and their deficiencies rectified.

  1. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection with a variable gravity and Keplerian rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabot, William H.

    1989-02-01

    Thermal convection was proposed as a possible mechanism for generation and maintenance of turbulence in the inner accretion disk regime of the primordial solar nebula. It is of fundamental interest to design experiments with the basic physical features of the solar nebula conditions cannot be produced in the laboratory, numerical simulations of hydrodynamic flows, which have been very successful in describing aerodynamic flows, can be suitable modified to provide experimental data for solar nebula modelling. The goals are to modify an extant, proven hydrodynamics code with the most important features of the solar nebula and other thin accretion disks: bouyancy terms to generate convection, internal heating representing the release of gravitational potential energy, a variable gravity linearly proportional the the distance from the vertical midplane due to centrifugal balance, rapid rotation with axis aligned with gravity, and Keplerian rotational shear; to determine the effect that these features have on the turbulent convection by introducing them individually and to determine the cumulative nature of the turbulent convection for accretion disk conditions; and to model the convection and the turbulence. In this manner, prior solar nebula models can be tested and their deficiencies rectified.

  2. Shell Worlds: The Question of Shell Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, K. L.; Kennedy, R. G., III; Fields, D. E.

    The initial idea of shell worlds was first proposed in the January 2009 edition of JBIS. In that paper the stability of the shell around a central world was not discussed at any length except to say that it was stable due to forces induced by gravity. This paper demonstrates in a qualitative and quantitative manner that a material shell supported by atmospheric pressure around a moon or small planet is indeed stable and does not require active measures to remain centered, provided that the central body is large enough. The minimal size of the central body to provide this stability is discussed.

  3. Parameterization of convective clouds, mesoscale convective systems, and convective-generated cirrus

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W.R.

    1992-03-03

    A level 2.5w deep convection updraft/downdraft parameterization scheme has been refined and tested against 3D simulations of sea-breeze generated convection over S. Florida. Cases for explicit simulation of MCSs in mid-latitudes and tropics have been encouraging. After a few refinements in those cases, fine resolution explicit simualtions of deep convection and mesoscale, stratiform clouds will be begun.

  4. Numerical investigation of binary fluid convection with a weak negative separation ratio in finite containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bingxin; Tian, Zhenfu

    2015-07-01

    By using a high-order compact finite difference method to solve the full hydrodynamic field equations, convection in binary fluid mixtures with a weak negative separation ratio of -0.1 in rectangular containers heated from below is numerically investigated. We consider the problem with the Prandtl number Pr ranging from 0.01 to 10 and the Lewis number Le from 0.0005 to 1. Several convective structures such as traveling wave, localized traveling wave, and undulation traveling wave convection as well as stationary overturning convection (SOC) are obtained. For the separation ratio considered, localized traveling wave state exists in a range of Rayleigh numbers spanning the critical point (the critical Rayleigh number at the onset of convection), and their length of the convective region is uniquely selected for a given parameter set. A bifurcation diagram of solution is drawn and the transitions between various traveling waves and the steady states on their upper branches are discussed. The effects of the fluid parameters and the aspect ratio of the container on the onset of convection and their saturated structures are studied in detail. Finally, several types of initial temperature fields are used to start simulations and five different stable SOC states with different mean wavenumbers are found. The corresponding heat and mass transfer properties of these stable SOC states are also investigated.

  5. Modeling of shallow and inefficient convection in the outer layers of the Sun using realistic physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yong-Cheol; Fox, Peter A.; Sofia, Sabatino; Demarque, Pierre

    1995-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the properties of convective energy transport in the solar convective zone, a numerical model has been constructed for turbulent flows in a compressible, radiation-coupled, nonmagnetic, gravitationally stratified medium using a realistic equation of state and realistic opacities. The time-dependent, three-dimensional hydrodynamic equations are solved with minimal simplifications. The statistical information obtained from the present simulation provides an improved undserstanding of solar photospheric convection. The characteristics of solar convection in shallow regions is parameterized and compared with the results of Chan & Sofia's (1989) simulations of deep and efficient convection. We assess the importance of the zones of partial ionization in the simulation and confirm that the radiative energy transfer is negliglble throughout the region except in the uppermost scale heights of the convection zone, a region of very high superadiabaticity. When the effects of partial ionization are included, the dynamics of flows are altered significantly. However, we confirm the Chan & Sofia result that kinetic energy flux is nonnegligible and can have a negative value in the convection zone.

  6. Introduction to the focus issue: chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities.

    PubMed

    De Wit, A; Eckert, K; Kalliadasis, S

    2012-09-01

    Pattern forming instabilities are often encountered in a wide variety of natural phenomena and technological applications, from self-organization in biological and chemical systems to oceanic or atmospheric circulation and heat and mass transport processes in engineering systems. Spatio-temporal structures are ubiquitous in hydrodynamics where numerous different convective instabilities generate pattern formation and complex spatiotemporal dynamics, which have been much studied both theoretically and experimentally. In parallel, reaction-diffusion processes provide another large family of pattern forming instabilities and spatio-temporal structures which have been analyzed for several decades. At the intersection of these two fields, "chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities" resulting from the coupling of hydrodynamic and reaction-diffusion processes have been less studied. The exploration of the new instability and symmetry-breaking scenarios emerging from the interplay between chemical reactions, diffusion and convective motions is a burgeoning field in which numerous exciting problems have emerged during the last few years. These problems range from fingering instabilities of chemical fronts and reactive fluid-fluid interfaces to the dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems in the presence of chaotic mixing. The questions to be addressed are at the interface of hydrodynamics, chemistry, engineering or environmental sciences to name a few and, as a consequence, they have started to draw the attention of several communities including both the nonlinear chemical dynamics and hydrodynamics communities. The collection of papers gathered in this Focus Issue sheds new light on a wide range of phenomena in the general area of chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities. It also serves as an overview of the current research and state-of-the-art in the field.

  7. Introduction to the Focus Issue: Chemo-Hydrodynamic Patterns and Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wit, A.; Eckert, K.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2012-09-01

    Pattern forming instabilities are often encountered in a wide variety of natural phenomena and technological applications, from self-organization in biological and chemical systems to oceanic or atmospheric circulation and heat and mass transport processes in engineering systems. Spatio-temporal structures are ubiquitous in hydrodynamics where numerous different convective instabilities generate pattern formation and complex spatiotemporal dynamics, which have been much studied both theoretically and experimentally. In parallel, reaction-diffusion processes provide another large family of pattern forming instabilities and spatio-temporal structures which have been analyzed for several decades. At the intersection of these two fields, "chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities" resulting from the coupling of hydrodynamic and reaction-diffusion processes have been less studied. The exploration of the new instability and symmetry-breaking scenarios emerging from the interplay between chemical reactions, diffusion and convective motions is a burgeoning field in which numerous exciting problems have emerged during the last few years. These problems range from fingering instabilities of chemical fronts and reactive fluid-fluid interfaces to the dynamics of reaction-diffusion systems in the presence of chaotic mixing. The questions to be addressed are at the interface of hydrodynamics, chemistry, engineering or environmental sciences to name a few and, as a consequence, they have started to draw the attention of several communities including both the nonlinear chemical dynamics and hydrodynamics communities. The collection of papers gathered in this Focus Issue sheds new light on a wide range of phenomena in the general area of chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities. It also serves as an overview of the current research and state-of-the-art in the field.

  8. [Development of a ballistic furnace for shell production]. Annual report 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R; Isakov, A I

    1998-12-31

    During the fourth contract year, the authors continued to develop Ballistic technology of shell formation. A new upgraded version of Ballistic Furnace with longer hot zone (1.56m) and cooling one (1.2m) had been finally assembled, and a lot of shell formation experiments had been carried out. The change of the Ballistic Furnace configuration has led to significant changing in operational conditions suitable for shells production. They had found optimal operational conditions for some grades of initial granules giving them high yield of good shells. Serious attention was paid on initial granules preparation. In the experiments some unexpected results were obtained--first of all it was a strong influence of temperature profile, an initial granule velocity and a trajectory angle on good quality shells yield. Those observations made them consider some additional physical phenomena (initial granule defragmentation and gas convection inside hot zone) to explain good shell formation. Appropriate estimations of the velocity of possible convectional gas currents in the hot zone, strength of formed shells, thermal stress in an initial granule caused by its fast heating in the ballistic furnace etc. were made. Good quality shells up to 2mm in diameters with high yield were produced. Although a production of good quality shells in diameter range > 1.8 mm stays an easy job, their experience led them to declare that Ballistic technology hasn't reach its boundaries, and future development will allow them to obtain perfect results.

  9. Interaction of localized convection cells in the bioconvection of Euglena gracilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iima, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Takayuki

    2016-11-01

    Euglena gracilis is a unicellular flagellated photosynthetic alga. The suspension of Euglena has behavioral responses to light, which causes a macroscopic localized bioconvection pattern when illuminated from below. One of the fundamental structures of this is a pair of convection cells, and high cell density region exists in the middle of the pair. Experimental studies show various types of interaction in the localized convection cells; bound state, collision, etc. We performed numerical simulation of a hydrodynamic model of this system, and show results of the interactions. Long-range interaction due to the conservation of cell number and merging process of two localized structures will be discussed. KAKENHI.

  10. Multi-dimensional hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.

    Core-collapse supernovae are some of the most energetic events in the Universe, they herald the birth of neutron stars and black holes, are a major site for nucleosynthesis, influence galactic hydrodynamics, and trigger further star formation. As such, it is important to understand the mechanism of explosion. Moreover, observations imply that asymmetries are, in the least, a feature of the mechanism, and theory suggests that multi-dimensional hydrodynamics may be crucial for successful explosions. In this dissertation, we present theoretical investigations into the multi-dimensional nature of the supernova mechanism. It had been suggested that nuclear reactions might excite non-radial g-modes (the [straight epsilon]-mechanism) in the cores of progenitors, leading to asymmetric explosions. We calculate the eigenmodes for a large suite of progenitors including excitation by nuclear reactions and damping by neutrino and acoustic losses. Without exception, we find unstable g-modes for each progenitor. However, the timescales for growth are at least an order of magnitude longer than the time until collapse. Thus, the [straight epsilon]- mechanism does not provide appreciable amplification of non-radial modes before the core undergoes collapse. Regardless, neutrino-driven convection, the standing accretion shock instability, and other instabilities during the explosion provide ample asymmetry. To adequately simulate these, we have developed a new hydrodynamics code, BETHE-hydro that uses the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach, includes rotational terms, solves Poisson's equation for gravity on arbitrary grids, and conserves energy and momentum in its basic implementation. By using time-dependent arbitrary grids that can adapt to the numerical challenges of the problem, this code offers unique flexibility in simulating astrophysical phenomena. Finally, we use BETHE-hydro to investigate the conditions and criteria for supernova explosions by the neutrino

  11. Active control of convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    1991-12-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that active (feedback) control can be used to alter the characteristics of thermal convection in a toroidal, vertical loop heated from below and cooled from above. As the temperature difference between the heated and cooled sections of the loop increases, the flow in the uncontrolled loop changes from no motion to steady, time-independent motion to temporally oscillatory, chaotic motion. With the use of a feedback controller effecting small perturbations in the boundary conditions, one can maintain the no-motion state at significantly higher temperature differences than the critical one corresponding to the onset of convection in the uncontrolled system. Alternatively, one can maintain steady, time-independent flow under conditions in which the flow would otherwise be chaotic. That is, the controller can be used to suppress chaos. Likewise, it is possible to stabilize periodic nonstable orbits that exist in the chaotic regime of the uncontrolled system. Finally, the controller also can be used to induce chaos in otherwise laminar (fully predictable), nonchaotic flow.

  12. Convective Instability in Ice I with Non-Newtonian Rheology: Application to the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, A. C.; Zhong, S.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    At the temperatures and stresses associated with the onset of convection in an ice I shell of the Galilean satellites, ice behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid with a viscosity that depends on both temperature and strain rate. The convective stability of a non-Newtonian ice shell can be judged by comparing the Rayleigh number of the shell to a critical value. Previous studies suggest that the critical Rayleigh number for a non-Newtonian fluid depends on the initial conditions in the fluid layer, in addition to the thermal, rheological, and physical properties of the fluid. We seek to extend the existing definition of the critical Rayleigh number for a non-Newtonian, basally heated fluid by quantifying the conditions required to initiate convection in an ice I layer initially in conductive equilibrium. We find that the critical Rayleigh number for the onset of convection in ice I varies as a power (-0.6 to -0.5) of the amplitude of the initial temperature perturbation issued to the layer, when the amplitude of perturbation is less than the rheological temperature scale. For larger-amplitude perturbations, the critical Rayleigh number achieves a constant value. We characterize the critical Rayleigh number as a function of surface temperature of the satellite, melting temperature of ice, and rheological parameters so that our results may be extrapolated for use with other rheologies and for a generic large icy satellite. The values of critical Rayleigh number imply that triggering convection from a conductive equilibrium in a pure ice shell less than 100 km thick in Europa, Ganymede, or Callisto requires a large, localized temperature perturbation of a few kelvins to tens of kelvins to soften the ice and therefore may require tidal dissipation in the ice shell.

  13. Convective Instability in Ice I with Non-Newtonian Rheology: Application to the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, A. C.; Zhong, S.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    At the temperatures and stresses associated with the onset of convection in an ice I shell of the Galilean satellites, ice behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid with a viscosity that depends on both temperature and strain rate. The convective stability of a non-Newtonian ice shell can be judged by comparing the Rayleigh number of the shell to a critical value. Previous studies suggest that the critical Rayleigh number for a non-Newtonian fluid depends on the initial conditions in the fluid layer, in addition to the thermal, rheological, and physical properties of the fluid. We seek to extend the existing definition of the critical Rayleigh number for a non-Newtonian, basally heated fluid by quantifying the conditions required to initiate convection in an ice I layer initially in conductive equilibrium. We find that the critical Rayleigh number for the onset of convection in ice I varies as a power (-0.6 to -0.5) of the amplitude of the initial temperature perturbation issued to the layer, when the amplitude of perturbation is less than the rheological temperature scale. For larger-amplitude perturbations, the critical Rayleigh number achieves a constant value. We characterize the critical Rayleigh number as a function of surface temperature of the satellite, melting temperature of ice, and rheological parameters so that our results may be extrapolated for use with other rheologies and for a generic large icy satellite. The values of critical Rayleigh number imply that triggering convection from a conductive equilibrium in a pure ice shell less than 100 km thick in Europa, Ganymede, or Callisto requires a large, localized temperature perturbation of a few kelvins to tens of kelvins to soften the ice and therefore may require tidal dissipation in the ice shell.

  14. 2D and 3D Models of Convective Turbulence and Oscillations in Intermediate-Mass Main-Sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Morgan, Taylor H.; Nelson, Nicholas J.; Lovekin, Catherine; Kitiashvili, Irina N.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    We present multidimensional modeling of convection and oscillations in main-sequence stars somewhat more massive than the sun, using three separate approaches: 1) Applying the spherical 3D MHD ASH (Anelastic Spherical Harmonics) code to simulate the core convection and radiative zone. Our goal is to determine whether core convection can excite low-frequency gravity modes, and thereby explain the presence of low frequencies for some hybrid gamma Dor/delta Sct variables for which the envelope convection zone is too shallow for the convective blocking mechanism to drive g modes; 2) Using the 3D planar ‘StellarBox’ radiation hydrodynamics code to model the envelope convection zone and part of the radiative zone. Our goals are to examine the interaction of stellar pulsations with turbulent convection in the envelope, excitation of acoustic modes, and the role of convective overshooting; 3) Applying the ROTORC 2D stellar evolution and dynamics code to calculate evolution with a variety of initial rotation rates and extents of core convective overshooting. The nonradial adiabatic pulsation frequencies of these nonspherical models will be calculated using the 2D pulsation code NRO of Clement. We will present new insights into gamma Dor and delta Sct pulsations gained by multidimensional modeling compared to 1D model expectations.

  15. Hydrodynamically mediated macrophyte silica dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schoelynck, J; Bal, K; Puijalon, S; Meire, P; Struyf, E

    2012-11-01

    In most aquatic ecosystems, hydrodynamic conditions are a key abiotic factor determining species distributions and abundance of aquatic plants. Resisting stress and keeping an upright position often relies on investment in tissue reinforcement, which is costly to produce. Silica could provide a more economical alternative. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the response of two submerged species, Egeria densa Planch. and Limnophila heterophylla (Roxb.) Benth., to dissolved silicic acid availability and exposure to hydrodynamic stress. The results were verified with a third species in a field study (Nuphar lutea (L.) Smith). Biogenic silica (BSi) concentration in both stems and leaves increases with increasing dissolved silica availability but also with the presence of hydrodynamic stress. We suggest that the inclusion of extra silica enables the plant to alternatively invest its energy in the production of lignin and cellulose. Although we found no significant effects of hydrodynamic stress on cellulose or lignin concentrations either in the laboratory or in the field, BSi was negatively correlated with cellulose concentration and positively correlated with lignin concentration in samples collected in the field study. This implies that the plant might perform with equal energy efficiency in both standing and running water environments. This could provide submerged species with a tool to respond to abiotic factors, to adapt to new ecological conditions and hence potentially colonise new environments. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  16. Softened Lagrangian hydrodynamics for cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    1995-04-01

    A new approach to cosmological hydrodynamics is discussed that is based on a moving, quasi-Lagrangian mesh. The softened Lagrangian hydrodynamics (SLH) method utilizes a high-resolution Lagrangian hydrodynamic code combined with a low-resolution Eulerian solver to deal with severe mesh distortions. Most of the volume of a simulation is treated with the Lagrangian code and only in sites where the Lagrangian approach fails, due to mesh distortions, does the Eulerian part of the code step in. This approach utilizes a high-resolution gravity solver without use of TREE or P3M methods; Poisson's equation is solved on the moving baryonic mesh using a simple relaxation technique. The dark matter is included by means of the cloud-in-cell method on the Lagrangian mesh. All three components of the cosmological code--gravity, dark matter, and baryons--are thus treated selft-consistently with exactly the same resolution. The computer code based on the SLH approach is described in detail, and comparison with existing Eulerian and smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) codes is presented. For most purposes the SLH approach turns out to be the intermediate between Eulerian and SPH codes, but it outperforms both of these approaches in resolving caustics. Thus, it may turn out to be a valuable tool to study galaxy formation.

  17. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  18. Radial stellar pulsation and three-dimensional convection. III. Comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional convection effects on radial pulsation

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Christopher M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2014-03-10

    We have developed a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of radial stellar pulsation and convection for full-amplitude pulsating models. Convection is computed using large eddy simulations. Here, we perform three-dimensional (3D) simulations of RR Lyrae stars for comparison with previously reported 2D simulations. We find that the time-dependent behavior of the peak convective flux on pulsation phase is very similar in both the 2D and 3D calculations. The growth rates of the pulsation in the 2D calculations are about 0.1% higher than in the 3D calculations. The amplitude of the light curve for a 6500 K RR Lyrae model is essentially the same for our 2D and 3D calculations, as is the rising light curve. There are differences in the slope at various times during falling light.

  19. Convective dynamos for rotating stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    Global dynamo theory is applied to the problem of why some stars have field reversing dynamos, and others do not. It is argued that convectively driven dynamos are the most likely source of magnetic fields in stars that have convection zones.

  20. A Circumstellar Shell Model for the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1996-08-01

    We model the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant in the framework of the circumstellar medium (C SM) interaction picture. In this model, the slow red supergiant wind of the supernova (SN) progenitor was swept into a dense shell by a fast stellar wind in the subsequent blue supergiant stage of the progenitor star. The supernova blast wave propagated quickly (≤ 100 yr) through the tenuous wind-blown bubble located within this shell and then slowed down in the dense (nH ˜15 cm-3) CSM shell. The shell was impulsively accelerated during this interaction stage; during the subsequent interaction with SN ejecta, the shell has been further accelerated to ˜2000 km s-1, the currently observed expansion rate. The comparison of our X-ray emission calculations with the ASCA spectrum suggests that about 8 Msun of X- material is present in Cas A. Most of this mass is located in the CSM shell and in the outlying red supergiant wind. The X-ray continuum and the Fe Kα line are dominated by the shell emission, but prominent Kα complexes of Mg, Si, and S must be produced by SN ejecta with strongly enhanced abundances of these elements. Our hydrodynamical models indicate that about 2 Msun of ejecta have been shocked. An explosion of a stellar He core is consistent with these findings.

  1. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  2. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  3. Nonlinear hydrodynamic stability and transition; Proceedings of the IUTAM Symposium, Nice, France, Sept. 3-7, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theoretical and experimental research on nonlinear hydrodynamic stability and transition is presented. Bifurcations, amplitude equations, pattern in experiments, and shear flows are considered. Particular attention is given to bifurcations of plane viscous fluid flow and transition to turbulence, chaotic traveling wave covection, chaotic behavior of parametrically excited surface waves in square geometry, amplitude analysis of the Swift-Hohenberg equation, traveling wave convection in finite containers, focus instability in axisymmetric Rayleigh-Benard convection, scaling and pattern formation in flowing sand, dynamical behavior of instabilities in spherical gap flows, and nonlinear short-wavelength Taylor vortices. Also discussed are stability of a flow past a two-dimensional grid, inertia wave breakdown in a precessing fluid, flow-induced instabilities in directional solidification, structure and dynamical properties of convection in binary fluid mixtures, and instability competition for convecting superfluid mixtures.

  4. Convection and lunar thermal history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.; Reynolds, R. T.; Graziani, F.; Summers, A.; Mcnellis, J.; Blalock, L.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of solid interior convection on the thermal history of the moon are examined. Convective models of lunar evolution are calculated to demonstrate the influence of various viscosities, radioactive heat source distributions and initial temperature profiles and tested by means of a thermal history simulation code. Results indicate that solid convection does not necessarily produce a quasi-steady thermal balance between heat sources and surface losses. The state of the lithosphere is found to be sensitive to the efficiency of heat source redistribution, while that of the convecting interior depends primarily on rheology. Interior viscosities of 10 to the 21st to 10 to the 22nd cm/sec are obtained, along with a central temperature above 1100 C. It is suggested that mare flooding could have been the result of magma production by pressure release melting in the upwelling region of convection cells.

  5. Stability analysis of dissolution-driven convection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami-Meybodi, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability of dissolution-driven convection in the presence of a capillary transition zone and hydrodynamic dispersion in a saturated anisotropic porous medium, where the solute concentration is assumed to decay via a first-order chemical reaction. While the reaction enhances stability by consuming the solute, porous media anisotropy, hydrodynamic dispersion, and capillary transition zone destabilize the diffusive boundary layer that is unstably formed in a gravitational field. We perform linear stability analysis, based on the quasi-steady-state approximation, to assess critical times, critical wavenumbers, and neutral stability curves as a function of anisotropy ratio, dispersivity ratio, dispersion strength, material parameter, Bond number, Damköhler number, and Rayleigh number. The results show that the diffusive boundary layer becomes unstable in anisotropic porous media where both the capillary transition zone and dispersion are considered, even if the geochemical reaction is significantly large. Using direct numerical simulations, based on the finite difference method, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the system by examining dissolution flux, interaction of convective fingers, and flow topology. The results of nonlinear simulations confirm the predictions from the linear stability analysis and reveal that the fingering pattern is significantly influenced by combined effects of reaction, anisotropy, dispersion, and capillarity. Finally, we draw conclusions on implications of our results on carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline aquifers.

  6. Deep convection and deepwater formation: Progress and new directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascard, Jean-Claude

    Focused interest in deep convection and deepwater formation was evidenced as early as 1972, when an international colloquium entirely dedicated to oceanic deepwater formation was convened by the Laboratoire d'Oceanographie du Museum in Paris. Discussions concentrated heavily, but not exclusively, on observations taken in the northwest Mediterranean Sea by the Medoc Group [1970], who proposed that processes leading to deepwater formation could be divided into three phases: preconditioning, violent mixing, and sinking and spreading. A new feature—the chimney—was identified, which tends to define the horizontal extent of an area where deep convection occurs to great depths and leads to deepwater formation.In terms of mechanisms for destroying stratification, double diffusion was the prevalent choice at that time among most participants. However, the effect of advection was also considered. Stommel [1972] claimed that the deep convection observed in the Mediterranean Sea was of a nonpenetrative type, since the density of the mixed layer increased steadily with thickness and time instead of decreasing as for penetrative convection. Most of these conclusions were based on the fact that the problem was believed to be truly one dimensional. Stommel recognized that the small size of the sinking area was not related to a hydrodynamical phenomenon such as the one he described in 1962 [Stommel, 1962] nor even directly forced by the atmosphere, which acts at a much larger scale. Rather, he indicated that the small size of a deep convective area was preconditioned by the general circulation in the basin. The major discovery during the following 10-year period (1973-1983) was realization of the important role played by baroclinic instability, active during ALL phases including the initial preconditioning.

  7. Topological analysis of a mixing flow generated by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Pablo Sebastián; de la Cruz, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We use topological tools to describe the natural convective motion and the Lagrangian trajectories of a flow generated by stepwise, alternating heating and cooling protocol of opposite vertical walls of a cubic container. The working fluid considered is Newtonian and the system is in presence of the acceleration of gravity but the nonlinear terms are neglected, i.e., we study the piece-wise steady and linear problem. For this convective mixing flow, we identify invariant surfaces formed by the Lagrangian orbits of massless tracers that are topologically equivalent to spherical shells and period-1 lines with elliptic and hyperbolic segments that are located on symmetry planes. We describe the previous features as functions of the Rayleigh number in the range 3 × 104 ≤ Ra ≤ 5 × 105. We show that this system shares properties with other systems with non-toroidal invariant surfaces.

  8. Dynamics of Compressible Convection and Thermochemical Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi

    The Earth's long-wavelength geoid anomalies have long been used to constrain the dynamics and viscosity structure of the mantle in an isochemical, whole-mantle convection model. However, there is strong evidence that the seismically observed large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lowermost mantle are chemically distinct and denser than the ambient mantle. In this thesis, I investigated how chemically distinct and dense piles influence the geoid. I formulated dynamically self-consistent 3D spherical convection models with realistic mantle viscosity structure which reproduce Earth's dominantly spherical harmonic degree-2 convection. The models revealed a compensation effect of the chemically dense LLSVPs. Next, I formulated instantaneous flow models based on seismic tomography to compute the geoid and constrain mantle viscosity assuming thermochemical convection with the compensation effect. Thermochemical models reconcile the geoid observations. The viscosity structure inverted for thermochemical models is nearly identical to that of whole-mantle models, and both prefer weak transition zone. Our results have implications for mineral physics, seismic tomographic studies, and mantle convection modelling. Another part of this thesis describes analyses of the influence of mantle compressibility on thermal convection in an isoviscous and compressible fluid with infinite Prandtl number. A new formulation of the propagator matrix method is implemented to compute the critical Rayleigh number and the corresponding eigenfunctions for compressible convection. Heat flux and thermal boundary layer properties are quantified in numerical models and scaling laws are developed.

  9. A THEORY ON THE CONVECTIVE ORIGINS OF ACTIVE LONGITUDES ON SOLAR-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Maria A.; Fan Yuhong; Miesch, Mark S.

    2013-06-20

    Using a thin flux tube model in a rotating spherical shell of turbulent, solar-like convective flows, we find that the distribution of emerging flux tubes in our simulation is inhomogeneous in longitude, with properties similar to those of active longitudes on the Sun and other solar-like stars. The large-scale pattern of flux emergence our simulations produce exhibits preferred longitudinal modes of low order, drift with respect to a fixed reference system, and alignment across the equator at low latitudes between {+-}15 Degree-Sign . We suggest that these active-longitude-like emergence patterns are the result of columnar, rotationally aligned giant cells present in our convection simulation at low latitudes. If giant convecting cells exist in the bulk of the solar convection zone, this phenomenon, along with differential rotation, could in part provide an explanation for the behavior of active longitudes.

  10. Temperature-Driven Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohan, Richard J.; Vandegrift, Guy

    2003-02-01

    Warm air aloft is stable. This explains the lack of strong winds in a warm front and how nighttime radiative cooling can lead to motionless air that can trap smog. The stability of stratospheric air can be attributed to the fact that it is heated from above as ultraviolet radiation strikes the ozone layer. On the other hand, fluid heated from below is unstable and can lead to Bernard convection cells. This explains the generally turbulent nature of the troposphere, which receives a significant fraction of its heat directly from the Earth's warmer surface. The instability of cold fluid aloft explains the violent nature of a cold front, as well as the motion of Earth's magma, which is driven by radioactive heating deep within the Earth's mantle. This paper describes how both effects can be demonstrated using four standard beakers, ice, and a bit of food coloring.

  11. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  12. Scale-free convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    2015-08-01

    Convection is one of the fundamental mechanism to transport energy, e.g., in planetology, oceanography as well as in astrophysics where stellar structure customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale parameter to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height of the star, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun.No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty.In a recent paper (Pasetto et al 2014) we presented the first fully analytical scale-free theory of convection that does not require the mixing-length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of convection determines all the properties of convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium (being it a either a star, an ocean, a primordial planet). The new theory of convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism.We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory in astrophysical environment are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm in stars with

  13. Scale-free convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    Convection is one of the fundamental mechanisms to transport energy, e.g., in planetology, oceanography, as well as in astrophysics where stellar structure is customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale parameter to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height of the star, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun. No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in the literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty. In a recent paper (Pasetto et al. 2014) we presented the first fully analytical scale-free theory of convection that does not require the mixing-length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of convection determines all the properties of convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium (be it a star, an ocean, or a primordial planet). The new theory of convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism. We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory in astrophysical environment are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm in stars with

  14. Two Dimensional Simulations of Plastic-Shell, Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, P B; Goncharov, V N; Collins, T B; Delettrez, J A; Elbaz, Y; Glebov, V Y; Keck, R L; Keller, D E; Knauer, J P; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Shvarts, D; Skupsky, S; Srebro, Y; Town, R J; Stoeckl, C

    2004-09-27

    Multidimensional hydrodynamic properties of high-adiabat direct-drive plastic-shell implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are investigated using the multidimensional hydrodynamic code, DRACO. Multimode simulations including the effects of nonuniform illumination and target roughness indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining target performance. For thick shells that remain integral during the acceleration phase, target yields are significantly reduced by the combination of the long-wavelength ({ell} < 10) modes due to surface roughness and beam imbalance and the intermediate modes (20 {le} {ell} {le} 50) due to single-beam nonuniformities. The neutron-production rate for these thick shells truncates relative to one-dimensional (1-D) predictions. The yield degradation in the thin shells is mainly due to shell breakup at short wavelengths ({lambda} {approx} {Delta}, where {Delta} is the in-flight shell thickness). The neutron-rate curves for the thinner shells have significantly lower amplitudes and a fall-off that is less steep than 1-D rates. DRACO simulation results are consistent with experimental observations.

  15. Two-dimensional simulations of plastic-shell, direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, P.B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Elbaz, Y.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Keck, R.L.; Keller, D.E.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Srebro, Y.; Town, R.P.J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2005-03-01

    Multidimensional hydrodynamic properties of high-adiabat direct-drive plastic-shell implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are investigated using the multidimensional hydrodynamic code, DRACO [D. Keller et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 37 (1999)]. Multimode simulations including the effects of nonuniform illumination and target roughness indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining target performance. For thick shells that remain integral during the acceleration phase, target yields are significantly reduced by the combination of the long-wavelength (l<10) modes due to surface roughness and beam imbalance and the intermediate modes (20{<=}l{<=}50) due to single-beam nonuniformities. The neutron-production rate for these thick shells truncates relative to one-dimensional (1D) predictions. The yield degradation in the thin shells is mainly due to shell breakup at short wavelengths ({lambda}{approx}{delta}, where {delta} is the in-flight shell thickness). The neutron-rate curves for the thinner shells have significantly lower amplitudes and a fall-off that is less steep than 1D rates. DRACO simulation results are consistent with experimental observations.

  16. 3D Hydrodynamic Simulation of Classical Novae Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Coleman J.

    2015-01-01

    This project investigates the formation and lifecycle of classical novae and determines how parameters such as: white dwarf mass, star mass and separation affect the evolution of the rotating binary system. These parameters affect the accretion rate, frequency of the nova explosions and light curves. Each particle in the simulation represents a volume of hydrogen gas and are initialized randomly in the outer shell of the companion star. The forces on each particle include: gravity, centrifugal, coriolis, friction, and Langevin. The friction and Langevin forces are used to model the viscosity and internal pressure of the gas. A velocity Verlet method with a one second time step is used to compute velocities and positions of the particles. A new particle recycling method was developed which was critical for computing an accurate and stable accretion rate and keeping the particle count reasonable. I used C++ and OpenCL to create my simulations and ran them on two Nvidia GTX580s. My simulations used up to 1 million particles and required up to 10 hours to complete. My simulation results for novae U Scorpii and DD Circinus are consistent with professional hydrodynamic simulations and observed experimental data (light curves and outburst frequencies). When the white dwarf mass is increased, the time between explosions decreases dramatically. My model was used to make the first prediction for the next outburst of nova DD Circinus. My simulations also show that the companion star blocks the expanding gas shell leading to an asymmetrical expanding shell.

  17. Hydrodynamics of Conically-Guided Fast-Ignition Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, S P; Clark, D; Tabak, M; Turner, R E; Stoeckel, C; Stephens, R B; Shiraga, H; Tanaka, K

    2005-09-29

    The fast ignition (FI) concept requires the generation of a compact, dense, pure fuel mass accessible to an external ignition source. The current baseline FI target is a shell fitted with a re-entrant cone extending to near its center. Conventional direct or indirect drive collapses the shell near the tip of the cone and then an ultra-intense laser pulse focused to the inside cone tip generates high-energy electrons to ignite the dense fuel. Theoretical investigations of this concept with a modest 2-D calculational scheme have sparsely explored the large design space and the tradeoffs available to optimize compaction of the fuel and maintain the integrity of the cone. Experiments have generally validated the modeling while revealing additional complexities. Away from the cone, the shell collapses much as does a conventional implosion, generating a hot, low-density inner core plasma which exhausts out toward the tip of the cone. The hot, low-density inner core can impede the compaction of the cold fuel, lowering the implosion/burn efficiency and the gain, and jetting toward the cone tip can affect the cone integrity. Thicker initial fuel layers, lower velocity implosions, and drive asymmetries can lead to decreased efficiency in converting implosion kinetic energy into compression. Ignition and burn hydrodynamic studies have revealed strategies for generating additional convergence and compression in the FI context. We describe 2-D and 1-D approaches to optimizing designs for cone-guided fast-ignition.

  18. Hydrodynamic fingering instability induced by a precipitation reaction.

    PubMed

    Nagatsu, Y; Ishii, Y; Tada, Y; De Wit, A

    2014-07-11

    We experimentally demonstrate that a precipitation reaction at the miscible interface between two reactive solutions can trigger a hydrodynamic instability due to the buildup of a locally adverse mobility gradient related to a decrease in permeability. The precipitate results from an A+B→C type of reaction when a solution containing one of the reactants is injected into a solution of the other reactant in a porous medium or a Hele-Shaw cell. Fingerlike precipitation patterns are observed upon displacement, the properties of which depend on whether A displaces B or vice versa. A mathematical modeling of the underlying mobility profile confirms that the instability originates from a local decrease in mobility driven by the localized precipitation. Nonlinear simulations of the related reaction-diffusion-convection model reproduce the properties of the instability observed experimentally. In particular, the simulations suggest that differences in diffusivity between A and B may contribute to the asymmetric characteristics of the fingering precipitation patterns.

  19. Anomalous hydrodynamics of fractional quantum Hall states

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegmann, P.

    2013-09-15

    We propose a comprehensive framework for quantum hydrodynamics of the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states. We suggest that the electronic fluid in the FQH regime can be phenomenologically described by the quantized hydrodynamics of vortices in an incompressible rotating liquid. We demonstrate that such hydrodynamics captures all major features of FQH states, including the subtle effect of the Lorentz shear stress. We present a consistent quantization of the hydrodynamics of an incompressible fluid, providing a powerful framework to study the FQH effect and superfluids. We obtain the quantum hydrodynamics of the vortex flow by quantizing the Kirchhoff equations for vortex dynamics.

  20. Imperfection Insensitive Thin Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xin

    The buckling of axially compressed cylindrical shells and externally pressurized spherical shells is extremely sensitive to even very small geometric imperfections. In practice this issue is addressed by either using overly conservative knockdown factors, while keeping perfect axial or spherical symmetry, or adding closely and equally spaced stiffeners on shell surface. The influence of imperfection-sensitivity is mitigated, but the shells designed from these approaches are either too heavy or very expensive and are still sensitive to imperfections. Despite their drawbacks, these approaches have been used for more than half a century. This thesis proposes a novel method to design imperfection-insensitive cylindrical shells subject to axial compression. Instead of following the classical paths, focused on axially symmetric or high-order rotationally symmetric cross-sections, the method in this thesis adopts optimal symmetry-breaking wavy cross-sections (wavy shells). The avoidance of imperfection sensitivity is achieved by searching with an evolutionary algorithm for smooth cross-sectional shapes that maximize the minimum among the buckling loads of geometrically perfect and imperfect wavy shells. It is found that the shells designed through this approach can achieve higher critical stresses and knockdown factors than any previously known monocoque cylindrical shells. It is also found that these shells have superior mass efficiency to almost all previously reported stiffened shells. Experimental studies on a design of composite wavy shell obtained through the proposed method are presented in this thesis. A method of making composite wavy shells and a photogrametry technique of measuring full-field geometric imperfections have been developed. Numerical predictions based on the measured geometric imperfections match remarkably well with the experiments. Experimental results confirm that the wavy shells are not sensitive to imperfections and can carry axial compression

  1. Numerical Simulations of Hydrodynamic Instability Growth in Polar-Direct-Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvydky, A.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Control of shell nonuniformities imprinted by the laser and amplified by hydrodynamic instabilities in the imploding target is critical to the success of polar-direct-drive ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To develop a platform for laser-imprint studies, hydrodynamic instability growth experiments in laser-driven implosions were performed on the NIF. The experiments used cone-in-shell targets with sinusoidal modulations of various wavelengths and amplitudes machined on the surface. Throughshell x-ray radiography was used to measure optical depth variations, from which the amplitudes of the shell areal-density modulations were extracted. Results of DRACO simulations of the growth of preimposed modulations and imprint-seeded perturbations will be presented and compared with the experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Differential Expression of Extracellular Matrix and Growth Factors by Embryoid Bodies in Hydrodynamic and Static Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fridley, Krista M.; Nair, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    During development, cell fate specification and tissue development are orchestrated by the sequential presentation of soluble growth factors (GF) and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Similarly, differentiation of stem cells in vitro relies upon the temporal presence of extracellular cues within the microenvironment. Hydrodynamic culture systems are not limited by volume restrictions and therefore offer several practical advantages for scalability over static cultures; however, hydrodynamic cultures expose cells to physical parameters not present in static culture, such as fluid shear stress and mass transfer through convective forces. In this study, the differences between static and hydrodynamic culture conditions on the expression of ECM and GF molecules during the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells were examined at both the gene and protein level. The expression of ECM and GF genes exhibited an early decrease in static cultures based on heat map and hierarchical clustering analysis and a relative delayed increase in hydrodynamic cultures. Although the temporal patterns of specific ECM and GF protein expression were comparable between static and hydrodynamic cultures, several notable differences in the magnitudes of expression were observed at similar time points. These results describe the establishment of an analytical framework that can be used to examine the expression patterns of ECM and GF molecules expressed by pluripotent stem cells undergoing differentiation as 3D multicellular aggregates under different culture conditions, and suggest that physical parameters of stem cell microenvironments can alter endogenous ECM and GF expression profiles that may, in turn, influence cell fate decisions. PMID:25423310

  3. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read jr, Kenneth F.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  4. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  5. Microscopic derivation of discrete hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Anero, Jesús G; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-12-28

    By using the standard theory of coarse graining based on Zwanzig's projection operator, we derive the dynamic equations for discrete hydrodynamic variables. These hydrodynamic variables are defined in terms of the Delaunay triangulation. The resulting microscopically derived equations can be understood, a posteriori, as a discretization on an arbitrary irregular grid of the Navier-Stokes equations. The microscopic derivation provides a set of discrete equations that exactly conserves mass, momentum, and energy and the dissipative part of the dynamics produces strict entropy increase. In addition, the microscopic derivation provides a practical implementation of thermal fluctuations in a way that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is satisfied exactly. This paper points toward a close connection between coarse-graining procedures from microscopic dynamics and discretization schemes for partial differential equations.

  6. Brain vascular and hydrodynamic physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Protecting the brain in vulnerable infants undergoing surgery is a central aspect of perioperative care. Understanding the link between blood flow, oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption leads to a more informed approach to bedside care. In some cases, we need to consider how high can we let the partial pressure of carbon dioxide go before we have concerns about risk of increased cerebral blood volume and change in intracranial hydrodynamics? Alternatively, in almost all such cases, we have to address the question of how low can we let the blood pressure drop before we should be concerned about brain perfusion? This review, provides a basic understanding of brain bioenergetics, hemodynamics, hydrodynamics, autoregulation and vascular homeostasis to changes in blood gases that is fundamental to our thinking about bedside care and monitoring. PMID:24331089

  7. Nonlinear Convection in Mushy Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worster, M. Grae; Anderson, Daniel M.; Schulze, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    When alloys solidify in a gravitational field there are complex interactions between solidification and natural, buoyancy-driven convection that can alter the composition and impair the structure of the solid product. The particular focus of this project has been the compositional convection within mushy layers that occurs in situations where the lighter component of the alloy is rejected into the melt during solidification by cooling from below. The linear stability of such a situation was previously described and has been further elucidated in a number of published articles. Here we describe some recent developments in the study of nonlinear evolution of convection in mushy layers.

  8. Dynamics of convective scale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of convective scale interaction are examined. An explanation of how sounding data can be coupled with satellite observed cumulus development in the warm sector and the arc cloud line's time evolution to develop a short range forecast of expected convective intensity along an arc cloud line. The formative, mature and dissipating stages of the arc cloud line life cycle are discussed. Specific properties of convective scale interaction are presented and the relationship between arc cloud lines and tornado producing thunderstorms is considered.

  9. Dynamics of convective scale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of convective scale interaction are examined. An explanation of how sounding data can be coupled with satellite observed cumulus development in the warm sector and the arc cloud line's time evolution to develop a short range forecast of expected convective intensity along an arc cloud line. The formative, mature and dissipating stages of the arc cloud line life cycle are discussed. Specific properties of convective scale interaction are presented and the relationship between arc cloud lines and tornado producing thunderstorms is considered.

  10. Hydrodynamic Viscosity in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Wolfgang J.; Strittmatter, Peter A.; Biermann, Peter L.

    We propose a generalized accretion disk viscosity prescription based on hydrodynamically driven turbulence at the critical effective Reynolds number. This approach is consistent with recent re-analysis by Richard & Zahn (1999) of experimental results on turbulent Couette-Taylor flows. This new β-viscosity formulation applies to both selfgravitating and non-selfgravitating disks and is shown to yield the standard α-disk prescription in the case of shock dissipation limited, non-selfgravitating disks.

  11. Striation and convection in penumbral filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruit, H. C.; Scharmer, G. B.; Löfdahl, M. G.

    2010-10-01

    Observations with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope of the flows seen in penumbral filaments are presented. Time sequences of bright filaments show overturning motions strikingly similar to those seen along the walls of small isolated structures in the active regions. The filaments show outward propagating striations with inclination angles suggesting that they are aligned with the local magnetic field. We interpret it as the equivalent of the striations seen in the walls of small isolated magnetic structures. Their origin is then a corrugation of the boundary between an overturning convective flow inside the filament and the magnetic field wrapping around it. The outward propagation is a combination of a pattern motion due to the downflow observed along the sides of bright filaments, and the Evershed flow. The observed short wavelength of the striation argues against the existence of a dynamically significant horizontal field inside the bright filaments. Its intensity contrast is explained by the same physical effect that causes the dark cores of filaments, light bridges and “canals”. In this way striation represents an important clue to the physics of penumbral structure and its relation with other magnetic structures on the solar surface. We put this in perspective with results from the recent 3-D radiative hydrodynamic simulations. 4 movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. A common origin for ridge-and-trough terrain on icy satellites by sluggish lid convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy C.; Hammond, Noah P.

    2015-12-01

    Ridge-and-trough terrain is a common landform on outer Solar System icy satellites. Examples include Ganymede's grooved terrain, Europa's gray bands, Miranda's coronae, and several terrains on Enceladus. The conditions associated with the formation of each of these terrains are similar: heat flows of order tens to a hundred milliwatts per meter squared, and deformation rates of order 10-16-10-12 s-1. Our prior work shows that the conditions associated with the formation of these terrains on Ganymede and the south pole of Enceladus are consistent with vigorous solid-state ice convection in a shell with a weak surface. We show that sluggish lid convection, an intermediate regime between the isoviscous and stagnant lid regimes, can create the heat flow and deformation rates appropriate for ridge and trough formation on a number of satellites, regardless of the ice shell thickness. For convection to deform their surfaces, the ice shells must have yield stresses similar in magnitude to the daily tidal stresses. Tidal and convective stresses deform the surface, and the spatial pattern of tidal cracking controls the locations of ridge-and-trough terrain.

  13. Coupled radiative convective equilibrium simulations with explicit and parameterized convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, Cathy; Stevens, Bjorn

    2016-09-01

    Radiative convective equilibrium has been applied in past studies to various models given its simplicity and analogy to the tropical climate. At convection-permitting resolution, the focus has been on the organization of convection that appears when using fixed sea surface temperature (SST). Here the SST is allowed to freely respond to the surface energy. The goals are to examine and understand the resulting transient behavior, equilibrium state, and perturbations thereof, as well as to compare these results to a simulation integrated with parameterized cloud and convection. Analysis shows that the coupling between the SST and the net surface energy acts to delay the onset of self-aggregation and may prevent it, in our case, for a slab ocean of less than 1 m. This is so because SST gradients tend to oppose the shallow low-level circulation that is associated with the self-aggregation of convection. Furthermore, the occurrence of self-aggregation is found to be necessary for reaching an equilibrium state and avoiding a greenhouse-like climate. In analogy to the present climate, the self-aggregation generates the dry and clear subtropics that allow the system to efficiently cool. In contrast, strong shortwave cloud radiative effects, much stronger than at convection-permitting resolution, prevent the simulation with parameterized cloud and convection to fall into a greenhouse state. The convection-permitting simulations also suggest that cloud feedbacks, as arising when perturbing the equilibrium state, may be very different, and in our case less negative, than what emerges from general circulation models.

  14. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jacob; Stewart, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-10-01

    Simulations of rings have traditionally been done using N-body methods, granting insight into the interactions of individual ring particles on varying scales. However, due to the scale of a typical ring system and the sheer number of particles involved, a global N-body simulation is too computationally expensive, unless particle collisions are replaced by stochastic forces (Bromley & Kenyon, 2013). Rings are extraordinarily flat systems and therefore are well-suited to existing geophysical shallow-water hydrodynamics models with well-established non-linear advection methods. By adopting a general relationship between pressure and surface density such as a polytropic equation of state, we can modify the shallow-water formula to treat a thin, compressible, self-gravitating, shearing fluid. Previous hydrodynamic simulations of planetary rings have been restricted to axisymmetric flows and therefore have not treated the response to nonaxisymmetric perturbations by moons (Schmidt & Tscharnuter 1999, Latter & Ogilvie 2010). We seek to expand on existing hydrodynamic methods and, by comparing our work with complementary N-body simulations and Cassini observations, confirm the veracity of our results at small scales before eventually moving to a global domain size. We will use non-Newtonian, dynamically variable viscosity to model the viscous transport caused by unresolved self-gravity wakes. Self-gravity will be added to model the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as density waves and edge waves. Support from NASA Outer Planets and Planetary Geology and Geophysics programs is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Particle hydrodynamics with tessellation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heß, Steffen; Springel, Volker

    2010-08-01

    Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a well-established approach to model fluids in astrophysical problems, thanks to its geometric flexibility and ability to automatically adjust the spatial resolution to the clumping of matter. However, a number of recent studies have emphasized inaccuracies of SPH in the treatment of fluid instabilities. The origin of these numerical problems can be traced back to spurious surface effects across contact discontinuities, and to SPH's inherent prevention of mixing at the particle level. We here investigate a new fluid particle model where the density estimate is carried out with the help of an auxiliary mesh constructed as the Voronoi tessellation of the simulation particles instead of an adaptive smoothing kernel. This Voronoi-based approach improves the ability of the scheme to represent sharp contact discontinuities. We show that this eliminates spurious surface tension effects present in SPH and that play a role in suppressing certain fluid instabilities. We find that the new `Voronoi Particle Hydrodynamics' (VPH) described here produces comparable results to SPH in shocks, and better ones in turbulent regimes of pure hydrodynamical simulations. We also discuss formulations of the artificial viscosity needed in this scheme and how judiciously chosen correction forces can be derived in order to maintain a high degree of particle order and hence a regular Voronoi mesh. This is especially helpful in simulating self-gravitating fluids with existing gravity solvers used for N-body simulations.

  16. Recent progress in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The quark-gluon plasma created in a relativistic heavy-ion collisions possesses a sizable pressure anisotropy in the local rest frame at very early times after the initial nuclear impact and this anisotropy only slowly relaxes as the system evolves. In a kinetic theory picture, this translates into the existence of sizable momentum-space anisotropies in the underlying partonic distribution functions, < pL2> ≪ < pT2>. In such cases, it is better to reorganize the hydrodynamical expansion by taking into account momentum-space anisotropies at leading-order in the expansion instead of as a perturbative correction to an isotropic distribution. The resulting anisotropic hydrodynamics framework has been shown to more accurately describe the dynamics of rapidly expanding systems such as the quark-gluon plasma. In this proceedings contribution, I review the basic ideas of anisotropic hydrodynamics, recent progress, and present a few preliminary phenomenological predictions for identified particle spectra and elliptic flow.

  17. Homogeneous, core-shell, and hollow-shell ZnS colloid-based photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Ian D; Liddell, Chekesha M

    2007-02-27

    Ordered ZnS-based colloidal crystals from homogeneous, core-shell, and hollow building blocks were prepared via electrosteric colloid stabilization combined with a convective assembly technique. The polyelectrolyte stabilized colloids assembled into face-centered cubic arrays with the (111) face perpendicular to the substrate. Structure-property correlations were made using scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and UV/visible/near-IR spectroscopy. Multilayer film growth, with film thickness of several micrometers, was achieved. Optical spectra showed (111) stopgaps along with pronounced higher order peaks. The spectral position of the photonic stopgap can be predicted using a volume average refractive index and the Maxwell-Garnett formula for the homogeneous and core-shell particles, respectively. This work holds the promise of harnessing ZnS for optical property engineering and enhanced photonic band gap materials.

  18. Strain history of ice shells of the Galilean satellites from radar detection of crystal orientation fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy C.; Stillman, David E.

    2011-03-01

    Orbital radar sounding has been suggested as a means of determining the subsurface thermal and physical structure of the outer ice I shells of the Galilean satellites. At radar frequencies, the dielectric permittivity of single- and polycrystalline water ice I is anisotropic. Crystal orientation fabric (COF), which is indicative of strain history, can be unambiguously detected by comparing the received power of dual co-polarization (linear polarization parallel and perpendicular to the orbit) radar data. Regions with crystal orientations dictated by the local strain field (“fabric”) form in terrestrial ice masses where accumulated strain and temperature are high, similar to conditions expected in a convecting outer ice I shell on Europa, Ganymede, or Callisto. We use simulations of solid-state ice shell convection to show that crystal orientation fabric can form in the warm convecting sublayer of the ice shells for plausible grain sizes. Changes in received power from parallel and perpendicular polarizations in the ice shells due to fabric could be detected if multi-polarization data is collected. With proper instrument design, radar sounding could be used to shed light on the strain history of the satellites' ice shells in addition to their present day internal structures.

  19. STELLAR DYNAMOS AND CYCLES FROM NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dubé, Caroline; Charbonneau, Paul E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca

    2013-09-20

    We present a series of kinematic axisymmetric mean-field αΩ dynamo models applicable to solar-type stars, for 20 distinct combinations of rotation rates and luminosities. The internal differential rotation and kinetic helicity profiles required to calculate source terms in these dynamo models are extracted from a corresponding series of global three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of solar/stellar convection, so that the resulting dynamo models end up involving only one free parameter, namely, the turbulent magnetic diffusivity in the convecting layers. Even though the αΩ dynamo solutions exhibit a broad range of morphologies, and sometimes even double cycles, these models manage to reproduce relatively well the observationally inferred relationship between cycle period and rotation rate. On the other hand, they fail in capturing the observed increase of magnetic activity levels with rotation rate. This failure is due to our use of a simple algebraic α-quenching formula as the sole amplitude-limiting nonlinearity. This suggests that α-quenching is not the primary mechanism setting the amplitude of stellar magnetic cycles, with magnetic reaction on large-scale flows emerging as the more likely candidate. This inference is coherent with analyses of various recent global magnetohydrodynamical simulations of solar/stellar convection.

  20. Numerical simulations of the convective flame in white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1993-01-01

    A first step toward better understanding of the mechanism driving convective flames in exploding white dwarfs is presented. The propagation of the convective flame is examined using a two-dimensional implicit hydrodynamical code. The large scales of the instability are captured by the grid while the scales that are smaller than the grid resolution are approximated by a mixing-length approximation. It is found that largescale perturbations (of order of the pressure scale height) do grow significantly during the expansion, leading to a very nonspherical burning front. The combustion rate is strongly enhanced (compared to the unperturbed case) during the first second, but later the expansion of the star suppresses the flame speed, leading to only partial incineration of the nuclear fuel. Our results imply that large-scale perturbations by themselves are not enough to explain the mechanism by which convective flames are driven, and a study of the whole spectrum of relevant perturbations is needed. The implications of these preliminary results on future simulations, in the context of current models for Type Ia supernovae, are discussed.

  1. Application of supercomputers to 3-D mantle convection

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgardner, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Current generation vector machines are providing for the first time the computing power needed to treat planetary mantle convection in a fully three-dimensional fashion. A numerical technique known as multigrid has been implemented in spherical geometry using a hierarchy of meshes constructed from the regular icosahedron to yield a highly efficient three-dimensional compressible Eulerian finite element hydrodynamics formulation. The paper describes the numerical method and presents convection solutions for the mantles of both the earth and the Moon. In the case of the Earth, the convection pattern is characterized by upwelling in narrow circular plumes originating at the core-mantle boundary and by downwelling in sheets or slabs derived from the cold upper boundary layer. The preferred number of plumes appears to be on the order of six or seven. For the Moon, the numerical results indicate that development of a predominately L = 2 pattern in later lunar history is a plausible explanation for the present large second-degree non-hydrostatic component in the lunar figure.

  2. Low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of multispecies liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, Aleksandar Bhattacharjee, Amit Kumar; Nonaka, Andy; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2015-03-15

    We develop a low Mach number formulation of the hydrodynamic equations describing transport of mass and momentum in a multispecies mixture of incompressible miscible liquids at specified temperature and pressure, which generalizes our prior work on ideal mixtures of ideal gases [Balakrishnan et al., “Fluctuating hydrodynamics of multispecies nonreactive mixtures,” Phys. Rev. E 89 013017 (2014)] and binary liquid mixtures [Donev et al., “Low mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of diffusively mixing fluids,” Commun. Appl. Math. Comput. Sci. 9(1), 47-105 (2014)]. In this formulation, we combine and extend a number of existing descriptions of multispecies transport available in the literature. The formulation applies to non-ideal mixtures of arbitrary number of species, without the need to single out a “solvent” species, and includes contributions to the diffusive mass flux due to gradients of composition, temperature, and pressure. Momentum transport and advective mass transport are handled using a low Mach number approach that eliminates fast sound waves (pressure fluctuations) from the full compressible system of equations and leads to a quasi-incompressible formulation. Thermal fluctuations are included in our fluctuating hydrodynamics description following the principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. We extend the semi-implicit staggered-grid finite-volume numerical method developed in our prior work on binary liquid mixtures [Nonaka et al., “Low mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics of binary liquid mixtures,” http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.2300 (2015)] and use it to study the development of giant nonequilibrium concentration fluctuations in a ternary mixture subjected to a steady concentration gradient. We also numerically study the development of diffusion-driven gravitational instabilities in a ternary mixture and compare our numerical results to recent experimental measurements [Carballido-Landeira et al., “Mixed-mode instability of a

  3. Ingredients for accurate simulations of convection in stellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampedach, Regner

    2004-10-01

    I present the ingredients for high precision, 3D hydrodynamical simulations of convection in stellar atmospheres, as well as a number of applications. I have developed a new scheme for evaluating radiative transfer, an improved equation of state and I have investigated a number of directions for improving the numerical stability of the convection simulations. The equation of state (EOS) used for the simulations, is updated by including post-Holtsmark micro-field distributions and relativistic electron-degeneracy as previously published. I have further included quantum effects, higher-order Coulomb interactions and improved treatment of extended particles. These processes (except relativistic degeneracy) have a significant effect in the solar convection zone, and most of them peak at a depth of only 10 Mm. I also include a range of astrophysically significant molecules, besides H2 and the H+2 -ion. This FOS will be used directly in the convection simulations, providing the thermodynamic state of the plasma, and as a foundation for a new calculation of opacities for stellar atmospheres and interiors. A new scheme for evaluating radiative transfer in dynamic and multi-dimensional stellar atmosphere calculations is developed. The idea being, that if carefully chosen, very few wavelengths can reproduce the full radiative transfer solution. This method is based on a calibration against a full solution to a 1D reference atmosphere, and is therefore not relevant for static 1D stellar atmosphere modeling. The first tests of the method are very promising, and reveal that the new method is an improvement over the former opacity binning technique. The range of convective fluctuations is spanned more accurately and not only the radiative heating, but also the first three angular moments of the specific intensity, can be evaluated reliably. Work on implementing the method in the convection-code, is in progress. These developments will be employed in the future for a number of

  4. A Thermal Equilibrium Analysis of Line Contact Hydrodynamic Lubrication Considering the Influences of Reynolds Number, Load and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoli; Sun, Zheng; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yuqi

    2015-01-01

    Thermal effects such as conduction, convection and viscous dissipation are important to lubrication performance, and they vary with the friction conditions. These variations have caused some inconsistencies in the conclusions of different researchers regarding the relative contributions of these thermal effects. To reveal the relationship between the contributions of the thermal effects and the friction conditions, a steady-state THD analysis model was presented. The results indicate that the contribution of each thermal effect sharply varies with the Reynolds number and temperature. Convective effect could be dominant under certain conditions. Additionally, the accuracy of some simplified methods of thermo-hydrodynamic analysis is further discussed.

  5. A Thermal Equilibrium Analysis of Line Contact Hydrodynamic Lubrication Considering the Influences of Reynolds Number, Load and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoli; Sun, Zheng; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yuqi

    2015-01-01

    Thermal effects such as conduction, convection and viscous dissipation are important to lubrication performance, and they vary with the friction conditions. These variations have caused some inconsistencies in the conclusions of different researchers regarding the relative contributions of these thermal effects. To reveal the relationship between the contributions of the thermal effects and the friction conditions, a steady-state THD analysis model was presented. The results indicate that the contribution of each thermal effect sharply varies with the Reynolds number and temperature. Convective effect could be dominant under certain conditions. Additionally, the accuracy of some simplified methods of thermo-hydrodynamic analysis is further discussed. PMID:26244665

  6. Characterizing convective cold pools: Characterizing Convective Cold Pools

    DOE PAGES

    Drager, Aryeh J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2017-05-09

    Cold pools produced by convective storms play an important role in Earth's climate system. However, a common framework does not exist for objectively identifying convective cold pools in observations and models. The present study investigates convective cold pools within a simulation of tropical continental convection that uses a cloud-resolving model with a coupled land-surface model. Multiple variables are assessed for their potential in identifying convective cold pool boundaries, and a novel technique is developed and tested for identifying and tracking cold pools in numerical model simulations. This algorithm is based on surface rainfall rates and radial gradients in the densitymore » potential temperature field. The algorithm successfully identifies near-surface cold pool boundaries and is able to distinguish between connected cold pools. Once cold pools have been identified and tracked, composites of cold pool evolution are then constructed, and average cold pool properties are investigated. Wet patches are found to develop within the centers of cold pools where the ground has been soaked with rainwater. These wet patches help to maintain cool surface temperatures and reduce cold pool dissipation, which has implications for the development of subsequent convection.« less

  7. The creation of AGB fallback shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The possibility that mass ejected during Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stellar evolution phases falls back towards the star has been suggested in applications ranging from the formation of accretion discs to the powering of late-thermal pulses. In this paper, we seek to explicate the properties of fallback flow trajectories from mass-loss events. We focus on a transient phase of mass ejection with sub-escape speeds, followed by a phase of a typical AGB wind. We solve the problem using both hydrodynamic simulations and a simplified one-dimensional analytic model that matches the simulations. For a given set of initial wind characteristics, we find a critical shell velocity that distinguishes between `shell fallback' and `shell escape'. We discuss the relevance of our results for both single and binary AGB stars. In particular, we discuss how our results help to frame further studies of fallback as a mechanism for forming the substantial population of observed post-AGB stars with dusty discs.

  8. Efficiency of thermal relaxation by radiative processes in protoplanetary discs: constraints on hydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, M. G.; Klahr, H.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Hydrodynamic, non-magnetic instabilities can provide turbulent stress in the regions of protoplanetary discs, where the magneto-rotational instability can not develop. The induced motions influence the grain growth, from which formation of planetesimals begins. Thermal relaxation of the gas constrains origins of the identified hydrodynamic sources of turbulence in discs. Aims: We aim to estimate the radiative relaxation timescale of temperature perturbations in protoplanetary discs. We study the dependence of the thermal relaxation on the perturbation wavelength, the location within the disc, the disc mass, and the dust-to-gas mass ratio. We then apply thermal relaxation criteria to localise modes of the convective overstability, the vertical shear instability, and the zombie vortex instability. Methods: For a given temperature perturbation, we estimated two timescales: the radiative diffusion timescale tthick and the optically thin emission timescale tthin. The longest of these timescales governs the relaxation: trelax = max (tthick, tthin). We additionally accounted for the collisional coupling to the emitting species. Our calculations employed the latest tabulated dust and gas mean opacities. Results: The relaxation criterion defines the bulk of a typical T Tauri disc as unstable to the development of linear hydrodynamic instabilities. The midplane is unstable to the convective overstability from at most 2au and up to 40au, as well as beyond 140au. The vertical shear instability can develop between 15au and 180au. The successive generation of (zombie) vortices from a seeded noise can work within the inner 0.8au. Conclusions: A map of relaxation timescale constrains the origins of the identified hydrodynamic turbulence-driving mechanisms in protoplanetary discs. Dynamic disc modelling with the evolution of dust and gas opacities is required to clearly localise the hydrodynamic turbulence, and especially its non-linear phase.

  9. Interface-tracking electro-hydrodynamic model for droplet coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl Erickson, Lindsay; Noble, David

    2012-11-01

    Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. micro-fluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface. The electro-hydrodynamic equations solved allow for convection of charge and charge accumulation at the interface, both of which may be important factors for the pinch-off dynamics in this parameter regime.

  10. Update on Thermal and Hydrodynamic Simulations on LMJ Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, G.; Charton, S.

    2004-03-15

    The temperature of the cryogenic target inside the hohlraum has been studied with a computational fluid dynamics code (FLUENT). Specific models have been developed and used for both thermal and hydrodynamic calculations.With thermal calculations only, we first have found the optimum heat flux required to counteract the effect of the laser entrance windows. This heat flux is centered on the hohlraum wall along the axis of revolution. With this heat flux, the temperature surface profiles of the capsule and the DT ice layer have been significantly reduced. Second, the sensitivity of the target temperature profiles (capsule and DT layer) relatively to capsule displacement has been determined. Thirdly, the effect of the shield extraction (shield surrounding the cryogenic structure) has been studied and has indicated that the target lifetime before the laser shot is less than 1s. Meanwhile, with hydrodynamic simulations, we have investigated the surface temperature profiles alteration due to He and H{sub 2} mixture convection within the hohlraum.In order to find out the variations between different configurations, results of these studies are given with seven significant digit outputs. Those results only indicate a trend because of the material's properties incertitude and the code approximation.

  11. Pulsations and Hydrodynamics of Luminous Blue Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Lovekin, Catherine C.

    2012-07-01

    The Luminous Blue Variable stars exhibit behavior ranging from light curve 'microvariations' on timescales of tens of days, to 'outbursts' accompanied by mass loss of ~10-3 Msun occurring decades apart, to 'giant eruptions' such as seen in Eta Carinae, ejecting one or more solar masses and recurring on timescales of centuries. Here we review the work of the Los Alamos group since 1993, to investigate pulsations and instabilities in massive stars using linear pulsation models and non-linear hydrodynamic models. The models predict pulsational variability that may be associated with the microvariations. We show using a nonlinear pulsation hydrodynamics code with a time-dependent convection treatment, that in some circumstances the Eddington limit is exceeded periodically in the pulsation driving region of the stellar envelope, accelerating the outer layers, and perhaps initiating mass loss or the LBV outbursts. We discuss how pulsations and mass loss may be responsible for the location of the Humphreys- Davidson Limit in the H-R diagram. The 'giant eruptions', however, must involve much deeper regions in the stellar core to cause such large amounts of mass to be ejected. We review and suggest some possible explanations, including mixing from gravity modes, secular instabilities, the epsilon mechanism, or the SASI instability as proposed for Type II supernovae. We outline future work and required stellar modeling capabilities to investigate these possibilities.

  12. The Last Minutes of Oxygen Shell Burning in a Massive Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Viallet, Maxime; Heger, Alexander; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We present the first 4π-three-dimensional (3D) simulation of the last minutes of oxygen shell burning in an 18 M ⊙ supernova progenitor up to the onset of core collapse. A moving inner boundary is used to accurately model the contraction of the silicon and iron core according to a one-dimensional stellar evolution model with a self-consistent treatment of core deleptonization and nuclear quasi-equilibrium. The simulation covers the full solid angle to allow the emergence of large-scale convective modes. Due to core contraction and the concomitant acceleration of nuclear burning, the convective Mach number increases to ˜0.1 at collapse, and an ℓ = 2 mode emerges shortly before the end of the simulation. Aside from a growth of the oxygen shell from 0.51 M ⊙ to 0.56 M ⊙ due to entrainment from the carbon shell, the convective flow is reasonably well described by mixing-length theory, and the dominant scales are compatible with estimates from linear stability analysis. We deduce that artificial changes in the physics, such as accelerated core contraction, can have precarious consequences for the state of convection at collapse. We argue that scaling laws for the convective velocities and eddy sizes furnish good estimates for the state of shell convection at collapse and develop a simple analytic theory for the impact of convective seed perturbations on shock revival in the ensuing supernova. We predict a reduction of the critical luminosity for explosion by 12%-24% due to seed asphericities for our 3D progenitor model relative to the case without large seed perturbations.

  13. Static cylindrical matter shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arık, Metin; Delice, Özgür

    2005-08-01

    Static cylindrical shells composed of massive particles arising from matching of two different Levi-Civita space-times are studied for the shell satisfying either an isotropic or an anisotropic equation of state. We find that these solutions satisfy the energy conditions for certain ranges of the parameters.

  14. Iridescence color of shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2002-06-01

    Some shells from both salt water and fresh water show the phenomenon of iridescence color. Pearls and mother-of-pearls also display this phenomenon. In the past, the cause of the iridescence color was attributed to interference. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to study the surface structure of the shell of the mollusk Pinctada Margaritifera. There is a groove structure of reflection grating on the surface area in where the iridescence color appears. An optic experiment with a laser obtained a diffraction pattern produced by the reflection grating structure of the shell. The study led to a conclusion that the iridescence color of the shell is caused by diffraction. A SEM image of the shells of an abalone Haliotis Rufescens (red abalone) showed a statistically regularly arranged tile structure that serves as a two-dimensional grating. This grating structure causes the iridescence color of the shell of red abalone. The dominant color of the iridescence of shells is caused by the uneven grating efficiency in the visible wavelength range when a shell functions as a reflection grating. The wavelength of the dominant color should be at or near the wavelength of the maximum efficiency of the grating.

  15. Realistic Solar Surface Convection Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, Ake

    2000-01-01

    We perform essentially parameter free simulations with realistic physics of convection near the solar surface. We summarize the physics that is included and compare the simulation results with observations. Excellent agreement is obtained for the depth of the convection zone, the p-mode frequencies, the p-mode excitation rate, the distribution of the emergent continuum intensity, and the profiles of weak photospheric lines. We describe how solar convection is nonlocal. It is driven from a thin surface thermal boundary layer where radiative cooling produces low entropy gas which forms the cores of the downdrafts in which most of the buoyancy work occurs. We show that turbulence and vorticity are mostly confined to the intergranular lanes and underlying downdrafts. Finally, we illustrate our current work on magneto-convection.

  16. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  17. Parameterization of precipitating shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Shallow convective clouds play a decisive role in many regimes of the atmosphere. They are abundant in the trade wind regions and essential for the radiation budget in the sub-tropics. They are also an integral part of the diurnal cycle of convection over land leading to the formation of deeper modes of convection later on. Errors in the representation of these small and seemingly unimportant clouds can lead to misforecasts in many situations. Especially for high-resolution NWP models at 1-3 km grid spacing which explicitly simulate deeper modes of convection, the parameterization of the sub-grid shallow convection is an important issue. Large-eddy simulations (LES) can provide the data to study shallow convective clouds and their interaction with the boundary layer in great detail. In contrast to observation, simulations provide a complete and consistent dataset, which may not be perfectly realistic due to the necessary simplifications, but nevertheless enables us to study many aspects of those clouds in a self-consistent way. Today's supercomputing capabilities make it possible to use domain sizes that not only span several NWP grid boxes, but also allow for mesoscale self-organization of the cloud field, which is an essential behavior of precipitating shallow convection. By coarse-graining the LES data to the grid of an NWP model, the sub-grid fluctuations caused by shallow convective clouds can be analyzed explicitly. These fluctuations can then be parameterized in terms of a PDF-based closure. The necessary choices for such schemes like the shape of the PDF, the number of predicted moments, etc., will be discussed. For example, it is shown that a universal three-parameter distribution of total water may exist at scales of O(1 km) but not at O(10 km). In a next step the variance budgets of moisture and temperature in the cloud-topped boundary layer are studied. What is the role and magnitude of the microphysical correlation terms in these equations, which

  18. Gravitational Effects on Collective Modes of Superfluid Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padavić, Karmela; Sun, Kuei; Lannert, Courtney; Vishveshwara, Smitha

    We study the effects of gravity on collective excitations of shell-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Superfluid shells are of general interest as examples of hollow geometries that can be produced in ultracold atoms in bubble-trap potentials or optical lattices. Our approach to analyzing superfluid shells is based on a Gross-Pitaevskii mean field theory and hydrodynamic equations derived from it. Considering a spherically symmetric BEC in general, there are distinct collective excitation spectra for the cases of a fully filled sphere and a very thin shell. Furthermore, an adiabatic change in the potential producing a slow transition from one geometry to the other shows a characteristic evolution. Given that in most realistic experimental conditions gravity cannot be neglected we investigate its effects on the equilibrium profile and the collective modes in the very thin shell limit. We analytically obtain the full excitation spectrum for the thin shell geometry and account for gravity perturbatively at length and energy scales that describe a stable matter-wave bubble. We find that gravity breaks spherical symmetry of the equilibrium density profile and affects the collective excitations by coupling adjacent modes in the angular direction.

  19. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  20. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  1. Cohesive Elements for Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; Turon, Albert

    2007-01-01

    A cohesive element for shell analysis is presented. The element can be used to simulate the initiation and growth of delaminations between stacked, non-coincident layers of shell elements. The procedure to construct the element accounts for the thickness offset by applying the kinematic relations of shell deformation to transform the stiffness and internal force of a zero-thickness cohesive element such that interfacial continuity between the layers is enforced. The procedure is demonstrated by simulating the response and failure of the Mixed Mode Bending test and a skin-stiffener debond specimen. In addition, it is shown that stacks of shell elements can be used to create effective models to predict the inplane and delamination failure modes of thick components. The results indicate that simple shell models can retain many of the necessary predictive attributes of much more complex 3D models while providing the computational efficiency that is necessary for design.

  2. Influence of convection on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.

    1994-01-01

    The primary motivation for this research was to determine the cause for space processing altering the microstructure of some eutectics, especially the MnBi-Bi eutectic. Four primary hypotheses were to be tested under this current grant: (1) A fibrous microstructure is much more sensitive to convection than a lamellar microstructure, which was assumed in our prior theoretical treatment. (2) An interface with one phase projecting out into the melt is much more sensitive to convection than a planar interface, which was assumed in our prior theoretical treatment. (3) The Soret effect is much more important in the absence of convection and has a sufficiently large influence on microstructure that its action can explain the flight results. (4) The microstructure is much more sensitive to convection when the composition of the bulk melt is off eutectic. These hypotheses were tested. It was concluded that none of these can explain the Grumman flight results. Experiments also were performed on the influence of current pulses on MnBi-Bi microstructure. A thorough review was made of all experimental results on the influence of convection on the fiber spacing in rod eutectics, including results from solidification in space or at high gravity, and use of mechanical stirring or a magnetic field. Contradictory results were noted. The predictions of models for convective influences were compared with the experimental results. Vigorous mechanical stirring appears to coarsen the microstructure by altering the concentration field in front of the freezing interface. Gentle convection is believed to alter the microstructure of a fibrous eutectic only when it causes a fluctuating freezing rate with a system for which the kinetics of fiber branching differs from that for fiber termination. These fluctuations may cause the microstructure to coarsen or to become finer, depending on the relative kinetics of these processes. The microstructure of lamellar eutectics is less sensitive to

  3. Convection coefficients at building surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerud, R. C.; Altmayer, E.; Bauman, F. S.; Gadgil, A.; Bohn, M.

    1982-09-01

    Correlations relating the rate of heat transfer from the surfaces of rooms to the enclosed air are being developed, based on empirical and analytic examinations of convection in enclosures. The correlations express the heat transfer rate in terms of boundary conditions relating to room geometry and surface temperatures. Work to date indicates that simple convection coefficient calculation techniques can be developed, which significantly improve accuracy of heat transfer predictions in comparison with the standard calculations recommended by ASHRAE.

  4. Divergence of a helicoidal shell in a pipe with a flowing fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, V. V.; Vetyukov, Yu. M.; Zinov'eva, T. V.

    2011-05-01

    This paper considers a solution of the problem of coupled hydroelasticity for a helicoidal shell in a rigid tube with a flowing ideal incompressible fluid, which is of interest for the design of heat exchange systems. The flow is considered potential, and boundary conditions are imposed on the deformed surface. The version of the classical theory of elastic shells as the Lagrangian mechanics of deformable surfaces is used. The longitudinal-torsional vibrations of a long shell and a naturally twisted rod are studied. It is established that the obtained hydrodynamic loads are conservative, so that a divergence type instability is possible. A critical combination of parameters is determined.

  5. The role of hard turbulent thermal convection in the Earth's early thermal evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Ulli; Yuen, David A.; Zhao, Wuling; Malevsky, Andrei V.

    1992-01-01

    In the last several years great progress was made in the study of a new transition in thermal convection, called hard turbulence. Initial experiments were conducted with helium gas, then with water. It was shown that for base-heated Newtonian convection a transition occurred at Rayleigh numbers between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 8). This transition is characterized by the appearance of disconnected plume structures in contrast to continuous plumes with mushroom-shaped tops found for lower Rayleigh numbers. This new hydrodynamic transition is expected to play an important role in reshaping our concepts of mantle convection in the early stages of planetary evolution. We have conducted two-dimensional calculations for large and small aspect-ratio configuration to see whether such a transition would take place for infinite Prandtl number fluids.

  6. Excitation of convective motions in isotropic and anisotropic liquids by light

    SciTech Connect

    Akopyan, R S; Alaverdyan, R B; Muradyan, L Kh; Seferyan, G E; Chilingaryan, Yu S

    2003-01-31

    The possibility of excitation of convective motions of the Rayleigh - Benard and Marangoni type in isotropic liquids and nematic liquid crystals upon absorption of light with a spatially periodic intensity distribution is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that gravitational and thermocapillary surface hydrodynamic waves are observed in the case of a running interference pattern. The possibility of control and the stability of convective motions are investigated. Benard cells become unstable when the light intensity is high. These instabilities are of thermal origin because the Prandtl number for the medium under investigation is considerably larger than unity. The competition between the gravitational and thermocapillary mechanisms of photohydrodynamic reorientation of the nematic liquid crystal director is also studied. The effect of convective motions on the thermodynamic phase transition is observed and explained. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  7. Entropy-limited hydrodynamics: a novel approach to relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guercilena, Federico; Radice, David; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-07-01

    We present entropy-limited hydrodynamics (ELH): a new approach for the computation of numerical fluxes arising in the discretization of hyperbolic equations in conservation form. ELH is based on the hybridisation of an unfiltered high-order scheme with the first-order Lax-Friedrichs method. The activation of the low-order part of the scheme is driven by a measure of the locally generated entropy inspired by the artificial-viscosity method proposed by Guermond et al. (J. Comput. Phys. 230(11):4248-4267, 2011, doi: 10.1016/j.jcp.2010.11.043). Here, we present ELH in the context of high-order finite-differencing methods and of the equations of general-relativistic hydrodynamics. We study the performance of ELH in a series of classical astrophysical tests in general relativity involving isolated, rotating and nonrotating neutron stars, and including a case of gravitational collapse to black hole. We present a detailed comparison of ELH with the fifth-order monotonicity preserving method MP5 (Suresh and Huynh in J. Comput. Phys. 136(1):83-99, 1997, doi: 10.1006/jcph.1997.5745), one of the most common high-order schemes currently employed in numerical-relativity simulations. We find that ELH achieves comparable and, in many of the cases studied here, better accuracy than more traditional methods at a fraction of the computational cost (up to {˜}50% speedup). Given its accuracy and its simplicity of implementation, ELH is a promising framework for the development of new special- and general-relativistic hydrodynamics codes well adapted for massively parallel supercomputers.

  8. Isentropic Analysis of Convective Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauluis, Olivier M.; Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the convective mass transport by sorting air parcels in terms of their equivalent potential temperature to determine an isentropic streamfunction. By averaging the vertical mass flux at a constant value of the equivalent potential temperature, one can compute an isentropic mass transport that filters out reversible oscillatory motions such as gravity waves. This novel approach emphasizes the fact that the vertical energy and entropy transports by convection are due to the combination of ascending air parcels with high energy and entropy and subsiding air parcels with lower energy and entropy. Such conditional averaging can be extended to other dynamic and thermodynamic variables such as vertical velocity, temperature, or relative humidity to obtain a comprehensive description of convective motions. It is also shown how this approach can be used to determine the mean diabatic tendencies from the three-dimensional dynamic and thermodynamic fields. A two-stream approximation that partitions the isentropic circulation into a mean updraft and a mean downdraft is also introduced. This offers a straightforward way to identify the mean properties of rising and subsiding air parcels. The results from the two-stream approximation are compared with two other definitions of the cloud mass flux. It is argued that the isentropic analysis offers a robust definition of the convective mass transport that is not tainted by the need to arbitrarily distinguish between convection and its environment, and that separates the irreversible convective overturning fromoscillations associated with gravity waves.

  9. Convection wave studies over land and sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuettner, Joachim; Grossmann, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary results of recent case studies conducted over land and sea are given. Two dimensional convection (roll vortex/cloudstreet) and three dimensional convection in the underlying boundary layer are dealt with. Vertical momentum flux profiles and time series of important parameters and vertical soundings taken in the experiment area are shown. The three cases described show that convection waves occur over land and over ocean, over three dimensional convection and over two dimensional convection.

  10. Hydrodynamic instability growth and mix experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Barrios, M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Mintz, M.; Parham, T.; Peterson, J. L.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on implosion performance were studied at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Implosion performance and mix have been measured at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and containing embedded localized carbon-deuterium diagnostic layers in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the tritium-tritium fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits for yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role. In addition, spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure instability growth in the acceleration phase of the implosions. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses, and ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography for a shell convergence ratio of ∼2. The measured growth was in good agreement with that predicted, thus validating simulations for the fastest growing modulations with mode numbers up to 90 in the acceleration phase. Future experiments will be focused on measurements at higher convergence, higher-mode number modulations, and growth occurring during the deceleration phase.

  11. Observation of deep convection initiation from shallow convection environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Couvreux, Fleur; Guichard, Françoise; Campistron, Bernard; Chong, Michel; Rio, Catherine; Williams, Earle

    2010-05-01

    In the afternoon of 10 July 2006, deep convective cells initiated right in the field of view of the Massachusetts Institute Technology (MIT) C-band Doppler radar. This radar, with its 3D exploration at 10 min temporal resolution and 250 m radial resolution, allows us to track the deep convective cells and also provides clear air observations of the boundary layer structure prior to deep convection initiation. Several other observational platforms were operating then which allow us to thoroughly analyse this case: Vertically pointing aerosol lidar, W-band radar and ceilometer from the ARM Mobile Facility, along with radiosoundings and surface measurements enable us to describe the environment, from before their initiation to after the propagation of of one propagating cell that generated a circular gust front very nicely caught by the MIT radar. The systems considered here differ from the mesoscale convective systems which are often associated with African Easterly Waves, increasing CAPE and decreasing CIN. The former have smaller size, and initiate more locally, but there are numerous and still play a large role in the atmospheric circulation and scalar transport. Though, they remain a challenge to model. (See the presentation by Guichard et al. in the same session, for a model set up based on the same case, with joint single-column model and Large Eddy Simulation, which aims at better understanding and improving the parametrisation of deep convection initiation.) Based on the analysis of the observations mentioned above, we consider here the possible sources of deep convection initiation that day, which showed a typical boundary-layer growth in semi-arid environment, with isolated deep convective events.

  12. Magnetic energy dissipation and mean magnetic field generation in planar convection-driven dynamos.

    PubMed

    Tilgner, A

    2014-07-01

    A numerical study of dynamos in rotating convecting plane layers is presented which focuses on magnetic energies and dissipation rates and the generation of mean fields (where the mean is taken over horizontal planes). The scaling of the magnetic energy with the flux Rayleigh number is different from the scaling proposed in spherical shells, whereas the same dependence of the magnetic dissipation length on the magnetic Reynolds number is found for the two geometries. Dynamos both with and without mean field exist in rapidly rotating convecting plane layers.

  13. Radiation Hydrodynamics of Stainless Steel Wire Arrays on the Z Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J.; Clark, R. W.; Whitney, K.; Coverdale, C. A.; Lepell, D.; Jones, B.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Experiments on the Z accelerator with nested stainless steel wire arrays produced K-shell x-ray yields exceeding 50 kJ in the energy range 5.5 to 8 keV. Stainless steel (Z = 24-28) can barely be ionized to the K-shell on Z, and the spectra are therefore sensitive to the details of the implosion. We have simulated the implosion dynamics of stainless steel wire arrays with diameters ranging from 4.5 to 8.0 centimeters using a detailed configuration non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics model. Reasonable agreement with total and K-shell experimental yields was obtained for the various array configurations. A comparison is made between the 1-D and 2-D simulations for shot Z-578.

  14. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  15. Radiative-convective instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, Kerry; Wing, Allison A.; Vincent, Emmanuel M.

    2014-03-01

    equilibrium (RCE) is a simple paradigm for the statistical equilibrium the earth's climate would exhibit in the absence of lateral energy transport. It has generally been assumed that for a given solar forcing and long-lived greenhouse gas concentration, such a state would be unique, but recent work suggests that more than one stable equilibrium may be possible. Here we show that above a critical specified sea surface temperature, the ordinary RCE state becomes linearly unstable to large-scale overturning circulations. The instability migrates the RCE state toward one of the two stable equilibria first found by Raymond and Zeng (2000). It occurs when the clear-sky infrared opacity of the lower troposphere becomes so large, owing to high water vapor concentration, that variations of the radiative cooling of the lower troposphere are governed principally by variations in upper tropospheric water vapor. We show that the instability represents a subcritical bifurcation of the ordinary RCE state, leading to either a dry state with large-scale descent, or to a moist state with mean ascent; these states may be accessed by finite amplitude perturbations to ordinary RCE in the subcritical state, or spontaneously in the supercritical state. As first suggested by Raymond (2000) and Sobel et al. (2007), the latter corresponds to the phenomenon of self-aggregation of moist convection, taking the form of cloud clusters or tropical cyclones. We argue that the nonrobustness of self-aggregation in cloud system resolving models may be an artifact of running such models close to the critical temperature for instability.

  16. Galaxy clusters as hydrodynamics laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Elke; Sheardown, Alexander; Fish, Thomas; ZuHone, John; Hunt, Matthew; Su, Yuanyuan; Kraft, Ralph P.; Nulsen, Paul; Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; Machacek, Marie E.

    2017-08-01

    The intra-cluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters shows a wealth of hydrodynamical features that trace the growth of clusters via the infall of galaxies or smaller subclusters. Such hydrodynamical features include the wakes of the infalling objects as well as the interfaces between the host cluster’s ICM and the atmosphere of the infalling object. Furthermore, the cluster dynamics can be traced by merger shocks, bow shocks, and sloshing motions of the ICM.The characteristics of these dynamical features, e.g., the direction, length, brightness, and temperature of the galaxies' or subclusters' gas tails varies significantly between different objects. This could be due to either dynamical conditions or ICM transport coefficients such as viscosity and thermal conductivity. For example, the cool long gas tails of of some infalling galaxies and groups have been attributed to a substantial ICM viscosity suppressing mixing of the stripped galaxy or group gas with the hotter ambient ICM.Using hydrodynamical simulations of minor mergers we show, however, that these features can be explained naturally by the dynamical conditions of each particular galaxy or group infall. Specifically, we identify observable features to distinguish the first and second infall of a galaxy or group into its host cluster as well as characteristics during apocentre passage. Comparing our simulations with observations, we can explain several puzzling observations such as the long and cold tail of M86 in Virgo and the very long and tangentially oriented tail of the group LEDA 87445 in Hydra A.Using our simulations, we also assess the validity of the stagnation pressure method that is widely used to determine an infalling galaxy's velocity. We show that near pericentre passage the method gives reasonable results, but near apocentre it is not easily applicable.

  17. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  18. Numerical investigation of bubble-induced Marangoni convection.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Séamus M; Robinson, Anthony J

    2009-04-01

    The liquid motion induced by surface tension variation, termed the thermocapillary or Marangoni effect, and its contribution to boiling heat transfer has long been a very controversial issue. In the past this convection was not the subject of much attention because, under terrestrial conditions, it is superimposed by the strong buoyancy convection, which makes it difficult to obtain quantitative experimental results. The scenario under consideration in this paper may be applicable to the analysis of boiling heat transfer, specifically the bubble waiting period and, possibly, the bubble growth period. To elucidate the influence of Marangoni convection on local heat transfer, this work numerically investigates the presence of a hemispherical bubble of constant radius, R(b)= 1.0 mm, situated on a heated wall immersed in a liquid silicone oil (Pr= 82.5) layer of constant depth H= 5.0 mm. A comprehensive description of the flow driven by surface tension gradients along the liquid-vapor interface required the solution of the nonlinear equations of free-surface hydrodynamics. For this problem, the procedure involved solution of the coupled equations of fluid mechanics and heat transfer using the finite-difference numerical technique. Simulations were carried out under zero-gravity conditions for temperatures of 50, 40, 30, 20, 10, and 1 K, corresponding to Marangoni numbers of 915, 732, 550, 366, 183, and 18.3, respectively. The predicted thermal and flow fields have been used to describe the enhancement of the heat transfer as a result of thermocapillary convection around a stationary bubble maintained on a heated surface. It was found that the heat transfer enhancement, as quantified by both the radius of enhancement and the ratio of Marangoni heat transfer to that of pure molecular diffusion, increases asymptotically with increasing Marangoni number. For the range of Marangoni numbers tested, a 1.18-fold improvement in the heat transfer was predicted within the region

  19. A Generalized Simple Formulation of Convective Adjustment Timescale for Cumulus Convection Parameterizations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Convective adjustment timescale (τ) for cumulus clouds is one of the most influential parameters controlling parameterized convective precipitation in climate and weather simulation models at global and regional scales. Due to the complex nature of deep convection, a pres...

  20. Progress in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Dilts, G.A.; Mandell, D.A.; Crotzer, L.A.; Knapp, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless, Lagrangian numerical method for hydrodynamics calculations where calculational elements are fuzzy particles which move according to the hydrodynamic equations of motion. Each particle carries local values of density, temperature, pressure and other hydrodynamic parameters. A major advantage of SPH is that it is meshless, thus large deformation calculations can be easily done with no connectivity complications. Interface positions are known and there are no problems with advecting quantities through a mesh that typical Eulerian codes have. These underlying SPH features make fracture physics easy and natural and in fact, much of the applications work revolves around simulating fracture. Debris particles from impacts can be easily transported across large voids with SPH. While SPH has considerable promise, there are some problems inherent in the technique that have so far limited its usefulness. The most serious problem is the well known instability in tension leading to particle clumping and numerical fracture. Another problem is that the SPH interpolation is only correct when particles are uniformly spaced a half particle apart leading to incorrect strain rates, accelerations and other quantities for general particle distributions. SPH calculations are also sensitive to particle locations. The standard artificial viscosity treatment in SPH leads to spurious viscosity in shear flows. This paper will demonstrate solutions for these problems that they and others have been developing. The most promising is to replace the SPH interpolant with the moving least squares (MLS) interpolant invented by Lancaster and Salkauskas in 1981. SPH and MLS are closely related with MLS being essentially SPH with corrected particle volumes. When formulated correctly, JLS is conservative, stable in both compression and tension, does not have the SPH boundary problems and is not sensitive to particle placement. The other approach to

  1. Hydrodynamic instability experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G.; Schneider, M.; Frerking, C.E.

    1995-07-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments are conducted on the Nova laser with strong radiatively driven shocks (Mach > 20) in planar, two-fluid targets with Atwood number A < 0. Single mode interfacial perturbations are used to test linear theory and 3D random perturbations are used to study turbulent mix. Rayleigh-Taylor experiments are conducted on a new facility called the Linear Electric Motor (LEM) in which macroscopic fluids are accelerated electromagnetically with arbitrary acceleration profiles. The initial experiments are described. Hydrodynamic simulations in 2D are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, but these studies show that simulations in 3D with good radiation transport and equation of state are needed.

  2. Hydrodynamic Synchronisation of Model Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putz, V. B.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    We define a model microswimmer with a variable cycle time, thus allowing the possibility of phase locking driven by hydrodynamic interactions between swimmers. We find that, for extensile or contractile swimmers, phase locking does occur, with the relative phase of the two swimmers being, in general, close to 0 or π, depending on their relative position and orientation. We show that, as expected on grounds of symmetry, self T-dual swimmers, which are time-reversal covariant, do not phase-lock. We also discuss the phase behaviour of a line of tethered swimmers, or pumps. These show oscillations in their relative phases reminiscent of the metachronal waves of cilia.

  3. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, Jacob I.

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  4. Hydrodynamics of post CHF region

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; De Jarlais, G.

    1984-04-01

    Among various two-phase flow regimes, the inverted flow in the post-dryout region is relatively less well understood due to its special heat transfer conditions. The review of existing data indicates further research is needed in the areas of basic hydrodynamics related to liquid core disintegration mechanisms, slug and droplet formations, entrainment, and droplet size distributions. In view of this, the inverted flow is studied in detail both analytically and experimentally. Criteria for initial flow regimes in the post-dryout region are given. Preliminary models for subsequent flow regime transition criteria are derived together with correlations for a mean droplet diameter based on the adiabatic simulation data.

  5. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity.

    PubMed

    Font, José A

    2000-01-01

    The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A representative sample of available numerical schemes is discussed and particular emphasis is paid to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of relevant astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields, including gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes and evolution of neutron stars, is also presented.

  6. Foundation of Hydrodynamics of Strongly Interacting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodynamics and quantum mechanics have many elements in common, as the density field and velocity fields are common variables that can be constructed in both descriptions. Starting with the Schroedinger equation and the Klein-Gordon for a single particle in hydrodynamical form, we examine the basic assumptions under which a quantum system of particles interacting through their mean fields can be described by hydrodynamics.

  7. Microscale hydrodynamics near moving contact lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garoff, Stephen; Chen, Q.; Rame, Enrique; Willson, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrodynamics governing the fluid motions on a microscopic scale near moving contact lines are different from those governing motion far from the contact line. We explore these unique hydrodynamics by detailed measurement of the shape of a fluid meniscus very close to a moving contact line. The validity of present models of the hydrodynamics near moving contact lines as well as the dynamic wetting characteristics of a family of polymer liquids are discussed.

  8. Lyman α radiation hydrodynamics of galactic winds before cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Aaron; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical impact of Lyman α (Lyα) radiation pressure on galaxy formation depends on the rate and duration of momentum transfer between Lyα photons and neutral hydrogen gas. Although photon trapping has the potential to multiply the effective force, ionizing radiation from stellar sources may relieve the Lyα pressure before appreciably affecting the kinematics of the host galaxy or efficiently coupling Lyα photons to the outflow. We present self-consistent Lyα radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of high-z galaxy environments by coupling the Cosmic Lyα Transfer code (COLT) with spherically symmetric Lagrangian frame hydrodynamics. The accurate but computationally expensive Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations are feasible under the one-dimensional approximation. The initial starburst drives an expanding shell of gas from the centre and in certain cases, Lyα feedback significantly enhances the shell velocity. Radiative feedback alone is capable of ejecting baryons into the intergalactic medium (IGM) for protogalaxies with a virial mass of Mvir ≲ 108 M⊙. We compare the Lyα signatures of Population III stars with 105 K blackbody emission to that of direct collapse black holes with a non-thermal Compton-thick spectrum and find substantial differences if the Lyα spectra are shaped by gas pushed by Lyα radiation-driven winds. For both sources, the flux emerging from the galaxy is reprocessed by the IGM such that the observed Lyα luminosity is reduced significantly and the time-averaged velocity offset of the Lyα peak is shifted redward.

  9. Modeling the Rise of Fibril Magnetic Fields in Fully Convective Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Maria A.; Browning, Matthew K.

    2016-08-01

    Many fully convective stars exhibit a wide variety of surface magnetism, including starspots and chromospheric activity. The manner by which bundles of magnetic field traverse portions of the convection zone to emerge at the stellar surface is not especially well understood. In the solar context, some insight into this process has been gleaned by regarding the magnetism as consisting partly of idealized thin flux tubes (TFTs). Here we present the results of a large set of TFT simulations in a rotating spherical domain of convective flows representative of a 0.3 M ⊙ main-sequence star. This is the first study to investigate how individual flux tubes in such a star might rise under the combined influence of buoyancy, convection, and differential rotation. A time-dependent hydrodynamic convective flow field, taken from separate 3D simulations calculated with the anelastic equations, impacts the flux tube as it rises. Convective motions modulate the shape of the initially buoyant flux ring, promoting localized rising loops. Flux tubes in fully convective stars have a tendency to rise nearly parallel to the rotation axis. However, the presence of strong differential rotation allows some initially low-latitude flux tubes of moderate strength to develop rising loops that emerge in the near-equatorial region. Magnetic pumping suppresses the global rise of the flux tube most efficiently in the deeper interior and at lower latitudes. The results of these simulations aim to provide a link between dynamo-generated magnetic fields, fluid motions, and observations of starspots for fully convective stars.

  10. Solar Surface Magneto-Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert F.

    2012-12-01

    We review the properties of solar magneto-convection in the top half of the convection zones scale heights (from 20 Mm below the visible surface to the surface, and then through the photosphere to the temperature minimum). Convection is a highly non-linear and nonlocal process, so it is best studied by numerical simulations. We focus on simulations that include sufficient detailed physics so that their results can be quantitatively compared with observations. The solar surface is covered with magnetic features with spatial sizes ranging from unobservably small to hundreds of megameters. Three orders of magnitude more magnetic flux emerges in the quiet Sun than emerges in active regions. In this review we focus mainly on the properties of the quiet Sun magnetic field. The Sun's magnetic field is produced by dynamo action throughout the convection zone, primarily by stretching and twisting in the turbulent downflows. Diverging convective upflows and magnetic buoyancy carry magnetic flux toward the surface and sweep the field into the surrounding downflow lanes where the field is dragged downward. The result is a hierarchy of undulating magnetic Ω- and U-loops of different sizes. New magnetic flux first appears at the surface in a mixed polarity random pattern and then collects into isolated unipolar regions due to underlying larger scale magnetic structures. Rising magnetic structures are not coherent, but develop a filamentary structure. Emerging magnetic flux alters the convection properties, producing larger, darker granules. Strong field concentrations inhibit transverse plasma motions and, as a result, reduce convective heat transport toward the surface which cools. Being cooler, these magnetic field concentrations have a shorter scale height and become evacuated. The field becomes further compressed and can reach strengths in balance with the surrounding gas pressure. Because of their small internal density, photons escape from deeper in the atmosphere. Narrow

  11. Mantle Convection Models Constrained by Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, C. J.; Shahnas, M.; Peltier, W. R.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Although available three dimensional models of the lateral heterogeneity of the mantle, based upon the latest advances in seismic tomographic imaging (e.g. Ritsema et al., 2004, JGR) have provided profound insights into aspects of the mantle general circulation that drives continental drift, the compatibility of the tomography with explicit models of mantle mixing has remained illusive. For example, it remains a significant issue as to whether hydrodynamic models of the mixing process alone are able to reconcile the observed detailed pattern of surface plate velocities or whether explicit account must be taken of elastic fracture processes to account for the observed equipartition of kinetic energy between the poloidal and toroidal components of the surface velocity pattern (e.g. Forte and Peltier, 1987, JGR). It is also an issue as to the significance of the role of mantle chemical heterogeneity in determining the buoyancy distribution that drives mantle flow, especially given the expected importance of the spin transition of iron that onsets in the mid-lower mantle, at least in the ferropericlase component of the mineralogy. In this paper we focus upon the application of data assimilation techniques to the development of a model of mantle mixing that is consistent with a modern three dimensional tomography based model of seismic body wave heterogeneity. Beginning with the simplest possible scenario, that chemical heterogeneity is irrelevant to first order, we employ a three dimensional version of the recently published control volume based convection model of Shahnas and Peltier (2010, JGR) as the basis for the assimilation of a three dimensional density field inferred from our preferred tomography model (Ritsema et al., 2004, JGR). The convection model fully incorporates the dynamical influence of the Olivine-Spinel and Spinel-Perovskite+Magnesiowustite solid-solid phase transformations that bracket the mantle transition zone as well as the recently discovered

  12. Thermal transport in a noncommutative hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Geracie, M. Son, D. T.

    2015-03-15

    We find the hydrodynamic equations of a system of particles constrained to be in the lowest Landau level. We interpret the hydrodynamic theory as a Hamiltonian system with the Poisson brackets between the hydrodynamic variables determined from the noncommutativity of space. We argue that the most general hydrodynamic theory can be obtained from this Hamiltonian system by allowing the Righi-Leduc coefficient to be an arbitrary function of thermodynamic variables. We compute the Righi-Leduc coefficient at high temperatures and show that it satisfies the requirements of particle-hole symmetry, which we outline.

  13. Tropical deep convective cloud morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igel, Matthew R.

    A cloud-object partitioning algorithm is developed. It takes contiguous CloudSat cloudy regions and identifies various length scales of deep convective clouds from a tropical, oceanic subset of data. The methodology identifies a level above which anvil characteristics become important by analyzing the cloud object shape. Below this level in what is termed the pedestal region, convective cores are identified based on reflectivity maxima. Identifying these regions allows for the assessment of length scales of the anvil and pedestal of the deep convective clouds. Cloud objects are also appended with certain environmental quantities from the ECMWF reanalysis. Simple geospatial and temporal assessments show that the cloud object technique agrees with standard observations of local frequency of deep-convective cloudiness. Additionally, the nature of cloud volume scale populations is investigated. Deep convection is seen to exhibit power-law scaling. It is suggested that this scaling has implications for the continuous, scale invariant, and random nature of the physics controlling tropical deep convection and therefore on the potentially unphysical nature of contemporary convective parameterizations. Deep-convective clouds over tropical oceans play important roles in Earth's climate system. The response of tropical, deep convective clouds to sea surface temperatures (SSTs) is investigated using this new data set. Several previously proposed feedbacks are examined: the FAT hypothesis, the Iris hypothesis, and the Thermostat hypothesis. When the data are analyzed per cloud object, each hypothesis is broadly found to correctly predict cloud behavior in nature, although it appears that the FAT hypothesis needs a slight modification to allow for cooling cloud top temperatures with increasing SSTs. A new response that shows that the base temperature of deep convective anvils remains approximately constant with increasing SSTs is introduced. These cloud-climate feedbacks are

  14. Tensor classification of structure in smoothed particle hydrodynamics density fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, Duncan; Bonnell, Ian; Lucas, William; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    As hydrodynamic simulations increase in scale and resolution, identifying structures with non-trivial geometries or regions of general interest becomes increasingly challenging. There is a growing need for algorithms that identify a variety of different features in a simulation without requiring a `by eye' search. We present tensor classification as such a technique for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). These methods have already been used to great effect in N-Body cosmological simulations, which require smoothing defined as an input free parameter. We show that tensor classification successfully identifies a wide range of structures in SPH density fields using its native smoothing, removing a free parameter from the analysis and preventing the need for tessellation of the density field, as required by some classification algorithms. As examples, we show that tensor classification using the tidal tensor and the velocity shear tensor successfully identifies filaments, shells and sheet structures in giant molecular cloud simulations, as well as spiral arms in discs. The relationship between structures identified using different tensors illustrates how different forces compete and co-operate to produce the observed density field. We therefore advocate the use of multiple tensors to classify structure in SPH simulations, to shed light on the interplay of multiple physical processes.

  15. Angular Momentum Redistribution in Turbulent Compressible Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Neal; Brummell, Nicholas; Toomre, Juri

    1997-08-01

    We consider the dynamics of turbulent compressible convection within a curved local segment of a rotating spherical shell. We aim to understand the disparity between the observed solar differential rotation and previous numerical simulations. The angular extent of the curved domain is limited to a small solid angle in order to exploit fully the available spatial degrees of freedom on current supercomputers and attain the highest possible Reynolds numbers. Here we present simulations with Rayleigh numbers in excess of 10^7, and Prandtl numbers less than 0.1. This computational domain takes the form of a curved, periodic channel in longitude with stress-free sidewalls in latitude and radius. The numerical solutions are obtained using high-order accuracy explicit code. It evaluates spatial derivatives using sixth-order compact finite differences in radius and latitude and psuedospectral methods in longitude and advances the solutions in time using a fourth-order Bulirsch-Stoer integrator. The surface flows form broad, laminar networks which mask the much more turbulent flows of the interior. The dynamics within this turbulent region is controlled by the interactions of a tangled web of strong vortex tubes. These tubes and their interactions redistrubute the angular momentum, generating azimuthal flows with strong shear in both radius and latitude. Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab

  16. Hydrodynamic noise and surface compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonwinkle, W. A.; Fitzgerald, J.; Carey, W. M.; Bakewell, H. P., Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This document discusses the role of surface compliance on hydrodynamic noise and is based on a review of theoretical and experimental flow-noise investigations. Basic flow-noise theories are discussed in light of compliant surface boundary conditions. A comprehensive review of the experimental results of compliant surface flow-noise experiments is presented. Surface compliance can effect the measured noise; however, the compliance of the surfaces used in previous experiments was not adequately described. Consequently, results varied and showed a marked, but undefined, temperature dependence. The characterization of the complex surface compliance is discussed, including effects of frequency and temperature. A method that characterizes surface compliance is denoted and used to measure the properties of several mammalian tissues. Then a discussion and a comparison of these results to the wavenumber spectra data follows. An experimental investigation of the effect of surface compliance on the hydrodynamic noise is proposed by means of measurement of material properties, measurement of wall pressure fluctuation spectra, holographic representation of the surface displacement, and characterization of the TBL boundary layer to determine the magnitude and role of complex surface compliance of the TBL and its flow noise.

  17. Hydrodynamic forces on piggyback pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, M.L.; Sayer, P.

    1995-12-31

    An increasing number of new offshore pipelines have been designed as bundles, mainly because of overall cost reductions. One popular way of combining two pipelines with different diameters is the piggyback configuration, with the smaller pipeline strapped on top of the main pipeline. The external hydrodynamic forces on this combination are at present very roughly estimated; pipeline engineers need more data to support their designs. This paper presents experimental results for the in-line hydrodynamic loading on three different piggyback set-ups. The models comprised a 0.4 m main pipeline, and three piggyback pipelines with diameters of 0.038 m, 0.059 m and 0.099 m. Each small pipeline was separately mounted to the main pipeline, with a gap equal to its own diameter. These model sizes lie approximately between half- and full-scale. Experiments were undertaken for K{sub C} between 5 and 42, and R{sub e} in the range 0.0 * 10{sup 4} to 8.5 * 10{sup 5}. The results based on Morison`s equation indicate that a simple addition of the separate forces acting on each cylinder underestimates the actual force by up to 35% at low K{sub C} (< {approximately} 10) and by as much as 100% in the drag-dominated regime (K{sub C} > {approximately} 20).

  18. Inducer Hydrodynamic Load Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has demonstrated two measurement devices for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The first - a derivative of the six component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This "rotating balance" was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining both the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The second device - a high frequency response pressure transducer surface mounted on a rotating component - was merely an extension of existing technology for application in water. MSFC has recently completed experimental evaluations of both the rotating balance and surface-mount transducers in a water test loop. The measurement bandwidth of the rotating balance was severely limited by the relative flexibility of the device itself, resulting in an unexpectedly low structural bending mode and invalidating the higher frequency response data. Despite these limitations, measurements confirmed that the integrated loads on the four-bladed inducer respond to both cavitation intensity and cavitation phenomena. Likewise, the surface-mount pressure transducers were subjected to a range of temperatures and flow conditions in a non-rotating environment to record bias shifts and transfer functions between the transducers and a reference device. The pressure transducer static performance was within manufacturer's specifications and dynamic response accurately followed that of the reference.

  19. The hydrodynamics of lamprey locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan C.

    The lamprey, an anguilliform swimmer, propels itself by undulating most of its body. This type of swimming produces flow patterns that are highly three-dimensional in nature and not very well understood. However, substantial previous work has been done to understand two-dimensional unsteady propulsion, the possible wake structures and thrust performance. Limited studies of three-dimensional propulsors with simple geometries have displayed the importance of the third dimension in designing unsteady swimmers. Some of the results of those studies, primarily the ways in which vorticity is organized in the wake region, are seen in lamprey swimming as well. In the current work, the third dimension is not the only important factor, but complex geometry and body undulations also contribute to the hydrodynamics. Through dye flow visualization, particle induced velocimetry and pressure measurements, the hydrodynamics of anguilliform swimming are studied using a custom built robotic lamprey. These studies all indicate that the undulations of the body are not producing thrust. Instead, it is the tail which acts to propel the animal. This conclusion led to further investigation of the tail, specifically the role of varying tail flexibility on hydrodymnamics. It is found that by making the tail more flexible, one decreases the coherence of the vorticity in the lamprey's wake. Additional flexibility also yields less thrust.

  20. Hydromechanical transmission with hydrodynamic drive

    DOEpatents

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1979-01-01

    This transmission has a first planetary gear assembly having first input means connected to an input shaft, first output means, and first reaction means, and a second planetary gear assembly having second input means connected to the first input means, second output means, and second reaction means connected directly to the first reaction means by a reaction shaft. First clutch means, when engaged, connect the first output means to an output shaft in a high driving range. A hydrodynamic drive is used; for example, a torque converter, which may or may not have a stationary case, has a pump connected to the second output means, a stator grounded by an overrunning clutch to the case, and a turbine connected to an output member, and may be used in a starting phase. Alternatively, a fluid coupling or other type of hydrodynamic drive may be used. Second clutch means, when engaged, for connecting the output member to the output shaft in a low driving range. A variable-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the input shaft, and a fixed-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the reaction shaft. The hydraulic units are hydraulically connected together so that when one operates as a pump the other acts as a motor, and vice versa. Both clutch means are connected to the output shaft through a forward-reverse shift arrangement. It is possible to lock out the torque converter after the starting phase is over.