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Sample records for hydrogel encapsulated tumor

  1. Manipulation of a Single Circulating Tumor Cell Using Visualization of Hydrogel Encapsulation toward Single-Cell Whole-Genome Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Seita; Negishi, Ryo; Hosokawa, Masahito; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2016-07-19

    Genetic characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could guide the choice of therapies for individual patients and also facilitate the development of new drugs. We previously developed a CTC recovery system using a microcavity array, which demonstrated highly efficient CTC recovery based on differences in cell size and deformability. However, the CTC recovery system lacked an efficient cell manipulation tool suitable for subsequent genetic analysis. Here, we resolve this issue and present a simple and rapid manipulation method for single CTCs using a photopolymerized hydrogel, polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), which is useful for subsequent genetic analysis. First, PEGDA was introduced into the cells entrapped on the microcavity array. Then, excitation light was projected onto the target single cells for encapsulation of each CTC by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The encapsulated single CTCs could be visualized by the naked eye and easily handled with tweezers. The single CTCs were only partially encapsulated on the PEGDA hydrogel, which allowed for sufficient whole-genome amplification and accurate genotyping. Our proposed methodology is a valuable tool for the rapid and simple manipulation of single CTCs and is expected to become widely utilized for analyses of mammalian cells and microorganisms in addition to CTCs.

  2. Nanocellulose-alginate hydrogel for cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsung; Lee, Dajung; Hyun, Jinho

    2015-02-13

    TEMPO-oxidized bacterial cellulose (TOBC)-sodium alginate (SA) composites were prepared to improve the properties of hydrogel for cell encapsulation. TOBC fibers were obtained using a TEMPO/NaBr/NaClO system at pH 10 and room temperature. The fibrillated TOBCs mixed with SA were cross-linked in the presence of Ca(2+) solution to form hydrogel composites. The compression strength and chemical stability of the TOBC/SA composites were increased compared with the SA hydrogel, which indicated that TOBC performed an important function in enhancing the structural, mechanical and chemical stability of the composites. Cells were successfully encapsulated in the TOBC/SA composites, and the viability of cells was investigated. TOBC/SA composites can be a potential candidate for cell encapsulation engineering.

  3. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microstructures encapsulating living cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Won-Gun; Revzin, Alexander; Pishko, Michael V

    2002-04-02

    We present an easy and effective method for the encapsulation of cells inside PEG-based hydrogel microstructures fabricated using photolithography. High-density arrays of three-dimensional microstructures were created on substrates using this method. Mammalian cells were encapsulated in cylindrical hydrogel microstructures of 600 and 50 micrometers in diameter or in cubic hydrogel structures in microfluidic channels. Reducing lateral dimension of the individual hydrogel microstructure to 50 micrometers allowed us to isolate 1-3 cells per microstructure. Viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable inside these hydrogels after encapsulation for up to 7 days.

  4. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microstructures encapsulating living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, Won-Gun; Revzin, Alexander; Pishko, Michael V.

    2002-01-01

    We present an easy and effective method for the encapsulation of cells inside PEG-based hydrogel microstructures fabricated using photolithography. High-density arrays of three-dimensional microstructures were created on substrates using this method. Mammalian cells were encapsulated in cylindrical hydrogel microstructures of 600 and 50 micrometers in diameter or in cubic hydrogel structures in microfluidic channels. Reducing lateral dimension of the individual hydrogel microstructure to 50 micrometers allowed us to isolate 1-3 cells per microstructure. Viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable inside these hydrogels after encapsulation for up to 7 days.

  5. Tumor Growth Suppression Induced by Biomimetic Silk Fibroin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Ribeiro, Viviana P.; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Correia, Cristina; da Silva Morais, Alain; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui M.; Oliveira, Ana L.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Reis, Rui L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-based hydrogels with distinct conformations which enable encapsulation or differentiation of cells are of great interest in 3D cancer research models. Conformational changes may cause macroscopic shifts in the hydrogels, allowing for its use as biosensors and drug carriers. In depth knowledge on how 3D conformational changes in proteins may affect cell fate and tumor formation is required. Thus, this study reports an enzymatically crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel system that can undergo intrinsic conformation changes from random coil to β-sheet conformation. In random coil status, the SF hydrogels are transparent, elastic, and present ionic strength and pH stimuli-responses. The random coil hydrogels become β-sheet conformation after 10 days in vitro incubation and 14 days in vivo subcutaneous implantation in rat. When encapsulated with ATDC-5 cells, the random coil SF hydrogel promotes cell survival up to 7 days, whereas the subsequent β-sheet transition induces cell apoptosis in vitro. HeLa cells are further incorporated in SF hydrogels and the constructs are investigated in vitro and in an in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane model for tumor formation. In vivo, Angiogenesis and tumor formation are suppressed in SF hydrogels. Therefore, these hydrogels provide new insights for cancer research and uses of biomaterials. PMID:27485515

  6. Tumor Growth Suppression Induced by Biomimetic Silk Fibroin Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Ribeiro, Viviana P.; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Correia, Cristina; da Silva Morais, Alain; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui M.; Oliveira, Ana L.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Reis, Rui L.

    2016-08-01

    Protein-based hydrogels with distinct conformations which enable encapsulation or differentiation of cells are of great interest in 3D cancer research models. Conformational changes may cause macroscopic shifts in the hydrogels, allowing for its use as biosensors and drug carriers. In depth knowledge on how 3D conformational changes in proteins may affect cell fate and tumor formation is required. Thus, this study reports an enzymatically crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel system that can undergo intrinsic conformation changes from random coil to β-sheet conformation. In random coil status, the SF hydrogels are transparent, elastic, and present ionic strength and pH stimuli-responses. The random coil hydrogels become β-sheet conformation after 10 days in vitro incubation and 14 days in vivo subcutaneous implantation in rat. When encapsulated with ATDC-5 cells, the random coil SF hydrogel promotes cell survival up to 7 days, whereas the subsequent β-sheet transition induces cell apoptosis in vitro. HeLa cells are further incorporated in SF hydrogels and the constructs are investigated in vitro and in an in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane model for tumor formation. In vivo, Angiogenesis and tumor formation are suppressed in SF hydrogels. Therefore, these hydrogels provide new insights for cancer research and uses of biomaterials.

  7. Microscale Strategies for Generating Cell-Encapsulating Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Selimović, Šeila; Oh, Jonghyun; Bae, Hojae; Dokmeci, Mehmet; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogels in which cells are encapsulated are of great potential interest for tissue engineering applications. These gels provide a structure inside which cells can spread and proliferate. Such structures benefit from controlled microarchitectures that can affect the behavior of the enclosed cells. Microfabrication-based techniques are emerging as powerful approaches to generate such cell-encapsulating hydrogel structures. In this paper we introduce common hydrogels and their crosslinking methods and review the latest microscale approaches for generation of cell containing gel particles. We specifically focus on microfluidics-based methods and on techniques such as micromolding and electrospinning. PMID:23626908

  8. Encapsulation of 10-hydroxy camptothecin in supramolecular hydrogel as an injectable drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixin; Shu, Chang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Hui; Xu, Danke; Zhong, Wenying

    2015-07-01

    10-Hydroxy camptothecin (HCPT) has been proven to be a cell cycle-specific chemotherapeutic agent, which is a necessary choice to inhibit tumor residue growth and prevent tumor metastasis after surgery. But it suffers from light decomposition, poor solubility, relatively low bioavailability, and some side effects, which are the major obstacles toward its clinical use. Integration of hydrophobic HCPT with hydrophilic hydrogel is a facile approach to change the disadvantageous situation of HCPT. In this study, a novel supramolecular hydrogelator with improved synthetic strategy was triggered by chemical hydrolysis, and then self-assembled to hydrogel. Taking advantage of the high-equilibrium solubility of HCPT in hydrogelator solution, this hydrogel was utilized to load HCPT via encapsulation as an effective carrier. HCPT hydrogels were characterized by several techniques including transmission electronic microscopy, rheology, and UV spectroscopy. In vitro release experiment indicated HCPT hydrogel could maintain long term and sustained release of HCPT at high accumulated rate. 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that HCPT hydrogel had an optimized anticancer efficacy. Besides, with prominent physical properties of carrier, HCPT hydrogel possessed satisfactory stability, syringeability, and recoverability, demonstrating itself as a potential localized injectable drug delivery system.

  9. Encapsulation optimization of lemon balm antioxidants in calcium alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Najafi-Soulari, Samira; Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2016-11-01

    Calcium alginate hydrogel beads were used to encapsulate lemon balm extract. Chitosan layer was used to investigate the effect of hydrogel coating. To determine the interactions of antioxidant compounds of extract with encapsulation materials and its stability, microstructure of hydrogel beads was thoroughly monitored using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Total polyphenols content and antiradical activity of lemon balm extract were also evaluated before and after encapsulation. Three significant parameters (lemon balm extract, sodium alginate, and calcium chloride concentrations) were optimized by response surface methodology to obtain maximum encapsulation efficiency. The FTIR spectra showed no interactions between extract and polymers as there were no new band in spectra of alginate hydrogel after encapsulation of active compounds of lemon balm extract. The antioxidant activity of lemon balm extract did not change after encapsulation. Therefore, it was found that alginate is a suitable material for encapsulation of natural antioxidants. Sodium alginate solution concentration, 1.84%, lemon balm extract concentration, 0.4%, and calcium chloride concentration, 0.2% was determined to be the optimum condition to reach maximum encapsulation efficiency.

  10. Peptide hydrogelation and cell encapsulation for 3D culture of MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongzhou; Ding, Ying; Sun, Xiuzhi S; Nguyen, Thu A

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture plays an invaluable role in tumor biology by providing in vivo like microenviroment and responses to therapeutic agents. Among many established 3D scaffolds, hydrogels demonstrate a distinct property as matrics for 3D cell culture. Most of the existing pre-gel solutions are limited under physiological conditions such as undesirable pH or temperature. Here, we report a peptide hydrogel that shows superior physiological properties as an in vitro matrix for 3D cell culture. The 3D matrix can be accomplished by mixing a self-assembling peptide directly with a cell culture medium without any pH or temperature adjustment. Results of dynamic rheological studies showed that this hydrogel can be delivered multiple times via pipetting without permanently destroying the hydrogel architecture, indicating the deformability and remodeling ability of the hydrogel. Human epithelial cancer cells, MCF-7, are encapsulated homogeneously in the hydrogel matrix during hydrogelation. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture, cells residing in the hydrogel matrix grow as tumor-like clusters in 3D formation. Relevant parameters related to cell morphology, survival, proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed using MCF-7 cells in 3D hydrogels. Interestingly, treatment of cisplatin, an anti-cancer drug, can cause a significant decrease of cell viability of MCF-7 clusters in hydrogels. The responses to cisplatin were dose- and time-dependent, indicating the potential usage of hydrogels for drug testing. Results of confocal microscopy and Western blotting showed that cells isolated from hydrogels are suitable for downstream proteomic analysis. The results provided evidence that this peptide hydrogel is a promising 3D cell culture material for drug testing.

  11. Critical factors affecting cell encapsulation in superporous hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Desai, Esha S; Tang, Mary Y; Ross, Amy E; Gemeinhart, Richard A

    2012-04-01

    We recently showed that superporous hydrogel (SPH) scaffolds promote long-term stem cell viability and cell driven mineralization when cells were seeded within the pores of pre-fabricated SPH scaffolds. The possibility of cell encapsulation within the SPH matrix during its fabrication was further explored in this study. The impact of each chemical component used in SPH fabrication and each step of the fabrication process on cell viability was systematically examined. Ammonium persulfate, an initiator, and sodium bicarbonate, the gas-generating compound, were the two components having significant toxicity toward encapsulated cells at the concentrations necessary for SPH fabrication. Cell survival rates were 55.7% ± 19.3% and 88.8% ± 9.4% after 10 min exposure to ammonium persulfate and sodium bicarbonate solutions, respectively. In addition, solution pH change via the addition of sodium bicarbonate had significant toxicity toward encapsulated cells with cell survival of only 50.3% ± 2.5%. Despite toxicity of chemical components and the SPH fabrication method, cells still exhibited significant overall survival rates within SPHs of 81.2% ± 6.8% and 67.0% ± 0.9%, respectively, 48 and 72 h after encapsulation. This method of cell encapsulation holds promise for use in vitro and in vivo as a scaffold material for both hydrogel matrix encapsulation and cell seeding within the pores.

  12. Fibrous Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation: A Modular and Supramolecular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk-Biegun, Małgorzata K.; Farbod, Kambiz; Werten, Marc W. T.; Slingerland, Cornelis J.; de Wolf, Frits A.; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C. G.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Kamperman, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Artificial 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems, which mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM), hold great potential as models to study cellular processes under controlled conditions. The natural ECM is a 3D structure composed of a fibrous hydrogel that provides both mechanical and biochemical cues to instruct cell behavior. Here we present an ECM-mimicking genetically engineered protein-based hydrogel as a 3D cell culture system that combines several key features: (1) Mild and straightforward encapsulation meters (1) ease of ut I am not so sure.encapsulation of the cells, without the need of an external crosslinker. (2) Supramolecular assembly resulting in a fibrous architecture that recapitulates some of the unique mechanical characteristics of the ECM, i.e. strain-stiffening and self-healing behavior. (3) A modular approach allowing controlled incorporation of the biochemical cue density (integrin binding RGD domains). We tested the gels by encapsulating MG-63 osteoblastic cells and found that encapsulated cells not only respond to higher RGD density, but also to overall gel concentration. Cells in 1% and 2% (weight fraction) protein gels showed spreading and proliferation, provided a relative RGD density of at least 50%. In contrast, in 4% gels very little spreading and proliferation occurred, even for a relative RGD density of 100%. The independent control over both mechanical and biochemical cues obtained in this modular approach renders our hydrogels suitable to study cellular responses under highly defined conditions. PMID:27223105

  13. The Diffusive Properties of Hydrogel Microcapsules for Cell Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Lavin, D M; Bintz, B E; Thanos, C G

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogel microcapsules have been used for decades to encapsulate cells and treat diseases ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to more systemic applications like Type I Diabetes. This cell encapsulation modality has been developed through more cumulative experiments than perhaps any other, owing to the relative ease of accessing the required materials, the commercial availability of droplet-generating instrumentation, and the mild microenvironment and unique permeability properties of hydrogels that are difficult to attain with alternative encapsulation systems employing thermoplastic materials. Because of their size and shape, microcapsules have an inherent advantage over macroencapsulation devices due to the more favorable surface area to volume ratio, which allows for greater efficiency in the amount of cellular cargo that is entrapped and enhanced nutrient exchange and efflux of secreted products. Unfortunately, with this significant positive benefit comes the caveat of difficult or impractical retrievability, highlighting the paradox that is particularly relevant as differentiated stem cell sources become more readily available. This chapter focuses on several techniques that can be used to evaluate the permeability and pore structure of hydrogel microcapsules, including a simplistic model for describing the diffusive behavior of alginate-polycation-alginate (APA) microcapsules with a liquid core, and an ancillary method to evaluate the ultrastructure of the APA membrane including morphometric analysis.

  14. Biocompatible Hydrogels for Microarray Cell Printing and Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Datar, Akshata; Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-01-01

    Conventional drug screening processes are a time-consuming and expensive endeavor, but highly rewarding when they are successful. To identify promising lead compounds, millions of compounds are traditionally screened against therapeutic targets on human cells grown on the surface of 96-wells. These two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayers are physiologically irrelevant, thus, often providing false-positive or false-negative results, when compared to cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) structures such as hydrogel droplets. However, 3D cell culture systems are not easily amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS), thus inherently low throughput, and requiring relatively large volume for cell-based assays. In addition, it is difficult to control cellular microenvironments and hard to obtain reliable cell images due to focus position and transparency issues. To overcome these problems, miniaturized 3D cell cultures in hydrogels were developed via cell printing techniques where cell spots in hydrogels can be arrayed on the surface of glass slides or plastic chips by microarray spotters and cultured in growth media to form cells encapsulated 3D droplets for various cell-based assays. These approaches can dramatically reduce assay volume, provide accurate control over cellular microenvironments, and allow us to obtain clear 3D cell images for high-content imaging (HCI). In this review, several hydrogels that are compatible to microarray printing robots are discussed for miniaturized 3D cell cultures. PMID:26516921

  15. Biocompatible Hydrogels for Microarray Cell Printing and Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Datar, Akshata; Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-10-26

    Conventional drug screening processes are a time-consuming and expensive endeavor, but highly rewarding when they are successful. To identify promising lead compounds, millions of compounds are traditionally screened against therapeutic targets on human cells grown on the surface of 96-wells. These two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayers are physiologically irrelevant, thus, often providing false-positive or false-negative results, when compared to cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) structures such as hydrogel droplets. However, 3D cell culture systems are not easily amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS), thus inherently low throughput, and requiring relatively large volume for cell-based assays. In addition, it is difficult to control cellular microenvironments and hard to obtain reliable cell images due to focus position and transparency issues. To overcome these problems, miniaturized 3D cell cultures in hydrogels were developed via cell printing techniques where cell spots in hydrogels can be arrayed on the surface of glass slides or plastic chips by microarray spotters and cultured in growth media to form cells encapsulated 3D droplets for various cell-based assays. These approaches can dramatically reduce assay volume, provide accurate control over cellular microenvironments, and allow us to obtain clear 3D cell images for high-content imaging (HCI). In this review, several hydrogels that are compatible to microarray printing robots are discussed for miniaturized 3D cell cultures.

  16. A microfluidic approach to encapsulate living cells in uniform alginate hydrogel microparticles.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Carlos J; Kim, Jin Woong; Ye, Congwang; Ortiz, Idelise; Rowat, Amy C; Marquez, Manuel; Weitz, David

    2012-07-01

    A microfluidic technique is described to encapsulate living cells in alginate hydrogel microparticles generated from monodisperse double-emulsion templates. A microcapillary device is used to fabricate double emulsion templates composed of an alginate drop surrounded by a mineral oil shell. Hydrogel formation begins when the alginate drop separates from the mineral oil shell and comes into contact with Ca(2+) ions in the continuous phase. Alginate hydrogel microparticles with diameters ranging from 60 to 230 µm are obtained. 65% of the cells encapsulated in the alginate microparticles were viable after one week. The technique provides a useful means to encapsulate the living cells in monodisperse hydrogel microparticles.

  17. Dextran-based hydrogel formed by thiol-Michael addition reaction for 3D cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen Qi; Wei, Zhao; Zhu, Xv Long; Huang, Guo You; Xu, Feng; Yang, Jian Hai; Osada, Yoshihito; Zrínyi, Miklós; Li, Jian Hui; Chen, Yong Mei

    2015-04-01

    Cell encapsulation in three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels can mimic native cell microenvironment and plays a major role in cell-based transplantation therapies. In this contribution, a novel in situ-forming hydrogel, Dex-l-DTT hydrogel ("l" means "linked-by"), by cross-linking glycidyl methacrylate derivatized dextran (Dex-GMA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) under physiological conditions, has been developed using thiol-Michael addition reaction. The mechanical properties, gelation process and degree of swelling of the hydrogel can be easily adjusted by changing the pH of phosphate buffer saline. The 3D cell encapsulation ability is demonstrated by encapsulating rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts into the in situ-forming hydrogel with maintained high viability. The BMSCs also maintain their differentiation potential after encapsulation. These results demonstrate that the Dex-l-DTT hydrogel holds great potential for biomedical field.

  18. In situ crosslinkable elastomeric hydrogel for long-term cell encapsulation for cardiac applications.

    PubMed

    Komeri, Remya; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2016-12-01

    The regenerative therapy of tissues relays on successful cell transplantation and engraftment. Soft hydrogel carriers are employed to protect transplanted cells from harmful microenvironment in soft tissue regeneration. Herein an injectable, porous, biodegradable, bioresorbable, and elastomeric hydrogel fabricated from poly(propylene fumarate-co-sebacate-co-ethylene glycol) crosslinked with PEGDA for cardiomyoblast encapsulation was reported. The hydrogel retains adequate mechanical property in the range of native myocardium even after 30 days of degradation (49 ± 0.008 kPa). The hydrogel shows maximum extensibility without collapsing even under 60% compression. The hydrogel retains 70.58% equilibrium water content, wide internal porosity, and slow bulk degradation favorable for cell carriers. The cardiomyoblast cells encapsulated in hydrogel retains viability even after 30 days of culture. The long-term viability and proliferation studies of encapsulated cells in the hydrogel substantiate the suitability of hydrogel microenvironment for cell survival. The present hydrogel is a potential cell carrier with favorable physical and biological properties for cell encapsulation for cardiac applications. The candidate hydrogels perform better than the other reported elastomeric hydrogels fabricated for cell therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2936-2944, 2016.

  19. In Situ "Clickable" Zwitterionic Starch-Based Hydrogel for 3D Cell Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dianyu; Li, Junjie; Cui, Man; Wang, Jinmei; Zhou, Yuhang; Luo, Liu; Wei, Yufei; Ye, Lei; Sun, Hong; Yao, Fanglian

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell encapsulation in hydrogel provides superb methods to investigate the biochemical cues in directing cellular fate and behaviors outside the organism, the primary step of which is to establish suitable "blank platform" to mimic and simplify native ECM microenvironment. In this study, zwitterionic starch-based "clickable" hydrogels were fabricated via a "copper- and light- free" Michael-type "thiol-ene" addition reaction between acylated-modified sulfobetaine-derived starch (SB-ST-A) and dithiol-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-SH). By incorporating antifouling SB-ST and PEG, the hydrogel system would be excellently protected from nontarget protein adsorption to act as a "blank platform". The hydrogels could rapidly gel under physiological conditions in less than 7 min. Dynamic rheology experiments suggested the stiffness of the hydrogel was close to the native tissues, and the mechanical properties as well as the gelation times and swelling behaviors could be easily tuned by varying the precursor proportions. The protein and cell adhesion assays demonstrated that the hydrogel surface could effectively resist nonspecific protein and cell adhesion. The degradation study in vitro confirmed that the hydrogel was biodegradable. A549 cells encapsulated in the hydrogel maintained high viability (up to 93%) and started to proliferate in number and extend in morphology after 2 days' culture. These results indicated the hydrogel presented here could be a potential candidate as "blank platform" for 3D cell encapsulation and biochemical cues induced cellular behavior investigation in vitro.

  20. Encapsulation of lactase (β-galactosidase) into κ-carrageenan-based hydrogel beads: Impact of environmental conditions on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zipei; Zhang, Ruojie; Chen, Long; McClements, David Julian

    2016-06-01

    Encapsulation of enzymes in hydrogel beads may improve their utilization and activity in foods. In this study, the potential of carrageenan hydrogel beads for encapsulating β-galactosidase was investigated. Hydrogel beads were fabricated by injecting an aqueous solution, containing β-galactosidase (26 U) and carrageenan (1 wt%), into a hardening solution (5% potassium chloride). Around 63% of the β-galactosidase was initially encapsulated in the hydrogel beads. Encapsulated β-galactosidase had a higher activity than that of the free enzyme over a range of pH and thermal conditions, which was attributed to the stabilization of the enzyme structure by K(+) ions within the carrageenan beads. Release of the enzyme from the beads was observed during storage in aqueous solutions, which was attributed to the relatively large pore size of the hydrogel matrix. Our results suggest that carrageenan hydrogel beads may be useful encapsulation systems, but further work is needed to inhibit enzyme leakage.

  1. Alginate-hydroxypropylcellulose hydrogel microbeads for alkaline phosphatase encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Karewicz, A; Zasada, K; Bielska, D; Douglas, T E L; Jansen, J A; Leeuwenburgh, S C G; Nowakowska, M

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using proteins as therapeutics agents. Unfortunately, they suffer from limited stability and bioavailability. We aimed to develop a new delivery system for proteins. ALP, a model protein, was successfully encapsulated in the physically cross-linked sodium alginate/hydroxypropylcellulose (ALG-HPC) hydrogel microparticles. The obtained objects had regular, spherical shape and a diameter of ∼4 µm, as confirmed by optical microscopy and SEM analysis. The properties of the obtained microbeads could be controlled by temperature and additional coating or crosslinking procedures. The slow, sustained release of ALP in its active form with no initial burst effect was observed for chitosan-coated microspheres at pH = 7.4 and 37 °C. Activity of ALP released from ALG/HPC microspheres was confirmed by the occurance of effectively induced mineralization. SEM and AFM images revealed formation of the interpenetrated three-dimensional network of mineral, originating from the microbeads' surfaces. FTIR and XRD analyses confirmed formation of hydroxyapatite.

  2. Cell-selective encapsulation in hydrogel sheaths via biospecific identification and biochemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Liu, Yang; Sengoku, Mikako; Taya, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Selective encapsulation of a particular cell population from heterogeneous cell populations has potential applications such as studies in cell-to-cell communication, regenerative medicine, and cell therapies. However, there are no versatile methods for realizing this. Here we report a method based on biospecific identification of the target cells through antigen-antibody reaction and subsequent enzymatic hydrogel sheath formation on the cell surfaces by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Human hepatoma cell line HepG2 cells were selectively encapsulated in alginate-based hydrogel sheath from the mixture with mouse embryo fibroblast-like cell line 10T1/2 fibroblasts using anti-human CD326 antibody conjugated with HRP. The viability of the encapsulated cells was 93%. The cells released at 6 days of the encapsulation by degrading the sheath using alginate lyase grew almost the same as those free from encapsulation. The versatility of the method was confirmed using another antibody, cells, and hydrogel sheath material: Only human vein endothelial cells were encapsulated in gelatin-based hydrogel sheath from the mixture with 10T1/2 fibroblasts using anti-human CD31 antibody conjugated with HRP. The cell-selective encapsulation was also achieved by a system using a primary antibody with a secondary antibody conjugated with HRP.

  3. Injectable, Biomolecule-Responsive Polypeptide Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation and Facile Cell Recovery through Triggered Degradation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinghua; He, Chaoliang; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Kaixuan; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-11-16

    Injectable hydrogels have been widely investigated in biomedical applications, and increasing demand has been proposed to achieve dynamic regulation of physiological properties of hydrogels. Herein, a new type of injectable and biomolecule-responsive hydrogel based on poly(l-glutamic acid) (PLG) grafted with disulfide bond-modified phloretic acid (denoted as PLG-g-CPA) was developed. The hydrogels formed in situ via enzymatic cross-linking under physiological conditions in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. The physiochemical properties of the hydrogels, including gelation time and the rheological property, were measured. Particularly, the triggered degradation of the hydrogel in response to a reductive biomolecule, glutathione (GSH), was investigated in detail. The mechanical strength and inner porous structure of the hydrogel were influenced by the addition of GSH. The polypeptide hydrogel was used as a three-dimensional (3D) platform for cell encapsulation, which could release the cells through triggered disruption of the hydrogel in response to the addition of GSH. The cells released from the hydrogel were found to maintain high viability. Moreover, after subcutaneous injection into rats, the PLG-g-CPA hydrogels with disulfide-containing cross-links exhibited a markedly faster degradation behavior in vivo compared to that of the PLG hydrogels without disulfide cross-links, implying an interesting accelerated degradation process of the disulfide-containing polypeptide hydrogels in the physiological environment in vivo. Overall, the injectable and biomolecule-responsive polypeptide hydrogels may serve as a potential platform for 3D cell culture and easy cell collection.

  4. HAp granules encapsulated oxidized alginate-gelatin-biphasic calcium phosphate hydrogel for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Avik; Amirian, Jhaleh; Min, Young Ki; Lee, Byong Taek

    2015-11-01

    Bone repair in the critical size defect zone using 3D hydrogel scaffold is still a challenge in tissue engineering field. A novel type of hydrogel scaffold combining ceramic and polymer materials, therefore, was fabricated to meet this challenge. In this study, oxidized alginate-gelatin-biphasic calcium phosphate (OxAlg-Gel-BCP) and spherical hydroxyapatite (HAp) granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel complex were fabricated using freeze-drying method. Detailed morphological and material characterizations of OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel (OGB00), 25wt% and 35wt% granules encapsulated hydrogel (OGB25 and OGB35) were carried out for micro-structure, porosity, chemical constituents, and compressive stress analysis. Cell viability, cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation behavior of rat bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC) on OGB00, OGB25 and OGB35 scaffolds were confirmed by MTT assay, Live-Dead assay, and confocal imaging in vitro experiments. Finally, OGB00 and OGB25 hydrogel scaffolds were implanted in the critical size defect of rabbit femoral chondyle for 4 and 8 weeks. The micro-CT analysis and histological studies conducted by H&E and Masson's trichrome demonstrated that a significantly higher (***p<0.001) and earlier bone formation happened in case of 25% HAp granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel than in OxAlg-Gel-BCP complex alone. All results taken together, HAp granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP system can be a promising 3D hydrogel scaffold for the healing of a critical bone defect.

  5. Enzymatically triggered peptide hydrogels for 3D cell encapsulation and culture.

    PubMed

    Szkolar, Laura; Guilbaud, Jean-Baptiste; Miller, Aline F; Gough, Julie E; Saiani, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using enzymatically triggered peptide hydrogels for the encapsulation and culture of cells. Based on recent work done on the enzymatically triggered gelation of FEFK (F, phenylalanine; E, glutamic acid; K, lysine) using thermolysin, a protease enzyme from Bacillus Thermoproteolyticus Rokko, we have investigated the possibility of using this gelation triggering mechanism to encapsulate cells within a 3D hydrogel matrix. First, the properties of enzymatically triggered hydrogels prepared in phosphate buffer solution were investigated and compared with the properties of hydrogels prepared in HPLC grade water from our previous work. We showed that the use of phosphate buffer solution allowed the production of hydrogels with very high shear moduli (>1 MPa). The gelation kinetics was also investigated, and the mechanical properties of the system were shown to closely follow the synthesis of the octapeptide by the enzyme through reverse hydrolysis. In a second phase, we developed, on the basis of information acquired, a facile protocol for the encapsulation of cells and plating of the hydrogel. Human dermal fibroblasts were then used to exemplify the use of these materials. FEFEFKFK octapeptide hydrogels prepared under the same conditions and with the same mechanical properties were used as a control. We showed that no significant differences were observed between the two systems and that after a decrease in cell number on day 1, cells start to proliferate. After 5 days of culture, the cells can be seen to start to adopt a stretched morphology typical of fibroblasts. The results clearly show that the protocol developed minimises the potential detrimental effect that thermolysin can have on the cells and that these enzymatically triggered hydrogels can be used for the 3D encapsulation and culture of cells.

  6. Covalently crosslinked chitosan hydrogel: properties of in vitro degradation and chondrocyte encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi; Song, Haiqing; Gong, Yihong; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou; Shen, Jiacong

    2007-01-01

    In vitro degradation and chondrocyte-encapsulation of chitosan hydrogel made of crosslinkable and water-soluble chitosan derivative (CML) at neutral pH and body temperature were studied with respect to weight loss, cytoviability, DNA content and cell morphology. In vitro degradation of the chitosan hydrogels was sensitive to their crosslinking degree and existence of lysozyme in the solution. Chitosan hydrogel (Gel-I5) fabricated from 1% CML and 5mM ammonium persulfate (APS)/N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) displayed no degradation in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) after 18d, but degraded completely at 8d in 1mg/ml lysozyme/PBS. The chitosan hydrogel fabricated from 10mM APS/TMEDA was non-degradable even in lysozyme/PBS solution after 18d. The hydrogel loaded with chondrocytes in cell culture medium, however, was susceptible to degradation during the in vitro culture. In vitro culture of the encapsulated chondrocytes in the chitosan hydrogel demonstrated that the cells retained round shaped morphology and could survive through a 12d-culture period, although the DNA assay detected an overall reduction of the cell number. These features provide a great opportunity to use the chitosan hydrogel as an injectable scaffold in tissue engineering and orthopaedics.

  7. Injectable and Self-Healing Carbohydrate-Based Hydrogel for Cell Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shaoyu; Gao, Chunmei; Xu, Xiubin; Bai, Xiao; Duan, Haogang; Gao, Nannan; Feng, Chen; Xiong, Yun; Liu, Mingzhu

    2015-06-17

    With the fast development of cell therapy, there has been a shift toward the development of injectable hydrogels as cell carriers that can overcome current limitations in cell therapy. However, the hydrogels are prone to damage during use, inducing cell apoptosis. Therefore, this study was carried out to develop an injectable and self-healing hydrogel based on chondroitin sulfate multiple aldehyde (CSMA) and N-succinyl-chitosan (SC). By varying the CSMA to SC ratio, the hydrogel stiffness, water content, and kinetics of gelation could be controlled. Gelation readily occurred at physiological conditions, predominantly due to a Schiff base reaction between the aldehyde groups on CSMA and amino groups on SC. Meanwhile, because of the dynamic equilibrium of Schiff base linkage, the hydrogel was found to be self-healing. Cells encapsulated in the hydrogel remained viable and metabolically active. In addition, the hydrogel produced minimal inflammatory response when injected subcutaneously in a rat model and showed biodegradability in vivo. This work establishes an injectable and self-healing hydrogel derived from carbohydrates with potential applications as a cell carrier and in tissue engineering.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell and gelatin microparticle encapsulation in thermally and chemically gelling injectable hydrogels for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tzouanas, Stephanie N; Ekenseair, Adam K; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we investigated the viability and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated with gelatin microparticles (GMPs) in an injectable, chemically and thermally gelling hydrogel system combining poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based thermogelling macromers containing pendant epoxy rings with polyamidoamine-based hydrophilic and degradable diamine crosslinking macromers. Specifically, we studied how the parameters of GMP size and loading ratio affected the viability and differentiation of cells encapsulated within the hydrogel. We also examined the effects of cell and GMP co-encapsulation on hydrogel mineralization. Cells demonstrated long-term viability within the hydrogels, which was shown to depend on GMP size and loading ratio. In particular, increased interaction of cells and GMPs through greater available GMP surface area, use of an epoxy-based chemical gelation mechanism, and the tunable high water content of the thermogelled hydrogels led to favorable long-term cell viability. Compared with cellular hydrogels without GMPs, hydrogels co-encapsulating cells and GMPs demonstrated greater production of alkaline phosphatase by cells at all time-points and a transient early enhancement of hydrogel mineralization for larger GMPs at higher loading ratios. Such injectable, in situ forming hydrogels capable of delivering and maintaining populations of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells and promoting mineralization in vitro offer promise as novel therapies for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  9. Fabrication of hydrogel-encapsulated silica core bound with chitosan chains for efficient drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeol Bae, Saet; Lee, Sang Wha

    2016-06-01

    In this study, hydrogel-encapsulated silica nanoparticles were facilely prepared through the following three consecutive steps: i) silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized via a sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) with ammonium hydroxide, ii) the resulting SNPs were functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propylmethacrylate (TPM) ligand with an olefin group, and iii) the TPM-functionalized SNPs were encapsulated with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid), NIPAM-co-AAc hydrogels by using a radical polymerization reaction of the co-monomers at the following ratio: \\text{NIPAM}:\\text{AAc} = 91:9 wt %. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the encapsulated hydrogels with a moiety of carboxylic groups was slightly above physiological temperature and they demonstrated a thermo-sensitive variation of particle size. The hydrogel-encapsulated SNPs (SNPs@Hyd) were finally bound with chitosan chains, which are bio-friendly and non-toxic polymers. When compared to SNPs@Hyd, chitosan-coated SNPs@Hyd (SNPs@Hyd@Chi) exhibited prolonged drug (ibuprofen) release and stable structural integrity during the release test.

  10. Programmable Self-Assembly of DNA-Protein Hybrid Hydrogel for Enzyme Encapsulation with Enhanced Biological Stability.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lan; Chen, Qiaoshu; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Huang, Jin; Li, Li; Guo, Xi; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Kemin

    2016-04-11

    A DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel was constructed based on a programmable assembly approach, which served as a biomimetic physiologic matrix for efficient enzyme encapsulation. A dsDNA building block tailored with precise biotin residues was fabricated based on supersandwich hybridization, and then the addition of streptavidin triggered the formation of the DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel. The biocompatible hydrogel, which formed a flower-like porous structure that was 6.7 ± 2.1 μm in size, served as a reservoir system for enzyme encapsulation. Alcohol oxidase (AOx), which served as a representative enzyme, was encapsulated in the hybrid hydrogel using a synchronous assembly approach. The enzyme-encapsulated hydrogel was utilized to extend the duration time for ethanol removal in serum plasma and the enzyme retained 78% activity after incubation with human serum for 24 h. The DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel can mediate the intact immobilization on a streptavidin-modified and positively charged substrate, which is very beneficial to solid-phase biosensing applications. The hydrogel-encapsulated enzyme exhibited improved stability in the presence of various denaturants. For example, the encapsulated enzyme retained 60% activity after incubation at 55 °C for 30 min. The encapsulated enzyme also retains its total activity after five freeze-thaw cycles and even suspended in solution containing organic solvents.

  11. Injectable Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel: Effects of Hydrophobic Drug Encapsulation and Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jessie; Stewart, Brandon; Litan, Alisa; Langhans, Sigrid; Schneider, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.

    2015-03-01

    We successfully encapsulated and continuously delivered a hydrophobic drug over the course of a month at effective, significant concentrations in a beta-hairpin peptide network that self-assembles into a shear-thinning injectable solid with immediate rehealing behavior. The peptidic network of the hydrogel is a result of the entangled and branched fibrillar nanostructure. This nanostructure protects the hydrophobic drug in an aqueous environment, while still maintaining original hydrogel network structures and properties. The characterization of the location and effect of the drug on the overall hydrogel properties over time are important to understand for future encapsulations of similarly hydrophobic payloads. The characterization techniques used to better understand the release and properties of the drug-gel constructs include rheology, small angle x-ray and neutron scattering, and in vitro methods.

  12. Encapsulation and culture of mammalian cells including corneal cells in alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Nicola C; Grover, Liam M

    2013-01-01

    The potential of cell therapy for the regeneration of diseased and damaged tissues is now widely -recognized. As a consequence there is a demand for the development of novel systems that can deliver cells to a particular location, maintaining viability, and then degrade at a predictable rate to release the cells into the surrounding tissues. Hydrogels have attracted much attention in this area, as the hydrogel structure provides an environment that is akin to that of the extracellular matrix. One widely investigated hydrogel is alginate, which has been used for cell encapsulation for more than 30 years. Alginate gels have the potential to be used as 3D cell culture systems and as prosthetic materials, both are applied to regeneration of the cornea. Here, we describe an alginate-based process that has been used for encapsulation of mammalian cells including corneal cells, with high levels of viability, and which allows subsequent retrieval of cell cultures for further characterization.

  13. Developing robust, hydrogel-based, nanofiber-enabled encapsulation devices (NEEDs) for cell therapies.

    PubMed

    An, Duo; Ji, Yewei; Chiu, Alan; Lu, Yen-Chun; Song, Wei; Zhai, Lei; Qi, Ling; Luo, Dan; Ma, Minglin

    2015-01-01

    Cell encapsulation holds enormous potential to treat a number of hormone deficient diseases and endocrine disorders. We report a simple and universal approach to fabricate robust, hydrogel-based, nanofiber-enabled encapsulation devices (NEEDs) with macroscopic dimensions. In this design, we take advantage of the well-known capillary action that holds wetting liquid in porous media. By impregnating the highly porous electrospun nanofiber membranes of pre-made tubular or planar devices with hydrogel precursor solutions and subsequent crosslinking, we obtained various nanofiber-enabled hydrogel devices. This approach is broadly applicable and does not alter the water content or the intrinsic chemistry of the hydrogels. The devices retained the properties of both the hydrogel (e.g. the biocompatibility) and the nanofibers (e.g. the mechanical robustness). The facile mass transfer was confirmed by encapsulation and culture of different types of cells. Additional compartmentalization of the devices enabled paracrine cell co-cultures in single implantable devices. Lastly, we provided a proof-of-concept study on potential therapeutic applications of the devices by encapsulating and delivering rat pancreatic islets into chemically-induced diabetic mice. The diabetes was corrected for the duration of the experiment (8 weeks) before the implants were retrieved. The retrieved devices showed minimal fibrosis and as expected, live and functional islets were observed within the devices. This study suggests that the design concept of NEEDs may potentially help to overcome some of the challenges in the cell encapsulation field and therefore contribute to the development of cell therapies in future.

  14. Time-Dependent Effect of Encapsulating Alginate Hydrogel on Neurogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Khosravizadeh, Zahra; Bahramian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective Due to the restricted potential of neural stem cells for regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) after injury, providing an alternative source for neural stem cells is essential. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent cells with properties suitable for tissue engineering. In addition, alginate hydrogel is a biocompatible polysaccharide polymer that has been used to encapsulate many types of cells. The aim of this study was to assess the proliferation rate and level of expression of neural markers; NESTIN, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in encapsulated human ADSCs (hADSCs) 10 and14 days after neural induction. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, ADSCs isolated from human were cultured in neural induction media and seeded into alginate hydrogel. The rate of proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated cells were evaluated by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, immunocytoflourescent and realtime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyzes 10 and 14 days after induction. Results The rate of proliferation of encapsulated cells was not significantly changed with time passage. The expression of NESTIN and GFAP significantly decreased on day 14 relative to day 10 (P<0.001) but MAP2 expression was increased. Conclusion Alginate hydrogel can promote the neural differentiation of encapsulated hADSCs with time passage. PMID:26199909

  15. Hydrophobic Drug Encapsulation Mechanisms of an Injectable Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jessie E. P.; Schneider, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.

    2012-02-01

    We examined a beta-hairpin peptide network that is a shear thinning injectable solid with immediate rehealing behavior. These rheological properties result from the entangled and branched fibrillar nanostructure of the hydrogel networks. The fibrils are formed by the intramolecular folding and subsequent intermolecular assembly of the self-assembling peptides. Taking advantage of the nanofibrillar peptide structures, the hydrogel can be used to encapsulate curcumin, a hydrophobic, natural anticancer agent and indian spice. The hydrogel shields curcumin from the environment while depositing it exactly where it is intended through syringe injection, taking advantage of the hydrogel shear thinning and rehealing behavior. How the network envelopes and interacts with the curcumin is examined using fluoresence and electron microscopy methods to better understand the exact mechanisms and behaviors of the gel itself and the gel-curcumin construct.

  16. The effects of PEG hydrogel crosslinking density on protein diffusion and encapsulated islet survival and function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Laney M.; Lopez, Christina G.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2010-01-01

    The rational design of immunoprotective hydrogel barriers for transplanting insulin-producing cells requires an understanding of protein diffusion within the hydrogel network and how alterations to the network structure affect protein diffusion. Hydrogels of varying crosslinking density were formed via the chain polymerization of dimethacrylated PEG macromers of varying molecular weight, and the diffusion of six model proteins with molecular weights ranging from 5,700 to 67,000 g/mol was observed in these hydrogel networks. Protein release profiles were used to estimate diffusion coefficients for each protein/gel system that exhibited Fickian diffusion. Diffusion coefficients were on the order of 10−6 to 10−7 cm2/s, such that protein diffusion time scales (td = L2/D) from 0.5 mm thick gels vary from 5 minutes to 24 hours. Adult murine islets were encapsulated in PEG hydrogels of varying crosslinking density, and islet survival and insulin release was maintained after two weeks of culture in each gel condition. While the total insulin released during a one hour glucose stimulation period was the same from islets in each sample, increasing hydrogel crosslinking density contributed to delays in insulin release from hydrogel samples within the one hour stimulation period. PMID:18570315

  17. Cell-mediated remodeling of biomimetic encapsulating hydrogels triggered by adipogenic differentiation of adipose stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Tracy N; Luna, Gabriel; Boctor, Daniel; Fisher, Steven K; Clegg, Dennis O

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common regenerative therapies is autologous fat grafting, which frequently suffers from unexpected volume loss. One approach is to deliver adipose stem cells encapsulated in the engineered hydrogels supportive of cell survival, differentiation, and integration after transplant. We describe an encapsulating, biomimetic poly(ethylene)-glycol hydrogel, with embedded peptides for attachment and biodegradation. Poly(ethylene)-glycol hydrogels containing an Arg–Gly–Asp attachment sequence and a matrix metalloprotease 3/10 cleavage site supported adipose stem cell survival and showed remodeling initiated by adipogenic differentiation. Arg–Gly–Asp–matrix metalloprotease 3/10 cleavage site hydrogels showed an increased number and area of lacunae or holes after adipose stem cell differentiation. Image analysis of adipose stem cells in Arg–Gly–Asp–matrix metalloprotease 3/10 cleavage site hydrogels showed larger Voronoi domains, while cell density remained unchanged. The differentiated adipocytes residing within these newly remodeled spaces express proteins and messenger RNAs indicative of adipocytic differentiation. These engineered scaffolds may provide niches for stem cell differentiation and could prove useful in soft tissue regeneration. PMID:27733898

  18. The incorporation of extracellular matrix proteins in protein polymer hydrogels to improve encapsulated beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Beenken-Rothkopf, Liese N; Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S; Davis, Nicolynn E; Forster, Ryan; Barron, Annelise E; Fontaine, Magali J

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial encapsulation of islets has been proposed to improve the long-term success of islet transplantation by recreating a suitable microenvironment and enhancing cell-matrix interactions that affect cellular function. Protein polymer hydrogels previously showed promise as a biocompatible scaffold by maintaining high cell viability. Here, enzymatically-crosslinked protein polymers were used to investigate the effects of varying scaffold properties and of introducing ECM proteins on the viability and function of encapsulated MIN6 β-cells. Chemical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel were modified by altering the protein concentrations while collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin were incorporated to reestablish cell-matrix interactions lost during cell isolation. Rheology indicated all hydrogels formed quickly, resulting in robust, elastic hydrogels with Young's moduli similar to soft tissue. All hydrogels tested supported both high MIN6 β-cell viability and function and have the potential to serve as an encapsulation platform for islet cell delivery in vivo.

  19. Optimizing Photo-Encapsulation Viability of Heart Valve Cell Types in 3D Printable Composite Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kang, Laura Hockaday; Armstrong, Patrick A; Lee, Lauren Julia; Duan, Bin; Kang, Kevin Heeyong; Butcher, Jonathan Talbot

    2017-02-01

    Photocrosslinking hydrogel technologies are attractive for the biofabrication of cardiovascular soft tissues, but 3D printing success is dependent on multiple variables. In this study we systematically test variables associated with photocrosslinking hydrogels (photoinitiator type, photoinitiator concentration, and light intensity) for their effects on encapsulated cells in an extrusion 3D printable mixture of methacrylated gelatin/poly-ethylene glycol diacrylate/alginate (MEGEL/PEGDA3350/alginate). The fabrication conditions that produced desired hydrogel mechanical properties were compared against those that optimize aortic valve or mesenchymal stem cell viability. In the 3D hydrogel culture environment and fabrication setting studied, Irgacure can increase hydrogel stiffness with a lower proportional decrease in encapsulated cell viability compared to VA086. Human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (HADMSC) survived increasing photoinitiator concentrations in photo-encapsulation conditions better than aortic valve interstitial cells (HAVIC) and aortic valve sinus smooth muscle cells (HASSMC). Within the range of photo-encapsulation fabrication conditions tested with MEGEL/PEGDA/alginate (0.25-1.0% w/v VA086, 0.025-0.1% w/v Irgacure 2959, and 365 nm light intensity 2-136 mW/cm(2)), the highest viabilities achieved were 95, 93, and 93% live for HASSMC, HAVIC, and HADMSC respectively. These results identify parameter combinations that optimize cell viability during 3D printing for multiple cell types. These results also indicate that general oxidative stress is higher in photocrosslinking conditions that induce lower cell viability. However, suppressing this increase in intracellular oxidative stress did not improve cell viability, which suggests that other stress mechanisms also contribute.

  20. Adapting biodegradable oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels for pigment epithelial cell encapsulation and lens regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mimi W; Park, Hansoo; Guo, Xuan; Nakamura, Kenta; Raphael, Robert M; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the encapsulation of newt iris pigment epithelial cells (PECs), which have the ability to regenerate a lens by trans-differentiation in vivo, within a biodegradable hydrogel of oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) crosslinked with poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. Hydrogel beads of initial diameter of 1 mm were fabricated by a molding technique. The swelling ratio and degradation rate of the hydrogel beads decreased with increasing crosslinking ratios. Confocal microscopy confirmed the cytocompatibility of crosslinking hydrogel formulations as evidenced by the viability of an encapsulated model cell line within a crosslinked hydrogel bead. Hydrogel beads encapsulating iris PECs were also implanted into lentectomized newts in vivo; histological evaluation of explants after 30 days revealed a regenerated lens, thus demonstrating that the presence of degrading hydrogel did not adversely affect lens regeneration. The results of this study suggest the potential of a method for lens regeneration involving oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels for iris PEC encapsulation and transplantation.

  1. Encapsulation of PEGylated low-molecular-weight PEI polyplexes in hyaluronic acid hydrogels reduces aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Siegman, Shayne; Truong, Norman F.; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The effective delivery of DNA locally could increase the applicability of gene therapy in tissue regeneration and therapeutic angiogenesis. One promising approach is through use of porous hydrogel scaffolds that incorporate and deliver DNA in the form of nanoparticles to the affected sites. While we have previously reported on Caged nanoparticle Encapsulation (CnE) to load DNA polyplexes within hydrogels at high concentrations without aggregation, frequent issues with limited polyplex release following CnE have been encountered. In this study, we report two alternative approaches to polyplex presentation for decreasing aggregation in porous hydrogels. The first approach reduces polyplex aggregation by utilizing polyethylene glycol modification of the gene carrier polymer polyethyleneimine (sPEG-PEI) to mitigate charge-charge interactions between polyplexes and the scaffold during gelation. The second approach electrostatically presents polyplexes on the surfaces of scaffold pores as opposed to an encapsulated presentation. The sPEG-PEI polymer formed a smaller, less toxic, and more stable polyplex that exhibited less aggregation within HA gels when compared to the traditionally used linear PEI (LPEI) polymer. Surface-coated polyplexes also resulted in a more homogenous distribution of polyplexes in hydrogels. Furthermore, sPEG-PEI polyplexes retained transfection abilities comparable to LPEI in 3D surface-coated transfections. These results demonstrate a significant improvement in scaffold-mediated gene delivery and show promise in applications to multi-gene delivery systems. PMID:26391497

  2. Impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in a paper-based microchamber.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-15

    Recently, 3D cell culture technique was proposed to provide a more physiologically-meaningful environment for cell-based assays. With the development of microfluidics technology, cellular response can be quantified by impedance measurement technique in a real-time and non-invasive manner. However, handling of these microfluidic systems requires a trained engineering personnel and the operation is not compatible to traditional biological research laboratories. In this work, we incorporated the impedance measurement technique to paper-based 3D cell culture model and demonstrated non-invasive quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel during the culture course. A cellulose filter paper was patterned with an array of circular microchambers. Cells were encapsulated in hydrogel and loaded to the microchambers for culturing cells in 3D environment. At the preset schedule during the culture course, the paper was placed on a glass substrate with measurement electrodes for the impedance measurement. Cells in each microchamber was represented by impedance magnitude and cell proliferation could be studied over time. Also, conventional bio-assay was performed to further confirm the feasibility of the impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in the paper-based microchamber. This technique provides a convenient, fast, and non-invasive approach to monitor cells cultured in 3D environment. It has potential to be developed for routine 3D cell culture protocol in biological research laboratories.

  3. Multi-compartment encapsulation of communicating droplets and droplet networks in hydrogel as a model for artificial cells.

    PubMed

    Bayoumi, Mariam; Bayley, Hagan; Maglia, Giovanni; Sapra, K Tanuj

    2017-04-03

    Constructing a cell mimic is a major challenge posed by synthetic biologists. Efforts to this end have been primarily focused on lipid- and polymer-encapsulated containers, liposomes and polymersomes, respectively. Here, we introduce a multi-compartment, nested system comprising aqueous droplets stabilized in an oil/lipid mixture, all encapsulated in hydrogel. Functional capabilities (electrical and chemical communication) were imparted by protein nanopores spanning the lipid bilayer formed at the interface of the encapsulated aqueous droplets and the encasing hydrogel. Crucially, the compartmentalization enabled the formation of two adjoining lipid bilayers in a controlled manner, a requirement for the realization of a functional protocell or prototissue.

  4. Multi-compartment encapsulation of communicating droplets and droplet networks in hydrogel as a model for artificial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bayoumi, Mariam; Bayley, Hagan; Maglia, Giovanni; Sapra, K. Tanuj

    2017-01-01

    Constructing a cell mimic is a major challenge posed by synthetic biologists. Efforts to this end have been primarily focused on lipid- and polymer-encapsulated containers, liposomes and polymersomes, respectively. Here, we introduce a multi-compartment, nested system comprising aqueous droplets stabilized in an oil/lipid mixture, all encapsulated in hydrogel. Functional capabilities (electrical and chemical communication) were imparted by protein nanopores spanning the lipid bilayer formed at the interface of the encapsulated aqueous droplets and the encasing hydrogel. Crucially, the compartmentalization enabled the formation of two adjoining lipid bilayers in a controlled manner, a requirement for the realization of a functional protocell or prototissue. PMID:28367984

  5. Core-shell hydrogel microcapsules for improved islets encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minglin; Chiu, Alan; Sahay, Gaurav; Doloff, Joshua C; Dholakia, Nimit; Thakrar, Raj; Cohen, Joshua; Vegas, Arturo; Chen, Delai; Bratlie, Kaitlin M; Dang, Tram; York, Roger L; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Weir, Gordon C; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-05-01

    Islets microencapsulation holds great promise to treat type 1 diabetes. Currently used alginate microcapsules often have islets protruding outside capsules, leading to inadequate immuno-protection. A novel design of microcapsules with core-shell structures using a two-fluid co-axial electro-jetting is reported. Improved encapsulation and diabetes correction is achieved in a single step by simply confining the islets in the core region of the capsules.

  6. Photoclick Hydrogels Prepared from Functionalized Cyclodextrin and Poly(ethylene glycol) for Drug Delivery and in Situ Cell Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2015-07-13

    Polymers or hydrogels containing modified cyclodextrin (CD) are highly useful in drug delivery applications, as CD is a cytocompatible amphiphilic molecule that can complex with a variety of hydrophobic drugs. Here, we designed modular photoclick thiol-ene hydrogels from derivatives of βCD and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), including βCD-allylether (βCD-AE), βCD-thiol (βCD-SH), PEG-thiol (PEGSH), and PEG-norbornene (PEGNB). Two types of CD-PEG hybrid hydrogels were prepared using radical-mediated thiol-ene photoclick reactions. Specifically, thiol-allylether hydrogels were formed by reacting multiarm PEGSH and βCD-AE, and thiol-norbornene hydrogels were formed by cross-linking βCD-SH and multiarm PEGNB. We characterized the properties of these two types of thiol-ene hydrogels, including gelation kinetics, gel fractions, hydrolytic stability, and cytocompatibility. Compared with thiol-allylether hydrogels, thiol-norbornene photoclick reaction formed hydrogels with faster gelation kinetics at equivalent macromer contents. Using curcumin, an anti-inflammatory and anticancer hydrophobic molecule, we demonstrated that CD-cross-linked PEG-based hydrogels, when compared with pure PEG-based hydrogels, afforded higher drug loading efficiency and prolonged delivery in vitro. Cytocompatibility of these CD-cross-linked hydrogels were evaluated by in situ encapsulation of radical sensitive pancreatic MIN6 β-cells. All formulations and cross-linking conditions tested were cytocompatible for cell encapsulation. Furthermore, hydrogels cross-linked by βCD-SH showed enhanced cell proliferation and insulin secretion as compared to gels cross-linked by either dithiothreitol (DTT) or βCD-AE, suggesting the profound impact of both macromer compositions and gelation chemistry on cell fate in chemically cross-linked hydrogels.

  7. Hydrogel Encapsulation of Cells in Core-Shell Microcapsules for Cell Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy Khiem; Son, Young Min; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2015-07-15

    A newly designed 3D core-shell microcapsule structure composed of a cell-containing liquid core and an alginate hydrogel shell is fabricated using a coaxial dual-nozzle electrospinning system. Spherical alginate microcapsules are successfully generated with a core-shell structure and less than 300 μm in average diameter using this system. The thickness of the core and shell can be easily controlled by manipulating the core and shell flow rates. Cells encapsulated in core-shell microcapsules demonstrate better cell encapsulation and immune protection than those encapsulated in microbeads. The observation of a high percentage of live cells (≈80%) after encapsulation demonstrates that the voltage applied for generation of microcapsules does not significantly affect the viability of encapsulated cells. The viability of encapsulated cells does not change even after 3 d in culture, which suggests that the core-shell structure with culture medium in the core can maintain high cell survival by providing nutrients and oxygen to all cells. This newly designed core-shell structure can be extended to use in multifunctional platforms not only for delivery of cells but also for factor delivery, imaging, or diagnosis by loading other components in the core or shell.

  8. In vivo triarylmethyl radical stabilization through encapsulation in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Kahina; Boutier-Pischon, Audrey; Auger, Florian; Françon, Dominique; Almario, Antonio; Frapart, Yves-Michel

    2016-09-01

    In vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging and spectroscopy are non-invasive technologies used to specifically detect and quantify paramagnetic species. However, the relative instability of spin probes such as triarylmethyl radicals limits their application to conduct oxygen quantification and mapping. In this study we encapsulated tetrathiatriarylmethyl radical (TAM; known as "Finland" probe) in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel (PF-127) in order to limit its degradation and evaluate its in vitro and in vivo EPR properties as a function of oxygen. Our results show that the EPR signal of encapsulated TAM in PF-127 hydrogel is similar to the one in solution. Although it is less sensitive to oxygen, it is suitable for oximetry. We also demonstrated that the incorporation of TAM in PF-127 hydrogel leads to an improved in vivo EPR stability of the radical under anesthesia. This new formulation enables high quality EPR imaging and oximetry and paves the way for the application of TAM radical-based probes in various biomedical fields.

  9. Bio-Orthogonally Crosslinked, Engineered Protein Hydrogels with Tunable Mechanics and Biochemistry for Cell Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Madl, Christopher M; Katz, Lily M; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2016-06-07

    Covalently-crosslinked hydrogels are commonly used as 3D matrices for cell culture and transplantation. However, the crosslinking chemistries used to prepare these gels generally cross-react with functional groups present on the cell surface, potentially leading to cytotoxicity and other undesired effects. Bio-orthogonal chemistries have been developed that do not react with biologically relevant functional groups, thereby preventing these undesirable side reactions. However, previously developed biomaterials using these chemistries still possess less than ideal properties for cell encapsulation, such as slow gelation kinetics and limited tuning of matrix mechanics and biochemistry. Here, engineered elastin-like proteins (ELPs) are developed that cross-link via strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) or Staudinger ligation. The SPAAC-crosslinked materials form gels within seconds and complete gelation within minutes. These hydrogels support the encapsulation and phenotypic maintenance of human mesenchymal stem cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and murine neural progenitor cells. SPAAC-ELP gels exhibit independent tuning of stiffness and cell adhesion, with significantly improved cell viability and spreading observed in materials containing a fibronectin-derived arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) domain. The crosslinking chemistry used permits further material functionalization, even in the presence of cells and serum. These hydrogels are anticipated to be useful in a wide range of applications, including therapeutic cell delivery and bioprinting.

  10. Controlling hydrogelation kinetics by peptide design for three-dimensional encapsulation and injectable delivery of cells.

    PubMed

    Haines-Butterick, Lisa; Rajagopal, Karthikan; Branco, Monica; Salick, Daphne; Rughani, Ronak; Pilarz, Matthew; Lamm, Matthew S; Pochan, Darrin J; Schneider, Joel P

    2007-05-08

    A peptide-based hydrogelation strategy has been developed that allows homogenous encapsulation and subsequent delivery of C3H10t1/2 mesenchymal stem cells. Structure-based peptide design afforded MAX8, a 20-residue peptide that folds and self-assembles in response to DMEM resulting in mechanically rigid hydrogels. The folding and self-assembly kinetics of MAX8 have been tuned so that when hydrogelation is triggered in the presence of cells, the cells become homogeneously impregnated within the gel. A unique characteristic of these gel-cell constructs is that when an appropriate shear stress is applied, the hydrogel will shear-thin resulting in a low-viscosity gel. However, after the application of shear has stopped, the gel quickly resets and recovers its initial mechanical rigidity in a near quantitative fashion. This property allows gel/cell constructs to be delivered via syringe with precision to target sites. Homogenous cellular distribution and cell viability are unaffected by the shear thinning process and gel/cell constructs stay fixed at the point of introduction, suggesting that these gels may be useful for the delivery of cells to target biological sites in tissue regeneration efforts.

  11. Encapsulation of primary salivary gland cells in enzymatically degradable poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels promotes acinar cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Andrew D; Felong, Timothy J; Schutrum, Brittany E; Joe, Debria S L; Ovitt, Catherine E; Benoit, Danielle S W

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers leads to permanent xerostomia due to the loss of secretory acinar cells in the salivary glands. Regenerative treatments utilizing primary submandibular gland (SMG) cells show modest improvements in salivary secretory function, but there is limited evidence of salivary gland regeneration. We have recently shown that poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels can support the survival and proliferation of SMG cells as multicellular spheres in vitro. To further develop this approach for cell-based salivary gland regeneration, we have investigated how different modes of PEG hydrogel degradation affect the proliferation, cell-specific gene expression, and epithelial morphology within encapsulated salivary gland spheres. Comparison of non-degradable, hydrolytically-degradable, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-degradable, and mixed mode-degradable hydrogels showed that hydrogel degradation by any mechanism is required for significant proliferation of encapsulated cells. The expression of acinar phenotypic markers Aqp5 and Nkcc1 was increased in hydrogels that are MMP-degradable compared with other hydrogel compositions. However, expression of secretory acinar proteins Mist1 and Pip was not maintained to the same extent as phenotypic markers, suggesting changes in cell function upon encapsulation. Nevertheless, MMP- and mixed mode-degradability promoted organization of polarized cell types forming tight junctions and expression of the basement membrane proteins laminin and collagen IV within encapsulated SMG spheres. This work demonstrates that cellularly remodeled hydrogels can promote proliferation and gland-like organization by encapsulated salivary gland cells as well as maintenance of acinar cell characteristics required for regenerative approaches. Investigation is required to identify approaches to further enhance acinar secretory properties.

  12. Injectable hydrogel as cell carriers: Mechanism of beta-hairpin peptide hydrogel shear thinning, immediate recovery and effects on encapsulated cell payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Congqi

    To facilitate future biomedical treatment with localized delivery and higher therapy efficacy, much research effort has been devoted recently to the development of hydrogel biomaterials to transport a therapy to in vivo target sites via simple syringe or catheter injection. Most injectable hydrogel materials are free flowing precursor solutions ex vivo that become crosslinked into hydrogels once injected in vivo in response to exposure to environmental stimuli. However, properties of the final hydrogel formed in vivo are unpredictable due to possible leakage, dilution or change of injected gel precursor solution. As an alternate, more recent strategy for injectable hydrogel therapies, beta-hairpin peptide-based hydrogels are a class of injectable hydrogel solids with significant potential use in injectable therapies. These physical hydrogels can shear-thin and consequently flow as a low-viscosity material under a sufficient shear stress but immediately recover back into a solid upon removal of the stress, allowing them to be injected as preformed gel solids. The shear-thinning and immediate self-healing properties of self-assembled beta-hairpin peptide hydrogels enable a direct delivery of gel-encapsulated cells via benign injection to tissue defect sites with well-defined final gel properties in vivo. In this dissertation, mechanisms of gel shear-thinning and immediate recovery were elucidated by investigating gel behavior during and after flow via mechanical and structural characterizations. All studied beta-hairpin hydrogels shear-thin during flow (gel network fracture into large hydrogel domains) and instantly recover after cessation of flow (gel domains are percolated which immediately reforms the solid hydrogel). Importantly, hydrogel flow behavior was further studied in a capillary geometry that mimicked the actual situation of syringe injection. It was observed that all beta-hairpin peptide hydrogels investigated displayed a promising flow profile for

  13. Phospholipid Fatty Acids as Physiological Indicators of Paracoccus denitrificans Encapsulated in Silica Sol-Gel Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Trögl, Josef; Jirková, Ivana; Kuráň, Pavel; Akhmetshina, Elmira; Brovdyová, Tat′jána; Sirotkin, Alexander; Kirilina, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) content was determined in samples of Paracoccus denitrificans encapsulated in silica hydrogel films prepared from prepolymerized tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). Immediately after encapsulation the total PLFA concentration was linearly proportional to the optical density (600 nm) of the input microbial suspension (R2 = 0.99). After 7 days this relationship remained linear, but with significantly decreased slope, indicating a higher extinction of bacteria in suspensions of input concentration 108 cells/mL and higher. trans-Fatty acids, indicators of cytoplasmatic membrane disturbances, were below the detection limit. The cy/pre ratio (i.e., ratio of cyclopropylated fatty acids (cy17:0 + cy19:0) to their metabolic precursors (16:1ω7 + 18:1ω7)), an indicator of the transition of the culture to a stationary growth-phase, decreased depending on co-immobilization of nutrients in the order phosphate buffer > mineral medium > Luria Broth rich medium. The ratio, too, was logarithmically proportional to cell concentration. These results confirm the applicability of total PLFA as an indicator for the determination of living biomass and cy/pre ratio for determination of nutrient limitation of microorganisms encapsulated in sol-gel matrices. This may be of interest for monitoring of sol-gel encapsulated bacteria proposed as optical recognition elements in biosensor construction, as well as other biotechnological applications. PMID:25690547

  14. Mold-casted non-degradable, islet macro-encapsulating hydrogel devices for restoration of normoglycemia in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Rios, Peter Daniel; Zhang, Xiaomin; Luo, Xunrong; Shea, Lonnie D

    2016-11-01

    Islet transplantation is a potential cure for diabetic patients, however this procedure is not widely adopted due to the high rate of graft failure. Islet encapsulation within hydrogels is employed to provide a three-dimensional microenvironment conducive to survival of transplanted islets to extend graft function. Herein, we present a novel macroencapsulation device, composed of PEG hydrogel, that combines encapsulation with lithography techniques to generate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds. PEG solutions are mixed with islets, which are then cast into PDMS molds for subsequent crosslinking. The molds can also be employed to provide complex architectures, such as microchannels that may allow vascular ingrowth through pre-defined regions of the hydrogel. PDMS molds allowed for the formation of stable gels with encapsulation of islets, and in complex architectures. Hydrogel devices with a thickness of 600 μm containing 500 islets promoted normoglycemia within 12 days following transplantation into the epididymal fat pad, which was sustained over the two-month period of study until removal of the device. The inclusion of microchannels, which had a similar minimum distance between islets and the hydrogel surface, similarly promoted normoglycemia. A glucose challenge test indicated hydrogel devices achieved normoglycemia 90 min post-dextrose injections, similar to control mice with native pancreata. Histochemical staining revealed that transplanted islets, identified as insulin positive, were viable and isolated from host tissue at 8 weeks post-transplantation, yet devices with microchannels had tissue and vascular ingrowth within the channels. Taken together, these results demonstrate a system for creating non-degradable hydrogels with complex geometries for encapsulating islets capable of restoring normoglycemia, which may expand islet transplantation as a treatment option for diabetic patients. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2485-2495. © 2016 Wiley

  15. Tetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride as a covalent cross-linking agent for cell encapsulation within protein-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cindy; Lampe, Kyle J; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2012-12-10

    Native tissues provide cells with complex, three-dimensional (3D) environments comprised of hydrated networks of extracellular matrix proteins and sugars. By mimicking the dimensionality of native tissue while deconstructing the effects of environmental parameters, protein-based hydrogels serve as attractive, in vitro platforms to investigate cell-matrix interactions. For cell encapsulation, the process of hydrogel formation through physical or covalent cross-linking must be mild and cell compatible. While many chemical cross-linkers are commercially available for hydrogel formation, only a subset are cytocompatible; therefore, the identification of new and reliable cytocompatible cross-linkers allows for greater flexibility of hydrogel design for cell encapsulation applications. Here, we introduce tetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC) as an inexpensive, amine-reactive, aqueous cross-linker for 3D cell encapsulation in protein-based hydrogels. We characterize the THPC-amine reaction by demonstrating THPC's ability to react with primary and secondary amines of various amino acids. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of THPC to tune hydrogel gelation time (6.7±0.2 to 27±1.2 min) and mechanical properties (storage moduli ∼250 Pa to ∼2200 Pa) with a recombinant elastin-like protein. Lastly, we show cytocompatibility of THPC for cell encapsulation with two cell types, embryonic stem cells and neuronal cells, where cells exhibited the ability to differentiate and grow in elastin-like protein hydrogels. The primary goal of this communication is to report the identification and utility of tetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC) as an inexpensive but widely applicable cross-linker for protein-based materials.

  16. Small functional groups for controlled differentiation of hydrogel-encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Durney, Andrew R.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2008-10-01

    Cell-matrix interactions have critical roles in regeneration, development and disease. The work presented here demonstrates that encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can be induced to differentiate down osteogenic and adipogenic pathways by controlling their three-dimensional environment using tethered small-molecule chemical functional groups. Hydrogels were formed using sufficiently low concentrations of tether molecules to maintain constant physical characteristics, encapsulation of hMSCs in three dimensions prevented changes in cell morphology, and hMSCs were shown to differentiate in normal growth media, indicating that the small-molecule functional groups induced differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first example where synthetic matrices are shown to control induction of multiple hMSC lineages purely through interactions with small-molecule chemical functional groups tethered to the hydrogel material. Strategies using simple chemistry to control complex biological processes would be particularly powerful as they could make production of therapeutic materials simpler, cheaper and more easily controlled.

  17. Hydrogel-encapsulated soil: A tool to measure contaminant attenuation in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Scott C; Spalding, Brian Patrick; Watson, David B

    2010-01-01

    After intervals of groundwater immersion, polyacrylamide hydrogel-encapsulated solid specimens were retrieved, assayed non-destructively for uranium and other elements using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and replaced in groundwater for continued reaction. Desorption dynamics of uranium from contaminated soils and other solids, when moved to uncontaminated groundwater, were fit to a general two-component kinetic retention model with slow-release and fast-release fractions of the total uranium. In a group of Oak Ridge soils with varying ambient uranium contamination (169-1360 mg/kg), the uranium fraction retained under long-term in situ kinetic behavior was strongly correlated (r2 = 0.89) with the residual uranium retained after laboratory sequential extraction of water-soluble and cation-exchangeable fractions of the same soils. To illustrate how potential remedial techniques can be compared to natural attenuation, thermal stabilization of one soil increased the size of its long-term retained fraction from 50 to 88% of the total uranium and increased the in situ retention half-life of the long-term retained fraction from 990 to 40,000 days. Hydrogel encapsulation presents a novel and powerful general method to observe many water-solids interactions in situ for a variety of aqueous media besides groundwater, with a variety of non-destructive analytical methods, and with a variety of solids besides contaminated soil.

  18. Vibration Stimulates Vocal Mucosa-like Matrix Expression by Hydrogel-encapsulated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kutty, Jaishankar K.; Webb, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The composition and organization of the vocal fold extracellular matrix (ECM) provide the viscoelastic mechanical properties that are required to sustain high frequency vibration during voice production. Although vocal injury and pathology are known to produce alterations in matrix physiology, the mechanisms responsible for the development and maintenance of vocal fold ECM are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of physiologically-relevant vibratory stimulation on ECM gene expression and synthesis by fibroblasts encapsulated within hyaluronic acid hydrogels that approximate the viscoelastic properties of vocal mucosa. Relative to static controls, samples exposed to vibration exhibited significant increases in mRNA expression levels of HA synthase 2, decorin, fibromodulin, and MMP-1, while collagen and elastin expression were relatively unchanged. Expression levels exhibited a temporal response, with maximum increases observed after 3 and 5 days of vibratory stimulation and significant downregulation observed at 10 days. Quantitative assays of matrix accumulation confirmed significant increases in sulfated glycosaminoglycans and significant decreases in collagen after 5 and 10 days of vibratory culture relative to static controls. Cellular remodeling and hydrogel viscosity were affected by vibratory stimulation and were influenced by varying the encapsulated cell density. These results indicate that vibration is a critical epigenetic factor regulating vocal fold ECM and suggest that rapid restoration of the phonatory microenvironment may provide a basis for reducing vocal scarring, restoring native matrix composition, and improving vocal quality. PMID:19842110

  19. Hydrogels of sodium alginate in cationic surfactants: Surfactant dependent modulation of encapsulation/release toward Ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Suraya; Chat, Oyais Ahmad; Maswal, Masrat; Ashraf, Uzma; Rather, Ghulam Mohammad; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-11-20

    The interaction of cetyltrimethylammoium bromide (CTAB) and its gemini homologue (butanediyl-1,4-bis (dimethylcetylammonium bromide), 16-4-16 with biocompatible polymer sodium alginate (SA) has been investigated in aqueous medium. Addition of K2CO3 influences viscoelastic properties of surfactant impregnated SA via competition between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Viscosity of these polymer-surfactant systems increases with increase in concentration of K2CO3, and a cryogel is formed at about 0.5M K2CO3 concentration. The thermal stability of gel (5% SA+0.5M K2CO3) decreases with increase in surfactant concentration, a minimum is observed with increase in 16-4-16 concentration. The impact of surfactant addition on the alginate structure vis-à-vis its drug loading capability and release thereof was studied using Ibuprofen (IBU) as the model drug. The hydrogel with 16-4-16 exhibits higher IBU encapsulation and faster release in comparison to the one containing CTAB. This higher encapsulation-cum-faster release capability has been related to micelle mediated solubilization and greater porosity of the hydrogel with gemini surfactant.

  20. A biodegradable hydrogel system containing curcumin encapsulated in micelles for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gong, ChangYang; Wu, QinJie; Wang, YuJun; Zhang, DouDou; Luo, Feng; Zhao, Xia; Wei, YuQuan; Qian, ZhiYong

    2013-09-01

    A biodegradable in situ gel-forming controlled drug delivery system composed of curcumin loaded micelles and thermosensitive hydrogel was prepared and applied for cutaneous wound repair. Curcumin is believed to be a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Due to its high hydrophobicity, curcumin was encapsulated in polymeric micelles (Cur-M) with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency. Cur-M loaded thermosensitive hydrogel (Cur-M-H) was prepared and applied as wound dressing to enhance the cutaneous wound healing. Cur-M-H was a free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and instantly converted into a non-flowing gel at body temperature. In vitro studies suggested that Cur-M-H exhibited well tissue adhesiveness and could release curcumin in an extended period. Furthermore, linear incision and full-thickness excision wound models were employed to evaluate the in vivo wound healing activity of Cur-M-H. In incision model, Cur-M-H-treated group showed higher tensile strength and thicker epidermis. In excision model, Cur-M-H group exhibited enhancement of wound closure. Besides, in both models, Cur-M-H-treated groups showed higher collagen content, better granulation, higher wound maturity, dramatic decrease in superoxide dismutase, and slight increase in catalase. Histopathologic examination also implied that Cur-M-H could enhance cutaneous wound repair. In conclusion, biodegradable Cur-M-H composite might have great application for wound healing.

  1. Single-cell hydrogel encapsulation for enhanced survival of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karoubi, Golnaz; Ormiston, Mark L; Stewart, Duncan J; Courtman, David W

    2009-10-01

    Inadequate extracellular matrix cues and subsequent apoptotic cell death are among crucial factors currently limiting cell viability and organ retention in cell-based therapeutic strategies for vascular regeneration. Here we describe the use of a single-cell hydrogel capsule to provide enhanced cell survival of adherent cells in transient suspension culture. Human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were singularly encapsulated in agarose capsules containing the immobilized matrix molecules, fibronectin and fibrinogen to ameliorate cell-matrix survival signals. MSCs in the enriched capsules demonstrated increased viability, greater metabolic activity and enhanced cell-cytoskeletal patterning. Increased cell viability resulted from the re-induction of cell-matrix interactions likely via integrin clustering and subsequent activation of the extracellular signal regulated MAPK (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Proof of principle in-vivo studies, investigating autologous MSC delivery into Fisher 344 rat hindlimb, depicted a significant increase in the number of engrafted cells using the single-cell encapsulation system. Incorporation of immobilized adhesion molecules compensates, at least in part, for the missing cell-matrix cues, thereby attenuating the initial anoikis stimuli and providing protection from subsequent apoptosis. Thus, this single-cell encapsulation strategy may markedly enhance therapeutic cell survival in targeted tissues.

  2. Hybrid hydrogel photonic barcodes for multiplex detection of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yueshuang; Zhang, Xiaoping; Luan, Chengxin; Wang, Huan; Chen, Baoan; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-01-15

    Barcodes-based suspension array have for demonstrated values in multiplex assay of tumor markers. Photonic barcodes which are encoded by their characteristic reflection peaks are the important supports for suspension array due to their stable code, low fluorescent background and high surface-volume ratio. Attempts to develop this technology tend to improve the function of the photonic barcodes. Here, we present a new type of hybrid hydrogel photonic barcodes for efficient multiplex assays. This photonic barcodes are hybrid inverse opal hydrogel composed of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) and agarose. The polymerized PEG-DA hydrogel could guarantee the stabilities of the inverse opal structure and its resultant code, while the agarose could offer active chemical groups for the probe immobilization and homogeneous water surrounding for the bioassay. In addition, the interconnected pores inverse opal structure could provide channels for biomolecules diffusing and reaction into the voids of barcodes. These features imparted the hybrid hydrogel photonic barcodes with limits of detection (LOD) of 0.78ng/mL for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and 0.21ng/mL for α-fetoprotein (AFP), respectively. It was also demonstrated that the proposed barcodes showed acceptable accuracy and detection reproducibility, and the results were in acceptable agreement with those from common clinic method for the detections of practical clinical samples. Thus, our technique provides a new platform for simultaneous multiplex immunoassay.

  3. A microfluidic-based cell encapsulation platform to achieve high long-term cell viability in photopolymerized PEGNB hydrogel microspheres.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Xia, Bingzhao; McBride, Ralph; Oakey, John

    2017-01-07

    Cell encapsulation within photopolymerized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based hydrogel scaffolds has been demonstrated as a robust strategy for cell delivery, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and developing in vitro platforms to study cellular behavior and fate. Strategies to achieve spatial and temporal control over PEG hydrogel mechanical properties, chemical functionalization, and cytocompatibility have advanced considerably in recent years. Recent microfluidic technologies have enabled the miniaturization of PEG hydrogels, thus enabling the fabrication of miniaturized cell-laden vehicles. However, rapid oxygen diffusive transport times on the microscale dramatically inhibit chain growth photopolymerization of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), thus decreasing the viability of cells encapsulated within these microstructures. Another promising PEG-based scaffold material, PEG norbornene (PEGNB), is formed by a step-growth photopolymerization and is not inhibited by oxygen. PEGNB has also been shown to be more cytocompatible than PEGDA and allows for orthogonal addition reactions. The step-growth kinetics, however, are slow and therefore challenging to fully polymerize within droplets flowing through microfluidic devices. Here, we describe a microfluidic-based droplet fabrication platform that generates consistently monodisperse cell-laden water-in-oil emulsions. Microfluidically generated PEGNB droplets are collected and photopolymerized under UV exposure in bulk emulsions. In this work, we compare this microfluidic-based cell encapsulation platform with a vortex-based method on the basis of microgel size, uniformity, post-encapsulation cell viability and long-term cell viability. Several factors that influence post-encapsulation cell viability were identified. Finally, long-term cell viability achieved by this platform was compared to a similar cell encapsulation platform using PEGDA. We show that this PEGNB microencapsulation platform is capable of

  4. Hydrogel-based encapsulation of biological, functional tissue: fundamentals, technologies and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, H.; Ehrhart, F.; Zimmermann, D.; Müller, K.; Katsen-Globa, A.; Behringer, M.; Feilen, P. J.; Gessner, P.; Zimmermann, G.; Shirley, S. G.; Weber, M. M.; Metze, J.; Zimmermann, U.

    2007-12-01

    Replacing dysfunctional endocrine cells or tissues (e.g. islets, parathyroid tissue) by functional, foreign material without using immunosuppressives could soon become reality. Immunological reactions are avoided by encapsulating cells/tissues in hydrogel (e.g. alginate) microcapsules, preventing interaction of the enclosed material with the host’s immune system while permitting the unhindered passage of nutrients, oxygen and secreted therapeutic factors. Detailed investigations of the physical, physico-chemical and immunological parameters of alginate-based microcapsules have led recently to the development of a novel class of cell-entrapping microcapsules that meet the demands of biocompatibility, long-term integrity and function. This together with the development of ‘good medical practice’ microfluidic chip technology and of advanced cryopreservation technology for generation and storage of immunoisolated transplants will bring cell-based therapy to clinics and the market.

  5. Tumor homing indocyanine green encapsulated micelles for near infrared and photoacoustic imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Uthaman, Saji; Bom, Joon-suk; Kim, Hyeon Sik; John, Johnson V; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Seon-Jong; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Il; Park, In-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging analytical modality that is under intense preclinical development for the early diagnosis of various medical conditions, including cancer. However, the lack of specific tumor targeting by various contrast agents used in PAI obstructs its clinical applications. In this study, we developed indocyanine green (ICG)-encapsulated micelles specific for the CD 44 receptor and used in near infrared and photoacoustic imaging of tumors. ICG was hydrophobically modified prior to loading into hyaluronic acid (HA)-based micelles utilized for CD 44 based-targeting. We investigated the physicochemical characteristics of prepared HA only and ICG-encapsulated HA micelles (HA-ICG micelles). After intravenous injection of tumor-bearing mice, the bio-distribution and in vivo photoacoustic images of ICG-encapsulated HA micelles accumulating in tumors were also investigated. Our study further encourages the application of this HA-ICG-based nano-platform as a tumor-specific contrast agent for PAI.

  6. Techniques for the isolation of high-quality RNA from cells encapsulated in chitosan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Claire; Young, Stuart; Russo, Valerio; Amsden, Brian G; Flynn, Lauren E

    2013-11-01

    Extracting high-quality RNA from hydrogels containing polysaccharide components is challenging, as traditional RNA isolation techniques designed for cells and tissues can have limited yields and purity due to physiochemical interactions between the nucleic acids and the biomaterials. In this study, a comparative analysis of several different RNA isolation methods was performed on human adipose-derived stem cells photo-encapsulated within methacrylated glycol chitosan hydrogels. The results demonstrated that RNA isolation methods with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) buffer followed by purification with an RNeasy® mini kit resulted in low yields of RNA, except when the samples were preminced directly within the buffer. In addition, genomic DNA contamination during reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was observed in the hydrogels processed with the CTAB-based methods. Isolation methods using TRIzol® in combination with one of a Qiaex® gel extraction kit, an RNeasy® mini kit, or an extended solvent purification method extracted RNA suitable for gene amplification, with no evidence of genomic contamination. The latter two methods yielded the best results in terms of yield and amplification efficiency. Predigestion of the scaffolds with lysozyme was investigated as a possible means of enhancing RNA extraction from the polysaccharide gels, with no improvements observed in terms of the purity, yield, or amplification efficiency. Overall, this work highlights the application of a TRIzol®+extended solvent purification method for optimizing RNA extraction that can be applied to obtain reliable and accurate gene expression data in studies investigating cells seeded in chitosan-based scaffolds.

  7. Scalable Production of Glioblastoma Tumor-initiating Cells in 3 Dimension Thermoreversible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Lin, Haishuang; Wang, Ou; Qiu, Xuefeng; Kidambi, Srivatsan; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lei, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing drugs that specifically target glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Current cell culture methods, however, cannot cost-effectively produce the large numbers of glioblastoma TICs required for drug discovery and development. In this paper we report a new method that encapsulates patient-derived primary glioblastoma TICs and grows them in 3 dimension thermoreversible hydrogels. Our method allows long-term culture (~50 days, 10 passages tested, accumulative ~>1010-fold expansion) with both high growth rate (~20-fold expansion/7 days) and high volumetric yield (~2.0 × 107 cells/ml) without the loss of stemness. The scalable method can be used to produce sufficient, affordable glioblastoma TICs for drug discovery. PMID:27549983

  8. Scalable Production of Glioblastoma Tumor-initiating Cells in 3 Dimension Thermoreversible Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Lin, Haishuang; Wang, Ou; Qiu, Xuefeng; Kidambi, Srivatsan; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lei, Yuguo

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in developing drugs that specifically target glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Current cell culture methods, however, cannot cost-effectively produce the large numbers of glioblastoma TICs required for drug discovery and development. In this paper we report a new method that encapsulates patient-derived primary glioblastoma TICs and grows them in 3 dimension thermoreversible hydrogels. Our method allows long-term culture (~50 days, 10 passages tested, accumulative ~>1010-fold expansion) with both high growth rate (~20-fold expansion/7 days) and high volumetric yield (~2.0 × 107 cells/ml) without the loss of stemness. The scalable method can be used to produce sufficient, affordable glioblastoma TICs for drug discovery.

  9. The collagen I mimetic peptide DGEA enhances an osteogenic phenotype in mesenchymal stem cells when presented from cell-encapsulating hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Manav; Madl, Christopher M; Lee, Shimwoo; Duda, Georg N; Mooney, David J

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to play critical roles in regulating cell phenotype. The identity of ECM ligands presented to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has previously been shown to direct the cell fate commitment of these cells. To enhance osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, alginate hydrogels were prepared that present the DGEA ligand derived from collagen I. When presented from hydrogel surfaces in 2D, the DGEA ligand did not facilitate cell adhesion, while hydrogels presenting the RGD ligand derived from fibronectin did encourage cell adhesion and spreading. However, the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs encapsulated within alginate hydrogels presenting the DGEA ligand was enhanced when compared with unmodified alginate hydrogels and hydrogels presenting the RGD ligand. MSCs cultured in DGEA-presenting gels exhibited increased levels of osteocalcin production and mineral deposition. These data suggest that the presentation of the collagen I-derived DGEA ligand is a feasible approach for selectively inducing an osteogenic phenotype in encapsulated MSCs.

  10. The Co-axial Flow of Injectable Solid Hydrogels with Encapsulated Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brandon; Pochan, Darrin; Sathaye, Sameer

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogels are quickly becoming an important biomaterial that can be used for the safe, localized injection of cancer drugs, the injection of stem cells into areas of interest or other biological applications. Our peptides can be self-assembled in a syringe where they form a gel, sheared by injection and, once in the body, immediately reform a localized pocket of stiff gel. My project has been designed around looking at the possibility of having a co-axial strand, in which one gel can surround another. This co-axial flow can be used to change the physical properties of our gel during injection, such as stiffening our gel using hyaluronic acid or encapsulating cells in the gel and surrounding the gel with growth medium or other biological factors. Rheology on hyaluron stiffened gels and cells encapsulated in gels was performed for comparison to the results from co-axial flow. Confocal microscopy was used to examine the coaxial gels after flow and to determine how the co-axial nature of the gels is affected by the concentration of peptide.

  11. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L.; Grist, S. M.; Nasseri, S. S.; Ni, C.; Cheung, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  12. Hydrogels based on dual curable chitosan-graft-polyethylene glycol-graft-methacrylate: application to layer-by-layer cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Poon, Yin Fun; Cao, Ye; Liu, Yunxiao; Chan, Vincent; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2010-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) photo-cross-linkable hydrogels have been commonly used for three-dimensional (3D) encapsulation of cells. Previous UV cross-linkable hydrogels have employed one-shot hardening of mixtures of hydrogels and cells. Here we propose an alternative method of making hydrogel-encapsulated cell constructs through layer by layer (LBL) buildup of alternating layers of cells and hydrogel. The LBL method potentially permits better spatial control of different cell types and control of cell orientation. Each hydrogel layer must be hardened before deposition of the next layer of cells. A UV-curable gel precursor that can also be gelled at physiological temperature is desirable to avoid repeated UV exposure of cells after deposition of each successive hydrogel layer. We designed, synthesized, and applied such a precursor, dual-curable-both thermoresponsive and UV-curable-chitosan-graft-polyethylene glycol-graft-methacrylate (CEGx-MA) copolymer (x is the PEG molecular weight in Daltons). We found that CEG350-MA copolymer solutions (5 wt % polymer) formed physical gels at approximately 37 degrees C and could be further photopolymerized to form thermally stable dual-cured hydrogels. This material was applied to the creation of a two-layer LBL smooth muscle cell (SMC)/hydrogel construct using temperature elevation to approximately 37 degrees C to gel each hydrogel layer. The physically gelled two-layered hydrogel/cell construct was finally exposed to a single UV shot to improve its mechanical properties and render it thermally stable. CEG350-MA solution and gel are nontoxic to SMCs. Cells remained mostly viable when they were encapsulated inside both physically gelled and dual-cured CEG350-MA and suffered little damage from the single brief UV exposure. The combination of LBL tissue engineering with a dual curable hydrogel precursor such as CEG350-MA permits the buildup of viable thick and complex tissues in a stable, biocompatible, and biodegradable matrix.

  13. Phenotypic Stability, Matrix Elaboration, and Functional Maturation of Nucleus Pulposus Cells Encapsulated in Photocrosslinkable Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hwa; Martin, John T.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of the nucleus pulposus (NP) is an early hallmark of intervertebral disc degeneration. The capacity for endogenous regeneration in the NP is limited due to the low cellularity and poor nutrient supply of this avascular tissue. Towards restoring the NP, a number of biomaterials have been explored for cell delivery. These materials must support the NP cell phenotype while promoting the elaboration of an NP-like extracellular matrix in the shortest possible time. Our previous work with chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that hydrogels based on hyaluronic acid (HA) are effective at promoting matrix production and the development of functional material properties. However, this material has not been evaluated in the context of NP cells. Therefore, to test this material for NP regeneration, bovine NP cells were encapsulated in 1% w/vol HA hydrogels at either a low seeding density (20 × 106 cells/ml) or a high seeding density (60 × 106 cells/ml), and constructs were cultured over an 8 week period. These engineered NP cell-laden HA hydrogels showed functional matrix accumulation, with increasing matrix content and mechanical properties with time in culture at both seeding densities. Furthermore, encapsulated cells showed NP-specific gene expression profiles that were significantly higher than expanded NP cells prior to encapsulation, suggesting a restoration of phenotype. Interestingly, these levels were higher at the lower seeding density compared to the higher seeding density. These findings support the use of HA-based hydrogels for NP tissue engineering and cellular therapies directed at restoration or replacement of the endogenous NP. PMID:25448344

  14. Pluronic F-127 hydrogel as a promising scaffold for encapsulation of dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Ivana M A; Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Marques, Márcia M; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an advantageous therapeutic option for tissue engineering due to their high accessibility and bioavailability. However, delivering MSCs to defect sites while maintaining a high MSC survival rate is still a critical challenge in MSC-mediated tissue regeneration. Here, we tested the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in a thermoreversible Pluronic F127 hydrogel scaffold encapsulation system in vitro. DPSCs were encapsulated in Pluronic (®) F-127 hydrogel and stem cell viability, proliferation and differentiation into adipogenic and osteogenic tissues were evaluated. The degradation profile and swelling kinetics of the hydrogel were also analyzed. Our results confirmed that Pluronic F-127 is a promising and non-toxic scaffold for encapsulation of DPSCs as well as control human bone marrow MSCs (hBMMSCs), yielding high stem cell viability and proliferation. Moreover, after 2 weeks of differentiation in vitro, DPSCs as well as hBMMSCs exhibited high levels of mRNA expression for osteogenic and adipogenic gene markers via PCR analysis. Our histochemical staining further confirmed the ability of Pluronic F-127 to direct the differentiation of these stem cells into osteogenic and adipogenic tissues. Furthermore, our results revealed that Pluronic F-127 has a dense tubular and reticular network morphology, which contributes to its high permeability and solubility, consistent with its high degradability in the tested conditions. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that Pluronic F-127 is a promising scaffold for encapsulation of DPSCs and can be considered for cell delivery purposes in tissue engineering.

  15. A methylcellulose and collagen based temperature responsive hydrogel promotes encapsulated stem cell viability and proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christina; Dolan, Eimear B; O'Sullivan, Janice; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Kelly, Helena M

    2017-02-01

    With the number of stem cell-based therapies emerging on the increase, the need for novel and efficient delivery technologies to enable therapies to remain in damaged tissue and exert their therapeutic benefit for extended periods, has become a key requirement for their translation. Hydrogels, and in particular, thermoresponsive hydrogels, have the potential to act as such delivery systems. Thermoresponsive hydrogels, which are polymer solutions that transform into a gel upon a temperature increase, have a number of applications in the biomedical field due to their tendency to maintain a liquid state at room temperature, thereby enabling minimally invasive administration and a subsequent ability to form a robust gel upon heating to physiological temperature. However, various hurdles must be overcome to increase the clinical translation of hydrogels as a stem cell delivery system, with barriers including their low tensile strength and their inadequate support of cell viability and attachment. In order to address these issues, a methylcellulose based hydrogel was formulated in combination with collagen and beta glycerophosphate, and key development issues such as injectability and sterilisation processes were examined. The polymer solution underwent thermogelation at ~36 °C as determined by rheological analysis, and when gelled, was sufficiently robust to resist significant disintegration in the presence of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) while concomitantly allowing for diffusion of methylene blue dye solution into the gel. We demonstrate that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated within the gel remained viable and showed raised levels of dsDNA at increasing time points, an indication of cell proliferation. Mechanical testing showed the "injectability", i.e. force required for delivery of the polymer solution through devices such as a syringe, needle or catheter. Sterilisation of the freeze-dried polymer wafer via gamma irradiation showed no adverse

  16. Oxidative stability of n-3 fatty acids encapsulated in filled hydrogel particles and of pork meat systems containing them.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Matalanis, Alison; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The effect of storage time (2°C, 19 days) and heating (70°C, 30 min) on physical characteristics and oxidative stability of fish oil encapsulated in filled hydrogel particles was determined and compared with a conventional oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion with the same oil content (8.5%). Subsequently they were used to enrich meat systems with n-3 LCPUFAs, and their lipid oxidation was evaluated and compared with two other meat systems: one containing all animal fat and another with fish oil added directly. Filled hydrogel particles were more effective in lowering the oxidation rate than O/W emulsion, even when thermal treatment was applied. Oxidative stability over the storage time was best in the n-3 LCPUFA-enriched meat system containing filled hydrogel particles, in which TBARS levels were up to 62% lower than other systems containing fish oil. Hydrogel particles offer a promising means of controlling lipid oxidation in n-3 LCPUFA-enriched meat products.

  17. Self-healable hydrogel on tumor cell as drug delivery system for localized and effective therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guanru; Chen, Yan; Li, Yanjie; Li, Shikuo; Huang, Fangzhi; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian

    2015-05-20

    A self-healable chitosan(CS)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel as an injectable drug carrier was first prepared in situ on tumor cells for effective and localized therapy. PVA molecules have a synergistic effect on the formation and maintenance of 3D network conformation of hydrogel. The hydrogel shows good biocompatibility and could be easily and rapidly formed. When loaded with fluorouracil (5-FU), the hydrogel possessed good drug retention ability at pH 7.4, which can prevent the loss of drug to normal cells and reduce the side effect. As well, the hydrogel shows continuous and controllable drug release, with the final cumulative releasing amount of 84.8% at pH 5.0. Therefore, the hydrogel not only could maintain a higher 5-FU concentration around tumor cells to enhance the antitumor effect, but also can achieve pH sensitive controllable drug release at the lesion site. Meantime, the attractive self-healing ability of the CS/PVA hydrogel is first revealed in this study, which contributes to the regeneration of its integral network from the broken fragments. The CS/PVA hydrogel may hold promise for better applications in anti-tumor therapy.

  18. Biocompatible fluorescent supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel for long-term cell tracking and tumor imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaimin; Mao, Duo; Wang, Youzhi; Wang, Kai; Yi, Xiaoyong; Kong, Deling; Yang, Zhimou; Liu, Qian; Ding, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Biocompatible peptide-based supramolecular hydrogel has recently emerged as a new and promising system for biomedical applications. In this work, Rhodamine B is employed as a new capping group of self-assembling peptide, which not only provides the driving force for supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel formation, but also endows the hydrogel with intrinsic fluroescence signal, allowing for various bioimaging applications. The fluorescent peptide nanofibrous hydrogel can be formed via disulfide bond reduction. After dilution of the hydrogel with aqueous solution, the fluorescent nanofiber suspension can be obtained. The resultant nanofibers are able to be internalized by the cancer cells and effectively track the HeLa cells for as long as 7 passages. Using a tumor-bearing mouse model, it is also demonstrated that the fluorescent supramolecular nanofibers can serve as an efficient probe for tumor imaging in a high-contrast manner.

  19. Extended Culture of Encapsulated Human Blastocysts in Alginate Hydrogel Containing Decidualized Endometrial Stromal Cells in the Presence of Melatonin.

    PubMed

    Arjmand, Fatemeh; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Arasteh, Shaghayegh; Mohammadzadeh, Afsaneh; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Extended in vitro culture of human embryos beyond blastocyst stage could serve as a tool to explore the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying embryo development and to identify factors regulating pregnancy outcomes. This study presents the first report on the maintenance of human embryo in vitro by alginate co-encapsulation of human blastocyst and decidualized endometrial stromal cells (EnSCs) under melatonin-fortified culture conditions. The effectiveness of the 3D culture system was studied through monitoring of embryo development in terms of survival time, viability, morphological changes, and production of the two hormones of 17b-oestradiol and human chorionic gonadotropin. The embryo structural integrity was preserved during alginate encapsulation; however, only 23 % of the encapsulated embryos could retain in the hydrogels over time and survived until day 4 post-encapsulation. The culture medium fortification with melatonin significantly elevated the maintenance rate of expanded embryos in alginate beads by 65 % and prolonged survival time of human embryos to day 5. Furthermore, embryo co-culture with EnSCs using melatonin-fortified medium increased the survival time of encapsulated embryos to 44 %. The levels of two measured hormones significantly rose at day 4 in comparison with day 2 post-encapsulation especially in the group co-encapsulated with EnSCs and cultivated in melatonin-fortified culture medium. These data are the first evidence representing in vitro development of human embryos until day 10 post-fertilization. This achievement can facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms regulating human embryo development.

  20. Injectable in situ forming xylitol-PEG-based hydrogels for cell encapsulation and delivery.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Shivaram; Pithapuram, Madhav V; Victor, Sunita P; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2015-02-01

    Injectable in situ crosslinking hydrogels offer unique advantages over conventional prefabricated hydrogel methodologies. Herein, we synthesize poly(xylitol-co-maleate-co-PEG) (pXMP) macromers and evaluate their performance as injectable cell carriers for tissue engineering applications. The designed pXMP elastomers were non-toxic and water-soluble with viscosity values permissible for subcutaneous injectable systems. pXMP-based hydrogels prepared via free radical polymerization with acrylic acid as crosslinker possessed high crosslink density and exhibited a broad range of compressive moduli that could match the natural mechanical environment of various native tissues. The hydrogels displayed controlled degradability and exhibited gradual increase in matrix porosity upon degradation. The hydrophobic hydrogel surfaces preferentially adsorbed albumin and promoted cell adhesion and growth in vitro. Actin staining on cells cultured on thin hydrogel films revealed subconfluent cell monolayers composed of strong, adherent cells. Furthermore, fabricated 3D pXMP cell-hydrogel constructs promoted cell survival and proliferation in vitro. Cumulatively, our results demonstrate that injectable xylitol-PEG-based hydrogels possess excellent physical characteristics and exhibit exceptional cytocompatibility in vitro. Consequently, they show great promise as injectable hydrogel systems for in situ tissue repair and regeneration.

  1. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  2. Synthesis of stiffness-tunable and cell-responsive Gelatin-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel for three-dimensional cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ye; Lee, Bae Hoon; Peled, Havazelet Bianco; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2016-10-01

    Biosynthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels have been extensively investigated as extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking gels as they retain the benefits of both ECM (biological cues) and synthetic hydrogels (tunable mechanical properties). In this article, we developed and characterized a new gelatin-PEG (GP) hydrogel that retains the benefits of gelatin and synthetic hydrogels. In this strategy, the thiolation of gelatin was accomplished by reacting with Traut's reagent; the thiolated gelatin was then conjugated to one end of PEG diacrylate (PEGDA) by Michael-type addition reaction. Two kinds of GP precursors, GP30 and GP60, were synthesized by changing the amount of Traut's reagent, while the weight ratio between thiolated-gelatin and PEGDA of GP30 and GP60 was 1.451:1 and 0.785:1, respectively. Finally, neonatal human dermal fibroblasts were encapsulated into the hydrogel by cross-linking the remaining double bonds of precursor under ultraviolet light. These GP hydrogels can encapsulate the fibroblasts in situ with high cell viability. Moreover, the behaviors of cells within the GP hydrogels can be modulated by varying the cross-linking density of GP hydrogel (storage modulus from 40 to 2000 Pa). In particular, this article showed that a minimum amount of cell-binding motifs (gelatin >2.30 wt/vol % and 44.0% dry weight percentage) are required for attachment; and appropriate initial rheological and structural properties (storage modulus <∼100 Pa and mesh size >∼150 nm) can accelerate the attachment of cells and improve cell viability. Hence, this mixed-hydrogel platform allows an easily control hydrogel structure and modulates cell behavior to reconstruct new tissue in the three-dimensional microenvironments. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2401-2411, 2016.

  3. Encapsulation of Adenovirus BMP2-Transduced Cells with PEGDA Hydrogels Allows Bone Formation in the Presence of Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Urena, Pedro; Davis, Eleanor; Sonnet, Corinne; Henslee, Gabrielle; Gugala, Zbigniew; Strecker, Edward V; Linscheid, Laura J; Cuchiara, Maude; West, Jennifer; Davis, Alan; Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth

    2017-01-25

    Gene therapy approaches have been difficult to implement due to pre-existing immunity against the virus used for delivery. To circumvent this problem, a cell-based approach was developed that avoided the use of free virus within the animal. However, even cells transduced in vitro with E1- to E3-deleted adenovirus encoding bone morphogenetic protein 2 (AdBMP2) resulted in the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies in mice. Furthermore, when mice received an intramuscular injection of nonencoding adenovirus (AdEmpty)-transduced cells, AdBMP2-transduced cells were unable to launch bone formation when an intramuscular injection of these BMP2-producing cells was delivered 1 week later. This phenomenon was not observed in NOD/SCID mice, and could be overcome in C57BL/6 mice by encapsulating the adenovirus-transduced cells in a nondegradable hydrogel poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). Data collectively suggest that PEGDA hydrogel encapsulation of AdBMP2-transduced cells prevents pre-existing immunity from suppressing BMP2-induced bone formation.

  4. Bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on glioblastoma cell behavior using PEG-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christine; Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan

    2014-07-07

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12-15 months, and the mechanisms underlying GBM tumor progression remain largely elusive. Given the importance of tumor niche signaling in driving GBM progression, there is a strong need to develop in vitro models to facilitate analysis of brain tumor cell-niche interactions in a physiologically relevant and controllable manner. Here we report the development of a bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to help elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate using poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with brain-mimicking biochemical and mechanical properties. We have chosen PEG given its bioinert nature and tunable physical property, and the resulting hydrogels allow tunable matrix stiffness without changing the biochemical contents. To facilitate cell proliferation and migration, CRGDS and a MMP-cleavable peptide were chemically incorporated. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was also incorporated to mimic the concentration in the brain extracellular matrix. Using U87 cells as a model GBM cell line, we demonstrate that such biomimetic hydrogels support U87 cell growth, spreading, and migration in 3D over the course of 3 weeks in culture. Gene expression analyses showed U87 cells actively deposited extracellular matrix and continued to upregulate matrix remodeling genes. To examine the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate in 3D, we encapsulated U87 cells in soft (1 kPa) or stiff (26 kPa) hydrogels, which respectively mimics the matrix stiffness of normal brain or GBM tumor tissues. Our results suggest that changes in matrix stiffness induce differential GBM cell proliferation, morphology, and migration modes in 3D. Increasing matrix stiffness led to delayed U87 cell proliferation inside hydrogels, but cells formed denser spheroids with extended cell protrusions. Cells cultured in stiff hydrogels also showed upregulation of HA synthase 1 and matrix

  5. Encapsulated neural stem cell neuronal differentiation in fluorinated methacrylamide chitosan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Wijekoon, Asanka; Leipzig, Nic D

    2014-07-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) are able to differentiate into the primary cell types (neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes) of the adult nervous system. This attractive property of NSPCs offers a potential solution for neural regeneration. 3D implantable scaffolds should mimic the microstructure and dynamic properties found in vivo, enabling the natural exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors for cell survival and differentiation. We have previously reported a new class of materials consisting of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) conjugated to methacrylamide chitosan (MAC), which possess the ability to repeatedly take-up and release oxygen at beneficial levels for favorable cell metabolism and proliferation. In this study, the neuronal differentiation responses of NSPCs to fluorinated methacrylamide chitosan (MACF) hydrogels were studied for 8 days. Two treatments, with oxygen reloading or without oxygen reloading, were performed during culture. Oxygen concentration distributions within cell-seeded MACF hydrogels were found to have higher concentrations of oxygen at the edge of the hydrogels and less severe drops in O2 gradient as compared with MAC hydrogel controls. Total cell number was enhanced in MACF hydrogels as the number of conjugated fluorines via PFC substitution increased. Additionally, all MACF hydrogels supported significantly more cells than MAC controls (p < 0.001). At day 8, MACF hydrogels displayed significantly greater neuronal differentiation than MAC controls (p = 0.001), and among MACF groups methacrylamide chitosan with 15 fluorines per addition (MAC(Ali15)F) demonstrated the best ability to promote NSPC differentiation.

  6. Double-Network Hydrogel with Tunable Mechanical Performance and Biocompatibility for the Fabrication of Stem Cells-Encapsulated Fibers and 3D Assemble

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhe; Liu, Chenguang; Li, Lili; Xu, Peidi; Luo, Guoan; Ding, Mingyu; Liang, Qionglin

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of cell-encapsulated fibers could greatly contribute to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, existing methods suffered from not only unavoidability of cell damaging conditions and/or sophisticated equipment, but also unavailability of proper materials to satisfy both mechanical and biological expectations. In this work, a simple method is proposed to prepare cell-encapsulated fibers with tunable mechanical strength and stretching behavior as well as diameter and microstructure. The hydrogel fibers are made from optimal combination of alginate and poly(N-iso-propylacrylamide)-poly(ethylene glycol), characteristics of double-network hydrogel, with enough stiffness and flexibility to create a variety of three dimensional structures like parallel helical and different knots without crack. Furthermore, such hydrogel fibers exhibit better compatibility as indicated by the viability, proliferation and expression of pluripotency markers of embryonic stem cells encapsulated after 4-day culture. The double-network hydrogel possesses specific quick responses to either of alginate lyase, EDTA or lower environmental temperature which facilitate the optional degradation of fibers or fibrous assemblies to release the cells encapsulated for subsequent assay or treatment. PMID:27628933

  7. In situ formation of poly(vinyl alcohol)–heparin hydrogels for mild encapsulation and prolonged release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Justine J; Farrugia, Brooke L; Green, Rylie A; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Martens, Penny J

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-based hydrogels are attractive for controlled growth factor delivery, due to the native ability of heparin to bind and stabilize growth factors. Basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor are heparin-binding growth factors that synergistically enhance angiogenesis. Mild, in situ encapsulation of both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor and subsequent bioactive dual release has not been demonstrated from heparin-crosslinked hydrogels, and the combined long-term delivery of both growth factors from biomaterials is still a major challenge. Both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were encapsulated in poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels and demonstrated controlled release. A model cell line, BaF32, was used to show bioactivity of heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor released from the gels over multiple days. Released basic fibroblast growth factor promoted higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth over 24 h and proliferation for 3 days than the poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels alone. The release of vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth but not significant proliferation. Dual-growth factor release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels resulted in a synergistic effect with significantly higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth compared to basic fibroblast growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin hydrogels allowed bioactive growth factor encapsulation and provided controlled release of multiple growth factors which is beneficial toward tissue regeneration applications. PMID:27895888

  8. Optimization of Stability, Encapsulation, Release, and Cross-Priming of Tumor Antigen-Containing PLGA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Shashi; Cody, Virginia; Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Fadel, Tarek R.; Edelson, Richard L.; Birchall, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In order to investigate Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) as potential vehicles for efficient tumor antigen (TA) delivery to dendritic cells (DC), this study aimed to optimize encapsulation/release kinetics before determining immunogenicity of antigen-containing NP. Methods Various techniques were used to liberate TA from cell lines. Single (gp100) and multiple (B16-tumor lysate containing gp100) antigens were encapsulated within differing molecular weight PLGA co-polymers. Differences in morphology, encapsulation/release and biologic potency were studied. Findings were adopted to encapsulate fresh tumor lysate from patients with advanced tumors and compare stimulation of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) against that achieved by soluble lysate. Results Four cycles of freeze-thaw + 15 s sonication resulted in antigen-rich lysates without the need for toxic detergents or protease inhibitors. The 80KDa polymer resulted in maximal release of payload and favorable production of immunostimulatory IL-2 and IFN-γ. NP-mediated antigen delivery led to increased IFN-γ and decreased immunoinhibitory IL-10 synthesis when compared to soluble lysate. Conclusions Four cycles of freeze-thaw followed by 15 s sonication is the ideal technique to obtain complex TA for encapsulation. The 80KDa polymer has the most promising combination of release kinetics and biologic potency. Encapsulated antigens are immunogenic and evoke favorable TIL-mediated anti-tumor responses. PMID:22798259

  9. Multi-lineage differentiation of hMSCs encapsulated in thermo-reversible hydrogel using a co-culture system with differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Sun; Yang, Han Na; Woo, Dae Gyun; Kim, Hyemin; Na, Kun; Park, Keun-Hong

    2010-10-01

    The micro-environment is an important factor in the differentiation of cultured stem cells for the purpose of site specific transplantation. In an attempt to optimize differentiation conditions, co-culture systems composed of both stem cells and primary cells or cell lines were used in hydrogel with in vitro and in vivo systems. Stem cells encapsulated in hydrogel, under certain conditions, can undergo increased differentiation both in vitro and in vivo; therefore, reconstruction of transplanted stem cells in a hydrogel co-culture system is important for tissue regeneration. In order to construct such a co-culture system, we attempted to create a hydrogel scaffold which could induce neo-tissue growth from the recipient bed into the material. This material would enable encapsulation of stem cells in vitro after which they could be transferred to an in vivo system utilizing nude mice. In this case, the hydrogel was implanted in the subfascial space of nude mice and excised 4 weeks later. Cross-sections of the excised samples were stained with von Kossa or safranin-O and tubular formations into the gel were observed with and tested by doppler imaging. The data showed that the hydrogel markedly induced growth of osteogenic, chondrogenic, and vascular-rich tissue into the hydrogel by 4 weeks, which surpassed that after transplantation in a co-culture system. Further, a co-culture system with differentiated cells and stem cells potentially enhanced chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and vascularization. These findings suggest that a co-culture system with hydrogel as scaffold material for neo-tissue formation is a useful tools for multi-lineage stem cell differentiation.

  10. Cellulose gel dispersion: From pure hydrogel suspensions to encapsulated oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Napso, Sofia; Rein, Dmitry M; Khalfin, Rafail; Kleinerman, Olga; Cohen, Yachin

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose hydrogel particles were fabricated from molecularly-dissolved cellulose/IL solutions. The characteristics of the formed hydrogels (cellulose content, particles' size and porosity) were determined as a function of cellulose concentration in the precursor solutions. There is a significant change in the hydrogel structure when the initial cellulose solution concentration increases above about 7-9%wt. These changes include increase of the cellulose content in the hydrogel, and decrease in its pore size. The finest cellulose particle dispersions can be obtained using low concentration cellulose/IL solutions (cellulose concentration in dispersion less than 2%wt.) or hydrogels (concentration less than 1%wt.) in a dispersing medium consisting of IL with no more than 20%wt. water. Stable paraffin oil-in-water emulsions are achieved by mixing oil and water with cellulose/IL solutions. The optimal conditions for obtaining the finest particles (about 20μm in diameter) are attained using cellulose solutions of concentration between 0.7 and 4%wt. at temperature of 70°C and oil/cellulose mass ratios between 1 and 1.5.

  11. Visualized intravesical floating hydrogel encapsulating vaporized perfluoropentane for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guanchen; Zhang, Yifan; Wang, Kaikai; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Lian, Huibo; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haoran; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-10-01

    Intravesical drug delivery is the main strategy for the treatment of bladder disorders. To reduce the relief arising from frequent intravesical instillation, mucoadhesive hydrogel was used for the controlled release of the drug. However, the viscosity of mucoadhesive gel might cause severe urinary obstruction and bladder irritation. To solve all these problems, a floating hydrogel delivery system was developed using perfluoropentane (PFP) as the floating agent. After intravesical instillation of the floating hydrogel, the increased temperature in bladder vaporized PFP, resulting in the generation of microbubbles in the hydrogel. Then, it can float in urine to avoid the urinary obstruction and bladder irritation. In this study, systematic experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of PFP vaporization on the morphology and floating ability of hydrogels. The floating process is much milder and safer than other floating methods published before. In addition, PFP had been used as contrast agent, which affiliated the monitoring of gels during the operation. Therefore, this new drug delivery system addresses the problems of conventional intravesical instillation and is promising for clinic use.

  12. In vivo bioengineered ovarian tumors based on collagen, matrigel, alginate and agarose hydrogels: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Hu, Xuefeng; Huang, Yuanjie; Xu, Guojie; Yang, Jinsong; Li, Li

    2015-01-29

    Scaffold-based tumor engineering is rapidly evolving the study of cancer progression. However, the effects of scaffolds and environment on tumor formation have seldom been investigated. In this study, four types of injectable hydrogels, namely, collagen type I, Matrigel, alginate and agarose gels, were loaded with human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells and then injected into nude mice subcutaneously. The growth of the tumors in vitro was also investigated. After four weeks, the specimens were harvested and analyzed. We found that tumor formation by SKOV3 cells was best supported by collagen, followed by Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose in vivo. The collagen I group exhibited a larger tumor volume with increased neovascularization and increased necrosis compared with the other materials. Further, increased MMP activity, upregulated expression of laminin and fibronectin and higher levels of HIF-1α and VEGF-A in the collagen group revealed that the engineered tumor is closer to human ovarian carcinoma. In order, collagen, Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose exhibited decreases in tumor formation. All evidence indicated that the in vivo engineered tumor is scaffold-dependent. Bioactive hydrogels are superior to inert hydrogels at promoting tumor regeneration. In particular, biomimetic hydrogels are advantageous because they provide a microenvironment that mimics the ECM of natural tumors. On the other hand, typical features of cancer cells and the expression of genes related to cancer malignancy were far less similar to the natural tumor in vitro, which indicated the importance of culture environment in vivo. Superior to the in vitro culture, nude mice can be considered satisfactory in vivo 'bioreactors' for the screening of favorable cell vehicles for tumor engineering in vitro.

  13. Direct hydrogel encapsulation of pluripotent stem cells enables ontomimetic differentiation and growth of engineered human heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Kerscher, Petra; Turnbull, Irene C; Hodge, Alexander J; Kim, Joonyul; Seliktar, Dror; Easley, Christopher J; Costa, Kevin D; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-01

    Human engineered heart tissues have potential to revolutionize cardiac development research, drug-testing, and treatment of heart disease; however, implementation is limited by the need to use pre-differentiated cardiomyocytes (CMs). Here we show that by providing a 3D poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen hydrogel microenvironment, we can directly differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into contracting heart tissues. Our straight-forward, ontomimetic approach, imitating the process of development, requires only a single cell-handling step, provides reproducible results for a range of tested geometries and size scales, and overcomes inherent limitations in cell maintenance and maturation, while achieving high yields of CMs with developmentally appropriate temporal changes in gene expression. We demonstrate that hPSCs encapsulated within this biomimetic 3D hydrogel microenvironment develop into functional cardiac tissues composed of self-aligned CMs with evidence of ultrastructural maturation, mimicking heart development, and enabling investigation of disease mechanisms and screening of compounds on developing human heart tissue.

  14. Direct Hydrogel Encapsulation of Pluripotent Stem Cells Enables Ontomimetic Differentiation and Growth of Engineered Human Heart Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kerscher, Petra; Turnbull, Irene C; Hodge, Alexander J; Kim, Joonyul; Seliktar, Dror; Easley, Christopher J; Costa, Kevin D; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Human engineered heart tissues have potential to revolutionize cardiac development research, drug-testing, and treatment of heart disease; however, implementation is limited by the need to use pre-differentiated cardiomyocytes (CMs). Here we show that by providing a 3D poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen hydrogel microenvironment, we can directly differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into contracting heart tissues. Our straight-forward, ontomimetic approach, imitating the process of development, requires only a single cell-handling step, provides reproducible results for a range of tested geometries and size scales, and overcomes inherent limitations in cell maintenance and maturation, while achieving high yields of CMs with developmentally appropriate temporal changes in gene expression. Here we demonstrate that hPSCs encapsulated within this biomimetic 3D hydrogel microenvironment develop into functional cardiac tissues composed of self-aligned CMs with evidence of ultrastructural maturation, mimicking heart development, and enabling investigation of disease mechanisms and screening of compounds on developing human heart tissue. PMID:26826618

  15. Differential response of encapsulated nucleus pulposus and bone marrow stem cells in isolation and coculture in alginate and chitosan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syeda Masooma; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies may hold significant promise for the treatment of early stage degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). Given their propensity to proliferate and ability to form multiple tissue types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed as a potential cell source to promote repair of the nucleus pulposus (NP). However, for any successful cell-based therapy, a carrier biomaterial may be essential for targeted delivery providing key biophysical and biochemical cues to facilitate differentiation of MSCs. Two widely used biomaterials for NP regeneration are chitosan and alginate. The primary objective of this study was to assess the influence of alginate and chitosan hydrogels on bone marrow stem cells (BM) and NP cells in isolation or in coculture. A secondary objective of this study was to investigate coculture seeding density effects of BM and NP cells and simultaneously explore which cell type is responsible for matrix formation in a cocultured environment. Porcine NP and BM cells were encapsulated in alginate and chitosan hydrogels separately at two seeding densities (4×10(6) and 8×10(6) cells/mL) or in coculture (1:1, 8×10(6) cells/mL). Constructs (diameter=5 mm, height=3 mm) were maintained under IVD-like conditions [low-glucose, low (5%) oxygen] with or without transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) supplementation for 21 days. Results demonstrated differential viability depending on hydrogel type. NP cells remained viable in both biomaterial types whereas BM viability was diminished in chitosan. Further, hydrogel type was found to regulate sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and collagen accumulation. Specifically, alginate better supports sGAG accumulation and collagen type II deposition for both NP and BM cell types compared with chitosan. Having identified that alginate more readily supports cell viability and matrix accumulation, we further explored additional effects of seeding density ratios (NP:BM--1:1, 1:2) for coculture

  16. A hydrolytically-tunable photocrosslinked PLA-PEG-PLA/PCL-PEG-PCL dual-component hydrogel that enhances matrix deposition of encapsulated chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sydney; Liu, Huang-Xiang; Ko, Chao-Yin; Yang, Shu-Rui; Hung, Wei-Lun; Chu, I-Ming

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a series of photocrosslinked hydrogels were designed composed of both poly(lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) (PEL) and poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEC) macromers. The PEL/PEC hydrogels at ratios of 100:0, 75:25, 50;50, 25:75 and 0:100 were studied for their degradation characteristics and their ability to support chondrogenesis of encapsulated chondrocytes. Difference in hydrolytic susceptibility between copolymers led to different degradation patterns where higher PEC content correlated with slower degradation. Increased chondrogenic gene expression was observed in chondrocyte-laden hydrogels within a 4-week culture period. Biochemical and histological evaluations revealed significant accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as glycosaminoglycans and collagen in the 50/50 hydrogel owing to appropriate tuning of hydrogel degradation. These results demonstrate that the dual-component photocrosslinked hydrogel system is suitable for use as scaffold to support chondrogenesis and, moreover, the tunability of these systems opens up possibilities for use in different cell culturing applications. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Polyacrylamide hydrogel encapsulated E. coli expressing metal-sensing green fluorescent protein as a potential tool for copper ion determination

    PubMed Central

    Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Srisarin, Apapan; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive and field applicable metal determination system would be a powerful tool for the efficient control of metal ion contamination in various sources e.g. drinking-water, water reservoir and waste discharges. In this study, we developed a cell-based metal sensor for specific and real-time detection of copper ions. E. coli expressing metal-sensing green fluorescent protein (designated as TG1/(CG)6GFP and TG1/H6CdBP4GFP) were constructed and served as a metal analytical system. Copper ions were found to exert a fluorescence quenching effect, while zinc and cadmium ions caused minor fluorescence enhancement in the engineered bacterial suspension. To construct a user-friendly and reagentless metal detection system, TG1/H6CdBP4GFP and TG1/(CG)6GFP were encapsulated in polyacrylamide hydrogels that were subsequently immobilized on an optical fiber equipped with a fluorescence detection module. The sensor could be applied to measure metal ions by simply dipping the encapsulated bacteria into a metal solution and monitoring fluorescence changes in real time as a function of the metal concentration in solution. The sensor system demonstrated high specificity toward copper ions. The fluorescence intensities of the encapsulated TG1/(CG)6GFP and TG1/H6CdBP4GFP were quenched by approximately 70 % and 80 % by a high-dose of copper ions (50 mM), respectively. The level of fluorescence quenching exhibited a direct correlation with the copper concentration, with a linear correlation coefficient (r) of 0.99. The cell-based metal sensor was able to efficiently monitor copper concentrations ranging between 5 M and 50 mM, encompassing the maximum allowed copper contamination in drinking water (31.15 M) established by the WHO. Furthermore, the cell-based metal sensor could undergo prolonged storage for at least 2 weeks without significantly influencing the copper sensitivity. PMID:26417267

  18. Negative dielectrophoretic patterning with colloidal particles and encapsulation into a hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masato; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2007-03-27

    Microparticle patterns have been fabricated on a nonconductive glass substrate and a conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate using negative dielectrophoresis (n-DEP). The patterned microparticles on the substrate were immobilized by covalent bonding or embedded into polymer sheets or strings. The patterning device consisted of an ITO interdigitated microband array (IDA) electrode as the template, a glass or ITO substrate, and a polyester film (10-microm thickness) as the spacer. A suspension of 2-microm-diameter polystyrene particles was introduced into the device between the upper IDA and the bottom glass or ITO support. An ac electrical signal (typically 20 Vpp, 3 MHz) was then applied to the IDA, resulting in the formation of line patterns with low electric field gradient regions on the bottom support. When the glass substrate was used as the bottom support, the particles aligned under the microband electrodes of the IDA within 5 s because the aligned areas on the support were regions with the weakest electric field; however, for the ITO support, the particles were directed to the regions under the electrode gap and aligned on the support because these regions had the weakest electric field. The width of the particle lines could be roughly controlled by regulating the initial concentration of the suspended particles. The particles forming the line and grid patterns with single-particle widths were immobilized by using a cross-linking reaction between the amino groups on the aligned particles and N-hydroxysuccinimide-activated ester on the glass substrate activated by succinimidyl 4-(p-maleimidophenyl)-butyrate (SMPB). The patterned particles were also embedded in a photoreactive hydrogel polymer. A prepolymer solution of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) was used as the suspension medium to maintain the particle patterns in the polymerized hydrogel sheet and string following photopolymerization. The hydrogel sheets with particle patterns were

  19. Hydrogels to Model 3D in vitro Microenvironment of Tumor Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ho Greco; Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of failing clinical trials for cancer therapy is substantiating the need to upgrade the current practice in culturing tumor cells and modeling tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Many attempts have been made to engineer vasculature in vitro by utilizing hydrogels, but the application of these tools in simulating in vivo tumor angiogenesis is still very new. In this review, we explore current use of hydrogels and their design parameters to engineer vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and to evaluate the angiogenic capability of cancerous cells and tissues. When coupled with other technologies such as lithography and three-dimensional printing, one can even create an advanced microvessel model as microfluidic channels to more accurately capture the native angiogenesis process. PMID:24969477

  20. Matrix-assisted colloidosome reverse-phase layer-by-layer encapsulating biomolecules in hydrogel microcapsules with extremely high efficiency and retention stability.

    PubMed

    Mak, Wing Cheung; Bai, Jianhao; Chang, Xiang Yun; Trau, Dieter

    2009-01-20

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) polyelectrolyte self-assembly encapsulation method has attracted much interest because of its versatility to use various polymers for capsule formation, ability to encapsulate different templates, and capability to control capsule permeability. Traditionally, the LbL method was performed in water as solvent and limited to poorly or non-water-soluble templates. Using the matrix-assisted LbL method, complex mixtures of water-soluble proteins or DNA could be encapsulated within agarose microbeads templates but leakage of biomolecules into the water phase during the LbL process results in low encapsulation efficiency. Recently, the reverse-phase LbL (RP-LbL) method was introduced to perform LbL and encapsulation of water-soluble templates in organic solvents, thus preventing the templates from dissolving and allowing high encapsulation efficiency. However, encapsulation of complex mixtures of biomolecules or other substances with quantitative encapsulation efficiency remained impossible. Here we present a new approach for encapsulation of biomolecules or complex mixtures thereof with almost 100% encapsulation efficiency. The ability of our method to achieve high encapsulation efficiency arises from the combination of two strategies. (1) Using microparticles as surface stabilizer to create stable biomolecule-loaded hydrogel microbeads, termed matrix-assisted colloidosome (MAC), that are able to disperse in oil and organic solvents. (2) Using the RP-LbL method to fabricate polymeric capsule "membranes", thereby preventing diffusion of the highly water-soluble biomolecules. Using an oil phase during emulsification and an organic solvent phase during encapsulation could completely prevent leakage of water-soluble biomolecules and almost 100% encapsulation efficiency is achieved. Microcapsules fabricated with our method retained nearly 100% of encapsulated proteins during a 7 day incubation period in water. The method was demonstrated on model

  1. EGF and curcumin co-encapsulated nanoparticle/hydrogel system as potent skin regeneration agent

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoling; Ye, Xianlong; Qi, Jianying; Fan, Rangrang; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Yunzhou; Zhou, Liangxue; Tong, Aiping; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex multifactorial process that relies on coordinated signaling molecules to succeed. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a mitogenic polypeptide that stimulates wound repair; however, precise control over its application is necessary to reduce the side effects and achieve desired therapeutic benefits. Moreover, the extensive oxidative stress during the wound healing process generally inhibits repair of the injured tissues. Topical applications of antioxidants like curcumin (Cur) could protect tissues from oxidative damage and significantly improve tissue remodeling. To achieve much accelerated wound healing effects, we designed a novel dual drug co-loaded in situ gel-forming nanoparticle/hydrogel system (EGF-Cur-NP/H) which acted not only as a supportive matrix for the regenerative tissue, but also as a sustained drug depot for EGF and Cur. In the established excisional full-thickness wound model, EGF-Cur-NP/H treatment significantly enhanced wound closure through increasing granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, and angiogenesis, relative to normal saline, nanoparticle/hydrogel (NP/H), Cur-NP/H, and EGF-NP/H treated groups. In conclusion, this study provides a biocompatible in situ gel-forming system for efficient topical application of EGF and Cur in the landscape of tissue repair. PMID:27574428

  2. On the use of hydrogels in cell encapsulation and tissue engineering system.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Christopher G; Emerich, Dwaine F

    2008-01-01

    Regenerative medicine requires the coordinated rebuilding of tissue and preservation of normal physiologic function. Cellular therapy incorporating tissue engineering principals has been among the most effective therapies, due to specific interactions between materials, cells, factors, and ligands that have been delineated over the last 5 decades. The current generation of these modalities incorporates the ability to control integration in vivo in a time- and space-dependent fashion. Hydrogels have been used as biofunctional vehicles for the introduction of these cell-based systems, and new techniques allow for the control of cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and other biologic functions in vivo. With these more robust methods in place, and the ability to scale up and manufacture clinical materials, additional innovations have evolved that allow for ectopic or orthotopic administration of cellular therapies to treat disorders that have previously seen limited therapeutic promise due to inability to provide time-matched therapy. As such, critical discoveries have gained a unique niche portfolio of novel patents, accounting for a large portion of those newly filed in the field of biotechnology. These include the novel hydrogel compositions engineered by David Mooney and his colleagues, various tissue bulking and reconstructive applications invented by Hubbell and others, and other important patents in this field. The inventions described here provide insight into important aspects of this overall movement, and demonstrate significant immediate clinical utility in a variety of indications.

  3. 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors based on collagen I hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Christopher S.; Buchanan, Cara F.; Freeman, Joseph W.; Rylander, Marissa N.

    2011-01-01

    Cells cultured within a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro environment have the ability to acquire phenotypes and respond to stimuli analogous to in vivo biological systems. This approach has been utilized in tissue engineering and can also be applied to the development of a physiologically relevant in vitro tumor model. In this study, collagen I hydrogels cultured with MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were bioengineered as a platform for in vitro solid tumor development. The cell–cell and cell-matrix interactions present during in vivo tissue progression were encouraged within the 3D hydrogel architecture, and the biocompatibility of collagen I supported unconfined cellular proliferation. The development of necrosis beyond a depth of ~150–200 μm and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α were demonstrated in the in vitro bioengineered tumors. Oxygen and nutrient diffusion limitations through the collagen I matrix as well as competition for available nutrients resulted in growing levels of intra-cellular hypoxia, quantified by a statistically significant (p < 0.01) upregulation of HIF-1α gene expression. The bioengineered tumors also demonstrated promising angiogenic potential with a statistically significant (p < 0.001) upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene expression. In addition, comparable gene expression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant increase of HIF-1α (p < 0.05) and VEGF-A (p < 0.001) by MDA-MB-231 cells cultured in the 3D collagen I hydrogels compared to cells cultured in a monolayer on two-dimensional tissue culture polystyrene. The results presented in this study demonstrate the capacity of collagen I hydrogels to facilitate the development of 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors that are representative of the pre-vascularized stages of in vivo solid tumor progression. PMID:21782234

  4. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  5. Development of a Biomimetic Chondroitin Sulfate-modified Hydrogel to Enhance the Metastasis of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Shujun; Sun, Dongsheng; Liu, Yongdong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Liu, Chang; Wu, Hao; Lv, Yan; Ren, Ying; Guo, Xin; Sun, Guangwei; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Tumor metastasis with resistance to anticancer therapies is the main cause of death in cancer patients. It is necessary to develop reliable tumor metastasis models that can closely recapitulate the pathophysiological features of the native tumor tissue. In this study, chondroitin sulfate (CS)-modified alginate hydrogel beads (ALG-CS) are developed to mimic the in vivo tumor microenvironment with an abnormally increased expression of CS for the promotion of tumor cell metastasis. The modification mechanism of CS on alginate hydrogel is due to the cross-linking between CS and alginate molecules via coordination of calcium ions, which enables ALG-CS to possess significantly different physical characteristics than the traditional alginate beads (ALG). And quantum chemistry calculations show that in addition to the traditional egg-box structure, novel asymmetric egg-box-like structures based on the interaction between these two kinds of polymers are also formed within ALG-CS. Moreover, tumor cell metastasis is significantly enhanced in ALG-CS compared with that in ALG, as confirmed by the increased expression of MMP genes and proteins and greater in vitro invasion ability. Therefore, ALG-CS could be a convenient and effective 3D biomimetic scaffold that would be used to construct standardized tumor metastasis models for tumor research and anticancer drug screening. PMID:27432752

  6. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram encapsulated PLGA NPs on tumor growth: Different administration routes.

    PubMed

    Fasehee, Hamidreza; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Ghaffari, Seyed Hamidollah; Faghihi, Shahab

    2016-06-01

    The strong anticancer activity of disulfiram is hindered by its rapid degradation in blood system. A novel folate-receptor-targeted poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanoparticle (NP) is developed for encapsulation and delivery of disulfiram into breast cancer tumor using passive (EPR effect) and active (folate receptor) targeting. The anticancer activity of disulfiram and its effect on caspase-3 activity and cell cycle are studied. The administration of encapsulated PLGA NPs using intra-peritoneal, intravenous and intra-tumor routes is investigated using animal model. Disulfiram shows strong cytotoxicity against MCF7 cell line. The activity of caspase-3 inhibited with disulfiram via dose dependent manner while the drug causes cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 and S phase time-dependently. The encapsulated disulfiram shows higher activity in apoptosis induction as compared to free drug. In nontoxic dose of encapsulated disulfiram, the highest and lowest efficacy of NPs in tumor growth inhibition is observed for intravenous injection and intraperitoneal injection. It is suggested that administration of disulfiram by targeted PLGA nanoparticles using intravenous injection would present an alternative therapeutic approach for solid tumor treatment.

  7. A comparison of self-assembly and hydrogel encapsulation as a means to engineer functional cartilaginous grafts using culture expanded chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mesallati, Tariq; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Despite an increased interest in the use of hydrogel encapsulation and cellular self-assembly (often termed "self-aggregating" or "scaffold-free" approaches) for tissue-engineering applications, to the best of our knowledge, no study to date has been undertaken to directly compare both approaches for generating functional cartilaginous grafts. The objective of this study was to directly compare self-assembly (SA) and agarose hydrogel encapsulation (AE) as a means to engineer such grafts using passaged chondrocytes. Agarose hydrogels (5 mm diameter × 1.5 mm thick) were seeded with chondrocytes at two cell seeding densities (900,000 cells or 4 million cells in total per hydrogel), while SA constructs were generated by adding the same number of cells to custom-made molds. Constructs were either supplemented with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 for 6 weeks, or only supplemented with TGF-β3 for the first 2 weeks of the 6 week culture period. The SA method was only capable of generating geometrically uniform cartilaginous tissues at high seeding densities (4 million cells). At these high seeding densities, we observed that total sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and collagen synthesis was greater with AE than SA, with higher sGAG retention also observed in AE constructs. When normalized to wet weight, however, SA constructs exhibited significantly higher levels of collagen accumulation compared with agarose hydrogels. Furthermore, it was possible to engineer such functionality into these tissues in a shorter timeframe using the SA approach compared with AE. Therefore, while large numbers of chondrocytes are required to engineer cartilaginous grafts using the SA approach, it would appear to lead to the faster generation of a more hyaline-like tissue, with a tissue architecture and a ratio of collagen to sGAG content more closely resembling native articular cartilage.

  8. Extracellular delivery of modified oligonucleotide and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles from a degradable hydrogel triggered by tumor acidosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Wen; Tseng, S-Ja; Kempson, Ivan M; Yang, Shuenn-Chen; Hong, Tse-Ming; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2013-06-01

    Chemically modified antisense RNA oligonucleotides (antagomir) offer promise for cancer therapies but suffer from poor therapeutic effect after systemic administration. Chemical modification or loading in degradable hydrogels can offer improvements in the accuracy and efficacy for sustained delivery at specific sites. In our approach, antagomir were entrapped with degradable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels, with and without incorporation of imidazole. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were simultaneously loaded with intent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The incorporation of imidazole into the PEG hydrogels led to a tunable-pH-response that dictated hydrogel swelling ratio and release rate of antagomir and SPION. As a result, the PEG-imidazole hydrogel swelling ratio and degradation over a 5 week period changed up to 734% and 149% as the pH dropped from 7.4 to 6.7, respectively. The swelling ratio of PEG-imidazole hydrogels was completely reversible over repeatable cycles of pH change. The stimuli-responsive behavior of PEG-imidazole hydrogels was used for the release of antagomir and SPION under conditions consistent with tumor acidosis. This manuscript demonstrates feasibility in designing tunable-pH-responsive hydrogels for loading multimodality therapeutic and contrast agents to enhance the bioactivity of chemically modified antisense RNA oligonucleotide and SPION for acidosis-related tumor therapy and MRI imaging applications.

  9. Tissue responses against tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of chondrocytes encapsulated within non-absorbable hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Sanshiro; Fujihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Komura, Makoto; Nagata, Satoru; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    To disclose the influence of foreign body responses raised against a non-absorbable hydrogel consisting of tissue-engineered cartilage, we embedded human/canine chondrocytes within agarose and transplanted them into subcutaneous pockets in nude mice and donor beagles. One month after transplantation, cartilage formation was observed in the experiments using human chondrocytes in nude mice. No significant invasion of blood cells was noted in the areas where the cartilage was newly formed. Around the tissue-engineered cartilage, agarose fragments, a dense fibrous connective tissue and many macrophages were observed. On the other hand, no cartilage tissue was detected in the autologous transplantation of canine chondrocytes. Few surviving chondrocytes were observed in the agarose and no accumulation of blood cells was observed in the inner parts of the transplants. Localizations of IgG and complements were noted in areas of agarose, and also in the devitalized cells embedded within the agarose. Even if we had inhibited the proximity of the blood cells to the transplanted cells, the survival of the cells could not be secured. We suggest that these cytotoxic mechanisms seem to be associated not only with macrophages but also with soluble factors, including antibodies and complements.

  10. Photothermal tumor ablation in mice with repeated therapy sessions using NIR-absorbing micellar hydrogels formed in situ.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chun-Wen; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Wan, Dehui; Korupalli, Chiranjeevi; Liao, Zi-Xian; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Chia, Wei-Tso; Lin, Kun-Ju; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Repeated cancer treatments are common, owing to the aggressive and resistant nature of tumors. This work presents a chitosan (CS) derivative that contains self-doped polyaniline (PANI) side chains, capable of self-assembling to form micelles and then transforming into hydrogels driven by a local change in pH. Analysis results of small-angle X-ray scattering indicate that the sol-gel transition of this CS derivative may provide the mechanical integrity to maintain its spatial stability in the microenvironment of solid tumors. The micelles formed in the CS hydrogel function as nanoscaled heating sources upon exposure to near-infrared light, thereby enabling the selective killing of cancer cells in a light-treated area. Additionally, photothermal efficacy of the micellar hydrogel is evaluated using a tumor-bearing mouse model; hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) are used for comparison. Given the ability of the micellar hydrogel to provide spatial stability within a solid tumor, which prevents its leakage from the injection site, the therapeutic efficacy of this hydrogel, as a photothermal therapeutic agent for repeated treatments, exceeds that of nanosized HGNs. Results of this study demonstrate that this in situ-formed micellar hydrogel is a highly promising modality for repeated cancer treatments, providing a clinically viable, minimally invasive phototherapeutic option for therapeutic treatment.

  11. Dental mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogel co-delivery microencapsulation system for cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Xu, Xingtian; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Snead, Malcolm L; Shi, Songtao

    2013-01-01

    Dental-derived MSCs are promising candidates for cartilage regeneration, with high chondrogenic differentiation capacity. This property contributes to making dental MSCs an advantageous therapeutic option compared to current treatment modalities. The MSC delivery vehicle is the principal determinant for the success of MSC-mediated cartilage regeneration therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel co-delivery system based on TGF-β1 loaded RGD-coupled alginate microspheres encapsulating Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (PDLSCs) or Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate dental MSC viability and chondrogenic differentiation in alginate microspheres. The results revealed the sustained release of TGF-β1 from the alginate microspheres. After 4 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation in vitro, PDLSCs, GMSCs as well as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSC) (as positive control) revealed chondrogenic gene expression markers (Col II and Sox-9) via qPCR, as well as matrix positively stained by toluidine blue and safranin-O. In animal studies, ectopic cartilage tissue regeneration was observed inside and around the transplanted microspheres, confirmed by histochemical and immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, PDLSCs showed more chondrogenesis than GMSCs and hBMMSCs (P<0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that RGD-modified alginate microencapsulating dental MSCs make a promising candidate for cartilage regeneration. Our results highlight the vital role played by the microenvironment, as well as value of presenting inductive signals for viability and differentiation of MSCs. PMID:23891740

  12. A Hydrogel-Based Tumor Model for the Evaluation of Nanoparticle-Based Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xian; Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Harrington, Daniel A.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue-engineered tumor models have the potential to bridge the gap between monolayer cultures and patient-derived xenografts for the testing of nanoparticle (NP)-based cancer therapeutics. In this study, a hydrogel-derived prostate cancer (PCa) model was developed for the in vitro evaluation of doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded polymer NPs (Dox-NPs). The hydrogels were synthesized using chemically modified hyaluronic acid (HA) carrying acrylate groups (HA-AC) or reactive thiols (HA-SH). The crosslinked hydrogel networks exhibited an estimated pore size of 70-100 nm, similar to the spacing of the extracellular matrices (ECM) surrounding tumor tissues. LNCaP PCa cells entrapped in the HA matrices formed distinct tumor-like multicellular aggregates with an average diameter of 50 μm after 7 days of culture. Compared to cells grown on two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture plates, cells from the engineered tumoroids expressed significantly higher levels of multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, including multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and lung resistance-related protein (LRP), both at the mRNA and the protein levels. Separately, Dox-NPs with an average diameter of 54 ± 1 nm were prepared from amphiphilic block copolymers based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) bearing pendant cyclic ketals. Dox-NPs were able to diffuse through the hydrogel matrices, penetrate into the tumoroid and be internalized by LNCaP PCa cells through caveolae-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis pathways. Compared to 2D cultures, LNCaP PCa cells cultured as multicellular aggregates in HA hydrogel were more resistant to Dox and Dox-NPs treatments. Moreover, the NP-based Dox formulation could bypass the drug efflux function of MRP1, thereby partially reversing the resistance to free Dox in 3D cultures. Overall, the engineered tumor model has the potential to provide predictable results on the efficacy of NP-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:24447463

  13. Disruption of cell-cell contact-mediated notch signaling via hydrogel encapsulation reduces mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic potential: winner of the Society for Biomaterials Student Award in the Undergraduate Category, Charlotte, NC, April 15 to 18, 2015.

    PubMed

    Chen, Amanda X; Hoffman, Michael D; Chen, Caressa S; Shubin, Andrew D; Reynolds, Daniel S; Benoit, Danielle S W

    2015-04-01

    Cell-cell contact-mediated Notch signaling is essential for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis during development. However, subsequent deactivation of Notch signaling is also required to allow for stem cell chondrogenic progression. Recent literature has shown that Notch signaling can also influence Wnt/β-catenin signaling, critical for MSC differentiation, through perturbations in cell-cell contacts. Traditionally, abundant cell-cell contacts, consistent with development, are emulated in vitro using pellet cultures for chondrogenesis. However, cells are often encapsulated within biomaterials-based scaffolds, such as hydrogels, to improve therapeutic cell localization in vivo. To explore the role of Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the context of hydrogel-encapsulated MSC chondrogenesis, we compared signaling and differentiation capacity of MSCs in both hydrogels and traditional pellet cultures. We demonstrate that encapsulation within poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels reduces cell-cell contacts, and both Notch (7.5-fold) and Wnt/β-catenin (84.7-fold) pathway activation. Finally, we demonstrate that following establishment of cell-cell contacts and transient Notch signaling in pellet cultures, followed by Notch signaling deactivation, resulted in a 1.5-fold increase in MSC chondrogenesis. Taken together, these findings support that cellular condensation, and establishment of initial cell-cell contacts is critical for MSC chondrogenesis, and this process is inhibited by hydrogel encapsulation.

  14. Self-assembled sorbitol-derived supramolecular hydrogels for the controlled encapsulation and release of active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Edward J; Okesola, Babatunde O; Smith, David K

    2015-05-01

    A simple supramolecular hydrogel based on 1,3:2,4-di(4-acylhydrazide)benzylidene sorbitol (DBS-CONHNH2), is able to extract acid-functionalised anti-inflammatory drugs via directed interactions with the self-assembled gel nanofibres. Two-component hydrogel-drug hybrid materials can be easily formed by mixing and exhibit pH-controlled drug release.

  15. Functionalized graphene oxide-based thermosensitive hydrogel for magnetic hyperthermia therapy on tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiali; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Heqing; Zhang, Yingjie; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-09-01

    A novel locally injectable, biodegradable, and thermo-sensitive hydrogel made from chitosan and β-glycerophosphate salt was prepared. It incorporated polyethylenimine (PEI)-modified super-paramagnetic graphene oxide (GO/IONP/PEI) as a form of minimally invasive treatment of cancer lesions by magnetically induced local hyperthermia. Doxorubicin (DOX) was mixed into the hydrogel which was pre-loaded on GO/IONP/PEI to create a drug delivery system DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel. In addition to the evaluation of in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities, the physicochemical properties, magnetic properties and DOX release profile of the DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel were determined. The aqueous solution of the hydrogel showed a sol-gel transition behavior depending on temperature changes. Magnetization loops indicated the super-paramagnetic properties of GO/IONP/PEI. Compared with free DOX, DOX-GO/IONP/PEI could efficiently pass through cell membranes, leading to more apoptosis and demonstrating higher antitumor efficacy on MCF-7 cells in vitro. Furthermore, DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel intratumorally injected (i.t.) showed high antitumor efficacy on tumor-bearing mice in vivo, with no obvious toxicity. The antitumor efficacy was higher when combined with an alternating magnetic field (AMF), showing that DOX-GO/IONP/PEI-gel under AMF has great potential for cancer magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

  16. Intra-articular delivery of sinomenium encapsulated by chitosan microspheres and photo-crosslinked GelMA hydrogel ameliorates osteoarthritis by effectively regulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengfei; Xia, Chen; Mei, Sheng; Wang, Jiying; Shan, Zhi; Lin, Xianfeng; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-03-01

    Reduced expression of autophagy regulators has been observed in pathological cartilage in humans and mice. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic therapeutic effect of promotion of chondrocyte autophagy via exposure to sinomenium (SIN) encapsulated by chitosan microspheres (CM-SIN) and photo-crosslinked gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel, with the goal of evaluating CM-SIN as a treatment for patients with osteoarthritis. First, we fabricated and characterized GelMA hydrogels and chitosan microspheres. Next, we measured the effect of SIN on cartilage matrix degradation induced by IL1-β in chondrocytes and an ex vivo model. SIN ameliorated the pathological changes induced by IL1-β at least partially through activation of autophagy. Moreover, we surgically induced osteoarthritis in mice, which were injected intra-articularly with CM-SIN and GelMA. Cartilage matrix degradation and chondrocyte autophagy were evaluated 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. Treatment with the combination of CM-SIN and GelMA retarded the progression of surgically induced OA. SIN ameliorated cartilage matrix degradation at least partially by inducing autophagy in vivo. Our results demonstrate that injection of the combination of GelMA hydrogel and CM-SIN could be a promising strategy for treating patients with osteoarthritis.

  17. Preclinical Evaluation of Poly(HEMA-co-acrylamide) Hydrogels Encapsulating Glucose Oxidase and Palladium Benzoporphyrin as Fully Implantable Glucose Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Rachel M.; Roberts, Jason R.; Nichols, Scott P.; Gamsey, Soya; Wisniewski, Natalie A.; McShane, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) require percutaneous wire probes to monitor glucose. Sensors based on luminescent hydrogels are being explored as fully implantable alternatives to traditional CGMs. Our previous work investigated hydrogel matrices functionalized with enzymes and oxygen-quenched phosphors, demonstrating sensitivity to glucose, range of response, and biofouling strongly depend on the matrix material. Here, we further investigate the effect of matrix composition on overall performance in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Sensors based on three hydrogels, a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) homopolymer and 2 poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-acrylamide) (pHEMA-co-AAm) copolymers, were compared. These were used to entrap glucose oxidase (GOx), catalase, and an oxygen-sensitive benzoporphyrin phosphor. All sensor formulations were evaluated for glucose response and stability at physiological temperatures. Selected sensors were then evaluated as implanted sensors in a porcine model challenged with glucose and insulin. The animal protocol used in this study was approved by an IACUC committee at Texas A&M University. Results: PHEMA-co-AAm copolymer hydrogels (75:25 HEMA:AAm) yielded the most even GOx and dye dispersion throughout the hydrogel matrix and best preserved GOx apparent activity. In response to in vitro glucose challenges, this formulation exhibited a dynamic range of 12-167 mg/dL, a sensitivity of 1.44 ± 0.46 µs/(mg/dL), and tracked closely with reference capillary blood glucose values in vivo. Conclusions: The hydrogel-based sensors exhibited excellent sensitivity and sufficiently rapid response to the glucose levels achieved in vivo, proving feasibility of these materials for use in real-time glucose tracking. Extending the dynamic range and assessing long-term effects in vivo are ongoing efforts. PMID:26085565

  18. Dynamic loading stimulates chondrocyte biosynthesis when encapsulated in charged hydrogels prepared from poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Idalis; Gladem, Sara K.; Kessler, Jeff; Bryant, Stephanie J.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the role of charge in mediating chondrocyte response to loading by employing synthetic 3D hydrogels. Specifically, neutral poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels were employed where negatively charged chondroitin sulfate (ChS), one of the main extracellular matrix components of cartilage, was systematically incorporated into the PEG network at 0%, 20% or 40% to control the fixed charge density. PEG hydrogels were employed as a control environment for extracellular events which occur as a result of loading, but which are not associated with a charged matrix (e.g., cell deformation and fluid flow). Freshly isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were embedded in the hydrogels and subject to dynamic mechanical stimulation (0.3 Hz, 15% amplitude strains, 6 hours) and assayed for nitric oxide production, cell proliferation, proteoglycan synthesis, and collagen deposition. In the absence of loading, incorporation of charge inhibited cell proliferation by ~75%, proteoglycan synthesis by ~22–50% depending on ChS content, but had no affect on collagen deposition. Dynamic loading had no effect on cellular responses in PEG hydrogels. However, dynamically loading 20% ChS gels inhibited nitrite production by 50%, cell proliferation by 40%, but stimulated proteoglycan and collagen deposition by 162% and 565%, respectively. Dynamic loading of 40% ChS hydrogels stimulated nitrite production by 62% and proteoglycan synthesis by 123%, but inhibited cell proliferation by 54% and collagen deposition by 52%. Upon removing the load and culturing under free swelling conditions for 36 hrs, the enhanced matrix synthesis observed in the 20% ChS gels was not maintained suggesting that loading is necessary to stimulate matrix production. In conclusion, extracellular events associated with a charged matrix has a dramatic affect on how chondrocytes respond to mechanical stimulation within these artificial 3D matrices suggesting that streaming potentials and

  19. Microbes encapsulated within crosslinkable polymers

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan; Liu, Ying; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to porous films comprising crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. Viable microbes are encapsulated within the crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. The crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers are water insoluble and permeable. The invention also relates to methods of making and using such porous films.

  20. Application of a New Dynamic Model to Predict the In Vitro Intrinsic Clearance of Tolbutamide Using Rat Microsomes Encapsulated in a Fab Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Zheng, Yuanting; Xing, Junfen; Yang, Huiying; Chen, Hanmei; Xiang, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Jing; Tong, Shanshan; Zhu, Bin; Cai, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Currently used in vitro models for estimating liver metabolism do not take into account the physiologic structure and blood circulation process of liver tissue. The Bio-PK metabolic system was established as an alternative approach to determine the in vitro intrinsic clearance of the model drug tolbutamide. The system contained a peristaltic pump, recirculating pipeline, reaction chamber, and rat liver microsomes (RLMs) encapsulated in pluronic F127-acrylamide-bisacrylamide (FAB) hydrogel. The metabolism of tolbutamide at initial concentrations of 100, 150, and 200 μM was measured in both the FAB hydrogel and the circular medium. The data from the FAB hydrogel and the circular medium were fitted to a mathematical model to obtain the predicted intrinsic clearance of tolbutamide after different periods of preincubation. The in vitro clearance value for tolbutamide was incorporated into Simcyp software and used to predict both the in vivo clearance value and the dynamic process of elimination. The predicted in vivo clearance of tolbutamide was 0.107, 0.087, and 0.095 L/h/kg for i.v. injection and 0.113, 0.095, and 0.107 L/h/kg for oral administration. Compared with the reported in vivo clearance of 0.09 L/h/kg (i.v.) and 0.10 L/h/kg (oral), all the predicted values differed by less than twofold. Thus, the Bio-PK metabolic system is a reliable and general in vitro model, characterized by three-dimensional structured RLM and circulation and perfusion processes for predicting the in vivo intrinsic clearance of low-extraction compounds, making the system more analogous with the rat in terms of both morphology and physiology.

  1. Enhanced adsorption of cesium on PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide hydrogel beads in a fixed-bed column system.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-10-01

    A continuous fixed-bed column study was performed using PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide (PB-GO) hydrogel beads as a novel adsorbent for the removal of cesium from aqueous solutions. The effects of different operating parameters, such as initial cesium concentration, pH, bed height, flow rate, and bead size, were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of the PB-GO hydrogel beads was 164.5mg/g at an initial cesium concentration of 5mM, bed height of 20cm, and flow rate of 0.83mL/min at pH 7. The Thomas, Adams-Bohart, and Yoon-Nelson models were applied to the experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves using non-linear regression. Although both the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models showed good agreement with the experimental data, the Yoon-Nelson model was found to provide the best representation for cesium adsorption on the adsorbent, based on the χ(2) analysis.

  2. Biodegradable polymeric micelles encapsulated JK184 suppress tumor growth through inhibiting Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Ning; Deng, Senyi; Song, Linjiang; Wu, Qinjie; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Xie, Yongmei; Gong, Changyang

    2015-01-01

    JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in vitro release behavior and had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of HUVECs than free JK184. Furthermore, JK184 micelles had stronger tumor growth inhibiting effects in subcutaneous Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor models. Histological analysis showed that JK184 micelles improved anti-tumor activity by inducing more apoptosis, decreasing microvessel density and reducing expression of CD31, Ki67, and VEGF in tumor tissues. JK184 micelles showed a stronger inhibition of Gli expression in Hh signaling, which played an important role in pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore, circulation time of JK184 in blood was prolonged after entrapment in polymeric micelles. Our results suggested that JK184 micelles are a promising drug candidate for treating pancreatic tumors with a highly inhibitory effect on Hh activity.JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in

  3. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells combats the foreign body response to cell-laden synthetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Swartzlander, Mark D; Blakney, Anna K; Amer, Luke D; Hankenson, Kurt D; Kyriakides, Themis R; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-02-01

    The implantation of non-biological materials, including scaffolds for tissue engineering, ubiquitously leads to a foreign body response (FBR). We recently reported that this response negatively impacts fibroblasts encapsulated within a synthetic hydrogel and in turn leads to a more severe FBR, suggesting a cross-talk between encapsulated cells and inflammatory cells. Given the promise of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in tissue engineering and recent evidence of their immunomodulatory properties, we hypothesized that MSCs encapsulated within poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels will attenuate the FBR. In vitro, murine MSCs encapsulated within PEG hydrogels attenuated classically activated primary murine macrophages by reducing gene expression and protein secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, most notably tumor necrosis factor-α. Using a COX2 inhibitor, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was identified as a mediator of MSC immunomodulation of macrophages. In vivo, hydrogels laden with MSCs, osteogenically differentiating MSCs, or no cells were implanted subcutaneously into C57BL/6 mice for 28 days to assess the impact of MSCs on the fibrotic response of the FBR. The presence of encapsulated MSCs reduced fibrous capsule thickness compared to acellular hydrogels, but this effect diminished with osteogenic differentiation. The use of MSCs prior to differentiation in tissue engineering may therefore serve as a dynamic approach, through continuous cross-talk between MSCs and the inflammatory cells, to modulate macrophage activation and attenuate the FBR to implanted synthetic scaffolds thus improving the long-term tissue engineering outcome.

  4. Cell encapsulation via microtechnologies.

    PubMed

    Kang, AhRan; Park, JiSoo; Ju, Jongil; Jeong, Gi Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-03-01

    The encapsulation of living cells in a variety of soft polymers or hydrogels is important, particularly, for the rehabilitation of functional tissues capable of repairing or replacing damaged organs. Cellular encapsulation segregates cells from the surrounding tissue to protect the implanted cell from the recipient's immune system after transplantation. Diverse hydrogel membranes have been popularly used as encapsulating materials and permit the diffusion of gas, nutrients, wastes and therapeutic products smoothly. This review describes a variety of methods that have been developed to achieve cellular encapsulation using microscale platform. Microtechnologies have been adopted to precisely control the encapsulated cell number, size and shape of a cell-laden polymer structure. We provide a brief overview of recent microtechnology-based cell encapsulation methods, with a detailed description of the relevant processes. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and future directions likely to be taken by cell microencapsulation approaches toward tissue engineering and cell therapy applications.

  5. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  6. 3D modeling of human cancer: A PEG-fibrin hydrogel system to study the role of tumor microenvironment and recapitulate the in vivo effect of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Del Bufalo, Francesca; Manzo, Teresa; Hoyos, Valentina; Yagyu, Shigeki; Caruana, Ignazio; Jacot, Jeffrey; Benavides, Omar; Rosen, Daniel; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between malignant and stromal cells and the 3D spatial architecture of the tumor both substantially modify tumor behavior, including the responses to small molecule drugs and biological therapies. Conventional 2D culture systems cannot replicate this complexity. To overcome these limitations and more accurately model solid tumors, we developed a highly versatile 3D PEG-fibrin hydrogel model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Our model relevantly recapitulates the effect of oncolytic adenovirus; tumor responses in this setting nearly reproduce those observed in vivo. We have also validated the use of this model for complex, long-term, 3D cultures of cancer cells and their stroma (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Both tumor proliferation and invasiveness were enhanced in the presence of stromal components. These results validate our 3D hydrogel model as a relevant platform to study cancer biology and tumor responses to biological treatments.

  7. Targeted Mesoporous Iron Oxide Nanoparticles-Encapsulated Perfluorohexane and a Hydrophobic Drug for Deep Tumor Penetration and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Lin; Fang, Jen-Hung; Liao, Chia-Ying; Lin, Chein-Ting; Li, Yun-Ting; Hu, Shang-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    A magneto-responsive energy/drug carrier that enhances deep tumor penetration with a porous nano-composite is constructed by using a tumor-targeted lactoferrin (Lf) bio-gate as a cap on mesoporous iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs). With a large payload of a gas-generated molecule, perfluorohexane (PFH), and a hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), Lf-MIONs can simultaneously perform bursting gas generation and on-demand drug release upon high-frequency magnetic field (MF) exposure. Biocompatible PFH was chosen and encapsulated in MIONs due to its favorable phase transition temperature (56 °C) and its hydrophobicity. After a short-duration MF treatment induces heat generation, the local pressure increase via the gasifying of the PFH embedded in MION can substantially rupture the three-dimensional tumor spheroids in vitro as well as enhance drug and carrier penetration. As the MF treatment duration increases, Lf-MIONs entering the tumor spheroids provide an intense heat and burst-like drug release, leading to superior drug delivery and deep tumor thermo-chemo-therapy. With their high efficiency for targeting tumors, Lf-MIONs/PTX-PFH suppressed subcutaneous tumors in 16 days after a single MF exposure. This work presents the first study of using MF-induced PFH gasification as a deep tumor-penetrating agent for drug delivery. PMID:26379789

  8. Dental mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in an alginate hydrogel co-delivery microencapsulation system for cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Xu, Xingtian; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Snead, Malcolm L; Shi, Songtao

    2013-12-01

    Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cartilage regeneration, with a high capacity for chondrogenic differentiation. This property helps make dental MSCs an advantageous therapeutic option compared to current treatment modalities. The MSC delivery vehicle is the principal determinant for the success of MSC-mediated cartilage regeneration therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel co-delivery system based on TGF-β1 loaded RGD-coupled alginate microspheres encapsulating periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) or gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate dental MSC viability and chondrogenic differentiation in alginate microspheres. The results revealed the sustained release of TGF-β1 from the alginate microspheres. After 4 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation in vitro, PDLSCs and GMSCs as well as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) (as positive control) revealed chondrogenic gene expression markers (Col II and Sox-9) via qPCR, as well as matrix positively stained by Toluidine Blue and Safranin-O. In animal studies, ectopic cartilage tissue regeneration was observed inside and around the transplanted microspheres, confirmed by histochemical and immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, PDLSCs showed more chondrogenesis than GMSCs and hBMMSCs (p<0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that RGD-modified alginate microencapsulating dental MSCs make a promising candidate for cartilage regeneration. Our results highlight the vital role played by the microenvironment, as well as value of presenting inductive signals for viability and differentiation of MSCs.

  9. Sustained release of PTX-incorporated nanoparticles synergized by burst release of DOX⋅HCl from thermosensitive modified PEG/PCL hydrogel to improve anti-tumor efficiency.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuxin; Wang, Weiwei; Li, Xijing; Liu, Jianping; Dong, Anjie; Deng, Liandong

    2014-10-01

    As drug therapies become increasingly sophisticated, the synergistic benefits of two or more drugs are often required. In this study, we aimed at improving anti-tumor efficiency of paclitaxel (PTX)-incorporated thermo-sensitive injectable hydrogel by the synergy of burst release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX⋅HCl). Thermosensitive injectable hydrogel composed of nanoparticles assembled from amphiphilic copolymer poly(ε-caprolactone-co-1,4,8-trioxa[4.6]spiro-9-undecanone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolaone-co-1,4,8-trioxa[4.6]spiro-9-undecanone) (PECT) was fabricated. Hydrophobic PTX and hydrophilic DOX⋅HCl were loaded simultaneously in the thermo-sensitive injectable hydrogel by a two-stage entrapment. Thermosensitive gelling behaviors of drug-loading PECT nanoparticle aqueous dispersions were studied. In vitro release profiles of PTX and DOX⋅HCl and in vivo anti-tumor effect by dual drugs from PECT hydrogel were investigated. The results showed that hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs could be successfully entrapped in PECT hydrogel simultaneously without affecting its thermo-sensitive behavior. In vitro release profiles demonstrated the burst release of DOX⋅HCl and the sustained release of PTX. Anti-tumor effect was improved by a fast and tense attack caused by the burst release of hydrophilic DOX⋅HCl from hydrogel, which was continued by the sequent sustained release of PTX-incorporated nanoparticles and remnant DOX⋅HCl. Unintentionally, entrapped in PECT hydrogel, hydrophilic DOX⋅HCl was observed to have a sustained releasing pattern in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Three-Dimensional Microfluidic Collagen Hydrogels for Investigating Flow-Mediated Tumor-Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Organization

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Elizabeth E.; Szot, Christopher S.; Freeman, Joseph W.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpermeable tumor vessels are responsible for elevated interstitial fluid pressure and altered flow patterns within the tumor microenvironment. These aberrant hydrodynamic stresses may enhance tumor development by stimulating the angiogenic activity of endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature. However, it is currently not known to what extent shear forces affect endothelial organization or paracrine signaling during tumor angiogenesis. The objective of this study was to develop a three-dimensional (3D), in vitro microfluidic tumor vascular model for coculture of tumor and endothelial cells under varying flow shear stress conditions. A central microchannel embedded within a collagen hydrogel functions as a single neovessel through which tumor-relevant hydrodynamic stresses are introduced and quantified using microparticle image velocimetry (μ-PIV). This is the first use of μ-PIV in a tumor representative, 3D collagen matrix comprised of cylindrical microchannels, rather than planar geometries, to experimentally measure flow velocity and shear stress. Results demonstrate that endothelial cells develop a confluent endothelium on the microchannel lumen that maintains integrity under physiological flow shear stresses. Furthermore, this system provides downstream molecular analysis capability, as demonstrated by quantitative RT-PCR, in which, tumor cells significantly increase expression of proangiogenic genes in response to coculture with endothelial cells under low flow conditions. This work demonstrates that the microfluidic in vitro cell culture model can withstand a range of physiological flow rates and permit quantitative measurement of wall shear stress at the fluid–collagen interface using μ-PIV optical flow diagnostics, ultimately serving as a versatile platform for elucidating the role of fluid forces on tumor–endothelial cross talk. PMID:23730946

  11. Anti-tumor activity of N-trimethyl chitosan-encapsulated camptothecin in a mouse melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Camptothecin (CPT) has recently attracted increasing attention as a promising anticancer agent for a variety of tumors. But the clinical application is largely hampered by its extreme water insolubility and unpredictable side effect. It is essential to establish an efficient and safe protocol for the administration of CPT versus melanoma. Methods Camptothecin was encapsulated with N-trimethyl chitosan (CPT-TMC) through microprecipitation and sonication. Its inhibition effect on B16-F10 cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis was evaluated by MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis in vitro. The anti-tumor activity of CPT-TMC was evaluated in C57BL/6 mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma. Tumor volume, tumor weight and survival time were recorded. Assessment of apoptotic cells within tumor tissue was performed by TUNEL assay. Antiangiogenesis and antiproliferation effects of CPT-TMC in vivo were conducted via CD31 and PCNA immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results CPT-TMC efficiently inhibited B16-F10 cells proliferation and increased apoptosis in vitro. Experiment group showed significant inhibition compared with free CPT-treated group (81.3% vs. 56.9%) in the growth of B16-F10 melanoma xenografts and prolonged the survival time of the treated mice (P < 0.05). Decreased cell proliferation, increased tumor apoptosis as well as a reduction in angiogenesis were observed. Conclusions Our data suggest that N-trimethyl chitosan-encapsulated camptothecin is superior to free CPT by overcoming its insolubility and finally raises the potential of its application in melanoma therapy. PMID:20565783

  12. High molecular weight chitosan derivative polymeric micelles encapsulating superparamagnetic iron oxide for tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunbin; Lin, Zuan Tao; Chen, Yanmei; Wang, He; Deng, Ya Li; Le, D Elizabeth; Bin, Jianguo; Li, Meiyu; Liao, Yulin; Liu, Yili; Jiang, Gangbiao; Bin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on chitosan derivatives have great potential for diagnosing diseases. However, stable tumor-targeted MRI contrast agents using micelles prepared from high molecular weight chitosan derivatives are seldom reported. In this study, we developed a novel tumor-targeted MRI vehicle via superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) encapsulated in self-aggregating polymeric folate-conjugated N-palmitoyl chitosan (FAPLCS) micelles. The tumor-targeting ability of FAPLCS/SPIONs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The results of dynamic light scattering experiments showed that the micelles had a relatively narrow size distribution (136.60±3.90 nm) and excellent stability. FAPLCS/SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility in cellular toxicity tests. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that FAPLCS/SPIONs bound specifically to folate receptor-positive HeLa cells, and that FAPLCS/SPIONs accumulated predominantly in established HeLa-derived tumors in mice. The signal intensities of T2-weighted images in established HeLa-derived tumors were reduced dramatically after intravenous micelle administration. Our study indicates that FAPLCS/SPION micelles can potentially serve as safe and effective MRI contrast agents for detecting tumors that overexpress folate receptors.

  13. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of doxorubicin loaded biodegradable semi-interpenetrating hydrogel implants of poly (acrylic acid)/gelatin for post surgical tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Maneesh; Naz, Farhat; Dinda, Amit K; Koul, Veena

    2013-08-01

    The paper describes the preparation and evaluation of doxorubicin loaded semi-interpenetrating polymeric hydrogel network of polyacrylic acid (PAc) and gelatin (G). Post surgical antitumor efficacy and biodistribution of doxorubicin from the implanted degradable hydrogels was investigated on Ehrlich's ascites tumor model using albino mice. Polycaprolactone diacrylate (PCL-DAr) was employed as a crosslinking agent for PAc chains whereas G was kept free. The effect of crosslinking concentration on various physico-chemical properties such as thermal behavior, swelling, degradation behavior, drug release and polymer-polymer interactions was investigated by various physico-chemical tools. Semi-interpenetrating polymeric networks (IPNs) with 0.2 mol% crosslinking concentration showed degradation within 20 days in phosphate buffer (pH 6.5). To determine the in vivo anticancer efficacy, placebo and drug laden cylindrical implants (65 ± 5 µg/implant of 10 mg) were implanted in tumor cavity post tumor excision. After predetermined time intervals (day 7, 11, 14, 20 and 25), drug biodistribution was assessed in tumor, tumor periphery, residual hydrogel and all vital organs i.e. liver, spleen, kidney, heart, lung and blood (spectrofluorimetrically). The drug distribution study showed the concentration of drug in the tumor, tumor periphery and residual hydrogel decreased with increasing time; on the 7th day, drug concentration was highest while, on the 25th day, it was negligible; however, insignificant quantities of the drug was found in vital organs. Histological examination revealed no sign of tumor recurrence until the 25th day with 100% necrosis and slight inflammation in treated the group. In vivo results established that these biodegradable implants can be utilized as post surgical therapy for solid tumors.

  14. Supramolecular hydrogels for long-term bioengineered stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Junseok; Kim, Su Jin; Jung, Hyuntae; Namkoong, Hong; Yang, Jeonga; Hwang, Byung Woo; Oh, Kyunghoon; Kim, Kimoon; Sung, Young Chul; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2015-01-28

    Synthetic hydrogels have been extensively investigated as artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) for tissue engineering in vitro and in vivo. Crucial challenges for such hydrogels are sustaining long-term cytocompatible encapsulation and providing appropriate cues at the right place and time for spatio-temporal control of the cells. Here, in situ supramolecularly assembled and modularly modified hydrogels for long-term engineered mesenchymal stem cell (eMSC) therapy are reported using cucurbit[6]uril-conjugated hyaluronic acid (CB[6]-HA), diaminohexane conjugated HA (DAH-HA), and drug-conjugated CB[6] (drug-CB[6]). The eMSCs producing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) remain alive and emit the fluorescence within CB[6]/DAH-HA hydrogels in mice for more than 60 d. Furthermore, the long-term expression of mutant interleukin-12 (IL-12M) by eMSCs within the supramolecular hydrogels results in effective inhibition of tumor growth with a significantly enhanced survival rate. Taken together, these findings confirm the feasibility of supramolecular HA hydrogels as 3D artificial ECMs for cell therapies and tissue engineering applications.

  15. Injectable supramolecular hydrogel formed from α-cyclodextrin and PEGylated arginine-functionalized poly(l-lysine) dendron for sustained MMP-9 shRNA plasmid delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qianming; Yang, Yumeng; Hu, Qian; Guo, Zhong; Liu, Tao; Xu, Jiake; Wu, Jianping; Kirk, Thomas Brett; Ma, Dong; Xue, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels have attracted much attention in cancer therapy and tissue engineering due to their sustained gene delivery ability. To obtain an injectable and high-efficiency gene delivery hydrogel, methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) was used to conjugate with the arginine-functionalized poly(l-lysine) dendron (PLLD-Arg) by click reaction, and then the synthesized MPEG-PLLD-Arg interacted with α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) to form the supramolecular hydrogel by the host-guest interaction. The gelation dynamics, hydrogel strength and shear viscosity could be modulated by α-CD content in the hydrogel. MPEG-PLLD-Arg was confirmed to bind and deliver gene effectively, and its gene transfection efficiency was significantly higher than PEI-25k under its optimized condition. After gelation, MMP-9 shRNA plasmid (pMMP-9) could be encapsulated into the hydrogel matrix in situ and be released from the hydrogels sustainedly, as the release rate was dependent on α-CD content. The released MPEG-PLLD-Arg/pMMP-9 complex still showed better transfection efficiency than PEI-25k and induced sustained tumor cell apoptosis. Also, in vivo assays indicated that this pMMP-9-loaded supramolecular hydrogel could result in the sustained tumor growth inhibition meanwhile showed good biocompatibility. As an injectable, sustained and high-efficiency gene delivery system, this supramolecular hydrogel is a promising candidate for long-term gene therapy.

  16. Chitosan-Decorated Doxorubicin-Encapsulated Nanoparticle Targets and Eliminates Tumor Reinitiating Cancer Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Wei; Wang, Hai; Han, Jianfeng; Zhao, Shuting; Dumbleton, Jenna; Agarwal, Pranay; Zhang, Wujie; Zhao, Gang; Yu, Jianhua; Zynger, Debra L; Lu, Xiongbin; He, Xiaoming

    2015-06-23

    Tumor reinitiating cancer stem-like cells are responsible for cancer recurrence associated with conventional chemotherapy. We developed a doxorubicin-encapsulated polymeric nanoparticle surface-decorated with chitosan that can specifically target the CD44 receptors of these cells. This nanoparticle system was engineered to release the doxorubicin in acidic environments, which occurs when the nanoparticles are localized in the acidic tumor microenvironment and when they are internalized and localized in the cellular endosomes/lysosomes. This nanoparticle design strategy increases the cytotoxicity of the doxorubicin by six times in comparison to the use of free doxorubicin for eliminating CD44(+) cancer stem-like cells residing in 3D mammary tumor spheroids (i.e., mammospheres). We further show these nanoparticles reduced the size of tumors in an orthotopic xenograft tumor model with no evident systemic toxicity. The development of nanoparticle system to target cancer stem-like cells with low systemic toxicity provides a new treatment arsenal for improving the survival of cancer patients.

  17. Thermo-mechanical behavior of graphene oxide hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Rituparna; Deka Boruah, Buddha; Misra, Abha

    2017-02-01

    Graphene oxide hydrogel with encapsulated water presents a unique structural characteristic similar to open cell foam. It is demonstrated that the encapsulated water plays a vital role in tailoring compressive behavior of graphene oxide hydrogel under varying thermal conditions. The present study is focused on systematically evaluating both the temperature and frequency dependence on compressive behavior of hydrogel to elucidate the evolution of stiffness in a wider temperature range. The stiffness of the hydrogel is further tailored through encapsulation of nanoparticles to achieve an extraordinary enhancement in storage modulus. It is concluded that the change in phase of water provides a large gradient in the stiffness of the hydrogel.

  18. Encapsulation of proteins in hydrogel carrier systems for controlled drug delivery: influence of network structure and drug size on release rate.

    PubMed

    Bertz, Andreas; Wöhl-Bruhn, Stefanie; Miethe, Sebastian; Tiersch, Brigitte; Koetz, Joachim; Hust, Michael; Bunjes, Heike; Menzel, Henning

    2013-01-20

    Novel hydrogels based on hydroxyethyl starch modified with polyethylene glycol methacrylate (HES-P(EG)₆MA) were developed as delivery system for the controlled release of proteins. Since the drug release behavior is supposed to be related to the pore structure of the hydrogel network the pore sizes were determined by cryo-SEM, which is a mild technique for imaging on a nanometer scale. The results showed a decreasing pore size and an increase in pore homogeneity with increasing polymer concentration. Furthermore, the mesh sizes of the hydrogels were calculated based on swelling data. Pore and mesh size were significantly different which indicates that both structures are present in the hydrogel. The resulting structural model was correlated with release data for bulk hydrogel cylinders loaded with FITC-dextran and hydrogel microspheres loaded with FITC-IgG and FITC-dextran of different molecular size. The initial release depended much on the relation between hydrodynamic diameter and pore size while the long term release of the incorporated substances was predominantly controlled by degradation of the network of the much smaller meshes.

  19. The reduction in immunogenicity of neurotrophin overexpressing stem cells after intra-striatal transplantation by encapsulation in an in situ gelling collagen hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Hoban, Deirdre B; Newland, Ben; Moloney, Teresa C; Howard, Linda; Pandit, Abhay; Dowd, Eilís

    2013-12-01

    Delivery of neurotrophic factors to the brain via genetically modified bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offers a promising neuroprotective strategy for neurodegenerative diseases. However, MSCs delivered to the CNS typically show poor survival post-transplantation, which is accompanied by microglial activation and astrocyte recruitment at the graft site. Recent studies have shown the potential of biomaterials to provide a supportive matrix for transplanted cells which may assist in the grafting process. In this study, an in situ gelling type I collagen hydrogel was evaluated as an intracerebral transplantation matrix for delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-overexpressing MSCs to the rat brain (GDNF-MSCs). In vitro analyses demonstrated that this collagen hydrogel did not affect the viability of the GDNF-MSCs nor did it prevent GDNF secretion into the surrounding medium. In vivo analyses also confirmed that the collagen hydrogel did not negatively impact on the survival of the cells and permitted GDNF secretion into the striatal parenchyma. Importantly, this study also revealed that transplanting GDNF-MSCs in a collagen hydrogel significantly diminished the host brain's response to the cells by reducing the recruitment of both microglia and astrocytes at the site of delivery. In conclusion, this hydrogel, which is composed of the natural extracellular matrix, collagen, was shown to be a well-tolerated cell delivery platform technology which could be functionalised to further aid cell support and graft integration.

  20. Improved survival of anchorage-dependent cells in core-shell hydrogel microcapsules via co-encapsulation with cell-friendly microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Yong; Choi, Hyungsoo; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin

    2017-01-18

    In this study, we investigated the effect of intracapsular environment on the survival of anchorage-dependent cells (ADCs) encapsulated in alginate microcapsules with three different core structures, i.e., liquid, semi-liquid and microsphere-encapsulating semi-liquid core, using NIH 3T3 fibroblasts as an ADC model. For the latter, we fabricated poly (ε-caprolactone) microspheres and co-encapsulated them with the cells, to establish cell-substrate interactions in the capsule. The fibroblast cells co-encapsulated with the microspheres exhibited higher survival and growth than those without. This study provides a 'proof of concept' for employing microspheres as a cell-friendly surface to establish intracapsular cell-substrate interactions thus prolonging the survival of encapsulated therapeutic ADCs.

  1. Synthesis and in-vitro photodynamic studies of the superparamagnetic chitosan hydrogel/chlorin E6 nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaie, Roya M; Amini, Fahimeh Satarzade; Maharramov, Abel; Ramazanov, Mohammad Ali

    2013-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop superparamagnetic chitosan(CS) � dextran sulfate(DS) hydrogels as a intelligent drug system for effective carrying of Chlorin E6(chn E6) photosensitizer to cancer cells. This system can be detectable by magnetic Resonance Imaging technique. The study shows that the lifetime of the triplet state for chn E6 photosensitizer is significantly increase when encapsulate into hydrogel. In addition to the possible enhancement of 1O2 generation, other advantages to incorporating chn E6 -based PS agents into hydrogel include the ability to solubilize these generally hydrophobic agents, the small and uniform size of hydrogels, and potential for passive targeting of solid tumors via the enhanced permeation and retention effect decreasing systemic photosensitization.

  2. T1-Weighted MR imaging of liver tumor by gadolinium-encapsulated glycol chitosan nanoparticles without non-specific toxicity in normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jin Hee; Lee, Sangmin; Koo, Heebeom; Han, Hyounkoo; Lee, Kyung Eun; Han, Seung Jin; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Lee, Seulki; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we have synthesized Gd(iii)-encapsulated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (Gd(iii)-CNPs) for tumor-targeted T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 contrast agent, Gd(iii), was successfully encapsulated into 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-modified CNPs to form stable Gd(iii)-encapsulated CNPs (Gd(iii)-CNPs) with an average particle size of approximately 280 nm. The stable nanoparticle structure of Gd(iii)-CNPs is beneficial for liver tumor accumulation by the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Moreover, the amine groups on the surface of Gd(iii)-CNPs could be protonated and could induce fast cellular uptake at acidic pH in tumor tissue. To assay the tumor-targeting ability of Cy5.5-labeled Gd(iii)-CNPs, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and MR imaging were used in a liver tumor model as well as a subcutaneous tumor model. Cy5.5-labeled Gd(iii)-CNPs generated highly intense fluorescence and T1 MR signals in tumor tissues after intravenous injection, while DOTAREM®, the commercialized control MR contrast agent, showed very low tumor-targeting efficiency on MR images. Furthermore, damaged tissues were found in the livers and kidneys of mice injected with DOTAREM®, but there were no obvious adverse effects with Gd(iii)-CNPs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the superiority of Gd(iii)-CNPs as a tumor-targeting T1 MR agent.Herein, we have synthesized Gd(iii)-encapsulated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (Gd(iii)-CNPs) for tumor-targeted T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 contrast agent, Gd(iii), was successfully encapsulated into 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-modified CNPs to form stable Gd(iii)-encapsulated CNPs (Gd(iii)-CNPs) with an average particle size of approximately 280 nm. The stable nanoparticle structure of Gd(iii)-CNPs is beneficial for liver tumor accumulation by the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Moreover, the

  3. A peptide functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel for investigating the influence of biochemical and biophysical matrix properties on tumor cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Samir P.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Lee, Justin Y.; Fairbanks, Benjamin D.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2014-01-01

    To address the challenges associated with defined control over matrix properties in 3D cell culture systems, we employed a peptide functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel matrix in which mechanical modulus and adhesive properties were tuned. An HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line was chosen as a model for probing matrix influences on tumor cell migration using the PEG hydrogel platform. HT-1080 speed varied with a complex dependence on both matrix modulus and Cys-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (CRGDS) adhesion ligand concentration, with regimes in which motility increased, decreased, or was minimally altered being observed. We further investigated cell motility by forming matrix interfaces that mimic aspects of tissue boundaries that might be encountered during invasion by taking advantage of the spatial control of the thiol-ene photochemistry to form patterned regions of low and high cross-linking densities. HT-1080s in 100 Pa regions of patterned PEG hydrogels tended to reverse direction or aggregate at the interface when they encountered a 360 Pa boundary. In contrast, HT-1080s were apparently unimpeded when migrating from the stiff to the soft regions of PEG peptide hydrogels, which may indicate that cells are capable of “reverse durotaxis” within at least some matrix regimes. Taken together, our results identified matrix regimes in which HT-1080 motility was both positively and negatively influenced by cell adhesion or matrix modulus. PMID:25105013

  4. Folic acid-targeted disulfide-based cross-linking micelle for enhanced drug encapsulation stability and site-specific drug delivery against tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Junhui; Yang, Cuihong; Wang, Weiwei; Chu, Liping; Huang, Fan; Liu, Qiang; Deng, Liandong; Kong, Deling; Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jinjian

    2016-01-01

    Although the shortcomings of small molecular antitumor drugs were efficiently improved by being entrapped into nanosized vehicles, premature drug release and insufficient tumor targeting demand innovative approaches that boost the stability and tumor responsiveness of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Here, we show the use of the core cross-linking method to generate a micelle with enhanced drug encapsulation ability and sensitivity of drug release in tumor. This kind of micelle could increase curcumin (Cur) delivery to HeLa cells in vitro and improve tumor accumulation in vivo. We designed and synthesized the core cross-linked micelle (CCM) with polyethylene glycol and folic acid-polyethylene glycol as the hydrophilic units, pyridyldisulfide as the cross-linkable and hydrophobic unit, and disulfide bond as the cross-linker. CCM showed spherical shape with a diameter of 91.2 nm by the characterization of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. Attributed to the core cross-linking, drug-loaded CCM displayed higher Nile Red or Cur-encapsulated stability and better sensitivity to glutathione than noncross-linked micelle (NCM). Cellular uptake and in vitro antitumor studies proved the enhanced endocytosis and better cytotoxicity of CCM-Cur against HeLa cells, which had a high level of glutathione. Meanwhile, the folate receptor-mediated drug delivery (FA-CCM-Cur) further enhanced the endocytosis and cytotoxicity. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that CCM-Cur and FA-CCM-Cur possessed higher tumor accumulation until 24 hours after injection. Concretely, FA-CCM-Cur exhibited the highest tumor accumulation with 1.7-fold of noncross-linked micelle Cur and 2.8-fold of free Cur. By combining cross-linking of the core with active tumor targeting of FA, we demonstrated a new and effective way to design nanocarriers for enhanced drug encapsulation, smart tumor responsiveness, and elevated tumor accumulation. PMID:27051287

  5. Tumor regression achieved by encapsulating a moderately soluble drug into a polymeric thermogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ci, Tianyuan; Chen, Liang; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-07-01

    For cancer chemotherapy, a tumor regression without any surgical resection and severe side effects is greatly preferred to merely slowing down the growth of tumors. Here, we report a formulation composed of irinotecan (IRN) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG-PLGA). IRN is a clinically used antitumor drug with active and inactive chemical forms in equilibrium, and the major form at physiological conditions is inactive but still has side effects. The aqueous solution of the PLGA-PEG-PLGA is a sol at room temperature and physically gels at body temperature, forming a thermogel. We successfully mixed this moderately soluble drug into the amphiphilic copolymer aqueous solution for the first time. The mixture was subcutaneously injected into nude mice with xenografted SW620 human colon tumors. Excellent in vivo antitumor efficacy was observed in the group that received the IRN-loaded thermogel. The tumor was significantly regressed after being treated with the IRN/thermogel, and the side effects (blood toxicity and body weight decrease) were very mild. These results might be attributed to the ideal sustained release profile and period of release of the drug from the thermogel and to the significant enhancement of the fraction of the active form of the drug by the thermogel.

  6. Maleimide cross-linked bioactive PEG hydrogel exhibits improved reaction kinetics and cross-linking for cell encapsulation and in-situ delivery

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Edward A.; Enemchukwu, Nduka O.; Fiore, Vincent F.; Sy, Jay C.; Murthy, Niren; Sulchek, Todd A.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Engineered polyethylene glycol-maleimide matrices for regenerative medicine exhibit improved reaction efficiency and wider range of Young’s moduli by utilizing maleimide cross-linking chemistry. This hydrogel chemistry is advantageous for cell delivery due to the mild reaction that occurs rapidly enough for in situ delivery, while easily lending itself to “plug-and-play” design variations such as incorporation of enzyme-cleavable cross-links and cell-adhesion peptides. PMID:22174081

  7. The effect of encapsulation of cardiac stem cells within matrix-enriched hydrogel capsules on cell survival, post-ischemic cell retention and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Audrey E; Tilokee, Everad L; Latham, Nicholas; McNeill, Brian; Lam, Bu-Khanh; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J; Courtman, David W; Stewart, Duncan J; Davis, Darryl R

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of ex vivo proliferated cardiac stem cells (CSCs) is an emerging therapy for ischemic cardiomyopathy but outcomes are limited by modest engraftment and poor long-term survival. As such, we explored the effect of single cell microencapsulation to increase CSC engraftment and survival after myocardial injection. Transcript and protein profiling of human atrial appendage sourced CSCs revealed strong expression the pro-survival integrin dimers αVβ3 and α5β1- thus rationalizing the integration of fibronectin and fibrinogen into a supportive intra-capsular matrix. Encapsulation maintained CSC viability under hypoxic stress conditions and, when compared to standard suspended CSC, media conditioned by encapsulated CSCs demonstrated superior production of pro-angiogenic/cardioprotective cytokines, angiogenesis and recruitment of circulating angiogenic cells. Intra-myocardial injection of encapsulated CSCs after experimental myocardial infarction favorably affected long-term retention of CSCs, cardiac structure and function. Single cell encapsulation prevents detachment induced cell death while boosting the mechanical retention of CSCs to enhance repair of damaged myocardium.

  8. Polypyrrole-encapsulated iron tungstate nanocomposites: a versatile platform for multimodal tumor imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhiyin; Peng, Chen; Jiang, Xiaohong; Peng, Yuxuan; Huang, Xiaojuan; Guan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Wenlong; Liu, Xiaoming; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2016-06-01

    A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in animal experiments. Blood circulation and biodistribution of the nanocomposites were also investigated to understand their in vivo behaviours. Our results verified the platform of FeWO4@PPy nanocomposites as a promising photothermal agent for imaging-guided cancer theranostics.A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in

  9. Novel Injectable Pentablock Copolymer Based Thermoresponsive Hydrogels for Sustained Release Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bobbala, Sharan; Tamboli, Viral; McDowell, Arlene; Mitra, Ashim K; Hook, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The need for multiple vaccinations to enhance the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines may be reduced by delivering the vaccine over an extended period of time. Here, we report two novel injectable pentablock copolymer based thermoresponsive hydrogels made of polyethyleneglycol-polycaprolactone-polylactide-polycaprolactone-polyethyleneglycol (PEG-PCL-PLA-PCL-PEG) with varying ratios of polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactide (PLA), as single shot sustained release vaccines. Pentablock copolymer hydrogels were loaded with vaccine-encapsulated poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (PLGA-NP) or with the soluble vaccine components. Incorporation of PLGA-NP into the thermoresponsive hydrogels increased the complex viscosity of the gels, lowered the gelation temperature, and minimized the burst release of antigen and adjuvants. The two pentablock hydrogels stimulated both cellular and humoral responses. The addition of PLGA-NP to the hydrogels sustained immune responses for up to 49 days. The polymer with a higher ratio of PCL to PLA formed a more rigid gel, induced stronger immune responses, and stimulated effective anti-tumor responses in a prophylactic melanoma tumor model.

  10. New generation of β-cyclodextrin-chitosan nanoparticles encapsulated quantum dots loaded with anticancer drug for tumor-target drug delivery and imaging of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chang; Li, Ruixin; Guo, Jin; Ding, Li; Zhong, Wenying

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to report the drug delivery system that can integrate the functional building blocks for optical pH-sensing, cancer cell imaging and controlled drug release into a single nanoparticle. The CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles were prepared by in-situ immobilization of ZnSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in β-cyclodextrin (CD) and chitosan (CS) polymer loaded with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Synthetic CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles were approximately 100 nm in size and with blue fluorescence. The drug encapsulation efficiency of nanoparticles was 22.36 % and the encapsulated drug was released via a controlled release mechanism after a 9 h plateau was reached. The efficiency of the drug release in tumor microenvironments (pH 5.3 buffer solutions) was higher than that in physiological pH 7.4. In vitro cytotoxicity assay results showed that the blank nanoparticles had no cytotoxicity and therefore can be used as the fluorescence tracer, and the SAHA-encapsulated nanoparticles expressed an anticancer effect. Confocal microscopy and in vivo imaging studies showed that the developed nanoparticles had cytotoxicity in resistant cancer cells and preferentially accumulated in tumors. CD/SAHA-QDs-CS/FA nanoparticles with excellent long-term optical properties have great prospects for the development of targeting tracers and anti-tumor biomedical research.

  11. A composite hydrogel platform for the dissection of tumor cell migration at tissue interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rape, Andrew D; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent primary brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse infiltration of tumor cells into brain tissue, which severely complicates surgical resection and contributes to tumor recurrence. The most rapid mode of tissue infiltration occurs along blood vessels or white matter tracts, which represent topological interfaces thought to serve as "tracks" that speed cell migration. Despite this observation, the field lacks experimental paradigms that capture key features of these tissue interfaces and allow reductionist dissection of mechanisms of this interfacial motility. To address this need, we developed a culture system in which tumor cells are sandwiched between a fibronectin-coated ventral surface representing vascular basement membrane and a dorsal hyaluronic acid (HA) surface representing brain parenchyma. We find that inclusion of the dorsal HA surface induces formation of adhesive complexes and significantly slows cell migration relative to a free fibronectin-coated surface. This retardation is amplified by inclusion of integrin binding peptides in the dorsal layer and expression of CD44, suggesting that the dorsal surface slows migration through biochemically specific mechanisms rather than simple steric hindrance. Moreover, both the reduction in migration speed and assembly of dorsal adhesions depend on myosin activation and the stiffness of the ventral layer, implying that mechanochemical feedback directed by the ventral layer can influence adhesive signaling at the dorsal surface.

  12. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization. PMID:27596933

  13. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-09-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization.

  14. A Controlled Release Codelivery System of MSCs Encapsulated in Dextran/Gelatin Hydrogel with TGF-β3-Loaded Nanoparticles for Nucleus Pulposus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuan; Luo, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell- (MSC-) based therapy is regarded as a potential tissue engineering strategy to achieve nucleus pulposus (NP) regeneration for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, it is still a challenge to induce MSC differentiation in NP-like cells when MSCs are implanted into the NP. The purpose of this study was to construct poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles as carriers for TGF-β3 controlled release and establish a codelivery system of a dextran/gelatin hydrogel with the nanoparticles for long-term processing of discogenesis differentiation. TGF-β3-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by the double-emulsion solvent evaporation method and seeded uniformly into the hydrogel. Morphological observations, an assessment of the release kinetics of TGF-β3, a cytotoxic assay, a cell proliferation test, a biochemical content assay, qRT-PCR, and immunohistological analyses of the codelivery system were conducted in the study. The results showed that the TGF-β3-loaded nanoparticles could release TGF-β3 gradually. The codelivery system exhibited favorable cytocompatibility, and the TGF-β3 that was released could induce MSCs to NP-like cells while promoting ECM-related biosynthesis. These results suggest this codelivery system may be employed as a promising carrier for discogenesis of MSCs in situ. PMID:27774108

  15. A Controlled Release Codelivery System of MSCs Encapsulated in Dextran/Gelatin Hydrogel with TGF-β3-Loaded Nanoparticles for Nucleus Pulposus Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yibo; Li, Sukai; Li, Pei; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Liyuan; Zhao, Chen; Ouyang, Bin; Tu, Bing; Zhang, Chengmin; Luo, Lei; Luo, Xiangdong; Mo, Xiumei; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell- (MSC-) based therapy is regarded as a potential tissue engineering strategy to achieve nucleus pulposus (NP) regeneration for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, it is still a challenge to induce MSC differentiation in NP-like cells when MSCs are implanted into the NP. The purpose of this study was to construct poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles as carriers for TGF-β3 controlled release and establish a codelivery system of a dextran/gelatin hydrogel with the nanoparticles for long-term processing of discogenesis differentiation. TGF-β3-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by the double-emulsion solvent evaporation method and seeded uniformly into the hydrogel. Morphological observations, an assessment of the release kinetics of TGF-β3, a cytotoxic assay, a cell proliferation test, a biochemical content assay, qRT-PCR, and immunohistological analyses of the codelivery system were conducted in the study. The results showed that the TGF-β3-loaded nanoparticles could release TGF-β3 gradually. The codelivery system exhibited favorable cytocompatibility, and the TGF-β3 that was released could induce MSCs to NP-like cells while promoting ECM-related biosynthesis. These results suggest this codelivery system may be employed as a promising carrier for discogenesis of MSCs in situ.

  16. Thermo-sensitive composite hydrogels based on poloxamer 407 and alginate and their therapeutic effect in embolization in rabbit VX2 liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lili; Shen, Ming; Li, Rongxin; Zhang, Xiangyu; Sun, Ying; Gao, Pei; Fu, Hao; Liu, Hongqiang; He, Yang; Du, Yuqing; Cao, Jun; Duan, Yourong

    2016-01-01

    Interventional embolization therapy is an effective, most widely used method for inoperable liver tumors. Blood-vessel-embolic agents were essential in transarterial embolization (TAE). In this work, thermo-sensitive composite hydrogels based on poloxamer 407, sodium alginate, hydroxymethyl cellulose and iodixanol (PSHI), together with Ca2+ (PSHI-Ca2+) were prepared as liquid embolic agents for TAE therapy to liver cancer. With increasing temperature, PSHI exhibited two phase states: a flowing sol and a shrunken gel. Rheology tests showed good fluidity and excellent viscoelastic behavior with a gelation temperature (GT) of 26.5°C. The studies of erosion indicated that PSHI had calcium ion-related erosion characteristics and showed a slow erosion rate in an aqueous environment. When incubated with L929 cells, the thermo-sensitive composite hydrogels had low cytotoxicity in vitro. The results of analyzing the digital subtraction angiography and computed tomography images obtained from in vitro and in vivo assays indicated a good embolic effect in the renal arteries of normal rabbits. Angiography and histological studies on VX2 tumor-bearing rabbits indicated that PSHI-Ca2+ successfully occluded the tumors, including the peripheral vessels. In conclusion, PSHI-Ca2+ was a promising embolic agent for transarterial embolization therapy. PMID:27602579

  17. Ex vivo cultures of glioblastoma in three-dimensional hydrogel maintain the original tumor growth behavior and are suitable for preclinical drug and radiation sensitivity screening

    SciTech Connect

    Jiguet Jiglaire, Carine; Baeza-Kallee, Nathalie; Denicolaï, Emilie; Barets, Doriane; Metellus, Philippe; and others

    2014-02-15

    Identification of new drugs and predicting drug response are major challenges in oncology, especially for brain tumors, because total surgical resection is difficult and radiation therapy or chemotherapy is often ineffective. With the aim of developing a culture system close to in vivo conditions for testing new drugs, we characterized an ex vivo three-dimensional culture system based on a hyaluronic acid-rich hydrogel and compared it with classical two-dimensional culture conditions. U87-MG glioblastoma cells and seven primary cell cultures of human glioblastomas were subjected to radiation therapy and chemotherapy drugs. It appears that 3D hydrogel preserves the original cancer growth behavior and enables assessment of the sensitivity of malignant gliomas to radiation and drugs with regard to inter-tumoral heterogeneity of therapeutic response. It could be used for preclinical assessment of new therapies. - Highlights: • We have compared primary glioblastoma cell culture in a 2D versus 3D-matrix system. • In 3D morphology, organization and markers better recapitulate the original tumor. • 3D-matrix culture might represent a relevant system for more accurate drug screening.

  18. Thermo-sensitive composite hydrogels based on poloxamer 407 and alginate and their therapeutic effect in embolization in rabbit VX2 liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lili; Shen, Ming; Li, Rongxin; Zhang, Xiangyu; Sun, Ying; Gao, Pei; Fu, Hao; Liu, Hongqiang; He, Yang; Du, Yuqing; Cao, Jun; Duan, Yourong

    2016-11-08

    Interventional embolization therapy is an effective, most widely used method for inoperable liver tumors. Blood-vessel-embolic agents were essential in transarterial embolization (TAE). In this work, thermo-sensitive composite hydrogels based on poloxamer 407, sodium alginate, hydroxymethyl cellulose and iodixanol (PSHI), together with Ca2+ (PSHI-Ca2+) were prepared as liquid embolic agents for TAE therapy to liver cancer. With increasing temperature, PSHI exhibited two phase states: a flowing sol and a shrunken gel. Rheology tests showed good fluidity and excellent viscoelastic behavior with a gelation temperature (GT) of 26.5°C. The studies of erosion indicated that PSHI had calcium ion-related erosion characteristics and showed a slow erosion rate in an aqueous environment. When incubated with L929 cells, the thermo-sensitive composite hydrogels had low cytotoxicity in vitro. The results of analyzing the digital subtraction angiography and computed tomography images obtained from in vitro and in vivo assays indicated a good embolic effect in the renal arteries of normal rabbits. Angiography and histological studies on VX2 tumor-bearing rabbits indicated that PSHI-Ca2+ successfully occluded the tumors, including the peripheral vessels. In conclusion, PSHI-Ca2+ was a promising embolic agent for transarterial embolization therapy.

  19. A Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Curcumin Supramolecular Hydrogel for liver tumor targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqin; Li, Jinliang; Cai, Yanbin; Zhan, Jie; Gao, Jie; Song, Mingcai; Shi, Yang; Yang, Zhimou

    2017-03-10

    Curcumin (Cur), a phenolic anti-oxidant compound obtained from Curcuma longa plant, possesses a variety of therapeutic properties. However, it is suffered from its low water solubility and low bioavailability property, which seriously restricts its clinical application. In this study, we developed a glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) modified curcumin supramolecular pro-gelator (GA-Cur) and a control compound Nap-Cur by replacing GA with the naphthylacetic acid (Nap). Both compounds showed good water solubility and could form supramolecular gels by disulfide bond reduction triggered by glutathione (GSH) in vitro. Both formed gels could sustainedly release Cur in buffer solutions. We also investigated the cytotoxicity of pro-gelators to HepG2 cells by a MTT assay and determined the cellular uptake behaviours of them by fluorescence microscopy and LC-MS. Due to the over expression of GA receptor in liver cancer cells, our pro-gelator of GA-Cur showed an enhanced cellular uptake and better inhibition capacity to liver tumor cells than Nap-Cur. Therefore, the GA-Cur could significantly inhibit HepG2 cell growth. Our study provides a novel nanomaterial for liver tumor chemotherapy.

  20. A Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Curcumin Supramolecular Hydrogel for liver tumor targeting therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoqin; Li, Jinliang; Cai, Yanbin; Zhan, Jie; Gao, Jie; Song, Mingcai; Shi, Yang; Yang, Zhimou

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin (Cur), a phenolic anti-oxidant compound obtained from Curcuma longa plant, possesses a variety of therapeutic properties. However, it is suffered from its low water solubility and low bioavailability property, which seriously restricts its clinical application. In this study, we developed a glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) modified curcumin supramolecular pro-gelator (GA-Cur) and a control compound Nap-Cur by replacing GA with the naphthylacetic acid (Nap). Both compounds showed good water solubility and could form supramolecular gels by disulfide bond reduction triggered by glutathione (GSH) in vitro. Both formed gels could sustainedly release Cur in buffer solutions. We also investigated the cytotoxicity of pro-gelators to HepG2 cells by a MTT assay and determined the cellular uptake behaviours of them by fluorescence microscopy and LC-MS. Due to the over expression of GA receptor in liver cancer cells, our pro-gelator of GA-Cur showed an enhanced cellular uptake and better inhibition capacity to liver tumor cells than Nap-Cur. Therefore, the GA-Cur could significantly inhibit HepG2 cell growth. Our study provides a novel nanomaterial for liver tumor chemotherapy. PMID:28281678

  1. A Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Curcumin Supramolecular Hydrogel for liver tumor targeting therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoqin; Li, Jinliang; Cai, Yanbin; Zhan, Jie; Gao, Jie; Song, Mingcai; Shi, Yang; Yang, Zhimou

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin (Cur), a phenolic anti-oxidant compound obtained from Curcuma longa plant, possesses a variety of therapeutic properties. However, it is suffered from its low water solubility and low bioavailability property, which seriously restricts its clinical application. In this study, we developed a glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) modified curcumin supramolecular pro-gelator (GA-Cur) and a control compound Nap-Cur by replacing GA with the naphthylacetic acid (Nap). Both compounds showed good water solubility and could form supramolecular gels by disulfide bond reduction triggered by glutathione (GSH) in vitro. Both formed gels could sustainedly release Cur in buffer solutions. We also investigated the cytotoxicity of pro-gelators to HepG2 cells by a MTT assay and determined the cellular uptake behaviours of them by fluorescence microscopy and LC-MS. Due to the over expression of GA receptor in liver cancer cells, our pro-gelator of GA-Cur showed an enhanced cellular uptake and better inhibition capacity to liver tumor cells than Nap-Cur. Therefore, the GA-Cur could significantly inhibit HepG2 cell growth. Our study provides a novel nanomaterial for liver tumor chemotherapy.

  2. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S P; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2015-07-14

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation.

  3. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S. P.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation. PMID:26184185

  4. Functional surface engineering of quantum dot hydrogels for selective fluorescence imaging of extracellular lactate release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Ding, Shushu; Cao, Sumei; Zhu, Anwei; Shi, Guoyue

    2016-06-15

    Selective and sensitive detection of extracellular lactate is of fundamental significance for studying the metabolic alterations in tumor progression. Here we report the rational design and synthesis of a quantum-dot-hydrogel-based fluorescent probe for biosensing and bioimaging the extracellular lactate. By surface engineering the destabilized quantum dot sol with Nile Blue, the destabilized Nile-Blue-functionalized quantum dot sol cannot only self-assemble forming quantum dot hydrogel but also monitor lactate in the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactor and lactate dehydrogenase through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Notably, the surface engineered quantum dot hydrogel show high selectivity toward lactate over common metal ions, amino acids and other small molecules that widely coexist in biological system. Moreover, the destabilized Nile-Blue-functionalized quantum dots can encapsulate isolated cancer cells when self-assembled into a hydrogel and thus specifically detect and image the extracellular lactate metabolism. By virtue of these properties, the functionalized quantum dot hydrogel was further successfully applied to monitor the effect of metabolic agents.

  5. Zoledronic acid-encapsulating self-assembling nanoparticles and doxorubicin: a combinatorial approach to overcome simultaneously chemoresistance and immunoresistance in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kopecka, Joanna; Porto, Stefania; Lusa, Sara; Gazzano, Elena; Salzano, Giuseppina; Pinzòn-Daza, Martha Leonor; Giordano, Antonio; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Ghigo, Dario; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Caraglia, Michele; Riganti, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The resistance to chemotherapy and the tumor escape from host immunosurveillance are the main causes of the failure of anthracycline-based regimens in breast cancer, where an effective chemo-immunosensitizing strategy is lacking. The clinically used aminobisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZA) reverses chemoresistance and immunoresistance in vitro. Previously we developed a nanoparticle-based zoledronic acid-containing formulation (NZ) that allowed a higher intratumor delivery of the drug compared with free ZA in vivo. We tested its efficacy in combination with doxorubicin in breast tumors refractory to chemotherapy and immune system recognition as a new combinatorial approach to produce chemo- and immunosensitization. NZ reduced the IC50 of doxorubicin in human and murine chemoresistant breast cancer cells and restored the doxorubicin efficacy against chemo-immunoresistant tumors implanted in immunocompetent mice. By reducing the metabolic flux through the mevalonate pathway, NZ lowered the activity of Ras/ERK1/2/HIF-1α axis and the expression of P-glycoprotein, decreased the glycolysis and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, induced a cytochrome c/caspase 9/caspase 3-dependent apoptosis, thus restoring the direct cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on tumor cell. Moreover, NZ restored the doxorubicin-induced immunogenic cell death and reversed the tumor-induced immunosuppression due to the production of kynurenine, by inhibiting the STAT3/indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase axis. These events increased the number of dendritic cells and decreased the number of immunosuppressive T-regulatory cells infiltrating the tumors. Our work proposes the use of nanoparticle encapsulating zoledronic acid as an effective tool overcoming at the same time chemoresistance and immunoresistance in breast tumors, thanks to the effects exerted on tumor cell and tumor-infiltrating immune cells. PMID:26980746

  6. Zoledronic acid-encapsulating self-assembling nanoparticles and doxorubicin: a combinatorial approach to overcome simultaneously chemoresistance and immunoresistance in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Kopecka, Joanna; Porto, Stefania; Lusa, Sara; Gazzano, Elena; Salzano, Giuseppina; Pinzòn-Daza, Martha Leonor; Giordano, Antonio; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Ghigo, Dario; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Caraglia, Michele; Riganti, Chiara

    2016-04-12

    The resistance to chemotherapy and the tumor escape from host immunosurveillance are the main causes of the failure of anthracycline-based regimens in breast cancer, where an effective chemo-immunosensitizing strategy is lacking.The clinically used aminobisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZA) reverses chemoresistance and immunoresistance in vitro. Previously we developed a nanoparticle-based zoledronic acid-containing formulation (NZ) that allowed a higher intratumor delivery of the drug compared with free ZA in vivo. We tested its efficacy in combination with doxorubicin in breast tumors refractory to chemotherapy and immune system recognition as a new combinatorial approach to produce chemo- and immunosensitization.NZ reduced the IC50 of doxorubicin in human and murine chemoresistant breast cancer cells and restored the doxorubicin efficacy against chemo-immunoresistant tumors implanted in immunocompetent mice. By reducing the metabolic flux through the mevalonate pathway, NZ lowered the activity of Ras/ERK1/2/HIF-1α axis and the expression of P-glycoprotein, decreased the glycolysis and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, induced a cytochrome c/caspase 9/caspase 3-dependent apoptosis, thus restoring the direct cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on tumor cell. Moreover, NZ restored the doxorubicin-induced immunogenic cell death and reversed the tumor-induced immunosuppression due to the production of kynurenine, by inhibiting the STAT3/indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase axis. These events increased the number of dendritic cells and decreased the number of immunosuppressive T-regulatory cells infiltrating the tumors.Our work proposes the use of nanoparticle encapsulating zoledronic acid as an effective tool overcoming at the same time chemoresistance and immunoresistance in breast tumors, thanks to the effects exerted on tumor cell and tumor-infiltrating immune cells.

  7. Encapsulation of Adipose Stromal Vascular Fraction Cells in Alginate Hydrogel Spheroids Using a Direct-Write Three-Dimensional Printing System

    PubMed Central

    Touroo, Jeremy S.; Church, Kenneth H.; Hoying, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The study of tissue function in vitro has been aided by the development of three-dimensional culture systems that more accurately duplicate the complex cell components of tissues and organs. Bioprinting of cells provides a rapid tissue fabrication technique that can be used to evaluate normal and pathologic conditions in vitro as well as to construct complex three-dimensional tissue structures for implantation in regenerative medicine therapies. Studies were performed using a direct write three-dimensional bioprinting system to fabricate adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cell spheroids. Human fat–derived stromal vascular fraction cells were mixed in 1.5% (w/v) alginate solutions, and fabrication conditions were varied to produce an array of spheroids. The spheroids were placed in spinner culture, and spheroid integrity and encapsulated cell viability were assessed for 16 days. Results establish the ability to tightly control adipose SVF spheroids in the range of 800–1500 μm. Fabrication conditions were used to control spheroid size, and the results illustrate the ability to construct spheroids of precise size and shape. The adipose SVF cell population remains viable and the spheroid integrity was maintained for 16 days in suspension culture. The direct-write printing of adipose stromal vascular fraction cell containing spheroids provides a rapid fabrication technology to support in vitro microphysiologic system studies. PMID:24380055

  8. Indocyanine green encapsulated nanogels for hyaluronidase activatable and selective near infrared imaging of tumors and lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Mok, Hyejung; Jeong, Hyunkyung; Kim, Sun-Jung; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2012-09-07

    Indocyanine green (ICG) encapsulated hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels were first studied for highly selective detection of specific cancers and lymph nodes via hyaluronidase sensitive switch-on of near infrared fluorescence as a long-lasting and stimuli-responsive imaging probe.

  9. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5–8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  10. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable and Tough Hydrogels into Complex, Cellularized Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Sycks, Dalton; Chan, Hon Fai; Lin, Shaoting; Lopez, Gabriel P; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-07-15

    X. Zhao and co-workers develop on page 4035 a new biocompatible hydrogel system that is extremely tough and stretchable and can be 3D printed into complex structures, such as the multilayer mesh shown. Cells encapsulated in the tough and printable hydrogel maintain high viability. 3D-printed structures of the tough hydrogel can sustain high mechanical loads and deformations.

  11. Enhanced antitumor effects by docetaxel/LL37-loaded thermosensitive hydrogel nanoparticles in peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rangrang; Tong, Aiping; Li, Xiaoling; Gao, Xiang; Mei, Lan; Zhou, Liangxue; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Intraperitoneal chemotherapy was explored in clinical trials as a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. In this work, we developed a biodegradable and injectable drug-delivery system by coencapsulation of docetaxel (Doc) and LL37 peptide polymeric nanoparticles (Doc+LL37 NPs) in a thermosensitive hydrogel system for colorectal peritoneal carcinoma therapy. Firstly, polylactic acid (PLA)-Pluronic L35-PLA (PLA-L35-PLA) was explored to prepare the biodegradable Doc+LL37 NPs using a water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion solvent-evaporation method. Then, biodegradable and injectable thermosensitive PLA-L64-PLA hydrogel with lower sol–gel transition temperature at around body temperature was also prepared. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Doc+LL37 NPs formed with the PLA-L35-PLA copolymer were spherical. Fourier-transform infrared spectra certified that Doc and LL37 were encapsulated successfully. X-ray diffraction diagrams indicated that Doc was encapsulated amorphously. Intraperitoneal administration of Doc+LL37 NPs–hydrogel significantly suppressed the growth of HCT116 peritoneal carcinomatosis in vivo and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results suggested that Doc+LL37 NPs–hydrogel may have potential clinical applications. PMID:26664119

  12. Enhanced antitumor effects by docetaxel/LL37-loaded thermosensitive hydrogel nanoparticles in peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rangrang; Tong, Aiping; Li, Xiaoling; Gao, Xiang; Mei, Lan; Zhou, Liangxue; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Intraperitoneal chemotherapy was explored in clinical trials as a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. In this work, we developed a biodegradable and injectable drug-delivery system by coencapsulation of docetaxel (Doc) and LL37 peptide polymeric nanoparticles (Doc+LL37 NPs) in a thermosensitive hydrogel system for colorectal peritoneal carcinoma therapy. Firstly, polylactic acid (PLA)-Pluronic L35-PLA (PLA-L35-PLA) was explored to prepare the biodegradable Doc+LL37 NPs using a water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion solvent-evaporation method. Then, biodegradable and injectable thermosensitive PLA-L64-PLA hydrogel with lower sol-gel transition temperature at around body temperature was also prepared. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Doc+LL37 NPs formed with the PLA-L35-PLA copolymer were spherical. Fourier-transform infrared spectra certified that Doc and LL37 were encapsulated successfully. X-ray diffraction diagrams indicated that Doc was encapsulated amorphously. Intraperitoneal administration of Doc+LL37 NPs-hydrogel significantly suppressed the growth of HCT116 peritoneal carcinomatosis in vivo and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results suggested that Doc+LL37 NPs-hydrogel may have potential clinical applications.

  13. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate, polymerized rapidly and produced some polymer film encapsulation of the aerosol droplets. A two-stage microcapsule generator was designed...encapsulating material, the generator also produced microcapsules of dibutyl phosphite in polyethylene, nitrocellulose, and natural rubber.

  14. 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable and Tough Hydrogels into Complex, Cellularized Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Sycks, Dalton; Chan, Hon Fai; Lin, Shaoting; Lopez, Gabriel P; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-07-15

    A 3D printable and highly stretchable tough hydrogel is developed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) and sodium alginate, which synergize to form a hydrogel tougher than natural cartilage. Encapsulated cells maintain high viability over a 7 d culture period and are highly deformed together with the hydrogel. By adding biocompatible nanoclay, the tough hydrogel is 3D printed in various shapes without requiring support material.

  15. Liposome-encapsulated actinomycin for cancer chemotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh-Erh; Cerny, Elizabeth A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for chemotherapy of malignant tumors by injection of antitumor drugs. The antitumor drug is encapsulated within liposomes and the liposomes containing the encapsulated drug are injected into the body. The encapsulated drug penetrates into the tumor cells where the drug is slowly released and induces degeneration and death of the tumor cells, while any toxicity to the host body is reduced. Liposome encapsulation of actinomycin D has been found to be particularly effective in treating cancerous abdominal tumors, while drastically reducing the toxicity of actinomycin D to the host.

  16. Deterministic encapsulation of single cells in thin tunable microgels for niche modelling and therapeutic delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Angelo S.; Shin, Jae-Won; Utech, Stefanie; Wang, Huanan; Uzun, Oktay; Li, Weiwei; Cooper, Madeline; Hu, Yuebi; Zhang, Liyuan; Weitz, David A.; Mooney, David J.

    2016-10-01

    Existing techniques to encapsulate cells into microscale hydrogels generally yield high polymer-to-cell ratios and lack control over the hydrogel's mechanical properties. Here, we report a microfluidic-based method for encapsulating single cells in an approximately six-micrometre layer of alginate that increases the proportion of cell-containing microgels by a factor of ten, with encapsulation efficiencies over 90%. We show that in vitro cell viability was maintained over a three-day period, that the microgels are mechanically tractable, and that, for microscale cell assemblages of encapsulated marrow stromal cells cultured in microwells, osteogenic differentiation of encapsulated cells depends on gel stiffness and cell density. We also show that intravenous injection of singly encapsulated marrow stromal cells into mice delays clearance kinetics and sustains donor-derived soluble factors in vivo. The encapsulation of single cells in tunable hydrogels should find use in a variety of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  17. Deterministic encapsulation of single cells in thin tunable microgels for niche modelling and therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Mao, Angelo S; Shin, Jae-Won; Utech, Stefanie; Wang, Huanan; Uzun, Oktay; Li, Weiwei; Cooper, Madeline; Hu, Yuebi; Zhang, Liyuan; Weitz, David A; Mooney, David J

    2017-02-01

    Existing techniques to encapsulate cells into microscale hydrogels generally yield high polymer-to-cell ratios and lack control over the hydrogel's mechanical properties. Here, we report a microfluidic-based method for encapsulating single cells in an approximately six-micrometre layer of alginate that increases the proportion of cell-containing microgels by a factor of ten, with encapsulation efficiencies over 90%. We show that in vitro cell viability was maintained over a three-day period, that the microgels are mechanically tractable, and that, for microscale cell assemblages of encapsulated marrow stromal cells cultured in microwells, osteogenic differentiation of encapsulated cells depends on gel stiffness and cell density. We also show that intravenous injection of singly encapsulated marrow stromal cells into mice delays clearance kinetics and sustains donor-derived soluble factors in vivo. The encapsulation of single cells in tunable hydrogels should find use in a variety of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  18. Facile synthesis of soybean phospholipid-encapsulated MoS2 nanosheets for efficient in vitro and in vivo photothermal regression of breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Gong, Yun; Zhou, Xiaoqian; Jin, Hui; Yan, Huanhuan; Wang, Shige; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet has been extensively explored as a photothermal agent for tumor regression; however, its surface modification remains a great challenge. Herein, as an alternative to surface polyethylene glycol modification (PEGylation), a facile approach based on “thin-film” strategy has been proposed for the first time to produce soybean phospholipid-encapsulated MoS2 (SP-MoS2) nanosheets. By simply vacuum-treating MoS2 nanosheets/soybean phospholipid/chloroform dispersion in a rotary evaporator, SP-MoS2 nanosheet was successfully constructed. Owing to the steric hindrance of polymer chains, the surface-coated soybean phospholipid endowed MoS2 nanosheets with excellent colloidal stability. Without showing detectable in vitro and in vivo hemolysis, coagulation, and cyto-/histotoxicity, the constructed SP-MoS2 nanosheets showed good photothermal conversion performance and photothermal stability. SP-MoS2 nanosheet was shown to be a promising platform for in vitro and in vivo breast tumor photothermal therapy. The produced SP-MoS2 nanosheets featured low cost, simple fabrication, and good in vivo hemo-/histocompatibility and hold promising potential for future clinical tumor therapy. PMID:27199557

  19. Facile synthesis of soybean phospholipid-encapsulated MoS2 nanosheets for efficient in vitro and in vivo photothermal regression of breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Gong, Yun; Zhou, Xiaoqian; Jin, Hui; Yan, Huanhuan; Wang, Shige; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet has been extensively explored as a photothermal agent for tumor regression; however, its surface modification remains a great challenge. Herein, as an alternative to surface polyethylene glycol modification (PEGylation), a facile approach based on "thin-film" strategy has been proposed for the first time to produce soybean phospholipid-encapsulated MoS2 (SP-MoS2) nanosheets. By simply vacuum-treating MoS2 nanosheets/soybean phospholipid/chloroform dispersion in a rotary evaporator, SP-MoS2 nanosheet was successfully constructed. Owing to the steric hindrance of polymer chains, the surface-coated soybean phospholipid endowed MoS2 nanosheets with excellent colloidal stability. Without showing detectable in vitro and in vivo hemolysis, coagulation, and cyto-/histotoxicity, the constructed SP-MoS2 nanosheets showed good photothermal conversion performance and photothermal stability. SP-MoS2 nanosheet was shown to be a promising platform for in vitro and in vivo breast tumor photothermal therapy. The produced SP-MoS2 nanosheets featured low cost, simple fabrication, and good in vivo hemo-/histocompatibility and hold promising potential for future clinical tumor therapy.

  20. Functional hydrogel contact lens for drug delivery in the application of oculopathy therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaohong; Tan, Huaping; Hao, Lingyun

    2016-12-01

    Although hydrogel contact lens has attracted increasingly concerns as delivery carriers in the field of oculopathy therapy, traditional hydrogel does not show excellent drug encapsulated and controlled properties due to simple hydrophilic polymer chain lacking extra interaction with drug molecule. Herein, functional hydrogels were synthesized in this research to delivery ophthalmic drug for oculopathy therapy. Functional monomer of mono-GMA-β-CD and functional crosslinker of MA-β-CD were incorporated into hydrogel by copolymerization. For hydrogels, equilibrium swelling ratio and contact angle was influenced by mono-GMA-β-CD ratio and MA-β-CD ratio, respectively. All hydrogels exhibited similar water loss behavior and good transparency. Hydrogels had rheological characteristic of typical elastomer. Viscoelasticity and surface morphology of hydrogel were also affected by mono-GMA-β-CD ratio and MA-β-CD ratio. In the aspect of properties, functional hydrogel containing β-CD domain exhibited better protein resistance capacity and significantly higher equilibrium encapsulated drug amount than traditional hydrogel. Besides the performance, drug release behavior of drug encapsulated hydrogel was adjusted by both mono-GMA-β-CD ratio and MA-β-CD ratio. Preliminary in vivo evaluation revealed that functional hydrogel contact lens had better effect and efficacy on lowering intraocular tension than commercial eye drop. It is inferred from all results that functional contact lens has a bright prospect in the application of oculopathy therapy.

  1. Versatile click alginate hydrogels crosslinked via tetrazine-norbornene chemistry.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rajiv M; Koshy, Sandeep T; Hilderbrand, Scott A; Mooney, David J; Joshi, Neel S

    2015-05-01

    Alginate hydrogels are well-characterized, biologically inert materials that are used in many biomedical applications for the delivery of drugs, proteins, and cells. Unfortunately, canonical covalently crosslinked alginate hydrogels are formed using chemical strategies that can be biologically harmful due to their lack of chemoselectivity. In this work we introduce tetrazine and norbornene groups to alginate polymer chains and subsequently form covalently crosslinked click alginate hydrogels capable of encapsulating cells without damaging them. The rapid, bioorthogonal, and specific click reaction is irreversible and allows for easy incorporation of cells with high post-encapsulation viability. The swelling and mechanical properties of the click alginate hydrogel can be tuned via the total polymer concentration and the stoichiometric ratio of the complementary click functional groups. The click alginate hydrogel can be modified after gelation to display cell adhesion peptides for 2D cell culture using thiol-ene chemistry. Furthermore, click alginate hydrogels are minimally inflammatory, maintain structural integrity over several months, and reject cell infiltration when injected subcutaneously in mice. Click alginate hydrogels combine the numerous benefits of alginate hydrogels with powerful bioorthogonal click chemistry for use in tissue engineering applications involving the stable encapsulation or delivery of cells or bioactive molecules.

  2. A photo-degradable supramolecular hydrogel for selective delivery of microRNA into 3D-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengquan; Yi, Qikun; Xia, Tingting; Yin, Wencui; Kadi, Adnan A; Li, Jinbo; Zhang, Yan

    2017-03-08

    Multi-functional supramolecular hydrogels have emerged as smart biomaterials for diverse biomedical applications. Here we report a multi-functional supramolecular hydrogel formed by the conjugate of the bioactive GRGDS peptide with biaryltetrazole that is the substrate of photo-click reaction. The hydrogel was used as a biocompatible matrix to encapsulate live cells for 3D culture. The presence of the RGD epitope in the hydrogelator enhanced the interaction of the nanofiber with integrin over-expressing cells, which resulted in the selective enhancement in the miRNA delivery into the encapsulated U87 cells. The intramolecular photo-click reaction of the biaryltetrazole moiety in the hydrogelator leads to a sensitive photo-response of the hydrogel, which allowed photo-degradation of the hydrogel for release of the encapsulated live cells for further bio-assay of the intracellular species.

  3. Combination between Taxol-Encapsulated Liposomes and Eruca sativa Seed Extract Suppresses Mammary Tumors in Female Rats Induced by 7,12 Dimethylbenz(α)anthracene.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Nadia; Abdel-Rahman, Salah; Haggag, Amany; Awad, Doaa; Bassiouny, Ahmad; Talaat, Iman

    2016-01-01

    Taxol (paclitaxel) is a powerful anti-cancer drug widely used against several types of malignant tumors. Because Taxol may exert several side effects, a variety of formulations have been developed. One of these features liposomes, regarded as one of the most promising drug carriers, biocompatible and best able to reduce drug toxicity without changing efficacy against tumor cells. Eruca sativa seed extract (SE) is considered a promising natural product from cruciferous vegetables against breast cancer, increasing chemotherapeutic and eliminating harmful side effects. The effects of Taxol-encapsulated liposomes (T) alone and in combination between Eruca sativa seed extract on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) gene expression levels were investigated in rat mammary gland carcinogenesis induced by 7,12 dimethylbenz(α) anthracene (DMBA) using qRT-PCR. The results showed that DMBA increased NF-κB, COX-2 and Bcl-2 gene expression levels and lipid peroxidation (LP), while decreasing glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and total antioxidant concentration (TAC) compared to the control group. T and T-SE treatment reduced NF-κB, COX-2 and Bcl-2 gene expression levels and LP. Hence, T and T-SE treatment appeared to reduce inflammation and cell proliferation, while increasing apoptosis, GST and SOD activities and TAC.

  4. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition is Superior to Vessels-Encapsulate Tumor Cluster in Promoting Metastasis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: a Morphological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    He, Chuanchao; Zhou, Zhenyu; Jiang, Hai; Yin, Zi; Meng, Shiyu; Zhang, Jianlong; Huang, Pinbo; Xu, Kang; Bian, Lijuan; Xiao, Zhiyu; Wang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Vessels-encapsulate tumor cluster (VETC) is a vascular pattern distinct from classical capillary-like pattern. It is reported that VETC structure is common in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and can promote HCC metastasis in an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-independent but VETC-dependent manner. However, the main metastatic manner of HCC containing both VETC and classical vascular structure (we called VETC±) is unknown. Methods Vascular pattern types and E-cadherin expression were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining in 168 HCC tissues, 50 pairs of primary HCC tissues and intrahepatic metastatic lesions, as well as 12 pairs of primary HCC tissues and major portal vein tumor thrombus. Survival and recurrence rates were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the independent prognostic factors of HCC. Results VETC± cases were more common than VETC+ cases (HCC tissues with a VETC pattern fully distributed in the HCC section) in HCC. Statistical analysis showed that VETC± was an independent predictor of survival and recurrence. Furthermore, E-cadherin was positively correlated with the presence of VETC structure. In the case of HCCs with VETC±, their metastases (both intrahepatic and major vascular) were more likely to be VETC negative. Conclusions Our findings suggest that EMT may be superior to VETC in promoting HCC metastasis. Thus, both anti-EMT and anti-VETC agents should be considered in the case of HCC with VETC±. PMID:28123596

  5. The influence of phospholipid on the physicochemical properties and anti-tumor efficacy of liposomes encapsulating cisplatin in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alavizadeh, Seyedeh Hoda; Badiee, Ali; Golmohammadzadeh, Shiva; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2014-10-01

    SPI-077, cisplatin stealth liposome, is the best illustration of poor cisplatin release from liposomes and the subsequent negligible therapeutic activity. For this reason, optimizing drug release kinetics is desirable. In this report, cisplatin was encapsulated in liposomes composed of different phosphatidylcholines with various phase transition temperatures (Tm) (HSPC, DPPC, DMPC, soy phosphatidylcholine (SPC)), cholesterol and mPEG2000-DSPE. In vitro cytotoxicity studies indicated that lowering Tm of lipids increases cisplatin release; the highest cytotoxicity was observed in SPCs. Cisplatin plasma concentration was also sensitive to the transition temperature. The highest platinum concentration observed after treatment with HSPC and DPPC liposomes, whilst the lowest was observed with SPC. HSPC and DPPC containing liposomes showed the highest therapeutic efficacy and survival with DPPC exhibited better efficacy in mouse model of C26. It seems that DPPC with Tm (41.5°C) nearly, or close to body temperature maintains good drug retention in blood circulation. Upon extravasation through permeable tumor microvasculature, it gradually releases its payload in the tumor area better than HSPC, with a greater Tm of 55°C. Our data suggests, the choice of Tm for lipid mixture directed to a considerable extent the rate of cisplatin elimination from plasma and therapeutic effects.

  6. Highly stable microwave susceptible agents via encapsulation of Ti-mineral superfine powders in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules for tumor hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Dan; Mao, Jingsong; Liu, Tianlong; Fu, Changhui; Tan, Longfei; Ren, Xiangling; Shi, Haitang; Su, Hongying; Ren, Jun; Meng, Xianwei

    2016-05-01

    In this study, Ti-mineral superfine powders (Ti-MSP) encapsulated in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules (Ti-MSP@UF-MC) were successfully prepared via a one-step microemulsion method for the first time. Because of the strong confinement effects, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC possessed perfect microwave heating effects. The temperature was 9.3 °C higher than that of the saline solution, superior to UF-MC (no significant microwave heating effect, 0 °C) and Ti-MSP (5.1 °C). The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed low toxicity and good biocompatibility via a series of studies, including a hemolysis study and the MTT assay in vitro and in vivo. When the concentration was below 1000 μg mL-1, the hemolysis rate was lower than 5% (hemolysis study). When the concentration was below 400 μg mL-1, the cell activity was higher than 80% (MTT assay). Moreover, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC exhibited an ideal CT imaging effect in vivo owing to the large molecular weight of Ti-MSP. The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed a favorable microwave therapy effect in vivo. Using mice bearing H22 tumor cells as an animal model, the tumor suppression rate could reach 100%.

  7. Highly stable microwave susceptible agents via encapsulation of Ti-mineral superfine powders in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules for tumor hyperthermia therapy.

    PubMed

    Long, Dan; Mao, Jingsong; Liu, Tianlong; Fu, Changhui; Tan, Longfei; Ren, Xiangling; Shi, Haitang; Su, Hongying; Ren, Jun; Meng, Xianwei

    2016-06-07

    In this study, Ti-mineral superfine powders (Ti-MSP) encapsulated in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules (Ti-MSP@UF-MC) were successfully prepared via a one-step microemulsion method for the first time. Because of the strong confinement effects, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC possessed perfect microwave heating effects. The temperature was 9.3 °C higher than that of the saline solution, superior to UF-MC (no significant microwave heating effect, 0 °C) and Ti-MSP (5.1 °C). The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed low toxicity and good biocompatibility via a series of studies, including a hemolysis study and the MTT assay in vitro and in vivo. When the concentration was below 1000 μg mL(-1), the hemolysis rate was lower than 5% (hemolysis study). When the concentration was below 400 μg mL(-1), the cell activity was higher than 80% (MTT assay). Moreover, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC exhibited an ideal CT imaging effect in vivo owing to the large molecular weight of Ti-MSP. The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed a favorable microwave therapy effect in vivo. Using mice bearing H22 tumor cells as an animal model, the tumor suppression rate could reach 100%.

  8. Effective induction of anti-tumor immunity using p5 HER-2/neu derived peptide encapsulated in fusogenic DOTAP cationic liposomes co-administrated with CpG-ODN.

    PubMed

    Mansourian, Mercedeh; Badiee, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Shariat, Sheida; Yazdani, Mona; Amin, Mohamdreza; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2014-11-01

    Cationic liposomes have been used as efficient antigen delivery systems for cancer vaccination. The current study has investigated whether the incorporation of the helper-fusogenic lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) in cationic liposomes composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP)-cholesterol enhances the cytosolic delivery of p5 HER-2/neu derived peptide (p5) and promotes cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) response. The p5, which is a very hydrophobic peptide, was encapsulated into liposomes by using three different methods and characterized for their colloidal properties. A chaotropic loading method using 7 M urea provided the highest encapsulation yields. Mice were first immunized with encapsulated p5 in liposomes composed of either DOTAP-cholesterol or DOTAP-cholesterol-DOPE, alone or co-administered with CpG-ODN, as an immunoadjuvant, then, inoculated with a subcutaneous injection of TUBO tumor cells. Results obtained from enzyme-linked immunospot, cytotoxicity and intracellular cytokine assays as well as tumor sizes and animal survival analysis demonstrated that p5 encapsulated in DOTAP-cholesterol-DOPE liposomes co-administered with CpG-ODN greatly enhanced the cytotoxic T lymphocytes response and highly inhibited the tumor progression. The outperformance of DOTAP-cholesterol-DOPE liposomes+CpG-ODN was found to be attributed to its capability in induction of both CD8+ and CD4+ responses. This formulation could be a suitable vaccine candidate against Her2 positive cancers and merits further investigations.

  9. Anticancer Drug Camptothecin Test in 3D Hydrogel Networks with HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jun; Susan Sun, Xiuzhi; Yang, Zhilong; Cao, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Development of a biomimetic 3D culture system for drug screening is necessary to fully understand the in vivo environment. Previously, a self-assembling peptide hydrogel has been reported; the hydrogel exhibited physiological properties superior to a 3D cell culture matrix. In this work, further research using H9e hydrogel with HeLa cells was carried out considering H9e hydrogel’s interaction with camptothecin, a hydrophobic drug. According to AFM images, a PGworks solution triggered H9e hydrogel fiber aggregation and forms a 3D matrix suitable for cell culture. Dynamic rheological studies showed that camptothecin was encapsulated within the hydrogel network concurrently with peptide self-assembly without permanently destroying the hydrogel’s architecture and remodeling ability. Fluorescence measurement indicated negligible interaction between the fluorophore part of camptothecin and the hydrogel, especially at concentration 0.25 and 0.5 wt%. Using a dialysis method, we found that H9e hydrogel could not significantly inhibit the diffusion of camptothecin encapsulated inside the hydrogel matrix. In the cell culture experiment, HeLa cells were simultaneously embedded in the H9e hydrogel with the initialization of hydrogelation. Most importantly, cell viability data after camptothecin treatment showed responses that were drug-dose dependent but unaffected by the H9e hydrogel concentration, indicating that the hydrogel did not inhibit the drug. PMID:28145436

  10. Designing hydrogels for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianyu; Mooney, David J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogel delivery systems can leverage therapeutically beneficial outcomes of drug delivery and have found clinical use. Hydrogels can provide spatial and temporal control over the release of various therapeutic agents, including small-molecule drugs, macromolecular drugs and cells. Owing to their tunable physical properties, controllable degradability and capability to protect labile drugs from degradation, hydrogels serve as a platform on which various physiochemical interactions with the encapsulated drugs occur to control drug release. In this Review, we cover multiscale mechanisms underlying the design of hydrogel drug delivery systems, focusing on physical and chemical properties of the hydrogel network and the hydrogel-drug interactions across the network, mesh and molecular (or atomistic) scales. We discuss how different mechanisms interact and can be integrated to exert fine control in time and space over drug presentation. We also collect experimental release data from the literature, review clinical translation to date of these systems and present quantitative comparisons between different systems to provide guidelines for the rational design of hydrogel delivery systems.

  11. Sustained release of adipose-derived stem cells by thermosensitive chitosan/gelatin hydrogel for therapeutic angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Nai-Chen; Lin, Wei-Jhih; Ling, Thai-Yen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2017-03-15

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) secrete several angiogenic growth factors and can be applied to treat ischemic tissue. However, transplantation of dissociated ASCs has frequently resulted in rapid cell death. Therefore, we aimed to develop a thermosensitive chitosan/gelatin hydrogel that is capable of ASC sustained release for therapeutic angiogenesis. By blending gelatin in the chitosan thermosensitive hydrogel, we significantly enhanced the viability of the encapsulated ASCs. During in vitro culturing, the gradual degradation of gelatin led to sustained release of ASCs from the chitosan/gelatin hydrogel. In vitro wound healing assays revealed significantly faster cell migration by co-culturing fibroblasts with ASCs encapsulated in chitosan/gelatin hydrogel compared to pure chitosan hydrogels. Additionally, significantly higher concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor were found in the supernatant of ASC-encapsulated chitosan/gelatin hydrogels. Co-culturing SVEC4-10 endothelial cells with ASC-encapsulated chitosan/gelatin hydrogels resulted in significantly more tube-like structures, indicating the hydrogel's potential in promoting angiogenesis. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay and mice wound healing model showed significantly higher capillary density after applying ASC-encapsulated chitosan/gelatin hydrogel. Relative to ASC alone or ASC-encapsulated chitosan hydrogel, more ASCs were also found in the wound tissue on post-wounding day 5 after applying ASC-encapsulated chitosan/gelatin hydrogel. Therefore, chitosan/gelatin thermosensitive hydrogels not only maintain ASC survival, they also enable sustained release of ASCs for therapeutic angiogenesis applications, thereby exhibiting great clinical potential in treating ischemic diseases.

  12. Thermoresponsive Magnetic Hydrogels as Theranostic Nanoconstructs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of thermoresponsive magnetic hydrogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) encapsulation of Fe3O4 magnetic nanostructures (MNS). In particular, we examined the effects of hydrogels encapsulated with poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) surface modified Fe3O4 MNS on magnetic resonance (MR) T2 (transverse spin relaxation) contrast enhancement and associated delivery efficacy of absorbed therapeutic cargo. The microstructural characterization reveal the regular spherical shape and size (∼200 nm) of the hydrogels with elevated hydrophilic to hydrophobic transition temperature (∼40 °C) characterized by LCST (lower critical solution temperature) due to the presence of encapsulated MNS. The hydrogel-MNS (HGMNS) system encapsulated with PEG functionalized Fe3O4 of 12 nm size (HGMNS-PEG-12) exhibited relaxivity rate (r2) of 173 mM–1s–1 compared to 129 mM–1s–1 obtained for hydrogel-MNS system encapsulated with POSS functionalized Fe3O4 (HGMNS-POSS-12) of the same size. Further studies with HGMNS-PEG-12 with absorbed drug doxorubicin (DOX) reveals approximately two-fold enhance in release during 1 h RF (radio-frequency) field exposure followed by 24 h incubation at 37 °C. Quantitatively, it is 2.1 μg mg–1 (DOX/HGMNS) DOX release with RF exposure while only 0.9 μg mg–1 release without RF exposure for the same period of incubation. Such enhanced release of therapeutic cargo is attributed to micro-environmental heating in the surroundings of MNS as well as magneto-mechanical vibrations under high frequency RF inside hydrogels. Similarly, RF-induced in vitro localized drug delivery studies with HeLa cell lines for HGMNS-PEG-12 resulted in more than 80% cell death with RF field exposures for 1 h. We therefore believe that magnetic hydrogel system has in vivo theranostic potential given high MR contrast enhancement from encapsulated MNS and RF-induced localized therapeutic delivery in one

  13. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with cell cleavable groups for autonomous cell delivery.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mrityunjoy; Vernon Shih, Yu-Ru; Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Cabrales, Pedro; Varghese, Shyni

    2016-01-01

    Cell-responsive hydrogels hold tremendous potential as cell delivery devices in regenerative medicine. In this study, we developed a hydrogel-based cell delivery vehicle, in which the encapsulated cell cargo control its own release from the vehicle in a protease-independent manner. Specifically, we have synthesized a modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel that undergoes degradation responding to cell-secreted molecules by incorporating disulfide moieties onto the backbone of the hydrogel precursor. Our results show the disulfide-modified PEG hydrogels disintegrate seamlessly into solution in presence of cells without any external stimuli. The rate of hydrogel degradation, which ranges from hours to months, is found to be dependent upon the type of encapsulated cells, cell number, and fraction of disulfide moieties present in the hydrogel backbone. The differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stem cells released from the hydrogels is maintained in vitro. The in vivo analysis of these cell-laden hydrogels, through a dorsal window chamber and intramuscular implantation, demonstrated autonomous release of cells to the host environment. The hydrogel-mediated implantation of cells resulted in higher cell retention within the host tissue when compared to that without a biomaterial support. Biomaterials that function as a shield to protect cell cargos and assist their delivery in response to signals from the encapsulated cells could have a wide utility in cell transplantation and could improve the therapeutic outcomes of cell-based therapies.

  14. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with cell cleavable groups for autonomous cell delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Mrityunjoy; Shih, Yu-Ru Vernon; Velez, Daniel Ortiz; Cabrales, Pedro; Varghese, Shyni

    2015-01-01

    Cell-responsive hydrogels hold tremendous potential as cell delivery devices in regenerative medicine. In this study, we developed a hydrogel-based cell delivery vehicle, in which the encapsulated cell cargo control its own release from the vehicle in a protease-independent manner. Specifically, we have synthesized a modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel that undergoes degradation responding to cell-secreted molecules by incorporating disulfide moieties onto the backbone of the hydrogel precursor. Our results show the disulfide-modified PEG hydrogels disintegrate seamlessly into solution in presence of cells without any external stimuli. The rate of hydrogel degradation, which ranges from hours to months, is found to be dependent upon the type of encapsulated cells, cell number, and fraction of disulfide moieties present in the hydrogel backbone. The differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stem cells released from the hydrogels is maintained in vitro. The in vivo analysis of these cell-laden hydrogels, through a dorsal window chamber and intramuscular implantation, demonstrated autonomous release of cells to the host environment. The hydrogel-mediated implantation of cells resulted in higher cell retention within the host tissue when compared to that without a biomaterial support. Biomaterials that function as a shield to protect cell cargos and assist their delivery in response to signals from the encapsulated cells could have a wide utility in cell transplantation and could improve the therapeutic outcomes of cell-based therapies. PMID:26606444

  15. Designing degradable hydrogels for orthogonal control of cell microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Kharkar, Prathamesh M.

    2013-01-01

    Degradable and cell-compatible hydrogels can be designed to mimic the physical and biochemical characteristics of native extracellular matrices and provide tunability of degradation rates and related properties under physiological conditions. Hence, such hydrogels are finding widespread application in many bioengineering fields, including controlled bioactive molecule delivery, cell encapsulation for controlled three-dimensional culture, and tissue engineering. Cellular processes, such as adhesion, proliferation, spreading, migration, and differentiation, can be controlled within degradable, cell-compatible hydrogels with temporal tuning of biochemical or biophysical cues, such as growth factor presentation or hydrogel stiffness. However, thoughtful selection of hydrogel base materials, formation chemistries, and degradable moieties is necessary to achieve the appropriate level of property control and desired cellular response. In this review, hydrogel design considerations and materials for hydrogel preparation, ranging from natural polymers to synthetic polymers, are overviewed. Recent advances in chemical and physical methods to crosslink hydrogels are highlighted, as well as recent developments in controlling hydrogel degradation rates and modes of degradation. Special attention is given to spatial or temporal presentation of various biochemical and biophysical cues to modulate cell response in static (i.e., non-degradable) or dynamic (i.e., degradable) microenvironments. This review provides insight into the design of new cell-compatible, degradable hydrogels to understand and modulate cellular processes for various biomedical applications. PMID:23609001

  16. Hydrogel design of experiments methodology to optimize hydrogel for iPSC-NPC culture.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jonathan; Carmichael, S Thomas; Lowry, William E; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-03-11

    Bioactive signals can be incorporated in hydrogels to direct encapsulated cell behavior. Design of experiments methodology methodically varies the signals systematically to determine the individual and combinatorial effects of each factor on cell activity. Using this approach enables the optimization of three ligands concentrations (RGD, YIGSR, IKVAV) for the survival and differentiation of neural progenitor cells.

  17. Injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel for delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fu, CuiXiang; Lin, XiaoXiao; Wang, Jun; Zheng, XiaoQun; Li, XingYi; Lin, ZhengFeng; Lin, GuangYong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel composed of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caplactone) (MPEG5000-PCL5000) micelles was developed by a simple method for hydrophobic anticancer drug delivery. By mixing α-CD aqueous solution and MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel could be formed under mild condition due to the inclusion complexation between α-CD and MPEG segment of MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles. The resultant supramolecular hydrogel was thereafter characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of α-CD amount on the gelation time, mechanical strength and thixotropic property was studied by a rheometer. Payload of hydrophobic paclitaxel (PTX) to supramolecular hydrogel was achieved by encapsulation of PTX into MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles prior mixing with α-CD aqueous solution. In vitro release study showed that the release behavior of PTX from hydrogel could be modulated by change the α-CD amount in hydrogel. Furthermore, such supramolecular hydrogel could enhance the biological activity of encapsulated PTX compared to free PTX, as indicated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay. All these results indicated that the developed micellar supramolecular hydrogel might be a promising injectable drug delivery system for anticancer therapy.

  18. Efficient antitumor effect of co-drug-loaded nanoparticles with gelatin hydrogel by local implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Tian, Yong; Zhu, Zhenshu; Xu, Huae; Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Donghui; Sun, Weihao

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet) could enhance the antitumor effect of Paclitaxel (Ptx) by increasing intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) levels, which leads to the possibility of co-delivery of both drugs for synergistic antitumor effect. In the current study, we reported an efficient, local therapeutic strategy employing effective Tet and Ptx delivery with a nanoparticle-loaded gelatin system. Tet- and Ptx co-loaded mPEG-PCL nanoparticles (P/T-NPs) were encapsulated into the physically cross-linked gelatin hydrogel and then implanted on the tumor site for continuous drug release. The drug-loaded gelatin hydrogel underwent a phase change when the temperature slowly increased. In vitro study showed that Tet/Ptx-loaded PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles encapsulated within a gelatin hydrogel (P/T-NPs-Gelatin) inhibited the growth and invasive ability of BGC-823 cells more effectively than the combination of free drugs or P/T-NPs. In vivo study validated the therapeutic potential of P/T-NPs-Gelatin. P/T-NPs-Gelatin significantly inhibited the activation of p-Akt and the downstream anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and also inducing the activation of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Moreover, the molecular-modulating effect of P/T-NPs-Gelatin on related proteins varied slightly under the influence of NAC, which was supported by the observations of the tumor volumes and weights. Based on these findings, local implantation of P/T-NPs-Gelatin may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27226240

  19. Encapsulation of new active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Onwulata, C I

    2012-01-01

    The organic construct consumed as food comes packaged in units that carry the active components and protect the entrapped active materials until delivered to targeted human organs. The packaging and delivery role is mimicked in the microencapsulation tools used to deliver active ingredients in processed foods. Microencapsulation efficiency is balanced against the need to access the entrapped nutrients in bioavailable forms. Encapsulated ingredients boosted with bioactive nutrients are intended for improved health and well-being and to prevent future health problems. Presently, active ingredients are delivered using new techniques, such as hydrogels, nanoemulsions, and nanoparticles. In the future, nutraceuticals and functional foods may be tailored to individual metabolic needs and tied to each person's genetic makeup. Bioactive ingredients provide health-enhancing nutrients and are protected through encapsulation processes that shield the active ingredients from deleterious environments.

  20. Evaluation of a mPEG-polyester-based hydrogel as cell carrier for chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sydney; Yang, Shu-Rui; Ko, Chao-Yin; Peng, Yu-Shiang; Chu, I-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Temperature-sensitive hydrogels are attractive alternatives to porous cell-seeded scaffolds and is minimally invasive through simple injection and in situ gelling. In this study, we compared the performance of two types of temperature-sensitive hydrogels on chondrocytes encapsulation for the use of tissue engineering of cartilage. The two hydrogels are composed of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)- poly(lactic-co-valerolactone) (mPEG-PVLA), and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic- co-glycolide) (mPEG-PLGA). Osmolarity and pH were optimized through the manipulation of polymer concentration and dispersion medium. Chondrocytes proliferation in mPEG-PVLA hydrogels was observed as well as accumulation of GAGs and collagen. On the other hand, chondrocytes encapsulated in mPEG-PLGA hydrogels showed low viability and chondrogenesis. Also, mPEG-PVLA hydrogel, which is more hydrophobic, retained physical integrity after 14 days while mPEG-PLGA hydrogel underwent full degradation due to faster hydrolysis rate and more pronounced acidic self-catalyzed degradation. The mPEG-PVLA hydrogel can be furthered tuned by manipulation of molecular weights to obtain hydrogels with different swelling and degradation characteristics, which may be useful as producing a selection of hydrogels compatible with different cell types. Taken together, these results demonstrate that mPEG-PVLA hydrogels are promising to serve as three-dimensional cell carriers for chondrocytes and potentially applicable in cartilage tissue engineering.

  1. Temperature responsive hydroxypropyl cellulose for encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Heitfeld, Kevin A.; Guo, Tingtai; Yang, George; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2009-08-26

    This work focuses on the use of temperature responsive gels (TRGs) (polymeric hydrogels with a large temperature-dependent change in volume) for flavor retention at cooking temperatures. Specifically, we have studied a gel with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) that swells at low temperatures and collapses at high temperatures. In the collapsed state, the polymer acts as a transport barrier, keeping the volatile flavors inside. We have successfully synthesized a cellulose gel that exhibits this volume change and have encapsulated an oil phase inside the gel. The flavor-loaded encapsulated oil exhibited an increased release time when compared to similar gelatin capsules.

  2. Vortex-Induced Injectable Silk Fibroin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Tuna; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A novel, to our knowledge, technique was developed to control the rate of β-sheet formation and resulting hydrogelation kinetics of aqueous, native silk solutions. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that vortexing aqueous solutions of silkworm silk lead to a transition from an overall protein structure that is initially rich in random coil to one that is rich in β-sheet content. Dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments collected under the same assembly conditions as the circular dichroism experiments indicated that the increase in β-sheet content due to intramolecular conformational changes and intermolecular self-assembly of the silk fibroin was directly correlated with the subsequent changes in viscoelastic properties due to hydrogelation. Vortexing low-viscosity silk solutions lead to orders-of-magnitude increase in the complex shear modulus, G∗, and formation of rigid hydrogels (G∗ ≈ 70 kPa for 5.2 wt % protein concentration). Vortex-induced, β-sheet-rich silk hydrogels consisted of permanent, physical, intermolecular crosslinks. The hydrogelation kinetics could be controlled easily (from minutes to hours) by changing the vortex time, assembly temperature and/or protein concentration, providing a useful timeframe for cell encapsulation. The stiffness of preformed hydrogels recovered quickly, immediately after injection through a needle, enabling the potential use of these systems for injectable cell delivery scaffolds. PMID:19804736

  3. Enzymatically crosslinked gelatin hydrogel promotes the proliferation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaomei; Long, Haiyan; Qian, Hong; Ma, Kunlong

    2016-01-01

    Gelatin hydrogel crosslinked by microbial transglutaminase (mTG) exhibits excellent performance in cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined the gelation time and gel strength of gelatin/mTG hydrogels in various proportions to investigate their physical properties and tested their degradation performances in vitro. Cell morphology and viability of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) cultured on the 2D gel surface or in 3D hydrogel encapsulation were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. Cell proliferation was tested via Alamar Blue assay. To investigate the hydrogel effect on cell differentiation, the cardiac-specific gene expression levelsof Nkx2.5, Myh6, Gja1, and Mef2c in encapsulated ADSCs with or without cardiac induction medium were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Cell release from the encapsulated status and cell migration in a 3D hydrogel model were assessed in vitro. Results show that the gelatin/mTG hydrogels are not cytotoxic and that their mechanical properties are adjustable. Hydrogel degradation is related to gel concentration and the resident cells. Cell growth morphology and proliferative capability in both 2D and 3D cultures were mainly affected by gel concentration. PCR result shows that hydrogel modulus together with induction medium affects the cardiac differentiation of ADSCs. The cell migration experiment and subcutaneous implantation show that the hydrogels are suitable for cell delivery. PMID:27703850

  4. Enzymatically crosslinked gelatin hydrogel promotes the proliferation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Xiao, Zhenghua; Ren, Xiaomei; Long, Haiyan; Qian, Hong; Ma, Kunlong; Guo, Yingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Gelatin hydrogel crosslinked by microbial transglutaminase (mTG) exhibits excellent performance in cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined the gelation time and gel strength of gelatin/mTG hydrogels in various proportions to investigate their physical properties and tested their degradation performances in vitro. Cell morphology and viability of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) cultured on the 2D gel surface or in 3D hydrogel encapsulation were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. Cell proliferation was tested via Alamar Blue assay. To investigate the hydrogel effect on cell differentiation, the cardiac-specific gene expression levelsof Nkx2.5, Myh6, Gja1, and Mef2c in encapsulated ADSCs with or without cardiac induction medium were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Cell release from the encapsulated status and cell migration in a 3D hydrogel model were assessed in vitro. Results show that the gelatin/mTG hydrogels are not cytotoxic and that their mechanical properties are adjustable. Hydrogel degradation is related to gel concentration and the resident cells. Cell growth morphology and proliferative capability in both 2D and 3D cultures were mainly affected by gel concentration. PCR result shows that hydrogel modulus together with induction medium affects the cardiac differentiation of ADSCs. The cell migration experiment and subcutaneous implantation show that the hydrogels are suitable for cell delivery.

  5. Enhanced antitumor activity and mechanism of biodegradable polymeric micelles-encapsulated chetomin in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Li, Guoyou; Deng, Senyi; Ouyang, Liang; Li, Ling; Liu, Lei; Luo, Na; Song, Xiangrong; He, Gu; Gong, Changyang; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-09-01

    Chetomin is a promising molecule with anti-tumor activities in the epipolythiodioxopiperazine family of fungal secondary metabolites; however, strong hydrophobicity has limited its further applications. In this work, chetomin was encapsulated into polymeric micelles to obtain an aqueous formulation, and the chetomin loaded micelles (Che-M) exhibited small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency. When the concentration of copolymer was higher than the critical gelation concentration, the Che-M could form a thermosensitive hydrogel (Che-H), which was free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and converted into a non-flowing gel at body temperature. The molecular modeling study has indicated that chetomin interacted with PCL as a core, which was embraced by PEG as a shell. Che-M showed equal cytotoxicity with free chetomin, but the apoptosis inducing effects of Che-M were more significant. Besides, Che-M could increase the GSSG level, decrease the GSH level, and increase the ROS in CT26 cells. Furthermore, stronger inhibitory effects of Che-M were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth in transgenic zebrafish models. In addition, Che-M was effective in inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival in a subcutaneous CT26 tumor model. In a colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis model, both Che-M and Che-H showed excellent therapeutic effects, but Che-H was more effective. In conclusion, Che-M and Che-H may serve as candidates for cancer therapy.

  6. Controlling the Porosity and Microarchitecture of Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Nichol, Jason W.; Zhong, Xia; Ji, Chengdong; Koshy, Sandeep; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for regeneration and repair of diseased tissues, making the development of tissue engineering scaffolds a topic of great interest in biomedical research. Because of their biocompatibility and similarities to native extracellular matrix, hydrogels have emerged as leading candidates for engineered tissue scaffolds. However, precise control of hydrogel properties, such as porosity, remains a challenge. Traditional techniques for creating bulk porosity in polymers have demonstrated success in hydrogels for tissue engineering; however, often the conditions are incompatible with direct cell encapsulation. Emerging technologies have demonstrated the ability to control porosity and the microarchitectural features in hydrogels, creating engineered tissues with structure and function similar to native tissues. In this review, we explore the various technologies for controlling the porosity and microarchitecture within hydrogels, and demonstrate successful applications of combining these techniques. PMID:20121414

  7. Design properties of hydrogel tissue-engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junmin; Marchant, Roger E

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the recent progress in the design and synthesis of hydrogels as tissue-engineering scaffolds. Hydrogels are attractive scaffolding materials owing to their highly swollen network structure, ability to encapsulate cells and bioactive molecules, and efficient mass transfer. Various polymers, including natural, synthetic and natural/synthetic hybrid polymers, have been used to make hydrogels via chemical or physical crosslinking. Recently, bioactive synthetic hydrogels have emerged as promising scaffolds because they can provide molecularly tailored biofunctions and adjustable mechanical properties, as well as an extracellular matrix-like microenvironment for cell growth and tissue formation. This article addresses various strategies that have been explored to design synthetic hydrogels with extracellular matrix-mimetic bioactive properties, such as cell adhesion, proteolytic degradation and growth factor-binding. PMID:22026626

  8. Injectable shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels for stem cell delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Ashish; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Peak, Charles W.; Carrow, James K.; Gentry, James; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.

    2016-06-01

    Injectable hydrogels are investigated for cell encapsulation and delivery as they can shield cells from high shear forces. One of the approaches to obtain injectable hydrogels is to reinforce polymeric networks with high aspect ratio nanoparticles such as two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. 2D nanomaterials are an emerging class of ultrathin materials with a high degree of anisotropy and they strongly interact with polymers resulting in the formation of shear-thinning hydrogels. Here, we present 2D nanosilicate reinforced kappa-carrageenan (κCA) hydrogels for cellular delivery. κCA is a natural polysaccharide that resembles native glycosaminoglycans and can form brittle hydrogels via ionic crosslinking. The chemical modification of κCA with photocrosslinkable methacrylate groups renders the formation of a covalently crosslinked network (MκCA). Reinforcing the MκCA with 2D nanosilicates results in shear-thinning characteristics, and enhanced mechanical stiffness, elastomeric properties, and physiological stability. The shear-thinning characteristics of nanocomposite hydrogels are investigated for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. The hMSCs showed high cell viability after injection and encapsulated cells showed a circular morphology. The proposed shear-thinning nanoengineered hydrogels can be used for cell delivery for cartilage tissue regeneration and 3D bioprinting.

  9. Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma of the Trunk: A Case Report and Review of Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Palisaded encapsulated neuroma is a rare, benign cutaneous tumor. It most commonly presents as a solitary, flesh-colored, dome-shaped nodule affecting the face. However, albeit rarely, palisaded encapsulated neuroma may also appear on the trunk, genitals, or extremities. We describe the clinical and pathologic findings of a male patient who presented with a palisaded encapsulated neuroma on his left flank. In addition, we review the characteristics of patients with truncal palisaded encapsulated neuromas and summarize the clinical and histologic differential diagnosis of this tumor. PMID:27630799

  10. Antimicrobial hydrogels for the treatment of infection

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, Ana Salomé; Schneider, Joel P.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of microbial infections, especially those associated with impaired wound healing and biomedical implant failure has spurred the development of new materials having antimicrobial activity. Hydrogels are a class of highly hydrated material finding use in diverse medical applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, as wound fillers and as implant coatings, to name a few. The biocompatible nature of many gels make them a convenient starting platform to develop selectively active antimicrobial materials. Hydrogels with antimicrobial properties can be obtained through the encapsulation or covalent immobilization of known antimicrobial agents, or the material itself can be designed to possess inherent antimicrobial activity. In this review we present an overview of antimicrobial hydrogels that have recently been developed and when possible provide a discussion relevant to their mechanism of action. PMID:24122459

  11. MODULATION OF CHONDROCYTE BEHAVIOR THROUGH TAILORING FUNCTIONAL SYNTHETIC SACCHARIDE-PEPTIDE HYDROGELS

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kanika; Yu, Ting-bin; Stutts, Lisa; Yen, Max; Guan, Zhibin

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring three-dimensional (3D) biomaterial environments to provide specific cues in order to modulate function of encapsulated cells could potentially eliminate the need for addition of exogenous cues in cartilage tissue engineering. We recently developed saccharide-peptide copolymer hydrogels for cell culture and tissue engineering applications. In this study, we aim to tailor our saccharide-peptide hydrogel for encapsulating and culturing chondrocytes in 3D and examine the effects of changing single amino acid moieties differing in hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity (valine (V), cysteine (C), tyrosine (Y)) on modulation of chondrocyte function. Encapsulated chondrocytes remained viable over 21 days in vitro. Glycosaminoglycan and collagen content was significantly higher in Y-functionalized hydrogels compared to V-functionalized hydrogels. Extensive matrix accumulation and concomitant increase in mechanical properties was evident over time, particularly with the presence of Y amino acid. After 21 days in vitro, Y-functionalized hydrogels attained a modulus of 193±46 kPa, compared to 44±21 kPa for V-functionalized hydrogels. Remarkably, mechanical and biochemical properties of chondrocyte-laden hydrogels were modulated by change in a single amino acid moiety. This unique property, combined with the versatility and biocompatibility, makes our saccharide-peptide hydrogels promising candidates for further investigation of combinatorial effects of multiple functional groups on controlling chondrocyte and other cellular function and behavior. PMID:22672831

  12. Mechanically Stiff Nanocomposite Hydrogels at Ultralow Nanoparticle Content.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manish K; Xavier, Janet R; Carrow, James K; Desai, Prachi; Alge, Daniel; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2016-01-26

    Although hydrogels are able to mimic native tissue microenvironments, their utility for biomedical applications is severely hampered due to limited mechanical stiffness and low toughness. Despite recent progress in designing stiff and tough hydrogels, it is still challenging to achieve a cell-friendly, high modulus construct. Here, we report a highly efficient method to reinforce collagen-based hydrogels using extremely low concentrations of a nanoparticulate-reinforcing agent that acts as a cross-link epicenter. Extraordinarily, the addition of these nanoparticles at a 10 000-fold lower concentration relative to polymer resulted in a more than 10-fold increase in mechanical stiffness and a 20-fold increase in toughness. We attribute the high stiffness of the nanocomposite network to the chemical functionality of the nanoparticles, which enabled the cross-linking of multiple polymeric chains to the nanoparticle surface. The mechanical stiffness of the nanoengineered hydrogel can be tailored between 0.2 and 200 kPa simply by manipulating the size of the nanoparticles (4, 8, and 12 nm), as well as the concentrations of the nanoparticles and polymer. Moreover, cells can be easily encapsulated within the nanoparticulate-reinforced hydrogel network, showing high viability. In addition, encapsulated cells were able to sense and respond to matrix stiffness. Overall, these results demonstrate a facile approach to modulate the mechanical stiffness of collagen-based hydrogels and may have broad utility for various biomedical applications, including use as tissue-engineered scaffolds and cell/protein delivery vehicles.

  13. MWNT-hybrided supramolecular hydrogel for hydrophobic camptothecin delivery.

    PubMed

    Mu, Shansong; Liang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuaijun; Zhang, Liming; Liu, Tao

    2015-05-01

    To encapsulate the hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT) into hydrogel matrix with a high loading amount, a supramolecular hydrogel hybrided with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was developed by the host-guest interactions and used for loading and delivering CPT. Firstly, carboxylated MWNTs were modified by polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (MPEG), which resulted in the water-dispersed MPEG-MWNTs. Then α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) was mixed with MPEG-MWNTs and the hybrid supramolecular hydrogel was fabricated by the inclusion interactions between α-CD and MPEG. The used MPEG not only dispersed MWNTs in aqueous solution, but also functioned as hydrogel matrix by interacting with α-CD. The gelation time for the sol-gel transition and rheological properties of the resultant hydrogels were studied. Due to the excellent application of MWNTs in drug delivery, hydrophobic CPT could be loaded into the hydrogel matrix by a higher amount compared with micelles. By in vitro release and cell viability tests, it was found that the encapsulated CPT could exhibit a controlled and sustained release behavior as well as sustained antitumor efficacy.

  14. Thiol-ene hydrogels as desmoplasia-mimetic matrices for modeling pancreatic cancer cell growth, invasion, and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Ki, Chang Seok; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Korc, Murray; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-12-01

    The development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is heavily influenced by local stromal tissues, or desmoplasia. Biomimetic hydrogels capable of mimicking tumor niches are particularly useful for discovering the role of independent matrix cues on cancer cell development. Here, we report a photo-curable and bio-orthogonal thiol-ene (i.e., cross-linked by mutually reactive norbornene and thiol groups via photoinitiation) hydrogel platform for studying the growth, morphogenesis, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell marker expression in PDAC cells cultured in 3D. The hydrogels were prepared from multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol)-norbornene cross-linked with protease-sensitive peptide to permit cell-mediated matrix remodeling. Collagen 1 fibrils were incorporated into the covalent network while cytokines (e.g., EGF and TGF-β1) were supplemented in the culture media for controlling cell fate. We found that the presence of collagen 1 enhanced cell proliferation and Yes-associated protein (YAP) translocation to cell nuclei. Cytokines and collagen 1 synergistically up-regulated MT1-MMP expression and induced cell spreading, suggestive of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the encapsulated cells. Furthermore, PDAC cells cultured in 3D developed chemo-resistance even in the absence of collagen 1 and cytokines. This phenotype is likely a consequence of the enrichment of pancreatic cancer stem cells that expressed high levels of CD24, sonic hedgehog (SHH), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  15. Thermosensitive hydrogel containing dexamethasone micelles for preventing postsurgical adhesion in a repeated-injury model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinjie; Wang, Ning; He, Tao; Shang, Jinfeng; Li, Ling; Song, Linjiang; Yang, Xi; Li, Xia; Luo, Na; Zhang, Wenli; Gong, Changyang

    2015-09-01

    Tissue adhesion is a common complication after surgery. In this work, a dexamethasone loaded polymeric micelles in thermosensitive hydrogel composite (Dex hydrogel) was prepared, which combined the anti-adhesion barrier with controlled release of anti-adhesion drug. Dexamethasone (Dex) was encapsulated in polymeric micelles (Dex micelles), and then the Dex micelles were loaded into biodegradable and thermosensitive hydrogel. The obtained Dex hydrogel showed a temperature-dependent sol-gel-sol phase transition behavior. The Dex hydrogel could form a non-flowing gel in situ upon subcutaneous injection and gradually degrade in about 20 days. In addition, Dex hydrogel was assigned for anti-adhesion studies in a more rigorous recurrent adhesion animal model. Compared with normal saline (NS) and Dex micelles group, tissue adhesions in hydrogel and Dex hydrogel group were significantly alleviated. In Dex hydrogel group, the media adhesion score is 0, which was dramatically lower than that in blank hydrogel group (2.50, P < 0.001). In histopathological examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, an integral neo-mesothelial cell layer with microvilli on their surface was observed, which revealed that the injured parietal and visceral peritoneum were fully recovered without the concerns of adhesion formation. Our results suggested that Dex hydrogel may serve as a potential anti-adhesion candidate.

  16. Conductive hydrogel composed of 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid and Fe(3+) used as enhanced electrochemical immunosensing substrate for tumor biomarker.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiqiang; Han, Hongliang; Ma, Zhanfang

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a new conductive hydrogel was prepared by a simple cross-linking coordination method using 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid as the ligand and Fe(3+) as the metal ion. The hydrogel film was formed on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by a drop coating method, which can dramatically facilitate the transport of electrons. A sensitive label-free electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated following electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a hydrogel film and immobilization of an antibody. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a lung cancer biomarker, was used as the model analyte to be detected. The proposed immunosensor exhibited a wide linear detection range of 1pgmL(-1) to 200ngmL(-1) and a limit of detection of 0.26pgmL(-1) (the ratio of signal to noise (S/N)=3). Moreover, the detection of NSE in human serum samples showed satisfactory accuracy compared with the data determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), indicating good analytical performance of the immunoassay.

  17. Control of β-carotene bioaccessibility using starch-based filled hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mun, Saehun; Kim, Yong-Ro; McClements, David Julian

    2015-04-15

    β-Carotene was incorporated into three types of delivery system: (i) "emulsions": protein-coated fat droplets dispersed in water; (ii) "hydrogels": rice starch gels; and (iii) "filled hydrogels": protein-coated fat droplets dispersed in rice starch gels. Fat droplets in filled hydrogels were stable in simulated mouth and stomach conditions, but aggregated under small intestinal conditions. Fat droplets in emulsions aggregated under oral, gastric, and intestinal conditions. β-Carotene bioaccessibility was higher when encapsulated in filled hydrogels than in emulsions or hydrogels, which was attributed to increased aggregation stability of the fat droplets leading to a larger exposed lipid surface area. β-Carotene bioaccessibility in starch hydrogels containing no fat was very low (≈1%) due to its crystalline nature and lack of mixed micelles to solubilise it. The information presented may be useful for the design of rice-starch based gel products fortified with lipophilic nutraceuticals.

  18. Encoding Hydrogel Mechanics via Network Cross-Linking Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The effects of mechanical cues on cell behaviors in 3D remain difficult to characterize as the ability to tune hydrogel mechanics often requires changes in the polymer density, potentially altering the material’s biochemical and physical characteristics. Additionally, with most PEG diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels, forming materials with compressive moduli less than ∼10 kPa has been virtually impossible. Here, we present a new method of controlling the mechanical properties of PEGDA hydrogels independent of polymer chain density through the incorporation of additional vinyl group moieties that interfere with the cross-linking of the network. This modification can tune hydrogel mechanics in a concentration dependent manner from <1 to 17 kPa, a more physiologically relevant range than previously possible with PEG-based hydrogels, without altering the hydrogel’s degradation and permeability. Across this range of mechanical properties, endothelial cells (ECs) encapsulated within MMP-2/MMP-9 degradable hydrogels with RGDS adhesive peptides revealed increased cell spreading as hydrogel stiffness decreased in contrast to behavior typically observed for cells on 2D surfaces. EC-pericyte cocultures exhibited vessel-like networks within 3 days in highly compliant hydrogels as compared to a week in stiffer hydrogels. These vessel networks persisted for at least 4 weeks and deposited laminin and collagen IV perivascularly. These results indicate that EC morphogenesis can be regulated using mechanical cues in 3D. Furthermore, controlling hydrogel compliance independent of density allows for the attainment of highly compliant mechanical regimes in materials that can act as customizable cell microenvironments. PMID:26082943

  19. Hydrogel based on interpenetrating polymer networks of dextran and gelatin for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunxiao; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogel networks are highly desirable as three-dimensional (3-D) tissue engineering scaffolds for cell encapsulation due to the high water content and ability to mimick the native extracellular matrix. However, their application is limited by their nanometer-scale mesh size, which restricts the spreading and proliferation of encapsulated cells, and their poor mechanical properties. This study seeks to address both limitations through application of a novel cell-encapsulating hydrogel family based on the interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) of gelatin and dextran bifunctionalized with methacrylate (MA) and aldehyde (AD) (Dex-MA-AD). The chemical structure of the synthesized Dex-MA-AD was verified by (1)H-NMR and the degrees of substitution of MA and AD were found to be 14 and 13.9+/-1.3 respectively. The water contents in all these hydrogels were approximately 80%. Addition of 40 mg/ml to 60 mg/ml gelatin to neat Dex-MA-AD increased the compressive modulus from 15.4+/-3.0 kPa to around 51.9+/-0.1 kPa (about 3.4-fold). Further, our IPN hydrogels have higher dynamic storage moduli (i.e. on the order of 10(4)Pa) than polyethylene glycol-based hydrogels (around 10(2)-10(3)Pa) commonly used for smooth muscle cells (SMCs) encapsulation. Our dextran-based IPN hydrogels not only supported endothelial cells (ECs) adhesion and spreading on the surface, but also allowed encapsulated SMCs to proliferate and spread in the bulk interior of the hydrogel. These IPN hydrogels appear promising as 3-D scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

  20. Enhanced bone tissue regeneration using a 3D printed microstructure incorporated with a hybrid nano hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Castro, Nathan J; Lee, Se-Jun; Noh, Hanaul; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-02-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) functional constructs with biomimetic mechanical and chemical properties are ideal for various regenerative medicine applications. These properties of 3D fabricated constructs mainly depend on the intrinsic characteristics of the materials and fabrication method. In this respect, the current use of hydrogels for musculoskeletal tissue repair is not ideal due to the lack of suitable mechanical properties, as well as the high biomimetic requirement for success. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel functionalized hydrogel with bioactive gold nanoparticles (GNPs), reinforcing a 3D printed microstructure via fused deposition modeling (FDM) for bone tissue regeneration. We used biodegradable thermoplastic polylactic acid (PLA) as the 3D printed microstructure in combination with photo-curable gelatin hydrogels as the encapsulation matrix for the incorporation of cyclic RGD conjugated GNPs (RGNP), and investigated their mechanical properties. In addition, human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were encapsulated within the gelatin hydrogel and examined for viability, morphology, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The results showed that the stiffness of the composite hydrogel on reinforcing a 3D printed microstructure can be readily modulated to simulate the stiffness of the human mandibular condyle. ADSCs encapsulated in the composite structures remained viable within the hydrogel and showed excellent spreading on the 3D printed PLA microstructure. More importantly, osteogenic differentiation with incorporated RGNPs promoted significantly higher gene expression of osteogenic specific factors. Therefore, reinforced composite hydrogels are suitable for stem cell differentiation control and bone tissue regeneration.

  1. Evaluation of genipin-crosslinked chitosan hydrogels as a potential carrier for silver sulfadiazine nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Gan, Hui; Meng, Zhiyun; Gu, Ruolan; Wu, Zhuona; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Wenzhong; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Sun, Tao; Dou, Guifang

    2016-12-01

    In the present study genipin crosslinked chitosan (CHI) hydrogels, which had been constructed and reported in our previous studies (Gao et al., 2014 [22]), were further evaluated for their advantage as a carrier for silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) nanocrystal systems. Firstly, AgSD nanocrystals with a mean particle size of 289nm were prepared by wet milling method and encapsulated into genipin crosslinked CHI hydrogels. AgSD nanocrystals displayed a uniform distribution and very good physical stability in the hydrogel network. Swelling-dependent release pattern was found for AgSD nanocrystals from hydrogels and the release profile could be well fitted with Peppas equation. When AgSD nanocrystals were encapsulated in hydrogels their fibroblast cytotoxicity decreased markedly, and their antibacterial effects against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were still comparable to unencapsulated AgSD nanocrystals. In vivo evaluation in excision and burn cutaneous wound models in mice showed that AgSD nanocrystal hydrogels markedly decreased the expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-6, but increased the levels of growth factors VEGF-A and TGF-β1. Histopathologically, the wounds treated by hydrogels containing AgSD nanocrystals showed the best healing state compared with commercial AgSD cream, hydrogels containing AgSD bulk powders and blank hydrogels. The wounds treated by AgSD nanocrystal hydrogels were dominated by marked fibroblast proliferation, new blood vessels and thick regenerated epithelial layer. Sirius Red staining assay indicated that AgSD nanocrystal hydrogels resulted in more collagen deposition characterized by a large proportion of type I fibers. Our study suggested that genipin-crosslinked CHI hydrogel was a potential carrier for local antibacterial nanomedicines.

  2. Hydrogels That Allow and Facilitate Bone Repair, Remodeling, and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Short, Aaron R.; Koralla, Deepthi; Deshmukh, Ameya; Wissel, Benjamin; Stocker, Benjamin; Calhoun, Mark; Dean, David; Winter, Jessica O.

    2015-01-01

    Bone defects can originate from a variety of causes, including trauma, cancer, congenital deformity, and surgical reconstruction. Success of the current “gold standard” treatment (i.e., autologous bone grafts) is greatly influenced by insufficient or inappropriate bone stock. There is thus a critical need for the development of new, engineered materials for bone repair. This review describes the use of natural and synthetic hydrogels as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. We discuss many of the advantages that hydrogels offer as bone repair materials, including their potential for osteoconductivity, biodegradability, controlled growth factor release, and cell encapsulation. We also discuss the use of hydrogels in composite devices with metals, ceramics, or polymers. These composites are useful because of the low mechanical moduli of hydrogels. Finally, the potential for thermosetting and photo-cross-linked hydrogels as three-dimensionally (3D) printed, patient-specific devices is highlighted. Three-dimensional printing enables controlled spatial distribution of scaffold materials, cells, and growth factors. Hydrogels, especially natural hydrogels present in bone matrix, have great potential to augment existing bone tissue engineering devices for the treatment of critical size bone defects. PMID:26693013

  3. Non-cytotoxic, In Situ Gelable Hydrogels Composed of N-carboxyethyl Chitosan and Oxidized Dextran

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lihui; Romanov, Alexander; Rooney, Jean; Chen, Weiliam

    2008-01-01

    A series of in situ gelable hydrogels were prepared from oxidized dextran (Odex) and N-carboxyethyl chitosan (CEC) without any extraneous crosslinking agent. The gelation readily took place at physiological pH and body temperature. The gelation process was monitored rheologically, and the effect of the oxidation degree of dextran on the gelation process was investigated. The higher the oxidation degree of Odex, the faster the gelation. A highly porous hydrogel structure was revealed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Swelling and degradation of the Odex/CEC hydrogels in PBS showed that both swelling and degradation were related to the crosslinking density of the hydrogels. In particular, the hydrogels underwent fast mass loss in the first 2 weeks, followed by a more moderate degradation. The results of long-term cell viability tests revealed that the hydrogels were non-cytotoxic. Mouse fibroblasts were encapsulated in the hydrogels and cell viability was at least 95% within 3 days following encapsulation. Furthermore, cells entrapped inside the hydrogel assumed round shape initially but they gradually adapted to the new environment and spread out to assume more spiny shapes. Additionally, the results from applying the Odex/CEC system to mice full-thickness transcutaneous wound models suggested that it was capable of enhancing wound healing. PMID:18639926

  4. Hyperbranched Polyester Hydrogels with Controlled Drug Release and Cell Adhesion Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbin; Patel, Alpesh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Mihaila, Silvia M.; Iviglia, Giorgio; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Bae, Hojae; Yang, Huai; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Hyperbranched polyesters (HPE) have a high efficiency to encapsulate bioactive agents, including drugs, genes and proteins, due to their globe-like nanostructure. However, the use of these highly branched polymeric systems for tissue engineering applications has not been broadly investigated. Here, we report synthesis and characterization of photocrosslinkable HPE hydrogels with sustained drug release characteristics for cellular therapies. These HPE can encapsulate hydrophobic drug molecules within the HPE cavities, due to the presence of hydrophobic inner structure that is otherwise difficult to achieve in conventional hydrogels. The functionalization of HPE with photocrosslinkable acrylate moieties renders the formation of hydrogels with highly porous interconnected structure, and mechanically tough network. The compressive modulus of HPE hydrogels was tunable by changing the crosslinking density. The feasibility of using these HPE networks for cellular therapies was investigated by evaluating cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation on hydrogel surface. Highly crosslinked and mechanically stiff HPE hydrogels have higher cell adhesion, spreading, proliferation compared to soft and complaint HPE hydrogels. Overall, we showed that hydrogels made from HPE could be used for biomedical applications that require control cell adhesion and control release of hydrophobic clues. PMID:23394067

  5. A biomimetic hydrogel based on methacrylated dextran-graft-lysine and gelatin for 3D smooth muscle cell culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunxiao; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2010-02-01

    Many synthetic hydrogels for cell encapsulation have hitherto been based on polyethylene glycol which is non-natural, non-biodegradable and only terminal-functionalizable, all of which are drawbacks for tissue engineering or cell delivery. The polysaccharide dextran is also highly hydrophilic but biodegradable and pendant-functionalizable and more closely resembles glycosaminoglycans to mimic the natural extracellular matrix. This study reports synthesis of a methacrylate and lysine functionalized dextran and development of hydrogel composite systems based on this material and methacrylamide modified gelatin. The mechanical stiffness and degree of swelling of the hydrogels were varied by manipulation of the degree of functionalization of dextran and gelatin and concentration/composition of precursor solution. Human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were encapsulated inside hydrogels during gel hardening with photopolymerization. Rapid cell spreading, extensive cellular network formation and high SMC proliferation occurred within softer hydrogels (with shear storage moduli ranging from 898 to 3124Pa). The encapsulated SMCs appear to be relatively contractile in the initial culture than on tissue culture polystyrene dish due to physical constraint imposed by the hydrogels but they become more synthetic with time possibly due to the inability of cells to reach confluence inside these cell-mediated degradable hydrogels. From the impressive cell proliferation and network formation, these new hydrogels combining polysaccharide and protein derivatives appear to be excellent candidates for further development as bioactive scaffolds for use in vascular tissue engineering and regeneration.

  6. Functionalized core-shell hydrogel microsprings by anisotropic gelation with bevel-tip capillary

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Koki; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    This study describes a novel microfluidic-based method for the synthesis of hydrogel microsprings that are capable of encapsulating various functional materials. A continuous flow of alginate pre-gel solution can spontaneously form a hydrogel microspring by anisotropic gelation around the bevel-tip of the capillary. This technique allows fabrication of hydrogel microsprings using only simple capillaries and syringe pumps, while their complex compartmentalization characterized by a laminar flow inside the capillary can contribute to the optimization of the microspring internal structure and functionality. Encapsulation of several functional materials including magnetic-responsive nanoparticles or cell dispersed collagen for tissue scaffold was demonstrated to functionalize the microsprings. Our core-shell hydrogel microsprings have immense potential for application in a number of fields, including biological/chemical microsensors, biocompatible soft robots/microactuators, drug release, self-assembly of 3D structures and tissue engineering. PMID:28378803

  7. Fabrication of Cell-Laden Macroporous Biodegradable Hydrogels with Tunable Porosities and Pore Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigated a cytocompatible particulate leaching method for the fabrication of cell-laden macroporous hydrogels. We used dehydrated and uncrosslinked gelatin microspheres as leachable porogens to create macroporous oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels. Varying gelatin content and size resulted in a wide range of porosities and pore sizes, respectively. Encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited high viability immediately following the fabrication process, and culture of cell-laden hydrogels revealed improved cell viability with increasing porosity. Additionally, the osteogenic potential of the encapsulated MSCs was evaluated over 16 days. Overall, this study presents a robust method for the preparation of cell-laden macroporous hydrogels with desired porosity and pore size for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25156274

  8. Optical cell separation from three-dimensional environment in photodegradable hydrogels for pure culture techniques.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masato; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Sugiura, Shinji; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Sumaru, Kimio; Matsui, Hirofumi; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-07

    Cell sorting is an essential and efficient experimental tool for the isolation and characterization of target cells. A three-dimensional environment is crucial in determining cell behavior and cell fate in biological analysis. Herein, we have applied photodegradable hydrogels to optical cell separation from a 3D environment using a computer-controlled light irradiation system. The hydrogel is composed of photocleavable tetra-arm polyethylene glycol and gelatin, which optimized cytocompatibility to adjust a composition of crosslinker and gelatin. Local light irradiation could degrade the hydrogel corresponding to the micropattern image designed on a laptop; minimum resolution of photodegradation was estimated at 20 µm. Light irradiation separated an encapsulated fluorescent microbead without any contamination of neighbor beads, even at multiple targets. Upon selective separation of target cells in the hydrogels, the separated cells have grown on another dish, resulting in pure culture. Cell encapsulation, light irradiation and degradation products exhibited negligible cytotoxicity in overall process.

  9. Engineered VEGF-releasing PEG-MAL hydrogel for pancreatic islet vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Edward A.; Templeman, Kellie L.; Thulé, Peter M.; García, Andrés J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofunctionalized polyethylene glycol maleimide (PEG-MAL) hydrogels were engineered as a platform to deliver pancreatic islets to the small bowel mesentery and promote graft vascularization. VEGF, a potent stimulator of angiogenesis, was incorporated into the hydrogel to be released in an on-demand manner through enzymatic degradation. PEG-MAL hydrogel enabled extended in vivo release of VEGF. Isolated rat islets encapsulated in PEG-MAL hydrogels remained viable in culture and secreted insulin. Islets encapsulated in PEG-MAL matrix and transplanted to the small bowel mesentery of healthy rats grafted to the host tissue and revascularized by 4 weeks. Addition of VEGF release to the PEG-MAL matrix greatly augmented the vascularization response. These results establish PEG-MAL engineered matrices as a vascular-inductive cell delivery vehicle and warrant their further investigation as islet transplantation vehicles in diabetic animal models. PMID:25787738

  10. Vaccination with OVA-bound nanoparticles encapsulating IL-7 inhibits the growth of OVA-expressing E.G7 tumor cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Hiroko; Yanase, Noriko; Yoshimoto, Takayuki; Harada, Mitsunori; Kato, Yasuki; Mizuguchi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has gained special attention due to its specific effects on tumor cells and systemic action to block metastasis. We recently demonstrated that ovalbumin (OVA) conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles (NPs) (OVA‑NPs) can manipulate humoral immune responses. In the present study, we aimed to ascertain whether vaccination with OVA-NPs entrapping IL-7 (OVA-NPs-IL-7) are able to induce antitumor immune responses in vivo. Pretreatment with a subcutaneous inoculation of OVA-NPs delayed the growth of thymic lymphoma cells expressing a model tumor antigen OVA (E.G7-OVA), and OVA-NPs-IL-7 substantially blocked the growth of E.G7-OVA tumor cells, although NPs-IL-7 alone had a meager effect, as assessed by the mean tumor size and the percentage of tumor-free mice. However, pretreatment with OVA-NPs-IL-7 failed to reduce the growth of parental thymic tumor cells, suggesting that the antitumor effect was antigen-specific. A tetramer assay revealed that vaccination with OVA-NPs-IL-7 tended to enhance the proportion of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) specific for OVA. When the tumor-free mice inoculated with OVA-NPs-IL-7 plus EG.7 cells were rechallenged with E.G7-OVA cells, they demonstrated reduced growth compared with that in the control mice. Thus, a single subcutaneous injection of OVA-NPs-IL-7 into mice induced tumor-specific and also memory-like immune responses, resulting in regression of tumor cells. Antigens on NPs entrapping IL-7 would be a promising carrier to develop and enhance immune responses, including humoral and cellular immunity as well as a method of drug delivery to a specific target of interest.

  11. Relating secondary structure to the mechanical properties of polypeptide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Sharon Anne

    Biomimetic hydrogels are being developed for use in medicine as drug delivery devices and tissue engineering matrices, and the mechanical properties of the materials play an important role in their performance. For example, in tissue engineering, gene expression and cell adhesion have been closely linked to the mechanical properties of the surrounding hydrogel matrix. In poly-L-lysine hydrogels, a five-fold increase in storage modulus, a 50% increase in equilibrium modulus, and a 62% decrease in swelling degree are shown to occur as the hydrogel network chains transition from an alpha-helix to a beta-sheet conformation. The manipulation of the network's mechanical behavior through changes in the secondary structure of the polymer chains offers an additional design variable in the development of biosynthetic materials. Analogous to poly-L-lysine, elastin-mimetic proteins based on the consensus repeat sequence of elastin (VPGVG) undergo a temperature-dependent secondary structure transition from a random coil to a beta-spiral. In this research, chemically-crosslinked poly[(VPGVG)4(VPGKG)] hydrogels are shown to possess temperature- and pH-dependent swelling. Following scaling law predictions (G ˜ φ2n), the hydrogels have been shown to behave as ideal elastic networks when the crosslink density is varied at synthesis (theory: n = 9/4, experimental: n = 2.0 +/- 0.1), and behave as flexible networks above and below their structural transition temperature of 35°C (theory: n = 1/3, experimental: n = 0.45 +/- 0.06). Evaluation of published data on elastin-mimetic hydrogels shows that the hydrogels behave as ideal elastic networks for all crosslinking techniques, crosslink spacings, and crosslink functionalities reported. As a contrast to chemically-crosslinked hydrogels, a novel elastin-mimetic triblock (EMT) copolymer was evaluated because of its potential use in cell encapsulation without potentially harmful side reactions. Unlike other thermally gelling copolymers

  12. Crosslinkable Hydrogels Derived from Cartilage, Meniscus, and Tendon Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Jetze; Levett, Peter A.; te Moller, Nikae C.R.; Besems, Jeremy; Boere, Kristel W.M.; van Rijen, Mattie H.P.; de Grauw, Janny C.; Dhert, Wouter J.A.; van Weeren, P. René

    2015-01-01

    Decellularized tissues have proven to be versatile matrices for the engineering of tissues and organs. These matrices usually consist of collagens, matrix-specific proteins, and a set of largely undefined growth factors and signaling molecules. Although several decellularized tissues have found their way to clinical applications, their use in the engineering of cartilage tissue has only been explored to a limited extent. We set out to generate hydrogels from several tissue-derived matrices, as hydrogels are the current preferred cell carriers for cartilage repair. Equine cartilage, meniscus, and tendon tissue was harvested, decellularized, enzymatically digested, and functionalized with methacrylamide groups. After photo-cross-linking, these tissue digests were mechanically characterized. Next, gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) hydrogel was functionalized with these methacrylated tissue digests. Equine chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) (both from three donors) were encapsulated and cultured in vitro up to 6 weeks. Gene expression (COL1A1, COL2A1, ACAN, MMP-3, MMP-13, and MMP-14), cartilage-specific matrix formation, and hydrogel stiffness were analyzed after culture. The cartilage, meniscus, and tendon digests were successfully photo-cross-linked into hydrogels. The addition of the tissue-derived matrices to GelMA affected chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, although no consequent improvement was demonstrated. For chondrocytes, the tissue-derived matrix gels performed worse compared to GelMA alone. This work demonstrates for the first time that native tissues can be processed into crosslinkable hydrogels for the engineering of tissues. Moreover, the differentiation of encapsulated cells can be influenced in these stable, decellularized matrix hydrogels. PMID:25557049

  13. Biomimetic Hydrogels Incorporating Polymeric Cell-Adhesive Peptide to Promote the 3D Assembly of Tumoroids

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ying; Zerdoum, Aidan B.; Stuffer, Alexander J.; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2016-01-01

    Towards the goal of establishing physiologically relevant in vitro tumor models, we synthesized and characterized a biomimetic hydrogel using thiolated hyaluronic acid (HA-SH) and an acrylated copolymer carrying multiple copies of cell adhesive peptide (PolyRGD-AC). PolyRGD-AC was derived from a random copolymer of tert-butyl methacrylate (tBMA) and oligomeric (ethylene glycol) methacrylate (OEGMA), synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Acid hydrolysis of tert-butyl moieties revealed the carboxylates, through which acrylate groups were installed. Partial modification of the acrylate groups with a cysteine-containing RGD peptide generated PolyRGD-AC. When PolyRGD-AC was mixed with HA-SH under physiological conditions, a macroscopic hydrogel with an average elastic modulus of 630 Pa was produced. LNCaP prostate cancer cells encapsulated in HA-PolyRGD gels as dispersed single cells formed multicellular tumoroids by day 4 and reached an average diameter of ~95 μm by day 28. Cells in these structures were viable, formed cell-cell contacts through E-cadherin (E-CAD and displayed cortical organization of F-actin. Compared to the control gels prepared using PolyRDG, multivalent presentation of the RGD signal in the HA matrix increased cellular metabolism, promoted the development of larger tumoroids and enhanced the expression of E-CAD and integrins. Overall, hydrogels with multivalently immobilized RGD is a promising 3D culture platform for dissecting principles of tumorigenesis and for screening anticancer drugs. PMID:27723964

  14. Efficient anti-tumor effect of photodynamic treatment with polymeric nanoparticles composed of polyethylene glycol and polylactic acid block copolymer encapsulating hydrophobic porphyrin derivative.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Shiraishi, Taro; Araki, Tomoya; Watanabe, Taka-ichi; Ono, Tsutomu; Higaki, Kazutaka

    2016-01-20

    To develop potent and safer formulation of photosensitizer for cancer photodynamic therapy (PDT), we tried to formulate hydrophobic porphyrin derivative, photoprotoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (PppIX-DME), into polymeric nanoparticles composed of polyethylene glycol and polylactic acid block copolymer (PN-Por). The mean particle size of PN-Por prepared was around 80nm and the zeta potential was determined to be weakly negative. In vitro phototoxicity study for PN-Por clearly indicated the significant phototoxicity of PN-Por for three types of tumor cells tested (Colon-26 carcinoma (C26), B16BL6 melanoma and Lewis lung cancer cells) in the PppIX-DME concentration-dependent fashion. Furthermore, it was suggested that the release of PppIX-DME from PN-Por would gradually occur to provide the sustained release of PppIX-DME. In vivo pharmacokinetics of PN-Por after intravenous administration was evaluated in C26 tumor-bearing mice, and PN-Por exhibited low affinity to the liver and spleen and was therefore retained in the blood circulation for a long time, leading to the efficient tumor disposition of PN-Por. Furthermore, significant and highly effective anti-tumor effect was confirmed in C26 tumor-bearing mice with the local light irradiation onto C26 tumor tissues after PN-Por injection. These findings indicate the potency of PN-Por for the development of more efficient PDT-based cancer treatments.

  15. Repairable, nanostructured biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, M.; Brombosz, S.; Grubjesic, S.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins facilitate many key cellular processes, including signal recognition and energy transduction. The ability to harness this evolutionarily-optimized functionality could lead to the development of protein-based systems useful for advancing alternative energy storage and conversion. The future of protein-based, however, requires the development of materials that will stabilize, order and control the activity of the proteins. Recently we have developed a synthetic approach for the preparation of a durable biomimetic chemical hydrogel that can be reversibly swollen in water. The matrix has proven ideal for the stable encapsulation of both water- and membrane-soluble proteins. The material is composed of an aqueous dispersion of a diacrylate end-derivatized PEO-PPO-PEO macromer, a saturated phospholipid and a zwitterionic co-surfactant that self-assembles into a nanostructured physical gel at room temperature as determined by X-ray scattering. The addition of a water soluble PEGDA co-monomer and photoinitator does not alter the self-assembled structure and UV irradiation serves to crosslink the acrylate end groups on the macromer with the PEGDA forming a network within the aqueous domains as determined by FT-IR. More recently we have begun to incorporate reversible crosslinks employing Diels-Alder chemistry, allowing for the extraction and replacement of inactive proteins. The ability to replenish the materials with active, non-denatured forms of protein is an important step in advancing these materials for use in nanostructured devices This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, USDoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. Hybrid elastin-like polypeptide-polyethylene glycol (ELP-PEG) hydrogels with improved transparency and independent control of matrix mechanics and cell ligand density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyuan; Cai, Lei; Paul, Alexandra; Enejder, Annika; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2014-09-08

    Hydrogels have been developed as extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics both for therapeutic applications and basic biological studies. In particular, elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) hydrogels, which can be tuned to mimic several biochemical and physical characteristics of native ECM, have been constructed to encapsulate various types of cells to create in vitro mimics of in vivo tissues. However, ELP hydrogels become opaque at body temperature because of ELP's lower critical solution temperature behavior. This opacity obstructs light-based observation of the morphology and behavior of encapsulated cells. In order to improve the transparency of ELP hydrogels for better imaging, we have designed a hybrid ELP-polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel system that rapidly cross-links with tris(hydroxymethyl) phosphine (THP) in aqueous solution via Mannich-type condensation. As expected, addition of the hydrophilic PEG component significantly improves the light transmittance. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy reveals that the hybrid ELP-PEG hydrogels have smaller hydrophobic ELP aggregates at 37 °C. Importantly, this hydrogel platform enables independent tuning of adhesion ligand density and matrix stiffness, which is desirable for studies of cell-matrix interactions. Human fibroblasts encapsulated in these hydrogels show high viability (>98%) after 7 days of culture. High-resolution confocal microscopy of encapsulated fibroblasts reveals that the cells adopt a more spread morphology in response to higher RGD ligand concentrations and softer gel mechanics.

  17. Using selective withdrawal to encapsulate pancreatic islets for immunoisolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Jason; Murphy, William; Mrksich, Milan

    2005-11-01

    We apply selective-withdrawal for encapsulating insulin-producing pancreatic islets within thin poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coats. Islets placed in an aqueous PEG solution are drawn into the selective-withdrawal spout which then breaks up, leaving the islets surrounded by a thin, 20μm, polymer coat. These coats, whose thickness is independent of the size of the encapsulated islet, are photo-crosslinked to form hydrogel capsules. We can apply multiple coats of varying chemical composition. These coats provide a semi-permeable membrane which allows the islets to respond to changes in glucose concentration by producing insulin in a manner similar to that of unencapsulated islets. Furthermore, the hydrogel capsules exclude large molecules the size of the smallest antibodies. Our results suggest that this microencapsulation technique may be useful for the transplantation of islets for treatment of Type I diabetes.

  18. Module encapsulation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    The identification and development techniques for low-cost module encapsulation materials were reviewed. Test results were displayed for a variety of materials. The improved prospects for modeling encapsulation systems for life prediction were reported.

  19. Encapsulation-free controlled release: Electrostatic adsorption eliminates the need for protein encapsulation in PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pakulska, Malgosia M.; Elliott Donaghue, Irja; Obermeyer, Jaclyn M.; Tuladhar, Anup; McLaughlin, Christopher K.; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulation of therapeutic molecules within polymer particles is a well-established method for achieving controlled release, yet challenges such as low loading, poor encapsulation efficiency, and loss of protein activity limit clinical translation. Despite this, the paradigm for the use of polymer particles in drug delivery has remained essentially unchanged for several decades. By taking advantage of the adsorption of protein therapeutics to poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles, we demonstrate controlled release without encapsulation. In fact, we obtain identical, burst-free, extended-release profiles for three different protein therapeutics with and without encapsulation in PLGA nanoparticles embedded within a hydrogel. Using both positively and negatively charged proteins, we show that short-range electrostatic interactions between the proteins and the PLGA nanoparticles are the underlying mechanism for controlled release. Moreover, we demonstrate tunable release by modifying nanoparticle concentration, nanoparticle size, or environmental pH. These new insights obviate the need for encapsulation and offer promising, translatable strategies for a more effective delivery of therapeutic biomolecules. PMID:27386554

  20. Rheological behavior and Ibuprofen delivery applications of pH responsive composite alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Suraya; Maswal, Masrat; Chat, Oyais Ahmad; Rather, Ghulam Mohammad; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    Synthesis and structural characterization of hydrogels composed of sodium alginate, polyethylene oxide and acrylic acid with cyclodextrin as the hydrocolloid prepared at different pH values is presented. The hydrogels synthesized show significant variations in rheological properties, drug encapsulation capability and release kinetics. The hydrogels prepared at lower pH (pH 1) are more elastic, have high tensile strength and remain almost unaffected by varying temperature or frequency. Further, their Ibuprofen encapsulation capacity is low and releases it slowly. The hydrogel prepared at neutral pH (pH 7) is viscoelastic, thermo-reversible and also exhibits sol-gel transition on applying frequency and changing temperature. It shows highest Ibuprofen encapsulation capacity and also optimum drug release kinetics. The hydrogel prepared at higher pH (pH 12) is more viscous, has low tensile strength, is unstable to change in temperature and has fast drug release rate. The study highlights the pH responsiveness of three composite alginate hydrogels prepared under different conditions to be employed in drug delivery applications.

  1. 3D Bioprinting of Heterogeneous Aortic Valve Conduits with Alginate/Gelatin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4±3.4% for SMC and 83.2±4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin when printed in stiff matrix, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin in soft matrix. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  2. Investigation of pectin/starch hydrogel as a carrier for oral delivery of probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dafe, Alireza; Etemadi, Hossein; Dilmaghani, Azita; Mahdavinia, Gholam Reza

    2017-04-01

    The present study highlights the fabrication of novel food-grade hydrogel particles based on pectin and starch for probiotic colon delivery. Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC:13643 (L. plantarum) cells were encapsulated in pectin/starch hydrogels by extrusion method. Four batches were formulated with different ratios of starch/pectin solutions. Optical and scanning electron microscopy obviously showed the random distribution of L. plantarum throughout the hydrogel network. The viability of encapsulated cells in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and bile salt solution was significantly higher when compared to nonencapsulated cells. Results demonstrated that encapsulated cells in pectin/starch hydrogels were resistant against adverse conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract and bile salt solution compared to non-encapsulated cells. After sequential exposure to simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) for 2h almost complete death of free cells was observed however the numbers of surviving cells were 5.15 and 6.67 Log CFU/g for pectin and pectin/starch hydrogel, respectively.

  3. Engineering Protein Hydrogels Using SpyCatcher-SpyTag Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoye; Fang, Jie; Xue, Bin; Fu, Linglan; Li, Hongbin

    2016-09-12

    Constructing hydrogels from engineered proteins has attracted significant attention within the material sciences, owing to their myriad potential applications in biomedical engineering. Developing efficient methods to cross-link tailored protein building blocks into hydrogels with desirable mechanical, physical, and functional properties is of paramount importance. By making use of the recently developed SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, we successfully engineered protein hydrogels on the basis of engineered tandem modular elastomeric proteins. Our resultant protein hydrogels are soft but stable, and show excellent biocompatibility. As the first step, we tested the use of these hydrogels as a drug carrier, as well as in encapsulating human lung fibroblast cells. Our results demonstrate the robustness of the SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, even when the SpyTag (or SpyCatcher) is flanked by folded globular domains. These results demonstrate that SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry can be used to engineer protein hydrogels from tandem modular elastomeric proteins that can find applications in tissue engineering, in fundamental mechano-biological studies, and as a controlled drug release vehicle.

  4. Modified Gellan Gum hydrogels with tunable physical and mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Daniela F.; Sant, Shilpa; Shin, Hyeongho; Oliveira, João T.; Gomes, Manuela E.; Neves, Nuno M.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Reis, Rui L.

    2010-01-01

    Gellan Gum (GG) has been recently proposed for tissue engineering applications. GG hydrogels are produced by physical crosslinking methods induced by temperature variation or by the presence of divalent cations. However, physical crosslinking methods may yield hydrogels that become weaker in physiological conditions due to the exchange of divalent cations by monovalent ones. Hence, this work presents a new class of GG hydrogels crosslinkable by both physical and chemical mechanisms. Methacrylate groups were incorporated in the GG chain, leading to the production of a methacrylated gellan gum (MeGG) hydrogel with highly tunable physical and mechanical properties. The chemical modification was confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The mechanical properties of the developed hydrogel networks, with Young’s modulus values between 0.15 and 148 kPa, showed to be tuned by the different crosslinking mechanisms used. The in vitro swelling kinetics and hydrolytic degradation rate was dependent on the crosslinking mechanisms used to form the hydrogels. Three-dimensional (3D) encapsulation of NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells in MeGG networks demonstrated in vitro biocompatibility confirmed by high cell survival. Given the highly tunable mechanical and degradation properties of MeGG, it may be applicable for a wide range of tissue engineering approaches. PMID:20663552

  5. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn , Mukkamala, Ravindranath , Chen, Oing , Hu, Hopin , Baude, Dominique

    2003-04-22

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  6. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mukkamala, Ravindranath; Chen, Qing; Hu, Hopin; Baude, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  7. Degradation prediction model and stem cell growth of gelatin-PEG composite hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Liu, Chang; Lv, Shijie; Sun, Dongsheng; Qiao, Qinglong; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Yang; Xiao, Jing; Sun, Guangwei

    2016-12-01

    Gelatin hydrogel has great potential in regenerative medicine. The degradation of gelatin hydrogel is important to control the release profile of encapsulated biomolecules and regulate in vivo tissue repair process. As a plasticizer, PEG can significantly improve the mechanical property of gelatin hydrogel. However, how preparation parameters affect the degradation rate of gelatin-PEG composite hydrogel is still not clear. In this study, the significant effect factor, glutaraldehyde (GA) concentration, was confirmed by means of Plackett-Burman method. Then a mathematical model was built to predict the degradation rate of composite hydrogels under different preparation conditions using the response surface method (RSM), which was helpful to prepare the certain composite hydrogel with desired degradation rate. In addition, it was found that gelatin-PEG composite hydrogel surface well supported the adhesion and growth of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Moreover, PEG concentration not only could adjust hydrogel degradation more subtly, but also might increase the cross-linking degree and affect the cell migration. Therefore, these results would be useful to optimize the preparation of gelatin-PEG composite hydrogel for drug delivery or tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3149-3156, 2016.

  8. Periodontal tissue regeneration using enzymatically solidified chitosan hydrogels with or without cell loading.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang-Zhen; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Cai, Xinjie; Yu, Na; Jansen, John A; Yang, Fang

    2015-03-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the in vivo biocompatibility and periodontal regenerative potential of enzymatically solidified chitosan hydrogels with or without incorporated periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs). To this end, chitosan hydrogels, with (n=8; CHIT+CELL) or without (n=8; CHIT) fluorescently labeled PDLCs, were prepared and transplanted into rat intrabony periodontal defects; untreated defects were used as empty controls (n=8; EMPTY). After 4 weeks, maxillae were harvested, decalcified, and used for histological, histomorphometrical, and immunohistochemical assessments. The results showed that PDLCs remained viable upon encapsulation within chitosan hydrogels before transplantation. Histological analysis demonstrated that the chitosan hydrogels were largely degraded after 4 weeks of implantation, without any adverse reaction in the surrounding tissue. In terms of periodontal regeneration, alveolar bone height, alveolar bone area, and epithelial downgrowth were comparable for CHIT, CHIT+CELL, as well as EMPTY groups. In contrast, both CHIT and CHIT+CELL showed a significant increase in functional ligament length compared with EMPTY. From a cellular perspective, the contribution of chitosan hydrogel-incorporated cells to the periodontal regeneration could not be ascertained, as no signal from transplanted PDLCs could be detected at 4 weeks posttransplantation. The results demonstrated that enzymatically solidified chitosan hydrogels are highly biocompatible and biodegradable. Moreover, chitosan hydrogels without cell loading can improve periodontal regeneration in terms of functional ligament length, indicating the great potential of this hydrogel in clinical applications. Further work on the use of chitosan hydrogels as cell carriers is required.

  9. Cytocompatible injectable carboxymethyl chitosan/N-isopropylacrylamide hydrogels for localized drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Ma, Peter X

    2014-03-15

    Cytocompatible injectable hydrogels with pH and temperature sensitivity based on carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-poly (N-isopropyl acrylamide)-glycidyl methacrylate (CMCS-PNIPAm-GMA) were prepared by UV crosslinking, and these hydrogels as localized drug carriers for anticancer drug and anti-inflammatory drug were also investigated. The chemical structure of CMCS-PNIPAm-GMA and of their hydrogels was characterized by FT-IR and NMR. The effect of PNIPAm grafting percentage, pH and temperature on the swelling ratio of the hydrogels was studied, demonstrating the pH/temperature-responsive nature of the hydrogels. The morphology of the hydrogels before and after swelling was observed by scanning electron microscope. 5-Fluorouracil and diclofenac sodium as model drugs were encapsulated into the hydrogels in situ. Moreover, the effect of pH and temperature on the release of these drugs was discussed. The cytocompatibility of the macromonomer CMCS-PNIPAm-GMA and their hydrogels was studied with dog bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by using Alamar blue measurement and Live/Dead assay kit. All the results indicated that these degradable injectable hydrogels are good candidates for localized delivery systems of drugs.

  10. An enzyme-sensitive PEG hydrogel based on aggrecan catabolism for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Skaalure, Stacey C; Chu, Stanley; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-02-18

    A new cartilage-specific degradable hydrogel based on photoclickable thiol-ene poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels is presented. The hydrogel crosslinks are composed of the peptide, CRDTEGE-ARGSVIDRC, derived from the aggrecanase-cleavable site in aggrecan. This new hydrogel is evaluated for use in cartilage tissue engineering by encapsulating bovine chondrocytes from different cell sources (skeletally immature (juvenile) and mature (adult) donors and adult cells stimulated with proinflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and culturing for 12 weeks. Regardless of cell source, a twofold decrease in compressive modulus is observed by 12 weeks, but without significant hydrogel swelling indicating limited bulk degradation. For juvenile cells, a connected matrix rich in aggrecan and collagen II, but minimal collagens I and X is observed. For adult cells, less matrix, but similar quality, is deposited. Aggrecanase activity is elevated, although without accelerating bulk hydrogel degradation. LPS further decreases matrix production, but does not affect aggrecanase activity. In contrast, matrix deposition in the nondegradable hydrogels consists of aggrecan and collagens I, II, and X, indicative of hypertrophic cartilage. Lastly, no inflammatory response in chondrocytes is observed by the aggrecanase-sensitive hydrogels. Overall, it is demonstrated that this new aggrecanase-sensitive hydrogel, which is degradable by chondrocytes and promotes a hyaline-like engineered cartilage, is promising for cartilage regeneration.

  11. Injectable biodegradable hybrid hydrogels based on thiolated collagen and oligo(acryloyl carbonate)-poly(ethylene glycol)-oligo(acryloyl carbonate) copolymer for functional cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guohui; Wang, Xiaolin; Deng, Chao; Teng, Xiaomei; Suuronen, Erik J; Shen, Zhenya; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-03-01

    Injectable biodegradable hybrid hydrogels were designed and developed based on thiolated collagen (Col-SH) and multiple acrylate containing oligo(acryloyl carbonate)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-oligo(acryloyl carbonate) (OAC-PEG-OAC) copolymers for functional cardiac regeneration. Hydrogels were readily formed under physiological conditions (37°C and pH 7.4) from Col-SH and OAC-PEG-OAC via a Michael-type addition reaction, with gelation times ranging from 0.4 to 8.1 min and storage moduli from 11.4 to 55.6 kPa, depending on the polymer concentrations, solution pH and degrees of substitution of Col-SH. The collagen component in the hybrid hydrogels retained its enzymatic degradability against collagenase, and the degradation time of the hydrogels increased with increasing polymer concentration. In vitro studies showed that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) exhibited rapid cell spreading and extensive cellular network formation on these hybrid hydrogels. In a rat infarction model, the infarcted left ventricle was injected with PBS, hybrid hydrogels, BMSCs or BMSC-encapsulating hybrid hydrogels. Echocardiography demonstrated that the hybrid hydrogels and BMSC-encapsulating hydrogels could increase the ejection fraction at 28 days compared to the PBS control group, resulting in improved cardiac function. Histology revealed that the injected hybrid hydrogels significantly reduced the infarct size and increased the wall thickness, and these were further improved with the BMSC-encapsulating hybrid hydrogel treatment, probably related to the enhanced engraftment and persistence of the BMSCs when delivered within the hybrid hydrogel. Thus, these injectable hybrid hydrogels combining intrinsic bioactivity of collagen, controlled mechanical properties and enhanced stability provide a versatile platform for functional cardiac regeneration.

  12. Microstructured dextran hydrogels for burst-free sustained release of PEGylated protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ki Hyun; Lee, Fan; Xu, Keming; Keng, Choong Tat; Tan, Sue Yee; Tan, Yee Joo; Chen, Qingfeng; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogels have gained significant attention as ideal delivery vehicles for protein drugs. However, the use of hydrogels for protein delivery has been restricted because their porous structures inevitably cause a premature leakage of encapsulated proteins. Here, we report a simple yet effective approach to regulate the protein release kinetics of hydrogels through the creation of microstructures, which serve as a reservoir, releasing their payloads in a controlled manner. Microstructured dextran hydrogels enable burst-free sustained release of PEGylated interferon over 3 months without compromising its bioactivity. These hydrogels substantially extend the circulation half-life of PEGylated interferon, allowing for less frequent dosing in a humanized mouse model of hepatitis C. The present approach opens up possibilities for the development of sustained protein delivery systems for a broad range of pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

  13. Light-guiding hydrogels for cell-based sensing and optogenetic synthesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Seonghoon; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Polymer hydrogels are widely used as cell scaffolds for biomedical applications. Although the biochemical and biophysical properties of hydrogels have been investigated extensively, little attention has been paid to their potential photonic functionalities. Here, we report cell-integrated polyethylene glycol-based hydrogels for in vivo optical-sensing and therapy applications. Hydrogel patches containing cells were implanted in awake, freely moving mice for several days and shown to offer long-term transparency, biocompatibility, cell viability and light-guiding properties (loss of <1 dB cm-1). Using optogenetic, glucagon-like peptide-1 secreting cells, we conducted light-controlled therapy using the hydrogel in a mouse model with diabetes and obtained improved glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, real-time optical readout of encapsulated heat-shock-protein-coupled fluorescent reporter cells made it possible to measure the nanotoxicity of cadmium-based bare and shelled quantum dots (CdTe; CdSe/ZnS) in vivo.

  14. Diffusion and Controlled Localized Drug Release from an Injectable Solid Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jessie E. P.; Stewart, Brandon; Langhans, Sigrid; Stewart, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.

    2014-03-01

    We use an injectable solid peptide hydrogel (first assembled into a solid hydrogel, can shear-thin flow and immediately reheal on cessation of shear) as a drug delivery vehicle for sustained and active drug release. The triggered intramolecular peptide folding into a beta-hairpin leads to intermolecular assmebly of the peptides into the entangled and branched nanofibrillar hydrogel network responsible for its advantageous rheological properties. The hydrogel is used to encapsulate a highly effective chemotherapeutic, vincristine, with hydrophobic behavior. We show that we are able to constantly maintain drug release in low but still potent concentrations after the shear-thinning injection process. Similarly, the mechanical and morphoogical properties of the gels remains identical after injection. Characterization of the hydrogel construct is through tritiated vincristine release, TEM, confocal microscopy, and in vitro methods.

  15. A modified emulsion gelation technique to improve buoyancy of hydrogel tablets for floating drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Yom-Tov, Ortal; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2015-10-01

    The use of buoyant or floating hydrogel tablets is of particular interest in the sustained release of drugs to the stomach. They have an ability to slow the release rates of drugs by prolonging their absorption window in the upper part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study we synthesized bioactive hydrogels that have sustainable release rates for drugs in the stomach based on a hydrogel preparation technique that employs emulsifying surfactants. The emulsion gelation technique, which encapsulates oil droplets within the hydrogels during crosslinking, was used to decrease their specific gravity in aqueous environments, resulting in floating drug release depots. Properties such as swelling, buoyancy, density and drug release were manipulated by changing the polymer concentrations, surfactant percentages and the oil:polymer ratios. The relationship between these properties and the hydrogel's floating lag time was documented. The potential for this material to be used as a floating drug delivery system was demonstrated.

  16. Nitrile Oxide-Norbornene Cycloaddition as a Bioorthogonal Crosslinking Reaction for the Preparation of Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Truong, Vinh X; Zhou, Kun; Simon, George P; Forsythe, John S

    2015-10-01

    This communication describes the first application of cycloaddition between an in situ generated nitrile oxide with norbornene leading to a polymer crosslinking reaction for the preparation of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels under physiological conditions. Hydrogels with high water content and robust physical strength are readily formed within 2-5 min by a simple two-solution mixing method which allows 3D encapsulation of neuronal cells. This bioorthogonal crosslinking reaction provides a simple yet highly effective method for preparation of hydrogels to be used in bioengineering.

  17. Enzymatically cross-linked hyperbranched polyglycerol hydrogels as scaffolds for living cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changzhu; Strehmel, Christine; Achazi, Katharina; Chiappisi, Leonardo; Dernedde, Jens; Lensen, Marga C; Gradzielski, Michael; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion B; Haag, Rainer

    2014-11-10

    Although several strategies are now available to enzymatically cross-link linear polymers to hydrogels for biomedical use, little progress has been reported on the use of dendritic polymers for the same purpose. Herein, we demonstrate that horseradish peroxidase (HRP) successfully catalyzes the oxidative cross-linking of a hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) functionalized with phenol groups to hydrogels. The tunable cross-linking results in adjustable hydrogel properties. Because the obtained materials are cytocompatible, they have great potential for encapsulating living cells for regenerative therapy. The gel formation can be triggered by glucose and controlled well under various environmental conditions.

  18. DNA-functionalized hydrogels for confined membrane-free in vitro transcription/translation.

    PubMed

    Thiele, J; Ma, Y; Foschepoth, D; Hansen, M M K; Steffen, C; Heus, H A; Huck, W T S

    2014-08-07

    We microfluidically fabricate bio-orthogonal DNA-functionalized porous hydrogels from hyaluronic acid that are employed in in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) of a green fluorescent protein. By co-encapsulating individual hydrogel particles and the IVTT machinery in water-in-oil microdroplets, we study protein expression in a defined reaction volume. Our approach enables precise control over protein expression rates by gene dosage. We show that gene transcription and translation are confined to the membrane-free hydrogel matrix, which contributes to the design of membrane-free protocells.

  19. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  20. Antifouling properties of hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murosaki, Takayuki; Ahmed, Nafees; Gong, Jian Ping

    2011-12-01

    Marine sessile organisms easily adhere to submerged solids such as rocks, metals and plastics, but not to seaweeds and fishes, which are covered with soft and wet 'hydrogel'. Inspired by this fact, we have studied long-term antifouling properties of hydrogels against marine sessile organisms. Hydrogels, especially those containing hydroxy group and sulfonic group, show excellent antifouling activity against barnacles both in laboratory assays and in the marine environment. The extreme low settlement on hydrogels in vitro and in vivo is mainly caused by antifouling properties against the barnacle cypris.

  1. Performance of an in situ formed bioactive hydrogel dressing from a PEG-based hyperbranched multifunctional copolymer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yixiao; Hassan, Waqar U; Kennedy, Robert; Greiser, Udo; Pandit, Abhay; Garcia, Yolanda; Wang, Wenxin

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogel dressings have been widely used for wound management due to their ability to maintain a hydrated wound environment, restore the skin's physical barrier and facilitate regular dressing replacement. However, the therapeutic functions of standard hydrogel dressings are restricted. In this study, an injectable hybrid hydrogel dressing system was prepared from a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based thermoresponsive hyperbranched multiacrylate functional copolymer and thiol-modified hyaluronic acid in combination with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The cell viability, proliferation and metabolic activity of the encapsulated ADSCs were studied in vitro, and a rat dorsal full-thickness wound model was used to evaluate this bioactive hydrogel dressing in vivo. It was found that long-term cell viability could be achieved for both in vitro (21days) and in vivo (14days) studies. With ADSCs, this hydrogel system prevented wound contraction and enhanced angiogenesis, showing the potential of this system as a bioactive hydrogel dressing for wound healing.

  2. Influence of Cross-Linkers on the in Vitro Chondrogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Maturavongsadit, Panita; Bi, Xiangdong; Metavarayuth, Kamolrat; Luckanagul, Jittima Amie; Wang, Qian

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of the structures of cross-linkers on the in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogels. The hydrogels were prepared by the covalent cross-linking of methacrylated HA with different types of thiol-tailored molecules, including dithiothreitol (DTT), 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and multiarm polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer using thiol-ene "click" chemistry. The microstructure, mechanical properties, diffusivity, and degradation rates of the resultant hydrogels were controlled by the structural feature of different cross-linkers. BMSCs were then encapsulated in the resulting hydrogels and cultured in chondrogenic conditions. Overall, chondrogenic differentiation was highly enhanced in the PEG-cross-linked HA hydrogels, as measured by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen accumulation. The physical properties of hydrogels, especially the mechanical property and microarchitecture, were resulted from the structures of different cross-linkers, which subsequently modulated the fate of BMSC differentiation.

  3. Click-crosslinkable and photodegradable gelatin hydrogels for cytocompatible optical cell manipulation in natural environment.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masato; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Sugiura, Shinji; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Sumaru, Kimio; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2015-10-09

    This paper describes the generation of "click-crosslinkable" and "photodegaradable" gelatin hydrogels from the reaction between dibenzocycloctyl-terminated photoclevable tetra-arm polyethylene glycol and azide-modified gelatin. The hydrogels were formed in 30 min through the click-crosslinking reaction. The micropatterned features in the hydrogels were created by micropatterned light irradiation; the minimum resolution of micropatterning was 10-μm widths for line patterns and 20-μm diameters for circle patterns. Cells were successfully encapsulated in the hydrogels without any loss of viability across a wide concentration range of crosslinker. In contrast, an activated-ester-type photocleavable crosslinker, which we previously used to prepare photodegradable gelatin hydrogels, induced a decrease in cell viability at crosslinker concentrations greater than 1.8 mM. We also observed morphology alteration and better growth of cancer cells in the click-crosslinked photodegradable gelatin hydrogels that included matrigel than in the absence of matrigel. We also demonstrated micropatterning of the hydrogels encapsulating cells and optical cell separation. Both of the cells that remained in the non-irradiated area and the cells collected from the irradiated area maintained their viability.

  4. Hydrogel Design for Supporting Neurite Outgrowth and Promoting Gene Delivery to Maximize Neurite Extension

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Stevans, Alyson C.; Holland, Samantha; Wang, Christine E.; Shikanov, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels capable of gene delivery provide a combinatorial approach for nerve regeneration, with the hydrogel supporting neurite outgrowth and gene delivery inducing the expression of inductive factors. This report investigates the design of hydrogels that balance the requirements for supporting neurite growth with those requirements for promoting gene delivery. Enzymatically-degradable PEG hydrogels encapsulating dorsal root ganglia explants, fibroblasts, and lipoplexes encoding nerve growth factor were gelled within channels that can physically guide neurite outgrowth. Transfection of fibroblasts increased with increasing concentration of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion sites and decreasing PEG content. The neurite length increased with increasing RGD concentration within 10% PEG hydrogels, yet was maximal within 7.5% PEG hydrogels at intermediate RGD levels. Delivering lipoplexes within the gel produced longer neurites than culture in NGF-supplemented media or co-culture with cells exposed to DNA prior to encapsulation. Hydrogels designed to support neurite outgrowth and deliver gene therapy vectors locally may ultimately be employed to address multiple barriers that limit regeneration. PMID:22038654

  5. Click-crosslinkable and photodegradable gelatin hydrogels for cytocompatible optical cell manipulation in natural environment

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Masato; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Sugiura, Shinji; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Sumaru, Kimio; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the generation of “click-crosslinkable“ and “photodegaradable“ gelatin hydrogels from the reaction between dibenzocycloctyl-terminated photoclevable tetra-arm polyethylene glycol and azide-modified gelatin. The hydrogels were formed in 30 min through the click-crosslinking reaction. The micropatterned features in the hydrogels were created by micropatterned light irradiation; the minimum resolution of micropatterning was 10-μm widths for line patterns and 20-μm diameters for circle patterns. Cells were successfully encapsulated in the hydrogels without any loss of viability across a wide concentration range of crosslinker. In contrast, an activated-ester-type photocleavable crosslinker, which we previously used to prepare photodegradable gelatin hydrogels, induced a decrease in cell viability at crosslinker concentrations greater than 1.8 mM. We also observed morphology alteration and better growth of cancer cells in the click-crosslinked photodegradable gelatin hydrogels that included matrigel than in the absence of matrigel. We also demonstrated micropatterning of the hydrogels encapsulating cells and optical cell separation. Both of the cells that remained in the non-irradiated area and the cells collected from the irradiated area maintained their viability. PMID:26450015

  6. Efficient inhibition of colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis by drug loaded micelles in thermosensitive hydrogel composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Changyang; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yujun; Wu, Qinjie; Zhang, Doudou; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we aim to develop a dual drug delivery system (DDDS) of self-assembled micelles in thermosensitive hydrogel composite to deliver hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs simultaneously for colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis (CRPC) therapy. In our previous studies, we found that poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCEC) copolymers with different molecular weight and PEG/PCL ratio could be administered to form micelles or thermosensitive hydrogels, respectively. Therefore, the DDDS was constructed from paclitaxel (PTX) encapsulated PCEC micelles (PTX-micelles) and a fluorouracil (Fu) loaded thermosensitive PCEC hydrogel (Fu-hydrogel). PTX-micelles were prepared by self-assembly of biodegradable PCEC copolymer (Mn = 3700) and PTX without using any surfactants or excipients. Meanwhile, biodegradable and injectable thermosensitive Fu-hydrogel (Mn = 3000) with a lower sol-gel transition temperature at around physiological temperature was also prepared. The obtained PTX-micelles in thermosensitive Fu-hydrogel (PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel) composite is a free-flowing sol at ambient temperature and rapidly turned into a non-flowing gel at physiological temperature. In addition, the results of cytotoxicity, hemolytic study, and acute toxicity evaluation suggested that the PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel was non-toxic and biocompatible. In vitro release behaviors of PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel indicated that both PTX and Fu have a sustained release behavior. Furthermore, intraperitoneal application of PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel effectively inhibited growth and metastasis of CT26 peritoneal carcinomatosis in vivo (p < 0.001), and induced a stronger antitumor effect than that of Taxol® plus Fu (p < 0.001). The pharmacokinetic study indicated that PTX-micelles-Fu-hydrogel significantly increased PTX and Fu concentration and residence time in peritoneal fluids compared with Taxol® plus Fu group. Thus, the results suggested the micelles-hydrogel DDDS may

  7. Photodegradable hydrogels for dynamic tuning of physical and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Kloxin, April M; Kasko, Andrea M; Salinas, Chelsea N; Anseth, Kristi S

    2009-04-03

    We report a strategy to create photodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels through rapid polymerization of cytocompatible macromers for remote manipulation of gel properties in situ. Postgelation control of the gel properties was demonstrated to introduce temporal changes, creation of arbitrarily shaped features, and on-demand pendant functionality release. Channels photodegraded within a hydrogel containing encapsulated cells allow cell migration. Temporal variation of the biochemical gel composition was used to influence chondrogenic differentiation of encapsulated stem cells. Photodegradable gels that allow real-time manipulation of material properties or chemistry provide dynamic environments with the scope to answer fundamental questions about material regulation of live cell function and may affect an array of applications from design of drug delivery vehicles to tissue engineering systems.

  8. Effects of permeability and living space on cell fate and neo-tissue development in hydrogel-based scaffolds: a study with cartilaginous model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Changjiang; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-04-01

    One bottleneck in tissue regeneration with hydrogel scaffolds is the limited understanding of the crucial factors for controlling hydrogel's physical microenvironments to regulate cell fate. Here, the effects of permeability and living space of hydrogels on encapsulated cells' behavior were evaluated, respectively. Three model hydrogel-based constructs are fabricated by using photo-crosslinkable hyaluronic acid as precursor and chondrocytes as model cell type. The better permeable hydrogels facilitate better cell viability and rapid proliferation, which lead to increased production of extracellular matrix (ECM), e.g. collagen, glycosaminoglycan. By prolonged culture, nano-sized hydrogel networks inhibit neo-tissue development, and the presence of macro-porous living spaces significantly enhance ECM deposition via forming larger cell clusters and eventually induce formation of scaffold-free neo-tissue islets. The results of this work demonstrate that the manipulation and optimization of hydrogel microenvironments, namely permeability and living space, are crucial to direct cell fate and neo-tissue formation.

  9. Evaluation of hydrogel composing of Pluronic F127 and carboxymethyl hexanoyl chitosan as injectable scaffold for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Yap, Lie-Sian; Yang, Ming-Chien

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrated a novel hydrogel system composing of Pluronic F127, carboxymethyl hexanoyl chitosan (CA) and glutaraldehyde (GA) for encapsulating fibroblasts (L-929). The thermal behavior of the hydrogel was evaluated using TGA, the swelling behavior of the hydrogel was evaluated in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's medium (DMEM), and the mechanical properties were determined through dynamic mechanical analysis. Cells were encapsulated by simple mixing, and the viability of encapsulated cells was determined using alamar blue cell viability assay and the cells morphology was examined using fluorescent imaging. The results indicated that the Tgel of this system was around 30°C, where sol-gel transformation occurred within 90s. Although the addition of CA and GA reduced the shear moduli slightly, the F127/CA/GA gel was able to remain in gelling state in the medium for more than 1 month. In vitro cell culture study revealed that F-127/CA/GA hydrogels were non-cytotoxic. Moreover, the viability of encapsulated L929 was 106% after incubation for 5 days. Based on these results, these F127/CA/GA hydrogels can be used to encapsulate cells for tissue engineering applications.

  10. PEG-PE/phosphatidylcholine mixed immunomicelles specifically deliver encapsulated taxol to tumor cells of different origin and promote their efficient killing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z; Lukyanov, A N; Chakilam, A R; Torchilin, V P

    2003-02-01

    Mixed micelles were prepared from poly(ethyleneglycol)-distearyl phosphoethanolamine (PEG2000-PE) and egg phosphatidylcholine. The micelles were covalently modified with the nucleosome-specific monoclonal antibody 2C5 known to recognize and bind a variety of tumor cells via their surface-bound nucleosomes. Covalent attachment of 2C5 antibody was performed via a micelle-incorporated PEG-PE with the distal terminus of the PEG block activated with p-nitrophenylcarbonyl group (pNP-PEG-PE). Micelle surface-attached 2C5 antibody maintained its specific activity. 2C5-targeted immunomicelles were able to carry more than 3 wt% of taxol. Taxol-loaded immunomicelles specifically recognized tumor cell lines of several types. The cytotoxicity of 2C5-targeted taxol-loaded immunomicelles in a cell culture model was much higher when compared with free taxol or taxol in non-targeted micelles.

  11. CNT Reinforced Hybrid Microgels as Scaffold Materials for Cell Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su Ryon; Bae, Hojae; Cha, Jae Min; Mun, Ji Young; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Tekin, Halil; Shin, Hyeongho; Farshchi, Saeed; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Tang, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels that mimic biological extracellular matrix (ECM) can provide cells with mechanical support and signaling cues to regulate their behavior. However, despite the ability of hydrogels to generate artificial ECM that can modulate cellular behavior, they often lack the mechanical strength needed for many tissue constructs. Here, we present reinforced CNT-gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hybrid as a biocompatible, cell-responsive hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden three dimensional (3D) constructs. The addition of CNTs successfully reinforced GelMA hydrogels without decreasing their porosity or inhibiting cell growth. The CNT-GelMA hybrids were also photopatternable allowing for easy fabrication of microscale structures without harsh processes. NIH-3T3 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) readily spread and proliferated after encapsulation in CNT-GelMA hybrid microgels. By controlling the amount of CNTs incorporated into the GelMA hydrogel system, we demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the hybrid material can be tuned making it suitable for various tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, due to the high pattern fidelity and resolution of CNT incorporated GelMA, it can be used for in vitro cell studies or fabricating complex 3D biomimetic tissue-like structures. PMID:22117858

  12. Hydrogels Constructed from Engineered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Kong, Na; Laver, Bryce; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-02-24

    Due to their various potential biomedical applications, hydrogels based on engineered proteins have attracted considerable interest. Benefitting from significant progress in recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering/design techniques, the field of protein hydrogels has made amazing progress. The latest progress of hydrogels constructed from engineered recombinant proteins are presented, mainly focused on biorecognition-driven physical hydrogels as well as chemically crosslinked hydrogels. The various bio-recognition based physical crosslinking strategies are discussed, as well as chemical crosslinking chemistries used to engineer protein hydrogels, and protein hydrogels' various biomedical applications. The future perspectives of this fast evolving field of biomaterials are also discussed.

  13. Hydrogel microparticles for biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Le Goff, Gaelle C.; Srinivas, Rathi L.; Hill, W. Adam; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their hydrophilic, biocompatible, and highly tunable nature, hydrogel materials have attracted strong interest in the recent years for numerous biotechnological applications. In particular, their solution-like environment and non-fouling nature in complex biological samples render hydrogels as ideal substrates for biosensing applications. Hydrogel coatings, and later, gel dot surface microarrays, were successfully used in sensitive nucleic acid assays and immunoassays. More recently, new microfabrication techniques for synthesizing encoded particles from hydrogel materials have enabled the development of hydrogel-based suspension arrays. Lithography processes and droplet-based microfluidic techniques enable generation of libraries of particles with unique spectral or graphical codes, for multiplexed sensing in biological samples. In this review, we discuss the key questions arising when designing hydrogel particles dedicated to biosensing. How can the hydrogel material be engineered in order to tune its properties and immobilize bioprobes inside? What are the strategies to fabricate and encode gel particles, and how can particles be processed and decoded after the assay? Finally, we review the bioassays reported so far in the literature that have used hydrogel particle arrays and give an outlook of further developments of the field. PMID:26594056

  14. The effect of acoustic radiation force on osteoblasts in cell/hydrogel constructs for bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Veronick, James; Assanah, Fayekah; Nair, Lakshmi S; Vyas, Varun; Huey, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound, or the application of acoustic energy, is a minimally invasive technique that has been used in diagnostic, surgical, imaging, and therapeutic applications. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used to accelerate bone fracture repair and to heal non-union defects. While shown to be effective the precise mechanism behind its utility is still poorly understood. In this study, we considered the possibility that LIPUS may be providing a physical stimulus to cells within bony defects. We have also evaluated ultrasound as a means of producing a transdermal physical force that could stimulate osteoblasts that had been encapsulated within collagen hydrogels and delivered to bony defects. Here we show that ultrasound does indeed produce a measurable physical force and when applied to hydrogels causes their deformation, more so as ultrasound intensity was increased or hydrogel stiffness decreased. MC3T3 mouse osteoblast cells were then encapsulated within hydrogels to measure the response to this force. Statistically significant elevated gene expression for alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, both well-established markers of osteoblast differentiation, was noted in encapsulated osteoblasts (p < 0.05), suggesting that the physical force provided by ultrasound may induce bone formation in part through physically stimulating cells. We have also shown that this osteoblastic response is dependent in part on the stiffness of the encapsulating hydrogel, as stiffer hydrogels resulted in reducing or reversing this response. Taken together this approach, encapsulating cells for implantation into a bony defect that can potentially be transdermally loaded using ultrasound presents a novel regenerative engineering approach to enhanced fracture repair. PMID:27229906

  15. Improving gelation efficiency and cytocompatibility of visible light polymerized thiol-norbornene hydrogels via addition of soluble tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Shih, Han; Liu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2017-02-28

    Hydrogels immobilized with biomimetic peptides have been used widely for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Photopolymerization has been among the most commonly used techniques to fabricate peptide-immobilized hydrogels as it offers rapid and robust peptide immobilization within a crosslinked hydrogel network. Both chain-growth and step-growth photopolymerizations can be used to immobilize peptides within covalently crosslinked hydrogels. A previously developed visible light mediated step-growth thiol-norbornene gelation scheme has demonstrated efficient crosslinking of hydrogels composed of an inert poly(ethylene glycol)-norbornene (PEGNB) macromer and a small molecular weight bis-thiol linker, such as dithiothreitol (DTT). Compared with conventional visible light mediated chain-polymerizations where multiple initiator components are required, step-growth photopolymerized thiol-norbornene hydrogels are more cytocompatible for the in situ encapsulation of radical sensitive cells (e.g., pancreatic β-cells). This contribution explored visible light based crosslinking of various bis-cysteine containing peptides with macromer 8-arm PEGNB to form biomimetic hydrogels suitable for in situ cell encapsulation. It was found that the addition of soluble tyrosine during polymerization not only significantly accelerated gelation, but also improved the crosslinking efficiency of PEG-peptide hydrogels as evidenced by a decreased gel point and enhanced gel modulus. In addition, soluble tyrosine drastically enhanced the cytocompatibility of the resulting PEG-peptide hydrogels, as demonstrated by in situ encapsulation and culture of pancreatic MIN6 β-cells. This visible light based thiol-norbornene crosslinking mechanism provides an attractive gelation method for preparing cytocompatible PEG-peptide hydrogels for tissue engineering applications.

  16. Hypoxia-Inducible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is vital for the existence of all multicellular organisms, acting as a signaling molecule regulating cellular activities. Specifically, hypoxia, which occurs when the partial pressure of oxygen falls below 5%, plays a pivotal role during development, regeneration, and cancer. Here we report a novel hypoxia-inducible (HI) hydrogel composed of gelatin and ferulic acid that can form hydrogel networks via oxygen consumption in a laccase-mediated reaction. Oxygen levels and gradients within the hydrogels can be accurately controlled and precisely predicted. We demonstrate that HI hydrogels guide vascular morphogenesis in vitro via hypoxia-inducible factors activation of matrix metalloproteinases and promote rapid neovascularization from the host tissue during subcutaneous wound healing. The HI hydrogel is a new class of biomaterials that may prove useful in many applications, ranging from fundamental studies of developmental, regenerative and disease processes through the engineering of healthy and diseased tissue models towards the treatment of hypoxia-regulated disorders. PMID:24909742

  17. Designing Visible Light-Cured Thiol-Acrylate Hydrogels for Studying the HIPPO Pathway Activation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsai-Yu; Bragg, John C; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2016-04-01

    Various polymerization mechanisms have been developed to prepare peptide-immobilized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels, a class of biomaterials suitable for studying cell biology in vitro. Here, a visible light mediated thiol-acrylate photopolymerization scheme is reported to synthesize dually degradable PEG-peptide hydrogels with controllable crosslinking and degradability. The influence of immobilized monothiol pendant peptide is systematically evaluated on the crosslinking of these hydrogels. Further, methods are proposed to modulate hydrogel crosslinking, including adjusting concentration of comonomer or altering the design of multifunctional peptide crosslinker. Due to the formation of thioether ester bonds, these hydrogels are hydrolytically degradable. If the dithiol peptide linkers used are susceptible to protease cleavage, these thiol-acrylate hydrogels can be designed to undergo partial proteolysis. The differences between linear and multiarm PEG-acrylate (i.e., PEGDA vs PEG4A) are also evaluated. Finally, the use of the mixed-mode thiol-acrylate PEG4A-peptide hydrogels is explored for in situ encapsulation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Huh7). The effects of matrix stiffness and integrin binding motif (e.g., RGDS) on Huh7 cell growth and HIPPO pathway activation are studied using PEG4A-peptide hydrogels. This visible light poly-merized thiol-acrylate hydrogel system represents an alternative to existing light-cured hydrogel platforms and shall be useful in many biomedical applications.

  18. Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, Jason A.; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), an immunoneutral polysaccharide that is ubiquitous in the human body, is crucial for many cellular and tissue functions and has been in clinical use for over thirty years. When chemically modified, HA can be transformed into many physical forms -- viscoelastic solutions, soft or stiff hydrogels, electrospun fibers, non-woven meshes, macroporous and fibrillar sponges, flexible sheets, and nanoparticulate fluids -- for use in a range of preclinical and clinical settings. Many of these forms are derived from the chemical crosslinking of pendant reactive groups by addition/condensation chemistry or by radical polymerization. Clinical products for cell therapy and regenerative medicine require crosslinking chemistry that is compatible with the encapsulation of cells and injection into tissues. Moreover, an injectable clinical biomaterial must meet marketing, regulatory, and financial constraints to provide affordable products that can be approved, deployed to the clinic, and used by physicians. Many HA-derived hydrogels meet these criteria, and can deliver cells and therapeutic agents for tissue repair and regeneration. This progress report covers both basic concepts and recent advances in the development of HA-based hydrogels for biomedical applications. PMID:21394792

  19. Preserving viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in vitro and in vivo by a new encapsulation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probiotics have shown beneficial effects on human health. To increase the efficacy of probiotic applications, we used Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) as a probiotic model to investigate approaches to enhance the bioavailability of probiotics. LGG was encapsulated in hydrogel beads containing pectin...

  20. Asymmetric hydrogel membranes for biohybrid artificial organs and bioseparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Weihua Sonya

    1999-11-01

    Homogeneous hydrogel membranes were prepared by crosslinking poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with glutaraldehyde. These membranes were then modified to create asymmetry by establishing a glutaraldehyde concentration gradient across the hydrogel thickness. Creatinine (MW: 113), goat Fab (MW: 50 kD) and human IgG (MW: 150 kD) were used to simulate the molecular size of nutrients, therapeutic proteins, and immunological molecules, respectively, involved in cell encapsulation. Permeation experiments were performed in a stirred diffusion cell through homogeneous and asymmetric PVA hydrogels. At a given value of IgG rejection, the asymmetric membranes had higher creatinine and Fab permeabilities than the corresponding homogeneous membranes, indicating that creating mesh size asymmetry in a hydrogel can result in a high-flux, high-selectivity membrane for bioartificial organs and bioseparations. The hydrogel membranes with mesh size asymmetry were characterized with laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. A fluorescent label, DTAF (5-{[4,6-dichlorotriazin-2-yl] amino}-fluorescein) was attached to poly(vinyl alcohol), which then was used to prepare homogeneous and asymmetric hydrogel membranes. Structural asymmetry was clearly present in the gradient-modified membranes from the intensity as a function of membrane depth. From the relationships between fluorescence intensity and water content and between solute permeability and water content for homogeneous membranes, the permeabilities of creatinine, Fab and IgG for the asymmetric membranes were predicted from a sum-of-resistances model. The predicted solute permeabilities compared well to experimental values. The hydrogel membranes were mechanically supported with flat-sheet microfiltration membranes by impregnating the pores with a PVA solution, which was crosslinked with glutaraldehyde and then modified under a glutaraldehyde gradient to produce mesh size asymmetry. The supported, PVA hydrogel membranes with mesh size

  1. Hierarchically designed agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) interpenetrating network hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Brandon J; Dormer, Nathan H; Ingavle, Ganesh C; Roatch, Christopher H; Lomakin, Joseph; Detamore, Michael S; Gehrke, Stevin H

    2010-12-01

    A new method for encapsulating cells in interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels of superior mechanical integrity was developed. In this study, two biocompatible materials-agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) diacrylate-were combined to create a new IPN hydrogel with greatly enhanced mechanical performance. Unconfined compression of hydrogel samples revealed that the IPN displayed a fourfold increase in shear modulus relative to a pure PEG-diacrylate network (39.9 vs. 9.9 kPa) and a 4.9-fold increase relative to a pure agarose network (8.2 kPa). PEG and IPN compressive failure strains were found to be 71% ± 17% and 74% ± 17%, respectively, while pure agarose gels failed around 15% strain. Similar mechanical property improvements were seen when IPNs-encapsulated chondrocytes, and LIVE/DEAD cell viability assays demonstrated that cells survived the IPN encapsulation process. The majority of IPN-encapsulated chondrocytes remained viable 1 week postencapsulation, and chondrocytes exhibited glycosaminoglycan synthesis comparable to that of agarose-encapsulated chondrocytes at 3 weeks postencapsulation. The introduction of a new method for encapsulating cells in a hydrogel with enhanced mechanical performance is a promising step toward cartilage defect repair. This method can be applied to fabricate a broad variety of cell-based IPNs by varying monomers and polymers in type and concentration and by adding functional groups such as degradable sequences or cell adhesion groups. Further, this technology may be applicable in other cell-based applications where mechanical integrity of cell-containing hydrogels is of great importance.

  2. A hybrid actuated microrobot using an electromagnetic field and flagellated bacteria for tumor-targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Donghai; Choi, Hyunchul; Cho, Sunghoon; Jeong, Semi; Jin, Zhen; Lee, Cheong; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new concept for a hybrid actuated microrobot for tumor-targeting therapy. For drug delivery in tumor therapy, various electromagnetic actuated microrobot systems have been studied. In addition, bacteria-based microrobot (so-called bacteriobot), which use tumor targeting and the therapeutic function of the bacteria, has also been proposed for solid tumor therapy. Compared with bacteriobot, electromagnetic actuated microrobot has larger driving force and locomotive controllability due to their position recognition and magnetic field control. However, because electromagnetic actuated microrobot does not have self-tumor targeting, they need to be controlled by an external magnetic field. In contrast, the bacteriobot uses tumor targeting and the bacteria's own motility, and can exhibit self-targeting performance at solid tumors. However, because the propulsion forces of the bacteria are too small, it is very difficult for bacteriobot to track a tumor in a vessel with a large bloodstream. Therefore, we propose a hybrid actuated microrobot combined with electromagnetic actuation in large blood vessels with a macro range and bacterial actuation in small vessels with a micro range. In addition, the proposed microrobot consists of biodegradable and biocompatible microbeads in which the drugs and magnetic particles can be encapsulated; the bacteria can be attached to the surface of the microbeads and propel the microrobot. We carried out macro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot along a desired path through electromagnetic field control and the micro-manipulation of the hybrid actuated microrobot toward a chemical attractant through the chemotaxis of the bacteria. For the validation of the hybrid actuation of the microrobot, we fabricated a hydrogel microfluidic channel that can generate a chemical gradient. Finally, we evaluated the motility performance of the hybrid actuated microrobot in the hydrogel microfluidic channel. We expect

  3. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  4. Solar cell encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A polymer syrup for encapsulating solar cell assemblies. The syrup includes uncrosslinked poly(n-butyl)acrylate dissolved in n-butyl acrylate monomer. Preparation of the poly(n-butyl)acrylate and preparation of the polymer syrup is disclosed. Methods for applying the polymer syrup to solar cell assemblies as an encapsulating pottant are described. Also included is a method for solar cell construction utilizing the polymer syrup as a dual purpose adhesive and encapsulating material.

  5. Encapsulating Ionic Liquid and Fe₃O₄ Nanoparticles in Gelatin Microcapsules as Microwave Susceptible Agent for MR Imaging-guided Tumor Thermotherapy.

    PubMed

    Du, Qijun; Ma, Tengchuang; Fu, Changhui; Liu, Tianlong; Huang, Zhongbing; Ren, Jun; Shao, Haibo; Xu, Ke; Tang, Fangqiong; Meng, Xianwei

    2015-06-24

    The combination of therapies and monitoring the treatment process has become a new concept in cancer therapy. Herein, gelatin-based microcapsules have been first reported to be used as microwave (MW) susceptible agent and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging contrast agent for cancer MW thermotherapy. Using the simple coacervation methods, ionic liquid (IL) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were wrapped in microcapsules, and these microcapsules showed good heating efficacy in vitro under MW irradiation. The results of cell tests indicated that gelatin/IL@Fe3O4 microcapsules possessed excellent compatibility in physiological environments, and they could effectively kill cancer cells with exposure to MW. The ICR mice bearing H22 tumors treated with gelatin/IL@Fe3O4 microcapsules were obtained an outstanding MW thermotherapy efficacy with 100% tumor elimination under ultralow density irradiation (1.8 W/cm(2), 450 MHz). In addition, the applicability of the microcapsules as an efficient contrast agent for MR imaging in vivo was evident. Therefore, these multifunctional microcapsules have a great potential for MR imaging-guided MW thermotherapy.

  6. An Injectable Enzymatically Crosslinked Carboxymethylated Pullulan/Chondroitin Sulfate Hydrogel for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Yu, Songrui; Liu, Bing; Ni, Yunzhou; Yu, Chunyang; Su, Yue; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yu, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an enzymatically cross-linked injectable and biodegradable hydrogel system comprising carboxymethyl pullulan-tyramine (CMP-TA) and chondroitin sulfate-tyramine (CS-TA) conjugates was successfully developed under physiological conditions in the presence of both horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for cartilage tissue engineering (CTTE). The HRP crosslinking method makes this injectable system feasible, minimally invasive and easily translatable for regenerative medicine applications. The physicochemical properties of the mechanically stable hydrogel system can be modulated by varying the weight ratio and concentration of polymer as well as the concentrations of crosslinking reagents. Additionally, the cellular behaviour of porcine auricular chondrocytes encapsulated into CMP-TA/CS-TA hydrogels demonstrates that the hydrogel system has a good cyto-compatibility. Specifically, compared to the CMP-TA hydrogel, these CMP-TA/CS-TA composite hydrogels have enhanced cell proliferation and increased cartilaginous ECM deposition, which significantly facilitate chondrogenesis. Furthermore, histological analysis indicates that the hydrogel system exhibits acceptable tissue compatibility by using a mouse subcutaneous implantation model. Overall, the novel injectable pullulan/chondroitin sulfate composite hydrogels presented here are expected to be useful biomaterial scaffold for regenerating cartilage tissue.

  7. Injectable dextran hydrogels fabricated by metal-free click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Zihan; Shi, Ting; Zhao, Peng; An, Kangkang; Lin, Chao; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-04-01

    Injectable dextran-based hydrogels were prepared for the first time by bioorthogonal click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering. Click-crosslinked injectable hydrogels based on cyto-compatible dextran (Mw=10kDa) were successfully fabricated under physiological conditions by metal-free alkyne-azide cycloaddition (click) reaction between azadibenzocyclooctyne-modified dextran (Dex-ADIBO) and azide-modified dextran (Dex-N3). Gelation time of these dextran hydrogels could be regulated in the range of approximately 1.1 to 10.2min, depending on the polymer concentrations (5% or 10%) and ADIBO substitution degree (DS, 5 or 10) of Dex-ADIBO. Rheological analysis indicated that the dextran hydrogels were elastic and had storage moduli from 2.1 to 6.0kPa with increasing DS of ADIBO from 5 to 10. The in vitro tests revealed that the dextran hydrogel crosslinked from Dex-ADIBO DS 10 and Dex-N3 DS 10 at a polymer concentration of 10% could support high viability of individual rabbit chondrocytes and the chondrocyte spheroids encapsulated in the hydrogel over 21days. Individual chondrocytes and chondrocyte spheroids in the hydrogel could produce cartilage matrices such as collagen and glycosaminoglycans. However, the chondrocyte spheroids produced a higher content of matrices than individual chondrocytes. This study indicates that metal-free click chemistry is effective to produce injectable dextran hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

  8. Sustained release of Avastin® from polysaccharides cross-linked hydrogels for ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Weng, Yuhua; Xu, Lu; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    Avastin(®) was the first choice drug for the treatment of age related macular degeneration (AMD) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in clinic. Due to its short half-time in intraocular, it was required repeat administration. In this paper, an in situ injectable polysaccharides cross-linked hydrogel was developed for potential ocular drug delivery of avastin. The polysaccharide cross-linked hydrogel was first synthesized by simple mixing of glycol chitosan and oxidized alginate aqueous solution, and then characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and rheometer. In vitro degradation test indicated that the degradation rate of hydrogels could be controlled by the varying the content of oxidized alginate in hydrogels. In vitro release study showed that the encapsulated avastin had an initial burst release at early stage (within 4 h) followed by a sustained release manner in period of 3 days. With the increase of oxidized alginate concentration in the hydrogel, the release rate of avastin from hydrogels declined accordingly. Meanwhile, the structure stability of avastin released from hydrogels at specific time intervals did not show apparent changes as compared with native avastin based on the analysis of SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAEG). As a result, the developed in situ injectable polysaccharides cross-linked hydrogel with controllable degradation rate and drug release might be a versatile carrier for avastin to apply in ocular drug delivery.

  9. Resilin-PEG Hybrid Hydrogels Yield Degradable Elastomeric Scaffolds with Heterogeneous Microstructure.

    PubMed

    McGann, Christopher L; Akins, Robert E; Kiick, Kristi L

    2016-01-11

    Hydrogels derived from resilin-like polypeptides (RLPs) have shown outstanding mechanical resilience and cytocompatibility; expanding the versatility of RLP-based materials via conjugation with other polypeptides and polymers would offer great promise in the design of a range of materials. Here, we present an investigation of the biochemical and mechanical properties of hybrid hydrogels composed of a recombinant RLP and a multiarm PEG macromer. These hybrid hydrogels can be rapidly cross-linked through a Michael-type addition reaction between the thiols of cysteine residues on the RLP and vinyl sulfone groups on the multiarm PEG. Oscillatory rheology and tensile testing confirmed the formation of elastomeric hydrogels with mechanical resilience comparable to aortic elastin; hydrogel stiffness was easily modulated through the cross-linking ratio. Macromolecular phase separation of the RLP-PEG hydrogels offers the unique advantage of imparting a heterogeneous microstructure, which can be used to localize cells, through simple mixing and cross-linking. Assessment of degradation of the RLP by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) illustrated the specific proteolysis of the polypeptide in both its soluble form and when cross-linked into hydrogels. Finally, the successful encapsulation and viable three-dimensional culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) demonstrated the cytocompatibility of the RLP-PEG gels. Overall, the cytocompatibility, elastomeric mechanical properties, microheterogeneity, and degradability of the RLP-PEG hybrid hydrogels offer a suite of promising properties for the development of cell-instructive, structured tissue engineering scaffolds.

  10. An Injectable Enzymatically Crosslinked Carboxymethylated Pullulan/Chondroitin Sulfate Hydrogel for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Yu, Songrui; Liu, Bing; Ni, Yunzhou; Yu, Chunyang; Su, Yue; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yu, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an enzymatically cross-linked injectable and biodegradable hydrogel system comprising carboxymethyl pullulan-tyramine (CMP-TA) and chondroitin sulfate-tyramine (CS-TA) conjugates was successfully developed under physiological conditions in the presence of both horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for cartilage tissue engineering (CTTE). The HRP crosslinking method makes this injectable system feasible, minimally invasive and easily translatable for regenerative medicine applications. The physicochemical properties of the mechanically stable hydrogel system can be modulated by varying the weight ratio and concentration of polymer as well as the concentrations of crosslinking reagents. Additionally, the cellular behaviour of porcine auricular chondrocytes encapsulated into CMP-TA/CS-TA hydrogels demonstrates that the hydrogel system has a good cyto-compatibility. Specifically, compared to the CMP-TA hydrogel, these CMP-TA/CS-TA composite hydrogels have enhanced cell proliferation and increased cartilaginous ECM deposition, which significantly facilitate chondrogenesis. Furthermore, histological analysis indicates that the hydrogel system exhibits acceptable tissue compatibility by using a mouse subcutaneous implantation model. Overall, the novel injectable pullulan/chondroitin sulfate composite hydrogels presented here are expected to be useful biomaterial scaffold for regenerating cartilage tissue. PMID:26817622

  11. Biodegradable DNA-enabled poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels prepared by copper-free click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Barker, Karolyn; Rastogi, Shiva K; Dominguez, Jose; Cantu, Travis; Brittain, William; Irvin, Jennifer; Betancourt, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Significant research has focused on investigating the potential of hydrogels in various applications and, in particular, in medicine. Specifically, hydrogels that are biodegradable lend promise to many therapeutic and biosensing applications. Endonucleases are critical for mechanisms of DNA repair. However, they are also known to be overexpressed in cancer and to be present in wounds with bacterial contamination. In this work, we set out to demonstrate the preparation of DNA-enabled hydrogels that could be degraded by nucleases. Specifically, hydrogels were prepared through the reaction of dibenzocyclooctyne-functionalized multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol) with azide-functionalized single-stranded DNA in aqueous solutions via copper-free click chemistry. Through the use of this method, biodegradable hydrogels were formed at room temperature in buffered saline solutions that mimic physiological conditions, avoiding possible harmful effects associated with other polymerization techniques that can be detrimental to cells or other bioactive molecules. The degradation of these DNA-cross-linked hydrogels upon exposure to the model endonucleases Benzonase(®) and DNase I was studied. In addition, the ability of the hydrogels to act as depots for encapsulation and nuclease-controlled release of a model protein was demonstrated. This model has the potential to be tailored and expanded upon for use in a variety of applications where mild hydrogel preparation techniques and controlled material degradation are necessary including in drug delivery and wound healing systems.

  12. An Injectable Enzymatically Crosslinked Carboxymethylated Pullulan/Chondroitin Sulfate Hydrogel for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Yu, Songrui; Liu, Bing; Ni, Yunzhou; Yu, Chunyang; Su, Yue; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yu, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2016-01-28

    In this study, an enzymatically cross-linked injectable and biodegradable hydrogel system comprising carboxymethyl pullulan-tyramine (CMP-TA) and chondroitin sulfate-tyramine (CS-TA) conjugates was successfully developed under physiological conditions in the presence of both horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for cartilage tissue engineering (CTTE). The HRP crosslinking method makes this injectable system feasible, minimally invasive and easily translatable for regenerative medicine applications. The physicochemical properties of the mechanically stable hydrogel system can be modulated by varying the weight ratio and concentration of polymer as well as the concentrations of crosslinking reagents. Additionally, the cellular behaviour of porcine auricular chondrocytes encapsulated into CMP-TA/CS-TA hydrogels demonstrates that the hydrogel system has a good cyto-compatibility. Specifically, compared to the CMP-TA hydrogel, these CMP-TA/CS-TA composite hydrogels have enhanced cell proliferation and increased cartilaginous ECM deposition, which significantly facilitate chondrogenesis. Furthermore, histological analysis indicates that the hydrogel system exhibits acceptable tissue compatibility by using a mouse subcutaneous implantation model. Overall, the novel injectable pullulan/chondroitin sulfate composite hydrogels presented here are expected to be useful biomaterial scaffold for regenerating cartilage tissue.

  13. In situ electroactive and antioxidant supramolecular hydrogel based on cyclodextrin/copolymer inclusion for tissue engineering repair.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haitao; Cui, Liguo; Zhang, Peibiao; Huang, Yubin; Wei, Yen; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-03-01

    The injectable electroactive and antioxidant hydrogels are prepared from mixing the tetraaniline functional copolymers and α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) aqueous solution. UV-vis and CV of the copolymer solution showed good electroactive properties. The antioxidant ability of the copolymer is also proved. The gelation mechanism and properties of the system are studied by WAXD, DSC, and rheometer. The encapsulated cells are highly viable in the hydrogels, suggesting that the hydrogels have excellent cytocompatibility. After subcutaneous injection, H&E staining study suggests acceptable biocompatibility of the materials in vivo. Moreover, data shows the injectable electroactive material can effectively accelerate the proliferation of encapsulated cells with electrical stimuli, and the mechanism is also elaborated. Such an injectable electroactive hydrogel would more closely mimic the native extracellular matrix, thereby combining a biomimetic environment of long-term cell survival and electrical signal to support the generation of functional tissue.

  14. Action of the anti-tumoral zinc(II)phthalocyanine in solution or encapsulated into nanoparticles of poly-ɛ-caprolactone internalized by peritoneal macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Abe, Amanda Santos Franco; Ricci-Júnior, Eduardo; Teixeira Lima Castelo Branco, Morgana; de Brito Gitirana, Lycia

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used as drug delivery systems (DDS) exhibiting high cell penetration power. As an antitumor photosensitizer, zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was applied in photodynamic therapy (PDT) since its phototoxic activity promotes death of tumor cells in the presence of laser light. Since drugs do not interact only with tumor cells in living organisms, this study aimed to analyze the action of ZnPc-loaded in nanoparticles (ZnPc-NPs) and in solution (free ZnPc) using peritoneal macrophages as a model of non-neoplastic cells that inhabit the tumoral stroma. NPs were produced by emulsion and evaporation of solvent and characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Assays as 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, light microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to evaluate the drug effects in the presence or absence of laser light applied in PDT. NPs exhibited dimensions between 290 and 350 nm and rounded shape. Empty NP did not affect cell viability, showing that these nanocarriers are biocompatible DDS. Free ZnPc was randomly distributed in the cytoplasm, while ZnPc-NP was preferably located near the nucleus. At 5 μg ml-1, free ZnPc caused greater loss of cell viability in the absence of laser when compared to ZnPc-NPs, in the presence or absence of irradiation. In contrast, free ZnPc and ZnPc-NPs (0.5 μg ml-1) promoted cell death to the same extent in cells treated with laser light or not. This demonstrates that the performance of this drug is dose dependent in its free form, but not in its nanoencapsulated form. Cells irradiated with laser (100 mW) and treated with free ZnPc or with ZnPc-NPs showed morphological changes. These observations show that both free ZnPc and ZnPc-NPs irradiated with laser light cause cell damage in peritoneal macrophages.

  15. Sequential assembly of 3D perfusable microfluidic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    He, Jiankang; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-11-01

    Bottom-up tissue engineering provides a promising way to recreate complex structural organizations of native organs in artificial constructs by assembling functional repeating modules. However, it is challenging for current bottom-up strategies to simultaneously produce a controllable and immediately perfusable microfluidic network in modularly assembled 3D constructs. Here we presented a bottom-up strategy to produce perfusable microchannels in 3D hydrogels by sequentially assembling microfluidic modules. The effects of agarose-collagen composition on microchannel replication and 3D assembly of hydrogel modules were investigated. The unique property of predefined microchannels in transporting fluids within 3D assemblies was evaluated. Endothelial cells were incorporated into the microfluidic network of 3D hydrogels for dynamic culture in a house-made bioreactor system. The results indicated that the sequential assembly method could produce interconnected 3D predefined microfluidic networks in optimized agarose-collagen hydrogels, which were fully perfusable and successfully functioned as fluid pathways to facilitate the spreading of endothelial cells. We envision that the presented method could be potentially used to engineer 3D vascularized parenchymal constructs by encapsulating primary cells in bulk hydrogels and incorporating endothelial cells in predefined microchannels.

  16. Performance and Biocompatibility of Extremely Tough Alginate/Polyacrylamide Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Max; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Mehta, Manav; Johnson, Chris; Arany, Praveen; Suo, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Although hydrogels now see widespread use in a host of applications, low fracture toughness and brittleness have limited their more broad use. As a recently described interpenetrating network (IPN) of alginate and polyacrylamide demonstrated a fracture toughness of ∼9000 J/m2, we sought to explore the biocompatibility and maintenance of mechanical properties of these hydrogels in cell culture and in vivo conditions. These hydrogels can sustain a compressive strain of over 90% with minimal loss of Young's Modulus as well as minimal swelling for up to 50 days of soaking in culture conditions. Mouse mesenchymal stem cells exposed to the IPN gel-conditioned media maintain high viability, and although cells exposed to conditioned media demonstrate slight reductions in proliferation and metabolic activity (WST assay), these effects are abrogated in a dose-dependent manner. Implantation of these IPN hydrogels into subcutaneous tissue of rats for 8 weeks led to mild fibrotic encapsulation and minimal inflammatory response. These results suggest the further exploration of extremely tough alginate/PAAM IPN hydrogels as biomaterials. PMID:23896005

  17. Nano-Fibrous Biopolymer Hydrogels via Biological Conjugation for Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huinan; Xing, Xiaodong; Jia, Yang; Mao, Jiahui; Zhang, Ziwei; Tan, Huaping

    2016-06-01

    Nanostructured biopolymer hydrogels have great potential in the field of drug delivery and regenerative medicine. In this work, a nano-fibrous (NF) biopolymer hydrogel was developed for cell growth factors (GFs) delivery and in vitro osteogenesis. The nano-fibrous hydrogel was produced via biological conjugation of streptavidin functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-Streptavidin) and biotin terminated star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-Biotin). In the present work, in vitro gelation, mechanical properties, degradation and equilibrium swelling of the NF hydrogel were examined. The potential application of this NF gel scaffold in bone tissue engineering was confirmed by encapsulation behavior of osteoblasts. Osteoblasts seeded directly in NF gel scaffold containing cell growth factor, e.g. bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), was to mimic the in vivo microenvironment in which cells interface biomaterials and interact with BMP-2. In combination with BMP-2, the NF hydrogel exhibited beneficial effects on osteoblast activity and differentiation, which suggested a promising future for local treatment of pathologies involving bone loss.

  18. Hydrogel films and coatings by swelling-induced gelation.

    PubMed

    Moreau, David; Chauvet, Caroline; Etienne, François; Rannou, François P; Corté, Laurent

    2016-11-22

    Hydrogel films used as membranes or coatings are essential components of devices interfaced with biological systems. Their design is greatly challenged by the need to find mild synthesis and processing conditions that preserve their biocompatibility and the integrity of encapsulated compounds. Here, we report an approach to produce hydrogel films spontaneously in aqueous polymer solutions. This method uses the solvent depletion created at the surface of swelling polymer substrates to induce the gelation of a thin layer of polymer solution. Using a biocompatible polymer that self-assembles at high concentration [poly(vinyl alcohol)], hydrogel films were produced within minutes to hours with thicknesses ranging from tens to hundreds of micrometers. A simple model and numerical simulations of mass transport during swelling capture the experiments and predict how film growth depends on the solution composition, substrate geometry, and swelling properties. The versatility of the approach was verified with a variety of swelling substrates and hydrogel-forming solutions. We also demonstrate the potential of this technique by incorporating other solutes such as inorganic particles to fabricate ceramic-hydrogel coatings for bone anchoring and cells to fabricate cell-laden membranes for cell culture or tissue engineering.

  19. Reusable optical bioassay platform with permeability-controlled hydrogel pads for selective saccharide detection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kwan Yee; Mak, Wing Cheung; Trau, Dieter

    2008-01-28

    A reusable optical bioassay platform using permeability-controlled hydrogel pads for selective saccharide detection has been developed. An optical glucose detection assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between dye-labeled dextran and Concanavalin A (ConA) was incorporated into hydrogel pads by entrapment. The hydrogel pads are constructed from hemispherical hydrogel attached onto hydrophobic surfaces of a microtiter plate. The resulted hemispherical hydrogel pads entrapping the sensing biological materials were further surface coated with polyelectrolyte multilayers through a Layer-by-Layer (LbL) self-assembly process to create a permeability-controlled membrane with nanometer thickness. The selective permeable LbL film deposited on the hydrogel surface allows small molecular weight analytes to diffuse into the hydrogel pads while the large molecular weight sensing biological molecules are immobilized. An encapsulation efficiency of 75% for the ConA/Dextran complex within the coated hydrogel pads was achieved and no significant leakage of the complex was observed. Glucose calibration curve with linear range from 0 to 10mM glucose was obtained. Selective permeability of the hydrogel pads has been demonstrated by measurement of saccharides with various molecular weights. The LbL hydrogel pads could selectively detect monosaccharides (glucose, MW=180) and disaccharides (sucrose, MW=342) while polysaccharides (dextran, MW approximately 70kDa) cannot diffuse through the LbL layer and are excluded. LbL hydrogel pads allow regeneration of the FRET system with good signal reproducibility of more than 90% to construct a reusable and reagentless optical bioassay platform.

  20. In vivo and in vitro anti-cancer activity of thermo-sensitive and photo-crosslinkable doxorubicin hydrogels composed of chitosan-doxorubicin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Il; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Seo Young; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2009-09-01

    Doxorubicin was chemically conjugated to acrylated chitosan in order to obtain sustained-release profiles of doxorubicin from thermo-responsive and photo-crosslinkable hydrogels. Chitooligosaccharide was acrylated with glycidyl methacrylate and subsequently conjugated to doxorubicin via an amide linkage. A mixture of doxorubicin-chitosan conjugates, acrylated Pluronic, and doxorubicin formed physical gels at 37 degrees C. Photo-irradiation was subsequently performed to chemically crosslink the physical hydrogel at 37 degrees C. Chitooligosaccharide-doxorubicin conjugates in the doxorubicin hydrogels significantly reduced burst release of free doxorubicin from doxorubicin hydrogels compared hydrogels without the conjugates. Upon incubating doxorubicin hydrogels at 37 degrees C, chitosan-doxorubicin conjugates were confirmed to be degraded into more hydrophilic oligomers by reversed-phase chromatography. In vitro cytotoxicity assay using released media from doxorubicin hydrogels showed that degraded chitosan-doxorubicin had cytotoxicity comparable to free doxorubicin. Athymic nude mice bearing human lung adenocarcinoma were subjected to intra-tumoral injections of physical hydrogels. After photo-crosslinking injected hydrogels using surgical catheters, tumor sizes, body weights, and survivals were measured for 1 month. Released media from doxorubicin hydrogels exerted similar cytotoxicities to free doxorubicin, and the tumor volume was significantly reduced for 1 month compared to other samples. Thus, doxorubicin hydrogels containing doxorubicin conjugates can be employed as a novel injectable anti-cancer drug aiming to achieve sustained release of doxorubicin for several weeks against solid tumors.

  1. Contemporary issues in hydrogels research

    SciTech Connect

    Peppas, N.A.

    1993-12-31

    The last ten years has seen an explosion in hydrogels research, the result of improved understanding of the structure and behavior of these water-swollen, crosslinked polymers. After the early developments of Flory And Katchalsky in the 1940s, the great Czechoslovakian researchers of the 1960s and Andrade, Hoffman, Ratner and Merrill of the early 1970s, hydrogels have again attracted significant research interest, especially through the imaginative research of Tanaka in the 1980s and others. Eight general areas of contemporary research in hydrogels are identified: (i) kinetic analysis of the copolymerization/crosslinking reactions used in hydrogel preparation; (ii) gelation and percolation theories; (iii) novel methods for tailor-made copolymers with desirable functional groups, or biodegradable chains; (iv) biomimetic hydrogels; (V) hydrogels of controlled porous structure; (vi) ultrapure hydrogels devoid of crosslinking agents, emulsifiers, etc.; (vii) critical phenomena in hydrogels; and (viii) behavior of anionic, cationic and amphiphilic hydrogels.

  2. Characterization Methods of Encapsulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhibing; Law, Daniel; Lian, Guoping

    Food active ingredients can be encapsulated by different processes, including spray drying, spray cooling, spray chilling, spinning disc and centrifugal co-extrusion, extrusion, fluidized bed coating and coacervation (see Chap. 2 of this book). The purpose of encapsulation is often to stabilize an active ingredient, control its release rate and/or convert a liquid formulation into a solid which is easier to handle. A range of edible materials can be used as shell materials of encapsulates, including polysaccharides, fats, waxes and proteins (see Chap. 3 of this book). Encapsulates for typical industrial applications can vary from several microns to several millimetres in diameter although there is an increasing interest in preparing nano-encapsulates. Encapsulates are basically particles with a core-shell structure, but some of them can have a more complex structure, e.g. in a form of multiple cores embedded in a matrix. Particles have physical, mechanical and structural properties, including particle size, size distribution, morphology, surface charge, wall thickness, mechanical strength, glass transition temperature, degree of crystallinity, flowability and permeability. Information about the properties of encapsulates is very important to understanding their behaviours in different environments, including their manufacturing processes and end-user applications. E.g. encapsulates for most industrial applications should have desirable mechanical strength, which should be strong enough to withstand various mechanical forces generated in manufacturing processes, such as mixing, pumping, extrusion, etc., and may be required to be weak enough in order to release the encapsulated active ingredients by mechanical forces at their end-user applications, such as release rate of flavour by chewing. The mechanical strength of encapsulates and release rate of their food actives are related to their size, morphology, wall thickness, chemical composition, structure etc. Hence

  3. Highly robust hydrogels via a fast, simple and cytocompatible dual crosslinking-based process.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana M S; Mano, João F

    2015-11-07

    A highly robust hydrogel device made from a single biopolymer formulation is reported. Owing to the presence of covalent and non-covalent crosslinks, these engineered systems were able to (i) sustain a compressive strength of ca. 20 MPa, (ii) quickly recover upon unloading, and (iii) encapsulate cells with high viability rates.

  4. Antifouling properties of hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Murosaki, Takayuki; Ahmed, Nafees; Ping Gong, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Marine sessile organisms easily adhere to submerged solids such as rocks, metals and plastics, but not to seaweeds and fishes, which are covered with soft and wet ‘hydrogel’. Inspired by this fact, we have studied long-term antifouling properties of hydrogels against marine sessile organisms. Hydrogels, especially those containing hydroxy group and sulfonic group, show excellent antifouling activity against barnacles both in laboratory assays and in the marine environment. The extreme low settlement on hydrogels in vitro and in vivo is mainly caused by antifouling properties against the barnacle cypris. PMID:27877456

  5. Myocardial matrix-polyethylene glycol hybrid hydrogels for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Gregory N.; Rao, Nikhil; Christman, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Similar to other protein-based hydrogels, extracellular matrix (ECM) based hydrogels, derived from decellularized tissues, have a narrow range of mechanical properties and are rapidly degraded. These hydrogels contain natural cellular adhesion sites, form nanofibrous networks similar to native ECM, and are biodegradable. In this study, we expand the properties of these types of materials by incorporating poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) into the ECM network. We use decellularized myocardial matrix as an example of a tissue specific ECM derived hydrogel. Myocardial matrix-PEG hybrids were synthesized by two different methods, cross-linking the proteins with an amine-reactive PEG-star and photo-induced radical polymerization of two different multi-armed PEG-acrylates. We show that both methods allow for conjugation of PEG to the myocardial matrix by gel electrophoresis and infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the hybrid materials still contain a nanofibrous network similar to unmodified myocardial matrix and that the fiber diameter is changed by the method of PEG incorporation and PEG molecular weight. PEG conjugation also decreased the rate of enzymatic degradation in vitro, and increased material stiffness. Hybrids synthesized with amine-reactive PEG had gelation rates of 30 min, similar to the unmodified myocardial matrix, and incorporation of PEG did not prevent cell adhesion and migration through the hydrogels, thus offering the possibility to have an injectable ECM hydrogel that degrades more slowly in vivo. The photo-polymerized radical systems gelled in 4 min upon irradiation, allowing 3D encapsulation and culture of cells, unlike the soft unmodified myocardial matrix. This work demonstrates that PEG incorporation into ECM-based hydrogels can expand material properties, thereby opening up new possibilities for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  6. Peritoneal adhesion prevention with a biodegradable and injectable N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan-aldehyde hyaluronic acid hydrogel in a rat repeated-injury model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Linjiang; Li, Ling; He, Tao; Wang, Ning; Yang, Suleixin; Yang, Xi; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Wenli; Yang, Li; Wu, Qinjie; Gong, Changyang

    2016-11-01

    Postoperative peritoneal adhesion is one of the serious issues because it induces severe clinical disorders. In this study, we prepared biodegradable and injectable hydrogel composed of N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan (NOCC) and aldehyde hyaluronic acid (AHA), and assessed its anti-adhesion effect in a rigorous and severe recurrent adhesion model which is closer to clinical conditions. The flexible hydrogel, which gelated in 66 seconds at 37 °C, was cross-linked by the schiff base derived from the amino groups of NOCC and aldehyde groups in AHA. In vitro cytotoxicity test showed the hydrogel was non-toxic. In vitro and in vivo degradation examinations demonstrated the biodegradable and biocompatibility properties of the hydrogel. The hydrogel discs could prevent the invasion of fibroblasts, whereas fibroblasts encapsulated in the porous 3-dimensional hydrogels could grow and proliferate well. Furthermore, the hydrogel was applied to evaluate the anti-adhesion efficacy in a more rigorous recurrent adhesion model. Compared with normal saline group and commercial hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, the NOCC-AHA hydrogel exhibited significant reduction of peritoneal adhesion. Compared to control group, the blood and abdominal lavage level of tPA was increased in NOCC-AHA hydrogel group. These findings suggested that NOCC-AHA hydrogel had a great potential to serve as an anti-adhesion candidate.

  7. Peritoneal adhesion prevention with a biodegradable and injectable N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan-aldehyde hyaluronic acid hydrogel in a rat repeated-injury model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linjiang; Li, Ling; He, Tao; Wang, Ning; Yang, Suleixin; Yang, Xi; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Wenli; Yang, Li; Wu, Qinjie; Gong, Changyang

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative peritoneal adhesion is one of the serious issues because it induces severe clinical disorders. In this study, we prepared biodegradable and injectable hydrogel composed of N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan (NOCC) and aldehyde hyaluronic acid (AHA), and assessed its anti-adhesion effect in a rigorous and severe recurrent adhesion model which is closer to clinical conditions. The flexible hydrogel, which gelated in 66 seconds at 37 °C, was cross-linked by the schiff base derived from the amino groups of NOCC and aldehyde groups in AHA. In vitro cytotoxicity test showed the hydrogel was non-toxic. In vitro and in vivo degradation examinations demonstrated the biodegradable and biocompatibility properties of the hydrogel. The hydrogel discs could prevent the invasion of fibroblasts, whereas fibroblasts encapsulated in the porous 3-dimensional hydrogels could grow and proliferate well. Furthermore, the hydrogel was applied to evaluate the anti-adhesion efficacy in a more rigorous recurrent adhesion model. Compared with normal saline group and commercial hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, the NOCC-AHA hydrogel exhibited significant reduction of peritoneal adhesion. Compared to control group, the blood and abdominal lavage level of tPA was increased in NOCC-AHA hydrogel group. These findings suggested that NOCC-AHA hydrogel had a great potential to serve as an anti-adhesion candidate. PMID:27869192

  8. Polymer hydrogels: Chaperoning vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, Herman F.; Leong, Kam W.

    2010-07-01

    A cationic nanosized hydrogel (nanogel) shows controlled antigen delivery in vivo following intranasal administration and hence holds promise for a clinically effective adjuvant-free and needle-free vaccine system.

  9. Surface deposition and encapsulation of metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, Jared Franklin

    In this work metallic clusters are produced by both encapsulation in an aerogel matrix and deposition on a surface. Entrapment of metal clusters inside aerogels is accomplished though synthesis of a hydrogel precursor, washing it with an aqueous metal salt solution, and controlled reduction of the metal. Although the aerogel matrix stabilizes and prevents subsequent loss or aggregation of the clusters once they are produced, controlling the rate of reduction is key to the size and morphology of the clusters. In order to do this, both radiolytic and chemical reduction methods are used. The radiolytic technique for the formation of metal cluster aerogel composites utilizes gamma radiation to reduce the solution of Ag+ or [AuCl 4]- ions inside of the hydrogel precursor. After exposure to gamma rays, the previously colorless gels have the coloration typical of colloids of Au (pink) and Ag (yellow/brown) clusters. Typical gamma doses are between 2 to 3.5 kGy for hydrogels containing 10-4 to 10-3 mol·L-1 metal solutions. Subsequent characterization confirmed the presence of metal clusters with a fcc structure. The cluster diameters varied between 10 and 200nm, depending on the synthesis parameters. More conventional chemical reduction is also employed in this work to produce noble metal clusters in an aerogel matrix. Hydrogels were washed in a basic solution of Ag+ or [AuCl4]- ions, and formaldehyde was added to the solution. The reduction proceeded relatively slowly, allowing the formaldehyde to diffuse into the hydrogel before complete reduction took place. This procedure was also used to produce alloys of gold and silver clusters embedded in silica aerogels. Also included in this dissertation is the surface deposition of metallic clusters on a silicon surface. The apparatus built produces a cold beam of gas droplets that pick up evaporated metal clusters and deposit them on a surface. The gas clusters are produced by supersonic expansion of a gas (Ar, He, or N2

  10. Reversible Polymer Hydrogels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    glucosamine hydrochloride was dissolved in 100 mL of de- ionized water and placed in an ice bath at >5oC and purged with N2 gas for 20 minutes; 3.25...Temperature sensitive hydrogels based on N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPA) and acryloyl glucosamine (AG) were synthesized using ammonium persulfate (APS) as...hydrogels by copolymerization of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPA), and acryloyl glucosamine (AG) a derivative of chi- tosan, a biopolymer from

  11. Surface chemistry and size influence the release of model therapeutic nanoparticles from poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Jeerage, Kavita M.

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles have emerged as promising therapeutic and diagnostic tools, due to their unique physicochemical properties. The specific core and surface chemistries, as well as nanoparticle size, play critical roles in particle transport and interaction with biological tissue. Localized delivery of therapeutics from hydrogels is well established, but these systems generally release molecules with hydrodynamic radii less than 5 nm. Here, model nanoparticles with biologically relevant surface chemistries and diameters between 10 and 35 nm are analyzed for their release from well-characterized hydrogels. Functionalized gold nanoparticles or quantum dots were encapsulated in three-dimensional poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with varying mesh size. Nanoparticle size, surface chemistry, and hydrogel mesh size all influenced the release of particles from the hydrogel matrix. Size influenced nanoparticle release as expected, with larger particles releasing at a slower rate. However, citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles were not released from hydrogels. Negatively charged carboxyl or positively charged amine-functionalized quantum dots were released from hydrogels at slower rates than neutrally charged PEGylated nanoparticles of similar size. Transmission electron microscopy images of gold nanoparticles embedded within hydrogel sections demonstrated uniform particle distribution and negligible aggregation, independent of surface chemistry. The nanoparticle-hydrogel interactions observed in this work will aid in the development of localized nanoparticle delivery systems.

  12. Calcium-Ion-Triggered Co-assembly of Peptide and Polysaccharide into a Hybrid Hydrogel for Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanyan; Zhao, Jun; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Wang, Yuefei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-04-01

    We report a new approach to constructing a peptide-polysaccharide hybrid hydrogel via the calcium-ion-triggered co-assembly of fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-diphenylalanine (Fmoc-FF) peptide and alginate. Calcium ions triggered the self-assembly of Fmoc-FF peptide into nanofibers with diameter of about 30 nm. Meanwhile, alginate was rapidly crosslinked by the calcium ions, leading to the formation of stable hybrid hydrogel beads. Compared to alginate or Fmoc-FF hydrogel alone, the hybrid Fmoc-FF/alginate hydrogel had much better stability in both water and a phosphate-buffered solution (PBS), probably because of the synergistic effect of noncovalent and ionic interactions. Furthermore, docetaxel was chosen as a drug model, and it was encapsulated by hydrogel beads to study the in vitro release behavior. The sustained and controlled docetaxel release was obtained by varying the concentration ratio between Fmoc-FF peptide and alginate.

  13. Encapsulation of rat bone marrow stromal cells using a poly-ion complex gel of chitosan and succinylated poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly).

    PubMed

    Kusumastuti, Yuni; Shibasaki, Yoshiaki; Hirohara, Shiho; Kobayashi, Mime; Terada, Kayo; Ando, Tsuyoshi; Tanihara, Masao

    2015-01-28

    Encapsulation of stem cells into a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold is necessary to achieve tissue regeneration. Prefabricated 3D scaffolds, such as fibres or porous sponges, have limitations regarding homogeneous cell distribution. Hydrogels that can encapsulate cells such as animal-derived collagen gels need adjustment of the pH and/or temperature upon cell mixing. In this report, we fabricated a poly-ion complex (PIC) hydrogel of chitosan and succinylated poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly) and assessed its effect on cell viability after encapsulation of rat bone marrow stromal cells. PIC hydrogels were obtained successfully with a concentration of each precursor as low as 3.0-3.8 mg/ml. The maximum gelation and swelling ratios were achieved with an equal molar ratio (1:1) of anionic and cationic groups. Using chitosan acetate as a cationic precursor produced a PIC hydrogel with both a significantly greater gelation ratio and a better swelling ratio than chitosan chloride. Ammonium succinylated poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly) as an anionic precursor gave similar gelation and swelling ratios to those of sodium succinylated poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly). Cell encapsulation was also achieved successfully by mixing rat bone marrow stromal cells with the PIC hydrogel simultaneously during its formation. The PIC hydrogel was maintained in the culture medium for 7 days at 37°C and the encapsulated cells survived and proliferated in it. Although it is necessary to improve its functionality, this PIC hydrogel has the potential to act as a 3D scaffold for cell encapsulation and tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A Periosteum-Inspired 3D Hydrogel-Bioceramic Composite for Enhanced Bone Regeneration .

    PubMed

    Chun, Yong Yao; Wang, Jun Kit; Tan, Nguan Soon; Chan, Peggy Puk Yik; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Choong, Cleo

    2016-02-01

    A 3D injectable hydrogel-bioceramic composite consisting of gelatin-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid (Gtn-HPA) and carboxymethyl cellulose-tyramine (CMC-Tyr), incorporated with fish scale-derived calcium phosphate (CaP), is developed for bone applications. The hydrogel-bioceramic composite has significantly improved the elastic modulus compared to the non-filled hydrogel, of which the addition of 10 w/v% CaP showed zero order fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran release profile and a significantly higher proliferation rate of encapsulated cells. All the samples promote the nucleation and growth of CaP minerals when exposed to 1× SBF. Overall, the hydrogel-bioceramic composite with 10 w/v% CaP can potentially be used as a periosteum-mimicking membrane to facilitate bone regeneration.

  15. Cells as factories for humanized encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhengwei; Cartier, Regis; Hohl, Anja; Farinacci, Maura; Dorhoi, Anca; Nguyen, Tich-Lam; Mulvaney, Paul; Ralston, John; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Möhwald, Helmuth; Wang, Dayang

    2011-05-11

    Biocompatibility is of paramount importance for drug delivery, tumor labeling, and in vivo application of nanoscale bioprobes. Until now, biocompatible surface processing has typically relied on PEGylation and other surface coatings, which, however, cannot minimize clearance by macrophages or the renal system but may also increase the risk of chemical side effects. Cell membranes provide a generic and far more natural approach to the challenges of encapsulation and delivery in vivo. Here we harness for the first time living cells as "factories" to manufacture cell membrane capsules for encapsulation and delivery of drugs, nanoparticles, and other biolabels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the built-in protein channels of the new capsules can be utilized for controlled release of encapsulated reagents.

  16. Designing Hydrogels for On-Demand Therapy.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Nuria; Conde, João; Wang, Kui; Artzi, Natalie

    2017-03-16

    Systemic administration of therapeutic agents has been the preferred approach to treat most pathological conditions, in particular for cancer therapy. This treatment modality is associated with side effects, off-target accumulation, toxicity, and rapid renal and hepatic clearance. Multiple efforts have focused on incorporating targeting moieties into systemic therapeutic vehicles to enhance retention and minimize clearance and side effects. However, only a small percentage of the nanoparticles administered systemically accumulate at the tumor site, leading to poor therapeutic efficacy. This has prompted researchers to call the status quo treatment regimen into question and to leverage new delivery materials and alternative administration routes to improve therapeutic outcomes. Recent approaches rely on the use of local delivery platforms that circumvent the hurdles of systemic delivery. Local administration allows delivery of higher "effective" doses while enhancing therapeutic molecules' stability, minimizing side effects, clearance, and accumulation in the liver and kidneys following systemic administration. Hydrogels have proven to be highly biocompatible materials that allow for versatile design to afford sensing and therapy at the same time. Hydrogels' chemical and physical versatility can be exploited to attain disease-triggered in situ assembly and hydrogel programmed degradation and consequent drug release, and hydrogels can also serve as a biocompatible depot for local delivery of stimuli-responsive therapeutic cargo. We will focus this Account on the hydrogel platform that we have developed in our lab, based on dendrimer amine and dextran aldehyde. This hydrogel is disease-responsive and capable of sensing the microenvironment and reacting in a graded manner to diverse pathologies to render different properties, including tissue adhesion, biocompatibility, hydrogel degradation, and embedded drug release profile. We also studied the degradation kinetics of

  17. Design of multimodal degradable hydrogels for controlled therapeutic delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkar, Prathamesh Madhav

    thiol exchange reaction facilitated rapid and responsive protein release in the presence of GSH. A photolabile o-nitrobenzyl ether group (o-NB) was subsequently incorporated within the PEG-based, gel-forming monomers to demonstrate cargo release triggered by exogenous stimuli for patient-specific therapies. Upon the application of cytocompatible doses of light, the photolabile o-NB linkage underwent irreversible cleavage yielding ketone and carboxylic acid-based cleavage products. Hydrogel degradation kinetics was characterized in response to externally applied cytocompatible light or GSH in aqueous microenvironments. By incorporating a photodegradable o-nitrobenzyl ether group, a thiol-sensitive succinimide thioether linkage, and ester linkages within the hydrogels, we demonstrated unique control over degradation via surface erosion or bulk degradation mechanisms, respectively, with degradation rate constants ranging from 10-1 min-1 to 10-4 min-1. As a proof of concept, the controlled release of nanobeads from the hydrogel was demonstrated in a preprogrammed and stimuli-responsive fashion. The multimodal degradable hydrogels were then investigated for the local controlled release of small molecular weight proteins, which are of interest for regulating various cellular functions and fates in vivo. Low molecular weight heparin, a highly sulfated polysaccharide was incorporated within the hydrogel network by Michael-type reaction due to its affinity with biologics such as growth factors and immunomodulatory proteins. Incorporation of reduction-sensitive linkages resulted in 2.3 fold differences in the release profile of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) in the presence of GSH compared to non-reducing microenvironment. Bioactivity of released FGF-2 was comparable to pristine FGF-2, indicating the ability of the hydrogel to retain bioactivity of cargo molecules during encapsulation and release. Further, preliminary in vivo studies demonstrated control over hydrogel

  18. Regulation of the Stem Cell–Host Immune System Interplay Using Hydrogel Coencapsulation System with an Anti-Inflammatory Drug

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; Schricker, Scott R.; Paine, Michael L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Khademhosseini, Ali; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2015-01-01

    The host immune system is known to influence mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated bone tissue regeneration. However, the therapeutic capacity of hydrogel biomaterial to modulate the interplay between MSCs and T-lymphocytes is unknown. Here it is shown that encapsulating hydrogel affects this interplay when used to encapsulate MSCs for implantation by hindering the penetration of pro-inflammatory cells and/or cytokines, leading to improved viability of the encapsulated MSCs. This combats the effects of the host pro-inflammatory T-lymphocyte-induced nuclear factor kappaB pathway, which can reduce MSC viability through the CASPASE-3 and CAS-PASE-8 associated proapoptotic cascade, resulting in the apoptosis of MSCs. To corroborate rescue of engrafted MSCs from the insult of the host immune system, the incorporation of the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin into the encapsulating alginate hydrogel further regulates the local microenvironment and prevents pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that the encapsulating hydrogel can regulate the MSC-host immune cell interplay and direct the fate of the implanted MSCs, leading to enhanced tissue regeneration. PMID:26120294

  19. Nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels mimic native tissue microenvironment due to their porous and hydrated molecular structure. An emerging approach to reinforce polymeric hydrogels and to include multiple functionalities focuses on incorporating nanoparticles within the hydrogel network. A wide range of nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, polymeric, ceramic, and metallic nanomaterials can be integrated within the hydrogel networks to obtain nanocomposites with superior properties and tailored functionality. Nanocomposite hydrogels can be engineered to possess superior physical, chemical, electrical, and biological properties. This review focuses on the most recent developments in the field of nanocomposite hydrogels with emphasis on biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. In particular, we discuss synthesis and fabrication of nanocomposite hydrogels, examine their current limitations and conclude with future directions in designing more advanced nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:24264728

  20. Ultrasonic encapsulation - A review.

    PubMed

    Leong, Thomas S H; Martin, Gregory J O; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2017-03-01

    Encapsulation of materials in particles dispersed in water has many applications in nutritional foods, imaging, energy production and therapeutic/diagnostic medicine. Ultrasonic technology has been proven effective at creating encapsulating particles and droplets with specific physical and functional properties. Examples include highly stable emulsions, functional polymeric particles with environmental sensitivity, and microspheres for encapsulating drugs for targeted delivery. This article provides an overview of the primary mechanisms arising from ultrasonics responsible for the formation of these materials, highlighting examples that show promise particularly in the development of foods and bioproducts.

  1. Development of Injectable Hyaluronic Acid/Cellulose Nanocrystals Bionanocomposite Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Rui M A; Silva, Marta; Gershovich, Pavel; Betta, Sefano; Babo, Pedro; Caridade, Sofia G; Mano, João F; Motta, Antonella; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2015-08-19

    Injectable hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogels compose a promising class of materials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. However, their limited mechanical properties restrict the potential range of application. In this study, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were employed as nanofillers in a fully biobased strategy for the production of reinforced HA nanocomposite hydrogels. Herein we report the development of a new class of injectable hydrogels composed of adipic acid dihydrazide-modified HA (ADH-HA) and aldehyde-modified HA (a-HA) reinforced with varying contents of aldehyde-modified CNCs (a-CNCs). The obtained hydrogels were characterized in terms of internal morphology, mechanical properties, swelling, and degradation behavior in the presence of hyaluronidase. Our findings suggest that the incorporation of a-CNCs in the hydrogel resulted in a more organized and compact network structure and led to stiffer hydrogels (maximum storage modulus, E', of 152.4 kPa for 0.25 wt % a-CNCs content) with improvements of E' up to 135% in comparison to unfilled hydrogels. In general, increased amounts of a-CNCs led to lower equilibrium swelling ratios and higher resistance to degradation. The biological performance of the developed nanocomposites was assessed toward human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs). HA-CNCs nanocomposite hydrogels exhibited preferential cell supportive properties in in vitro culture conditions due to higher structural integrity and potential interaction of microenvironmental cues with CNC's sulfate groups. hASCs encapsulated in HA-CNCs hydrogels demonstrated the ability to spread within the volume of gels and exhibited pronounced proliferative activity. Together, these results demonstrate that the proposed strategy is a valuable toolbox for fine-tuning the structural, biomechanical, and biochemical properties of injectable HA hydrogels, expanding their potential range of application in the biomedical field.

  2. Microencapsulation of probiotics in hydrogel particles: enhancing Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris LM0230 viability using calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Timothy W; Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; McClements, David J; Sela, David A

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics are beneficial microbes often added to food products to enhance the health and wellness of consumers. A major limitation to producing efficacious functional foods containing probiotic cells is their tendency to lose viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit. In this study, the impact of encapsulating probiotics within food-grade hydrogel particles to mitigate sensitivity to environmental stresses was examined. Confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed that Lactococcus lactis were trapped within calcium alginate beads formed by dripping a probiotic-alginate mixture into a calcium solution. Encapsulation improved the viability of the probiotics during aerobic storage: after seven days, less than a two-log reduction was observed in encapsulated cells stored at room temperature, demonstrating that a high concentration of cells survived relative to non-encapsulated bacteria. These hydrogel beads may have applications for improving the stability and efficacy of probiotics in functional foods.

  3. Patterned three-dimensional encapsulation of embryonic stem cells using dielectrophoresis and stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Piyush; Marchwiany, Daniel; Duarte, Carlos; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the assembly of cells in three dimensions is very important for engineering functional tissues, drug screening, probing cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions, and studying the emergent behavior of cellular systems. Although the current methods of cell encapsulation in hydrogels can distribute them in three dimensions, these methods typically lack spatial control of multi-cellular organization and do not allow for the possibility of cell-cell contacts as seen for the native tissue. Here, we report the integration of dielectrophoresis (DEP) with stereolithography (SL) apparatus for the spatial patterning of cells on custom made gold micro-electrodes. Afterwards, they are encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels of different stiffnesses. This technique can mimic the in vivo microscale tissue architecture, where the cells have a high degree of three dimensional (3D) spatial control. As a proof of concept, we show the patterning and encapsulation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblasts. mESCs show high viability in both the DEP (91.79% ± 1.4%) and the no DEP (94.27% ± 0.5%) hydrogel samples. Furthermore, we also show the patterning of mouse embryoid bodies (mEBs) and C2C12 spheroids in the hydrogels, and verify their viability. This robust and flexible in vitro platform can enable various applications in stem cell differentiation and tissue engineering by mimicking elements of the native 3D in vivo cellular micro-environment.

  4. Elastin Based Cell-laden Injectable Hydrogels with Tunable Gelation, Mechanical and Biodegradation Properties

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Ali; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Wei, Hua; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Valtchev, Peter; Weiss, Anthony S.; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    the PNPHO copolymer. Moreover, our results demonstrated that more than 80% of cells encapsulated in these hydrogels remained viable, and the number of encapsulated cells increased for at least 5 days. These unique properties mark elastin-co-PNHPO hydrogels as favorable candidates for a broad range of tissue engineering applications. PMID:24731705

  5. Smart nanocomposite hydrogels based on azo crosslinked graphene oxide for oral colon-specific drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lin; Shi, Yuyang; Jiang, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Han, Huili; Feng, Qianhua; Ren, Junxiao; Yuan, Yujie; Wang, Yongchao; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-08-01

    A safe and efficient nanocomposite hydrogel for colon cancer drug delivery was synthesized using pH-sensitive and biocompatible graphene oxide (GO) containing azoaromatic crosslinks as well as poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (GO-N=N-GO/PVA composite hydrogels). Curcumin (CUR), an anti-cancer drug, was encapsulated successfully into the hydrogel through a freezing and thawing process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were performed to confirm the formation and morphological properties of the nanocomposite hydrogel. The hydrogels exhibited good swelling properties in a pH-sensitive manner. Drug release studies under conditions mimicking stomach to colon transit have shown that the drug was protected from being released completely into the physiological environment of the stomach and small intestine. In vivo imaging analysis, pharmacokinetics and a distribution of the gastrointestinal tract experiment were systematically studied and evaluated as colon-specific drug delivery systems. All the results demonstrated that GO-N=N-GO/PVA composite hydrogels could protect CUR well while passing through the stomach and small intestine to the proximal colon, and enhance the colon-targeting ability and residence time in the colon site. Therefore, CUR loaded GO-N=N-GO/PVA composite hydrogels might potentially provide a theoretical basis for the treatment of colon cancer with high efficiency and low toxicity.

  6. Tough and elastic hydrogel of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as potential cell scaffold materials.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yilu; Tang, Zhurong; Cao, Wanxu; Lin, Hai; Fan, Yujiang; Guo, Likun; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Natural polysaccharides are extensively investigated as cell scaffold materials for cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation due to their excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, and biofunctions. However, their application is often severely limited by their mechanical behavior. In this study, a tough and elastic hydrogel scaffold was prepared with hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS). HA and CS were conjugated with tyramine (TA) and the degree of substitution (DS) was 10.7% and 11.3%, respectively, as calculated by (1)H NMR spectra. The hydrogel was prepared by mixing HA-TA and CS-TA in presence of H2O2 and HRP. The sectional morphology of hydrogels was observed by SEM, static and dynamic mechanical properties were analyzed by Shimadzu electromechanical testing machine and dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer Q800. All samples showed good ability to recover their appearances after deformation, the storage modulus (E') of hydrogels became higher as the testing frequency went up. Hydrogels also showed fatigue resistance to cyclic compression. Mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in hydrogels showed good cell viability as detected by CLSM. This study suggests that the hydrogels have both good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, and may serve as model systems to explore mechanisms of deformation and energy dissipation or find some applications in tissue engineering.

  7. Mimicking of Chondrocyte Microenvironment Using In Situ Forming Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate-Based Synthetic Polyanionic Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Dey, Pradip; Schneider, Tobias; Chiappisi, Leonardo; Gradzielski, Michael; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula; Haag, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    A stable polymeric network that mimics the highly polyanionic extracellular cartilage matrix still remains a great challenge. The main aim of this study is to present the synthesis of dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS)-based in situ forming hydrogels using strain promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions. A real time rheological study has been used to characterize the hydrogel properties. The viability of encapsulated human chondrocytes in the different hydrogels are monitored using live-dead staining. Furthermore, type I and II collagen gene have been analyzed. Hydrogels with elastic moduli ranging from 1 to 5 kPa have been prepared by varying the dPGS amount. The chondrocyte viability in dPGS hydrogels is found to be higher than in pure PEG and alginate-based hydrogels after 21 d. The higher cell viability in the dPGS engineered hydrogels can be explained by the fact that dPGS can interact with different proteins responsible for cell growth and proliferation.

  8. Recent advances in crosslinking chemistry of biomimetic poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The design and application of biomimetic hydrogels have become an important and integral part of modern tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Many of these hydrogels are prepared from synthetic macromers (e.g., poly(ethylene glycol) or PEG) as they provide high degrees of tunability for matrix crosslinking, degradation, and modification. For a hydrogel to be considered biomimetic, it has to recapitulate key features that are found in the native extracellular matrix, such as the appropriate matrix mechanics and permeability, the ability to sequester and deliver drugs, proteins, and or nucleic acids, as well as the ability to provide receptor-mediated cell-matrix interactions and protease-mediated matrix cleavage. A variety of chemistries have been employed to impart these biomimetic features into hydrogel crosslinking. These chemistries, such as radical-mediated polymerizations, enzyme-mediated crosslinking, bio-orthogonal click reactions, and supramolecular assembly, may be different in their crosslinking mechanisms but are required to be efficient for gel crosslinking and ligand bioconjugation under aqueous reaction conditions. The prepared biomimetic hydrogels should display a diverse array of functionalities and should also be cytocompatible for in vitro cell culture and/or in situ cell encapsulation. The focus of this article is to review recent progress in the crosslinking chemistries of biomimetic hydrogels with a special emphasis on hydrogels crosslinked from poly(ethylene glycol)-based macromers. PMID:26029357

  9. Hydroxyethyl starch-based polymers for the controlled release of biomacromolecules from hydrogel microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wöhl-Bruhn, Stefanie; Bertz, Andreas; Harling, Steffen; Menzel, Henning; Bunjes, Heike

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogels are promising delivery systems for the controlled release of biomacromolecules. Based on previous studies, hydrogels were prepared from crosslinkable hydroxyethyl starch with new linker groups to improve mechanical and release properties of the resulting hydrogels. Polyethylene glycol methacrylate with two different spacer lengths was used to obtain polymers (HES-P(EG)(n)MA) with increased hydrophilicity and degradability, whereas a polymer with methacrylate linker directly at the starch backbone (HES-MA) resulted in a less degradable polymer. Hydrogel disks were obtained by UV crosslinking and characterized by swelling and rheological measurements. The hydrogel strength was strongly influenced by the polymer concentration. Using a water-in-water emulsion process, hydrogel microspheres were prepared. The influence of the type of the linker, the degree of substitution and the phase ratio in the production process on the properties of the microspheres was investigated. Depending on the preparation parameters, particles with narrow particle size distribution and encapsulation efficiencies of up to more than 80% for FITC-dextran 70 kDa (FD70) were obtained. Incorporated FITC-labeled IgG showed a faster release from hydrogel microspheres than FD70. The release rate of incorporated FD70 could be adjusted by using different polymers (HES-P(EG)(10)MA>HES-P(EG)(6)MA>HES-MA).

  10. Enhancing the Gelation and Bioactivity of Injectable Silk Fibroin Hydrogel with Laponite Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Su, Dihan; Jiang, Libo; Chen, Xin; Dong, Jian; Shao, Zhengzhong

    2016-04-20

    Regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) of Bombyx mori silk fiber is a promising natural material for bone defect repair. However, a lack of specific integrin and growth factor for osteoinduction significantly hinders its application in this area. In this study, the role of Laponite nanoplatelet (LAP), a bioactive clay that can promote osteoblast growth, in the formation of RSF hydrogel, as well as the various properties of RSF/LAP hybrid hydrogel, was closely investigated. The results indicate that LAP could serve as a medium to accelerate hydrophobic interaction among the RSF molecules and a disruptor to limit the growth of β-sheet domain during the gelation of RSF. Rheological measurement suggests that the RSF/LAP hydrogel is injectable as it displays thixotropy in the room temperature. Proliferation and differentiation results of the primary osteoblasts encapsulated in hydrogel show that RSF/LAP hydrogel can promote the cell proliferation and enhance the osteogenic differentiation. The transcript levels for alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and collagen type I osteogenic markers obviously improve with RSF/LAP hydrogel compared to the controls at 14 days, especially with the higher contents of LAP. Overall, the results suggest that the RSF/LAP hydrogel have great potential to be utilized as an injectable biomaterial for irregular bone defect repair.

  11. Cyclodextrin/poly(ethylene glycol) polypseudorotaxane hydrogels as a promising sustained-release system for lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Taishi; Tajima, Anna; Motoyama, Keiichi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2012-08-01

    In this study, to clarify the utility of polypseudorotaxane (PPRX) hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and α- or γ-cyclodextrin (α- or γ-CyD) as a sustained-release system for protein drugs, we prepared CyD PPRX hydrogels including lysozyme, and then the release profiles of lysozyme from these hydrogels and the release mechanisms were investigated. The α- and γ-CyD formed PPRX hydrogels by threading onto one PEG chain and two PEG chains, respectively. The formation of α- and γ-CyD PPRX hydrogels including lysozyme was based on physical cross-linking arisen from their columnar structures. The in vitro release rates of lysozyme were markedly decreased by the encapsulation into CyD PPRX hydrogels. In addition, when release data were plotted according to Korsmeyer-Peppas model, the exponent values (n) in the α- and γ-CyD systems had no statistically significant difference, suggesting that these release mechanisms were almost same. In conclusion, these results suggest that α- and γ-CyD PPRX hydrogels possess the potential as a sustained-release system for lysozyme.

  12. Encapsulation with structured triglycerides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids provide excellent materials to encapsulate bioactive compounds for food and pharmaceutical applications. Lipids are renewable, biodegradable, and easily modified to provide additional chemical functionality. The use of structured lipids that have been modified with photoactive properties are ...

  13. Review of Collagen I Hydrogels for Bioengineered Tissue Microenvironments: Characterization of Mechanics, Structure, and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Type I collagen hydrogels have been used successfully as three-dimensional substrates for cell culture and have shown promise as scaffolds for engineered tissues and tumors. A critical step in the development of collagen hydrogels as viable tissue mimics is quantitative characterization of hydrogel properties and their correlation with fabrication parameters, which enables hydrogels to be tuned to match specific tissues or fulfill engineering requirements. A significant body of work has been devoted to characterization of collagen I hydrogels; however, due to the breadth of materials and techniques used for characterization, published data are often disjoint and hence their utility to the community is reduced. This review aims to determine the parameter space covered by existing data and identify key gaps in the literature so that future characterization and use of collagen I hydrogels for research can be most efficiently conducted. This review is divided into three sections: (1) relevant fabrication parameters are introduced and several of the most popular methods of controlling and regulating them are described, (2) hydrogel properties most relevant for tissue engineering are presented and discussed along with their characterization techniques, (3) the state of collagen I hydrogel characterization is recapitulated and future directions are proposed. Ultimately, this review can serve as a resource for selection of fabrication parameters and material characterization methodologies in order to increase the usefulness of future collagen-hydrogel-based characterization studies and tissue engineering experiments. PMID:24923709

  14. Sustained-release hydrogels of topotecan for retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Taich, Paula; Moretton, Marcela A; Del Sole, María Jose; Winter, Ursula; Bernabeu, Ezequiel; Croxatto, Juan O; Oppezzo, Javier; Williams, Gustavo; Chantada, Guillermo L; Chiappetta, Diego A; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of retinoblastoma, the most common primary ocular malignancy in children, has greatly improved over the last decade. Still, new devices for chemotherapy are needed to achieve better tumor control. The aim of this project was to develop an ocular drug delivery system for topotecan (TPT) loaded in biocompatible hydrogels of poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) block copolymers (PCL-PEG-PCL) for sustained TPT release in the vitreous humor. Hydrogels were prepared from TPT and synthesized PCL-PEG-PCL copolymers. Rheological properties and in vitro and in vivo TPT release were studied. Hydrogel cytotoxicity was evaluated in retinoblastoma cells as a surrogate for efficacy and TPT vitreous pharmacokinetics and systemic as well as ocular toxicity were evaluated in rabbits. The pseudoplastic behavior of the hydrogels makes them suitable for intraocular administration. In vitro release profiles showed a sustained release of TPT from PCL-PEG-PCL up to 7days and drug loading did not affect the release pattern. Blank hydrogels did not affect retinoblastoma cell viability but 0.4% (w/w) TPT-loaded hydrogel was highly cytotoxic for at least 7days. After intravitreal injection, TPT vitreous concentrations were sustained above the pharmacologically active concentration. One month after injection, animals with blank or TPT-loaded hydrogels showed no systemic toxicity or retinal impairment on fundus examination, electroretinographic, and histopathological assessments. These novel TPT-hydrogels can deliver sustained concentrations of active drug into the vitreous with excellent biocompatibility in vivo and pronounced cytotoxic activity in retinoblastoma cells and may become an additional strategy for intraocular retinoblastoma treatment.

  15. pH-responsive and enzymatically-responsive hydrogel microparticles for the oral delivery of therapeutic proteins: Effects of protein size, crosslinking density, and hydrogel degradation on protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Michael Clinton; Guido, Joseph Frank; Gupta, Malvika; Zhang, Annie; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2016-01-10

    Two potential platform technologies for the oral delivery of protein therapeutics were synthesized and tested. pH-responsive poly(itaconic acid-co-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (P(IA-co-NVP)) hydrogel microparticles were tested in vitro with model proteins salmon calcitonin, urokinase, and rituximab to determine the effects of particle size, protein size, and crosslinking density on oral delivery capability. Particle size showed no significant effect on overall delivery potential but did improve percent release of encapsulated protein over the micro-scale particle size range studied. Protein size was shown to have a significant impact on the delivery capability of the P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel. We show that when using P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel microparticles with 3 mol% tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate crosslinker, a small polypeptide (salmon calcitonin) loads and releases up to 45 μg/mg hydrogel while the mid-sized protein urokinase and large monoclonal antibody rituximab load and release only 19 and 24 μg/mg hydrogel, respectively. We further demonstrate that crosslinking density offers a simple method for tuning hydrogel properties to variously sized proteins. Using 5 mol% TEGDMA crosslinker offers optimal performance for the small peptide, salmon calcitonin, whereas lower crosslinking density of 1 mol% offers optimal performance for the much larger protein rituximab. Finally, an enzymatically-degradable hydrogels of P(MAA-co-NVP) crosslinked with the peptide sequence MMRRRKK were synthesized and tested in simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. These hydrogels offer ideal loading and release behavior, showing no degradative release of encapsulated salmon calcitonin in gastric conditions while yielding rapid and complete release of encapsulated protein within 1h in intestinal conditions.

  16. Design of Responsive Peptide-based Hydrogels as Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Joel

    2008-03-01

    Hydrogels composed of self-assembled peptides have been designed to allow minimally invasive delivery of cells in-vivo. These peptides undergo sol-gel phase transitions in response to biological media enabling the three-dimensional encapsulation of cells. Peptides are designed such that when dissolved in aqueous solution, exist in an ensemble of random coil conformations rendering them fully soluble. The addition of an exogenous stimulus results in peptide folding into beta-hairpin conformation. This folded structure undergoes rapid self-assembly into a highly crosslinked hydrogel network whose nanostructure is defined and controllable. This mechanism, which links intramolecular peptide folding to self-assembly, allows temporally resolved material formation. In general, peptides can be designed to fold and assemble affording hydrogel in response to changes in pH or ionic strength, the addition of heat or even light. In addition to these stimuli, DMEM cell culture media is able to initiate folding and consequent self-assembly. DMEM-induced gels are cytocompatible towards NIH 3T3 murine fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, hepatocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. As an added bonus, many of these hydrogels possess broad spectrum antibacterial activity suggesting that adventitious bacterial infections that may occur during surgical manipulations and after implantation can be greatly reduced. Lastly, when hydrogelation is triggered in the presence of cells, gels become impregnated and can serve as a delivery vehicle. A unique characteristic of these gels is that when an appropriate shear stress is applied, the gel will shear-thin, becoming an injectable low viscosity gel. However, after the application of shear has stopped, the material quickly self-heals producing a gel with mechanical rigidity nearly identical to the original hydrogel. This attribute allows cell-impregnated gels to be delivered to target tissues via syringe where they quickly recover complementing

  17. Thiol–ene click hydrogels for therapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kharkar, Prathamesh M.; Rehmann, Matthew S.; Skeens, Kelsi M.; Maverakis, Emanual; Kloxin, April M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels are of growing interest for the delivery of therapeutics to specific sites in the body. For use as a delivery vehicle, hydrophilic precursors are usually laden with bioactive moieties and then directly injected to the site of interest for in situ gel formation and controlled release dictated by precursor design. Hydrogels formed by thiol–ene click reactions are attractive for local controlled release of therapeutics owing to their rapid reaction rate and efficiency under mild aqueous conditions, enabling in situ formation of gels with tunable properties often responsive to environmental cues. Herein, we will review the wide range of applications for thiol–ene hydrogels, from the prolonged release of anti-inflammatory drugs in the spine to the release of protein-based therapeutics in response to cell-secreted enzymes, with a focus on their clinical relevance. We will also provide a brief overview of thiol–ene click chemistry and discuss the available alkene chemistries pertinent to macromolecule functionalization and hydrogel formation. These chemistries include functional groups susceptible to Michael type reactions relevant for injection and radically-mediated reactions for greater temporal control of formation at sites of interest using light. Additionally, mechanisms for the encapsulation and controlled release of therapeutic cargoes are reviewed, including i) tuning the mesh size of the hydrogel initially and temporally for cargo entrapment and release and ii) covalent tethering of the cargo with degradable linkers or affinity binding sequences to mediate release. Finally, myriad thiol–ene hydrogels and their specific applications also are discussed to give a sampling of the current and future utilization of this chemistry for delivery of therapeutics, such as small molecule drugs, peptides, and biologics. PMID:28361125

  18. Injectable hydrogels derived from phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Sem; Song, Minsoo; Lee, Eun-Jung; Shin, Ueon Sang

    2015-06-01

    Phosphorylation of sodium alginate salt (NaAlg) was carried out using H3PO4/P2O5/Et3PO4 followed by acid-base reaction with Ca(OAc)2 to give phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes (CaPAlg), as a water dispersible alginic acid derivative. The modified alginate derivatives including phosphorylated alginic acid (PAlg) and CaPAlg were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for (1)H, and (31)P nuclei, high resolution inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. CaPAlg hydrogels were prepared simply by mixing CaPAlg solution (2w/v%) with NaAlg solution (2w/v%) in various ratios (2:8, 4:6, 6:4, 8:2) of volume. No additional calcium salts such as CaSO4 or CaCl2 were added externally. The gelation was completed within about 3-40min indicating a high potential of hydrogel delivery by injection in vivo. Their mechanical properties were tested to be ≤6.7kPa for compressive strength at break and about 8.4kPa/mm for elastic modulus. SEM analysis of the CaPAlg hydrogels showed highly porous morphology with interconnected pores of width in the range of 100-800μm. Cell culture results showed that the injectable hydrogels exhibited comparable properties to the pure alginate hydrogel in terms of cytotoxicity and 3D encapsulation of cells for a short time period. The developed injectable hydrogels showed suitable physicochemical and mechanical properties for injection in vivo, and could therefore be beneficial for the field of soft tissue engineering.

  19. Development of in situ forming thermosensitive hydrogel for radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in a mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng-Liang; Shih, Ying-Hsia; Liang, Kuo-Sheng; Chiang, Ping-Fang; Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Tang, I-Chang; Yao, Cheng-Jung; Lee, Shin-Yi; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2013-05-06

    This study evaluated a system for local cancer radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. The delivery system is a thermosensitive hydrogel containing a therapeutic radionuclide ((188)Re-Tin colloid) and a chemotherapeutic drug (liposomal doxorubicin). The thermosensitive PCL-PEG-PCL copolymer was designed to spontaneously undergo a sol-gel phase transition in response to temperature, remaining liquid at room temperature and rapidly forming a gel at body temperature. A scanning electron microscope was used to observe the microstructure of the fully loaded hydrogel. Release of radionuclide and doxorubicin from the hydrogel was slow, and the system tended to remain stable for at least 10 days. After the intratumoral administration of Lipo-Dox/(188)Re-Tin hydrogel in mice with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), its retention by the tumor, spatiotemporal distribution, and therapeutic effect were evaluated. The residence time in the tumor was significantly longer for (188)Re-Tin loaded hydrogel than for Na (188)Re perrhenate (Na (188)ReO4). The hydrogel after thermal transition kept the radionuclide inside the tumor, whereas free (188)Re perrhenate ((188)ReO4) diffused quickly from the tumor. The tumor growth was more profoundly inhibited by treatment with Lipo-Dox/(188)Re-Tin hydrogel (with up to 80% regression of well-established tumors on day 32) than treatment with either (188)Re-Tin hydrogel or Lipo-Dox hydrogel. Therefore, this injectable and biodegradable hydrogel may offer the advantage of focusing radiotherapy and chemotherapy locally to maximize their effects on hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. 3D Printed Trileaflet Valve Conduits Using Biological Hydrogels and Human Valve Interstitial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Kapetanovic, Edi; Hockaday, Laura A.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering has great potential to provide a functional de novo living valve replacement capable of integration with host tissue and growth. Among various valve conduit fabrication techniques, 3D bioprinting enables deposition of cells and hydrogels into 3D constructs with anatomical geometry and heterogeneous mechanical properties. Successful translation of this approach is however constrained by the dearth of printable and biocompatible hydrogel materials. Furthermore, it is not known how human valve cells respond to these printed environments. In this study, we develop 3D printable formulations of hybrid hydrogels based on methacrylated hyaluronic acid (Me-HA) and methacrylated gelatin (Me-Gel), and utilize them to bioprint heart valve conduits containing encapsulated human aortic valvular interstitial cells (HAVIC). Increasing Me-Gel concentration resulted in lower stiffness and higher viscosity, facilitated cell spreading, and better maintained HAVIC fibroblastic phenotype. Bioprinting accuracy was dependent upon the relative concentrations of Me-Gel and Me-HA, but when optimized enabled the fabrication of a trileaflet valve shape accurate to the original design. HAVIC encapsulated within bioprinted heart valves maintained high viability, and remodeled the initial matrix by depositing collagen and glyosaminoglycans. These findings represent the first rational design of bioprinted trileaflet valve hydrogels that regulate encapsulated human VIC behavior. The use of anatomically accurate living valve scaffolds through bioprinting may accelerate our understanding of physiological valve cell interactions and our progress towards de novo living valve replacements. PMID:24334142

  1. Bioactive hydrogel scaffolds for controllable vascular differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lino S; Gerecht, Sharon; Fuller, Jason; Shieh, Hester F; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Langer, Robert

    2007-06-01

    We propose a new methodology to enhance the vascular differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) by encapsulation in a bioactive hydrogel. hESCs were encapsulated in a dextran-based hydrogel with or without immobilized regulatory factors: a tethered RGD peptide and microencapsulated VEGF(165). The fraction of cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor KDR/Flk-1, a vascular marker, increased up to 20-fold, as compared to spontaneously differentiated embryoid bodies (EBs). The percentage of encapsulated cells in hydrogels with regulatory factors expressing ectodermal markers including nestin or endodermal markers including alpha-fetoprotein decreased 2- or 3-fold, respectively, as compared to EBs. When the cells were removed from these networks and cultured in media conditions conducive for further vascular differentiation, the number of vascular cells was higher than the number obtained through EBs, using the same media conditions. Functionalized dextran-based hydrogels could thus enable derivation of vascular cells in large quantities, particularly endothelial cells, for potential application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  2. Alginate hydrogel as a promising scaffold for dental-derived stem cells: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Ansari, Sahar; Xu, Xingtian; Chee, Winston W; Schricker, Scott R; Shi, Songtao

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop an injectable and biodegradable scaffold based on oxidized alginate microbeads encapsulating periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate the stem cell viability, and osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells in vitro. Stem cells were encapsulated using alginate hydrogel. The stem cell viability, proliferation and differentiation to adipogenic and osteogenic tissues were studied. To investigate the expression of both adipogenesis and ontogenesis related genes, the RNA was extracted and RT-PCR was performed. The degradation behavior of hydrogel based on oxidized sodium alginate with different degrees of oxidation was studied in PBS at 37 °C as a function of time by monitoring the changes in weight loss. The swelling kinetics of alginate hydrogel was also investigated. The results showed that alginate is a promising candidate as a non-toxic scaffold for PDLSCs and GMSCs. It also has the ability to direct the differentiation of these stem cells to osteogenic and adipogenic tissues as compared to the control group in vitro. The encapsulated stem cells remained viable in vitro and both osteo-differentiated and adipo-differentiated after 4 weeks of culturing in the induction media. It was found that the degradation profile and swelling kinetics of alginate hydrogel strongly depends on the degree of oxidation showing its tunable chemistry and degradation rate. These findings demonstrate for the first time that immobilization of PDLSCs and GMSCs in the alginate microspheres provides a promising strategy for bone tissue engineering.

  3. Three-dimensional printed trileaflet valve conduits using biological hydrogels and human valve interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, B; Kapetanovic, E; Hockaday, L A; Butcher, J T

    2014-05-01

    Tissue engineering has great potential to provide a functional de novo living valve replacement, capable of integration with host tissue and growth. Among various valve conduit fabrication techniques, three-dimensional (3-D) bioprinting enables deposition of cells and hydrogels into 3-D constructs with anatomical geometry and heterogeneous mechanical properties. Successful translation of this approach, however, is constrained by the dearth of printable and biocompatible hydrogel materials. Furthermore, it is not known how human valve cells respond to these printed environments. In this study, 3-D printable formulations of hybrid hydrogels are developed, based on methacrylated hyaluronic acid (Me-HA) and methacrylated gelatin (Me-Gel), and used to bioprint heart valve conduits containing encapsulated human aortic valvular interstitial cells (HAVIC). Increasing Me-Gel concentration resulted in lower stiffness and higher viscosity, facilitated cell spreading, and better maintained HAVIC fibroblastic phenotype. Bioprinting accuracy was dependent upon the relative concentrations of Me-Gel and Me-HA, but when optimized enabled the fabrication of a trileaflet valve shape accurate to the original design. HAVIC encapsulated within bioprinted heart valves maintained high viability, and remodeled the initial matrix by depositing collagen and glyosaminoglycans. These findings represent the first rational design of bioprinted trileaflet valve hydrogels that regulate encapsulated human VIC behavior. The use of anatomically accurate living valve scaffolds through bioprinting may accelerate understanding of physiological valve cell interactions and progress towards de novo living valve replacements.

  4. AFSOR Bio-X: Encapsulated DNA-Based Molecular Autonomous Sensing Devices With Photonic I/O

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-03

    To optimize hydrogel/ aerogel encapsulation and preservation of the biomolecular detection systems to ensure robust activity upon rehydration in the...high molecular weight dendritic nanostructure. The dendritic nanostructures are configured to organize appropriately labeled gold nanoparticles...used to trigger an autocatalytic opening of circularized deoxyribozymes. These linear products are configured to organize appropriately labeled gold

  5. Triple Emulsion Drops with An Ultrathin Water Layer: High Encapsulation Efficiency and Enhanced Cargo Retention in Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lee, Hyomin; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Kim, June Hwan; Fan, Jing; Caggioni, Marco; Wesner, Chris; Zhu, Taotao; Weitz, David A

    2016-05-01

    Triple emulsion drops with an ultrathin water layer are developed to achieve high encapsulation efficiency of hydrophobic cargo in a hydrophobic polymeric shell, directly dispersed in water. Furthermore, enhanced retention of volatile hydrophobic cargo is achieved by forming a hydrogel network within this water layer that serves as a physical barrier.

  6. Microfluidic hydrogels for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo You; Zhou, Li Hong; Zhang, Qian Cheng; Chen, Yong Mei; Sun, Wei; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2011-03-01

    With advanced properties similar to the native extracellular matrix, hydrogels have found widespread applications in tissue engineering. Hydrogel-based cellular constructs have been successfully developed to engineer different tissues such as skin, cartilage and bladder. Whilst significant advances have been made, it is still challenging to fabricate large and complex functional tissues due mainly to the limited diffusion capability of hydrogels. The integration of microfluidic networks and hydrogels can greatly enhance mass transport in hydrogels and spatiotemporally control the chemical microenvironment of cells, mimicking the function of native microvessels. In this review, we present and discuss recent advances in the fabrication of microfluidic hydrogels from the viewpoint of tissue engineering. Further development of new hydrogels and microengineering technologies will have a great impact on tissue engineering.

  7. Hydrogels in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, Brandon V.; Khurshid, Shahana S.; Fisher, Omar Z.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels, due to their unique biocompatibility, flexible methods of synthesis, range of constituents, and desirable physical characteristics, have been the material of choice for many applications in regenerative medicine. They can serve as scaffolds that provide structural integrity to tissue constructs, control drug and protein delivery to tissues and cultures, and serve as adhesives or barriers between tissue and material surfaces. In this work, the properties of hydrogels that are important for tissue engineering applications and the inherent material design constraints and challenges are discussed. Recent research involving several different hydrogels polymerized from a variety of synthetic and natural monomers using typical and novel synthetic methods are highlighted. Finally, special attention is given to the microfabrication techniques that are currently resulting in important advances in the field. PMID:20882499

  8. Peptide hydrogel in vitro non‐inflammatory potential

    PubMed Central

    Markey, A.; Workman, V. L.; Bruce, I. A.; Woolford, T. J.; Derby, B.; Miller, A. F.; Cartmell, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide‐based hydrogels have attracted significant interest in recent years as these soft, highly hydrated materials can be engineered to mimic the cell niche with significant potential applications in the biomedical field. Their potential use in vivo in particular is dependent on their biocompatibility, including their potential to cause an inflammatory response. In this work, we investigated in vitro the inflammatory potential of a β‐sheet forming peptide (FEFEFKFK; F: phenylalanine, E: glutamic acid; K: lysine) hydrogel by encapsulating murine monocytes within it (3D culture) and using the production of cytokines, IL‐β, IL‐6 and TNFα, as markers of inflammatory response. No statistically significant release of cytokines in our test sample (media + gel + cells) was observed after 48 or 72 h of culture showing that our hydrogels do not incite a pro‐inflammatory response in vitro. These results show the potential biocompatibility of these hydrogels and therefore their potential for in vivo use. The work also highlighted the difference in monocyte behaviour, proliferation and morphology changes when cultured in 2D vs. 3D. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27990715

  9. Tough, in-situ thermogelling, injectable hydrogels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Jalani, Ghulam; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Makhoul, Georges; Abdalla, Sherif; Cecere, Renzo; Vetrone, Fiorenzo; Haglund, Lisbet; Cerruti, Marta

    2015-04-01

    Injectable hydrogels are extensively used in drug delivery and tissue engineering to administer drugs, genes, growth factors and live cells. We report a method to produce tough, in-situ thermogelling, non-toxic, injectable hydrogels made of chitosan and hyaluronic acid co-crosslinked with β-glycerophophate and genipin. The gels are highly homogeneous and form within 32 min, i.e., faster than gels crosslinked with either genipin or β-glycerophophate. The shear strength of co-crosslinked hydrogels is 3.5 kPa, higher than any chitosan-based gel reported. Chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus cells thrive inside the gels and produce large amounts of collagen II. Injection in rats shows that the gels form in-vivo within a short time and remain well localized for more than one week while the rats remain healthy and active. The excellent mechanical properties, fast in-situ gelation, good biocompatibility and the ability to encapsulate live cells at physiological conditions make these hydrogels ideal for tissue engineering, especially cartilage regeneration.

  10. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-05-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe--the key actuating element--has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices.

  11. Thiol-ene Clickable Poly(glycidol) Hydrogels for Biofabrication.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Simone; Jungst, Tomasz; Schamel, Martha; Zilkowski, Ilona; Kuhlmann, Matthias; Böck, Thomas; Blunk, Torsten; Teßmar, Jörg; Groll, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    In this study we introduce linear poly(glycidol) (PG), a structural analog of poly(ethylene glycol) bearing side chains at each repeating unit, as polymer basis for bioink development. We prepare allyl- and thiol-functional linear PG that can rapidly be polymerized to a three-dimensionally cross-linked hydrogel network via UV mediated thiol-ene click reaction. Influence of polymer concentration and UV irradiation on mechanical properties and swelling behavior was examined. Thiol-functional PG was synthesized in two structural variations, one containing ester groups that are susceptible to hydrolytic cleavage, and the other one ester-free and stable against hydrolysis. This allowed the preparation of degradable and non-degradable hydrogels. Cytocompatibility of the hydrogel was demonstrated by encapsulation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Rheological properties of the hydrogels were adjusted for dispense plotting by addition of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid. The optimized formulation enabled highly reproducible plotting of constructs composed of 20 layers with an overall height of 3.90 mm.

  12. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe—the key actuating element—has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices. PMID:27199165

  13. Polymersomes containing a hydrogel network for high stability and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Kim, Jin Woong; Kim, Do-Hoon; Han, Sang-Hoon; Weitz, David A

    2013-01-14

    Capillary microfluidic devices are used to prepare monodisperse polymersomes consisting of a hydrogel core and a bilayer membrane of amphiphilic diblock-copolymers. To make polymersomes, water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion drops are prepared as templates through single-step emulsification in a capillary microfluidic device. The amphiphile-laden middle oil phase of the double-emulsion drop dewets from the surface of the innermost water drop, which contains hydrogel prepolymers; this dewetting leads to the formation of a bilayer membrane. Subsequently, the oil phase completely separates from the innermost water drop, leaving a polymersome. Upon UV illumination of the polymersome, the prepolymers encapsulated within the interior are crosslinked, forming a hydrogel core. The hydrogel network within the polymersomes facilitates sustained release of the encapsulated materials and increases the stability of the polymersomes through the formation of a scaffold to support the bilayer. In addition, this approach provides a facile method to make monodisperse hydrogel particles directly dispersed in water.

  14. QHREDGS Enhances Tube Formation, Metabolism and Survival of Endothelial Cells in Collagen-Chitosan Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W.; Dallabrida, Susan M.; Reis, Lewis A.; Ismail, Nesreen; Rupnick, Maria; Radisic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    Cell survival in complex, vascularized tissues, has been implicated as a major bottleneck in advancement of therapies based on cardiac tissue engineering. This limitation motivates the search for small, inexpensive molecules that would simultaneously be cardio-protective and vasculogenic. Here, we present peptide sequence QHREDGS, based upon the fibrinogen-like domain of angiopoietin-1, as a prime candidate molecule. We demonstrated previously that QHREDGS improved cardiomyocyte metabolism and mitigated serum starved apoptosis. In this paper we further demonstrate the potency of QHREDGS in its ability to enhance endothelial cell survival, metabolism and tube formation. When endothelial cells were exposed to the soluble form of QHREDGS, improvements in endothelial cell barrier functionality, nitric oxide production and cell metabolism (ATP levels) in serum starved conditions were found. The functionality of the peptide was then examined when conjugated to collagen-chitosan hydrogel, a potential carrier for in vivo application. The presence of the peptide in the hydrogel mitigated paclitaxel induced apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the peptide modified hydrogels stimulated tube-like structure formation of encapsulated endothelial cells. When integrin αvβ3 or α5β1were antibody blocked during cell encapsulation in peptide modified hydrogels, tube formation was abolished. Therefore, the dual protective nature of the novel peptide QHREDGS may position this peptide as an appealing augmentation for collagen-chitosan hydrogels that could be used for biomaterial delivered cell therapies in the settings of myocardial infarction. PMID:24013716

  15. Reversal of Oxidative Stress in Neural Cells by an Injectable Curcumin/Thermosensitive Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin as an antioxidative agent which has been widely used medicinally in India and China. However, rapid metabolism coupled with the instability of curcumin under physiological conditions has greatly limited its applications in vivo. In the present study, a thermosensitive hydrogel with high payload of curcumin was developed by using a co-precipitation method, and its reversion of oxidative stress in Neuro-2a cells was investigated. With an increase in drug loading capacity, the solgel transition temperature of the thermosensitive hydrogel decreased accordingly. The stability of curcumin in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; pH=7.4) was greatly improved by encapsulation in the thermosensitive hydrogel, as indicated by an in vitro degradation test. An in vitro release study showed that the encapsulated curcumin was rapidly released from the hydrogel within 6 h. A curcumin/F-127 aqueous solution under the threshold concentration of 4μg/mL was non-toxic against Neuro-2a cells after 24-h incubation. A MitoSOX assay indicated that the developed curcumin formulation could attenuate the oxidative damage induced by H2O2 as compared to that of the H2O2 group. All these results suggested that the developed curcumin/thermosensitive hydrogel might have great potential application in the reversion of oxidative stress after traumatic brain injury.

  16. Controlled release behaviors of chitosan/α, β-glycerophosphate thermo-sensitive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-Fang; Kang, Chuan-Zhen; Kong, Ming; Li, Yang; Su, Jing; Yi, An; Cheng, Xiao-Jie; Chen, Xi-Guang

    2012-09-01

    Chitosan/α, β-glycerophosphate (CS/α, β-GP) thermo-sensitive hydrogels presented flowable solution state at low temperature and semisolid hydrogel when the ambient temperature increased. In this research, different concentrations of metronidazole encapsulated, CS and α, β-GP, as well as different acid solvents, were chosen to evaluate their influences on the drug release behaviors from CS/α, β-GP hydrogels. It was found that there was a sustaining release during the first 3 h followed by a plateau. SEM images showed that drugs were located both on the surface and in the interior of hydrogels. The optimal preparation conditions of this hydrogel for drug release were as follows: 1.8% (w/v) CS in HAc solvent, 5.6% (w/v) α, β-GP and 5 g/L metronidazole encapsulation. Cytotoxicity evaluation found no toxic effect. In order to control the release rate, 2.5 g/L chitosan microspheres with spherical shape and smooth surface were incorporated, and it was found that the initial release process was alleviated, while drug concentration had no obvious effect on the release rate. It could be concluded that the metronidzole release behaviors could be optimized according to practical applications.

  17. Functional Self-Assembled Peptide Nanofibers for Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Encapsulation and Regeneration in Nucleus Pulposus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaohong; Jia, Zhiwei; Liu, Longgang; Zhao, Yachao; Li, Hao; Wang, Chaofeng; Tao, Hui; Tang, Yong; He, Qing; Ruan, Dike

    2016-06-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is mainly caused by intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Recent studies have demonstrated that the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can regenerate regions that have undergone degeneration, and the regenerative effect can be enhanced by using a hydrogel carrier. This article describes an injectable functional hydrogel system manufactured by combining RADA16-I and RADA-KPSS (RADA-KPSS was manufactured by conjugating a bioactive motif derived from BMP-7 [KPSS] onto the C terminal of RADA16-I) at a volume ratio of 1:1. This hydrogel system can enhance the proliferation, differentiation, and chemotactic migration of BMSCs. In addition, the encapsulation of BMSCs with this system maintains cell viability for a long period after transplantation into an ex vivo cultured disc model. In conclusion, KPSS-conjugated RADKPS is an ideal encapsulation system for BMSCs in intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration.

  18. Functional Hydrogel Materials Inspired by Amyloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Joel

    2012-02-01

    Protein assembly resulting in the formation of amyloid fibrils, assemblies rich in cross beta-sheet structure, is normally thought of as a deleterious event associated with disease. However, amyloid formation is also involved in a diverse array of normal biological functions such as cell adhesion, melanin synthesis, insect defense mechanism and modulation of water surface tension by fungi and bacteria. These findings indicate that Nature has evolved to take advantage of large, proteinaceous fibrillar assemblies to elicit function. We are designing functional materials, namely hydrogels, from peptides that self-assembled into fibrillar networks, rich in cross beta-sheet structure. These gels can be used for the direct encapsulation and delivery of small molecule-, protein- and cell-based therapeutics. Loaded gels exhibit shear-thinning/self-healing mechanical properties enabling their delivery via syringe. In addition to their use for delivery, we have found that some of these gels display antibacterial activity. Although cytocompatible towards mammalian cells, the hydrogels can kill a broad spectrum of bacteria on contact.

  19. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  20. Emerging Technologies for Assembly of Microscale Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kavaz, Doga; Demirel, Melik C.; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of cell encapsulating building blocks (i.e., microscale hydrogels) has significant applications in areas including regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and cell-based in vitro assays for pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. Inspired by the repeating functional units observed in native tissues and biological systems (e.g., the lobule in liver, the nephron in kidney), assembly technologies aim to generate complex tissue structures by organizing microscale building blocks. Novel assembly technologies enable fabrication of engineered tissue constructs with controlled properties including tunable microarchitectural and predefined compositional features. Recent advances in micro- and nano-scale technologies have enabled engineering of microgel based three dimensional (3D) constructs. There is a need for high-throughput and scalable methods to assemble microscale units with a complex 3D micro-architecture. Emerging assembly methods include novel technologies based on microfluidics, acoustic and magnetic fields, nanotextured surfaces, and surface tension. In this review, we survey emerging microscale hydrogel assembly methods offering rapid, scalable microgel assembly in 3D, and provide future perspectives and discuss potential applications. PMID:23184717

  1. Injectable biodegradable hydrogels for embryonic stem cell transplantation: improved cardiac remodelling and function of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibin; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Dexue; Guo, Xuan; Kasper, F Kurtis; Duan, Cuimi; Zhou, Jin; Mikos, Antonios G; Wang, Changyong

    2012-06-01

    In this study, an injectable, biodegradable hydrogel composite of oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF) was investigated as a carrier of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) for the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI). The OPF hydrogels were used to encapsulate mESCs. The cell differentiation in vitro over 14 days was determined via immunohistochemical examination. Then, mESCs encapsulated in OPF hydrogels were injected into the LV wall of a rat MI model. Detailed histological analysis and echocardiography were used to determine the structural and functional consequences after 4 weeks of transplantation. With ascorbic acid induction, mESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes and other cell types in all three lineages in the OPF hydrogel. After transplantation, both the 24-hr cell retention and 4-week graft size were significantly greater in the OPF + ESC group than that of the PBS + ESC group (P < 0.01). Four weeks after transplantation, OPF hydrogel alone significantly reduced the infarct size and collagen deposition and improved the cardiac function. The heart function and revascularization improved significantly, while the infarct size and fibrotic area decreased significantly in the OPF + ESC group compared with that of the PBS + ESC, OPF and PBS groups (P < 0.01). All treatments had significantly reduced MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels compared to the PBS control group, and the OPF + ESC group decreased most by Western blotting. Transplanted mESCs expressed cardiovascular markers. This study suggests the potential of a method for heart regeneration involving OPF hydrogels for stem cell encapsulation and transplantation.

  2. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts.

    PubMed

    Torres, J R; Jay, G D; Kim, K-S; Bothun, G D

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  3. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  4. Silk fibroin/copolymer composite hydrogels for the controlled and sustained release of hydrophobic/hydrophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tianyi; Jiang, Zhijuan; Wang, Peng; Bie, Shiyu; Zhang, Feng; Zuo, Baoqi

    2015-10-15

    In the present study, a composite system for the controlled and sustained release of hydrophobic/hydrophilic drugs is described. Composite hydrogels were prepared by blending silk fibroin (SF) with PLA-PEG-PLA copolymer under mild aqueous condition. Aspirin and indomethacin were incorporated into SF/Copolymer hydrogels as two model drugs with different water-solubility. The degradation of composite hydrogels during the drug release was mainly caused by the hydrolysis of copolymers. SF with stable β-sheet-rich structure was not easily degraded which maintained the mechanical integrity of composite hydrogel. The hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions of copolymers with model drugs would significantly alter the morphological features of composite hydrogels. Various parameters such as drug load, concentration ratio, and composition of copolymer were considered in vitro drug release. Aspirin as a hydrophilic drug could be controlled release from composite hydrogel at a constant rate for 5 days. Its release was mainly driven by diffusion-based mechanism. Hydrophobic indomethacin could be encapsulated in copolymer nanoparticles distributing in the composite hydrogel. Its sustained release was mainly degradation controlled which could last up to two weeks. SF/Copolymer hydrogel has potential as a useful composite system widely applying for controlled and sustained release of various drugs.

  5. Supramolecular Hydrogelators and Hydrogels: From Soft Matter to Molecular Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this review we intend to provide a relatively comprehensive summary of the work of supramolecular hydrogelators after 2004 and to put emphasis particularly on the applications of supramolecular hydrogels/hydrogelators as molecular biomaterials. After a brief introduction of methods for generating supramolecular hydrogels, we discuss supramolecular hydrogelators on the basis of their categories, such as small organic molecules, coordination complexes, peptides, nucleobases, and saccharides. Following molecular design, we focus on various potential applications of supramolecular hydrogels as molecular biomaterials, classified by their applications in cell cultures, tissue engineering, cell behavior, imaging, and unique applications of hydrogelators. Particularly, we discuss the applications of supramolecular hydrogelators after they form supramolecular assemblies but prior to reaching the critical gelation concentration because this subject is less explored but may hold equally great promise for helping address fundamental questions about the mechanisms or the consequences of the self-assembly of molecules, including low molecular weight ones. Finally, we provide a perspective on supramolecular hydrogelators. We hope that this review will serve as an updated introduction and reference for researchers who are interested in exploring supramolecular hydrogelators as molecular biomaterials for addressing the societal needs at various frontiers. PMID:26646318

  6. Nanostructuring biosynthetic hydrogels for tissue engineering: a cellular and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Frisman, Ilya; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2012-01-01

    The nanostructuring of hydrogel scaffolds used in tissue engineering provides the ability to control cellular fate and tissue morphogenesis through cell-matrix interactions. Here we describe a method to provide nanostructure to a biosynthetic hydrogel scaffold made from crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen conjugates (PEG-fibrinogen), by modifying them with the block-copolymer Pluronic® F127. The copolymeric additive self-assembled into micelles at certain concentrations and temperatures, thereby creating nanostructures within the crosslinked hydrogel. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy at cryogenic temperature were used to detect Pluronic® F127 micelles embedded within the crosslinked PEG-fibrinogen hydrogels. The density and order of the micelles within the hydrogel matrix increased as the relative Pluronic® F127 concentration was raised. The transient stability of the micelles within the hydrogel network was analyzed using time-dependent swelling and Pluronic® F127 release measurements. These characterizations revealed that most of the Pluronic® F127 molecules diffuse out of the hydrogels after 4 days in aqueous buffer and SAXS analysis confirmed a significant change in the structure and interactions of the micelles during this time. Cell culture experiments evaluating the three-dimensional fibroblast morphology within the matrix indicated a strong correlation between cell spreading and the hydrogel's characteristic mesh size. The present research thereby provides a more quantitative understanding of how structural features in an encapsulating hydrogel environment can affect cell morphogenesis towards tissue regeneration.

  7. Encapsulation and Enhanced Retention of Fragrance in Polymer Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyomin; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Wesner, Chris; Caggioni, Marco; Zhu, Taotao; Weitz, David A

    2016-02-17

    Fragrances are amphiphilic and highly volatile, all of which makes them a challenging cargo to efficiently encapsulate and retain in microcapsules using traditional approaches. We address these limitations by introducing a new strategy that combines bulk and microfluidic emulsification: a stable fragrance-in-water (F/W) emulsion that is primarily prepared from bulk emulsification is incorporated within a polymer microcapsule via microfluidic emulsification. On the basis of the in-depth study of physicochemical properties of the microcapsules on fragrance leakage, we demonstrate that enhanced retention of fragrance can be achieved by using a polar polymeric shell and forming a hydrogel network within the microcapsule. We further extend the utility of these microcapsules by demonstrating the enhanced retention of encapsulated fragrance in powder state.

  8. Covalent and injectable chitosan-chondroitin sulfate hydrogels embedded with chitosan microspheres for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Tan, Huaping; Jia, Yang; Zou, Siyue; Guo, Shuxuan; Zhao, Meng; Huang, Hao; Ling, Zhonghua; Chen, Yong; Hu, Xiaohong

    2017-02-01

    Injectable hydrogels and microspheres derived from natural polysaccharides have been extensively investigated as drug delivery systems and cell scaffolds. In this study, we report a preparation of covalent hydrogels basing polysaccharides via the Schiff' base reaction. Water soluble carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) and oxidized chondroitin sulfate (OCS) were prepared for cross-linking of hydrogels. The mechanism of cross-linking is attributed to the Schiff' base reaction between amino and aldehyde groups of polysaccharides. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin (BSA) loaded chitosan-based microspheres (CMs) with a diameter of 3.8-61.6μm were fabricated by an emulsion cross-linking method, followed by embedding into CMC-OCS hydrogels to produce a composite CMs/gel scaffold. In the current work, gelation rate, morphology, mechanical properties, swelling ratio, in vitro degradation and BSA release of the CMs/gel scaffolds were examined. The results show that mechanical and bioactive properties of gel scaffolds can be significantly improved by embedding CMs. The solid CMs can serve as a filler to toughen the soft CMC-OCS hydrogels. Compressive modulus of composite gel scaffolds containing 20mg/ml of microspheres was 13KPa, which was higher than the control hydrogel without CMs. Cumulative release of BSA during 2weeks from CMs embedded hydrogel was 30%, which was significantly lower than those of CMs and hydrogels. Moreover, the composite CMs/gel scaffolds exhibited lower swelling ratio and slower degradation rate than the control hydrogel without CMs. The potential of the composite hydrogel as an injectable scaffold was demonstrated by encapsulation of bovine articular chondrocytes in vitro. These results demonstrate the potential of CMs embedded CMC-OCS hydrogels as an injectable drug and cell delivery system in cartilage tissue engineering.

  9. Enzymatically cross-linked hyaluronic acid/graphene oxide nanocomposite hydrogel with pH-responsive release.

    PubMed

    Song, Fangfang; Hu, Weikang; Xiao, Longqiang; Cao, Zheng; Li, Xiaoqiong; Zhang, Chao; Liao, Liqiong; Liu, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is made up of repeating disaccharide units (β-1,4-d-glucuronic acid and β-1,3-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) and is a major constituent of the extracellular matrix. HA and its derivatives which possess excellent biocompatibility and physiochemical properties have been studied in drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Tyramine-based HA hydrogel with good compatibility to cell and tissue has been reported recently. However, inferior mechanical property may limit the biomedical application of the HA hydrogel. In this study, HA/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite (NC) hydrogel was prepared through a horseradish peroxidase catalyzed in situ cross-linking process. As compared with pure HA hydrogels, incorporation of GO to the HA matrix could significantly enhance the mechanical properties (storage moduli 1800 Pa) of the hydrogel and prolong the release of rhodamine B (RB) as the model drug from the hydrogel (33 h) as well. In addition, due to the multiple interactions between GO and RB, the NC hydrogels showed excellent pH-responsive release behavior. The release of RB from the NC hydrogel was prolonged at low pH (pH 4.0) in the presence of GO, which could be attributed to the enhanced interactions between GO and HA as well as with RB. In situ three-dimensional encapsulation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (BALB 3T3 cells) in the NC hydrogels and cytotoxicity results indicated the cytocompatibility of both the enzymatic cross-linking process and HA/GO NC hydrogels (cell viability 90.6 ± 4.25%). The enzymatically catalyzed fabrication of NC hydrogels proved to be an easy and mild approach, and had great potential in the construction of both tissue engineering scaffolds and stimuli-responsive drug release matrices.

  10. Development of functionalized multi-walled carbon-nanotube-based alginate hydrogels for enabling biomimetic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joddar, Binata; Garcia, Eduardo; Casas, Atzimba; Stewart, Calvin M.

    2016-08-01

    Alginate is a hydrogel commonly used for cell culture by ionically crosslinking in the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions. However these alginate gels are mechanically unstable, not permitting their use as scaffolds to engineer robust biological bone, breast, cardiac or tumor tissues. This issue can be addressed via encapsulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) serving as a reinforcing phase while being dispersed in a continuous phase of alginate. We hypothesized that adding functionalized MWCNT to alginate, would yield composite gels with distinctively different mechanical, physical and biological characteristics in comparison to alginate alone. Resultant MWCNT-alginate gels were porous, and showed significantly less degradation after 14 days compared to alginate alone. In vitro cell-studies showed enhanced HeLa cell adhesion and proliferation on the MWCNT-alginate compared to alginate. The extent of cell proliferation was greater when cultured atop 1 and 3 mg/ml MWCNT-alginate; although all MWCNT-alginates lead to enhanced cell cluster formation compared to alginate alone. Among all the MWCNT-alginates, the 1 mg/ml gels showed significantly greater stiffness compared to all other cases. These results provide an important basis for the development of the MWCNT-alginates as novel substrates for cell culture applications, cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  11. Development of functionalized multi-walled carbon-nanotube-based alginate hydrogels for enabling biomimetic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Joddar, Binata; Garcia, Eduardo; Casas, Atzimba; Stewart, Calvin M.

    2016-01-01

    Alginate is a hydrogel commonly used for cell culture by ionically crosslinking in the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions. However these alginate gels are mechanically unstable, not permitting their use as scaffolds to engineer robust biological bone, breast, cardiac or tumor tissues. This issue can be addressed via encapsulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) serving as a reinforcing phase while being dispersed in a continuous phase of alginate. We hypothesized that adding functionalized MWCNT to alginate, would yield composite gels with distinctively different mechanical, physical and biological characteristics in comparison to alginate alone. Resultant MWCNT-alginate gels were porous, and showed significantly less degradation after 14 days compared to alginate alone. In vitro cell-studies showed enhanced HeLa cell adhesion and proliferation on the MWCNT-alginate compared to alginate. The extent of cell proliferation was greater when cultured atop 1 and 3 mg/ml MWCNT-alginate; although all MWCNT-alginates lead to enhanced cell cluster formation compared to alginate alone. Among all the MWCNT-alginates, the 1 mg/ml gels showed significantly greater stiffness compared to all other cases. These results provide an important basis for the development of the MWCNT-alginates as novel substrates for cell culture applications, cell therapy and tissue engineering. PMID:27578567

  12. Three-dimensional direct cell patterning in collagen hydrogels with near-infrared femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hribar, Kolin C.; Meggs, Kyle; Liu, Justin; Zhu, Wei; Qu, Xin; Chen, Shaochen

    2015-11-01

    We report a methodology for three-dimensional (3D) cell patterning in a hydrogel in situ. Gold nanorods within a cell-encapsulating collagen hydrogel absorb a focused near-infrared femtosecond laser beam, locally denaturing the collagen and forming channels, into which cells migrate, proliferate, and align in 3D. Importantly, pattern resolution is tunable based on writing speed and laser power, and high cell viability (>90%) is achieved using higher writing speeds and lower laser intensities. Overall, this patterning technique presents a flexible direct-write method that is applicable in tissue engineering systems where 3D alignment is critical (such as vascular, neural, cardiac, and muscle tissue).

  13. Three-dimensional direct cell patterning in collagen hydrogels with near-infrared femtosecond laser

    PubMed Central

    Hribar, Kolin C.; Meggs, Kyle; Liu, Justin; Zhu, Wei; Qu, Xin; Chen, Shaochen

    2015-01-01

    We report a methodology for three-dimensional (3D) cell patterning in a hydrogel in situ. Gold nanorods within a cell-encapsulating collagen hydrogel absorb a focused near-infrared femtosecond laser beam, locally denaturing the collagen and forming channels, into which cells migrate, proliferate, and align in 3D. Importantly, pattern resolution is tunable based on writing speed and laser power, and high cell viability (>90%) is achieved using higher writing speeds and lower laser intensities. Overall, this patterning technique presents a flexible direct-write method that is applicable in tissue engineering systems where 3D alignment is critical (such as vascular, neural, cardiac, and muscle tissue). PMID:26603915

  14. Encapsulated islets for diabetes therapy: history, current progress, and critical issues requiring solution.

    PubMed

    Scharp, David W; Marchetti, Piero

    2014-04-01

    Insulin therapy became a reality in 1921 dramatically saving lives of people with diabetes, but not protecting them from long-term complications. Clinically successful free islet implants began in 1989 but require life long immunosuppression. Several encapsulated islet approaches have been ongoing for over 30 years without defining a clinically relevant product. Macro-devices encapsulating islet mass in a single device have shown long-term success in large animals but human trials have been limited by critical challenges. Micro-capsules using alginate or similar hydrogels encapsulate individual islets with many hundreds of promising rodent results published, but a low incidence of successful translation to large animal and human results. Reduction of encapsulated islet mass for clinical transplantation is in progress. This review covers the status of both early and current studies including the presentation of corporate efforts involved. It concludes by defining the critical items requiring solution to enable a successful clinical diabetes therapy.

  15. Vaginal delivery of carboplatin-loaded thermosensitive hydrogel to prevent local cervical cancer recurrence in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Jin; Wu, Wenbin; Li, Hongjun

    2016-11-01

    Local tumor recurrence after cervical cancer surgery remains a clinical problem. Vaginal delivery of thermosensitive hydrogel may be suited to reduce tumor relapse rate with more efficacy and safety. A pilot study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of carboplatin-loaded poloxamer hydrogel to prevent local recurrence of cervical cancer after surgery. In vivo vaginal retention evaluation of 27% poloxamer hydrogel in mice was proven to be a suitable vaginal drug delivery formulation due to its low gelation temperature. A mimic orthotopic cervical/vaginal cancer recurrence model after surgery was established by injecting murine cervical cancer cell line U14 into the vaginal submucosa to simulate the residual tumor cells infiltrated in the surgical site, followed by drug administration 24 h later to interfere with the formation/recurrence of the tumor. By infusing fluorescein sodium-loaded hydrogel into the vagina of mice, a maximized accumulation of fluorescein sodium (Flu) in the vagina was achieved and few signals were observed in other organs. When used in the prevention of the cervical cancer formation/recurrence in mice, the carboplatin-loaded poloxamer hydrogel exhibited great efficacy and systemic safety. In conclusion, thermosensitive hydrogel presents a simple, practical approach for the local drug delivery via vagina against cervical cancer recurrence.

  16. Intelligent hydrogels for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    He, Liumin; Zuo, Qinhua; Xie, Shasha; Huang, Yuexin; Xue, Wei

    2011-09-01

    Intelligent hydrogel, also known as smart hydrogels, are materials with great potential for development in drug delivery system. Intelligent hydrogel also has the ability to perceive as a signal structure change and stimulation. The review introduces the temperature-, pH-, electric signal-, biochemical molecule-, light- and pressure- sensitive hydrogels. Finally, we described the application of intelligent hydrogel in drug delivery system and the recent patents involved for hydrogel in drug delivery.

  17. Application of modified-alginate encapsulated carbonate producing bacteria in concrete: a promising strategy for crack self-healing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianyun; Mignon, Arn; Snoeck, Didier; Wiktor, Virginie; Van Vliergerghe, Sandra; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2015-01-01

    Self-healing concrete holds promising benefits to reduce the cost for concrete maintenance and repair as cracks are autonomously repaired without any human intervention. In this study, the application of a carbonate precipitating bacterium Bacillus sphaericus was explored. Regarding the harsh condition in concrete, B. sphaericus spores were first encapsulated into a modified-alginate based hydrogel (AM-H) which was proven to have a good compatibility with the bacteria and concrete regarding the influence on bacterial viability and concrete strength. Experimental results show that the spores were still viable after encapsulation. Encapsulated spores can precipitate a large amount of CaCO3 in/on the hydrogel matrix (around 70% by weight). Encapsulated B. sphaericus spores were added into mortar specimens and bacterial in situ activity was demonstrated by the oxygen consumption on the mimicked crack surface. While specimens with free spores added showed no oxygen consumption. This indicates the efficient protection of the hydrogel for spores in concrete. To conclude, the AM-H encapsulated carbonate precipitating bacteria have great potential to be used for crack self-healing in concrete applications. PMID:26528254

  18. Application of modified-alginate encapsulated carbonate producing bacteria in concrete: a promising strategy for crack self-healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyun; Mignon, Arn; Snoeck, Didier; Wiktor, Virginie; Van Vliergerghe, Sandra; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2015-01-01

    Self-healing concrete holds promising benefits to reduce the cost for concrete maintenance and repair as cracks are autonomously repaired without any human intervention. In this study, the application of a carbonate precipitating bacterium Bacillus sphaericus was explored. Regarding the harsh condition in concrete, B. sphaericus spores were first encapsulated into a modified-alginate based hydrogel (AM-H) which was proven to have a good compatibility with the bacteria and concrete regarding the influence on bacterial viability and concrete strength. Experimental results show that the spores were still viable after encapsulation. Encapsulated spores can precipitate a large amount of CaCO3 in/on the hydrogel matrix (around 70% by weight). Encapsulated B. sphaericus spores were added into mortar specimens and bacterial in situ activity was demonstrated by the oxygen consumption on the mimicked crack surface. While specimens with free spores added showed no oxygen consumption. This indicates the efficient protection of the hydrogel for spores in concrete. To conclude, the AM-H encapsulated carbonate precipitating bacteria have great potential to be used for crack self-healing in concrete applications.

  19. Review of encapsulation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaulis, L.

    1996-09-01

    The use of encapsulation technology to produce a compliant waste form is an outgrowth from existing polymer industry technology and applications. During the past 12 years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been researching the use of this technology to treat mixed wastes (i.e., containing hazardous and radioactive wastes). The two primary encapsulation techniques are microencapsulation and macroencapsulation. Microencapsulation is the thorough mixing of a binding agent with a powdered waste, such as incinerator ash. Macroencapsulation coats the surface of bulk wastes, such as lead debris. Cement, modified cement, and polyethylene are the binding agents which have been researched the most. Cement and modified cement have been the most commonly used binding agents to date. However, recent research conducted by DOE laboratories have shown that polyethylene is more durable and cost effective than cements. The compressive strength, leachability, resistance to chemical degradation, etc., of polyethylene is significantly greater than that of cement and modified cement. Because higher waste loads can be used with polyethylene encapsulant, the total cost of polyethylene encapsulation is significantly less costly than cement treatment. The only research lacking in the assessment of polyethylene encapsulation treatment for mixed wastes is pilot and full-scale testing with actual waste materials. To date, only simulated wastes have been tested. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site had planned to conduct pilot studies using actual wastes during 1996. This experiment should provide similar results to the previous tests that used simulated wastes. If this hypothesis is validated as anticipated, it will be clear that polyethylene encapsulation should be pursued by DOE to produce compliant waste forms.

  20. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Encapsulation materials for solar cells were investigated. The different phases consisted of: (1) identification and development of low cost module encapsulation materials; (2) materials reliability examination; and (3) process sensitivity and process development. It is found that outdoor photothermal aging devices (OPT) are the best accelerated aging methods, simulate worst case field conditions, evaluate formulation and module performance and have a possibility for life assessment. Outdoor metallic copper exposure should be avoided, self priming formulations have good storage stability, stabilizers enhance performance, and soil resistance treatment is still effective.

  1. Stretchability of encapsulated electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Liu, Z. J.; Song, J.; Huang, Y.; Hwang, K.-C.; Zhang, Y. W.; Rogers, J. A.

    2011-08-01

    Stretchable and flexible electronics offer the performance of conventional wafer-based systems but can be stretched like a rubber band, twisted like a rope, and bent over a pencil. Such a technology offers new application opportunities, in areas of surgical and diagnostic implements that naturally integrate with the human body to provide advanced capabilities, to curvilinear devices such as hemispherical "eyeball" cameras. In practice, stretchable and flexible electronic systems require encapsulation layers to provide mechanical and environmental protection. This paper establishes a simple, analytical model for the optimal design of encapsulation.

  2. Anthelmintic activity of Eucalyptus staigeriana encapsulated oil on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    de Aquino Mesquita, Mayara; E Silva Júnior, João Batista; Panassol, Andressa Machado; de Oliveira, Erick Falcão; Vasconcelos, Ana Lourdes Camurça Fernandes; de Paula, Haroldo Cesar Beserra; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal

    2013-09-01

    The anthelmintic activity of Eucalyptus staigeriana essential oil has previously been inferred through both in vitro and in vivo tests. Thus, the encapsulation process generally improves oil stability, promotes controlled release in target organs, reduces dosage, and increases efficacy. The aims of this study were to analyze and encapsulate E. staigeriana essential oil and to verify its anthelmintic activity in sheep. The encapsulation process was accomplished through emulsion using a 4% chitosan solution as the matrix. Anthelmintic activity was established through controlled testing using 18 sheep that were separated into three groups: group 1 was treated with a single dose of 365 mg/kg of E. staigeriana encapsulated oil, group 2 was treated with 200 μg/kg of ivermectin, and group 3 was treated with a 4% chitosan solution as a negative control. The sheep were euthanized and necropsied 13 days posttreatment to evaluate worm burden. Limonene was the major oil component (72.91%). The final product was a hydrogel with 36.5% (m/m) E. staigeriana essential oil per gram. Its efficacy on gastrointestinal nematodes was 60.79%. The highest efficacy was against abomasal nematodes, with 83.75% efficacy. Further studies are necessary to explore the possibility of increasing the hydrogel efficacy; nevertheless, we can state that E. staigeriana encapsulated oil had anthelmintic activity and can be used in gastrointestinal nematode control.

  3. Characterization of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells in vitro culture and in vivo differentiation in a temperature-sensitive chitosan/β- glycerophosphate/collagen hybrid hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Yan, Xinyu; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yiwei; Liu, Tianqing

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) with chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/collagen (C/GP/Co) hybrid hydrogel was test, followed by investigating the capability of engineered adipose tissue formation using this ADSCs seeded hydrogel. The ADSCs were harvested and mixed with a C/GP/Co hydrogel followed by a gelation at 37°C and an in vitro culture. The results showed that the ADSCs within C/GP/Co hydrogels achieved a 30% of expansion over 7days in culture medium and encapsulated cell in C/GP/Co hydrogel demonstrated a characteristic morphology with high viability over 5days. C/GP/Co hydrogel were subcutaneous injected into SD-rats to assess the biocompatibility. The induced ADSCs-C/GP/Co hydrogel and non-induced ADSCs-C/GP/Co hydrogel were subcutaneously injected into nude mice for detecting potential of adipogenic differentiation. It has shown that C/GP/Co hydrogel were well tolerated in SD rats where they had persisted over 4weeks post implantation. Histology analysis indicated that induced ADSCs-C/GP/Co hydrogel has a greater number of adipocytes and vascularized adipose tissues compared with non-induced ADSCs-C/GP/Co hydrogel.

  4. Synthesis of "click" alginate hydrogel capsules and comparison of their stability, water swelling, and diffusion properties with that of Ca(+2) crosslinked alginate capsules.

    PubMed

    Breger, Joyce C; Fisher, Benjamin; Samy, Raghu; Pollack, Steven; Wang, Nam Sun; Isayeva, Irada

    2015-07-01

    Ionically crosslinked alginate hydrogels have been extensively explored for encapsulation and immunoisolation of living cells/tissues to develop implantable cell therapies, such as islet encapsulation for bioartificial pancreas. Chemical instability of these hydrogels during long-term implantation hinders the development of viable cell therapy. The exchange between divalent crosslinking ions (e.g., Ca(+2) ) with monovalent ions from physiological environment causes alginate hydrogels to degrade, resulting in exposure of the donor tissue to the host's immune system and graft failure. The goal of this study was to improve stability of alginate hydrogels by utilizing covalent "click" crosslinking while preserving other biomedically viable hydrogel properties. Alginate was first functionalized to contain either pendant alkyne or azide functionalities, and subsequently reacted via "click" chemistry to form "click" gel capsules. Alginate functionalization was confirmed by NMR and gel permeation chromatography. When compared with Ca(+2) capsules, "click" capsules exhibited superior stability in ionic media, while showing higher permeability to small size diffusants and similar molecular weight cut-off and water swelling. Physicochemical properties of "click" alginate hydrogels demonstrate their potential utility for therapeutic cell encapsulation and other biomedical applications.

  5. Sericin/Dextran Injectable Hydrogel as an Optically Trackable Drug Delivery System for Malignant Melanoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Qi, Chao; Tao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Luming; Jiang, Xulin; Zhang, Yunti; Huang, Lei; Li, Qilin; Xie, Hongjian; Gao, Jinbo; Shuai, Xiaoming; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Severe side effects of cancer chemotherapy prompt developing better drug delivery systems. Injectable hydrogels are an effective site-target system. For most of injectable hydrogels, once delivered in vivo, some properties including drug release and degradation, which are critical to chemotherapeutic effects and safety, are challenging to monitor. Developing a drug delivery system for effective cancer therapy with in vivo real-time noninvasive trackability is highly desired. Although fluorescence dyes are used for imaging hydrogels, the cytotoxicity limits their applications. By using sericin, a natural photoluminescent protein from silk, we successfully synthesized a hydrazone cross-linked sericin/dextran injectable hydrogel. This hydrogel is biodegradable and biocompatible. It achieves efficient drug loading and controlled release of both macromolecular and small molecular drugs. Notably, sericin's photoluminescence from this hydrogel is directly and stably correlated with its degradation, enabling long-term in vivo imaging and real-time monitoring of the remaining drug. The hydrogel loaded with Doxorubicin significantly suppresses tumor growth. Together, the work demonstrates the efficacy of this drug delivery system, and the in vivo effectiveness of this sericin-based optical monitoring strategy, providing a potential approach for improving hydrogel design toward optimal efficiency and safety of chemotherapies, which may be widely applicable to other drug delivery systems.

  6. Alginate: A Versatile Biomaterial to Encapsulate Isolated Ovarian Follicles.

    PubMed

    Vanacker, Julie; Amorim, Christiani A

    2017-02-28

    In vitro culture of ovarian follicles isolated or enclosed in ovarian tissue fragments and grafting of isolated ovarian follicles represent a potential alternative to restore fertility in cancer patients who cannot undergo cryopreservation of embryos or oocytes or transplantation of frozen-thawed ovarian tissue. In this regard, respecting the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of isolated follicles is crucial to maintaining their proper follicular physiology. To this end, alginate hydrogel has been widely investigated using follicles from numerous animal species, yielding promising results. The goal of this review is therefore to provide an overview of alginate applications utilizing the biomaterial as a scaffold for 3D encapsulation of isolated ovarian follicles. Different methods of isolated follicle encapsulation in alginate are discussed in this review, as its use of 3D alginate culture systems as a tool for in vitro follicle analysis. Possible improvements of this matrix, namely modification with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide or combination with fibrin, are also summarized. Encouraging results have been obtained in different animal models, and particularly with isolated follicles encapsulated in alginate matrices and grafted to mice. This summary is designed to guide the reader towards development of next-generation alginate scaffolds, with enhanced properties for follicle encapsulation.

  7. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and (131)I by thermosensitive micellar-hydrogel for enhanced in situ synergetic chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pingsheng; Zhang, Yumin; Wang, Weiwei; Zhou, Junhui; Sun, Yu; Liu, Jinjian; Kong, Deling; Liu, Jianfeng; Dong, Anjie

    2015-12-28

    Combined chemoradiotherapy is potent to defeat malignant tumor. Concurrent delivery of radioisotope with chemotherapeutic drugs, which also act as the radiosensitizer, to tumor tissues by a single vehicle is essential to achieve this objective. To this end, a macroscale injectable and thermosensitive micellar-hydrogel (MHg) depot was constructed by thermo-induced self-aggregation of poly(ε-caprolactone-co-1,4,8-trioxa[4.6]spiro-9-undecanone)-poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone-co-1,4,8-trioxa[4.6]spiro-9-undecanone) (PECT) triblock copolymer micelles (Ms), which could not only serve as a micellar drug reservoir to locally deliver concentrated nano chemotherapeutic drugs, but also immobilize radioisotopes at the internal irradiation hot focus. Doxorubicin (DOX) and iodine-131 labeled hyaluronic acid ((131)I-HA) were used as the model therapeutic agents. The aqueous mixture of drug-loaded PECT micelles and (131)I-HA exhibited sol-to-gel transition around body temperature. In vitro drug release study indicated that PECT/DOX Ms were sustainedly shed from the native PECT/DOX MHg formulation, which could be internalized by tumor cells with rapid intracellular DOX release. This hydrogel formulation demonstrated considerable in vitro antitumor effect as well as remarkable radiosensitization. In vivo subcutaneous injection of PECT MHg demonstrated that (131)I isotope was immobilized stably at the injection location and no obvious indication of damage to major organs were observed as indicated by the histopathological analysis. Furthermore, the peritumoral injection of chemo-radiation therapeutic agents-encapsulated MHg formulation on tumor-bearing nude mice resulted in the desired combined treatment effect, which significantly improved the tumor growth inhibition efficiency with minimized drug-associated side effects to major organs. Consequently, such a thermosensitive MHg formulation, which enabled the precise control over the dosage and ratio of combination

  8. Porous hyaluronic acid hydrogels for localized nonviral DNA delivery in a diabetic wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Tokatlian, Talar; Cam, Cynthia; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-05-01

    The treatment of impaired wounds requires the use of biomaterials that can provide mechanical and biological queues to the surrounding environment to promote angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, and wound closure. Porous hydrogels show promotion of angiogenesis, even in the absence of proangiogenic factors. It is hypothesized that the added delivery of nonviral DNA encoding for proangiogenic growth factors can further enhance this effect. Here, 100 and 60 μm porous and nonporous (n-pore) hyaluronic acid-MMP hydrogels with encapsulated reporter (pGFPluc) or proangiogenic (pVEGF) plasmids are used to investigate scaffold-mediated gene delivery for local gene therapy in a diabetic wound healing mouse model. Porous hydrogels allow for significantly faster wound closure compared with n-pore hydrogels, which do not degrade and essentially provide a mechanical barrier to closure. Interestingly, the delivery of pDNA/PEI polyplexes positively promotes granulation tissue formation even when the DNA does not encode for an angiogenic protein. And although transfected cells are present throughout the granulation tissue surrounding, all hydrogels at 2 weeks, pVEGF delivery does not further enhance the angiogenic response. Despite this, the presence of transfected cells shows promise for the use of polyplex-loaded porous hydrogels for local gene delivery in the treatment of diabetic wounds.

  9. Tailoring hydrogel surface properties to modulate cellular response to shear loading.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Christoph; Schrobback, Karsten; Levett, Peter A; Lutton, Cameron; Sah, Robert L; Klein, Travis J

    2016-10-08

    Biological tissues at articulating surfaces, such as articular cartilage, typically have remarkable low-friction properties that limit tissue shear during movement. However, these frictional properties change with trauma, aging, and disease, resulting in an altered mechanical state within the tissues. Yet, it remains unclear how these surface changes affect the behaviour of embedded cells when the tissue is mechanically loaded. Here, we developed a cytocompatible, bilayered hydrogel system that permits control of surface frictional properties without affecting other bulk physicochemical characteristics such as compressive modulus, mass swelling ratio, and water content. This hydrogel system was applied to investigate the effect of variations in surface friction on the biological response of human articular chondrocytes to shear loading. Shear strain in these hydrogels during dynamic shear loading was significantly higher in high-friction hydrogels than in low-friction hydrogels. Chondrogenesis was promoted following dynamic shear stimulation in chondrocyte-encapsulated low-friction hydrogel constructs, whereas matrix synthesis was impaired in high-friction constructs, which instead exhibited increased catabolism. Our findings demonstrate that the surface friction of tissue-engineered cartilage may act as a potent regulator of cellular homeostasis by governing the magnitude of shear deformation during mechanical loading, suggesting a similar relationship may also exist for native articular cartilage.

  10. A newly developed chemically crosslinked dextran-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jukes, Jojanneke M; van der Aa, Leonardus J; Hiemstra, Christine; van Veen, Theun; Dijkstra, Pieter J; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; de Boer, Jan

    2010-02-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering, in which chondrogenic cells are combined with a scaffold, is a cell-based approach to regenerate damaged cartilage. Various scaffold materials have been investigated, among which are hydrogels. Previously, we have developed dextran-based hydrogels that form under physiological conditions via a Michael-type addition reaction. Hydrogels can be formed in situ by mixing a thiol-functionalized dextran with a tetra-acrylated star poly(ethylene glycol) solution. In this article we describe how the degradation time of dextran-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels can be varied from 3 to 7 weeks by changing the degree of substitution of thiol groups on dextran. The degradation times increased slightly after encapsulation of chondrocytes in the gels. The effect of the gelation reaction on cell viability and cartilage formation in the hydrogels was investigated. Chondrocytes or embryonic stem cells were mixed in the aqueous dextran solution, and we confirmed that the cells survived gelation. After a 3-week culturing period, chondrocytes and embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid bodies were still viable and both cell types produced cartilaginous tissue. Our data demonstrate the potential of dextran hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering strategies.

  11. Degradable hydrogels derived from PEG-diacrylamide for hepatic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kelly R; Miller, Jordan S; Blakely, Brandon L; Chen, Christopher S; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-10-01

    Engineered tissue constructs have the potential to augment or replace whole organ transplantation for the treatment of liver failure. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based systems are particularly promising for the construction of engineered liver tissue due to their biocompatibility and amenability to modular addition of bioactive factors. To date, primary hepatocytes have been successfully encapsulated in non-degradable hydrogels based on PEG-diacrylate (PEGDA). In this study, we describe a hydrogel system based on PEG-diacrylamide (PEGDAAm) containing matrix-metalloproteinase sensitive (MMP-sensitive) peptide in the hydrogel backbone that is suitable for hepatocyte culture both in vitro and after implantation. By replacing hydrolytically unstable esters in PEGDA with amides in PEGDAAm, resultant hydrogels resisted non-specific hydrolysis, while still allowing for MMP-mediated hydrogel degradation. Optimization of polymerization conditions, hepatocellular density, and multicellular tissue composition modulated both the magnitude and longevity of hepatic function in vitro. Importantly, hepatic PEGDAAm-based tissues survived and functioned for over 3 weeks after implantation ectopically in the intraperitoneal (IP) space of nude mice. Together, these studies suggest that MMP-sensitive PEGDAAm-based hydrogels may be a useful material system for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 3331-3338, 2015.

  12. An injectable extracellular matrix derived hydrogel for meniscus repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglei; Ding, Qing; Dutta, Ahana; Wang, Yezhou; Huang, Yi-Hui; Weng, Hong; Tang, Liping; Hong, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Tissue-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) biomaterials to regenerate the meniscus have gained increasing attention in treating meniscus injuries and diseases, particularly for aged persons and athletes. However, ECM scaffold has poor cell infiltration and can only be implanted using surgical procedures. To overcome these limitations, we developed an injectable ECM hydrogel material from porcine meniscus via modified decellularization and enzymatic digestion. This meniscus-derived ECM hydrogel exhibited a fibrous morphology with tunable compression and initial modulus. It had a good injectability evidenced by syringe injection into mouse subcutaneous tissue. The hydrogel showed good cellular compatibility by promoting the growth of both bovine chondrocytes and mouse 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in the hydrogel for 2 weeks. It also promoted cell infiltration as shown in both in vitro cell culture and in vivo mouse subcutaneous implantation. The in vivo study revealed that the ECM hydrogel possessed good tissue compatibility after 7 days of implantation. The results support the great potential of the newly produced injectable meniscus-derived ECM hydrogel specifically for meniscus repair and regeneration.

  13. Hydrogel network design using multifunctional macromers to coordinate tissue maturation in ovarian follicle culture

    PubMed Central

    Shikanov, Ariella; Smith, Rachel M; Xu, Min; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic hydrogels with tunable properties are appealing for regenerative medicine. A critical limitation in hydrogel design at low solids concentration is the formation of defects, which increase gelation times and swelling, and reduce elasticity. Here, we report that tri-functional crosslinking peptides applied to 4-arm poly-(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels decreased swelling and gelation time relative to bi-functional crosslinkers. In contrast to bi-functional peptides, the third cross-linking site on the peptide created a branch point if an intramolecular crosslink formed, which prevented non-functional “dangling-ends” in the hydrogel network and enhanced the number of elastically active cross-links. The improved network formation enabled mouse ovarian follicle encapsulation and maturation in vitro. Hydrogels with bi-functional crosslinkers resulted in cellular dehydration, likely due to osmosis during the prolonged gelation. For tri-functional crosslinkers, the hydrogels supported a 17-fold volumetric expansion of the tissue during culture, with expansion dependent on the ability of the follicle to rearrange its microenvironment, which is controlled through the sensitivity of the cross-linking peptide to the proteolytic activity of plasmin. The improved network design enabled ovarian follicle culture in a completely synthetic system, and can advance fertility preservation technology for women facing premature infertility from anticancer therapies. PMID:21247629

  14. Sphyga: a multiparameter open source tool for fabricating smart and tunable hydrogel microbeads.

    PubMed

    Tirella, A; Magliaro, C; Penta, M; Troncone, M; Pimentel, R; Ahluwalia, A

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogel microbeads are used in many biological applications, particularly for cell, protein or drug encapsulation. Although there are several methods for fabricating microbeads with controlled shapes and dimensions, many are limited to a small range of materials or sizes. We describe a compact open source tool-the spherical hydrogel generator (Sphyga)-for the fabrication of highly reproducible hydrogel based microbeads with predictable shapes and diameters ranging from 100 to 2000 µm. The unique feature of the system is the ability to modulate multiple parameters independently, so as to create a wide range of working conditions for fabricating tailored microbeads. Hence, by combining the different fabrication parameters, hydrogel beads with chosen shapes, sizes and materials can be generated with Sphyga. A multiparameter working-window was obtained by fixing the concentration of the base material, alginate, and varying the viscosity of the solution along with Sphyga's fabrication parameters (needle size, external air pressure, and material outflow). To validate the multiparameter working window, components such as proteins, cells, dyes and nanoparticles were also used to fabricate composite microbeads. The results show that the architecture of hydrogel microbeads can be engineered by considering the viscosity of the initial solution, which depends principally on the pH and composition of alginate solution. Coupled with Sphyga's multiple working parameters, material viscosity can then be used to tune hydrogel domains and thereby generate complex biologically relevant microenvironments for many biomedical applications.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell-laden anti-inflammatory hydrogel enhances diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shixuan; Shi, Junbin; Zhang, Min; Chen, Yinghua; Wang, Xueer; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Zhihui; Yan, Yuan; Li, Qinglin; Zhong, Wen; Xing, Malcolm; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lin

    2015-12-08

    The purpose of this study was to permit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to reach their full potential in the treatment of chronic wounds. A biocompatible multifunctional crosslinker based temperature sensitive hydrogel was developed to deliver BMSCs, which improve the chronic inflammation microenvironments of wounds. A detailed in vitro investigation found that the hydrogel is suitable for BMSC encapsulation and can promote BMSC secretion of TGF-β1 and bFGF. In vivo, full-thickness skin defects were made on the backs of db/db mice to mimic diabetic ulcers. It was revealed that the hydrogel can inhibit pro-inflammatory M1 macrophage expression. After hydrogel association with BMSCs treated the wound, significantly greater wound contraction was observed in the hydrogel + BMSCs group. Histology and immunohistochemistry results confirmed that this treatment contributed to the rapid healing of diabetic skin wounds by promoting granulation tissue formation, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix secretion, wound contraction, and re-epithelialization. These results show that a hydrogel laden with BMSCs may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the management of diabetic ulcers.

  16. Cyclodextrin Inclusion Polymers Forming Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun

    This chapter reviews the advances in the developments of supramolecular hydrogels based on the polypseudorotaxanes and polyrotaxanes formed by inclusion complexes of cyclodextrins threading onto polymer chains. Both physical and chemical supramolecular hydrogels of many different types are discussed with respect to their preparation, structure, property, and gelation mechanism. A large number of physical supramolecular hydrogels were formed induced by self-assembly of densely packed cyclodextrin rings threaded on polymer or copolymer chains acting as physical crosslinking points. The thermo-reversible and thixotropic properties of these physical supramolecular hydrogels have inspired their applications as injectable drug delivery systems. Chemical supramolecular hydrogels synthesized from polypseudorotaxanes and polyrotaxanes were based on the chemical crosslinking of either the cyclodextrin molecules or the included polymer chains. The chemical supramolecular hydrogels were often made biodegradable through incorporation of hydrolyzable threading polymers, end caps, or crosslinkers, for their potential applications as biomaterials.

  17. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1985-01-01

    The successful use of outdoor mounting racks as an accelerated aging technique (these devices are called optal reactors); a beginning list of candidate pottant materials for thin-film encapsulation, which process at temperatures well below 100 C; and description of a preliminary flame retardant formulation for ethylene vinyl acetate which could function to increase module flammability ratings are presented.

  18. In situ injectable nano-composite hydrogel composed of curcumin, N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan and oxidized alginate for wound healing application.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingyi; Chen, Shuo; Zhang, Binjun; Li, Mei; Diao, Kai; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Li, Jie; Xu, Yu; Wang, Xianhuo; Chen, Hao

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, an in situ injectable nano-composite hydrogel composed of curcumin, N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan and oxidized alginate as a novel wound dressing was successfully developed for the dermal wound repair application. Nano-curcumin with improved stability and similar antioxidant efficiency compared with that of unmodified curcumin was developed by using methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (MPEG-PCL) as carrier followed by incorporating into the N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan/oxidized alginate hydrogel (CCS-OA hydrogel). In vitro release study revealed that the encapsulated nano-curcumin was slowly released from CCS-OA hydrogel with the diffusion-controllable manner at initial phase followed by the corrosion manner of hydrogel at terminal phase. In vivo wound healing study was performed by injecting hydrogels on rat dorsal wounds. Histological study revealed that application of nano-curcumin/CCS-OA hydrogel could significantly enhance the re-epithelialization of epidermis and collagen deposition in the wound tissue. DNA, protein and hydroxyproline content in wound tissue from each group were measured on 7th day of post wounding and the results also indicated that combined using nano-curcumin and CCS-OA hydrogel could significantly accelerate the process of wound healing. Therefore, all these results suggested that the developed nano-curcumin/CCS-OA hydrogel as a promising wound dressing might have potential application in the wound healing.

  19. Microfluidics assisted generation of innovative polysaccharide hydrogel microparticles.

    PubMed

    Marquis, M; Davy, J; Cathala, B; Fang, A; Renard, D

    2015-02-13

    Capillary flow-based approach such as microfluidic devices offer a number of advantages over conventional flow control technology because they ensure highly versatile geometry and can be used to produce monodisperse spherical and non-spherical polymeric microparticles. Based on the principle of a flow-focusing device to emulsify the coflow of aqueous solutions in an organic phase, we were able to produce the following innovative polysaccharide hydrogel microparticles: - Janus hydrogel microparticles made of pectin–pectin (homo Janus) and pectin–alginate (hetero Janus) were produced. The efficiency of separation of the two hemispheres was investigated by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) of previously labelled biopolymers. The Janus structure was confirmed by subjecting each microparticle hemisphere to specific enzymatic degradation. As a proof of concept, free BSA or BSA grafted with dextran, were encapsulated in each hemisphere of the hetero Janus hydrogel microparticles. While BSA, free or grafted with dextran, was always confined in the alginate hemisphere, a fraction of BSA diffused from the pectin to the alginate hemisphere. Methoxy groups along the pectin chain will be responsible of the decrease of the number of attractive electrostatic interactions occurring between amino groups of BSA and carboxylic groups of pectin. - Pectin hydrogel microparticles of complex shapes were successfully produced by combining on-chip the phenomenon of gelation and water diffusion induced self-assembly, using dimethyl carbonate as continuous phase, or by deformation of the pre-gelled droplets off-chip at a fluid–fluid interface. Sphere, oblate ellipsoid, torus or mushroom-type morphologies were thus obtained. Moreover, it was established that after crossing the interface during their collect, mushroom-type microparticles did not migrate in the calcium or DMC phase but stayed at the liquid–liquid interface. These new and original hydrogel microparticles will

  20. Differentiation of cardiosphere-derived cells into a mature cardiac lineage using biodegradable poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenqing; Guo, Xiaolei; Matsushita, Satoshi; Guan, Jianjun

    2011-04-01

    A family of injectable and thermosensitive hydrogels suitable for myocardial injection was developed to deliver cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), an emerging and promising cell type for cardiac cell therapy. The hydrogels were based on polycaprolactone, N-isopropylacrylamide, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and dimethyl-γ-butyrolactone acrylate. Atom transfer radical polymerization was used to synthesize hydrogels with a well-defined structure and well-controlled properties. The hydrogel solutions possessed thermal transition temperatures around room temperature and exhibited injectability suitable for myocardial injection. At 37 °C, the hydrogel solutions were capable of forming solid gels within 5s. This would allow the hydrogels to largely retain in the heart during injection. The hydrogels were highly flexible at body temperature with moduli matching those of the rat and human myocardium, and breaking strains higher than those of the myocardium, enabling them to respond synchronically with heart motion. The well-controlled polymer structure allowed for precisely controlling and decoupling water content and stiffness that affect cell differentiation. DNA assay demonstrated that CDCs proliferated in the 3D hydrogels during a 2-week culture period. CDCs maintained their colony formation capability in the hydrogel. Interestingly, hydrogels directed CDCs differentiation into mature cardiac lineage. At mRNA level, the mature cardiac specific transcript factors cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYH6) were up-regulated, while the pre-mature cardiac marker GATA4 was down-regulated even after 1 day of encapsulation. CDC differentiation was interplayed by hydrogel stiffness and collagen in the hydrogel. Hydrogel with modulus ∼31 kPa was found to more significantly up-regulate cardiac expression than that with modulus ∼5 or ∼63 kPa. cTnT expression was largely regulated by both stiffness and collagen while MYH6 was mainly regulated by

  1. Wet Winding Improves Coil Encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    Wet-winding process encapsulates electrical coils more uniformily than conventional processes. Process requires no vacuum pump and adapts easily to existing winding machines. Encapsulant applied to each layer of wire as soon as added to coil. Wet-winding process eliminates voids, giving more uniformly encapsulated coil.

  2. Gel-based optical waveguides with live cell encapsulation and integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aadhar; Yang, Allen H J; Erickson, David

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate a biocompatible microscale optical device fabricated from agarose hydrogel that allows for encapsulation of cells inside an optical waveguide. This allows for better interaction between the light in the waveguide and biology, since it can interact with the direct optical mode rather than the evanescent field. We characterize the optical properties of the waveguide and further incorporate a microfluidic channel over the optical structure, thus developing an integrated optofluidic system fabricated entirely from agarose gel.

  3. Sulfated hyaluronic acid hydrogels with retarded degradation and enhanced growth factor retention promote hMSC chondrogenesis and articular cartilage integrity with reduced hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qian; Lin, Sien; Zhang, Kunyu; Dong, Chaoqun; Wu, Tianyi; Huang, Heqin; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Li; Li, Gang; Bian, Liming

    2017-02-11

    Recently, hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels have been extensively researched for delivering cells and drugs to repair damaged tissues, particularly articular cartilage. However, the in vivo degradation of HA is fast, thus limiting the clinical translation of HA hydrogels. Furthermore, HA cannot bind proteins with high affinity because of the lack of negatively charged sulfate groups. In this study, we conjugated tunable amount of sulfate groups to HA. The sulfated HA exhibits significantly slower degradation by hyaluronidase compared to the wild type HA. We hypothesize that the sulfation reduces the available HA octasaccharide substrate needed for the effective catalytic action of hyaluronidase. Moreover, the sulfated HA hydrogels significantly improve the protein sequestration, thereby effectively extending the availability of the proteinaceous drugs in the hydrogels. In the following in vitro study, we demonstrate that the HA hydrogel sulfation exerts no negative effect on the viability of encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Furthermore, the sulfated HA hydrogels promote the chondrogenesis and suppresses the hypertrophy of encapsulated hMSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, intra-articular injections of the sulfated HA hydrogels avert the cartilage abrasion and hypertrophy in the animal osteoarthritic joints. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that the sulfated HA is a promising biomaterial for the delivery of therapeutic agents to aid the regeneration of injured or diseased tissues and organs.

  4. Improving the controlled delivery formulations of caffeine in alginate hydrogel beads combined with pectin, carrageenan, chitosan and psyllium.

    PubMed

    Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Komes, Draženka; Karlović, Sven; Djaković, Senka; Spoljarić, Igor; Mršić, Gordan; Ježek, Damir

    2015-01-15

    Alginate-based blends consisting of carrageenan, pectin, chitosan or psyllium husk powder were prepared for assessment of the best formulation aimed at encapsulation of caffeine. Alginate-pectin blend exhibited the lowest viscosity and provided the smallest beads. Alginate-psyllium husk blend was characterised with higher viscosity, yielding the largest bead size and the highest caffeine encapsulation efficiency (83.6%). The release kinetics of caffeine indicated that the porosity of alginate hydrogel was not reduced sufficiently to retard the diffusion of caffeine from the beads. Chitosan coated alginate beads provided the most retarded release of caffeine in water. Morphological characteristics of beads encapsulating caffeine were adversely affected by freeze drying. Bitterness intensity of caffeine-containing beads in water was the lowest for alginate-psyllium beads and chitosan coated alginate beads. Higher sodium alginate concentration (3%) for production of hydrogel beads in combination with psyllium or chitosan coating would present the most favourable carrier systems for immobilization of caffeine.

  5. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  6. Localized Co-delivery of Doxorubicin, Cisplatin, and Methotrexate by Thermosensitive Hydrogels for Enhanced Osteosarcoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hecheng; He, Chaoliang; Cheng, Yilong; Yang, Zhiming; Zang, Junting; Liu, Jianguo; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-12-16

    Localized cancer treatments with combination drugs have recently emerged as crucial approaches for effective inhibition of tumor growth and reoccurrence. In this study, we present a new strategy for the osteosarcoma treatment by localized co-delivery of multiple drugs, including doxorubicin (DOX), cisplatin (CDDP) and methotraxate (MTX), using thermosensitive PLGA-PEG-PLGA hydrogels. The release profiles of the drugs from the hydrogels were investigated in vitro. It was found that the multidrug coloaded hydrogels exhibited synergistic effects on cytotoxicity against osteosarcoma Saos-2 and MG-63 cells in vitro. After a single peritumoral injection of the drug-loaded hydrogels into nude mice bearing human osteosarcoma Saos-2 xenografts, the hydrogels coloaded with DOX, CDDP, and MTX displayed the highest tumor suppression efficacy in vivo for up to 16 days, as well as led to enhanced tumor apoptosis and increased regulation of the expressions of apoptosis-related genes. Moreover, the monitoring on the mice body change and the ex vivo histological analysis of the key organs indicated that the localized treatments caused less systemic toxicity and no obvious damage to the normal organs. Therefore, the approach of localized co-delivery of DOX, CDDP, and MTX by the thermosensitive hydrogels may be a promising approach for enhanced osteosarcoma treatment.

  7. Antitumor activity of TNF-α after intratumoral injection using an in situ thermosensitive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yourui; Shen, Yan; Ouahab, Ammar; Li, Chang; Xiong, Yerong; Tu, Jiasheng

    2015-03-01

    Local drug delivery strategies based on nanoparticles, gels, polymeric films, rods and wafers are increasingly used in cancer chemotherapy in order to enhance therapeutic effect and reduce systemic toxicity. Herein, a biodegradable and biocompatible in situ thermosensitive hydrogel was designed and employed to deliver tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) locally by intratumoral injection. The triblock copolymer was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of β-butyrolactone (β-BL) and lactide (LA) in bulk using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as an initiator and Sn(Oct)2 as the catalyst, the polymer was characterized by NMR, gel permeation chromatography and differential scanning calorimetry. Blood and tumor pharmacokinetics and in vivo antitumor activity of TNF-α after intratumoral administration in hydrogel or solution with the same dose were evaluated on S180 tumor-bearing mice. Compared with TNF-α solution, TNF-α hydrogel exhibited a longer T1/2 (4-fold) and higher AUCtumor (19-fold), but Cmax was lower (0.5-fold), which means that the hydrogel formulation improved the efficacy with a lower systhemic exposure than the solution formation. In addition, TNF-α hydrogel improved the antitumor activity and survival due to lower systemic exposure than the solution. These results demonstrate that the in situ thermosensitive hydrogel-based local delivery system by intratumoral injection is well suited for the administration of TNF-α.

  8. Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycan Hydrogels Create Endogenous Niches for Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Enam, Syed Faaiz; Brown, Ashley C; Saxena, Tarun; Betancur, Martha I; Barker, Thomas H; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2015-12-16

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) possess great potential for neural tissue repair after traumatic injuries to the central nervous system (CNS). However, poor survival and self-renewal of NSCs after injury severely limits its therapeutic potential. Sulfated chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans (CS-GAGs) linked to CS proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) have the ability to bind and potentiate trophic factor efficacy, and promote NSC self-renewal in vivo. In this study, we investigated the potential of CS-GAG hydrogels composed of monosulfated CS-4 (CS-A), CS-6 (CS-C), and disulfated CS-4,6 (CS-E) CS-GAGs as NSC carriers, and their ability to create endogenous niches by enriching specific trophic factors to support NSC self-renewal. We demonstrate that CS-GAG hydrogel scaffolds showed minimal swelling and degradation over a period of 15 days in vitro, absorbing only 6.5 ± 0.019% of their initial weight, and showing no significant loss of mass during this period. Trophic factors FGF-2, BDNF, and IL10 bound with high affinity to CS-GAGs, and were significantly (p < 0.05) enriched in CS-GAG hydrogels when compared to unsulfated hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels. Dissociated rat subventricular zone (SVZ) NSCs when encapsulated in CS-GAG hydrogels demonstrated ∼88.5 ± 6.1% cell viability in vitro. Finally, rat neurospheres in CS-GAG hydrogels conditioned with the mitogen FGF-2 demonstrated significantly (p < 0.05) higher self-renewal when compared to neurospheres cultured in unconditioned hydrogels. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the ability of CS-GAG based hydrogels to regulate NSC self-renewal, and facilitate growth factor enrichment locally.

  9. Magnetically Aligned Supramolecular Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Matthew; Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Frith, William J; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic-field-induced alignment of the fibrillar structures present in an aqueous solution of a dipeptide gelator, and the subsequent retention of this alignment upon transformation to a hydrogel upon the addition of CaCl2 or upon a reduction in solution pH is reported. Utilising the switchable nature of the magnetic field coupled with the slow diffusion of CaCl2, it is possible to precisely control the extent of anisotropy across a hydrogel, something that is generally very difficult to do using alternative methods. The approach is readily extended to other compounds that form viscous solutions at high pH. It is expected that this work will greatly expand the utility of such low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWG) in areas where alignment is key. PMID:25345918

  10. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  11. Sonication-induced gelation of silk fibroin for cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Kluge, Jonathan A; Leisk, Gary G; Kaplan, David L

    2008-03-01

    Purified native silk fibroin forms beta-sheet-rich, physically cross-linked, hydrogels from aqueous solution, in a process influenced by environmental parameters. Previously we reported gelation times of days to weeks for aqueous native silk protein solutions, with high ionic strength and temperature and low pH responsible for increasing gelation kinetics. Here we report a novel method to accelerate the process and control silk fibroin gelation through ultrasonication. Depending on the sonication parameters, including power output and time, along with silk fibroin concentration, gelation could be controlled from minutes to hours, allowing the post-sonication addition of cells prior to final gel setting. Mechanistically, ultrasonication initiated the formation of beta-sheets by alteration in hydrophobic hydration, thus accelerating the formation of physical cross-links responsible for gel stabilization. K(+) at physiological concentrations and low pH promoted gelation, which was not observed in the presence of Ca(2+). The hydrogels were assessed for mechanical properties and proteolytic degradation; reported values matched or exceeded other cell-encapsulating gel material systems. Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were successfully incorporated into these silk fibroin hydrogels after sonication, followed by rapid gelation and sustained cell function. Sonicated silk fibroin solutions at 4%, 8%, and 12% (w/v), followed by mixing in hMSCs, gelled within 0.5-2 h. The cells grew and proliferated in the 4% gels over 21 days, while survival was lower in the gels with higher protein content. Thus, sonication provides a useful new tool with which to initiate rapid sol-gel transitions, such as for cell encapsulation.

  12. Antitumor Activity of Peptide Amphiphile Nanofiber-Encapsulated Camptothecin

    SciTech Connect

    Soukasene, Stephen; Toft, Daniel J.; Moyer, Tyson J.; Lu, Hsuming; Lee, Hyung-Kun; Standley, Stephany M.; Cryns, Vincent L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-04-02

    Self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers were used to encapsulate camptothecin (CPT), a naturally occurring hydrophobic chemotherapy agent, using a solvent evaporation technique. Encapsulation by PA nanofibers was found to improve the aqueous solubility of the CPT molecule by more than 50-fold. PAs self-assembled into nanofibers in the presence of CPT as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Small-angle X-ray scattering results suggest a slight increase in diameter of the nanofiber to accommodate the hydrophobic cargo. In vitro studies using human breast cancer cells show an enhancement in antitumor activity of the CPT when encapsulated by the PA nanofibers. In addition, using a mouse orthotopic model of human breast cancer, treatment with PA nanofiber-encapsulated CPT inhibited tumor growth. These results highlight the potential of this model PA system to be adapted for delivery of hydrophobic therapies to treat a variety of diseases including cancer.

  13. Preparation and characterization of pH-sensitive methyl methacrylate-g-starch/hydroxypropylated starch hydrogels: in vitro and in vivo study on release of esomeprazole magnesium.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Ganure, Ashok Laxmanrao; Subudhi, Bharat Bhushan; Shukla, Shubhanjali

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, novel hydrogels were prepared through graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate onto starch and hydroxypropylated starch for intestinal drug delivery. The successful grafting has been confirmed by FTIR, NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Morphological examination of copolymeric hydrogels by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirms the macroporous nature of the copolymers. The high decomposition temperature was observed in thermograms indicating the thermal stability of the hydrogels. To attain a hydrogel with maximum percent graft yield, the impact of reaction variables like concentration of ceric ammonium nitrate as initiator and methyl methacrylate as monomer were consistently optimized. X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetric analysis supported the successful entrapment of the drug moiety (esomeprazole magnesium; proton pump inhibitor) within the hydrogel network. Drug encapsulation efficiency of optimized hydrogels was found to be >78%. Furthermore, swelling capacity of copolymeric hydrogels exhibited a pH-responsive behavior which makes the synthesized hydrogels potential candidates for controlled delivery of medicinal agents. In vitro drug release was found to be sustained up to 14 h with 80-90% drug release in pH 6.8 solution; however, the cumulative release was 40-45% in pH 1.2. The gastrointestinal transit behavior of optimized hydrogel was determined by gamma scintigraphy, using (99m)Tc as marker. The amount of radioactive tracer released from the labeled hydrogel was minimal when the hydrogel was in the stomach, whereas it increased as hydrogel reached in intestine. Well-correlated results of in vitro and in vivo analysis proved their controlled release behavior with preferential delivery into alkaline pH environment.

  14. Polyurethane/poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel coating improves the cytocompatibility of neural electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Zhou, Hai-han; Li, Tao; Li, Cheng-yan; Xia, Zhong-yuan; Duan, Yanwen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Neural electrodes, the core component of neural prostheses, are usually encapsulated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). However, PDMS can generate a tissue response after implantation. Based on the physicochemical properties and excellent biocompatibility of polyurethane (PU) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) when used as coating materials, we synthesized PU/PVA hydrogel coatings and coated the surface of PDMS using plasma treatment, and the cytocompatibility to rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells was assessed. Protein adsorption tests indicated that the amount of protein adsorption onto the PDMS substrate was reduced by 92% after coating with the hydrogel. Moreover, the PC12 cells on the PU/PVA-coated PDMS showed higher cell density and longer and more numerous neurites than those on the uncoated PDMS. These results indicate that the PU/PVA hydrogel is cytocompatible and a promising coating material for neural electrodes to improve their biocompatibility. PMID:26889197

  15. Neuralization of mouse embryonic stem cells in alginate hydrogels under retinoic acid and SAG treatment.

    PubMed

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Peto, Heather

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the differentiation of a mouse embryonic stem cell line (CGR8) into neurons, under retinoic acid (RA) and smoothened agonist (SAG) treatment. When stem cells underwent through an embryoid body (EB) formation stage, dissociation and seeding on glass coverslips, immunofluorescent labelling for neuronal markers (Nestin, b-Tubulin III, MAP2) revealed the presence of both immature neural progenitors and mature neurons. Undifferentiated CGR8 were also encapsulated in tubular, alginate-gelatin hydrogels and incubated in differentiation media containing retinoic acid (RA) and smoothened agonist (SAG). Cryo-sections of the hydrogel tubes were positive for Nestin, Pax6 and b-Tubulin III, verifying the presence of neurons and neural progenitors. Provided neural induction can be more precisely directed in the tubular hydrogels, these scaffolds will become a powerful model of neural tube development in embryos and will highlight potential strategies for spinal cord regeneration.

  16. Dynamic transformation of self-assembled structures using anisotropic magnetized hydrogel microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Satoru; Takinoue, Masahiro; Iwase, Eiji; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a system through which the self-assembly of anisotropic hydrogel microparticles is achieved, which also enables dynamic transformation of the assembled structures. Using a centrifuge-based microfluidic device, anisotropic hydrogel microparticles encapsulating superparamagnetic materials on one side are fabricated, which respond to a magnetic field. We successfully achieve dynamic assembly using these hydrogel microparticles and realize three different self-assembled structures (single and double pearl chain structures, and close-packed structures), which can be transformed to other structures dynamically via tuning of the precessional magnetic field. We believe that the developed system has potential application as an effective platform for a dynamic cell manipulation and cultivation system, in biomimetic autonomous microrobot organization, and that it can facilitate further understanding of the self-organization and complex systems observed in nature.

  17. Ophthalmic drug-loaded N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan hydrogels: synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-qun; Lan, Yu-qing; Guo, Hui; Cheng, Liang-zheng; Fan, Ji-zhou; Cai, Xiang; Zhang, Li-ming; Chen, Ru-fu; Zhou, Huai-sheng

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the ability of drug-loaded N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) hydrogels to modulate wound healing after glaucoma filtration surgery. Methods: The drug-loaded CMCS hydrogels were in situ synthesized using genipin as the crosslinker in the presence of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) or bevacizumab. Their structures were characterized by FTIR, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In-vitro drug release experiments and in vivo evaluation in rabbits were performed. Results: The results of FTIR, UV-vis spectroscopy and SEM analyses indicated that 5FU was encapsulated into the CMCS hydrogels that were crosslinked by genipin. The in vitro drug release experiments showed that nearly 100% of 5FU was released from the drug-loaded hydrogels within 8 h, but less than 20% bevacizumab was released after 53 h. The in vivo evaluation in rabbits indicated that the drug-loaded CMCS hydrogels were nontoxic to the cornea and were gradually biodegraded in the eyes. Furthermore, the drug-loaded CMCS hydrogels effectively inhibited conjunctival scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery and controlled postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP). Conclusion: The drug-loaded CMCS hydrogels provide a great opportunity to increase the therapeutic efficacy of glaucoma filtration surgery. PMID:21042284

  18. Self-Adjustable Adhesion of Polyampholyte Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Roy, Chanchal Kumar; Guo, Hong Lei; Sun, Tao Lin; Ihsan, Abu Bin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Takahata, Masakazu; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2015-12-02

    Developing nonspecific, fast, and strong adhesives that can glue hydrogels and biotissues substantially promotes the application of hydrogels as biomaterials. Inspired by the ubiquitous adhesiveness of bacteria, it is reported that neutral polyampholyte hydrogels, through their self-adjustable surface, can show rapid, strong, and reversible adhesion to charged hydrogels and biological tissues through the Coulombic interaction.

  19. Injectable microcryogels reinforced alginate encapsulation of mesenchymal stromal cells for leak-proof delivery and alleviation of canine disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yang; Chen, Chun; Liu, Wei; Fu, Qinyouen; Han, Zhihua; Li, Yaqian; Feng, Siyu; Li, Xiaokang; Qi, Chunxiao; Wu, Jianhong; Wang, Deli; Corbett, Christopher; Chan, Barbara P; Ruan, Dike; Du, Yanan

    2015-08-01

    In situ crosslinked thermo-responsive hydrogel applied for minimally invasive treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) may not prevent extrusion of cell suspension from injection site due to high internal pressure of intervertebral disc (IVD), causing treatment failure or osteophyte formation. In this study, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were encapsulated in alginate precursor and loaded into previously developed macroporous PGEDA-derived microcryogels (PMs) to form three-dimensional (3D) microscale cellular niches, enabling non-thermo-responsive alginate hydrogel to be injectable. The PMs reinforced alginate hydrogel showed superior elasticity compared to alginate hydrogel alone and could well protect encapsulated cells through injection. Chondrogenic committed MSCs in the injectable microniches expressed higher level of nucleus pulposus (NP) cell markers compared to 2D cultured cells. In an ex vivo organ culture model, injection of MSCs-laden PMs into NP tissue prevented cell leakage, improved cell retention and survival compared to free cell injection. In canine IVDD models, alleviated degeneration was observed in MSCs-laden PMs treated group after six months which was superior to other treated groups. Our results provide in-depth demonstration of injectable alginate hydrogel reinforced by PMs as a leak-proof cell delivery system for augmented regenerative therapy of IVDD in canine models.

  20. Preserving viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in vitro and in vivo by a new encapsulation system.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Yufeng; Polk, D Brent; Tomasula, Peggy M; Yan, Fang; Liu, LinShu

    2016-05-28

    Probiotics have shown beneficial effects on health and prevention of diseases in humans. However, a concern for application of probiotics is the loss of viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit. The aim of this study was to develop an encapsulation system to preserve viability of probiotics when they are administrated orally and apply Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) as a probiotic model to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach using in vitro and in vivo experiments. LGG was encapsulated in hydrogel beads prepared using pectin, a food grade polysaccharide, glucose, and calcium chloride, and lyophilized by freeze-drying. Encapsulated LGG was cultured in vitro under the condition that mimicked the physiological environment of the human gastrointestinal tract. Compared to non-encapsulated LGG, encapsulation increased tolerance of LGG in the acid condition, protected LGG from protease digestion, and improved shelf time when stored at the ambient condition, in regard of survivability and production of p40, a known LGG-derived protein involved in LGG's beneficial effects on intestinal homeostasis. To evaluate the effects of encapsulation on p40 production in vivo and prevention of intestinal inflammation by LGG, mice were gavaged with LGG containing beads and treated with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) to induce intestinal injury and colitis. Compared to non-encapsulated LGG, encapsulated LGG enhanced more p40 production in mice, and exerted higher levels of effects on prevention of DSS-induced colonic injury and colitis and suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. These data indicated that the encapsulation system developed in this study preserves viability of LGG in vitro and in vivo, leading to longer shelf time and enhancing the functions of LGG in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, this encapsulation approach may have the potential application for improving efficacy of probiotics.

  1. Preserving viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in vitro and in vivo by a new encapsulation system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Yufeng; Polk, D. Brent; Tomasula, Peggy M.; Yan, Fang; Liu, LinShu

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have shown beneficial effects on health and prevention of diseases in humans. However, a concern for application of probiotics is the loss of viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit. The aim of this study was to develop an encapsulation system to preserve viability of probiotics when they are administrated orally and apply Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) as a probiotic model to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach using in vitro and in vivo experiments. LGG was encapsulated in hydrogel beads prepared using pectin, a food grade polysaccharide, glucose, and calcium chloride, and lyophilized by freeze-drying. Encapsulated LGG was cultured in vitro under the condition that mimicked the physiological environment of the human gastrointestinal tract. Compared to non-encapsulated LGG, encapsulation increased tolerance of LGG in the acid condition, protected LGG from protease digestion, and improved shelf time when stored at the ambient condition, in regard of survivability and production of p40, a known LGG-derived protein involved in LGG’s beneficial effects on intestinal homeostasis. To evaluate the effects of encapsulation on p40 production in vivo and prevention of intestinal inflammation by LGG, mice were gavaged with LGG containing beads and treated with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) to induce intestinal injury and colitis. Compared to non-encapsulated LGG, encapsulated LGG enhanced more p40 production in mice, and exerted higher levels of effects on prevention of DSS-induced colonic injury and colitis and suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. These data indicated that the encapsulation system developed in this study preserves viability of LGG in vitro and in vivo, leading to longer shelf time and enhancing the functions of LGG in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, this encapsulation approach may have the potential application for improving efficacy of probiotics. PMID:27063422

  2. Photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B.; Willis, P. W.; Cuddihy, E. C.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate materials for the construction of cost-effective solar cell flat array modules are reviewed. Fabrication goals include electricity production at $.70/W with a lifetime of 20 yr. Research is currently directed toward low cost encapsulants and substrates for the cells, and outer covers which resist weathering. Ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) at $.09/sq ft has displayed the most promising results as the encapsulant laminate when subjected to peroxide cross-linking to prevent melting. EVA accepts the addition of antioxidants, quenchers, absorbers, and stabilizers. Wood is favored as the rigid substrate due to cost, while top covers in substrate modules comprise candidate acrylic and polyvinyl fluoride films and a copolymer. Finally, fiberglass mat is placed between the substrate and the EVA pottant as a mechanical support and for electrical insulation.

  3. Sustained transdermal release of diltiazem hydrochloride through electron beam irradiated different PVA hydrogel membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Tridib; Goswami, Luna; Chattopadhyay, Dipankar; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit

    2011-08-01

    Extremely fast release of diltiazem hydrochloride (water soluble, anti anginal drug used to treat chest pain) together with its faster erosion has been the primary problem in conventional oral therapy. It has been addressed in this paper by encapsulating the drug in electron beam irradiated various poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel membranes and delivering it through transdermal route. Results show excellent control over the release of diltiazem hydrochloride through these membranes subject to their physico-mechanicals.

  4. Hydrogels and scaffolds for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    For over two decades, immunologists and biomaterials scientists have co-existed in parallel world with the rationale of understanding the molecular profile of immune responses to vaccination, implantation, and treating incurable diseases. Much of the field of biomaterial-based immunotherapy has relied on evaluating model antigens such as chicken egg ovalbumin in mouse models but their relevance to humans has been point of much discussion. Nevertheless, such model antigens have provided important insights into the mechanisms of immune regulation and served as a proof-of-concept for plethora of biomaterial-based vaccines. After years of extensive development of numerous biomaterials for immunomodulation, it is only recently that an experimental scaffold vaccine implanted beneath the skin has begun to use the human model to study the immune responses to cancer vaccination by co-delivering patient-derived tumor lysates and immunomodulatory proteins. If successful, this scaffold vaccine will change the way we approached untreatable cancers, but more importantly, will allow a faster and more rational translation of therapeutic regimes to other cancers, chronic infections, and autoimmune diseases. Most materials reviews have focused on immunomodulatory adjuvants and micro-nano-particles. Here we provide an insight into emerging hydrogel and scaffold based immunomodulatory approaches that continue to demonstrate efficacy against immune associated diseases.

  5. Rapid self-healing hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Ameya; Zhang, Chao; Arman, Bedri; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Mashelkar, Raghunath A.; Lele, Ashish K.; Tauber, Michael J.; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic materials that are capable of autonomous healing upon damage are being developed at a rapid pace because of their many potential applications. Despite these advancements, achieving self-healing in permanently cross-linked hydrogels has remained elusive because of the presence of water and irreversible cross-links. Here, we demonstrate that permanently cross-linked hydrogels can be engineered to exhibit self-healing in an aqueous environment. We achieve this feature by arming the hydrogel network with flexible-pendant side chains carrying an optimal balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that allows the side chains to mediate hydrogen bonds across the hydrogel interfaces with minimal steric hindrance and hydrophobic collapse. The self-healing reported here is rapid, occurring within seconds of the insertion of a crack into the hydrogel or juxtaposition of two separate hydrogel pieces. The healing is reversible and can be switched on and off via changes in pH, allowing external control over the healing process. Moreover, the hydrogels can sustain multiple cycles of healing and separation without compromising their mechanical properties and healing kinetics. Beyond revealing how secondary interactions could be harnessed to introduce new functions to chemically cross-linked polymeric systems, we also demonstrate various potential applications of such easy-to-synthesize, smart, self-healing hydrogels. PMID:22392977

  6. Crosslinking density influences chondrocyte metabolism in dynamically loaded photocrosslinked poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Stephanie J; Chowdhury, Tina T; Lee, David A; Bader, Dan L; Anseth, Kristi S

    2004-03-01

    In approaches to tissue engineer articular cartilage, an important consideration for in situ forming cell carriers is the impact of mechanical loading on the cell composite structure and function. Photopolymerized hydrogel scaffolds based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) may be synthesized with a range of crosslinking densities and corresponding macroscopic properties. This study tests the hypothesis that changes in the hydrogel crosslinking density influences the metabolic response of encapsulated chondrocytes to an applied load. PEG hydrogels were formulated with two crosslinking densities that resulted in gel compressive moduli ranging from 60 to 670 kPa. When chondrocytes were encapsulated in these PEG gels, an increase in crosslinking density resulted in an inhibition in cell proliferation and proteoglycan synthesis. Moreover, when the gels were dynamically loaded for 48 h in unconfined compression with compressive strains oscillating from 0 to 15% at a frequency of 1 Hz, cell proliferation and proteoglycan synthesis were affected in a crosslinking-density-dependent manner. Cell proliferation was inhibited in both crosslinked gels, but was greater in the highly crosslinked gel. In contrast, dynamic loading did not influence proteoglycan synthesis in the loosely crosslinked gel, but a marked decrease in proteoglycan production was observed in the highly crosslinked gel. In summary, changes in PEG hydrogel properties greatly affect how chondrocytes respond to an applied dynamic load.

  7. Microparticles Produced by the Hydrogel Template Method for Sustained Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying; Sturek, Michael; Park, Kinam

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric microparticles have been used widely for sustained drug delivery. Current methods of microparticle production can be improved by making homogeneous particles in size and shape, increasing the drug loading, and controlling the initial burst release. In the current study, the hydrogel template method was used to produce homogeneous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles and to examine formulation and process-related parameters. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was used to make hydrogel templates. The parameters examined include PVA molecular weight, type of PLGA (as characterized by lactide content, inherent viscosity), polymer concentration, drug concentration and composition of solvent system. Three model compounds studied were risperidone, methylprednisolone acetate and paclitaxel. The ability of the hydrogel template method to produce microparticles with good conformity to template was dependent on molecular weight of PVA and viscosity of the PLGA solution. Drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were found to be influenced by PLGA lactide content, polymer concentration and composition of the solvent system. The drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were 28.7% and 82% for risperidone, 31.5% and 90% for methylprednisolone acetate, and 32.2 % and 92 % for paclitaxel, respectively. For all three drugs, release was sustained for weeks, and the in vitro release profile of risperidone was comparable to that of microparticles prepared using the conventional emulsion method. The hydrogel template method provides a new approach of manipulating microparticles. PMID:24333903

  8. Synthesis and characterization of thermo-sensitive semi-IPN hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) macromer, N-isopropylacrylamide, and sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sanping; Cao, Mengjie; Li, Han; Li, Liyan; Xu, Weilin

    2010-02-11

    Thermo-sensitive semi-IPN hydrogels were prepared via in situ copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) with poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PEG-co-PCL) macromer in the presence of sodium alginate by UV irradiation technology. The effects of the sodium alginate content, temperature, and salt on the swelling behavior of the as-obtained hydrogels were studied. The results showed that the swelling ratio of the hydrogels increased with the increasing sodium alginate content at the same temperature, and decreased with the increase in temperature. The salt sensitivity of the semi-IPN hydrogels was dependent on the content of sodium alginate introduced in the hydrogels. The mechanical rheology of the hydrogels and in vitro release behavior of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in situ encapsulated within the hydrogels were also investigated. It was found that the introduction of sodium alginate with semi-IPN structure improved mechanical strength of the hydrogels and the cumulative release percentage of BSA from the hydrogels. Such double-sensitive semi-IPN hydrogel materials could be exploited as potential candidates for drug delivery carriers.

  9. Hydrogel-based reinforcement of 3D bioprinted constructs

    PubMed Central

    Levato, R; Peiffer, Q C; de Ruijter, M; Hennink, W E; Vermonden, T; Malda, J

    2016-01-01

    Progress within the field of biofabrication is hindered by a lack of suitable hydrogel formulations. Here, we present a novel approach based on a hybrid printing technique to create cellularized 3D printed constructs. The hybrid bioprinting strategy combines a reinforcing gel for mechanical support with a bioink to provide a cytocompatible environment. In comparison with thermoplastics such as є-polycaprolactone, the hydrogel-based reinforcing gel platform enables printing at cell-friendly temperatures, targets the bioprinting of softer tissues and allows for improved control over degradation kinetics. We prepared amphiphilic macromonomers based on poloxamer that form hydrolysable, covalently cross-linked polymer networks. Dissolved at a concentration of 28.6%w/w in water, it functions as reinforcing gel, while a 5%w/w gelatin-methacryloyl based gel is utilized as bioink. This strategy allows for the creation of complex structures, where the bioink provides a cytocompatible environment for encapsulated cells. Cell viability of equine chondrocytes encapsulated within printed constructs remained largely unaffected by the printing process. The versatility of the system is further demonstrated by the ability to tune the stiffness of printed constructs between 138 and 263 kPa, as well as to tailor the degradation kinetics of the reinforcing gel from several weeks up to more than a year. PMID:27431861

  10. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  11. Bioactivity of permselective PVA hydrogels with mixed ECM analogues.

    PubMed

    Nafea, Eman H; Poole-Warren, Laura A; Martens, Penny J

    2015-12-01

    The presentation of multiple biological cues, which simulate the natural in vivo cell environment within artificial implants, has recently been identified as crucial for achieving complex cellular functions. The incorporation of two or more biological cues within a largely synthetic network can provide a simplified model of multifunctional ECM presentation to encapsulated cells. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of simultaneously and covalently incorporating two dissimilar biological molecules, heparin and gelatin, within a PVA hydrogel. PVA was functionalized with 7 and 20 methacrylate functional groups per chain (FG/c) to tailor the permselectivity of UV photopolymerized hydrogels. Both heparin and gelatin were covalently incorporated into PVA at an equal ratio resulting in a final PVA:heparin:gelatin composition of 19:0.5:0.5. The combination of both heparin and gelatin within a PVA network has proven to be stable over time without compromising the PVA base characteristics including its permselectivity to different proteins. Most importantly, this combination of ECM analogues supplemented PVA with the dual functionalities of promoting cellular adhesion and sequestering growth factors essential for cellular proliferation. Multi-functional PVA hydrogels with synthetically controlled network characteristics and permselectivity show potential in various biomedical applications including artificial cell implants.

  12. Hydrogel Droplet Microfluidics for High-Throughput Single Molecule/Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2017-01-17

    Heterogeneity among individual molecules and cells has posed significant challenges to traditional bulk assays, due to the assumption of average behavior, which would lose important biological information in heterogeneity and result in a misleading interpretation. Single molecule/cell analysis has become an important and emerging field in biological and biomedical research for insights into heterogeneity between large populations at high resolution. Compared with the ensemble bulk method, single molecule/cell analysis explores the information on time trajectories, conformational states, and interactions of individual molecules/cells, all key factors in the study of chemical and biological reaction pathways. Various powerful techniques have been developed for single molecule/cell analysis, including flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy, optical and magnetic tweezers, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and so forth. However, some of them have the low-throughput issue that has to analyze single molecules/cells one by one. Flow cytometry is a widely used high-throughput technique for single cell analysis but lacks the ability for intercellular interaction study and local environment control. Droplet microfluidics becomes attractive for single molecule/cell manipulation because single molecules/cells can be individually encased in monodisperse microdroplets, allowing high-throughput analysis and manipulation with precise control of the local environment. Moreover, hydrogels, cross-linked polymer networks that swell in the presence of water, have been introduced into droplet microfluidic systems as hydrogel droplet microfluidics. By replacing an aqueous phase with a monomer or polymer solution, hydrogel droplets can be generated on microfluidic chips for encapsulation of single molecules/cells according to the Poisson distribution. The sol-gel transition property endows the hydrogel droplets with new functionalities and diversified applications in single

  13. Encapsulation of cardiac stem cells in superoxide dismutase-loaded alginate prevents doxorubicin-mediated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting Chu Ken; Ismail, Siti; Brennan, Orlaith; Hastings, Conn; Duffy, Garry P

    2013-04-01

    Anthracyclines are powerful drugs available for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. Unfortunately, these chemotherapy agents cause cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anthracycline and evidence indicates that DOX-induced cardiotoxicity can be viewed as a stem cell disease, whereby the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by DOX is seen to predominantly hinder cardiac stem cell (CSC) regenerative capability. Acute, early-onset and late-onset cardiotoxicity have been described and this may be reversible by the local administration of CSCs, which regenerate myocardial tissue and rescue the failing heart. CSCs are, however, particularly sensitive to oxidative stress and die rapidly by apoptosis in such adverse conditions. Therefore, this study aims to enhance CSC survival by encapsulation in an alginate hydrogel formulation containing superoxide dismutase (SOD), a reactive oxygen species scavenger. Cell survival was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed by fluorescent microscopy and assays measuring metabolic activity, cell viability, cytotoxicity and apoptosis. CSCs were cultured in DOX-conditioned cell culture medium and displayed reduced live cell numbers as well as high levels of apoptosis. Encapsulation of CSCs in alginate alone failed to prevent apoptosis. Encapsulation in SOD-loaded alginate reduced apoptosis to near-normal levels, whilst metabolic activity was returned to baseline. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that encapsulation of CSCs in SOD-loaded alginate hydrogel enhances CSC survival in the presence of DOX, raising the possibility of its application as a novel therapy for the treatment of acute and early onset DOX-induced cardiotoxicity.

  14. A new three dimensional biomimetic hydrogel to deliver factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Caron, Ilaria; Rossi, Filippo; Papa, Simonetta; Aloe, Rossella; Sculco, Marika; Mauri, Emanuele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Erba, Eugenio; Panini, Nicolò; Parazzi, Valentina; Barilani, Mario; Forloni, Gianluigi; Perale, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Lorenza; Veglianese, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represents a promising strategy in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, both systemic and parenchymal hMSCs administrations show significant drawbacks as a limited number and viability of stem cells in situ. Biomaterials able to encapsulate and sustain hMSCs represent a viable approach to overcome these limitations potentially improving the stem cell therapy. In this study, we evaluate a new agarose/carbomer based hydrogel which combines different strategies to optimize hMSCs viability, density and delivery of paracrine factors. Specifically, we evaluate a new loading procedure on a lyophilized scaffold (soaked up effect) that reduces mechanical stress in encapsulating hMSCs into the hydrogel. In addition, we combine arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide and 3D extracellular matrix deposition to increase the capacity to attach and maintain healthy hMSCs within the hydrogel over time. Furthermore, the fluidic diffusion from the hydrogel toward the injury site is improved by using a cling film that oriented efficaciously the delivery of paracrine factors in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that an improved combination as here proposed of hMSCs and biomimetic hydrogel is able to immunomodulate significantly the pro-inflammatory environment in a SCI mouse model, increasing M2 macrophagic population and promoting a pro-regenerative environment in situ.

  15. Selective encapsulation by Janus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Ruth, Donovan; Gunton, James D.; Rickman, Jeffrey M.

    2015-06-28

    We employ Monte Carlo simulation to examine encapsulation in a system comprising Janus oblate spheroids and isotropic spheres. More specifically, the impact of variations in temperature, particle size, inter-particle interaction range, and strength is examined for a system in which the spheroids act as the encapsulating agents and the spheres as the encapsulated guests. In this picture, particle interactions are described by a quasi-square-well patch model. This study highlights the environmental adaptation and selectivity of the encapsulation system to changes in temperature and guest particle size, respectively. Moreover, we identify an important range in parameter space where encapsulation is favored, as summarized by an encapsulation map. Finally, we discuss the generalization of our results to systems having a wide range of particle geometries.

  16. Encapsulation of graphene in Parylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoblin, Grigory; Sun, Jie; Yurgens, August

    2017-01-01

    Graphene encapsulated between flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) demonstrates the highest known mobility of charge carriers. However, the technology is not scalable to allow for arrays of devices. We are testing a potentially scalable technology for encapsulating graphene where we replace hBN with Parylene while still being able to make low-ohmic edge contacts. The resulting encapsulated devices show low parasitic doping and a robust Quantum Hall effect in relatively low magnetic fields <5 T.

  17. A microgel construction kit for bioorthogonal encapsulation and pH-controlled release of living cells.

    PubMed

    Steinhilber, Dirk; Rossow, Torsten; Wedepohl, Stefanie; Paulus, Florian; Seiffert, Sebastian; Haag, Rainer

    2013-12-16

    pH-Cleavable cell-laden microgels with excellent long-term viabilities were fabricated by combining bioorthogonal strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) and droplet-based microfluidics. Poly(ethylene glycol)dicyclooctyne and dendritic poly(glycerol azide) served as bioinert hydrogel precursors. Azide conjugation was performed using different substituted acid-labile benzacetal linkers that allowed precise control of the microgel degradation kinetics in the interesting pH range between 4.5 and 7.4. By this means, a pH-controlled release of the encapsulated cells was achieved upon demand with no effect on cell viability and spreading. As a result, the microgel particles can be used for temporary cell encapsulation, allowing the cells to be studied and manipulated during the encapsulation and then be isolated and harvested by decomposition of the microgel scaffolds.

  18. Benzoyl Peroxide Formulated Polycarbophil/Carbopol 934P Hydrogel with Selective Antimicrobial Activity, Potentially Beneficial for Treatment and Prevention of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Cavera, Veronica L.; Rogers, Michael A.; Huang, Qingrong; Zubovskiy, Konstantin; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The human vagina is colonized by a variety of indigenous microflora; in healthy individuals the predominant bacterial genus is Lactobacillus while those with bacterial vaginosis (BV) carry a variety of anaerobic representatives of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) encapsulated in a hydrogel against Gardnerella vaginalis, one of the causative agents of BV, as well as indicating its safety for healthy human lactobacilli. Herein, it is shown that in well diffusion assays G. vaginalis is inhibited at 0.01% hydrogel-encapsulated BPO and that the tested Lactobacillus spp. can tolerate concentrations of BPO up to 2.5%. In direct contact assays (cells grown in a liquid culture containing hydrogel with 1% BPO or BPO particles), we demonstrated that hydrogels loaded with 1% BPO caused 6-log reduction of G. vaginalis. Conversely, three of the tested Lactobacillus spp. were not inhibited while L. acidophilus growth was slightly delayed. The rheological properties of the hydrogel formulation were probed using oscillation frequency sweep, oscillation shear stress sweep, and shear rate sweep. This shows the gel to be suitable for vaginal application and that the encapsulation of BPO did not alter rheological properties. PMID:24382940

  19. Benzoyl peroxide formulated polycarbophil/carbopol 934P hydrogel with selective antimicrobial activity, potentially beneficial for treatment and prevention of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shiqi; Cavera, Veronica L; Rogers, Michael A; Huang, Qingrong; Zubovskiy, Konstantin; Chikindas, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    The human vagina is colonized by a variety of indigenous microflora; in healthy individuals the predominant bacterial genus is Lactobacillus while those with bacterial vaginosis (BV) carry a variety of anaerobic representatives of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) encapsulated in a hydrogel against Gardnerella vaginalis, one of the causative agents of BV, as well as indicating its safety for healthy human lactobacilli. Herein, it is shown that in well diffusion assays G. vaginalis is inhibited at 0.01% hydrogel-encapsulated BPO and that the tested Lactobacillus spp. can tolerate concentrations of BPO up to 2.5%. In direct contact assays (cells grown in a liquid culture containing hydrogel with 1% BPO or BPO particles), we demonstrated that hydrogels loaded with 1% BPO caused 6-log reduction of G. vaginalis. Conversely, three of the tested Lactobacillus spp. were not inhibited while L. acidophilus growth was slightly delayed. The rheological properties of the hydrogel formulation were probed using oscillation frequency sweep, oscillation shear stress sweep, and shear rate sweep. This shows the gel to be suitable for vaginal application and that the encapsulation of BPO did not alter rheological properties.

  20. JPL encapsulation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed summary of the diverse encapsulation materials and techniques that evolved to meet the cost goals of the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project is presented. A typical solar cell now consists of low iron glass, two layers of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) polymers, a porous space, primers/adhesives, a back cover of Tedlar, and a gasket/seal for a volume cost of $1.30/sq ft. This compares well with the project goal of $1.40/sq ft.

  1. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  2. Modulus-regulated 3D-cell proliferation in an injectable self-healing hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsan; Zhang, Yingwei; Shi, Feng; Tao, Lei; Wei, Yen; Wang, Xing

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy has attracted wide attention among researchers in biomaterial and medical areas. As a carrier, hydrogels that could keep high viability of the embedded cells have been developed. However, few researches were conducted on 3D cell proliferation, a key factor for cell therapy, especially after injection. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time the proliferation regulation of the 3D-embedded L929 cells in a modulus-tunable and injectable self-healing hydrogel before and after injection without adding specific growth factor. The cells showed a stiffness-dependent proliferation to grow faster in higher stiffness hydrogels. The proliferating rates of the encapsulated cells before and after injection were quantified, and the shearing force as a possible negative influence factor was discussed, suggesting the both internal property of the hydrogel and injection process are critical for further practical applications. Due to the high operability and good biocompatibility, this injectable self-healing hydrogel can be a promising carrier for cell therapy.

  3. Click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels: emerging platforms for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjiao; Chen, Jing; Deng, Chao; Suuronen, Erik J; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have emerged as versatile and viable platforms for sustained protein release, targeted drug delivery, and tissue engineering due to excellent biocompatibility, a microporous structure with tunable porosity and pore size, and dimensions spanning from human organs, cells to viruses. In the past decade, remarkable advances in hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have been achieved with click chemistry. It is a most promising strategy to prepare gels with varying dimensions owing to its high reactivity, superb selectivity, and mild reaction conditions. In particular, the recent development of copper-free click chemistry such as strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, radical mediated thiol-ene chemistry, Diels-Alder reaction, tetrazole-alkene photo-click chemistry, and oxime reaction renders it possible to form hydrogels, microgels and nanogels without the use of potentially toxic catalysts or immunogenic enzymes that are commonly required. Notably, unlike other chemical approaches, click chemistry owing to its unique bioorthogonal feature does not interfere with encapsulated bioactives such as living cells, proteins and drugs and furthermore allows versatile preparation of micropatterned biomimetic hydrogels, functional microgels and nanogels. In this review, recent exciting developments in click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels, as well as their biomedical applications such as controlled protein and drug release, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine are presented and discussed.

  4. Tyrosine-Selective Functionalization for Bio-Orthogonal Cross-Linking of Engineered Protein Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Madl, Christopher M; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2017-02-02

    Engineered protein hydrogels have shown promise as artificial extracellular matrix materials for the 3D culture of stem cells due to the ability to decouple hydrogel biochemistry and mechanics. The modular design of these proteins allows for incorporation of various bioactive sequences to regulate cellular behavior. However, the chemistry used to cross-link the proteins into hydrogels can limit what bioactive sequences can be incorporated, in order to prevent nonspecific cross-linking within the bioactive region. Bio-orthogonal cross-linking chemistries may allow for the incorporation of any arbitrary bioactive sequence, but site-selective and scalable incorporation of bio-orthogonal reactive groups such as azides that do not rely on commonly used amine-reactive chemistry is often challenging. In response, we have optimized the reaction of an azide-bearing 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) with engineered elastin-like proteins (ELPs) to selectively azide-functionalize tyrosine residues within the proteins. The PTAD-azide functionalized ELPs cross-link with bicyclononyne (BCN) functionalized ELPs via the strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction to form hydrogels. Human mesenchymal stem cells and murine neural progenitor cells encapsulated within these hydrogels remain highly viable and maintain their phenotypes in culture. Tyrosine-specific modification may expand the number of bioactive sequences that can be designed into protein-engineered materials by permitting incorporation of lysine-containing sequences without concern for nonspecific cross-linking.

  5. Mechanical loading regulates human MSC differentiation in a multi-layer hydrogel for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Neven J; Aisenbrey, Elizabeth A; Westbrook, Kristofer K; Qi, H Jerry; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-07-01

    A bioinspired multi-layer hydrogel was developed for the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. The spatial presentation of biochemical cues, via incorporation of extracellular matrix analogs, and mechanical cues, via both hydrogel crosslink density and externally applied mechanical loads, were characterized in each layer. A simple sequential photopolymerization method was employed to form stable poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels with a soft cartilage-like layer of chondroitin sulfate and low RGD concentrations, a stiff bone-like layer with high RGD concentrations, and an intermediate interfacial layer. Under a compressive load, the variation in hydrogel stiffness within each layer produced high strains in the soft cartilage-like layer, low strains in the stiff bone-like layer, and moderate strains in the interfacial layer. When hMSC-laden hydrogels were cultured statically in osteochondral differentiation media, the local biochemical and matrix stiffness cues were not sufficient to spatially guide hMSC differentiation after 21 days. However dynamic mechanical stimulation led to differentially high expression of collagens with collagen II in the cartilage-like layer, collagen X in the interfacial layer and collagen I in the bone-like layer and mineral deposits localized to the bone layer. Overall, these findings point to external mechanical stimulation as a potent regulator of hMSC differentiation toward osteochondral cellular phenotypes.

  6. Effect of Strand Symmetry on the Nanostructure and Material Properties in Beta-Hairpin Peptide Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hule, Rohan; Pochan, Darrin; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel

    2007-03-01

    Hydrogels have been established as promising biomaterials for applications such as scaffolds for tissue engineering, controlled drug delivery and cell encapsulation. De novo designed beta hairpin peptides, capable of undergoing self assembly and hydrogel formation, were investigated that contain asymmetric beta strand arms surrounding a turn sequence. The stimuli responsive self assembly of the hydrogels occurs via an intramolecular folding and strand interdigitation mechanism. CD and FTIR indicate a beta sheet secondary structure. WAXS shows a fibril structure reminiscent of the cross beta spine. SANS has been employed to globally quantify the local structure as being rod-like. Modification of the strand registry results in fibrils with non-twisting, laminated vs. twisted nanostructure. Fibril dimensions as measured by TEM and AFM corroborate the interdigitated assembly. Bulk material properties of these hydrogels studied using oscillatory rheology vary significantly for the different morphologies. Differences in the peptide registry that drive hydrogel nanostructure and the consequent material properties can be potentially utilized for usage in specific biomaterial applications.

  7. Degradation-mediated cellular traction directs stem cell fate in covalently crosslinked three-dimensional hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetan, Sudhir; Guvendiren, Murat; Legant, Wesley R.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2013-05-01

    Although cell-matrix adhesive interactions are known to regulate stem cell differentiation, the underlying mechanisms, in particular for direct three-dimensional encapsulation within hydrogels, are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that in covalently crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is directed by the generation of degradation-mediated cellular traction, independently of cell morphology or matrix mechanics. hMSCs within HA hydrogels of equivalent elastic moduli that permit (restrict) cell-mediated degradation exhibited high (low) degrees of cell spreading and high (low) tractions, and favoured osteogenesis (adipogenesis). Moreover, switching the permissive hydrogel to a restrictive state through delayed secondary crosslinking reduced further hydrogel degradation, suppressed traction, and caused a switch from osteogenesis to adipogenesis in the absence of changes to the extended cellular morphology. Furthermore, inhibiting tension-mediated signalling in the permissive environment mirrored the effects of delayed secondary crosslinking, whereas upregulating tension induced osteogenesis even in the restrictive environment.

  8. Differences in time-dependent mechanical properties between extruded and molded hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Ersumo, N; Witherel, CE; Spiller, KL

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of hydrogels used in biomaterials and tissue engineering applications are critical determinants of their functionality. Despite the recent rise of additive manufacturing, and specifically extrusion-based bioprinting, as a prominent biofabrication method, comprehensive studies investigating the mechanical behavior of extruded constructs remain lacking. To address this gap in knowledge, we compared the mechanical properties and swelling properties of crosslinked gelatin-based hydrogels prepared by conventional molding techniques or by 3D bioprinting using a BioBots Beta pneumatic extruder. A preliminary characterization of the impact of bioprinting parameters on construct properties revealed that both Young's modulus and optimal extruding pressure increased with polymer content, and that printing resolution increased with both printing speed and nozzle gauge. High viability (>95%) of encapsulated NIH 3T3 fibroblasts confirmed the cytocompatibility of the construct preparation process. Interestingly, the Young's moduli of extruded and molded constructs were not different, but extruded constructs did show increases in both the rate and extent of time-dependent mechanical behavior observed in creep. Despite similar polymer densities, extruded hydrogels showed greater swelling over time compared to molded hydrogels, suggesting that differences in creep behavior derived from differences in microstructure and fluid flow. Because of the crucial roles of time-dependent mechanical properties, fluid flow, and swelling properties on tissue and cell behavior, these findings highlight the need for greater consideration of the effects of the extrusion process on hydrogel properties. PMID:27550945

  9. Preparation of monodisperse and size-controlled poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel nanoparticles using liposome templates.

    PubMed

    An, Se Yong; Bui, Minh-Phuong Ngoc; Nam, Yun Jung; Han, Kwi Nam; Li, Cheng Ai; Choo, Jaebum; Lee, Eun Kyu; Katoh, Shigeo; Kumada, Yoichi; Seong, Gi Hun

    2009-03-01

    Liposomes were used as templates to prepare size-controlled and monodisperse poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel nanoparticles. The procedure for the preparation of PEG nanoparticles using liposomes consists of encapsulation of photopolymerizable PEG hydrogel solution into the cavity of the liposomes, extrusion through a membrane with a specific pore size, and photopolymerization of the contents inside the liposomes by UV irradiation. The size distributions of the prepared particles were 1.32+/-0.16 microm (12%), 450+/-62 nm (14%), and 94+/-12 nm (13%) after extrusion through membrane filters with pore sizes of 1 microm, 400 nm, and 100 nm, respectively. With this approach, it is also possible to modify the surface of the hydrogel nanoparticles with various functional groups in a one-step procedure. To functionalize the surface of a PEG nanoparticle, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-aldehyde was added as copolymer to the hydrogel-forming components and aldehyde-functionalized PEG nanoparticles could be obtained easily by UV-induced photopolymerization, following conjugation with poly-L-lysine-FITC through amine-aldehyde coupling. The prepared PEG particles showed strong fluorescence from FITC on the edge of the particles using confocal microscopy. The immobilization of biomaterials such as enzymes in hydrogel particles could be performed with loading beta-galactosidases during the hydration step for liposome preparation without additional procedures. The resorufin produced by applying resorufin beta-D-galactopyranoside as the substrate showed the fluorescence under the confocal microscopy.

  10. In vitro release of metformin hydrochloride from sodium alginate/polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Fabián; Guerrero, Juan; Matsuhiro, Betty; Pavez, Jorge

    2017-01-02

    Hydrogels, based on polysaccharides have found a number of applications as drug delivery carriers. In this work, hydrogels of full characterized sodium alginate (Mn 87,400g/mol) and commercial poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) sensitive to pH and temperature stimuli were obtained using a simple, controlled, green, low cost method based on freeze-thaw cycles. Stable hydrogels of sodium alginate/PVA with 0.5:1.5 and 1.0:1.0w/v concentrations showed very good swelling ratio values in distilled water (14 and 20g/g, respectively). Encapsulation and release of metformin hydrochloride in hydrogels of 1.0:1.0w/v sodium alginate/PVA was followed by UV spectroscopy. The hydrogel released a very low amount of metformin hydrochloride at pH 1.2; the highest release value (55%) was obtained after 6h at pH 8.0. Also, the release of metformin hydrochloride was studied by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of methyl group signals of metformin showed 30% of drug release after 3h.

  11. Controlling the rheology of gellan gum hydrogels in cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Moxon, Samuel R; Smith, Alan M

    2016-03-01

    Successful culturing of tissues within polysaccharide hydrogels is reliant upon specific mechanical properties. Namely, the stiffness and elasticity of the gel have been shown to have a profound effect on cell behaviour in 3D cell cultures and correctly tuning these mechanical properties is critical to the success of culture. The usual way of tuning mechanical properties of a hydrogel to suit tissue engineering applications is to change the concentration of polymer or its cross-linking agents. In this study sonication applied at various amplitudes was used to control mechanical properties of gellan gum solutions and gels. This method enables the stiffness and elasticity of gellan gum hydrogels cross-linked with DMEM to be controlled without changing either polymer concentration or cross-linker concentration. Controlling the mechanical behaviour of gellan hydrogels impacted upon the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in encapsulated MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts. This shows the potential of applying a simple technique to generate hydrogels where tissue-specific mechanical properties can be produced that subsequently influence cell behaviour.

  12. On the role of hydrogel structure and degradation in controlling the transport of cell-secreted matrix molecules for engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Dhote, Valentin; Skaalure, Stacey; Akalp, Umut; Roberts, Justine; Bryant, Stephanie J; Vernerey, Franck J

    2013-03-01

    Damage to cartilage caused by injury or disease can lead to pain and loss of mobility, diminishing one's quality of life. Because cartilage has a limited capacity for self-repair, tissue engineering strategies, such as cells encapsulated in synthetic hydrogels, are being investigated as a means to restore the damaged cartilage. However, strategies to date are suboptimal in part because designing degradable hydrogels is complicated by structural and temporal complexities of the gel and evolving tissue along multiple length scales. To address this problem, this study proposes a multi-scale mechanical model using a triphasic formulation (solid, fluid, unbound matrix molecules) based on a single chondrocyte releasing extracellular matrix molecules within a degrading hydrogel. This model describes the key players (cells, proteoglycans, collagen) of the biological system within the hydrogel encompassing different length scales. Two mechanisms are included: temporal changes of bulk properties due to hydrogel degradation, and matrix transport. Numerical results demonstrate that the temporal change of bulk properties is a decisive factor in the diffusion of unbound matrix molecules through the hydrogel. Transport of matrix molecules in the hydrogel contributes both to the development of the pericellular matrix and the extracellular matrix and is dependent on the relative size of matrix molecules and the hydrogel mesh. The numerical results also demonstrate that osmotic pressure, which leads to chan