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Sample records for hydrogen adsorbate structures

  1. Electronic Structures of Hydrogen and Oxygen Adsorbed Tungsten (3, 2, 0) and Tungsten (8, 7, 0) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Zhuo; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Kevan, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    The Valence band electronic structues of Hydrogen adsorbed and Oxygen adsorbed Tungsten stepped surfaces, Tungsten (3, 2, 0) and (8, 7, 0) surface are investigated using angular-resolved photoemission techniques and ab-initio electronic structure calculation methods. The band features of surface states at different Hydrogen and Oxygen coverages are experimentally distinguished by using photon-energy scanning method. Quasi-one- dimensional band features are found in the surface states with saturated Oxygen coverages of both stepped surfaces. The effects of adsorbate coverages on dimensionalities of surface electronic states are studied using high-resolution band mapping methods and ab-initio calculation methods. Thanks to Department of Energy for the financial supporting of this project.

  2. Hydrogen molecule on lithium adsorbed graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Gaganpreet, Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structure calculations for the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on lithium (Li) decorated and pristine graphene have been studied systematically using SIESTA code [1] within the framework of the first-principle DFT under the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)[2], including spin polarization. The energy of adsorption of hydrogen molecule on graphene is always enhanced by the presence of co-adsorbed lithium. The most efficient adsorption configuration is when H2 is lying parallel to lithium adsorbed graphene which is in contrast to its adsorption on pristine graphene (PG) where it prefers perpendicular orientation.

  3. A theoretical study of hydrogen diffraction following photodissociation of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosloff, Ronnie; Zeiri, Yehuda

    1992-08-01

    A new probe of surface structure is presented which is based on the photodissociation of hydrogen from an adsorbate molecule. The event creates an atomic hydrogen fragment, positioned between the adsorbate layer and the solid surface. Due to its light mass, the hydrogen dynamics is quantum mechanical in nature. A useful image is of the hydrogenic wave function behaving like a liquid able to fill all cracks. The coherent character of the hydrogenic wave function is crucial in the ability of the photodissociation experiment to act as a probe. A series of case studies has been carried out whose aim is to reveal the relation between the structure of the surface and the asymptotic energy resolved angular distribution of the hydrogen fragment. The dynamics of the hydrogen atom motion was modeled by the time dependent Schrödinger equation. The cases studied include the dissociation of a single HBr adsorbate on flat and corrugated surfaces. A broad specular peak was observed, in addition to diffraction peaks which can be correlated with the corrugation. Moreover, selective adsorption peaks, which can be correlated with the attractive part of the surface potential, have been identified. Systems in which the hydrogenic wave function scatters from several adsorbates were also investigated. It was found that the scattering is dominated by the trapping of the wave function by unstable periodic orbits. The quantization rules of these periodic orbits have been identified, creating a link between the structure of the adsorbates and the asymptotic angular distributions.

  4. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-14

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet. PMID:26374054

  5. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-14

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  6. Structural transformation of hydrogen-adsorbed Si(111)-√3×√3-Ag surfaces induced by electron-stimulated desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    1997-07-01

    Atomic hydrogen irradiated Si(111)-√3×√3-Ag surfaces, which involve nanometer size Ag clusters and hydrogen terminated regions, are studied by combined surface analysis with ultrahigh-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (UHV-SEM), scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM), microprobe reflection high-energy electron diffration (μ-RHEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Electron beam irradiation onto this surface results in disappearance of the Ag clusters, and subsequent low-temperature annealing at 275°C transforms the surface to the original √3×√3-Ag structure. Hydrogen removal from the Si surface induced by electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) and surface diffusion of Ag atoms on the bare regions by low-temperature annealing explain this structural transformation.

  7. Hydrogen storage on palladium adsorbed graphene: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantha, Nurapati; Khaniya, Asim; Adhikari, Narayan Prasad

    2015-07-01

    We have performed density functional theory (DFT)-based first-principles calculations to study the stability, geometrical structures, and electronic properties of a single palladium (Pd) atom adsorbed graphene with reference to pristine graphene. The study also covers the adsorption properties of molecular hydrogen/s on the most stable Pd-graphene geometry by taking into account London dispersion forces in addition to the standard DFT calculations in the Quantum ESPRESSO package. From the analysis of estimated values of binding energy of Pd on different occupation sites (i.e., bridge, hollow, and top) of graphene supercells, the bridge site is found to be the most favorable one with the magnitudes of 1.114, 1.426, and 1.433 eV in 2×2, 3×3, and 4×4 supercells, respectively. The study of the electronic properties of Pd adsorbed graphene shows a bandgap of 45 meV, which can account for the breaking of the symmetry of the graphene structure. Regarding the gaseous (hydrogen) adsorption on Pd-adatom graphene, we checked the increasing number of molecular hydrogens (H2) from one to seven on the 3×3 supercell, and found that the adsorption energy per H2 decreases on increasing hydrogen concentration and lies within the range of 0.998-0.151 eV.

  8. Application of Henry's Law for Binding Energies of Adsorbed Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Andrew; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Sweany, Mark; Pfeifer, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The method of isosteres is the simplest method used to calculate the differential enthalpy of adsorption. However, it is incredibly sensitive to the choice of model and respective fitting parameters. For a set of isotherms measured on a specific sample, most models converge upon a similar value at high coverage, but are inconsistent in the low pressure regime. In this talk, we investigate the application of various models for localized and mobile adsorption at low pressures in order to obtain binding energy of hydrogen to the adsorbent surface. Henry's Law analysis of the Langmuir Model of adsorption yield binding energies in excellent agreement with those obtained from the Clausius Clapeyron relation. Work supported by DOE-EERE, Award No. DE-FG36-08GO18142.

  9. Properties of SBA-15 modified by iron nanoparticles as potential hydrogen adsorbents and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazizi, N.; Ouargli, R.; Nousir, S.; Slama, R. Ben; Azzouz, A.

    2015-02-01

    SBA-15-Fe was synthesized via the incorporation of Fe0 nanoparticles (Fe(0)-Nps) in the mesoporous channels. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that dispersion of fine iron NPs occurs mainly inside the channels of SBA-15, producing a slight structure compaction. This was accompanied by a significant improvement of both the affinity towards hydrogen and electrical conductivity, as supported by hydrogen adsorption tests and impedance measurements. CO2 thermal programmed desorption measurements revealed an attenuation of the acid character of the solid surface. This was explained in terms of strong iron interaction with the lattice oxygen atoms that reduces the SiO-H bond polarity. The close vicinity of fine Fe(0)-Nps combined with the large pore size of SBA-15 appear to contribute to a synergistic improvement of the electrical conductivity. The results reported herein open new prospects for SBA-15 as potential adsorbents for hydrogen storage and carriers for hydrogen sensors. The use of iron in lieu of noble metals for designing such materials is a novelty, because such applications of iron-loaded silica have not been envisaged so far due to the high reactivity of iron towards air and water. The development of such technologies, if any, should address this issue.

  10. Interaction between adsorbed hydrogen and potassium on a carbon nanocone containing material as studied by photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Raaen, Steinar

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen adsorption on a potassium doped carbon nanocone containing material was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and work function measurement. The valence band spectra indicate that there is charge transfer from potassium to carbon. Upon deposition on carbon potassium is in its ionic state for lower doping and shows both ionic and metallic behavior at higher doping. Adsorption of hydrogen facilitates diffusion of potassium on the carbon material as seen by changes in the K{sub 2p} core level spectrum. Variations in the measured sample work function indicate that hydrogen initially adsorb on the K dopants and subsequently adsorb on the carbon cone containing material.

  11. Heat capacity of quantum adsorbates: Hydrogen and helium on evaporated gold films

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, J.T. |

    1996-06-01

    The author has constructed an apparatus to make specific heat measurements of quantum gases adsorbed on metallic films at temperatures between 0.3 and 4 K. He has used this apparatus to study quench-condensed hydrogen films between 4 and 923 layers thick with J = 1 concentrations between 0.28 and 0.75 deposited on an evaporated gold surface. He has observed that the orientational ordering of the J = 1 molecules depends on the substrate temperature during deposition of the hydrogen film. He has inferred that the density of the films condensed at the lowest temperatures is 25% higher than in bulk H{sub 2} crystals and have observed that the structure of those films is affected by annealing at 3.4 K. The author has measured the J = 1 to J = 0 conversion rate to be comparable to that of the bulk for thick films; however, he found evidence that the gold surface catalyzes conversion in the first two to four layers. He has also used this apparatus to study films of {sup 4}He less than one layer thick adsorbed on an evaporated gold surface. He shows that the phase diagram of the system is similar to that for {sup 4}He/graphite although not as rich in structure, and the phase boundaries occur at different coverages and temperatures. At coverages below about half a layer and at sufficiently high temperatures, the {sup 4}He behaves like a two-dimensional noninteracting Bose gas. At lower temperatures and higher coverages, liquidlike and solidlike behavior is observed. The Appendix shows measurements of the far-infrared absorptivity of the high-{Tc} superconductor La{sub 1.87}Sr{sub 0.13}CuO{sub 4}.

  12. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  13. Structural characterization of adsorbed helical and beta-sheet peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Newton Thangadurai

    Adsorbed peptides on surfaces have potential applications in the fields of biomaterials, tissue engineering, peptide microarrays and nanobiotechnology. The surface region, the "biomolecular interface" between a material and the biological environment, plays a crucial role in these applications. As a result, characterization of adsorbed peptide structure, especially with respect to identity, concentration, spatial distribution, conformation and orientation, is important. The present research employs NEXAFS (near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy) and SFG (sum frequency generation spectroscopy) to provide information about the adsorbed peptide structure. Soft X-ray NEXAFS is a synchrotron-based technique which typically utilizes polarized X-rays to interrogate surfaces under ultra-high vacuum conditions. SFG is a non-linear optical technique which utilizes a combination of a fixed visible and a tunable infrared laser beams to generate a surface-vibrational spectrum of surface species. SFG has the added advantage of being able to directly analyze the surface-structure at the solid-liquid interface. The main goals of the present research were twofold: characterize the structure of adsorbed peptides (1) ex situ using soft X-ray NEXAFS, and (2) in situ using non-linear laser spectroscopy (SFG). Achieving the former goal involved first developing a comprehensive characterization of the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen k-edge NEXAFS spectra for amino acids, and then using a series of helical and beta-sheet peptides to demonstrate the sensitivity of polarization-dependent NEXAFS to secondary structure of adsorbed peptides. Characterizing the structure of adsorbed peptides in situ using SFG involved developing a model system to probe the solid-liquid interface in situ; demonstrating the ability to probe the molecular interactions and adsorbed secondary structure; following the time-dependent ordering of the adsorbed peptides; and establishing the ability to obtain

  14. Probing the effects of 2D confinement on hydrogen dynamics in water and ice adsorbed in graphene oxide sponges.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Giovanni; Senesi, Roberto; Zhang, Xuan; Loh, Kian Ping; Andreani, Carla

    2015-12-21

    We studied the single particle dynamics of water and ice adsorbed in graphene oxide (GO) sponges at T = 293 K and T = 20 K. We used Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) at the ISIS neutron and muon spallation source to derive the hydrogen mean kinetic energy, 〈EK〉, and momentum distribution, n(p). The goal of this work was to study the hydrogen dynamics under 2D confinement and the potential energy surface, fingerprinting the hydrogen interaction with the layered structure of the GO sponge. The observed scattering is interpreted within the framework of the impulse approximation. Samples of both water and ice adsorbed in GO show n(p) functions with almost harmonic and anisotropic line shapes and 〈EK〉 values in excess of the values found at the corresponding temperatures in the bulk. The hydrogen dynamics are discussed in the context of the interaction between the interfacial water and ice and the confining hydrophilic surface of the GO sponge. PMID:26556604

  15. Orientational and Translational Properties of Hydrogen Films Adsorbed onto Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Morgan David

    As physics continues to expand its knowledge base, physicists seek new frontiers to investigate. Quantum -mechanical, two-dimensional systems have proven to be a subject that is not only rich in new discoveries (e.g., Kousterlitz-Thoules transitions and new phases of matter), but also filled with exciting predictions (e.g., new superfluids). The physisorption of a gas onto the surface of a homogenous, spacious (on a molecular scale) substrate with a low adsorption potential is one physical analogue to the much-analyzed theoretical two-dimensional system. Hydrogen in reduced dimensions has been found to have suppressed melting and freezing points, thus possibly permitting the onset of Bose condensation and a new superfluid phase. The use of boron nitride as an adsorption substrate allows for the study of physisorbed systems with a lower adsorption potential than previous studies using similar substrates (i.e., graphite and magnesium oxide). This dissertation has two parts. The first concerns the translational properties and adsorption energies of hydrogen adsorbed onto boron nitride. These properties are investigated through the use of volumetric adsorption isotherm techniques. The data suggest that the adsorption of hydrogen occurs in a step-wise manner at temperatures below 20 Kelvin. Changes in the translational phases (vapor -liquid-solid) occur between 10 to 20 Kelvin for the first four adsorbed monolayers. Isotopic effects are investigated through the use of the three common forms of hydrogen: molecular hydrogen (H_2), deuterium hydride (HD), and deuterium (D_2). The critical temperatures of the second, third, and fourth layers are determined, presented, and compared with the known phase diagrams of hydrogen isotopes adsorbed onto graphite and MgO. While the adsorption potential of the hydrogen-boron nitride system is found to be less than that of previously studied substrates, it does not translate into lower critical temperatures. The second part of this

  16. Structure and Reactivity of Adsorbed Fibronectin Films on Mica

    PubMed Central

    Hull, James R.; Tamura, Glen S.; Castner, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the interactions of adsorbed fibronectin (Fn) with other biomolecules is important for many biomedical applications. Fn is found in almost all body fluids, in the extracellular matrix, and plays a fundamental role in many biological processes. This study found that the structure (conformation, orientation) and reactivity of Fn adsorbed onto mica is dependent on the Fn surface concentration. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to determine the surface coverage of adsorbed Fn from isolated molecules at low surface coverage to full monolayers at high surface coverage. Both methods showed that the thickness of Fn film continued to increase after the mica surface was completely covered, consistent with Fn adsorbed in a more upright conformation at the highest surface-Fn concentrations. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry showed that relative intensities of both sulfur-containing (cystine, methionine) and hydrophobic (glycine, leucine/isoleucine) amino acids varied with changing Fn surface coverage, indicating that the conformation of adsorbed Fn depended on surface coverage. Single-molecule force spectroscopy with collagen-related peptides immobilized onto the atomic force microscope tip showed that the specific interaction force between the peptide and Fn increases with increasing Fn surface coverage. PMID:17890402

  17. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  18. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators. PMID:25133545

  19. Surface atomic relaxation and magnetism on hydrogen-adsorbed Fe(110) surfaces from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chohan, Urslaan K.; Jimenez-Melero, Enrique; Koehler, Sven P. K.

    2016-11-01

    We have computed adsorption energies, vibrational frequencies, surface relaxation and buckling for hydrogen adsorbed on a body-centred-cubic Fe(110) surface as a function of the degree of H coverage. This adsorption system is important in a variety of technological processes such as the hydrogen embrittlement in ferritic steels, which motivated this work, and the Haber-Bosch process. We employed spin-polarised density functional theory to optimise geometries of a six-layer Fe slab, followed by frozen mode finite displacement phonon calculations to compute Fe-H vibrational frequencies. We have found that the quasi-threefold (3f) site is the most stable adsorption site, with adsorption energies of ∼3.0 eV/H for all coverages studied. The long-bridge (lb) site, which is close in energy to the 3f site, is actually a transition state leading to the stable 3f site. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies collectively span from 730 to 1220 cm-1, for a range of coverages. The increased first-to-second layer spacing in the presence of adsorbed hydrogen, and the pronounced buckling observed in the Fe surface layer, may facilitate the diffusion of hydrogen atoms into the bulk, and therefore impact the early stages of hydrogen embrittlement in steels.

  20. A Comprehensive Study of Hydrogen Adsorbing to Amorphous Water ice: Defining Adsorption in Classical Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, John L.; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C.

    2016-11-01

    Gas–grain and gas–phase reactions dominate the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas–grain reactions require a substrate (e.g., a dust or ice grain) on which the reaction is able to occur. The formation of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the ISM is the prototypical example of a gas–grain reaction. In these reactions, an atom of hydrogen will strike a surface, stick to it, and diffuse across it. When it encounters another adsorbed hydrogen atom, the two can react to form molecular hydrogen and then be ejected from the surface by the energy released in the reaction. We perform in-depth classical molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen atoms interacting with an amorphous water-ice surface. This study focuses on the first step in the formation process; the sticking of the hydrogen atom to the substrate. We find that careful attention must be paid in dealing with the ambiguities in defining a sticking event. The technical definition of a sticking event will affect the computed sticking probabilities and coefficients. Here, using our new definition of a sticking event, we report sticking probabilities and sticking coefficients for nine different incident kinetic energies of hydrogen atoms [5–400 K] across seven different temperatures of dust grains [10–70 K]. We find that probabilities and coefficients vary both as a function of grain temperature and incident kinetic energy over the range of 0.99–0.22.

  1. Adsorbate structures and catalytic reactions studied in the torrpressure range by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kevin Shao-Lin

    2003-05-23

    High-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (HPHTSTM) was used to study adsorbate structures and reactions on single crystal model catalytic systems. Studies of the automobile catalytic converter reaction [CO + NO {yields} 1/2 N{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}] on Rh(111) and ethylene hydrogenation [C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}] on Rh(111) and Pt(111) elucidated information on adsorbate structures in equilibrium with high-pressure gas and the relationship of atomic and molecular mobility to chemistry. STM studies of NO on Rh(111) showed that adsorbed NO forms two high-pressure structures, with the phase transformation from the (2 x 2) structure to the (3 x 3) structure occurring at 0.03 Torr. The (3 x 3) structure only exists when the surface is in equilibrium with the gas phase. The heat of adsorption of this new structure was determined by measuring the pressures and temperatures at which both (2 x 2) and (3 x 3) structures coexisted. The energy barrier between the two structures was calculated by observing the time necessary for the phase transformation to take place. High-pressure STM studies of the coadsorption of CO and NO on Rh(111) showed that CO and NO form a mixed (2 x 2) structure at low NO partial pressures. By comparing surface and gas compositions, the adsorption energy difference between topsite CO and NO was calculated. Occasionally there is exchange between top-site CO and NO, for which we have described a mechanism for. At high NO partial pressures, NO segregates into islands, where the phase transformation to the (3 x 3) structure occurs. The reaction of CO and NO on Rh(111) was monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) and HPHTSTM. From MS studies the apparent activation energy of the catalytic converter reaction was calculated and compared to theory. STM showed that under high-temperature reaction conditions, surface metal atoms become mobile. Ethylene hydrogenation and its poisoning by CO was also studied by STM on Rh

  2. Structure of polymer layers adsorbed from concentrated solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auvray, Loïc; Auroy, Philippe; Cruz, Margarida

    1992-06-01

    We study by neutron scattering the interfacial strucuture of poly(dimethylsiloxane) layers irreversibly adsorbed from concentrated solutions or melts. We first measure the thickness h of the layers swollen by a good solvent as a function of the chain polymerisation index N and of the polymer volume fraction in the initial solution Φ. The relation h ≈ N^{0.8}Φ^{0.3}, recently predicted from an analogy between irreversibly adsorbed layers and grafted polymer brushes, describes well our results. We can therefore deduce that there is at least one large loop of about N monomers per adsorbed chain. We also study the shape of the polymer concentration profile in the layers by measuring on two samples the polymer-solid partial structure factor, that is proportional to the Fourier transform of the profile. The model of pseudobrushes predicts a concentration decay varying with the distance of the wall z as z^{-2/5}. This power law profile accounts quantitatively for the angular variation of the polymer-solid cross structure factor but it is difficult to distinguish it without anbiguity from less singular profiles. It implies that the adsorption of PDMS onto silica is sufficiently strong and fast to quench completely the loop distribution in the initial layer. Nous étudions par diffusion de neutrons la structure interfaciale de couches de poly(diméthylsiloxane) irréversiblement adsorbées sur de la silice à partir de solutions semidiluées et de fondus. Nous mesurons d'abord l'épaisseur h des couches gonflées par un bon solvant en fonction du degré de polymérisation des chaînes N et de la fraction volumique dans la solution initiale Φ. La relation h≈ N^{0.8}Φ^{0.3} récemment prédite à partir de l'analogie entre couches irréversiblement adsorbées et brosses de polymères greffés décrit bien nos résultats. Nous en déduisons qu'il existe au moins une grande boucle d'environ N monomères par chaîne adsorbée. Nous étudions aussi la forme du profil de

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline

  4. Organic silicon compounds anf hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas by mineral and adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide , as their burning has damaging effects on utilities and humans; organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide can be found in biogas produced from biomass wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product,such as cosmetics, detergents and paints.Siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Ajhar et al., 2010); aim of the present work is to find a single practical andeconomic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both hydrogen sulfide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleoneet al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing both hydrogen sulphide and volatile siloxane (Decamethycyclopentasiloxane or D5) in a nitrogen stream,typically 25-300 ppm D5 over N2, through an clay minerals, Fe oxides and Silica; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best silica shows an adsorption capacity of 0.2 g D5 per gram of silica. The next thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests.The capacity results depend on D5 and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. A regenerative silica process is then carried out byheating the silica bed up to 200 ° C and flushing out the adsorbed D5 and hydrogen sulphide samples in a nitrogen stream in athree step heating procedure up to 200 ° C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cyclingthe samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  5. Hydrogenation of olefin adsorbed on Pt/SiO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, T.; Burwell, R.L. Jr.

    1986-11-01

    Cyclopentene and cyclooctene have been hydrogenated in a batch reactor on supported platinum catalysts at temperatures such that over 99.99% of the olefin was in the adsorbed state and primarily on the support. Reaction temperatures were -75/sup 0/C for cyclopentene and -22/sup 0/C for cyclooctene and P(H/sub 2/) was usually 100 Torr. At coverages of one molecule of cyclopentene per nm/sub 2/ on Pt/(wide pore silica gel), the rate was zero order in olefin up to a conversion of about 70% following which the rate declined. The rate was about one-half order in hydrogen. Pt/alumina and Pt/silica gel gave similar results. Transport of olefin from the surface of the support to crystallites of platinum occurred primarily by surface migration rather than through the vapor phase. Significant contribution to hydrogenation by hydrogen spillover from platinum to silica can be excluded. Small particles of platinum on silica gel gave somewhat larger values of turnover frequency, N/sub t/, than did larger particles, at least after the pretreatment O/sub 2/, 300/sup 0/C; He, 450/sup 0/C; cool in He. N/sub t/ for cyclopentene was roughly equal to that for propylene in conventional vapor phase hydrogenation extrapolated to -75/sup 0/C.

  6. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequencies relevant to PSA vessel operation.

  7. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequenciesmore » relevant to PSA vessel operation.« less

  8. Chemical and structural characterization of copper adsorbed on mosses (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    González, Aridane G; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Adamo, Paola; Pokrovsky, Oleg S

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of copper on passive biomonitors (devitalized mosses Hypnum sp., Sphagnum denticulatum, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachythecium rutabulum) was studied under different experimental conditions such as a function of pH and Cu concentration in solution. Cu assimilation by living Physcomitrella patents was also investigated. Molecular structure of surface adsorbed and incorporated Cu was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Devitalized mosses exhibited the universal adsorption pattern of Cu as a function of pH, with a total binding sites number 0.05-0.06 mmolg(dry)(-1) and a maximal adsorption capacity of 0.93-1.25 mmolg(dry)(-1) for these devitalized species. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) fit of the first neighbor demonstrated that for all studied mosses there are ∼4.5 O/N atoms around Cu at ∼1.95 Å likely in a pseudo-square geometry. The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis demonstrated that Cu(II)-cellulose (representing carboxylate groups) and Cu(II)-phosphate are the main moss surface binding moieties, and the percentage of these sites varies as a function of solution pH. P. patens exposed during one month to Cu(2+) yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu-S(CN) complexes, suggesting metabolically-controlled reduction of adsorbed and assimilated Cu(2+). PMID:26852210

  9. Structure of Inert Gases Adsorbed in MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Dylan; Sokol, Paul

    One-dimensional quantum liquids of 3He or 4He have generated recent interest for investigation in the Luttinger liquid model. Unfortunately, current studies lack a clear demonstration of definitively one-dimensional behavior. We propose using the templated, porous material, MCM-41, as a host for an atomic Luttinger liquid. In general, the pores of MCM-41 are too wide to provide a strictly one-dimensional environment, so we investigate preplating these pores with inert gases to effectively reduce their diameter. We present the results of studies of the structure of inert gases in MCM-41. Nitrogen sorption isotherms were used to characterize the sample. Then, using inert gases as adsorbates, we determined the minimum effective pore diameter that can be achieved in our sample before capillary condensation takes over. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed on the ideally preplated sample to investigate the structure of the adsorbates in the nanopores. The XRD measurements are compared to simulations of core-shell cylinder model scattering, and the validity of the model is assessed. The prospects for creating a definitively one-dimensional channel for the application of studying the structure and dynamics of helium confined in one dimension are discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DGE-1069091.

  10. Chemical and structural characterization of copper adsorbed on mosses (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    González, Aridane G; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Adamo, Paola; Pokrovsky, Oleg S

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of copper on passive biomonitors (devitalized mosses Hypnum sp., Sphagnum denticulatum, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachythecium rutabulum) was studied under different experimental conditions such as a function of pH and Cu concentration in solution. Cu assimilation by living Physcomitrella patents was also investigated. Molecular structure of surface adsorbed and incorporated Cu was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Devitalized mosses exhibited the universal adsorption pattern of Cu as a function of pH, with a total binding sites number 0.05-0.06 mmolg(dry)(-1) and a maximal adsorption capacity of 0.93-1.25 mmolg(dry)(-1) for these devitalized species. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) fit of the first neighbor demonstrated that for all studied mosses there are ∼4.5 O/N atoms around Cu at ∼1.95 Å likely in a pseudo-square geometry. The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis demonstrated that Cu(II)-cellulose (representing carboxylate groups) and Cu(II)-phosphate are the main moss surface binding moieties, and the percentage of these sites varies as a function of solution pH. P. patens exposed during one month to Cu(2+) yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu-S(CN) complexes, suggesting metabolically-controlled reduction of adsorbed and assimilated Cu(2+).

  11. Spin-polarized hydrogen adsorbed on the surface of superfluid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Marín, J. M.; Boronat, J.; Markić, L. Vranješ

    2013-12-14

    The experimental realization of a thin layer of spin-polarized hydrogen H↓ adsorbed on top of the surface of superfluid {sup 4}He provides one of the best examples of a stable, nearly two-dimensional (2D) quantum Bose gas. We report a theoretical study of this system using quantum Monte Carlo methods in the limit of zero temperature. Using the full Hamiltonian of the system, composed of a superfluid {sup 4}He slab and the adsorbed H↓ layer, we calculate the main properties of its ground state using accurate models for the pair interatomic potentials. Comparing the results for the layer with the ones obtained for a strictly 2D setup, we analyze the departure from the 2D character when the density increases. Only when the coverage is rather small the use of a purely 2D model is justified. The condensate fraction of the layer is significantly larger than in 2D at the same surface density, being as large as 60% at the largest coverage studied.

  12. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4pz atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  13. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4p{sub z} atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  14. Correlation of adsorption isotherms of hydrogen isotopes on mordenite adsorbents using reactive vacancy solution theory

    SciTech Connect

    Munakata, K.; Nakamura, A.; Kawamura, Y.

    2015-03-15

    The authors have applied the isotherm equations derived from the reactive vacancy solution theory (RVST) to correlation of experimental and highly non-ideal adsorption isotherms of hydrogen and deuterium on a mordenite adsorbent, and have examined the ability of the isotherm equations to match this correlation. Several isotherm equations such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Toth, Vacancy Solution Theory and so forth were also tested, but they did not work. For the Langmuir-Freundlich equation tests have indicated that its 'ability to correlate' of the adsorption isotherms is not satisfactory. For the multi-site Langmuir-Freundlich (MSLF) equation the correlation of the isotherms appears to be somewhat improved but remains unsatisfactory. The results show that the isotherm equations derived from RVST can better correlate the experimental isotherms.

  15. Structural characteristics of oligomeric DNA strands adsorbed onto single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Roxbury, Daniel; Jagota, Anand; Mittal, Jeetain

    2013-01-10

    The single-stranded DNA to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) hybrid continues to attract significant interest as an exemplary biological molecule-nanomaterial conjugate. In addition to their many biomedical uses, such as in vivo sensing and delivery of molecular cargo, DNA-SWCNT hybrids enable the sorting of SWCNTs according to their chirality. Current experimental methods have fallen short of identifying the actual structural ensemble of DNA adsorbed onto SWCNTs that enables and controls several of these phenomena. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been a useful tool for studying the structure of these hybrid molecules. In recent studies, using replica exchange MD (REMD) simulation we have shown that novel secondary structures emerge and that these structures are DNA-sequence and SWCNT-type dependent. Here, we use REMD to investigate in detail the structural characteristics of two DNA-SWCNT recognition pairs: (TAT)(4)-(6,5)-SWCNT, i.e., DNA sequence TATTATTATTAT bound to the (6,5) chirality SWCNT, and (CCG)(2)CC-(8,7)-SWCNT as well as off-recognition pairs (TAT)(4)-(8,7)-SWCNT and (CCG)(2)CC-(6,5)-SWCNT. From a structural clustering analysis, dominant equilibrium structures are identified and show a right-handed self-stitched motif for (TAT)(4)-(6,5) in contrast to a left-handed β-barrel for (CCG)(2)CC-(8,7). Additionally, characteristics such as DNA end-to-end distance, solvent accessible SWCNT surface area, DNA hydrogen bonding between bases, and DNA dihedral distributions have been probed in detail as a function of the number of DNA strands adsorbed onto the nanotube. We find that the DNA structures adsorbed onto a nanotube are also stabilized by significant numbers of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds (intrastrand and interstrand) in addition to π-π stacking between DNA bases and nanotube surface and Watson-Crick pairs. Finally, we provide a summary of DNA structures observed for various DNA-SWCNT hybrids as a preliminary set of motifs that may be

  16. Chiral modification of platinum: ab initio study of the effect of hydrogen coadsorption on stability and geometry of adsorbed cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Konstanze R; Seitsonen, Ari P; Baiker, Alfons

    2015-11-01

    The cinchona alkaloids cinchonidine and cinchonine belong to the most efficient chiral modifiers for the noble metal-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of C=O and C=C bonds. Under reaction conditions these modifiers are coadsorbed on the noble metal surface with hydrogen. Using density functional theory, we studied the effect of coadsorbed hydrogen on the adsorption mode of cinchonidine and cinchonine on a Pt(111) surface at different hydrogen coverages. The theoretical study indicates that the presence of coadsorbed hydrogen affects both the adsorption geometry as well as the stability of the adsorbed cinchona alkaloids. At all hydrogen coverages the cinchona alkaloids are found to be adsorbed via anchoring of the quinoline moiety. In the absence of hydrogen as well as at low hydrogen coverage the quinoline moiety adsorbs nearly parallel to the surface, whereas at higher hydrogen coverage it becomes tilted. Higher hydrogen coverage as well as partial hydrogenation of the quinoline part of the cinchona alkaloid and hydrogen transfer to the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond at 10, 11 position of the quinuclidine moiety destabilize the adsorbed cinchona alkaloid, whereas hydrogen transfer to the nitrogen atom of the quinoline and the quinuclidine moiety stabilizes the adsorbed molecule. The stability as well as the adsorption geometry of the cinchona alkaloids are affected by the coadsorbed hydrogen and are proposed to influence the efficiency of the enantiodifferentiating ability of the chirally modified platinum surface.

  17. Chiral modification of platinum: ab initio study of the effect of hydrogen coadsorption on stability and geometry of adsorbed cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Konstanze R; Seitsonen, Ari P; Baiker, Alfons

    2015-11-01

    The cinchona alkaloids cinchonidine and cinchonine belong to the most efficient chiral modifiers for the noble metal-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of C=O and C=C bonds. Under reaction conditions these modifiers are coadsorbed on the noble metal surface with hydrogen. Using density functional theory, we studied the effect of coadsorbed hydrogen on the adsorption mode of cinchonidine and cinchonine on a Pt(111) surface at different hydrogen coverages. The theoretical study indicates that the presence of coadsorbed hydrogen affects both the adsorption geometry as well as the stability of the adsorbed cinchona alkaloids. At all hydrogen coverages the cinchona alkaloids are found to be adsorbed via anchoring of the quinoline moiety. In the absence of hydrogen as well as at low hydrogen coverage the quinoline moiety adsorbs nearly parallel to the surface, whereas at higher hydrogen coverage it becomes tilted. Higher hydrogen coverage as well as partial hydrogenation of the quinoline part of the cinchona alkaloid and hydrogen transfer to the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond at 10, 11 position of the quinuclidine moiety destabilize the adsorbed cinchona alkaloid, whereas hydrogen transfer to the nitrogen atom of the quinoline and the quinuclidine moiety stabilizes the adsorbed molecule. The stability as well as the adsorption geometry of the cinchona alkaloids are affected by the coadsorbed hydrogen and are proposed to influence the efficiency of the enantiodifferentiating ability of the chirally modified platinum surface. PMID:26426825

  18. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K{sub 1}RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K{sub 1}RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D{sub 2}-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C{sub 2h}-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D{sub 2}-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C{sub 2h}-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments

  19. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K1RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D2- and C2h-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K1RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D2-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C2h-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D2-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C2h-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments than the other two on the opposite side, which leads to the largely enhanced

  20. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K1RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D2- and C2h-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K1RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D2-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C2h-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D2-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C2h-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments than the other two on the opposite side, which leads to the largely enhanced

  1. Chiral modification of platinum by co-adsorbed cinchonidine and trifluoroacetic acid: origin of enhanced stereocontrol in the hydrogenation of trifluoroacetophenone.

    PubMed

    Meemken, Fabian; Baiker, Alfons; Schenker, Sebastian; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2014-01-27

    Cinchonidine (CD) adsorbed onto a platinum metal catalyst leads to rate acceleration and induces strong stereocontrol in the asymmetric hydrogenation of trifluoroacetophenone. Addition of catalytic amounts of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) significantly enhances the enantiomeric excess from 50 to 92%. The origin of the enantioselectivity bestowed by co-adsorbed CD and TFA is investigated by using in situ attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy and modulation excitation spectroscopy. Molecular interactions between the chiral modifier (CD), acid additive (TFA) and the trifluoro-activated substrate at the solid-liquid interface are elucidated under conditions relevant to catalytic hydrogenations, that is, on a technical Pt/Al2O3 catalyst in the presence of H2 and solvent. Monitoring of the unmodified and modified surface during the hydrogenation provides an insight into the phenomenon of rate enhancement and the crucial interactions of CD with the ketone, corresponding product alcohol, and TFA. Comparison of the diastereomeric interactions occurring on the modified surface and in the liquid solution shows a striking difference for the chiral preferences of CD. The spectroscopic data, in combination with calculations of molecular structures and energies, sheds light on the reaction mechanism of the heterogeneous asymmetric hydrogenation of trifluoromethyl ketones and the involvement of TFA in the diastereomeric intermediate surface complex: the quinuclidine N atom of the adsorbed CD forms an N-H-O-type hydrogen-bonding interaction not only with the trifluoro-activated ketone but also with the corresponding alcohol and the acid additive. Strong evidence is provided that it is a monodentate acid/base adduct in which the carboxylate of TFA resides at the quinuclidine N-atom of CD, which imparts a better stereochemical control.

  2. Role of adsorbed hydrogen species on ruthenium and molybdenum sulfides. Characterization by inelastic neutron scattering, thermoanalysis methods and model reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, M.; Jobic, H.; Dumonteil, C.; Afanasiev, P.

    1996-12-31

    The interaction of hydrogen over unsupported MoS{sub 2} and RuS{sub 2} has been investigated as a function of the sulfur to metal ratio. On these solids the presence of sulfur deficient sites is required to generate an activity and to allow hydrogen chemisorption. The nature of the adsorbed species differs depending on the catalyst under investigation. On RuS{sub 2}, two types of hydrogen were evidenced by thermoflash desorption and inelastic neutron scattering: one was assigned to hydrogen adsorbed on surface sulfur anions while the other one is retained on coordinatively unsaturated ruthenium cations. By contrast, only SH groups were detected on MoS{sub 2}. ESR measurements have shown that a fraction of chemisorbed hydrogen induces a modification of the concentration of paramagnetic Mo(V) and Mo(III) species. Thus both solids behave differently towards an hydrogen atmosphere. RuS{sub 2} has a pseudometallic comportment whereas for MoS{sub 2} redox or acid base properties are involved.

  3. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-21

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53–75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  4. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53-75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  5. A theoretical study of the interaction of hydrogen and oxygen with palladium or gold adsorbed on pyridine-like nitrogen-doped graphene.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Eduardo; Magana, Luis Fernando; Sansores, Luis Enrique

    2014-12-15

    The interaction of H2 and O2 molecules in the presence of nitrogen-doped graphene decorated with either a palladium or gold atom was investigated by using density functional theory. It was found that two hydrogen molecules were adsorbed on the palladium atom. The interaction of these adsorbed hydrogen molecules with two oxygen molecules generates two hydrogen peroxide molecules first through a Eley-Rideal mechanism and then through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The barrier energies for this reaction were small; therefore, we expect that this process may occur spontaneously at room temperature. In the case of gold, a single hydrogen molecule is adsorbed and dissociated on the metal atom. The interaction of the dissociated hydrogen molecule on the surface with one oxygen molecule generates a water molecule. The competitive adsorption between oxygen and hydrogen molecules slightly favors oxygen adsorption.

  6. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c < 50 μg ml-1) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c ⩾ 50 μg ml-1) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18 cm-1, indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed.

  7. Hydrogen uptake in vanadium first wall structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, E.P.; Jones, R.H.

    1996-04-01

    Evaluation of hydrogen sources and transport are needed to assess the mechanical integrity of V structures. Two sources include implantation and transmutation. The proposed coatings for the DEMO and ITER first wall strongly influence retention of hydrogen isotopes. Upper limit calculations of hydrogen inventory were based on recycling to the plasma and an impermeable coolant-side coating. Hydrogen isotope concentrations in V approaching 1,000 appm may be activated.

  8. Adsorbate modification of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of ferromagnetic fcc {110} surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, D. S. D.; Jenkins, Stephen J.

    2011-03-01

    We identify trends in structural, electronic, and magnetic modifications that occur on ferromagnetic {110} surfaces upon varying either the substrate material or the adsorbate species. First, we have modeled the adsorption of several first-row p-block elements on the surface of fcc Co{110} at two coverages [0.5 and 1.0 monolayer (ML)]. All adsorbates were found to expand the distance between the first and second substrate layers and to contract the distance between the second and third layers. The energetic location of a characteristic trough in the density-of-d-states difference plot correlates with the direction of the adsorbate magnetic coupling to the surface, and a trend of antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic coupling to the surface was observed across the elements from boron to fluorine. A high fluorine adatom coverage (1.0 ML) was found to enhance the surface spin magnetic moment by 11%. Second, we also calculate and contrast adsorption of 0.5 and 1.0 ML of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen adatoms on fcc iron, cobalt, and nickel {110} surfaces and compare the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of these systems. Carbon and nitrogen are found to couple antiferromagnetically, and oxygen ferromagnetically, to all surfaces. It was found that antiferromagnetically coupled adsorbates retained their largest spin moment values on iron, whereas ferromagnetically coupled adsorbates possessed their lowest moments on this surface. The strongly localized influence of these adsorbates is clearly illustrated in partial density-of-states plots for the surface atoms.

  9. Infrared spectroscopy of water clusters co-adsorbed with hydrogen molecules on a sodium chloride film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen gas containing a trace of water vapor was dosed on a vacuum-evaporated sodium chloride film at 13 K, and water clusters formed on the substrate were investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Absorption bands due to (H2O)n clusters with n = 3-6 and an induced absorption band due to hydrogen were clearly observed. With increasing gas dosage, the intensities of the cluster bands increased linearly while the intensity of the hydrogen band was constant. This suggests that the water clusters were formed in two-dimensional matrices of hydrogen. We found that the water clusters did exist on the surface upon heating even after the hydrogen molecules had desorbed. A further rise of the substrate temperature up to 27 K yielded the formation of larger clusters, (H2O)n with n > 6 . We also discuss the origins of the two bands of the trimer in terms of pseudorotation and a metastable isomer.

  10. Evaluation of Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Methodology on Adsorbents for Tritium Removal

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morgan, Gregg A.; Xiao, S. Xin

    2015-03-06

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has demonstrated a potential process that can be used to remove tritium from tritiated water using Pt-catalyzed molecular sieves. The process is an elemental isotope exchange process in which H2 (when flowed through the molecular sieves) will exchange with the adsorbed water, D2O, leaving H2O adsorbed on the molecular sieves. Various formulations of catalyzed molecular sieve material were prepared using two different techniques, Pt-implantation and Pt-ion exchange. This technology has been demonstrated for a protium (H) and deuterium (D) system, but can also be used for the removal of tritium from contaminated water (T2O, HTO,more » and DTO) using D2 (or H2)« less

  11. Evaluation of Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Methodology on Adsorbents for Tritium Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Gregg A.; Xiao, S. Xin

    2015-03-06

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has demonstrated a potential process that can be used to remove tritium from tritiated water using Pt-catalyzed molecular sieves. The process is an elemental isotope exchange process in which H2 (when flowed through the molecular sieves) will exchange with the adsorbed water, D2O, leaving H2O adsorbed on the molecular sieves. Various formulations of catalyzed molecular sieve material were prepared using two different techniques, Pt-implantation and Pt-ion exchange. This technology has been demonstrated for a protium (H) and deuterium (D) system, but can also be used for the removal of tritium from contaminated water (T2O, HTO, and DTO) using D2 (or H2)

  12. Evaluation of hydrogen isotope exchange methodology on adsorbents for tritium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G.A.; Xin Xiao, S.

    2015-03-15

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has demonstrated a potential process that can be used to remove tritium from tritiated water using Pt-catalyzed molecular sieves. The process is an elemental isotope exchange process in which H{sub 2} (when flowed through the molecular sieves) will exchange with the adsorbed water, D{sub 2}O, leaving H{sub 2}O adsorbed on the molecular sieves. Various formulations of catalyzed molecular sieve material were prepared using two different techniques, Pt-implantation and Pt-ion exchange. This technology has been demonstrated for a protium (H) and deuterium (D) system, but can also be used for the removal of tritium from contaminated water (T{sub 2}O, HTO, and DTO) using D{sub 2} (or H{sub 2}). (authors)

  13. FTIR spectroscopy and thermodynamics of hydrogen adsorbed in a cross-linked polymer.

    PubMed

    Spoto, Giuseppe; Vitillo, Jenny G; Cocina, Donato; Damin, Alessandro; Bonino, Francesca; Zecchina, Adriano

    2007-09-28

    The adsorption of H(2) in a cross-linked poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (St-DVB) microporous polymer (BET surface area 920 m(2) g(-1)) is studied by volumetric and gravimetric methods, FTIR spectroscopy at variable temperature (300-14 K) and ab initio calculations. At 77 K the polymer reversibly stores up to 1.3 mass% H(2) at a pressure of 1 bar and 1.8 mass% at 10 bar. The adsorption process involves the specific interaction of H(2) with the structural phenyl rings through weak dispersive forces. The interacting molecules become IR active and give rise to vibrational and rotational-vibrational manifestations which are affected by the temperature, the contact time and the H(2) equilibrium pressure. The spectra of the H(2)/St-DVB system reported here represent the first IR evidence of the adsorption of hydrogen on unsaturated molecules. The adsorption enthalpy is evaluated by the VTIR (variable temperature IR spectroscopy) method (C. Otero Areán et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2007, DOI: 10.1039/b615535a) and compared with the results of ab initio calculations for the H(2)/benzene interaction and with literature data.

  14. Structure of a peptide adsorbed on graphene and graphite.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Jyoti; Kim, Sang Nyon; Kuang, Zhifeng; Farmer, Barry L; Naik, Rajesh R; Tatulian, Suren A; Ishigami, Masa

    2012-05-01

    Noncovalent functionalization of graphene using peptides is a promising method for producing novel sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. Here we perform atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate peptide-binding behavior to graphene and graphite. We studied a dodecamer peptide identified with phage display to possess affinity for graphite. Optical spectroscopy reveals that the peptide forms secondary structures both in powder form and in an aqueous medium. The dominant structure in the powder form is α-helix, which undergoes a transition to a distorted helical structure in aqueous solution. The peptide forms a complex reticular structure upon adsorption on graphene and graphite, having a helical conformation different from α-helix due to its interaction with the surface. Our observation is consistent with our molecular dynamics calculations, and our study paves the way for rational functionalization of graphene using biomolecules with defined structures and, therefore, functionalities.

  15. Persistent hydrogen bonding in polymorphic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2009-02-01

    The significance of hydrogen bonding and its variability in polymorphic crystal structures is explored using new automated structural analysis methods. The concept of a chemically equivalent hydrogen bond is defined, which may be identified in pairs of structures, revealing those types of bonds that may persist, or not, in moving from one polymorphic form to another. Their frequency and nature are investigated in 882 polymorphic structures from the Cambridge Structural Database. A new method to compare conformations of equivalent molecules is introduced and applied to derive distinct subsets of conformational and packing polymorphs. The roles of chemical functionality and hydrogen-bond geometry in persistent interactions are systematically explored. Detailed structural comparisons reveal a large majority of persistent hydrogen bonds that are energetically crucial to structural stability. PMID:19155561

  16. Surface structure of GaAs with adsorbed Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, R. D.; Austin, R. F.

    1986-10-01

    The surface structures that result from the adsorption of Te on (100) GaAs have been shown to affect the orientation of CdTe films on GaAs. Two structures are described here. A low-temperature (6×1) surface leads to (100) film growth. At 580 °C, a new surface results which is characterized by ordering along directions 60° from [011¯] and [01¯1], and leads to (111) growth of CdTe. Both surface structure and the interaction of the group II element with the surface are believed to be important in determining the orientation of the film.

  17. In situ laser Raman spectra of iron phthalocyanine adsorbed on copper and gold electrodes. [Electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C.A.; Rios, C.B.; Feng, X.; McMasters, R.

    1983-01-01

    Raman spectra of iron phthalocyanine (FePc) and its tetrasulfonated derivative (FeTSPc) adsorbed on copper and gold electrodes have been observed in situ in 0.05 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solution. Results confirm the authors previous finding on the coordination of FePc to water molecules to solution. Evidence suggests that the iron phthalocyanines are probably oriented with their planes parallel to the electrode surface even in immersed electrodes. A decrease in intensity and broadening of some vibrational bands are observed on increasing cathodic polarization; these are attributed to a lifting of the degeneracy of the vibrational modes due to a change in symmetry of the adsorbed molecules brought about by polarization induced by the double-layer field. The effect of carbon on the Raman spectra is discussed. The iron phthalocyanines appear to be stable at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in the absence of oxygen. 18 references, 8 figures.

  18. Interlocking order parameter fluctuations in structural transitions between adsorbed polymer phases.

    PubMed

    Martins, Paulo H L; Bachmann, Michael

    2016-01-21

    By means of contact-density chain-growth simulations of a simple coarse-grained lattice model for a polymer grafted at a solid homogeneous substrate, we investigate the complementary behavior of the numbers of surface-monomer and monomer-monomer contacts under various solvent and thermal conditions. This pair of contact numbers represents an appropriate set of order parameters that enables the distinct discrimination of significantly different compact phases of polymer adsorption. Depending on the transition scenario, these order parameters can interlock in perfect cooperation. The analysis helps understand the transitions from compact filmlike adsorbed polymer conformations into layered morphologies and dissolved adsorbed structures, respectively, in more detail.

  19. Molecular Association and Structure of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    The statement is sometimes made in textbooks that liquid hydrogen peroxide is more strongly associated than water, evidenced by its higher boiling point and greater heat of vaporization. Discusses these and an additional factor (the nearly double molecular mass of the peroxide), focusing on hydrogen bonds and structure of the molecule. (JN)

  20. Theoretical study of the dynamics of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on graphene multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaied, Mohammed; Moreno, J. A.; Caturla, M. J.; Ynduráin, Félix; Palacios, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dynamics of H atoms adsorbed on graphene bilayers with Bernal stacking. First, through extensive density functional theory calculations, including van der Waals interactions, we obtain the activation barriers involved in the desorption and migration processes of a single H atom. These barriers, along with attempt rates and the energetics of H pairs, are used as input parameters in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to study the time evolution of an initial random distribution of adsorbed H atoms. The simulations reveal that, at room temperature, H atoms occupy only one sublattice before they completely desorb or form clusters. This sublattice selectivity in the distribution of H atoms may last for sufficiently long periods of time upon lowering the temperature down to 0 ∘C . The final fate of the H atoms, namely, desorption or cluster formation, depends on the actual relative values of the activation barriers which can be tuned by doping. In some cases, a sublattice selectivity can be obtained for periods of time experimentally relevant even at room temperature. This result shows the possibility for observation and applications of the ferromagnetic state associated with such distribution.

  1. Structural precursor to adsorbate-induced reconstruction: C on Ni(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Terborg, R.; Hoeft, J.T.; Polcik, M.; Lindsay, R.; Schaff, O.; Bradshaw, A.M.; Toomes, R.; Booth, N.A.; Woodruff, D.P.; Rotenberg, E.; Denlinger, J.

    1999-10-01

    The local structure around adsorbed carbon atoms on Ni(100) has been determined at low coverage as well as in the 0.5 monolayer (2{times}2)p4g {open_quotes}clock{close_quotes} reconstruction by scanned energy mode photoelectron diffraction. At low coverage, there is no radial strain of the Ni atoms surrounding the adsorbed carbon, contrary to previous suggestions. None of the C-Ni near-neighbor distances are changed by reconstruction, but the Ni-Ni nearest-neighbor distance in the top layer increases significantly, showing that the adsorbate-induced compressive stress is associated with Ni-Ni, rather than Ni-C, repulsion. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Structure and Dynamics of Proteins Adsorbed to Biomaterial Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Drobny, Gary P.; Long, Joanna R.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Cotten, Myriam L.; Stayton, Partick S.

    2002-10-31

    Biomineralization, defined as the organized deposition of inorganic materials in the cellular or extracellular matrix, may be as simple a process as the formation of an iron oxide crystal in the vesicle of a magnetobacterium, or as complex a process as the formation of the intricate calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate structures found in marine coccoliths, invertebrate shells, vertebrate skeletons and teeth. The phenomenon of Biomineralization has attracted a great deal of attention recently from the materials science community, which seeks to understand the way in which inorganic biological composites are synthesized and processed in nature.

  3. Extended hydrogen-bonded structures of phosphatidylethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Sen, A; Yang, P W; Mantsch, H H; Hui, S W

    1988-06-01

    The structure of phosphatidylethanolamine in pure dry hexane was studied. Viscosity measurements show that the hexane solution of PE has a very high viscosity, while freeze fracture electron microscopy revealed extensive fibre-like structures. These extended structures are disrupted by the addition of small amounts of water or organic solvents which are capable of hydrogen-bonding. The Fourier transform infrared spectra of the lipid solutions in dry and hydrated hexane show considerable differences in the phosphate and ethanolamine absorption bands, and demonstrate that the viscous fibre-like structures formed by phosphatidylethanolamine in dry hexane consist of extended intermolecular hydrogen-bonds, similar to those found in the solid lipid, with the ammonium group as the hydrogen-donor and the phosphate group as the hydrogen-acceptor. The high viscosity is not observed in hexane solution of phosphatidylcholine.

  4. Role of Structure and Glycosylation of Adsorbed Protein Films in Biolubrication

    PubMed Central

    Veeregowda, Deepak H.; Busscher, Henk J.; Vissink, Arjan; Jager, Derk-Jan; Sharma, Prashant K.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2012-01-01

    Water forms the basis of lubrication in the human body, but is unable to provide sufficient lubrication without additives. The importance of biolubrication becomes evident upon aging and disease, particularly under conditions that affect secretion or composition of body fluids. Insufficient biolubrication, may impede proper speech, mastication and swallowing, underlie excessive friction and wear of articulating cartilage surfaces in hips and knees, cause vaginal dryness, and result in dry, irritated eyes. Currently, our understanding of biolubrication is insufficient to design effective therapeutics to restore biolubrication. Aim of this study was to establish the role of structure and glycosylation of adsorbed protein films in biolubrication, taking the oral cavity as a model and making use of its dynamics with daily perturbations due to different glandular secretions, speech, drinking and eating, and tooth brushing. Using different surface analytical techniques (a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, colloidal probe atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurements and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy), we demonstrated that adsorbed salivary conditioning films in vitro are more lubricious when their hydrophilicity and degree of glycosylation increase, meanwhile decreasing their structural softness. High-molecular-weight, glycosylated proteins adsorbing in loops and trains, are described as necessary scaffolds impeding removal of water during loading of articulating surfaces. Comparing in vitro and in vivo water contact angles measured intra-orally, these findings were extrapolated to the in vivo situation. Accordingly, lubricating properties of teeth, as perceived in 20 volunteers comprising of equal numbers of male and female subjects, could be related with structural softness and glycosylation of adsorbed protein films on tooth surfaces. Summarizing, biolubrication is due to a combination of structure and glycosylation of adsorbed protein

  5. Formation of 1D adsorbed water structures on CaO(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xunhua; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Ghiringhelli, Luca M.; Levchenko, Sergey V.; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of water with oxide surfaces is of fundamental importance for basic and engineering sciences. Recently, a spontaneous formation of one-dimensional (1D) adsorbed water structures have been observed on CaO(001). Interestingly, at other alkaline earth metal oxides, in particular MgO(001) and SrO(001), such structures have not been found experimentally. We calculate the relative stability of adsorbed water structures on the three oxides using density-functional theory combined with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics. Low-energy structures at different coverages are obtained with a first-principles genetic algorithm. Finite-temperature vibrational spectra are calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics. We find a range of (T, p) conditions where 1D structures are thermodynamically stable on CaO(001). The orientation and vibrational spectra of the 1D structures are in agreement with the experiments. The formation of the 1D structures is found to be actuated by a symmetry breaking in the adsorbed water tetramer, as well as by a balance between water-water and water-substrate interactions, determined by the lattice constant of the oxide.

  6. Structural and sorption characteristics of adsorbed humic acid on clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaijun; Xing, Baoshan

    2005-01-01

    Clay-humic complexes are commonly distributed in natural environments. They play very important roles in regulating the transport and retention of hydrophobic organic contaminants in soils and sediments. This study examined the structural changes of humic acid (HA) after adsorption by clay minerals and determined phenanthrene sorption by clay-humic complexes. Solid- and liquid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the first time, provided direct evidence for HA fractionation during adsorption on mineral surfaces, that is, aliphatic fractions were preferentially adsorbed by clay minerals while aromatic fractions were left in the solution. The ratio of UV absorbance of HA at 465 and 665 nm (E4 to E6 ratio), which is related to aromaticity, corroborated with the NMR results. For both montmorillonite and kaolinite, adsorbed HA fractions had higher sorption linearity (N) and affinity (K(oc)) than the source HA. The K(oc) of adsorbed HA for the clay-humic complexes could be up to several times higher than that of the source HA. This large increase may be contributed by the low polarity of the bound HA. Moreover, for each mineral, the N values of adsorbed HA increased with increasing HA loading. It is believed that HA may develop a more condensed structure on mineral surface at lower HA loading level due to the stronger interactions between HA and mineral surface as a result of close contacts. PMID:15647564

  7. Structural relaxation of adlayers in the presence of adsorbate-induced reconstruction: C60/Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Woei Wu; Hsu, Ching-Ling; Lin, M. C.; Lin, K. C.; Tang, T. B.

    2004-03-01

    We revisit submonolayer growth of C60 on Cu(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), with emphasis on the formation of higher-order commensurate metastable states. These phases show concomitant interfacial reconstruction, adlayer buckling, and adlayer rotation in order to match as closely as possible the 10.0 Å C60 nearest neighbor (NN) distance. Most interestingly, a clear correlation between the adlayer rotation angle and molecular contrast patterns is demonstrated. This is caused by the C60-induced reconstruction at preferred binding sites and adlayer buckling in adjustment to strain. Four contrast patterns, i.e., “disordered maze,” “linear-wall maze,” “p(√(7)×√(7)),” and “p(2×2),” with increasing C60 NN distances are categorized. In the most compressed phase, buckling is favored and it is analogous to the ground state of a strongly-coupled antiferromagnetic system on a triangular lattice with alike adlayer buckling and interfacial corrugation. In contrast, the molecular orderings in the other structures are mostly dictated by lateral displacements of C60 toward preferred reconstructive binding sites. These metastable phases thus illustrate structural relaxation of a molecular layer on an adsorbate-induced reconstructed substrate in different adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interaction limits.

  8. Magnetic Properties of High-Surface-Area Carbons and Their Effect on Adsorbed Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matthew; Kraus, Michael; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2009-03-01

    We report the discovery that a large number of nanoporous carbon samples, made from corn cob and exhibiting high hydrogen storage capacities (Pfeifer et al, Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 1041 R02-02 (2008)), show unexpected magnetic properties, due to iron impurities in the samples. Magnetization curves are consistent with ferromagnetic and/or super-paramagnetic behavior. Magnetic susceptibilities, saturation magnetizations, coercivities and remanence magnetizations, from measurements on a SQUID magnetometer, will be presented, and their temperature dependence will be discussed. Results will be presented regarding the presence of small iron clusters, magnetic properties of iron-leached samples, and hydrogen binding energies as a function of iron leaching. This material is based on work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FG-08GO18142.

  9. Structural features of polymer adsorbent LiChrolut EN and interfacial behavior of water and water/organic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gun'ko, V M; Turov, V V; Zarko, V I; Nychiporuk, Y M; Goncharuk, E V; Pakhlov, E M; Yurchenko, G R; Kulik, T V; Palyanytsya, B B; Borodavka, T V; Krupskaya, T V; Leboda, R; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J; Osovskii, V D; Ptushinskii, Y G; Turov, A V

    2008-07-01

    The structural and adsorption characteristics of polymer adsorbent LiChrolut EN and the behavior of adsorbed water and water/organic mixtures were studied using adsorption, microcalorimetry, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy with layer-by-layer freezing-out of liquids (190-273 K), and thermally stimulated depolarization current method (90-265 K). This adsorbent is characterized by large specific surface area (approximately 1500 m2/g) and pore volume (0.83 cm3/g) with a major contribution of narrow pores (R<10 nm) of a complicated shape (long hysteresis loop is in nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm). The adsorbent includes aromatic and aliphatic structures and oxygen-containing functionalities and can effectively adsorb organics and water/organic mixtures. On co-adsorption of water and organics (dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, methane), there is a weak influence of one on another adsorbate due to their poor mixing in pores. Weakly polar chloroform displaces a fraction of water from narrow pores. These effects can explain high efficiency of the adsorbent in solid-phase extraction of organics from aqueous solutions. The influence of structural features of several carbon and polymer adsorbents on adsorbed nitrogen, water and water/organics is compared on the basis of the adsorption and 1H NMR data. PMID:18440015

  10. Molecular Structure and Equilibrium Forces of Bovine Submaxillary Mucin Adsorbed at a Solid-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Zappone, Bruno; Patil, Navinkumar J; Madsen, Jan B; Pakkanen, Kirsi I; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-04-21

    By combining dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and surface force apparatus, the conformation of bovine submaxillary mucin in dilute solution and nanomechanical properties of mucin layers adsorbed on mica have been investigated. The samples were prepared by additional chromatographic purification of commercially available products. The mucin molecule was found to have a z-average hydrodynamic diameter of ca. 35 nm in phosphate buffered solution, without any particular secondary or tertiary structure. The contour length of the mucin is larger than, yet of the same order of magnitude as the diameter, indicating that the molecule can be modeled as a relatively rigid polymeric chain due to the large persistence length of the central glycosylated domain. Mucin molecules adsorbed abundantly onto mica from saline buffer, generating polymer-like, long-ranged, repulsive, and nonhysteretic forces upon compression of the adsorbed layers. Detailed analysis of such forces suggests that adsorbed mucins had an elongated conformation favored by the stiffness of the central domain. Acidification of aqueous media was chosen as means to reduce mucin-mucin and mucin-substrate electrostatic interactions. The hydrodynamic diameter in solution did not significantly change when the pH was lowered, showing that the large persistence length of the mucin molecule is due to steric hindrance between sugar chains, rather than electrostatic interactions. Remarkably, the force generated by an adsorbed layer with a fixed surface coverage also remained unaltered upon acidification. This observation can be linked to the surface-protective, pH-resistant role of bovine submaxillary mucin in the variable environmental conditions of the oral cavity. PMID:25806669

  11. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  12. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  13. Differential Pair Distribution Function Study of the Structure of Arsenate Adsorbed on Nanocrystalline [gamma]-Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Harrington, Richard; Tang, Yuanzhi; Kubicki, James D.; Aryanpour, Masoud; Reeder, Richard J.; Parise, John B.; Phillips, Brian L.

    2012-03-15

    Structural information is important for understanding surface adsorption mechanisms of contaminants on metal (hydr)oxides. In this work, a novel technique was employed to study the interfacial structure of arsenate oxyanions adsorbed on {gamma}-alumina nanoparticles, namely, differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering. The d-PDF is the difference of properly normalized PDFs obtained for samples with and without arsenate adsorbed, otherwise identically prepared. The real space pattern contains information on atomic pair correlations between adsorbed arsenate and the atoms on {gamma}-alumina surface (Al, O, etc.). PDF results on the arsenate adsorption sample on {gamma}-alumina prepared at 1 mM As concentration and pH 5 revealed two peaks at 1.66 {angstrom} and 3.09 {angstrom}, corresponding to As-O and As-Al atomic pair correlations. This observation is consistent with those measured by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, which suggests a first shell of As-O at 1.69 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom} with a coordination number of 4 and a second shell of As-Al at 3.13 {+-} 0.04 {angstrom} with a coordination number of 2. These results are in agreement with a bidentate binuclear coordination environment to the octahedral Al of {gamma}-alumina as predicted by density functional theory (DFT) calculation.

  14. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-decorated boron-nitride nanotube: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Richa Naja; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-01

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped BNNTs has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site in the center of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 0.8048eV. Decorating by Y makes the system half-metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 1.0µB. Y decorated Boron-Nitride (8,0) nanotube can adsorb up to five hydrogen molecules whose average binding energy is computed as 0.5044eV. All the hydrogen molecules are adsorbed with an average desorption temperature of 644.708 K. Taking that the Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, the implied wt% comes out to be 5.31%, a relatively acceptable value for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system can serve as potential hydrogen storage medium.

  15. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-decorated boron-nitride nanotube: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Richa Naja; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped BNNTs has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site in the center of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 0.8048eV. Decorating by Y makes the system half-metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 1.0µ{sub B}. Y decorated Boron-Nitride (8,0) nanotube can adsorb up to five hydrogen molecules whose average binding energy is computed as 0.5044eV. All the hydrogen molecules are adsorbed with an average desorption temperature of 644.708 K. Taking that the Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, the implied wt% comes out to be 5.31%, a relatively acceptable value for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system can serve as potential hydrogen storage medium.

  16. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-doped graphene: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Desnavi, Sameerah; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2014-04-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped grapheme has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 1.40 eV. Doping by Y makes the system metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 2.11 μ{sub B}. Y decorated graphene can adsorb up to four hydrogen molecules with an average binding energy of 0.415 eV. All the hydrogen atoms are physisorbed with an average desorption temperature of 530.44 K. The Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, which imply a wt% of 6.17, close to the DoE criterion for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system is potential hydrogen storage medium with 100% recycling capability.

  17. Hydrogen bonding in peptide secondary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Zoltán; Kovács, Attila

    Hydrogen bonding interactions in various peptide secondary structures (β-sheet, 27-ribbon, 310-helix, α-helix, π-helix, β-turn II, and γ-turn) have been investigated in small oligopeptides by quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. Besides the primary O...HN interactions, the optimized structures revealed the importance of N...HN hydrogen bonding in several structures. The effect of substitution on the energy and structural properties was investigated comparing the properties of glycine, alanine, valine, and serine. The aliphatic substituents generally weaken the hydrogen bonds, the strongest effects being observed in crowded valine conformers. Additional hydrogen bonding interactions introduced by the OH group of serine can both strengthen (by polarizing the amide moiety through N...H interaction) and weaken (constraining the CO oxygen by O...HO interaction) the backbone hydrogen bonds. The effect of water as a polarizable medium on the energy properties was assessed by the COSMO model.

  18. The effect of gold nanoparticle structure on the conformation and function of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagner, Jennifer E.

    Many applications of nanobiomaterials rely on or are enhanced by specific, protein-mediated interactions with biological systems. These interactions can be engineered by chemically modifying the surface of the material to affect protein adsorption, or by altering the topography of the nanoscale surface. The attachment or adsorption of proteins onto materials can greatly affect the structure and subsequent function of those proteins, giving rise to unpredictable and potentially undesirable effects. Thus, it is essential to develop a detailed understanding of how nanostructured surface characteristics, such as atomic-scale topography, surface energy, and chemical structure may affect protein adsorption, structure, function, and stability. The presented work on gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the forms of spheres (AuNS), rods (AuNR), cubes (AuNC) and octahedra (AuNO) will elucidate the effect of nanoparticle morphology on adsorbed model proteins lysozyme (Lyz) and α-chymotrypsin (ChT). It has been found that nanoparticle morphology does affect the structure of adsorbed proteins as well as the extent of the surface coverage; however, the final form of the nano-bio conjugate is protein specific. Lyz conjugates underwent loss of structure and rapid aggregation regardless of AuNP morphology; however, ChT conjugates exhibited no structure loss when immobilized on AuNS, and a significant, loading specific structure loss when adsorbed on AuNR. Further work will be presented on efforts to determine the role of crystal structure, surface energy, and ligand chemistry on adsorbed proteins. Wet chemical methods are used to synthesize AuNC with f100g facets and AuNO with f111g facets. Nanoparticles are characterized through electron microscopy, X-ray and electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Protein conjugation and changes in protein structure are monitored through a variety of physical and spectroscopic techniques

  19. Structural relaxation of an adlayer in presence of adsorbate-induced reconstruction: C_60/Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Woei Wu; Hsu, C. L.; Lin, M. C.; Lin, K. C.

    2004-03-01

    We revisit submonolayer growth of C_60 on Cu(111) by STM, with emphasis on the formation of higher-order commensurate metastable states. These phases show concomitant interfacial reconstruction, adlayer buckling, and adlayer rotation to match to the 10.0 ÅC_60 nearest neighbor (NN) distance. Most interestingly, a clear correlation between the adlayer rotation angle and molecular contrast patterns is demonstrated. This is caused by the C_60-induced reconstruction at preferred binding sites and adlayer buckling in adjustment to strain. Four contrast patterns, i.e., ''disordered-maze'', ''linear-wall-maze'', ''p(√7 × √7)'', and ''p (2 × 2)'', with increasing C_60 NN distances are categorized. In the most compressed phase, buckling is favored and it is analogous to the ground state of an antiferromagnetic system on a triangular lattice with alike adlayer buckling and interfacial corrugation. In contrast, the molecular orderings in the other structures are mostly dictated by lateral displacements of C_60 toward preferred reconstructive binding sites. These phases thus illustrate structural relaxation of a molecular layer on an adsobate-induced reconstructed substrate in different adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interaction limits.

  20. Untangleing the effects of chain rigidity on the structure and dynamics of strongly adsorbed polymer melts

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Cheng, Shiwang; Kumar, Rajeev; Goswami, Monojoy; Sokolov, Alexei P; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-06-11

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of semiflexible polymer melts in contact with a strongly adsorbing substrate. We have characterized the segments in the interfacial layer by counting the number of trains, loops, tails and unadsorbed segments. For more rigid chains, a tail and an adsorbed segment (a train) dominate while loops are more prevalent in more flexible chains. The tails exhibit a non-uniformly stretched conformation akin to the polydispersed pseudobrush envisioned by Guiselin. To probe the dynamics of the segments we computed the layer z-resolved intermediate coherent collective dynamics structure factor, S(q, t, z), mean-square displacement of segments, and the 2nd Legendre polynomial of the time-autocorrelation of unit bond vectors, 2[ni(t,z)•ni(0,z)]>. Our results show that segmental dynamics is slower for stiffer chains and there is a strong correlation between the structure and dynamics in the interfacial layer. There is no glassy layer, and the slowing down in dynamics of stiffer chains in the adsorbed region can be attributed to the densification and the more persistent layering of segments.

  1. Untangleing the effects of chain rigidity on the structure and dynamics of strongly adsorbed polymer melts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Cheng, Shiwang; Kumar, Rajeev; Goswami, Monojoy; Sokolov, Alexei P; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-06-11

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of semiflexible polymer melts in contact with a strongly adsorbing substrate. We have characterized the segments in the interfacial layer by counting the number of trains, loops, tails and unadsorbed segments. For more rigid chains, a tail and an adsorbed segment (a train) dominate while loops are more prevalent in more flexible chains. The tails exhibit a non-uniformly stretched conformation akin to the polydispersed pseudobrush envisioned by Guiselin. To probe the dynamics of the segments we computed the layer z-resolved intermediate coherent collective dynamics structure factor, S(q, t, z),more » mean-square displacement of segments, and the 2nd Legendre polynomial of the time-autocorrelation of unit bond vectors, 2[ni(t,z)•ni(0,z)]>. Our results show that segmental dynamics is slower for stiffer chains and there is a strong correlation between the structure and dynamics in the interfacial layer. There is no glassy layer, and the slowing down in dynamics of stiffer chains in the adsorbed region can be attributed to the densification and the more persistent layering of segments.« less

  2. Changes in the quaternary structure of amelogenin when adsorbed onto surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Lea, Alan S.; Bernt, William; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2009-02-02

    The amelogenin protein is involved in the formation of highly controlled and anisotropic hydroxyapatite crystals in tooth enamel. Amelogenin is unique in that it self assembles to form supramolecular quaternary structures called “nanospheres,” spherical aggregates of amelogenin monomers typically 20-60 nm in diameter. Although nanospheres have been observed in solution, the quaternary structure of amelogenin adsorbed onto surfaces is not well known. A better understanding of the surface structure is of great importance, however, because the function of amelogenin depends on it. We report studies of the adsorption of amelogenin onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing COOH and CH3 end group functionality as well as single crystal fluoroapatite (FAP), a biologically relevant surface. The supramolecular structures of the protein in solution as determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared with the supramolecular structures of the protein physisorbed onto surfaces as studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found that although our solutions contained only nanospheres of narrow size distribution, smaller structures such as monomers and dimers were observed onto both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. This suggests that amelogenin can adsorb onto surfaces as small structures that peel away or “shed” from the nanospheres that are present in solution.

  3. Density-functional investigation of the geometric and electronic structure of ethylene oxide adsorbed on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Qing-Fang; Yang, Cui-Hong; Wei, Yue-Ling; Zhu, Xing-Feng; Rao, Wei-Feng

    2016-05-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of the ethylene oxide (EO) molecule adsorbed on Si(100)-(2 × 1) surface were investigated by using the density-functional theory calculations. All possible adsorbed structures were considered and it was found that only four adsorption structures are stable. The calculations of the formation energy revealed the most stable conformation and demonstrated that the nature of Si-O bond significantly affects the stability of adsorption systems. The analysis of corresponding electronic structures showed that two adsorbed structures are still semiconductor compounds but the other two are not. In particular, the EO after adsorbing was found to be connected via a ring-opening reaction where the molecule forms a five-membered ring together with the surface of dimer silicon atoms, and the produced five-membered ring is almost perpendicular to the silicon surface.

  4. Hydrogen-hydrogen intermolecular structure of polyethylene in the melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, J. D.; Annis, B. K.; Habenschuss, A.; Smith, G. D.; Borodin, O.; Tso, C.; Hsieh, E. T.; Soper, A. K.

    1999-05-01

    Three polyethylene samples, which differed in their degree of deuteration, were studied in neutron diffraction isotopic substitution (NDIS) experiments at 428 K. These results were complemented at small wavevectors by small angle neutron measurements. The intermolecular hydrogen-hydrogen (HH) structure function, hHH(Q), was obtained without recourse to intramolecular structure models, as demonstrated in a prior report. The PE experimental results are compared to computer simulation results for the alkanes C100 at 509 K and C44 at 350, 400, and 450 K. The small temperature dependence of the HH intermolecular radial distribution functions, gHH(r) for C44 indicates that the differences observed between the PE, C100, and C44 (450 K) results are, for the most part, not due to just temperature differences. It is shown that the string model, an analytic result from an integral equation theory of polymers (PRISM), can account approximately for the overall shape of the gHH(r) functions, and that this overall shape is dependent on the radius of gyration of the molecule. Further analysis shows that there are two other contributions to gHH(r), both of which are independent of chain length to first order. The first is due to chain-chain packing, and the second is due to local HH intermolecular correlations. These results are significant because they demonstrate that hHH(Q) is a useful function for studying intermolecular polymer structure, which has been shown to underpin phase behavior in polyolefin blends.

  5. Structural changes of silica mesocellular foam supported amine-functionalized CO2 adsorbents upon exposure to steam.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Bollini, Praveen; Didas, Stephanie A; Choi, Sunho; Drese, Jeffrey H; Jones, Christopher W

    2010-11-01

    Three classes of amine-functionalized mesocellular foam (MCF) materials are prepared and evaluated as CO(2) adsorbents. The stability of the adsorbents under steam/air and steam/nitrogen conditions is investigated using a Parr autoclave reactor to simulate, in an accelerated manner, the exposure that such adsorbents will see under steam stripping regeneration conditions at various temperatures. The CO(2) capacity and organic content of all adsorbents decrease after steam treatment under both steam/air and steam/nitrogen conditions, primarily due to structural collapse of the MCF framework, but with additional contributions likely associated with amine degradation during treatment under harsh conditions. Treatment with steam/air is found to have stronger effect on the CO(2) capacity of the adsorbents compared to steam/nitrogen.

  6. Synthesis of adsorbents with dendronic structures for protein hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Marco A; Yaman, Sena; Valencia-Gallegos, Jesus A; Tari, Canan; Rito-Palomares, Marco; González-Valdez, José

    2016-04-22

    Here, we introduced a new technology based on the incorporation of dendrons-branched chemical structures-onto supports for synthesis of HIC adsorbents. In doing so we studied the synthesis and performance of these novel HIC dendron-based adsorbents. The adsorbents were synthesized in a facile two-step reaction. First, Sepharose 4FF (R) was chemically modified with polyester dendrons of different branching degrees i.e. third (G3) or fifth (G5) generations. Then, butyl-end valeric acid ligands were coupled to dendrons via ester bond formation. UV-vis spectrophotometry and FTIR analyses of the modified resins confirmed the presence of the dendrons and their ligands on them. Inclusion of dendrons allowed the increment of ligand density, 82.5 ± 11 and 175.6 ± 5.7 μmol ligand/mL resin for RG3 and RG5, respectively. Static adsorption capacity of modified resins was found to be ∼ 60 mg BSA/mL resin. Interestingly, dynamic binding capacity was higher at high flow rates, 62.5 ± 0.8 and 58.0 ± 0.5mg/mL for RG3 and RG5, respectively. RG3 was able to separate lipase, β-lactoglobulin and α-chymotrypsin selectively as well as fractionating of a whole proteome from yeast. This innovative technology will improve the existing HIC resin synthesis methods. It will also allow the reduction of the amount of adsorbent used in a chromatographic procedure and thus permit the use of smaller columns resulting in faster processes. Furthermore, this method could potentially be considered as a green technology since both, dendrons and ligands, are formed by ester bonds that are more biodegradable allowing the disposal of used resin waste in a more ecofriendly manner when compared to other exiting resins.

  7. Synthesis of adsorbents with dendronic structures for protein hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Marco A; Yaman, Sena; Valencia-Gallegos, Jesus A; Tari, Canan; Rito-Palomares, Marco; González-Valdez, José

    2016-04-22

    Here, we introduced a new technology based on the incorporation of dendrons-branched chemical structures-onto supports for synthesis of HIC adsorbents. In doing so we studied the synthesis and performance of these novel HIC dendron-based adsorbents. The adsorbents were synthesized in a facile two-step reaction. First, Sepharose 4FF (R) was chemically modified with polyester dendrons of different branching degrees i.e. third (G3) or fifth (G5) generations. Then, butyl-end valeric acid ligands were coupled to dendrons via ester bond formation. UV-vis spectrophotometry and FTIR analyses of the modified resins confirmed the presence of the dendrons and their ligands on them. Inclusion of dendrons allowed the increment of ligand density, 82.5 ± 11 and 175.6 ± 5.7 μmol ligand/mL resin for RG3 and RG5, respectively. Static adsorption capacity of modified resins was found to be ∼ 60 mg BSA/mL resin. Interestingly, dynamic binding capacity was higher at high flow rates, 62.5 ± 0.8 and 58.0 ± 0.5mg/mL for RG3 and RG5, respectively. RG3 was able to separate lipase, β-lactoglobulin and α-chymotrypsin selectively as well as fractionating of a whole proteome from yeast. This innovative technology will improve the existing HIC resin synthesis methods. It will also allow the reduction of the amount of adsorbent used in a chromatographic procedure and thus permit the use of smaller columns resulting in faster processes. Furthermore, this method could potentially be considered as a green technology since both, dendrons and ligands, are formed by ester bonds that are more biodegradable allowing the disposal of used resin waste in a more ecofriendly manner when compared to other exiting resins. PMID:27018188

  8. Neutron Reflectometry Studies of the Adsorbed Structure of the Amelogenin, LRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Perez-Salas, Ursula; Masica, David L.; Philo, John; Krueger, Susan; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-03-21

    Amelogenins make up over 90 percent of the protein present during enamel formation and have been demonstrated to be critical in proper enamel development, but the mechanism governing this control is not well understood. Leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the charged regions from the full protein thought to control crystal regulation. In this work, we utilized neutron reflectivity (NR) to investigate the structure and orientation of LRAP adsorbed from solutions onto molecularly smooth COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) surfaces. Sedimentation velocity experiments revealed that LRAP is primarily a monomer in saturated calcium phosphate (SCP) solutions (0.15 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. LRAP adsorbed as ~33 Å thick layers at ~70% coverage as determined by NR. Rosetta simulations of the dimensions of LRAP in solution (37 Å diameter) indicate that the NR determined z dimension is consistent with an LRAP monomer. Sedimentation velocity experiments and Rosetta simulation show that the LRAP monomer has an extended, asymmetric shape in solution. The NR data suggests that the protein is not completely extended on the surface, having some degree of structure away from the surface. A protein orientation with the C-terminal and inner N-terminal region (~8-24)) located near the surface is consistent with the higher scattering length density (SLD) and higher protein hydration found near the surface by NR. This work presents new information on the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP in solution and adsorbed onto surfaces. It also presents further evidence that the monomeric species may be an important functional form of amelogenin proteins.

  9. Novel hydrogen hydrate structures under pressure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Lyakhov, Andriy O; Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem R; Dong, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Gas hydrates are systems of prime importance. In particular, hydrogen hydrates are potential materials of icy satellites and comets, and may be used for hydrogen storage. We explore the H₂O-H₂ system at pressures in the range 0-100 GPa with ab initio variable-composition evolutionary simulations. According to our calculation and previous experiments, the H₂O-H₂ system undergoes a series of transformations with pressure, and adopts the known open-network clathrate structures (sII, C₀), dense "filled ice" structures (C₁, C₂) and two novel hydrate phases. One of these is based on the hexagonal ice framework and has the same H₂O:H₂ ratio (2:1) as the C₀ phase at low pressures and similar enthalpy (we name this phase Ih-C₀). The other newly predicted hydrate phase has a 1:2 H₂O:H₂ ratio and structure based on cubic ice. This phase (which we name C₃) is predicted to be thermodynamically stable above 38 GPa when including van der Waals interactions and zero-point vibrational energy, and explains previously mysterious experimental X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements. This is the hydrogen-richest hydrate and this phase has a remarkable gravimetric density (18 wt.%) of easily extractable hydrogen.

  10. Novel hydrogen hydrate structures under pressure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Lyakhov, Andriy O; Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem R; Dong, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Gas hydrates are systems of prime importance. In particular, hydrogen hydrates are potential materials of icy satellites and comets, and may be used for hydrogen storage. We explore the H₂O-H₂ system at pressures in the range 0-100 GPa with ab initio variable-composition evolutionary simulations. According to our calculation and previous experiments, the H₂O-H₂ system undergoes a series of transformations with pressure, and adopts the known open-network clathrate structures (sII, C₀), dense "filled ice" structures (C₁, C₂) and two novel hydrate phases. One of these is based on the hexagonal ice framework and has the same H₂O:H₂ ratio (2:1) as the C₀ phase at low pressures and similar enthalpy (we name this phase Ih-C₀). The other newly predicted hydrate phase has a 1:2 H₂O:H₂ ratio and structure based on cubic ice. This phase (which we name C₃) is predicted to be thermodynamically stable above 38 GPa when including van der Waals interactions and zero-point vibrational energy, and explains previously mysterious experimental X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements. This is the hydrogen-richest hydrate and this phase has a remarkable gravimetric density (18 wt.%) of easily extractable hydrogen. PMID:25001502

  11. LEED structure analysis of Sb adsorbed Si(0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, T.; Hongo, S.; Urano, T.

    2001-06-01

    Sb adsorbed Si(0 0 1) surfaces have been investigated by LEED and AES. After a few monolayer (ML) deposition at room temperature, the LEED patterns of 1×1, 2×1 and c(4×4) have been observed successively as elevating the annealing temperature. Two structures (1×1 and 2×1) were examined by LEED I- V curve analysis. The genetic algorithm (GA) was operated to search a global optimum structure. For the 1×1 structure, a good R-factor value of 0.22 was obtained for the model in which topmost 1 ML Sb atoms sit on the Si atoms of fourth substrate layer. For the 2×1 structure, two cases of 1 ML and a half ML Sb coverage was examined, and an Sb dimer model with 1 ML coverage gave a better R-factor value.

  12. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations of H2 adsorbed to lithium-doped benzene: A model for hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindoy, Lachlan P.; Kolmann, Stephen J.; D'Arcy, Jordan H.; Crittenden, Deborah L.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2015-11-01

    Finite temperature quantum and anharmonic effects are studied in H2-Li+-benzene, a model hydrogen storage material, using path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations on an interpolated potential energy surface refined over the eight intermolecular degrees of freedom based upon M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) density functional theory calculations. Rigid-body PIMC simulations are performed at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 150 K, producing both quantum and classical probability density histograms describing the adsorbed H2. Quantum effects broaden the histograms with respect to their classical analogues and increase the expectation values of the radial and angular polar coordinates describing the location of the center-of-mass of the H2 molecule. The rigid-body PIMC simulations also provide estimates of the change in internal energy, ΔUads, and enthalpy, ΔHads, for H2 adsorption onto Li+-benzene, as a function of temperature. These estimates indicate that quantum effects are important even at room temperature and classical results should be interpreted with caution. Our results also show that anharmonicity is more important in the calculation of U and H than coupling—coupling between the intermolecular degrees of freedom becomes less important as temperature increases whereas anharmonicity becomes more important. The most anharmonic motions in H2-Li+-benzene are the "helicopter" and "ferris wheel" H2 rotations. Treating these motions as one-dimensional free and hindered rotors, respectively, provides simple corrections to standard harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor thermochemical expressions for internal energy and enthalpy that encapsulate the majority of the anharmonicity. At 150 K, our best rigid-body PIMC estimates for ΔUads and ΔHads are -13.3 ± 0.1 and -14.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol-1, respectively.

  13. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations of H2 adsorbed to lithium-doped benzene: A model for hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Lindoy, Lachlan P; Kolmann, Stephen J; D'Arcy, Jordan H; Crittenden, Deborah L; Jordan, Meredith J T

    2015-11-21

    Finite temperature quantum and anharmonic effects are studied in H2-Li(+)-benzene, a model hydrogen storage material, using path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations on an interpolated potential energy surface refined over the eight intermolecular degrees of freedom based upon M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) density functional theory calculations. Rigid-body PIMC simulations are performed at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 150 K, producing both quantum and classical probability density histograms describing the adsorbed H2. Quantum effects broaden the histograms with respect to their classical analogues and increase the expectation values of the radial and angular polar coordinates describing the location of the center-of-mass of the H2 molecule. The rigid-body PIMC simulations also provide estimates of the change in internal energy, ΔUads, and enthalpy, ΔHads, for H2 adsorption onto Li(+)-benzene, as a function of temperature. These estimates indicate that quantum effects are important even at room temperature and classical results should be interpreted with caution. Our results also show that anharmonicity is more important in the calculation of U and H than coupling-coupling between the intermolecular degrees of freedom becomes less important as temperature increases whereas anharmonicity becomes more important. The most anharmonic motions in H2-Li(+)-benzene are the "helicopter" and "ferris wheel" H2 rotations. Treating these motions as one-dimensional free and hindered rotors, respectively, provides simple corrections to standard harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor thermochemical expressions for internal energy and enthalpy that encapsulate the majority of the anharmonicity. At 150 K, our best rigid-body PIMC estimates for ΔUads and ΔHads are -13.3 ± 0.1 and -14.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol(-1), respectively.

  14. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations of H2 adsorbed to lithium-doped benzene: A model for hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Lindoy, Lachlan P; Kolmann, Stephen J; D'Arcy, Jordan H; Crittenden, Deborah L; Jordan, Meredith J T

    2015-11-21

    Finite temperature quantum and anharmonic effects are studied in H2-Li(+)-benzene, a model hydrogen storage material, using path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations on an interpolated potential energy surface refined over the eight intermolecular degrees of freedom based upon M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) density functional theory calculations. Rigid-body PIMC simulations are performed at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 150 K, producing both quantum and classical probability density histograms describing the adsorbed H2. Quantum effects broaden the histograms with respect to their classical analogues and increase the expectation values of the radial and angular polar coordinates describing the location of the center-of-mass of the H2 molecule. The rigid-body PIMC simulations also provide estimates of the change in internal energy, ΔUads, and enthalpy, ΔHads, for H2 adsorption onto Li(+)-benzene, as a function of temperature. These estimates indicate that quantum effects are important even at room temperature and classical results should be interpreted with caution. Our results also show that anharmonicity is more important in the calculation of U and H than coupling-coupling between the intermolecular degrees of freedom becomes less important as temperature increases whereas anharmonicity becomes more important. The most anharmonic motions in H2-Li(+)-benzene are the "helicopter" and "ferris wheel" H2 rotations. Treating these motions as one-dimensional free and hindered rotors, respectively, provides simple corrections to standard harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor thermochemical expressions for internal energy and enthalpy that encapsulate the majority of the anharmonicity. At 150 K, our best rigid-body PIMC estimates for ΔUads and ΔHads are -13.3 ± 0.1 and -14.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol(-1), respectively. PMID:26590532

  15. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - have been identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described. An awareness of probable shortages of strategic materials has been maintained in these suggested programs.

  16. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - were identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described.

  17. Structural and topographical characteristics of adsorbed WPI and monoglyceride mixed monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Patino, Juan M Rodríguez; Fernández, Marta Cejudo

    2004-05-25

    In this work we have analyzed the structural and topographical characteristics of mixed monolayers formed by an adsorbed whey protein isolate (WPI) and a spread monoglyceride monolayer (monopalmitin or monoolein) on the previously adsorbed protein film. Measurements of the surface pressure (pi)-area (A) isotherm were obtained at 20 degrees C and at pH 7 for protein-adsorbed films from water in a Wilhelmy-type film balance. Since the surface concentration (1/A) is actually unknown for the adsorbed monolayer, the values were derived by assuming that the A values for adsorbed and spread monolayers were equal at the collapse point of the mixed film. The pi-A isotherm deduced for adsorbed WPI monolayer in this work is practically the same as that obtained directly by spreading. For WPI-monoglyceride mixed films, the pi-A isotherms for adsorbed and spread monolayers at pi higher than the equilibrium surface pressure of WPI are practically coincident, a phenomenon which may be attributed to the protein displacement by the monoglyceride from the interface. At lower surface pressures, WPI and monoglyceride coexist at the interface and the adsorbed and spread pi-A isotherms (i.e., the monolayer structure of the mixed films) are different. Monopalmitin has a higher capacity than monoolein for the displacement of protein from the air-water interface. However, some degree of interactions exists between proteins and monoglycerides and these interactions are higher for adsorbed than for spread films. The topography of the monolayer corroborates these conclusions.

  18. Structure and Reactivity of Alkyl Ethers Adsorbed on CeO(2)(111) Model Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Calaza, Florencia C; Chen, Tsung-Liang; Mullins, David R; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2011-01-01

    The effect of surface hydroxyls on the adsorption of ether on ceria was explored. Adsorption of dimethyl ether (DME) and diethyl ether (DEE) on oxidized and reduced CeO{sub 2}(111) films was studied and compared with Ru(0001) using RAIRS and sXPS within a UHV environment. On Ru(0001) the ethers adsorb weakly with the molecular plane close to parallel to the surface plane. On the ceria films, the adsorption of the ethers was stronger than on the metal surface, presumably due to stronger interaction of the ether oxygen lone pair electrons with a cerium cation. This interaction causes the ethers to tilt away from the surface plane compared to the Ru(0001) surface. No pronounced differences were found between oxidized (CeO{sub 2}) and reduced (CeOx) films. The adsorption of the ethers was found to be perturbed by the presence of OH groups on hydroxylated CeOx. In the case of DEE, the geometry of adsorption resembles that found on Ru, and in the case of dimethyl ether DME is in between that one found on clean CeOx and the metal surface. Decomposition of the DEE was observed on the OH/CeOx surface following high DEE exposure at 300 K and higher temperatures. Ethoxides and acetates were identified as adsorbed species on the surface by means of RAIRS and ethoxides and formates by s-XPS. No decomposition of dimethyl ether was observed on the OH/CeOx at these higher temperatures, implying that the dissociation of the C-O bond from ethers requires the presence of {beta}-hydrogen.

  19. Structure and Reactivity of Alkyl Ethers Adsorbed on CeO2(111) Model Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    F Calaza; T Chen; D Mullins; S Overbury

    2011-12-31

    The effect of surface hydroxyls on the adsorption of ether on ceria was explored. Adsorption of dimethyl ether (DME) and diethyl ether (DEE) on oxidized and reduced CeO{sub 2}(111) films was studied and compared with Ru(0001) using RAIRS and sXPS within a UHV environment. On Ru(0001) the ethers adsorb weakly with the molecular plane close to parallel to the surface plane. On the ceria films, the adsorption of the ethers was stronger than on the metal surface, presumably due to stronger interaction of the ether oxygen lone pair electrons with a cerium cation. This interaction causes the ethers to tilt away from the surface plane compared to the Ru(0001) surface. No pronounced differences were found between oxidized (CeO{sub 2}) and reduced (CeOx) films. The adsorption of the ethers was found to be perturbed by the presence of OH groups on hydroxylated CeOx. In the case of DEE, the geometry of adsorption resembles that found on Ru, and in the case of dimethyl ether DME is in between that one found on clean CeOx and the metal surface. Decomposition of the DEE was observed on the OH/CeOx surface following high DEE exposure at 300 K and higher temperatures. Ethoxides and acetates were identified as adsorbed species on the surface by means of RAIRS and ethoxides and formates by s-XPS. No decomposition of dimethyl ether was observed on the OH/CeOx at these higher temperatures, implying that the dissociation of the C-O bond from ethers requires the presence of {beta}-hydrogen.

  20. Extended DLVO calculations expose the role of the structural nature of the adsorbent beads during chromatography.

    PubMed

    Aasim, Muhammad; Bibi, Noor Shad; Vennapusa, Rami Reddy; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2012-05-01

    Protein adsorption onto hydrophobic interaction chromatography supports was studied by a surface-thermodynamics approach. To gather relevant experimental information, contact angle measurements and zeta potential determinations were performed on three different commercial adsorbent beads, Phenyl Sepharose 6 Fast Flow, Toyopearl Phenyl 650-C and Source 15 Phenyl, having soft to rigid backbone structure. Similar information was obtained for a collection of model proteins, lysozyme, bovine serum albumin (BSA), polygalacturonase, aminopeptidase, chymosin, aspartic protease, beta-galactosidase, human immunoglobulin G, and lactoferrin, were evaluated in the hydrated and in the dehydrated state. Based on the mentioned experimental data, calculations were performed to obtain the (interfacial) energy versus distance profiles of nine individual (model) proteins on (commercial) beads of three different types. All of these beads harbored the phenyl-ligand onto a matrix of differentiated chemical nature. Extended Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) calculations were correlated with actual chromatographic behavior. Typical chromatography conditions were employed. The population of model proteins utilized in this study could be segregated into two groups, according to the minimum values observed for the resulting interaction energy pockets and the corresponding retention volumes (or times) during chromatography. Moreover, trends were also identified as a function of the type of adsorbent bead under consideration. This has revealed the influence of the physicochemical nature of the bead structure on the adsorption process and consequently, on the expected separation behavior.

  1. Redetermination of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of adventitious water in a reaction between dicyclopentamethylene thiuram-disulfide (C5H10NCS2)(sub 2) and a picoline solution of tricyclopentadienyl indium(III) (C5H5)(sub 3). It resulted in the formation of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide (C5H13NS). The piperidinium hydrogen sulfide produced in this way was unambiguously characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure determination showed that the piperidinium hydrogen sulfide crystal (MW = 119.23 g/mol) has an orthorhombic (Pbcm) unit cell whose parameters are: a = 9.818(2), b = 7.3720(1), c = 9.754(1) A, V = 706.0(3) A(exp 3), Z=4. D(sub chi) = 1.122 g cm(exp -3), Mo K(alpha) (lamda = 0.71073), mu= 3.36 cm(exp -1), F(000) = 264.0, T =293 K, R = 0.036 for 343 reflections with F(sub O)(sup 2) greater than 3 sigma (F(sub O)(sup 2)) and 65 variables. The compound consists of (C5H10NH2)(+) cations and (SH)(-) anions with both species residing on crystallographic mirror planes. N-H -- S hydrogen bonding contributes to the interconnection of neighboring piperidinium components of the compound.

  2. Pre-adsorbed type-I collagen structure-dependent changes in osteoblastic phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Hanagata, Nobutaka . E-mail: HANAGATA.Nobutaka@nims.go.jp; Takemura, Taro; Monkawa, Akira; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2006-06-16

    Type-I collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix in bones and modulates various functions of osteoblasts. We prepared two different structures of type-I collagen on tissue culture grade polystylene (TCPS) surfaces, one is feltwork structure of filamentous molecules from acid solutions (ACs) and the other is network structure of fibrils from neutral solutions (NCs), to examine effects of the structures on the maturation process of osteoblast-like cells. No significant differences of cell proliferation were observed between TCPS and ACs, but NCs delayed the proliferation. In initial cell attachment, the cells on ACs had tense lamellipodia with sharp tips, while those on NCs had loose lamellipodia. No detectable differences in levels of expressed integrin {alpha}{sub 2}- and {alpha}{sub 5}-subunits were observed between the structures. Although the matrix mineralization in NCs was also delayed in comparison with TCPS and ACs, fully mineralized levels in NCs were the same as those of TCPS and ACs. In addition, although we examined the effects of densities of pre-adsorbed collagen molecules on osteoblast maturation, the effects were less serious than those of the structures. This study suggests that the structures of collagen affect proliferation and mineralization of osteoblast-like cells.

  3. Speciation of Fe adsorbed onto and assimilated by bacteria: XAS structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Aridane G.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Shirikova, Ludmilla S.; Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Magdalena Santana-Casiano, J.; González-Dávila, Melchor; Emnova, Ecaterina E.

    2010-05-01

    The speciation of iron has been studied in natural waters in order to elucidate the biogeochemical cycle of this element in the environment. One important aspect of Fe biogeochemistry that remains poorly investigated is the speciation of this element within the living organisms, notably bacteria. In this study, iron speciation has been measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) structural analysis in bacterial samples having surface adsorbed or intracellular incorporated Fe. Three typical and abundant cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp., Planktothrix sp. and Gloeocapsa sp.) and one soil bacteria (rhizospheric Pseudomonas aureofaciens) were used both in assimilation (from Fe3+-containing nutrient solution) and adsorption (from Fe3+ and Fe2+- containing inert electrolyte) experiments. Aquatic cyanobacteria were selected for their well-known requirement for Fe and Pseudomonas aureofaciens was used due to its capacity to produce high exopolysacharide on the cell surface under environmental stress. Results of this work demonstrated that Fe uptake during growth of EPS-producing and EPS-poor cultures produces octahedral oxygen environment of trivalent iron with no polymers of Fe-O-Fe structures even at pH 7 (P. aurefaciens) and 10.5 (cyanobacteria). Intracellular Fe storage in the form of Fe(III) phosphate is the most likely scavenging mechanism during growth at high concentration (10-100 mg/L of Fe(aq)). Fe(III)-phosphate complexes at the surface and inside the cells were detected for Synechochoccus sp., Planthotrix sp. and P. aureofaciens. In contrast, studies with Gloeocapsa sp. showed mainly Fe-Alginate structures. Fe(II) were not detected by XANES analysis, being all oxidized to Fe(III) under aerobic environmental conditions. Our results strongly suggest that, in the presence of surface organic ligands, the oxidation of divalent iron does occur but the polymerization of formed Fe(III) oxyhydroxides is completely inhibited and adsorbed iron presents in the form

  4. Theoretical predictions of structures in dispersions containing charged colloidal particles and non-adsorbing polymers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fei; Turesson, Martin; Woodward, Clifford E; van Gruijthuijsen, Kitty; Stradner, Anna; Forsman, Jan

    2016-04-28

    We develop a theoretical model to describe structural effects on a specific system of charged colloidal polystyrene particles, upon the addition of non-adsorbing PEG polymers. This system has previously been investigated experimentally, by scattering methods, so we are able to quantitatively compare predicted structure factors with corresponding experimental data. Our aim is to construct a model that is coarse-grained enough to be computationally manageable, yet detailed enough to capture the important physics. To this end, we utilize classical polymer density functional theory, wherein all possible polymer configurations are accounted for, subject to a mean-field Boltzmann weight. We make efforts to counteract drawbacks with this mean-field approach, resulting in structural predictions that agree very well with computationally more demanding simulations. Electrostatic interactions are handled at the fully non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann level, and we demonstrate that a linearization leads to less accurate predictions. The particle charge is an experimentally unknown parameter. We define the surface charge such that the experimental and theoretical gel point at equal polymer concentration coincide. Assuming a fixed surface charge for a certain salt concentration, we find very good agreements between measured and predicted structure factors across a wide range of polymer concentrations. We also present predictions for other structural quantities, such as radial distribution functions, and cluster size distributions. Finally, we demonstrate that our model predicts the occurrence of equilibrium clusters at high polymer concentrations, but low particle volume fractions and salt levels. PMID:27056112

  5. Coordination structure of adsorbed Zn(II) at Water-TiO2 interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    He, G.; Pan, G.; Zhang, M.; Waychunas, G.A.

    2011-01-15

    The local structure of aqueous metal ions on solid surfaces is central to understanding many chemical and biological processes in soil and aquatic environments. Here, the local coordination structure of hydrated Zn(II) at water-TiO{sub 2} interfaces was identified by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A nonintegral coordination number of average {approx}4.5 O atoms around a central Zn atom was obtained by EXAFS analysis. DFT calculations indicated that this coordination structure was consistent with the mixture of 4-coordinated bidentate binuclear (BB) and 5-coordinated bidentate mononuclear (BM) metastable equilibrium adsorption (MEA) states. The BB complex has 4-coordinated Zn, while the monodentate mononuclear (MM) complex has 6-coordinated Zn, and a 5-coordinated adsorbed Zn was found in the BM adsorption mode. DFT calculated energies showed that the lower-coordinated BB and BM modes were thermodynamically more favorable than the higher-coordinated MM MEA state. The experimentally observed XANES fingerprinting provided additional direct spectral evidence of 4- and 5-coordinated Zn-O modes. The overall spectral and computational evidence indicated that Zn(II) can occur in 4-, 5-, and 6-oxygen coordinated sites in different MEA states due to steric hindrance effects, and the coexistence of different MEA states formed the multiple coordination environments.

  6. Band structure of hydrogenated silicene on Ag(111): Evidence for half-silicane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Olovsson, W.; Uhrberg, R. I. G.

    2016-02-01

    In the case of graphene, hydrogenation removes the conductivity due to the bands forming the Dirac cone by opening up a band gap. This type of chemical functionalization is of the utmost importance for electronic applications. As predicted by theoretical studies, a similar change in the band structure is expected for silicene, the closest analog to graphene. We here report a study of the atomic and electronic structures of hydrogenated silicene with hydrogen on one side, the so-called half-silicane. The ("2 √{3 }×2 √{3 } ") phase of silicene on Ag(111) was used in this Rapid Communication since it can be formed homogeneously across the entire surface of the Ag substrate. Low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy data clearly show that hydrogenation changes the structure of silicene on Ag(111) resulting in a (1 × 1) periodicity with respect to the silicene lattice. The hydrogenated silicene also exhibits a quasiregular (2 √{3 }×2 √{3 } )-like arrangement of vacancies. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy revealed two dispersive bands which can be unambiguously assigned to half-silicane. The common top of these bands is located at ˜0.9 eV below the Fermi level. We find that the experimental bands are closely reproduced by the theoretical band structure of free-standing silicene with H adsorbed on the upper hexagonal sublattice.

  7. LEED crystallography studies of the structure of clean and adsorbate-covered Ir, Pt and Rh crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koestner, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    There have only been a few Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) intensity analyses carried out to determine the structure of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces; most surface crystallography studies concentrated on the structure of clean unreconstructed or atomic adsorbate-covered transition metal faces. The few molecular adsorption systems already investigated by dynamical LEED are CO on Ni(100), Cu(100) and Pd(100) as well as C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ adsorbed on Pt(111). The emphasis of this thesis research has been to extend the applicability of LEED crystallography to the more complicated unit cells found in molecular overlayers on transition metals or in there constructed surfaces of clean transition metals.

  8. Manipulation of adsorbed atoms and creation of new structures on room-temperature surfaces with a scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Whitman, L J; Stroscio, J A; Dragoset, R A; Celotta, R J

    1991-03-01

    A general method of manipulating adsorbed atoms and molecules on room-temperature surfaces with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope is described. By applying an appropriate voltage pulse between the sample and probe tip, adsorbed atoms can be induced to diffuse into the region beneath the tip. The field-induced diffusion occurs preferentially toward the tip during the voltage pulse because of the local potential energy gradient arising from the interaction of the adsorbate dipole moment with the electric field gradient at the surface. Depending upon the surface and pulse parameters, cesium (Cs) structures from one nanometer to a few tens of nanometers across have been created in this way on the (110) surfaces of gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium antimonide (InSb), including structures that do not naturally occur.

  9. Impact of temperature and electrical potentials on the stability and structure of collagen adsorbed on the gold electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, Frank; Ahlers, Michael; Brand, Izabella; Wittstock, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    The morphology and structure of collagen type I adsorbed on gold electrodes were studied as a function of electrode potential and temperature by means of capacitance measurements, polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and scanning force microscopy at temperatures of 37 °C, 43 °C and 50 °C. The selected temperatures corresponded to the normal body temperature, temperature of denaturation of collagen molecules and denaturation of collagen fibrils, respectively. Independently of the solution temperature, collagen was adsorbed on gold electrodes in the potential range - 0.7 V < E < 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl, where the protein film was very stable. Fragments of collagen molecules made a direct contact to the gold surface and water was present in the film. Protein molecules were oriented preferentially with their long axis towards the gold surface. Collagen molecules in the adsorbed state preserved their native triple helical structure even at temperatures corresponding to collagen denaturation in aqueous solutions. Application of E < - 0.75 V vs. Ag/AgCl leads to the swelling of the protein film by water and desorption from the electrode surface. IR spectra provided no evidence of the thermal denaturation of adsorbed collagen molecules. A temperature increase to 50 °C leads to a distortion of the collagen film. The processes of aggregation and fibrilization were preferred over thermal denaturation for collagen adsorbed on the electrode surface and exposed to changing potentials.

  10. Electronic and structural properties of nitrogen adsorbed Nb(100) surfaces: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, P. A. S.; Miwa, R. H.

    2013-08-01

    We have performed an ab initio total energy investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitrogen adsorbed Nb(100) surface, N/Nb(100). We find an energetic preference for the nitrogen adsorption on the hollow sites of the Nb(100) surface. Upon the presence of N adatoms, there is a reduction of the electronic density of states near the Fermi level. However, the metallic character of the Nb(100) surface has been maintained. The (occupied) electronic states of N adatoms are resonant within the valence band of Nb(100), mostly lying at 4 eV below the Fermi level. Further investigations reveal the formation of energetically stable N/Nb(100)-(n × 1) phase, being the (2 × 1), (5 × 1), and (10 × 1) the most likely ones. Those (n × 1) structures are composed by NbN stripes separated by N vacancy lines. Our scanning tunneling microscopy simulations indicate the formation of bright lines lying on the Nb atoms neighboring the (dark) N vacancy lines, giving rise to an anisotropic electronic structure on the N/Nb(100)-(n × 1) surface. That is, the metallic character of the surface has been strengthened along the vacancy-lines.

  11. Cathodic reduction of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide at cobalt and iron crowned phthalocyanines adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, N.; Janda, P.; Lever, A.B.P. )

    1992-12-09

    The surface electrochemistry of iron and cobalt crowned phthalocyanine (Fe[sup II]CRPc(-2) and Co[sup II]CRPc(-2)) adsorbed on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrode has been explored under an argon atmosphere. The redox processes of surface bound Co[sup II]CRPc(-2)/[Co[sup I]CRPc(-2)][sup [minus

  12. Analysis of structure and orientation of adsorbed polymers in solution subject to a dynamic shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.; Baker, S.; Toprakcioglu, C.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Polymer-based separation techniques rely on the ability of a binding portion of the polymer to interact with a specific molecule in a solution flowing past the polymer. The location of the binding site within or out of the entangled polymer chains is thus crucial to the effectiveness of these methods. For this reason, the details of flow induced deformation of the polymer chains is important in such applications as exclusion chromatography, waste water treatment, ultrafiltration, enhanced oil recovery and microbial adhesion. Few techniques exist to examine the structure and orientation of polymeric materials, and even fewer to examine systems in a dynamic fluid flow. The goal of this project was to understand the molecular structure and orientation of adsorbed polymers with and without active binding ligands as a function of solvent shear rate, solvent power, polymer molecular weight, surface polymer coverage and heterogeneity of the surface polymer chains by neutron reflectometry in a newly designed shear cell. Geometrical effects on binding of molecules in the flow was also studied subject to the same parameters.

  13. Di- and triethanolamine grafted kaolinites of different structural order as adsorbents of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Koteja, Anna; Matusik, Jakub

    2015-10-01

    Efficient sorbents based on widely available clay minerals are of particular value in the field of pollution control. The research shows mineral-based sorbents formed through organic modification of two kaolinites differing in structural order. Their structure and texture was characterized by XRD, FTIR, DTA/TG, CHN, XPS and N2 adsorption/desorption methods. The obtained materials were tested as adsorbents of Cd(II), Zn(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) in equilibrium and kinetic experiments. Moreover, the sorption mechanisms were subjected to investigation. The synthesis procedure involved interlayer grafting of kaolinites with diethanolamine (DEA) and triethanolamine (TEA). The organo-kaolinites showed resistance to hydrolysis and temperature up to ∼300 °C. The adsorption improvement was observed for the modified materials, particular the DEA derivatives and materials based on the poorly ordered kaolinite. The XPS analyses of elements local environment coupled with binding strength tests enabled to confirm the immobilization mechanisms. The pure kaolinites removed metal ions through either the ion-exchange or the surface complexation, exclusively on the external surfaces. In turn, the grafted materials additionally immobilized ions in the interlayer space which was expanded. The ions were attracted by the grafted DEA or TEA, which are N and O-donors and readily form complexes with metals, particularly with the Cu(II).

  14. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural alloys. A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to hydrogen embrittlement of structural metals and alloys are reviewed. Particular note was taken of documents regarding hydrogen effects in rocket propulsion, aircraft propulsion and hydrogen energy systems, including storage and transfer systems.

  15. Hydrogen and the structure of transition aluminas

    SciTech Connect

    Sohlberg, K.; Pennycook, S.J.; Pantelides, S.T.

    1999-08-25

    {alpha}-Alumina results from the complete dehydration of several minerals of the form Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center{underscore}dot}nH{sub 2}O. The ``transition'' aluminas, {gamma}-alumina, {eta}-alumina, and {delta}-alumina are known to have a spinel structure but the possibility that they contain hydrogen (H) has been the subject of debate. The authors present a series of density-functional theory calculations which, together with available experimental data, show that the spinel aluminas exist over a range of hydrogen content captured by the empirical formula H{sub 3m}Al{sub 2{minus}m}O{sub 3}, with a different greek-letter phases corresponding to different distributions of the Aluminum (Al) ions on the two cation sublattices. Calculations of densities and vibrational frequencies of bulk OH bonds are in excellent agreement with available data. The theory reconciles seemingly inconsistent data and reveals a remarkable property of the spinel aluminas: They are ``reactive sponges'' in that they can store and release water in a reactive way. This chemical activity offers a basis for understanding long-standing puzzles in the behavior of aluminas in catalytic systems.

  16. Dephenolization of stored olive-mill wastewater, using four different adsorbing matrices to attain a low-cost feedstock for hydrogen photo-production.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Giulia; Pintucci, Cristina; Carlozzi, Pietro

    2013-06-01

    This investigation deals with the conversion of olive-mill wastewater (OMW) into several feedstocks suitable for hydrogen photo-production. The goal was reached by means of two sequential steps: (i) a pre-treatment process of stored-OMW for the removal of polyphenols, which made it possible to obtain several effluents, and (ii) a photo-fermentative process for hydrogen production by means of Rhodopseudomonas palustris sp. Four different adsorbent matrices (Azolla, granular active carbon, resin, and zeolite) were used to dephenolize stored-OMW. The four liquid fractions attained by using the above process created the same number of effluents, and these were diluted with water and then used for hydrogen photo-production. The maximum hydrogen production rate (14.31 mL/L/h) was attained with the photo-fermenter containing 25% of the effluent, which came from the pre-treatment of stored-OMW using granular active carbon. Using the carbon effluent as feedstock, the greatest light conversion efficiency of 2.29% was achieved. PMID:23612177

  17. Hydrogen spillover on Rh/TiO2: the FTIR study of donated electrons, co-adsorbed CO and H/D exchange.

    PubMed

    Panayotov, D; Ivanova, E; Mihaylov, M; Chakarova, K; Spassov, T; Hadjiivanov, K

    2015-08-28

    Hydrogen dissociation and spillover on supported metal nanoparticles have received renewed interest because these chemical processes are closely related to applications in heterogeneous catalysis and hydrogen storage. In heterogeneous catalysis, spillover can control the reaction rate and selectivity of a wide range of reactions, e.g. hydrogenation, synthesis of methanol and hydroisomerization. In this work, we combine three spectroscopic approaches, i.e. the FT-IR spectroscopy of donated electrons, co-adsorbed CO and H/D exchange, to obtain detailed information on the dynamics of hydrogen interaction with a model 1.3% Rh/TiO2 catalyst. Our spectroscopic results helped us to build a physical picture of the processes occurring during the H-spillover on Rh/TiO2. It was found that molecular H2 dissociates on nanocrystalline Rh; H atoms spillover onto the titania thus protonating the semiconductor, while donating electrons to shallow trap (ST) states and the conduction band (CB) of TiO2. These donated electrons are observed by their specific IR features. By simultaneously monitoring the changes in the vibrational modes of CO, and, the infrared absorbance due to transitions involving CB and ST electrons, we found that both CO-reduced and partially re-oxidized Rh nanocrystallites promote the H-spillover and thus the n-doping of TiO2 materials. Upon evacuation, the process reverses: hydrogen atoms spillover back to Rh nanoparticles where they recombine to form H2 molecules that desorb from the surface. These new mechanistic insights into the process of H2 dissociation and spillover on the powder Rh/TiO2 catalyst call for further model surface science studies with model metal nanoparticle-single crystal substrate systems, in which a detailed picture of energetics and spatial distribution of hydrogen and injected electrons could be obtained.

  18. Binding energies and electronic structures of adsorbed titanium chains on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chih-Kai; Zhao, Jijun; Lu, Jianping

    2002-03-01

    Our calculations based on first principles have shown that titanium is much favored energetically over gold and aluminum to form a continuous chain on a variety of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Results from two zigzag nanotubes, (10,0) and (14,0), and two armchairs, (6,6) and (8,8), indicate that binding energy for a Ti-adsorbed SWNT is generally six to seven eV per unit cell larger than a Au or Al-adsorbed SWNT. Furthermore, the adsorbed Ti chain generates additional states in the band gaps of the two semi-conducting zigzag nanotubes, transforming them into metals.

  19. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-impregnated mesoporous silicates: surface structure and behavior of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Woo; Han, James S; Jang, Min; Min, Soo-Hong; Park, Jae Kwang; Rowell, Roger M

    2004-02-01

    Phosphorus from excess fertilizers and detergents ends up washing into lakes, creeks, and rivers. This overabundance of phosphorus causes excessive aquatic plant and algae growth and depletes the dissolved oxygen supply in the water. In this study, aluminum-impregnated mesoporous adsorbents were tested for their ability to remove phosphate from water. The surface structure of the materials was investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD), a N2 adsorption-desorption technique, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the effect of surface properties on the adsorption behavior of phosphate. The mesoporous materials were loaded with Al components by reaction with surface silanol groups. In the adsorption test, the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials showed fast adsorption kinetics as well as high adsorption capacities, compared with activated alumina. The uniform mesopores of the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials caused the diffusion rate in the adsorption process to increase, which in turn caused the fast adsorption kinetics. High phosphate adsorption capacities of the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials were attributed to not only the increase of surface hydroxyl density on Al oxide due to well-dispersed impregnation of Al components but also the decrease in stoichiometry of surface hydroxyl ions to phosphate by the formation of monodentate surface complexes. PMID:14968882

  20. Comparative study of normal and branched alkane monolayer films adsorbed on a solid surface. I. Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enevoldsen, A. D.; Hansen, F. Y.; Diama, A.; Criswell, L.; Taub, H.

    2007-03-01

    The structure of a monolayer film of the branched alkane squalane (C30H62) adsorbed on graphite has been studied by neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and compared with a similar study of the n-alkane tetracosane (n-C24H52). Both molecules have 24 carbon atoms along their backbone and squalane has, in addition, six methyl side groups. Upon adsorption, there are significant differences as well as similarities in the behavior of these molecular films. Both molecules form ordered structures at low temperatures; however, while the melting point of the two-dimensional (2D) tetracosane film is roughly the same as the bulk melting point, the surface strongly stabilizes the 2D squalane film such that its melting point is 91K above its value in bulk. Therefore, squalane, like tetracosane, will be a poor lubricant in those nanoscale devices that require a fluid lubricant at room temperature. The neutron diffraction data show that the translational order in the squalane monolayer is significantly less than in the tetracosane monolayer. The authors' MD simulations suggest that this is caused by a distortion of the squalane molecules upon adsorption on the graphite surface. When the molecules are allowed to relax on the surface, they distort such that all six methyl groups point away from the surface. This results in a reduction in the monolayer's translational order characterized by a decrease in its coherence length and hence a broadening of the diffraction peaks. The MD simulations also show that the melting mechanism in the squalane monolayer is the same footprint reduction mechanism found in the tetracosane monolayer, where a chain melting drives the lattice melting.

  1. Comparative study of normal and branched alkane monolayer films adsorbed on a solid surface. I. Structure.

    PubMed

    Enevoldsen, A D; Hansen, F Y; Diama, A; Criswell, L; Taub, H

    2007-03-14

    The structure of a monolayer film of the branched alkane squalane (C30H62) adsorbed on graphite has been studied by neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and compared with a similar study of the n-alkane tetracosane (n-C24H52). Both molecules have 24 carbon atoms along their backbone and squalane has, in addition, six methyl side groups. Upon adsorption, there are significant differences as well as similarities in the behavior of these molecular films. Both molecules form ordered structures at low temperatures; however, while the melting point of the two-dimensional (2D) tetracosane film is roughly the same as the bulk melting point, the surface strongly stabilizes the 2D squalane film such that its melting point is 91 K above its value in bulk. Therefore, squalane, like tetracosane, will be a poor lubricant in those nanoscale devices that require a fluid lubricant at room temperature. The neutron diffraction data show that the translational order in the squalane monolayer is significantly less than in the tetracosane monolayer. The authors' MD simulations suggest that this is caused by a distortion of the squalane molecules upon adsorption on the graphite surface. When the molecules are allowed to relax on the surface, they distort such that all six methyl groups point away from the surface. This results in a reduction in the monolayer's translational order characterized by a decrease in its coherence length and hence a broadening of the diffraction peaks. The MD simulations also show that the melting mechanism in the squalane monolayer is the same footprint reduction mechanism found in the tetracosane monolayer, where a chain melting drives the lattice melting.

  2. A surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of tellurium adsorbed onto Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, S. R.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Wilks, S. P.; Dunstan, P. R.; Dunscombe, C. J.; Williams, R. H.

    1996-09-01

    The adsorption of tellurium on Si(100) has been studied using surface extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (SEXAFS) and X-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW). This particular system is of interest due to its potential applicability in the surfactant aided growth of CdHgTeCdTeSi(100) based infra-red detectors. The Te/Si(100) structure was generated by depositing a thick layer (˜ 100 Å) of CdTe onto a clean Si (2 × 1) double domain surface, and annealing the sample to 350°C. This resulted is a ˜ 1 ML Te terminated surface where the (2 × 1) reconstruction was lost in favour of a (1 × 1) symmetry. X-ray absorption of the Te L 3 edge ( E = 4341 eV), with a photon energy range of 4440-4700 eV, was probed using a total yield detection scheme. The SEXAFS results indicated that the Te atoms sat in 2-fold bridge sites directly above a fourth layer Si atom. The corresponding bond length was measured to be 2.52 ± 0.05 Å. The XSW measurements of the (400) reflection gave a coherent position of 1.63 ± 0.03 Å and a coherent fraction of 0.65. This is consistent with the breaking of the SiSi dimers and thus could be an example of the phenomena of adsorbate-induced dereconstruction of the surface. These results are compared with those of Bennet et al. who examined a similar system using soft X-ray photoemission (SXPS) and the STM study of Yoshikawa et al.

  3. Structure and Properties of Tactic Hydrogenated Polynorbornenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Adam B.; Register, Richard A.

    Tacticity is one of the most important structural parameters for determining the physical properties of a polymer. A high degree of steroregularity typically promotes crystallization, with different tacticities giving rise to differences in crystal structure, melting point, and degree of crystallinity. In polynorbornene (PN) made by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), tacticity is determined by the relative configuration of the nonplanar cyclopentylene rings enchained in the backbone. Traditional ROMP initiators yield atactic polymers (aPN); however, recent advances in catalyst design have produced both isotactic and syndiotactic PN. Newly reported cis,isotactic- and cis,syndiotactic-PNs were catalytically hydrogenated (abbreviated ihPN and shPN, respectively) without altering the tacticity. The thermal and structural characteristics of ihPN and shPN were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) and compared to that of ahPN. Remarkably, all three polymers are semicrystalline, each with a distinct crystal structure. ihPN has a nominal melting point of 165 C, more than 20 C above that of ahPN. WAXS patterns of melt-drawn fibers of ihPN show few strong reflections indicative of either a highly symmetric unit cell or poor long-range order. ihPN fibers also exhibit a crystal-crystal transition near 130 C, which is not fully reversible on subsequent cooling. On the other hand, shPN has a nominal melting point some 15 C below that of ahPN, and shPN fibers show no evidence of polymorphism.

  4. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  5. Study on the electronic structure and hydrogen adsorption by transition metal decorated single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Modak, P; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Banerjee, S

    2012-05-01

    The ground state geometry and electronic structure of various 4d transition metal (TM) atom (Y, Zr, Nb and Mo) decorated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are obtained using density functional theory and the projector augmented wave (PAW) method. We found a systematic change in the adsorption site of the transition metal atom with increasing number of d electrons. We also predicted that Y and Zr decorated SWCNTs are metallic whereas Nb and Mo decorated SWCNTs are semiconducting. From detailed electronic structure and Bader charge analysis we found that the systematic variation of the adsorption site with the number of d electrons is related to the decreasing amount of charge transfer from the TM atom to the SWCNT along the 4d series. We have also studied the hydrogen adsorption capabilities of these decorated SWCNTs to understand the role of transition metal d electrons in binding the hydrogen molecules to the system. We found that metallic SWCNT + TM systems are better hydrogen adsorbers. We showed that the hydrogen adsorption by a TM decorated SWCNT will be maximum when all the adsorptions are physisorption and that the retention of magnetism by the system is crucial for physisorption.

  6. Modeling the construction of polymeric adsorbent media: effects of counter-ions on ligand immobilization and pore structure.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Enrico; Wang, Jee-Ching; Liapis, Athanasios I

    2014-02-28

    Molecular dynamics modeling and simulations are employed to study the effects of counter-ions on the dynamic spatial density distribution and total loading of immobilized ligands as well as on the pore structure of the resultant ion exchange chromatography adsorbent media. The results show that the porous adsorbent media formed by polymeric chain molecules involve transport mechanisms and steric resistances which cause the charged ligands and counter-ions not to follow stoichiometric distributions so that (i) a gradient in the local nonelectroneutrality occurs, (ii) non-uniform spatial density distributions of immobilized ligands and counter-ions are formed, and (iii) clouds of counter-ions outside the porous structure could be formed. The magnitude of these counter-ion effects depends on several characteristics associated with the size, structure, and valence of the counter-ions. Small spherical counter-ions with large valence encounter the least resistance to enter a porous structure and their effects result in the formation of small gradients in the local nonelectroneutrality, higher ligand loadings, and more uniform spatial density distributions of immobilized ligands, while the formation of exterior counter-ion clouds by these types of counter-ions is minimized. Counter-ions with lower valence charges, significantly larger sizes, and elongated shapes, encounter substantially greater steric resistances in entering a porous structure and lead to the formation of larger gradients in the local nonelectroneutrality, lower ligand loadings, and less uniform spatial density distributions of immobilized ligands, as well as substantial in size exterior counter-ion clouds. The effects of lower counter-ion valence on pore structure, local nonelectroneutrality, spatial ligand density distribution, and exterior counter-ion cloud formation are further enhanced by the increased size and structure of the counter-ion. Thus, the design, construction, and functionality of

  7. Hydrogen in magnesium palladium thin layer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijtzer, G. L.

    2008-02-01

    In this thesis, the study of hydrogen storage, absorption and desorption in magnesium layers is described. The magnesium layers have a thickness of 50-500 nm and are covered by a palladium layer which acts as a hydrogen dissociation/association catalyst. The study was preformed under ultra high vacuum conditions to avoid oxygen contamination. The main analysis techniques were RBS, ERD and TDS.

  8. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide onto activated carbon fibers: effect of pore structure and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguo; Kwon, Seokjoon; Borguet, Eric; Vidic, Radisav

    2005-12-15

    To understand the nature of H2S adsorption onto carbon surfaces under dry and anoxic conditions, the effects of carbon pore structure and surface chemistry were studied using activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structures and surface areas. Surface pretreatments, including oxidation and heattreatment, were conducted before adsorption/desorption tests in a fixed-bed reactor. Raw ACFs with higher surface area showed greater adsorption and retention of sulfur, and heat treatment further enhanced adsorption and retention of sulfur. The retained amount of hydrogen sulfide correlated well with the amount of basic functional groups on the carbon surface, while the desorbed amount reflected the effect of pore structure. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the retained sulfurous compounds were strongly bonded to the carbon surface. In addition, surface chemistry of the sorbent might determine the predominant form of adsorbate on the surface. PMID:16475362

  9. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide onto activated carbon fibers: effect of pore structure and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguo; Kwon, Seokjoon; Borguet, Eric; Vidic, Radisav

    2005-12-15

    To understand the nature of H2S adsorption onto carbon surfaces under dry and anoxic conditions, the effects of carbon pore structure and surface chemistry were studied using activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structures and surface areas. Surface pretreatments, including oxidation and heattreatment, were conducted before adsorption/desorption tests in a fixed-bed reactor. Raw ACFs with higher surface area showed greater adsorption and retention of sulfur, and heat treatment further enhanced adsorption and retention of sulfur. The retained amount of hydrogen sulfide correlated well with the amount of basic functional groups on the carbon surface, while the desorbed amount reflected the effect of pore structure. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the retained sulfurous compounds were strongly bonded to the carbon surface. In addition, surface chemistry of the sorbent might determine the predominant form of adsorbate on the surface.

  10. Structural and magnetic studies on heavy-metal-adsorbing iron sulphide nanoparticles produced by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, J. H. P.; Cressey, B. A.; Roberts, A. P.; Ellwood, D. C.; Charnock, J. M.; Soper, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    In previous and in work to be published, it has been shown that iron sulphide material, produced by sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), is an excellent adsorbent for a wide range of heavy metals. The material adsorbs between 100 and 400 mg g -1 and residual levels in solutions can be of the order of pg per litre. Further, strongly magnetic forms of this material can now be produced which can be effectively and cheaply removed from suspension together with the adsorbate by magnetic separation. This paper examines the structure of weakly magnetic and strongly magnetic iron sulphide material produced by SRB with a view to increasing the understanding of its adsorbent and the magnetic properties. The structural properties have been examined using high-resolution imaging and electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), the measurements of magnetisation versus field and temperature, extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and neutron diffraction. Before drying the surface area of both the weakly magnetic and the strongly magnetic iron sulphide is of the order of 400-500 m 2 g -1 as revealed by the magnetic properties, neutron scattering and the adsorption of a number of heavy metals. After freeze-drying the surface area falls to between 18 and 19 m 2 g -1. The initial inocula came from a semi-saline source and when fed with nutrient containing Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ produced a weakly magnetic iron sulphide (Watson et al., Minerals Eng. 8 (1995) 1097) and a few % of a more strongly magnetic material. Further work using a novel method (Keller-Besrest, Collin, J. Solid State Chem. 84 (1990) 211) produced a strongly magnetic iron sulphide material. EXAFS and XANES spectroscopy revealed (Keller-Besrest and Collin, 1990) that the weakly magnetic iron sulphide material had the Ni-As structure in which the Fe is tetrahedrally coordinated with the composition Fe 1- xS. The strongly

  11. Two-step adsorption on jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers: dependence on hydrogen-bonding capability of adsorbates, ligand-substituent effect, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Yukari; Onishi, Fumiaki; Kita, Hidetoshi; Ebihara, Masahiro

    2010-11-01

    A preliminary study of isopropanol (IPA) adsorption/desorption isotherms on a jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymer, [Zn(2)(bdc)(2)(dabco)](n) (1, H(2)bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, dabco =1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane), showed unambiguous two-step profiles via a highly shrunk intermediate framework. The results of adsorption measurements on 1, using probing gas molecules of alcohol (MeOH and EtOH) for the size effect and Me(2)CO for the influence of hydrogen bonding, show that alcohol adsorption isotherms are gradual two-step profiles, whereas the Me(2)CO isotherm is a typical type-I isotherm, indicating that a two-step adsorption/desorption is involved with hydrogen bonds. To further clarify these characteristic adsorption/desorption behaviors, selecting nitroterephthalate (bdc-NO(2)), bromoterephthalate (bdc-Br), and 2,5-dichloroterephthalate (bdc-Cl(2)) as substituted dicarboxylate ligands, isomorphous jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers, {[Zn(2)(bdc-NO(2))(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (2 ⊃ solvents), {[Zn(2)(bdc-Br)(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (3 ⊃ solvents), and {[Zn(2)(bdc-Cl(2))(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (4 ⊃ solvents), were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray analyses. Thermal gravimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and N(2) adsorption at 77 K measurements reveal that [Zn(2)(bdc-NO(2))(2)(dabco)](n) (2), [Zn(2)(bdc-Br)(2)(dabco)](n) (3), and [Zn(2)(bdc-Cl(2))(2)(dabco)](n) (4) maintain their frameworks without guest molecules with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of 1568 (2), 1292 (3), and 1216 (4) m(2) g(-1). As found in results of MeOH, EtOH, IPA, and Me(2)CO adsorption/desorption on 2-4, only MeOH adsorption on 2 shows an obvious two-step profile. Considering the substituent effects and adsorbate sizes, the hydrogen bonds, which are triggers for two-step adsorption, are formed between adsorbates and carboxylate groups at the corners in the pores, inducing wide pores to become narrow pores. Interestingly, such

  12. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  13. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  14. Structure and energetics of hydrogen-bonded networks of methanol on close packed transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Colin J.; Carrasco, Javier; Lawton, Timothy J.; Liriano, Melissa L.; Baber, Ashleigh E.; Lewis, Emily A.; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-07-01

    Methanol is a versatile chemical feedstock, fuel source, and energy storage material. Many reactions involving methanol are catalyzed by transition metal surfaces, on which hydrogen-bonded methanol overlayers form. As with water, the structure of these overlayers is expected to depend on a delicate balance of hydrogen bonding and adsorbate-substrate bonding. In contrast to water, however, relatively little is known about the structures methanol overlayers form and how these vary from one substrate to another. To address this issue, herein we analyze the hydrogen bonded networks that methanol forms as a function of coverage on three catalytically important surfaces, Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111), using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. We investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions, surface coverage, and adsorption energies on molecular assembly and compare the results to more widely studied water networks on the same surfaces. Two main factors are shown to direct the structure of methanol on the surfaces studied: the surface coverage and the competition between the methanol-methanol and methanol-surface interactions. Additionally, we report a new chiral form of buckled hexamer formed by surface bound methanol that maximizes the interactions between methanol monomers by sacrificing interactions with the surface. These results serve as a direct comparison of interaction strength, assembly, and chirality of methanol networks on Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111) which are catalytically relevant for methanol oxidation, steam reforming, and direct methanol fuel cells.

  15. Structure and energetics of hydrogen-bonded networks of methanol on close packed transition metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin J; Carrasco, Javier; Lawton, Timothy J; Liriano, Melissa L; Baber, Ashleigh E; Lewis, Emily A; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-07-01

    Methanol is a versatile chemical feedstock, fuel source, and energy storage material. Many reactions involving methanol are catalyzed by transition metal surfaces, on which hydrogen-bonded methanol overlayers form. As with water, the structure of these overlayers is expected to depend on a delicate balance of hydrogen bonding and adsorbate-substrate bonding. In contrast to water, however, relatively little is known about the structures methanol overlayers form and how these vary from one substrate to another. To address this issue, herein we analyze the hydrogen bonded networks that methanol forms as a function of coverage on three catalytically important surfaces, Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111), using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. We investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions, surface coverage, and adsorption energies on molecular assembly and compare the results to more widely studied water networks on the same surfaces. Two main factors are shown to direct the structure of methanol on the surfaces studied: the surface coverage and the competition between the methanol-methanol and methanol-surface interactions. Additionally, we report a new chiral form of buckled hexamer formed by surface bound methanol that maximizes the interactions between methanol monomers by sacrificing interactions with the surface. These results serve as a direct comparison of interaction strength, assembly, and chirality of methanol networks on Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111) which are catalytically relevant for methanol oxidation, steam reforming, and direct methanol fuel cells.

  16. Origin of the periodic structure in the conductance curve of gold nanojunctions in hydrogen environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of the atomic structure and the vibrational and electronic transport properties of gold atomic junctions incorporating molecular and atomic hydrogen upon elongation have been investigated with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that for the case of gold junctions doped with a single H2 molecule the low-bias conductance drops rapidly with the electrodes' separation, while it remains almost constant if a single H atom replaces the molecule. In contrast, when one considers two H atoms adsorbed on a gold monatomic chain forming an Au-H-Au-H-Au double-bridge structure, the low-bias conductance increases first and then shows a plateau upon stretching the junction, in perfect agreement with experiments on gold nanocontacts in hydrogen environment. Furthermore, also the distribution of the calculated vibrational energies of the two H atoms is consistent with the experimental result in the low-conductance region, demonstrating clear evidence that hydrogen molecules can dissociate on stretched gold monatomic chains. These findings are helpful to improve our understanding of the structure-property relation of gold nanocontacts and also provide a new prospect for gold nanowires being used as chemical sensors and catalysts.

  17. Structure and energetics of hydrogen-bonded networks of methanol on close packed transition metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin J; Carrasco, Javier; Lawton, Timothy J; Liriano, Melissa L; Baber, Ashleigh E; Lewis, Emily A; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-07-01

    Methanol is a versatile chemical feedstock, fuel source, and energy storage material. Many reactions involving methanol are catalyzed by transition metal surfaces, on which hydrogen-bonded methanol overlayers form. As with water, the structure of these overlayers is expected to depend on a delicate balance of hydrogen bonding and adsorbate-substrate bonding. In contrast to water, however, relatively little is known about the structures methanol overlayers form and how these vary from one substrate to another. To address this issue, herein we analyze the hydrogen bonded networks that methanol forms as a function of coverage on three catalytically important surfaces, Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111), using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. We investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions, surface coverage, and adsorption energies on molecular assembly and compare the results to more widely studied water networks on the same surfaces. Two main factors are shown to direct the structure of methanol on the surfaces studied: the surface coverage and the competition between the methanol-methanol and methanol-surface interactions. Additionally, we report a new chiral form of buckled hexamer formed by surface bound methanol that maximizes the interactions between methanol monomers by sacrificing interactions with the surface. These results serve as a direct comparison of interaction strength, assembly, and chirality of methanol networks on Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111) which are catalytically relevant for methanol oxidation, steam reforming, and direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:25005297

  18. Surface Structure and Chemical Switching of Thioctic Acid Adsorbed on Au(111) as Observed Using Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenberg, R W; van Buuren, T; Vance, A L; Terminello, L J; Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; Fadley, C S

    2004-01-06

    Thioctic acid (alpha-lipoic acid) is a molecule with a large disulfide-containing base, a short alkyl-chain with four CH{sub 2} units, and a carboxyl termination. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of thioctic acid adsorbed on Au(111) have been investigated with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine film quality, bonding and morphology. Using standard preparation protocols for SAMs, that is, dissolving thioctic acid in ethanol and exposing gold to the solution, results in poor films. These films are highly disordered, contain a mixture of carboxyl and carboxylate terminations, have more than monolayer coverage, and exhibit unbound disulfide. Conversely, forming films by dissolving 1 mmol thioctic acid into 5% acetic acid in ethanol (as previously reported with carboxyl-terminated alkyl-thiols) forms ordered monolayers with small amounts of unbound sulfur. NEXAFS indicates tilted over endgroups with the carboxyl group normal on average 38{sup o} from the surface normal. Slight dichroism in other features indicates alkyl chains statistically more upright than prostrate on the surface. Reflection-absorption Fourier transform infrared (RA-FTIR) spectra indicate hydrogen bonding between neighboring molecules. In such well-formed monolayers, a stark reorientation occurs upon deprotonation of the endgroup by rinsing in a KOH solution. The carboxylate plane normal is now about 66{sup o} from sample normal, a much more upright orientation. Data indicate this reorientation may also cause a more upright orientation to the alkyl portion of the molecules.

  19. Structure of 4-methylpyridinium Hydrogen Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Martuch, Robert A.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    4-Methylpyridinium hydrogen sulfide, (C6H7NH)HS, M(sub r) = 127.21, consists of C6H7NH(+) cations and HS(-) anions. Z = 2 for the crystal with monoclinic space group Cm (#8), dimensions of a = 8.679(2) A, b = 7.964(1) A, and c = 4.860(2) A, an angle beta of 101.10(2) degrees, and a volume of V = 329.6(3) A(exp 3). R = 0.039 and R(sub w) = 0.048 for 385 reflections with F(sub o)(exp 2) greater than 3 sigma(F(sub o)(exp 2)) and 59 variables. Both the C6H7NH(+) cation and the HS(-) anion lie on crystallographic mirror planes with the N,S, two carbon atoms, and two hydrogen atoms positioned in the planes. The hydrogen atom of the HS(-) anion was not located.

  20. Adlayer structure dependent ultrafast desorption dynamics in carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pd (111).

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Young; Xu, Pan; Camillone, Nina R; White, Michael G; Camillone, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    We report our ultrafast photoinduced desorption investigation of the coverage dependence of substrate-adsorbate energy transfer in carbon monoxide adlayers on the (111) surface of palladium. As the CO coverage is increased, the adsorption site population shifts from all threefold hollows (up to 0.33 ML), to bridge and near bridge (>0.5 to 0.6 ML) and finally to mixed threefold hollow plus top site (at saturation at 0.75 ML). We show that between 0.24 and 0.75 ML this progression of binding site motifs is accompanied by two remarkable features in the ultrafast photoinduced desorption of the adsorbates: (i) the desorption probability increases roughly two orders magnitude, and (ii) the adsorbate-substrate energy transfer rate observed in two-pulse correlation experiments varies nonmonotonically, having a minimum at intermediate coverages. Simulations using a phenomenological model to describe the adsorbate-substrate energy transfer in terms of frictional coupling indicate that these features are consistent with an adsorption-site dependent electron-mediated energy coupling strength, ηel, that decreases with binding site in the order: three-fold hollow > bridge and near bridge > top site. This weakening of ηel largely counterbalances the decrease in the desorption activation energy that accompanies this progression of adsorption site motifs, moderating what would otherwise be a rise of several orders of magnitude in the desorption probability. Within this framework, the observed energy transfer rate enhancement at saturation coverage is due to interadsorbate energy transfer from the copopulation of molecules bound in three-fold hollows to their top-site neighbors.

  1. Adlayer structure dependent ultrafast desorption dynamics in carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pd (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Young; Xu, Pan; Camillone, Nina R.; White, Michael G.; Camillone, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    We report our ultrafast photoinduced desorption investigation of the coverage dependence of substrate-adsorbate energy transfer in carbon monoxide adlayers on the (111) surface of palladium. As the CO coverage is increased, the adsorption site population shifts from all threefold hollows (up to 0.33 ML), to bridge and near bridge (>0.5 to 0.6 ML) and finally to mixed threefold hollow plus top site (at saturation at 0.75 ML). We show that between 0.24 and 0.75 ML this progression of binding site motifs is accompanied by two remarkable features in the ultrafast photoinduced desorption of the adsorbates: (i) the desorption probability increases roughly two orders magnitude, and (ii) the adsorbate-substrate energy transfer rate observed in two-pulse correlation experiments varies nonmonotonically, having a minimum at intermediate coverages. Simulations using a phenomenological model to describe the adsorbate-substrate energy transfer in terms of frictional coupling indicate that these features are consistent with an adsorption-site dependent electron-mediated energy coupling strength, ηel, that decreases with binding site in the order: three-fold hollow > bridge and near bridge > top site. This weakening of ηel largely counterbalances the decrease in the desorption activation energy that accompanies this progression of adsorption site motifs, moderating what would otherwise be a rise of several orders of magnitude in the desorption probability. Within this framework, the observed energy transfer rate enhancement at saturation coverage is due to interadsorbate energy transfer from the copopulation of molecules bound in three-fold hollows to their top-site neighbors.

  2. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.S.

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin`s resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  3. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.S.

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin's resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  4. Electronic structure and binding geometry of tetraphenylporphyrin-derived molecules adsorbed on metal and metal oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Senia

    Tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP)-derived molecules have been studied extensively as efficient photosensitizers when chemisorbed on the metal oxide substrates in dye-sensitized solar cells. Still, many fundamental electronic properties of the dye/oxide interface are not understood and need careful consideration. In this thesis we present a comprehensive study of the electronic structure, energy level alignment and the adsorption geometry of the TPP-derived dye molecules adsorbed on TiO2(110), ZnO(1120) and Ag(100) single crystal surfaces using ultra-high vacuum (UHV) based surface sensitive techniques. The alignment of the molecular energy levels with respect to the TiO 2 and ZnO band edges for all TPP-derived molecules we studied was found to be insensitive to either the nature of the functional groups located on the phenyl rings, presence of zinc as a central metal ion and different binding geometry of the molecules. Binding geometry, molecule-molecule interaction and the aggregation effects in the adsorbed layer, that were observed in the UV-visible spectra of the molecules adsorbed on ZnO substrate were not observed in the ultraviolet photoemission (UPS) and inverse photoemission (IPS) spectra of the occupied and unoccupied molecular states. Using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), binding geometry of the two representative TPP-derivatives was directly determined to be upright, with the porphyrin ring under large angle with respect to the surface for the p-ZnTCPP molecules and with the porphyrin ring parallel to the surface for the m-ZnTCPP molecules. We observe that the energies and the energy level alignment of the ZnTPP molecular levels measured in UPS and IPS depend on the substrate on which the molecules are adsorbed (Ag(100) or TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces). The differences are attributed to different charge screening properties of these two materials. Image charges created in the substrates during

  5. Quantum chemical investigation on the role of Li adsorbed on anatase (101) surface nano-materials on the storage of molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Srinivasadesikan, V; Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2015-06-01

    Lithiation of TiO2 has been shown to enhance the storage of hydrogen up to 5.6 wt% (Hu et al. J Am Chem Soc 128:11740-11741, 2006). The mechanism for the process is still unknown. In this work we have carried out a study on the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on the surface and migration into subsurface layers of anatase (101) by periodic density functional theory calculations implementing on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U). The model consists of 24 [TiO2] units with 11.097 × 7.655 Å(2) surface area. Adsorption energies have been calculated for different Li atoms (1-14) on the surface. A maximum of 13 Li atoms can be accommodated on the surface at two bridged O, Ti-O, and Ti atom adsorption sites, with 83 kcal mol(-1) adsorption energy for a single Li atom adsorbed between two bridged O atoms from where it can migrate into the subsurface layer with 27 kcal mol(-1) energy barrier. The predicted adsorption energies for H2 on the lithiated TiO2 (101) surface with 1-10 Li atoms revealed that the highest adsorption energies occurred on 1-Li, 5-Li, and 9-Li surfaces with 3.5, 4.4, and 7.6 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The values decrease rapidly with additional H2 co-adsorbed on the lithiated surfaces; the maximum H2 adsorption on the 9Li-TiO2(a) surface was estimated to be only 0.32 wt% under 100 atm H2 pressure at 77 K. The result of Bader charge analysis indicated that the reduction of Ti occurred depending on the Li atoms covered on the TiO2 surface.

  6. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  7. Electron structure of AgCl nanocrystal with silver ion adsorbed on atomic-rough surface and quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenko, Yury K.; Shunina, Valentina A.

    2009-08-01

    Adsorption was considered as on the atomically-rough surface (near the step and step fracture) as on the smooth surface. The electron structure of AgCl nanocrystals with the adsorbed silver ion were calculated by semiempirical tight-binding method relying on a self-consistent approach for the effective charges and dipole moments of the ions and in frame of DFT method B3LYP/HW. The quantum transitions were investigated in semiempirical approach. Visualization of the wave functions was performed for the localized states. Basing on the obtained data a conclusion is specically made that one can expect an enhancement of photoelectron localization with a decrease of the anions number in the substrate nearest to the adsorbed ion. It means that the most ecient trapping of photoelectron should occur under adsorption on a smooth surface rather than near the steps and their fractures as it was assumed previously. Also probabilities of quantum transitions for AgCl : J nanocrystal with the adsorbed silver ion were been discussed. This work is a continuation of paper [1].

  8. Influence of surface charge on the rate, extent, and structure of adsorbed Bovine Serum Albumin to gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Beykal, Burcu; Herzberg, Moshe; Oren, Yoram; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this work is to investigate the rate, extent, and structure of amphoteric proteins with charged solid surfaces over a range of applied potentials and surface charges. We use Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring (E-QCM-D) to investigate the adsorption of amphoteric Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) to a gold electrode while systematically varying the surface charge on the adsorbate and adsorbent by manipulating pH and applied potential, respectively. We also perform cyclic voltammetry-E-QCM-D on an adsorbed layer of BSA to elucidate conformational changes in response to varied applied potentials. We confirm previous results demonstrating that increasing magnitude of applied potential on the gold electrode is positively correlated with increasing mass adsorption when the protein and the surface are oppositely charged. On the other hand, we find that the rate of BSA adsorption is not governed by simple electrostatics, but instead depends on solution pH, an observation not well documented in the literature. Cyclic voltammetry with simultaneous E-QCM-D measurements suggest that BSA protein undergoes a conformational change as the surface potential varies.

  9. Two-dimensional Supramolecular Structures by Hydrogen and Halogen Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keon Yoon, Jong; Kim, Howon; Huem Jeon, Jeong; Kahng, Se-Jong

    2010-03-01

    Supramolecualr ordering has been actively studied due to it's possible applications to the fabrication processes of nano-electronic devices. Van der Waals interaction and hydrogen bonding are frequently studied mechanisms for various molecular structures based on non-uniform charge distributions. Halogen atoms in molecules can have electrostatic interactions with similar strength. Big halogen atoms have strong non-uniform charge distributions. To study molecular orderings formed by hydrogen and halogen interactions, we chose a molecular system containing oxygen, hydrogen, and bromine atoms, a bromo-quinone. A two-dimensional molecular network was studied on Au(111) using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. Bromo-quinone molecules form self-assembled square grids having windmill structures. Their molecular orderings, chiral structures, and defects are explained in terms of hydrogen and halogen interactions.

  10. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  11. Anomalous fast dynamics of adsorbate overlayers near an incommensurate structural transition.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2013-09-20

    We investigate the dynamics of a compressively strained adsorbed layer on a periodic substrate via a simple two-dimensional model that admits striped and hexagonal incommensurate phases. We show that the mass transport is superfast near the striped-hexagonal phase boundary and in the hexagonal phase. For an initial step profile separating a bare substrate region (or "hole") from the rest of a striped incommensurate phase, the superfast domain wall dynamics leads to a bifurcation of the initial step profile into two interfaces or profiles propagating in opposite directions with a hexagonal phase in between. This yields a theoretical understanding of the recent experiments for the Pb/Si(111) system.

  12. Development of hydrogen resistant structural alloy NASA-23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Kuruvilla, A. K.; Chen, P. S.; Panda, B.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen-resistant alloy NASA-23 was developed specifically as a structural alloy for application in liquid propulsion systems that use hydrogen fuel. NASA-23 was designed to be similar to Alloy 718 in strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, but with superior resistance to hydrogen environment embrittlement. The alloy is readily processed; it can be both hot and cold worked and is castable and weldable. A material property data base is being generated for both cast and wrought NASA-23. This paper will present the status of alloy development and discuss potential applications in propulsion systems.

  13. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, M.A. |

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  14. First-principle study of the electronic structure and magnetism of lithium-adsorbed 3d transition-metal phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Hu, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Li, Y.; Zhou, T.; Ren, J.

    2016-02-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the electronic structures and magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal phthalocyanine (TMPc, TM = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu), as well as Li-adsorbed phthalocyanines have been studied. The results show that the pristine TMPcs all have a good D4h symmetry. When there is one Li atom adsorbed on TMPcs directly over (LiTMPc-α) or slantly above (LiTMPc-β) the TM atoms, the geometries and electronic structures will be changed. For LiTMPc-α systems, the central TM atoms will deviate from the molecular plane and the molecules exhibit good C4v symmetry. LiTMPc-β systems are more stable than LiTMPc-α systems but it do not possess D4h and C4v symmetries. The total and local magnetic moments and the charge transfer are also presented. Finally, by using the orbit mixing and splitting theory under D4h and C4v symmetry, we get the ordering of the energy levels of the central TM atoms.

  15. Study of hydrogenated silicene: The initialization model of hydrogenation on planar, low buckled and high buckled structures of silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Syaputra, Marhamni Wella, Sasfan Arman; Wungu, Triati Dewi Kencana; Purqon, Acep; Suprijadi

    2015-09-30

    We study the hydrogenation structures possessed by silicene i.e. planar (PL), low buckled (LB) and high buckled (HB). On those structures we found the hydrogenation process occurs with some particular notes. Hydrogen stable position on the silicene surface is determined by its initial configuration. We only considered the fully hydrogenated case with the formula unit (SiH){sub n} for all of these structures. Physical and electronic structure shift after the process are compared with hydrogenated graphene. Moreover, we observed a chemical process in the presence of hydrogen on the PL structure by nudged elastic band (NEB) which illustrates how hydrogen has a significant impact to the force barrier of the PL that changing it from its original structure.

  16. Anomalous fast dynamics of adsorbate overlayers near an incommensurate structural transition.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2013-09-20

    We investigate the dynamics of a compressively strained adsorbed layer on a periodic substrate via a simple two-dimensional model that admits striped and hexagonal incommensurate phases. We show that the mass transport is superfast near the striped-hexagonal phase boundary and in the hexagonal phase. For an initial step profile separating a bare substrate region (or "hole") from the rest of a striped incommensurate phase, the superfast domain wall dynamics leads to a bifurcation of the initial step profile into two interfaces or profiles propagating in opposite directions with a hexagonal phase in between. This yields a theoretical understanding of the recent experiments for the Pb/Si(111) system. PMID:24093278

  17. Adlayer structure dependent ultrafast desorption dynamics in carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pd (111)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hong, Sung -Young; Xu, Pan; Camillone, Nina R.; White, Michael G.; Camillone, III, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    Here, we report our ultrafast photoinduced desorption investigation of the coverage dependence of substrate–adsorbate energy transfer in carbon monoxide adlayers on the (111) surface of palladium. As the CO coverage is increased, the adsorption site population shifts from all threefold hollows (up to 0.33 ML), to bridge and near bridge (>0.5 to 0.6 ML) and finally to mixed threefold hollow plus top site (at saturation at 0.75 ML). We show that between 0.24 and 0.75 ML this progression of binding site motifs is accompanied by two remarkable features in the ultrafast photoinduced desorption of the adsorbates: (i) the desorption probabilitymore » increases roughly two orders magnitude, and (ii) the adsorbate–substrate energy transfer rate observed in two-pulse correlation experiments varies nonmonotonically, having a minimum at intermediate coverages. Simulations using a phenomenological model to describe the adsorbate–substrate energy transfer in terms of frictional coupling indicate that these features are consistent with an adsorption-site dependent electron-mediated energy coupling strength, ηel, that decreases with binding site in the order: three-fold hollow > bridge and near bridge > top site. This weakening of ηel largely counterbalances the decrease in the desorption activation energy that accompanies this progression of adsorption site motifs, moderating what would otherwise be a rise of several orders of magnitude in the desorption probability. Within this framework, the observed energy transfer rate enhancement at saturation coverage is due to interadsorbate energy transfer from the copopulation of molecules bound in three-fold hollows to their top-site neighbors.« less

  18. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution.

  19. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution. PMID:18715021

  20. Influence of molecular structure and adsorbent properties on sorption of organic compounds to a temperature series of wood chars.

    PubMed

    Lattao, Charisma; Cao, Xiaoyan; Mao, Jingdong; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Pignatello, Joseph J

    2014-05-01

    Chars from wildfires and soil amendments (biochars) are strong adsorbents that can impact the fate of organic compounds in soil, yet the effects of solute and adsorbent properties on sorption are poorly understood. We studied sorption of benzene, naphthalene, and 1,4-dinitrobenzene from water to a series of wood chars made anaerobically at different heat treatment temperatures (HTT) from 300 to 700 °C, and to graphite as a nonporous, unfunctionalized reference adsorbent. Peak suppression in the NMR spectrum by sorption of the paramagnetic relaxation probe TEMPO indicated that only a small fraction of char C atoms lie near sorption sites. Sorption intensity for all solutes maximized with the 500 °C char, but failed to trend regularly with N2 or CO2 surface area, micropore volume, mesopore volume, H/C ratio, O/C ratio, aromatic fused ring size, or HTT. A model relating sorption intensity to a weighted sum of microporosity and mesoporosity was more successful. Sorption isotherm linearity declined progressively with carbonization of the char. Application of a thermodynamic model incorporating solvent-water and char-graphite partition coefficients permitted for the first time quantification of steric (size exclusion in pores) and π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) free energy contributions, relative to benzene. Steric hindrance for naphthalene increases exponentially from 9 to 16 kJ/mol (∼ 1.6-2.9 log units of sorption coefficient) with the fraction of porosity in small micropores. π-π EDA interactions of dinitrobenzene contribute -17 to -19 kJ/mol (3-3.4 log units of sorption coefficient) to sorption on graphite, but less on chars. π-π EDA interaction of naphthalene on graphite is small (-2 to 2 kJ/mol). The results show that sorption is a complex function of char properties and solute molecular structure, and not very predictable on the basis of readily determined char properties.

  1. Influence of molecular structure and adsorbent properties on sorption of organic compounds to a temperature series of wood chars.

    PubMed

    Lattao, Charisma; Cao, Xiaoyan; Mao, Jingdong; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Pignatello, Joseph J

    2014-05-01

    Chars from wildfires and soil amendments (biochars) are strong adsorbents that can impact the fate of organic compounds in soil, yet the effects of solute and adsorbent properties on sorption are poorly understood. We studied sorption of benzene, naphthalene, and 1,4-dinitrobenzene from water to a series of wood chars made anaerobically at different heat treatment temperatures (HTT) from 300 to 700 °C, and to graphite as a nonporous, unfunctionalized reference adsorbent. Peak suppression in the NMR spectrum by sorption of the paramagnetic relaxation probe TEMPO indicated that only a small fraction of char C atoms lie near sorption sites. Sorption intensity for all solutes maximized with the 500 °C char, but failed to trend regularly with N2 or CO2 surface area, micropore volume, mesopore volume, H/C ratio, O/C ratio, aromatic fused ring size, or HTT. A model relating sorption intensity to a weighted sum of microporosity and mesoporosity was more successful. Sorption isotherm linearity declined progressively with carbonization of the char. Application of a thermodynamic model incorporating solvent-water and char-graphite partition coefficients permitted for the first time quantification of steric (size exclusion in pores) and π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) free energy contributions, relative to benzene. Steric hindrance for naphthalene increases exponentially from 9 to 16 kJ/mol (∼ 1.6-2.9 log units of sorption coefficient) with the fraction of porosity in small micropores. π-π EDA interactions of dinitrobenzene contribute -17 to -19 kJ/mol (3-3.4 log units of sorption coefficient) to sorption on graphite, but less on chars. π-π EDA interaction of naphthalene on graphite is small (-2 to 2 kJ/mol). The results show that sorption is a complex function of char properties and solute molecular structure, and not very predictable on the basis of readily determined char properties. PMID:24758543

  2. Zero-Temperature Structures of Atomic Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeffrey; Ceperley, David

    2011-03-01

    Since the first prediction of an atomic metallic phase of hydrogen by Wigner and Huntington over 75 years ago, there have been many theoretical efforts aimed at determining the crystal structures of the zero-temperature phases. We present results from ab initio random structure searching with density functional theory performed to determine the ground state structures from 500 GPa to 5 TPa. We estimate that molecular hydrogen dissociates into a monatomic body-centered tetragonal structure near 500 GPa (rs = 1.225), which then remains stable to 2.5 TPa (rs = 0.969). At higher pressures, hydrogen stabilizes in an . . . ABCABC . . . planar structure that is remarkably similar to the ground state of lithium, which compresses to the face-centered cubic lattice beyond 5 TPa (rs < 0.86). Our results provide a complete ab initio description of the atomic metallic crystal structures of hydrogen, resolving one of the most fundamental and long outstanding issues concerning the structures of the elements.

  3. Crystal structure of 4-sulfamoylanilinium di­hydrogen phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Muthuselvi, C.; Mala, N.; Srinivasan, N.; Pandiarajan, S.; Krishnakumar, R. V.

    2014-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title mol­ecular salt, C6H9N2O2S+·H2PO4 −, the sulfomylalinium cations and the di­hydrogen phosphate anions form independent [100] chains through Ns—H⋯O (s = sulfamo­yl) and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, respectively. The chains are cross-linked by Na—H⋯O (a = amine) hydrogen bonds, generating (010) sheets. Two C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving diametrically opposite C atoms in the benzene ring of the cation as donors form chains parallel to [202] in which P=O and P—OH groups are acceptors. Together, these inter­actions lead to a three-dimensional network. PMID:25309301

  4. The structures and dynamics of atomic and molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hyungsuk Alexander

    1996-12-01

    Studies of surface structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces are presented. My research has focused on understanding the nature of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions through surface studies of coverage dependency and coadsorption using both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The effect of adsorbate coverage on the surface structures of sulfur on Pt(111) and Rh(111) was examined. On Pt(111), sulfur forms p(2x2) at 0.25 ML of sulfur, which transforms into a more compressed ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{degrees} at 0.33 ML. On both structures, it was found that sulfur adsorbs only in fcc sites. When the coverage of sulfur exceeds 0.33 ML, it formed more complex c({radical}3x7)rect structure with 3 sulfur atoms per unit cell. In this structure, two different adsorption sites for sulfur atoms were observed - two on fcc sites and one on hcp site within the unit cell.

  5. Structure and dynamics of monolayer films of squalane molecules adsorbed on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D. T Enevoldsen, A.; Hansen, F. Y.; Diama, A.; Taub, H.

    2003-03-01

    Squalane is a branched alkane (C_30H_62). It consists of a straight chain with 24 carbon atoms, as in tetracosane (C_24H_50), and has six methyl side groups. Branched polymers such as squalane are thought to be better lubricants than n-alkanes. At low temperature, our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the molecules form an ordered monolayer which melts at approximately 325 K compared to the tetracosane monolayer melting point of ˜ 340 K. Our MD simulations indicate the same melting mechanism in the squalane monolayer that was found previously for tetracosane (F. Y. Hansen and H. Taub, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 652 (1992).) They also show that the adsorbed molecules are distorted from an all-trans carbon backbone in contrast to what was found for tetracosane. This may explain why the Bragg diffraction peaks were observed to be broader for the squalane monolayer than for tetracosane (D. Fuhrmann, A. P. Graham, L. Criswell, H. Mo, B. Matthies, K. W. Herwig, and H. Taub, Surf. Sci. 482-485, 77 (2001).). The diffusive motion in a squalane monolayer has been investigated by both quasielastic neutron scattering and MD simulations and compared to the dynamics in tetracosane monolayers. Focus will be on differences in the dynamics.

  6. Benzene derivatives adsorbed to the Ag(111) surface: Binding sites and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Daniel P.; Tymińska, Nina; Zurek, Eva; Simpson, Scott

    2015-03-14

    Dispersion corrected Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to study the adsorption of benzenes derivatized with functional groups encompassing a large region of the activated/deactivated spectrum to the Ag(111) surface. Benzenes substituted with weak activating or deactivating groups, such as methyl and fluoro, do not have a strong preference for adsorbing to a particular site on the substrate, with the corrugations in the potential energy surface being similar to those of benzene. Strong activating (N(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}) and deactivating (NO{sub 2}) groups, on the other hand, possess a distinct site preference. The nitrogen in the former prefers to lie above a silver atom (top site), but in the latter a hollow hexagonal-closed-packed (H{sub hcp}) site of the Ag(111) surface is favored instead. Benzenes derivatized with classic activating groups donate electron density from their highest occupied molecular orbital to the surface, and those functionalized with deactivating groups withdraw electron density from the surface into orbitals that are unoccupied in the gas phase. For benzenes functionalized with two substituents, the groups that are strongly activating or deactivating control the site preference and the other groups assume sites that are, to a large degree, dictated by their positions on the benzene ring. The relative stabilities of the ortho, meta, and para positional isomers of disubstituted benzenes can, in some cases, be modified by adsorption to the surface.

  7. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  8. Discovery during Hydrogen Annealing: Formation of Nanoscale Fluorocarbon Tubular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiuchun; Tanaka, Sinya; Masuda, Atsuhiko; Maenaka, Kazusuke; Higuchi, Kohei

    2013-09-01

    A novel fabrication method for nanoscale tubular structures is presented in this paper. The tubular structures can be obtained by heating single-crystal silicon trenches or pillars formed by the inductively coupled plasma reactive-ion etching (ICP-RIE) Bosch process in hydrogen ambient. The importance of initial vacuum in the reaction chamber for tube formation and the tube formation mechanism were discussed. The components and sidewall size of the tubular structure were also studied to verify that the tube is made of the fluorocarbon (CF) passivation layer deposited by the Bosch process. The CF tubular structure would be a promising structure for BioMEMS.

  9. Adsorption isotherms and structure of cationic surfactants adsorbed on mineral oxide surfaces prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wangchareansak, Thipvaree; Craig, Vincent S J; Notley, Shannon M

    2013-12-01

    The adsorption isotherms and aggregate structures of adsorbed surfactants on smooth thin-film surfaces of mineral oxides have been studied by optical reflectometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Films of the mineral oxides of titania, alumina, hafnia, and zirconia were produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with low roughness. We find that the surface strongly influences the admicelle organization on the surface. At high concentrations (2 × cmc) of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), the surfactant aggregates on a titania surface exhibit a flattened admicelle structure with an average repeat distance of 8.0 ± 1.0 nm whereas aggregates on alumina substrates exhibit a larger admicelle with an average separation distance of 10.5 ± 1.0 nm. A wormlike admicelle structure with an average separation distance of 7.0 ± 1.0 nm can be observed on zirconia substrates whereas a bilayered aggregate structure on hafnia substrates was observed. The change in the surface aggregate structure can be related to an increase in the critical packing parameter through a reduction in the effective headgroup area of the surfactant. The templating strength of the surfaces are found to be hafnia > alumina > zirconia > titania. Weakly templating surfaces are expected to have superior biocompatibility.

  10. The diammoniate of diborane: Crystal structure and hydrogen release

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Mark E.; Heldebrant, David J.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Proffen, Thomas E.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Autrey, Thomas

    2010-10-12

    [(NH3)2BH2]+[BH4]- is formed from the room temperature decomposition of NH4+BH4-, via a NH3BH3 intermediate. Its crystal structure has been determined and contains disordered BH4- ions in 2 distinct sites. Hydrogen release is similar to that from NH3BH3 but with faster kinetics.

  11. Structural and orientation effects on electronic energy transfer between silicon quantum dots with dopants and with silver adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, N.; Freitag, H.; Micha, D. A.

    2014-06-28

    Starting from the atomic structure of silicon quantum dots (QDs), and utilizing ab initio electronic structure calculations within the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) treatment, a model has been developed to characterize electronic excitation energy transfer between QDs. Electronic energy transfer rates, K{sub EET}, between selected identical pairs of crystalline silicon quantum dots systems, either bare, doped with Al or P, or adsorbed with Ag and Ag{sub 3}, have been calculated and analyzed to extend previous work on light absorption by QDs. The effects of their size and relative orientation on energy transfer rates for each system have also been considered. Using time-dependent density functional theory and the hybrid functional HSE06, the FRET treatment was employed to model electronic energy transfer rates within the dipole-dipole interaction approximation. Calculations with adsorbed Ag show that: (a) addition of Ag increases rates up to 100 times, (b) addition of Ag{sub 3} increases rates up to 1000 times, (c) collinear alignment of permanent dipoles increases transfer rates by an order of magnitude compared to parallel orientation, and (d) smaller QD-size increases transfer due to greater electronic orbitals overlap. Calculations with dopants show that: (a) p-type and n-type dopants enhance energy transfer up to two orders of magnitude, (b) surface-doping with P and center-doping with Al show the greatest rates, and (c) K{sub EET} is largest for collinear permanent dipoles when the dopant is on the outer surface and for parallel permanent dipoles when the dopant is inside the QD.

  12. Electronic Structures of Clusters of Hydrogen Vacancies on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bi-Ru; Yang, Chih-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen vacancies in graphane are products of incomplete hydrogenation of graphene. The missing H atoms can alter the electronic structure of graphane and therefore tune the electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of the composite. We systematically studied a variety of well-separated clusters of hydrogen vacancies in graphane, including the geometrical shapes of triangles, parallelograms, hexagons, and rectangles, by first-principles density functional calculation. The results indicate that energy levels caused by the missing H are generated in the broad band gap of pure graphane. All triangular clusters of H vacancies are magnetic, the larger the triangle the higher the magnetic moment. The defect levels introduced by the missing H in triangular and parallelogram clusters are spin-polarized and can find application in optical transition. Parallelograms and open-ended rectangles are antiferromagnetic and can be used for nanoscale registration of digital information. PMID:26468677

  13. Effect of the internal motions of an adsorbate on the characteristics of adsorption for structurally heterogenous surfaces of slit-like pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.; Zaitseva, E. S.; Rabinovich, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of internal motions of an adsorbate on the local characteristics of adsorption and layering phase diagrams are studied for structurally heterogeneous surfaces of slit-like pores. A molecular model describing adsorbate distributions inside slit-like pores, which is based on discrete distribution functions (lattice gas model), is used for the calculation. Molecular distributions are calculated by the Lennard-Jones potential (12-6) in a quasi-chemical approximation reflecting the effects of direct correlations of interacting particles and for the combined interaction of an adsorbate with walls in the average potential approximation (9-3) and the short-range Lennard-Jones potential for structurally heterogeneous surface areas. The conclusion is made that internal motions reflect the vibrational motion of molecules within a modified quasi-dimer model and a displacement of the adsorbate during its translational motion inside cells. It was found that the taking into account of internal motions decreases the critical temperature of adsorbate layering in slit-like pores.

  14. Structure and friction of stearic acid and oleic acid films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces in squalane.

    PubMed

    Doig, Michael; Warrens, Chris P; Camp, Philip J

    2014-01-14

    The structure and friction of fatty acid surfactant films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces lubricated by squalane are examined using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The structures of stearic acid and oleic acid films under static and shear conditions, and at various surface coverages, are described in detail, and the effects of unsaturation in the tail group are highlighted. At high surface coverage, the measured properties of stearic acid and oleic acid films are seen to be very similar. At low and intermediate surface coverages, the presence of a double bond, as in oleic acid, is seen to give rise to less penetration of lubricant in to the surfactant film and less layering of the lubricant near to the film. The kinetic friction coefficient is measured as a function of shear rate within the hydrodynamic (high shear rate) lubrication regime. Lubricant penetration and layering are observed to be correlated with friction coefficient. The friction coefficient with oleic acid depends only weakly on surface coverage, while stearic acid admits more lubricant penetration, and its friction coefficient increases significantly with decreasing surface coverage. Connections between film structure and friction are discussed.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the ordered structures of dialkylamino hydroxylated squaraines adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Stawasz, M.E.; Sampson, D.L.; Parkinson, B.A.

    2000-03-07

    Squaraine dyes form aggregates in solution and in the solid state. The authors have found that squaraines form two-dimensional (2D) ordered layers when adsorbed onto HOPG from phenyloctane and from liquid crystalline solvents. The authors investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy the 2D structures of the absorbed phases of five bis(4-alkylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl) squaraines (both symmetric and asymmetric) and mixtures of these squaraines. Differences in the stability of the 2D structures and molecular packing are observed when the alkyl tail length and symmetry are varied. A transition in the 2D structure from a herringbone packing to a lamellar packing occurs between the tail lengths of 4 carbons and 8 carbons. Many of the compounds form a number of 2D polytypes on HOPG. Multilayers of squaraine molecules were observed for most of the studied molecules. Squaraines with tail lengths of 12 carbons exhibited a tendency toward registry with the HOPG substrate whereas all other squaraine compounds investigated showed a lack of molecule-substrate registry. Domain sizes of the investigated molecules varied from tens of nanometers to a micron.

  16. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations of H{sub 2} adsorbed to lithium-doped benzene: A model for hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lindoy, Lachlan P.; Kolmann, Stephen J.; D’Arcy, Jordan H.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.; Crittenden, Deborah L.

    2015-11-21

    Finite temperature quantum and anharmonic effects are studied in H{sub 2}–Li{sup +}-benzene, a model hydrogen storage material, using path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations on an interpolated potential energy surface refined over the eight intermolecular degrees of freedom based upon M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) density functional theory calculations. Rigid-body PIMC simulations are performed at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 150 K, producing both quantum and classical probability density histograms describing the adsorbed H{sub 2}. Quantum effects broaden the histograms with respect to their classical analogues and increase the expectation values of the radial and angular polar coordinates describing the location of the center-of-mass of the H{sub 2} molecule. The rigid-body PIMC simulations also provide estimates of the change in internal energy, ΔU{sub ads}, and enthalpy, ΔH{sub ads}, for H{sub 2} adsorption onto Li{sup +}-benzene, as a function of temperature. These estimates indicate that quantum effects are important even at room temperature and classical results should be interpreted with caution. Our results also show that anharmonicity is more important in the calculation of U and H than coupling—coupling between the intermolecular degrees of freedom becomes less important as temperature increases whereas anharmonicity becomes more important. The most anharmonic motions in H{sub 2}–Li{sup +}-benzene are the “helicopter” and “ferris wheel” H{sub 2} rotations. Treating these motions as one-dimensional free and hindered rotors, respectively, provides simple corrections to standard harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor thermochemical expressions for internal energy and enthalpy that encapsulate the majority of the anharmonicity. At 150 K, our best rigid-body PIMC estimates for ΔU{sub ads} and ΔH{sub ads} are −13.3 ± 0.1 and −14.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively.

  17. Structure of Palladium Nanoclusters for Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, K.J.; Ingham, B.; Toney, M.F.; Brown, S.A.; Lassesson, A.; /SLAC, SSRL /Canterbury U.

    2009-05-11

    Palladium nanoclusters produced by inert gas aggregation/magnetron sputtering are used as building blocks for the construction of nano electronic devices with large surface to volume ratios that can be used as sensitive hydrogen gas sensors in fuel cells and in petrochemical plants. X-ray diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been used to characterize the structure, lattice constant, particle diameter and oxide thickness of the palladium nanoclusters in order to understand the operation of these sensors. Grazing incidence XRD (GIXRD) of heat treated Pd clusters has shown that the palladanite structure forms at elevated temperatures.

  18. The stability and electronic structure of lithium adsorbed in triplet form of (5.0) carbon nanotubes and (5.0) boron nitrogen nanotubes: Density functional theory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke Jing; Shao, Qing Yi; Zhang, Juan; Yao, Xin Hua

    2016-07-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the stability and electronic structure of lithium (Li) adsorbed in triplet form of (5.0) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and (5.0) boron nitrogen nanotubes (BNNTs). We have mainly found that three (5.0) tubes are covalently connected. The triplet form is an energetically stable semiconductor. Li atom can be chemically adsorbed in the triplet form of nanotubes (NTs). Meanwhile, upon the adsorption of Li, the triplet form convert into metal. Hence, the triplet form can improve reactivity and sensitivity of NTs to Li significantly.

  19. First-Principles Electronic Structure Calculations of N2H4 Adsorbed on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M.; Tian, W. Q.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2008-03-01

    Recent experiments conducted by Desai et al. [1] reveal that single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks exposed to N2H4 vapor at various pressures exhibit considerable drop in resistance with respect to the pristine sample. Experimental findings reveal: (i) n-type behavior for the adsorption of N2H4/SWCNT, and (ii) the binding of N2H4 on SWCNT as chemisorption. In the present work, we have performed first-principles electronic structure calculations [2] for the N2H4 adsorbed on the (14, 0) SWCNT, where several orientations for the N2H4 molecule were considered. Calculations for the combined system were performed using 3 unit cells with the DFT/GGA and ultra soft pseudo-potentials. Our calculations reveal: (i) the binding of N2H4 on SWCNT as physisorption, and (ii) the electronic structure of SWCNT to be practically unaltered by the adsorption of N2H4, suggesting that there will not be a dramatic drop in resistance for N2H4/SWCNT. This is in disagreement with the experimental findings. To further understand the experimental observations, we will discuss mechanisms that may alter the binding nature of N2H4 on SWCNT. [1] S. Desai, G. Sumanasekera, et al. (APS, March 2008). [2] G. Kresse and J. Furthmuller, Phys. Rev. B 54, 11169 (1996).

  20. Layer structured graphite oxide as a novel adsorbent for humic acid removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Hartono, Tri; Wang, Shaobin; Ma, Qing; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2009-05-01

    Layer structured graphite oxide (GO) was prepared from graphite using the Hummers-Offeman method, characterised using N(2) adsorption, XRD, XPS, SEM(TEM), and FT-IR, and tested for humic acid (HA) adsorption in aqueous solution. XRD, XPS, and FT-IR measurements indicate the formation of layered structure with strong functional groups of GO. It is also found that the GO exhibits strong and much higher adsorption capacity of HA than graphite. The maximum adsorption capacity of the GO from the Langmuir isotherm is 190 mg/g, higher than activated carbon. For the adsorption, several parameters will affect the adsorption such as solid loading and pH. HA adsorption will decrease with increasing pH and an optimum GO loading is required for maximum adsorption. PMID:19233379

  1. Characterization of Cross-Linked Cellulosic Ion-Exchange Adsorbents: 1. Structural Properties

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, James M.; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Gantier, Rene; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2014-01-01

    The structural characteristics of the HyperCel family of cellulosic ion-exchange materials (Pall Corporation) were assessed using methods to gauge the pore dimensions and the effect of ionic strength on intraparticle architecture. Inverse size exclusion chromatography (ISEC) was applied to the S and STAR AX HyperCel derivatives. The theoretical analysis yielded an average pore radius for each material of about 5 nm, with a particularly narrow pore-size distribution. Electron microscopy techniques were used to visualize the particle structure and relate it to macroscopic experimental data. Microscopy of Q and STAR AX HyperCel anion exchangers presented some qualitative differences in pore structure that can be attributed to the derivatization using conventional quaternary ammonium and salt-tolerant ligands, respectively. Finally, the effect of ionic strength was studied through the use of salt breakthrough experiments to determine to what extent Donnan exclusion plays a role in restricting the accessible pore volume for small ions. It was determined that Donnan effects were prevalent at total ionic strengths (TIS) less than 150 mM, suggesting the presence of a ligand-containing partitioning volume within the pore space. PMID:24188996

  2. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  3. Hydrogenated graphene and hydrogenated silicene: computational insights.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Phong, Pham Nam; Tuyen, Nguyen Duc

    2015-06-01

    Density functional calculations are performed to study the energetic, structural, and electronic properties of graphene and silicene functionalized with hydrogen. Our calculations predict that H atoms bind much more strongly to silicene than to graphene. The adsorbed H atoms tend to cooperatively stabilize each other leading to a two-dimensional nucleation and growth mechanism. The different structural and electronic modifications induced by H in fully functionalized graphene and silicene (known as graphane and silicane) are also explained. Finally, the electronic properties of defective graphane with multiple hydrogen vacancies are investigated. Engineering the vacancies in graphane offers a way to modify the electronic properties of this material.

  4. Oligoethylene-bridged diferrocene on Ag(110): Monolayer structures and adsorbate-induced faceting

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, D. Y.; Fuchs, H.; Wang, W. C.; Dou, R. F.; Chi, L. F.; Wedeking, K.; Erker, G.

    2007-11-15

    The self-assembly of a ferrocene (Fc) derivative, oligoethylene-bridged diferrocene (diFc), Fc(CH{sub 2}){sub 14}Fc, on Ag(110) surface has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultrahigh vacuum. Three ordered structures, the majority {beta} and the minorities {alpha} and {gamma}, are formed at monolayer coverage. In {alpha} and {gamma}, a unit cell contains one molecule and the molecules are parallel to each other so that the distances between Fc groups and between oligoethylene chains are reduced. A unit cell contains five molecules in {beta}: four of them are parallel to each other but not parallel to the fifth. The interaction between diFc and Ag(110), which is relatively strong in comparison to the intermolecular interaction, is dominant for the assembly of the ordered structures. The adsorption of diFc molecules induces the reorganization of substrate steps, which prefer to follow the directions of the superstructure lattice vectors, i.e. ({+-}1,2) and ({+-}3,2) of the Ag(110) surface. The (12 13-1) facet is formed due to step bunching at regions with high step density. By using in situ STM, the process of step reorganization and faceting has been observed in real time. It is concluded that the Ag adatoms play a key role on the substrate reorganization.

  5. Electronic structure of uracil-like nucleobases adsorbed on Si(001): uracil, thymine and 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, Elena; Onida, Giovanni; Cappellini, Giancarlo

    2016-04-01

    We study the electronic properties of the Si(001):Uracil, Si(001):Thymine, and Si(001):5-Fluorouracil systems, focusing on the Si dimer-bridging configuration with adsorption governed by carbonyl groups. While the overall structural and electronic properties are similar, with small differences due to chemical substitutions, much larger effects on the surface band dispersion and bandgap show up as a function of the molecular orientation with respect to the surface. An off-normal orientation of the molecular planes is favored, showing larger bandgap and lower total energy than the upright position. We also analyze the localization of gap-edge occupied and unoccupied surface states. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70011-1

  6. Sulfur cathodes with hydrogen reduced titanium dioxide inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Li, Weiyang; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2014-05-27

    Sulfur is a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries with a high specific capacity of 1675 mAh/g. The rapid capacity fading, however, presents a significant challenge for the practical application of sulfur cathodes. Two major approaches that have been developed to improve the sulfur cathode performance include (a) fabricating nanostructured conductive matrix to physically encapsulate sulfur and (b) engineering chemical modification to enhance binding with polysulfides and, thus, to reduce their dissolution. Here, we report a three-dimensional (3D) electrode structure to achieve both sulfur physical encapsulation and polysulfides binding simultaneously. The electrode is based on hydrogen reduced TiO2 with an inverse opal structure that is highly conductive and robust toward electrochemical cycling. The relatively enclosed 3D structure provides an ideal architecture for sulfur and polysulfides confinement. The openings at the top surface allow sulfur infusion into the inverse opal structure. In addition, chemical tuning of the TiO2 composition through hydrogen reduction was shown to enhance the specific capacity and cyclability of the cathode. With such TiO2 encapsulated sulfur structure, the sulfur cathode could deliver a high specific capacity of ∼1100 mAh/g in the beginning, with a reversible capacity of ∼890 mAh/g after 200 cycles of charge/discharge at a C/5 rate. The Coulombic efficiency was also maintained at around 99.5% during cycling. The results showed that inverse opal structure of hydrogen reduced TiO2 represents an effective strategy in improving lithium sulfur batteries performance. PMID:24766547

  7. Sulfur cathodes with hydrogen reduced titanium dioxide inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Li, Weiyang; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2014-05-27

    Sulfur is a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries with a high specific capacity of 1675 mAh/g. The rapid capacity fading, however, presents a significant challenge for the practical application of sulfur cathodes. Two major approaches that have been developed to improve the sulfur cathode performance include (a) fabricating nanostructured conductive matrix to physically encapsulate sulfur and (b) engineering chemical modification to enhance binding with polysulfides and, thus, to reduce their dissolution. Here, we report a three-dimensional (3D) electrode structure to achieve both sulfur physical encapsulation and polysulfides binding simultaneously. The electrode is based on hydrogen reduced TiO2 with an inverse opal structure that is highly conductive and robust toward electrochemical cycling. The relatively enclosed 3D structure provides an ideal architecture for sulfur and polysulfides confinement. The openings at the top surface allow sulfur infusion into the inverse opal structure. In addition, chemical tuning of the TiO2 composition through hydrogen reduction was shown to enhance the specific capacity and cyclability of the cathode. With such TiO2 encapsulated sulfur structure, the sulfur cathode could deliver a high specific capacity of ∼1100 mAh/g in the beginning, with a reversible capacity of ∼890 mAh/g after 200 cycles of charge/discharge at a C/5 rate. The Coulombic efficiency was also maintained at around 99.5% during cycling. The results showed that inverse opal structure of hydrogen reduced TiO2 represents an effective strategy in improving lithium sulfur batteries performance.

  8. Hydrogenation induced structure and property changes in GdGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedumkandathil, Reji; Kranak, Verina F.; Johansson, Robert; Ångström, Jonas; Balmes, Oliver; Andersson, Mikael S.; Nordblad, Per; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Sahlberg, Martin; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Hydrides GdGaHx were obtained by exposing the Zintl phase GdGa with the CrB structure to a hydrogen atmosphere at pressures from 1.5 to 50 bar and temperatures from 50 to 500 °C. Structural analysis by powder X-ray diffraction suggests that conditions with hydrogen pressures in a range between 15 and 50 bar and temperatures below 500 °C afford a uniform hydride phase with the NdGaH1.66 structure (Cmcm, a=3.9867(7) Å, b=12.024(2) Å, c=4.1009(6) Å) which hosts H in two distinct positions, H1 and H2. H1 is coordinated in a tetrahedral fashion by Gd atoms, whereas H2 atoms are inserted between Ga atoms. The assignment of the NdGaH1.66 structure is corroborated by first principles DFT calculations. Modeling of phase and structure stability as a function of composition resulted in excellent agreement with experimental lattice parameters when x=1.66 and revealed the presence of five-atom moieties Ga-H2-Ga-H2-Ga in GdGaH1.66. From in situ powder X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation it was established that hydrogenation at temperatures above 200 °C affords a hydride with x≈1.3, which is stable up to 500 °C, and that additional H absorption, yielding GdGaH1.66, takes place at lower temperatures. Consequently, GdGaH1.66 desorbs H above T=200 °C. Without the presence of hydrogen, hydrides GdGaHx decompose at temperatures above 300 °C into GdH2 and an unidentified Gd-Ga intermetallics. Thus the hydrogenation of GdGa is not reversible. From magnetic measurements the Curie-Weiss constant and effective magnetic moment of GdGaH1.66 were obtained. The former indicates antiferromagnetic interactions, the latter attains a value of ~8 μB which is typical for compounds containing Gd3+ions.

  9. Immunoelectronmicroscopic study of the nucleoid structure of hydrogen bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mogilnaya, O A; Kiselyova, E V; Medvedeva, S E; Puzir, A P; Guseynov, O A; Kulyba, N N; Kozlov, A V

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopical studies of the nucleoid structure of hydrogen bacteria using ultrahin sections and spread DNA from bacterial cell lysates revealed a different DNA packaging in the cell. A compact state of the major part of DNA at all growth stages and stability of nucleosome-like structures were shown. The use of antibodies to HU protein of E. coli labelled by protein A-colloidal gold demonstrated the immunological relationship between HU protein of E. coli and histone-like proteins of Alcaligenes eutrophus and their possible role in the nucleosome-like DNA packaging in procariotic genome.

  10. Density functional studies of small Au clusters adsorbed on α-FeOOH: Structural and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, Leandro F.; Zubieta, Carolina E.; Fuente, Silvia A.; Belelli, Patricia G.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.

    2016-11-01

    We report a density functional theory (DFT) investigation on the interaction of tiny Aun (n = 1-5) clusters with the bare and hydroxylated (110) surfaces of goethite (α-FeOOH). Both adsorption and atom-by-atom nucleation processes were modeled. The adsorption is shown to be strong on the bare surface and takes place preferentially through the interaction of Au atoms with unsaturated surface oxygen anions, accompanied with an electronic charge transfer from the metal to the support. Au3, Au4 and Au5 planar structures resulted to be particularly stable due to polarization effects; indeed, Coulombic repulsion between basal Au atoms and surface oxygen anions promotes the displacement of the electronic density toward terminal Au atoms producing a Au+δ(basal)/Au-δ(terminal) polarization. On the hydroxylated surface, Au clusters adsorb more weakly with respect to the bare surface, mainly through monocoordinated surface hydroxyl groups and tricoordinated oxygen ions. Concerning the nucleation mechanism, while on the hydroxylated surface the nucleation energy is governed by the spin of the interacting systems, on the bare surface polarization effects seems to play a predominant role.

  11. Iron wheels on silicon: wetting behavior and electronic structure of adsorbed organostannoxane clusters.

    PubMed

    Frehill, F; Schulte, K H G; Martin, C P; Wang, L; Patel, S; Purton, J A; Vos, J G; Moriarty, P

    2004-07-20

    Atomic force microscopy and synchrotron radiation (SR) spectroscopy have been used to study the wetting behavior and electronic structure of thin films of a novel organometallic cluster--[BuSn(O)OC(O)Fc]6 ("Fc" = ferrocenyl)--on silicon substrates. This cluster comprises six ferrocene units connected to a stannoxane central core--"an iron wheel on a tin drum" (V. Chandrasekhar; et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2000, 39, 1833). Thin films spin-cast onto native oxide-terminated silicon readily dewet the substrate. We have utilized advanced image analysis techniques based on Minkowski functionals to provide a detailed quantitative analysis of the morphology of the stannoxane overlayers. This analysis shows that the dewetting patterns are rather far removed from those expected to arise from a simple Poisson distribution of centers, and we discuss the implications of this finding in terms of nucleated and spinodal dewetting. Variations in both the surface roughness and the in-plane correlation length have been followed as a function of annealing time to probe the surface dewetting dynamics. SR valence band photoemission illustrates that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the cluster is found 2 eV below the Fermi level. Fe 2p --> 3d and Sn 3d --> 5p resonant photoemission spectroscopy have been used to enhance the cross sections of the partial density of states associated with the Fe and Sn atoms. Sn atoms make a large contribution to the HOMO of the cluster, whereas the Fe atoms are associated with an electronic environment seemingly very similar to that in the "parent" ferrocene molecule.

  12. Electronic structure and enthalpy of hydrogen and helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.; Klepeis, J. E.; Schafer, K. J.; Barbee, T. W., III

    1992-11-01

    The first local density approximation (LDA) calculations of the electronic structure, equation of state, and enthalpy of mixing were carried out for a number of different compositions of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices. These are fully quantum mechanical, self-consistent calculations utilizing state-of-the-art methods of electron band theory, which make no assumptions regarding pressure ionization. The major approximation in the LDA method is that the exchange and correlation energy is given by a free electron functional in terms of the local electron density. The majority of previous mixture calculations start with the assumption that both hydrogen and helium are pressure-ionized so that the electronic structure is approximately that of free or weakly screened electrons in the presence of positive ions. Stevenson used a hard-sphere mixture model for the ions with an ion-ion pseudopotential to account for electron screening and predicted that a mixture containing 7% helium by number, the composition believed to be present in Jupiter and Saturn, would phase separate at a temperature of about 7000 K at 8 Mbar. Subsequent calculations carried out for the fully ionized mixture and for a mixture of screened ions (linear response theory) have all arrived at predictions similar to those of Stevenson. MacFarlane and Hubbard performed Thomas-Fermi-Dirac calculations for mixing enthalpies of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices and predicted that phase separation would not occur at any temperature.

  13. Structural Features of a Hyperthermostable Endo-β-1,3-glucanase in Solution and Adsorbed on “Invisible” Particles

    PubMed Central

    Koutsopoulos, Sotirios; van der Oost, John; Norde, Willem

    2005-01-01

    Conformational characteristics and the adsorption behavior of endo-β-1,3-glucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus were studied by circular dichroism, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and calorimetry in solution and in the adsorbed state. The adsorption isotherms were determined on two types of surfaces: hydrophobic Teflon and hydrophilic silica particles were specially designed so that they do not interact with light and therefore do not interfere with spectroscopic measurements. We present the most straightforward method to study structural features of adsorbed macromolecules in situ using common spectroscopic techniques. The enzyme was irreversibly adsorbed and immobilized in the adsorbed state even at high temperatures. Adsorption offered further stabilization to the heat-stable enzyme and in the case of adsorption on Teflon its denaturation temperature was measured at 133°C, i.e., the highest experimentally determined for a protein. The maintenance of the active conformation and biological function particularly at high temperatures is important for applications in biocatalysis and biotechnology. With this study we also suggest that nature may employ adsorption as a complementary mode to maintain structural integrity of essential biomolecules at extreme conditions of temperature. PMID:15516527

  14. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites. PMID:26658356

  15. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-12-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites.

  16. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer.

    PubMed

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites.

  17. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer.

    PubMed

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites. PMID:26658356

  18. A Link between Protein Structure and Enzyme Catalyzed Hydrogen Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahnson, Brian J.; Colby, Thomas D.; Chin, Jodie K.; Goldstein, Barry M.; Klinman, Judith P.

    1997-11-01

    We present evidence that the size of an active site side chain may modulate the degree of hydrogen tunneling in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Primary and secondary kH/kT and kD/kT kinetic isotope effects have been measured for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 25 degrees C. As reported in earlier studies, the relationship between secondary kH/kT and kD/kT isotope effects provides a sensitive probe for deviations from classical behavior. In the present work, catalytic efficiency and the extent of hydrogen tunneling have been correlated for the alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed hydride transfer among a group of site-directed mutants at position 203. Val-203 interacts with the opposite face of the cofactor NAD+ from the alcohol substrate. The reduction in size of this residue is correlated with diminished tunneling and a two orders of magnitude decrease in catalytic efficiency. Comparison of the x-ray crystal structures of a ternary complex of a high-tunneling (Phe-93 --> Trp) and a low-tunneling (Val-203 --> Ala) mutant provides a structural basis for the observed effects, demonstrating an increase in the hydrogen transfer distance for the low-tunneling mutant. The Val-203 --> Ala ternary complex crystal structure also shows a hyperclosed interdomain geometry relative to the wild-type and the Phe-93 --> Trp mutant ternary complex structures. This demonstrates a flexibility in interdomain movement that could potentially narrow the distance between the donor and acceptor carbons in the native enzyme and may enhance the role of tunneling in the hydride transfer reaction.

  19. Electronic structure of hydrogenated diamond: Microscopical insight into surface conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Alippi, Paola; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Offi, F.; Petaccia, L.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    We have correlated the surface conductivity of hydrogen-terminated diamond to the electronic structure in the Fermi region. Significant density of electronic states (DOS) in proximity of the Fermi edge has been measured by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) on surfaces exposed to air, corresponding to a p -type electric conductive regime, while upon annealing a depletion of the DOS has been achieved, resembling the diamond insulating state. The surface and subsurface electronic structure has been determined, exploiting the different probing depths of PES applied in a photon energy range between 7 and 31 eV. Ab initio density functional calculations including surface charge depletion and band-bending effects favorably compare with electronic states measured by angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Such states are organized in the energy-momentum space in a twofold structure: one, bulk-derived, band disperses in the Γ -X direction with an average hole effective mass of (0.43 ±0.02 ) m0 , where m0 is the bare electron mass; a second flatter band, with an effective mass of (2.2 ±0.9 ) m0 , proves that a hole gas confined in the topmost layers is responsible for the conductivity of the (2 ×1 ) hydrogen-terminated diamond (100 ) surface.

  20. The spiral structure of the outer Milky Way in hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Levine, E S; Blitz, Leo; Heiles, Carl

    2006-06-23

    We produce a detailed map of the perturbed surface density of neutral hydrogen in the outer Milky Way disk, demonstrating that the Galaxy is a non-axisymmetric multiarmed spiral. Spiral structure in the southern half of the Galaxy can be traced out to at least 25 kiloparsecs, implying a minimum radius for the gas disk. Overdensities in the surface density are coincident with regions of reduced gas thickness. The ratio of the surface density to the local median surface density is relatively constant along an arm. Logarithmic spirals can be fit to the arms with pitch angles of 20 degrees to 25 degrees .

  1. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  2. Structure sensitive adsorption of hydrogen on ruthenium and ruthenium-silver catalysts supported on silica

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N.

    1999-02-12

    Supported metal catalysts typically consist of particles with sizes less than 10 nm, and because of the small crystallite size, low coordination number sites (edges and corners) represent a significant fraction of all surface sites. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that adsorption rates can be much greater at these low coordination sites than on basal plane sites. What has not been generally appreciated, however, is that preferential adsorption at edge and corner sites may explain the mechanism by which a promoter, or the addition of a second metal to form a bimetallic, can alter the selectivity and rate of reaction. For example, the measurements of hydrogen adsorption onto supported Ru-Ag catalysts show marked decreases in the amount of hydrogen adsorbed relative to the amount adsorbed on Ru catalysts. Although it is known that Ag does not dissociatively adsorb hydrogen, this decrease cannot be explained by a simple one-to-one site blocking mechanism unless Ag preferentially populates edges and corners, thereby reducing the number of Ru edge sites. Indeed, Monte Carlo simulations of Ru-Group IB metal catalysts predict that Group IB metal atoms preferentially populate corner and edge sites of ruthenium crystals. This evidence, taken together, suggests that adsorption occurs preferentially at Ru corner and edge sites, which act as portals onto basal planes. A model based on this portal theory for hydrogen adsorption onto supported ruthenium bimetallic catalysts has been developed using a rate equation approach. Specifically, the model accounts for the following features: (1) preferential adsorption through portals, (2) basal plane site-energy multiplicity, and (3) hydrogen spillover onto the support. A comparison of model predictions with experiment is presented for different concentration of Ag in Ru-Ag catalysts. The portal model of hydrogen adsorption can explain the observed decreased in the amount of hydrogen adsorbed on Ru-Ag catalysts. The model can be

  3. Structure and Reactions of Carbon and Hydrogen on Ru(0001): A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-09

    The interaction between carbon and hydrogen atoms on a Ru(0001) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Density Functional Theory (DFT) and STM image calculations. Formation of CH species by reaction between adsorbed H and C was observed to occur readily at 100 K. When the coverage of H increased new complexes of the form CH+nH (n = 1, 2 and 3) were observed. These complexes, never observed before, might be precursors for further hydrogenation reactions. DFT analysis reveals that a considerable energy barrier exists for the CH+H {yields} CH{sub 2} reaction.

  4. Adsorptive Removal of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products from Water with Functionalized Metal-organic Frameworks: Remarkable Adsorbents with Hydrogen-bonding Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Pill Won; Bhadra, Biswa Nath; Ahmed, Imteaz; Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of typical pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) (such as naproxen, ibuprofen and oxybenzone) from aqueous solutions was studied by using the highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF) MIL-101 with and without functionalization. Adsorption results showed that MIL-101s with H-donor functional groups such as –OH and –NH2 were very effective for naproxen adsorption, despite a decrease in porosity, probably because of H-bonding between O atoms on naproxen and H atoms on the adsorbent. For this reason, MIL-101 with two functional groups capable of H-bonding (MIL-101-(OH)2) exhibited remarkable adsorption capacity based on adsorbent surface area. The favorable contributions of –OH and –(OH)2 on MIL-101 in the increased adsorption of ibuprofen and oxybenzone (especially based on porosity) confirmed again the importance of H-bonding mechanism. The adsorbent with the highest adsorption capacity, MIL-101-OH, was very competitive when compared with carbonaceous materials, mesoporous materials, and pristine MIL-101. Moreover, the MIL-101-OH could be recycled several times by simply washing with ethanol, suggesting potential application in the adsorptive removal of PPCPs from water. PMID:27695005

  5. Adsorptive Removal of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products from Water with Functionalized Metal-organic Frameworks: Remarkable Adsorbents with Hydrogen-bonding Abilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Pill Won; Bhadra, Biswa Nath; Ahmed, Imteaz; Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-10-01

    Adsorption of typical pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) (such as naproxen, ibuprofen and oxybenzone) from aqueous solutions was studied by using the highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF) MIL-101 with and without functionalization. Adsorption results showed that MIL-101s with H-donor functional groups such as –OH and –NH2 were very effective for naproxen adsorption, despite a decrease in porosity, probably because of H-bonding between O atoms on naproxen and H atoms on the adsorbent. For this reason, MIL-101 with two functional groups capable of H-bonding (MIL-101-(OH)2) exhibited remarkable adsorption capacity based on adsorbent surface area. The favorable contributions of –OH and –(OH)2 on MIL-101 in the increased adsorption of ibuprofen and oxybenzone (especially based on porosity) confirmed again the importance of H-bonding mechanism. The adsorbent with the highest adsorption capacity, MIL-101-OH, was very competitive when compared with carbonaceous materials, mesoporous materials, and pristine MIL-101. Moreover, the MIL-101-OH could be recycled several times by simply washing with ethanol, suggesting potential application in the adsorptive removal of PPCPs from water.

  6. Morphology and structure of photosensitive dye J-aggregates adsorbed on AgBr microcrystals grown in gelatin.

    PubMed

    Saijo, H; Shiojiri, M

    1998-07-15

    Though the cyanine dye J-aggregates carry the role to sense the exposing light in the silver halide photographic system, little research on the morphology of the aggregates in adsorption has been made with modern surface analytical methods. In this paper, we describe the size, epitaxy, multi-layered array formation, nucleation and preferential adsorption, and irregular distribution of population between particles and the segregation on a particle, of J-aggregates adsorbed on AgBr grown in gelatin. We employed cathodoluminescence microscopy, low energy high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Dye molecules aggregate together near the surface of AgBr and adsorb on the surface. The growth of adsorbed aggregates is controlled by the diffusion of dye molecules from the surrounding solution. The population of J-aggregates adsorbed on an AgBr particle varies from almost none to full coverage. Each aggregate is about (20-30) x (30-50) nm in size and is 2.1 nm thick for thiacarbocyanine with sodium ion, 1.04 nm for thiacarbocyanine with tosyl ion, and 0.5 nm for an oxacarbocyanine. The aggregates connect their longer edges to each other to form arrays, and the arrays build up multi-layered stacks. The arrays align parallel and segregate to form terraces. The longer edges of J-aggregates align along [210] on AgBr (100) or [632] on AgBr (111). PMID:9728883

  7. First-Principles Study of Electronic Structure and Hydrogen Adsorption of 3d Transition Metal Exposed Paddle Wheel Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, J. H.; Le, V. D.; Kang, J.; Wei, S. H.; Kim, Y. H.

    2012-04-05

    Open-site paddle wheels, comprised of two transition metals bridged with four carboxylate ions, have been widely used for constructing metal-organic frameworks with large surface area and high binding energy sites. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we have investigated atomic and electronic structures of various 3d transition metal paddle wheels before and after metal exposure and their hydrogen adsorption properties at open metal sites. Notably, the hydrogen adsorption is impeded by covalent metal-metal bonds in early transition metal paddle wheels from Sc to Cr and by the strong ferromagnetic coupling of diatomic Mn and Fe in the paddle wheel configurations. A significantly enhanced H{sub 2} adsorption is predicted in the nonmagnetic Co{sub 2} and Zn{sub 2} paddle wheel with the binding energy of {approx}0.2 eV per H{sub 2}. We also propose the use of two-dimensional Co{sub 2} and Zn{sub 2} paddle wheel frameworks that could have strongly adsorbed dihydrogen up to 1.35 wt % for noncryogenic hydrogen storage applications.

  8. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111)

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; Bai, Yun; Saldin, Dilano K.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-01-01

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEA+MP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunnelling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by binding of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O····H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. The combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations. PMID:27488075

  9. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; Bai, Yun; Saldin, Dilano K.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-08-01

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEA+MP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunnelling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by binding of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O....H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. The combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations.

  10. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111).

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; Bai, Yun; Saldin, Dilano K; Tysoe, Wilfred T

    2016-01-01

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEA+MP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunnelling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by binding of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O····H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. The combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations. PMID:27488075

  11. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; Bai, Yun; Saldin, Dilano K.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-08-04

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEAþMP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by bindingmore » of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O...H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. In conclusion, the combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations.« less

  12. Hydrogen bonding and multiphonon structure in copper pyrazine coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Brown, S; Cao, J; Musfeldt, J L; Conner, M M; McConnell, A C; Southerland, H I; Manson, J L; Schlueter, J A; Phillips, M D; Turnbull, M M; Landee, C P

    2007-10-15

    We report a systematic investigation of the temperature-dependent infrared vibrational spectra of a family of chemically related coordination polymer magnets based upon bridging bifluoride (HF(2)-) and terminal fluoride (F-) ligands in copper pyrazine complexes including Cu(HF(2))(pyz)(2)BF(4), Cu(HF(2))(pyz)(2)ClO(4), and CuF(2)(H(2)O)(2)(pyz). We compare our results with several one- and two-dimensional prototype materials including Cu(pyz)(NO(3))(2) and Cu(pyz)(2)(ClO(4))(2). Unusual low-temperature hydrogen bonding, local structural transitions associated with stronger low-temperature hydrogen bonding, and striking multiphonon effects that derive from coupling of an infrared-active fundamental with strong Raman-active modes of the pyrazine building-block molecule are observed. On the basis of the spectroscopic evidence, these interactions are ubiquitous to this family of coordination polymers and may work to stabilize long-range magnetic ordering at low temperature. Similar interactions are likely to be present in other molecule-based magnets.

  13. Comparison of adsorbents for H2S and D4 removal for biogas conversion in a solid oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sigot, Léa; Ducom, Gaëlle; Benadda, Belkacem; Labouré, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Biogas contains trace compounds detrimental for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application, especially sulphur-containing compounds and volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs). It is therefore necessary to remove these impurities from the biogas for fuelling an SOFC. In this paper, dynamic lab-scale adsorption tests were performed on synthetic polluted gas to evaluate the performance of a polishing treatment to remove hydrogen sulphide (H2S - sulphur compound) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4 - VOSiC). Three kinds of adsorbents were tested: an activated carbon, a silica gel (SG) and a zeolite (Z). Z proved to be the best adsorbent for H2S removal, with an adsorbed quantity higher than [Formula: see text] at the SOFC tolerance limit. However, as concerns D4 removal, SG was the most efficient adsorbent, with an adsorbed quantity of about 184 mgD4/gSG at the SOFC tolerance limit. These results could not be explained by structural characteristics of the adsorbents, but they were partly explained by chemical interactions between the adsorbate and the adsorbent. In these experiments, internal diffusion was the controlling step, Knudsen diffusion being predominant to molecular diffusion. As Z was also a good adsorbent for D4 removal, competition phenomena were investigated with Z for the simultaneous removal of H2S and D4. It was shown that H2S retention was dramatically decreased in the presence of D4, probably due to D4 polymerization resulting in pore blocking.

  14. Selective removal of caffeine from tea extracts using macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Wang, Peng; Kong, Xia; Shi, Rongfu; Yuan, Zhi; Wang, Chunhong

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis reaction of ester groups in vinyl acetate (VAc) was used to introduce hydroxyl groups into the matrix of a macroporous adsorbent, which was itself prepared by free radical suspension copolymerization of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and VAc. Therefore, the copolymerization incompatibility between the hydrophilic and the hydrophobic monomer was overcome successfully and the hydrophobic matrix of the polymeric adsorbent containing a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) segment was obtained. Introduction of the PVA segment decreased the hydrophobic adsorption affinity of the adsorbent while producing the hydrogen-bonding interaction. When isolating the two active components, polyphenols (TPh) and caffeine (CAF), from green tea extracts, this polymeric adsorbent, namely poly(TAIC-co-VA), exhibited good adsorption selectivity towards TPh over CAF. The adsorption mechanism leading to this selectivity involved a hydrophobic interaction mechanism for CAF and multiple weak hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions for TPh. The adsorption thermodynamics for TPh on poly(TAIC-co-VA) were studied. The effects of adsorbent structure and gradient desorption conditions on isolation were investigated. The result showed that adsorbent, with 20% TAIC content, was able to efficiently remove CAF from different tea extracts with different ratios of TPh and CAF. Finally, almost no CAF was detected in the TPh fraction and the recovery of TPh was greater than 95%.

  15. The investigation of hydrogenation influence on structure changes of zirconium with nickel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudiiarov, V. N.; Bordulev, Yu S.; Laptev, R. S.; Pushilina, N. S.; Kashkarov, E. B.; Syrtanov, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    The results of experimental investigation of hydrogenation influence on structure changes of zirconium alloy (Zr-1%Nb) with thin nickel layer have presented in this work. Nickel layer was formed by magnetron sputter deposition. Hydrogenation was carried out at gas atmosphere at constant temperature. Different hydrogen concentrations were obtained by varying time of hydrogenation. Defect and phase structure was studied by means of X-ray diffraction, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopies. New experimental data about the evolution of the positron annihilation parameters depending on hydrogen concentration in Zr-1Nb alloy with nickel layer was obtained.

  16. Hydrogen bond rotations as a uniform structural tool for analyzing protein architecture.

    PubMed

    Penner, Robert C; Andersen, Ebbe S; Jensen, Jens L; Kantcheva, Adriana K; Bublitz, Maike; Nissen, Poul; Rasmussen, Anton M H; Svane, Katrine L; Hammer, Bjørk; Rezazadegan, Reza; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Nielsen, Jakob T; Andersen, Jørgen E

    2014-12-17

    Proteins fold into three-dimensional structures, which determine their diverse functions. The conformation of the backbone of each structure is locally at each C(α) effectively described by conformational angles resulting in Ramachandran plots. These, however, do not describe the conformations around hydrogen bonds, which can be non-local along the backbone and are of major importance for protein structure. Here, we introduce the spatial rotation between hydrogen bonded peptide planes as a new descriptor for protein structure locally around a hydrogen bond. Strikingly, this rotational descriptor sampled over high-quality structures from the protein data base (PDB) concentrates into 30 localized clusters, some of which correlate to the common secondary structures and others to more special motifs, yet generally providing a unifying systematic classification of local structure around protein hydrogen bonds. It further provides a uniform vocabulary for comparison of protein structure near hydrogen bonds even between bonds in different proteins without alignment.

  17. Phase Space Structures Explain Hydrogen Atom Roaming in Formaldehyde Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Mauguière, Frédéric A L; Collins, Peter; Kramer, Zeb C; Carpenter, Barry K; Ezra, Gregory S; Farantos, Stavros C; Wiggins, Stephen

    2015-10-15

    We re-examine the prototypical roaming reaction--hydrogen atom roaming in formaldehyde decomposition--from a phase space perspective. Specifically, we address the question "why do trajectories roam, rather than dissociate through the radical channel?" We describe and compute the phase space structures that define and control all possible reactive events for this reaction, as well as provide a dynamically exact description of the roaming region in phase space. Using these phase space constructs, we show that in the roaming region, there is an unstable periodic orbit whose stable and unstable manifolds define a conduit that both encompasses all roaming trajectories exiting the formaldehyde well and shepherds them toward the H2···CO well.

  18. The structure, energetics, and nature of the chemical bonding of phenylthiol adsorbed on the Au(111) surface: implications for density-functional calculations of molecular-electronic conduction.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Ante; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of phenylthiol on the Au(111) surface is modeled using Perdew and Wang density-functional calculations. Both direct molecular physisorption and dissociative chemisorption via S-H bond cleavage are considered as well as dimerization to form disulfides. For the major observed product, the chemisorbed thiol, an extensive potential-energy surface is produced as a function of both the azimuthal orientation of the adsorbate and the linear translation of the adsorbate through the key fcc, hcp, bridge, and top binding sites. Key structures are characterized, the lowest-energy one being a broad minimum of tilted orientation ranging from the bridge structure halfway towards the fcc one. The vertically oriented threefold binding sites, often assumed to dominate molecular electronics measurements, are identified as transition states at low coverage but become favored in dense monolayers. A similar surface is also produced for chemisorption of phenylthiol on Ag(111); this displays significant qualitative differences, consistent with the qualitatively different observed structures for thiol chemisorption on Ag and Au. Full contours of the minimum potential energy as a function of sulfur translation over the crystal face are described, from which the barrier to diffusion is deduced to be 5.8 kcal mol(-1), indicating that the potential-energy surface has low corrugation. The calculated bond lengths, adsorbate charge and spin density, and the density of electronic states all indicate that, at all sulfur locations, the adsorbate can be regarded as a thiyl species that forms a net single covalent bond to the surface of strength 31 kcal mol(-1). No detectable thiolate character is predicted, however, contrary to experimental results for alkyl thiols that indicate up to 20%-30% thiolate involvement. This effect is attributed to the asymptotic-potential error of all modern density functionals that becomes manifest through a 3-4 eV error in the lineup of the adsorbate and

  19. Quasiparticle excitations of adsorbates on doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Dillon; Karrasch, Christoph; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jiong; Omrani, Arash A.; Brar, Victor; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wu, Qiong; Corsetti, Fabiano; Mostofi, Arash; Kawakami, Roland K.; Moore, Joel; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Mike

    Adsorbed atoms and molecules can modify the electronic structure of graphene, but in turn it is also possible to control the properties of adsorbates via the graphene substrate. In my talk, I will discuss the electronic structure of F4-TCNQ molecules on doped graphene and present a first-principles based theory of quasiparticle excitations that captures the interplay of doping-dependent image charge interactions between substrate and adsorbate and electron-electron interaction effects on the molecule. The resulting doping-dependent quasiparticle energies will be compared to experimental scanning tunnelling spectra. Finally, I will also discuss the effects of charged adsorbates on the electronic structure of doped graphene.

  20. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy studies of adsorbates on Pt(111): Studies of CO at high pressures and temperatures, coadsorbed with olefins and its role as a poison in ethylene hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Kyle Yi

    2000-12-31

    High pressure high temperature CO adsorption and coadsorption with ethylene and propylene on Pt(111) was monitored in situ with infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG). At high pressures and high temperatures, CO dissociates on a Pt(111) surface to form carbon. At 400 torr CO pressure and 673K, CO modifies the Pt(111) surface through a carbonyl intermediate, and dissociates to leave carbon on the surface. SFG was used to follow the CO peak evolution from monolayer adsorption in ultra high vacuum (UHV) to 400 torr CO pressure. At this high pressure, a temperature dependence study from room temperature to 823K was carried out. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to identify carbon on the surface CO coadsorption with ethylene and CO coadsorption with propylene studies were carried out with 2-IR 1-visible SFG. With this setup, two spectral ranges covering the C-H stretch range and the CO stretch range can be monitored simultaneously. The coadsorption study with ethylene reveals that after 5L ethylene exposure on a Pt(111) surface to form ethylidyne , CO at high pressures cannot completely displace the ethylidyne from the surface. Instead, CO first adsorbs on defect sites at low pressures and then competes with ethylidyne for terrace sites at high pressures. Propylene coadsorption with CO at similar conditions shows that propylidyne undergoes conformation changes with increased CO pressure and at 1 torr, is absent from the Pt(111) surface. Experiments on CO poisoning of ethylene hydrogenation was carried by 2-IR 1-visible SFG. At 1 torr CO,10 torr ethylene and 100 torr hydrogen, CO was found to block active sites necessary for ethylene hydrogenation, Above 425K, CO desorbs from the surface to allow ethylene hydrogenation to occur. The gas phase species were monitored by gas chromatography.

  1. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V.; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M.; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of ‘extra adsorption domains’—that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically.

  2. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-26

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of 'extra adsorption domains'-that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically. PMID:26550825

  3. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Adsorption Mechanism of Hydrogen on Boron-Doped Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liu-Min; Shi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Ji, Guang-Fu; Lu, Zhi-Peng

    2009-08-01

    The C35BH-H2 complex and two other possible isomers, C34BCaH-H2 and C34BCbH-H2, are investigated using the local-spin-density approximation (LSDA) method. The results indicate that a single hydrogen molecule could be strongly adsorbed on two isomers, C34BCaH and C34BCbH, with binding energies of 0.42 and 0.47 eV, respectively, and that these calculated binding energies are suitable for reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption near room temperature. However, it is difficult for the H2 molecule to be firmly adsorbed on C35BH. We analyze the interaction between C34BCxH (x = a, b) and the H2 molecule using dipole moments and molecular orbitals. The charge analysis showed there was a partial charge (about 0.32e) transfer from H2 to the doped fullerenes. These calculation results should broaden our understanding of the mechanisms of hydrogen storage using boron-doped fullerenes.

  4. Micro-structured femtosecond laser assisted FBG hydrogen sensor.

    PubMed

    Karanja, Joseph Muna; Dai, Yutang; Zhou, Xian; Liu, Bin; Yang, Minghong

    2015-11-30

    We discuss hydrogen sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) micro-machined by femtosecond laser to form microgrooves and sputtered with Pd/Ag composite film. The atomic ratio of the two metals is controlled at Pd:Ag = 3:1. At room temperature, the hydrogen sensitivity of the sensor probe micro-machined by 75 mW laser power and sputtered with 520 nm of Pd/Ag film is 16.5 pm/%H. Comparably, the standard FBG hydrogen sensitivity becomes 2.5 pm/%H towards the same 4% hydrogen concentration. At an ambient temperature of 35°C, the processed sensor head has a dramatic rise in hydrogen sensitivity. Besides, the sensor shows good response and repeatability during hydrogen concentration test. PMID:26698733

  5. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  6. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  7. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N2 bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N2 bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N2 sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, “semi-unfolded” ↔ “native” ↔ “globally unfolded” → “aggregated”. This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  8. Structure, hydrogen bonding and thermal expansion of ammonium carbonate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, A. Dominic; Wood, Ian G.; Alfè, Dario; Hernández, Eduardo R.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Sparkes, Hazel A.

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of ammonium carbonate monohydrate, (NH4)2CO3·H2O, using Laue single-crystal diffraction methods with pulsed neutron radiation. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group Pnma (Z = 4), with unit-cell dimensions a = 12.047 (3), b = 4.453 (1), c = 11.023 (3) Å and V = 591.3 (3) Å3 [ρcalc = 1281.8 (7) kg m−3] at 10 K. The single-crystal data collected at 10 and 100 K are complemented by X-ray powder diffraction data measured from 245 to 273 K, Raman spectra measured from 80 to 263 K and an athermal zero-pressure calculation of the electronic structure and phonon spectrum carried out using density functional theory (DFT). We find no evidence of a phase transition between 10 and 273 K; above 273 K, however, the title compound transforms first to ammonium sesquicarbonate monohydrate and subsequently to ammonium bicarbonate. The crystallographic and spectroscopic data and the calculations reveal a quite strongly hydrogen-bonded structure (E HB ≃ 30–40 kJ mol−1), on the basis of H⋯O bond lengths and the topology of the electron density at the bond critical points, in which there is no free rotation of the ammonium cation at any temperature. The barrier to free rotation of the ammonium ions is estimated from the observed librational frequency to be ∼ 36 kJ mol−1. The c-axis exhibits negative thermal expansion, but the thermal expansion behaviour of the a and b axes is ormal. PMID:25449618

  9. Multicomponent adsorption of alcohols onto silicalite-1 from aqueous solution: isotherms, structural analysis, and assessment of ideal adsorbed solution theory.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2012-11-01

    Configurational-bias Monte Carlo (CBMC) simulations in the isobaric-isothermal version of the Gibbs ensemble (GE) were carried out to probe the adsorption from aqueous solutions of methanol and/or ethanol onto silicalite-1. This methodology does require neither specification of the chemical potential nor any reference to activity models based on experimental data. The CBMC-GE methodology can be applied to the complete range of mixture compositions from pure water to pure alcohols and can also be used when multiple solute types are present at high concentration. The simulations demonstrate high selectivities for the alcohols (α(ethanol) > α(methanol)) almost over the entire composition range. The ideal adsorbed solution theory is found to substantially underpredict the amount of sorbed water and leads to very large errors for low alcohol solution concentrations. The simulations indicate that, at lower loadings, the adsorbed alcohol molecules can serve as seeds for water adsorption but, at higher loadings, alcohols displace water molecules from their preferred region.

  10. Hydrogen dimer structures in the far-infrared spectra of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frommhold, L.; Samuelson, R.; Birnbaum, G.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a spectral line shape computation and radiative transfer calculations, it is shown that the unexplained, diminutive structures seen in the Voyager IRIS Jovian spectra near the hydrogen S0(0) and S0(1) rotational frequencies are due to bound-free transitions involving hydrogen dimers. The absorption intensities of these transitions, as well as of the collision-induced background, are given. These dimer structures may possibly prove to be useful for determining the helium/hydrogen ratio and the para-hydrogen fraction in the atmospheres of the outer planets.

  11. Nanohole Structuring for Improved Performance of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Johlin, Eric; Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-06-22

    While low hole mobilities limit the current collection and efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic devices, attempts to improve mobility of the material directly have stagnated. Herein, we explore a method of utilizing nanostructuring of a-Si:H devices to allow for improved hole collection in thick absorber layers. This is achieved by etching an array of 150 nm diameter holes into intrinsic a-Si:H and then coating the structured material with p-type a-Si:H and a conformal zinc oxide transparent conducting layer. The inclusion of these nanoholes yields relative power conversion efficiency (PCE) increases of ∼45%, from 7.2 to 10.4% PCE for small area devices. Comparisons of optical properties, time-of-flight mobility measurements, and internal quantum efficiency spectra indicate this efficiency is indeed likely occurring from an improved collection pathway provided by the nanostructuring of the devices. Finally, we estimate that through modest optimizations of the design and fabrication, PCEs of beyond 13% should be obtainable for similar devices.

  12. Nanohole Structuring for Improved Performance of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Johlin, Eric; Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-06-22

    While low hole mobilities limit the current collection and efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic devices, attempts to improve mobility of the material directly have stagnated. Herein, we explore a method of utilizing nanostructuring of a-Si:H devices to allow for improved hole collection in thick absorber layers. This is achieved by etching an array of 150 nm diameter holes into intrinsic a-Si:H and then coating the structured material with p-type a-Si:H and a conformal zinc oxide transparent conducting layer. The inclusion of these nanoholes yields relative power conversion efficiency (PCE) increases of ∼45%, from 7.2 to 10.4% PCE for small area devices. Comparisons of optical properties, time-of-flight mobility measurements, and internal quantum efficiency spectra indicate this efficiency is indeed likely occurring from an improved collection pathway provided by the nanostructuring of the devices. Finally, we estimate that through modest optimizations of the design and fabrication, PCEs of beyond 13% should be obtainable for similar devices. PMID:27227369

  13. Porphyrin adsorbed on the (101[combining macron]0) surface of the wurtzite structure of ZnO--conformation induced effects on the electron transfer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Mika; Kuisma, Mikael; Cramariuc, Oana; Golovanov, Viacheslav; Hukka, Terttu I; Tkachenko, Nikolai; Rantala, Tapio T

    2013-10-28

    Electron transfer at the adsorbate-surface interface is crucial in many applications but the steps taking place prior to and during the electron transfer are not always thoroughly understood. In this work a model system of 4-(porphyrin-5-yl)benzoic acid adsorbed as a corresponding benzoate on the ZnO wurtzite (101[combining macron]0) surface is studied using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT. Emphasis is on the initial photoexcitation of porphyrin and on the strength of coupling between the porphyrin LUMO or LUMO + 1 and the ZnO conduction band that plays a role in the electron transfer. Firstly, ZnO wurtzite bulk is optimized to minimum energy geometry and the properties of the isolated ZnO (101[combining macron]0) surface model and the porphyrin model are discussed to gain insight into the combined system. Secondly, various orientations of the model porphyrin on the ZnO surface are studied: the porphyrin model standing perpendicularly to the surface and gradually brought close to the surface by tilting the linker in a few steps. The porphyrin model approaches the surface either sideways with hydrogen atoms of the porphyrin ring coming down first or twisted in a ca. 45° angle, giving rise to π-interactions of the porphyrin ring with ZnO. Because porphyrins are closely packed and near the surface, emerging van der Waals (vdW) interactions are examined using Grimme's D2 method. While the orientation affects the initial excitation of porphyrin only slightly, the coupling between the LUMO and LUMO + 1 of porphyrin and the conduction band of ZnO increases considerably if porphyrin is close to the surface, especially if the π-electrons are interacting with the surface. Based on the results of coupling studies, not only the distance between porphyrin and the ZnO surface but also the orientation of porphyrin can greatly affect the electron transfer. PMID:24022239

  14. Bioinspired synthesis of hierarchically micro/nano-structured CuI tetrahedron and its potential application as adsorbent for Cd(II) with high removal capacity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuyan; Yang, Jianmao; Li, Zhengdao; Jia, Xiaoxia; Chen, Yanli

    2012-04-15

    An environment friendly bioinspired strategy for synthesizing hierarchically micro/nano-structured CuI tetrahedron has been developed by combining the stabilization and the reduction performances of l-tryptophan together. A possible growth mechanism of such hierarchical tetrahedron is tentatively proposed. Remarkably, such CuI tetrahedron is found to possess high removal capacity for poisonous Cd(II) ions, 136.3mg/g, and ideal reusability. This is ascribed to the hierarchical micro/nano-structure and chemical adsorption mechanism, which shows great advantages over the traditional nano-scaled adsorbents. These interesting results stand out the promising applications of such hierarchically micro/nano-structured materials in environment. It is also a good example for the organic combination of green chemistry and nanotechnologies for the treatment of contaminated water.

  15. The structure of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the NaCl(100) surface—a combined LEED and DFT-D/vdW-DF study.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Jochen; Vogt, Birgit

    2014-12-01

    The structure of the first layer CO adsorbed on NaCl(100) is investigated experimentally by means of quantitative low-energy electron diffraction at 25 K, and theoretically by means of density functional theory. Consistent with earlier helium atom diffraction results, the monolayer structure has p(2×1) symmetry with a glide-plane along the longer axis of the unit cell. The structure analysis confirms the binding of CO via the carbon end to the NaCl(100) surface. The vertical distance of carbon above Na(+) is 2.58 ± 0.08 Å, in good agreement with geometry optimizations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory, and 0.15 Å lower than predicted in calculations based on the nonlocal van der Waals density functional. PMID:25481162

  16. The structure of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the NaCl(100) surface—a combined LEED and DFT-D/vdW-DF study.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Jochen; Vogt, Birgit

    2014-12-01

    The structure of the first layer CO adsorbed on NaCl(100) is investigated experimentally by means of quantitative low-energy electron diffraction at 25 K, and theoretically by means of density functional theory. Consistent with earlier helium atom diffraction results, the monolayer structure has p(2×1) symmetry with a glide-plane along the longer axis of the unit cell. The structure analysis confirms the binding of CO via the carbon end to the NaCl(100) surface. The vertical distance of carbon above Na(+) is 2.58 ± 0.08 Å, in good agreement with geometry optimizations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory, and 0.15 Å lower than predicted in calculations based on the nonlocal van der Waals density functional.

  17. The structure of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the NaCl(100) surface—A combined LEED and DFT-D/vdW-DF study

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Jochen; Vogt, Birgit

    2014-12-07

    The structure of the first layer CO adsorbed on NaCl(100) is investigated experimentally by means of quantitative low-energy electron diffraction at 25 K, and theoretically by means of density functional theory. Consistent with earlier helium atom diffraction results, the monolayer structure has p(2×1) symmetry with a glide-plane along the longer axis of the unit cell. The structure analysis confirms the binding of CO via the carbon end to the NaCl(100) surface. The vertical distance of carbon above Na{sup +} is 2.58 ± 0.08 Å, in good agreement with geometry optimizations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory, and 0.15 Å lower than predicted in calculations based on the nonlocal van der Waals density functional.

  18. Parameter-Free Hydrogen-Bond Definition to Classify Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Hasti; Higham, Jonathan; Henchman, Richard H

    2016-08-25

    DSSP is the most commonly used method to assign protein secondary structure. It is based on a hydrogen-bond definition with an energy cutoff. To assess whether hydrogen bonds defined in a parameter-free way may give more generality while preserving accuracy, we examine a series of hydrogen-bond definitions to assign secondary structure for a series of proteins. Assignment by the strongest-acceptor bifurcated definition with provision for unassigned donor hydrogens, termed the SABLE method, is found to match DSSP with 95% agreement. The small disagreement mainly occurs for helices, turns, and bends. While there is no absolute way to assign protein secondary structure, avoiding molecule-specific cutoff parameters should be advantageous in generalizing structure-assignment methods to any hydrogen-bonded system. PMID:27067825

  19. Structures, stability and hydrogen bonding in inositol conformers.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Nazia; Singh, Vijay; Deshmukh, Milind M; Gurunath, Ramanathan

    2015-07-28

    Various ab initio calculations using the density-functional (DFT), the second order Möller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) and self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) theories were performed on thirteen theoretically possible inositol stereoisomers. Gas phase calculations reveal that the myo- and neo-isomers of inositol (bearing one and two axial hydroxyl groups, respectively) are marginally more stable (by 0.5 kcal mol(-1)) than the all equatorially substituted scyllo-inositol. The calculations when done in different polar solvents show that the scyllo-inositol becomes the most stable inositol isomer, a fact attributed to weaker intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The individual hydrogen bond energy in all the isomers of inositol was also estimated using the molecular tailoring approach (MTA). The calculated hydrogen bond energies in these isomers are in excellent agreement with reported O-H···O hydrogen bond distances and ν(O-H) stretching frequencies. The estimated H-bond energy values suggest that the order of the intramolecular hydrogen bond strength follows: axial-axial > equatorial-axial > axial-equatorial > equatorial-equatorial hydrogen bonds. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the scyllo isomer are much weaker than those in other conformers, thus making this isomer more stable in polar solvents.

  20. HELIOSPHERIC STRUCTURE: THE BOW WAVE AND THE HYDROGEN WALL

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G. P.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zirnstein, E.; Wood, B. E.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-01-20

    Recent IBEX observations indicate that the local interstellar medium (LISM) flow speed is less than previously thought (23.2 km s{sup -1} rather than 26 km s{sup -1}). Reasonable LISM plasma parameters indicate that the LISM flow may be either marginally super-fast magnetosonic or sub-fast magnetosonic. This raises two challenging questions: (1) Can a LISM model that is barely super-fast or sub-fast magnetosonic account for Ly{alpha} observations that rely critically on the additional absorption provided by the hydrogen wall (H-wall)? and (2) If the LISM flow is weakly super-fast magnetosonic, does the transition assume the form of a traditional shock or does neutral hydrogen (H) mediate shock dissipation and hence structure through charge exchange? Both questions are addressed using three three-dimensional self-consistently coupled magnetohydrodynamic plasma-kinetic H models with different LISM magnetic field strengths (2, 3, and 4 {mu}G) as well as plasma and neutral H number densities. The 2 and 3 {mu}G models are fast magnetosonic far upwind of the heliopause whereas the 4 {mu}G model is fully subsonic. The 2 {mu}G model admits a broad ({approx}50-75 AU) bow-shock-like structure. The 3 {mu}G model has a smooth super-fast-sub-fast magnetosonic transition that resembles a very broad, {approx}200 AU thick, bow wave. A theoretical analysis shows that the transition from a super-fast to a sub-fast magnetosonic downstream state is due to the charge exchange of fast neutral H and hot neutral H created in the supersonic solar wind and hot inner heliosheath, respectively. For both the 2 {mu}G and the 3 {mu}G models, the super-fast magnetosonic LISM flow passes through a critical point located where the fast magnetosonic Mach number M = 1 and Q{sub e} = {gamma}/({gamma} - 1)UQ{sub m} , where Q{sub e} and Q{sub m} are the plasma energy and momentum source terms due to charge exchange, U is the LISM flow speed, and {gamma} is the plasma adiabatic index. Because the Mach

  1. Dependence of hydrogen permeabilities of isotropic graphites on the pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, M.; Yamaguchi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Tanaka, S.

    1991-03-01

    The permeation behavior of molecular hydrogen through isotropic graphites is investigated. The observed dependences of the permeation rate on pressure, specimen thickness, temperature and molecular weight suggest that hydrogen permeates by molecular flow, probably through open pores. A simple pore structure model is developed and is compared with the experimental results. It is revealed that hydrogen permeation through isotropic graphites depends not only on the pore size or the porosity, but also on the pore size distribution and tortuosity.

  2. Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, Peer-Timo; Weber, Gunther; Pascucci, Valerio; Day, Marc; Bell, John

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents topology-based methods to robustly extract, analyze, and track features defined as subsets of isosurfaces. First, we demonstrate how features identified by thresholding isosurfaces can be defined in terms of the Morse complex. Second, we present a specialized hierarchy that encodes the feature segmentation independent of the threshold while still providing a flexible multi-resolution representation. Third, for a given parameter selection we create detailed tracking graphs representing the complete evolution of all features in a combustion simulation over several hundred time steps. Finally, we discuss a user interface that correlates the tracking information with interactive rendering of the segmented isosurfaces enabling an in-depth analysis of the temporal behavior. We demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames subject to different levels of turbulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn in cells separated by locally extinguished regions. The number, area, and evolution over time of these cells provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. Utilizing the hierarchy we can perform an extensive parameter study without re-processing the data for each set of parameters. The resulting statistics enable scientist to select appropriate parameters and provide insight into the sensitivity of the results wrt. to the choice of parameters. Our method allows for the first time to quantitatively correlate the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly segmented and selected. In particular, our analysis shows that counter-intuitively stronger turbulence leads to larger cell structures, which burn more intensely than expected. This behavior suggests that flames could be stabilized under much leaner conditions than previously anticipated.

  3. Study on Pt-structured anodic alumina catalysts for catalytic combustion of toluene: Effects of competitive adsorbents and competitive impregnation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Luan, Hongjuan; Li, Tao; Wu, Yongqiang; Ni, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Novel competitive impregnation methods were used to prepare high dispersion Pt-structured anodic alumina catalysts. It is found that competitive adsorbents owning different acidity result in different Pt loading amount and also exert great effects on Pt distribution, particle size and redox ability. The suitable adsorption ability of lactic acid led to its best activity for catalytic combustion of toluene. Co-competitive and pre-competitive impregnation methods were also compared and the mechanisms of two competitive methods were proposed. Co-competitive impregnation made Pt distribute more uniformly through pore channels and resulted in better catalytic activity, because of the weaker spatial constraint effect of lactic acid. Furthermore, the optimized Pt-structured anodic alumina catalyst also showed a good chlorine-resistance under moisture atmosphere, because water could promote the reaction of dichloromethane (DCM) transformation and clean chloride by-products to release more active sites.

  4. Topological hydrogen-bond definition to characterize the structure and dynamics of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Henchman, Richard H; Irudayam, Sheeba Jem

    2010-12-23

    A definition that equates a hydrogen bond topologically with a local energy well in the potential energy surface is used to study the structure and dynamics of liquid water. We demonstrate the robustness of this hydrogen-bond definition versus the many other definitions which use fixed, arbitrary parameters, do not account for variable molecular environments, and cannot effectively resolve transition states. Our topology definition unambiguously shows that most water molecules are double acceptors but sizable proportions are single or triple acceptors. Almost all hydrogens are found to take part in hydrogen bonds. Broken hydrogen bonds only form when two molecules try to form two hydrogen bonds between them. The double acceptors have tetrahedral geometry, lower potential energy, entropy, and density, and slower dynamics. The single and triple acceptors have trigonal and trigonal bipyramidal geometry and when considered together have higher density, potential energy, and entropy, faster dynamics, and a tendency to cluster. These calculations use an extended theory for the entropy of liquid water that takes into account the variable number of hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen-bond switching is shown to depend explicitly on the variable number of hydrogen bonds accepted and the presence of interstitial water molecules. Transition state theory indicates that the switching of hydrogen bonds is a mildly activated process, requiring only a moderate distortion of hydrogen bonds. Three main types of switching events are observed depending on whether the donor and acceptor are already sharing a hydrogen bond. The switch may proceed with no intermediate or via a bifurcated-oxygen or cyclic dimer, both of which have a broken hydrogen bond and symmetric and asymmetric forms. Switching is found to be strongly coupled to whole-molecule vibration, particularly for the more mobile single and triple acceptors. Our analysis suggests that even though water is heterogeneous in terms of the

  5. Manufacturing of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents--effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on particle structure and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Nicolas; Bowen, James; Pacek, Andrzej; Zhang, Zhibing

    2012-02-01

    The effect of ionic strength of agarose solution and quenching temperature of the emulsion on the structure and mechanical strength of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents was investigated. Solutions of agarose containing different amounts of NaCl were emulsified at elevated temperature in mineral oil using a high-shear mixer. The hot emulsion was quenched at different temperatures leading to the gelation of agarose and formation of soft particles. Analysis of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images of particle surfaces shows that pore size of particles increases with ionic strength and/or high quenching temperature. Additionally it has been found that the compressive strength of particles measured by micromanipulation also increases with ionic strength of the emulsion and/or high quenching temperature but these two parameters have no significant effect on the resulting particle size and particle size distribution. Results from both characterization methods were compared with Sepharose 4B, a commercial agarose-based adsorbent. This is the first report examining the effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on the microstructure of micron-sized agarose beads for bioseparation.

  6. HAAD: A quick algorithm for accurate prediction of hydrogen atoms in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunqi; Roy, Ambrish; Zhang, Yang

    2009-08-20

    Hydrogen constitutes nearly half of all atoms in proteins and their positions are essential for analyzing hydrogen-bonding interactions and refining atomic-level structures. However, most protein structures determined by experiments or computer prediction lack hydrogen coordinates. We present a new algorithm, HAAD, to predict the positions of hydrogen atoms based on the positions of heavy atoms. The algorithm is built on the basic rules of orbital hybridization followed by the optimization of steric repulsion and electrostatic interactions. We tested the algorithm using three independent data sets: ultra-high-resolution X-ray structures, structures determined by neutron diffraction, and NOE proton-proton distances. Compared with the widely used programs CHARMM and REDUCE, HAAD has a significantly higher accuracy, with the average RMSD of the predicted hydrogen atoms to the X-ray and neutron diffraction structures decreased by 26% and 11%, respectively. Furthermore, hydrogen atoms placed by HAAD have more matches with the NOE restraints and fewer clashes with heavy atoms. The average CPU cost by HAAD is 18 and 8 times lower than that of CHARMM and REDUCE, respectively. The significant advantage of HAAD in both the accuracy and the speed of the hydrogen additions should make HAAD a useful tool for the detailed study of protein structure and function. Both an executable and the source code of HAAD are freely available at http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/HAAD.

  7. Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haidan; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2010-05-01

    We present the first femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquids, enabling the observation of changes in hydrogen bond structures in water via core-hole excitation. The oxygen K-edge of vibrationally excited water is probed with femtosecond soft x-ray pulses, exploiting the relation between different water structures and distinct x-ray spectral features. After excitation of the intramolecular OH stretching vibration, characteristic x-ray absorption changes monitor the conversion of strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures to more disordered structures with weaker hydrogen-bonding described by a single subpicosecond time constant. The latter describes the thermalization time of vibrational excitations and defines the characteristic maximum rate with which nonequilibrium populations of more strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures convert to less-bonded ones. On short time scales, the relaxation of vibrational excitations leads to a transient high-pressure state and a transient absorption spectrum different from that of statically heated water.

  8. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  9. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function.

  10. Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of transition-metal atom adsorbed two-dimensional GaAs nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jia; Xiang, Gang; Yu, Tian; Lan, Mu; Zhang, Xi

    2016-09-01

    By using first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, the electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transitional metal (TM) atoms (from Sc to Zn) adsorbed monolayer GaAs nanosheets (GaAsNSs) are systematically investigated. Upon TM atom adsorption, GaAsNS, which is a nonmagnetic semiconductor, can be tuned into a magnetic semiconductor (Sc, V, and Fe adsorption), a half-metal (Mn adsorption), or a metal (Co and Cu adsorption). Our calculations show that the strong p–d hybridization between the 3d orbit of TM atoms and the 4p orbit of neighboring As atoms is responsible for the formation of chemical bonds and the origin of magnetism in the GaAsNSs with Sc, V, and Fe adsorption. However, the Mn 3d orbit with more unpaired electrons hybridizes not only with the As 4p orbit but also with the Ga 4p orbit, resulting in a stronger exchange interaction. Our results may be useful for electronic and magnetic applications of GaAsNS-based materials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174212).

  11. Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of transition-metal atom adsorbed two-dimensional GaAs nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jia; Xiang, Gang; Yu, Tian; Lan, Mu; Zhang, Xi

    2016-09-01

    By using first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, the electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transitional metal (TM) atoms (from Sc to Zn) adsorbed monolayer GaAs nanosheets (GaAsNSs) are systematically investigated. Upon TM atom adsorption, GaAsNS, which is a nonmagnetic semiconductor, can be tuned into a magnetic semiconductor (Sc, V, and Fe adsorption), a half-metal (Mn adsorption), or a metal (Co and Cu adsorption). Our calculations show that the strong p-d hybridization between the 3d orbit of TM atoms and the 4p orbit of neighboring As atoms is responsible for the formation of chemical bonds and the origin of magnetism in the GaAsNSs with Sc, V, and Fe adsorption. However, the Mn 3d orbit with more unpaired electrons hybridizes not only with the As 4p orbit but also with the Ga 4p orbit, resulting in a stronger exchange interaction. Our results may be useful for electronic and magnetic applications of GaAsNS-based materials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174212).

  12. Structural investigations of hydrogenated epitaxial graphene grown on 4H-SiC (0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, M.; Kowalski, G. Stępniewski, R.; Możdżonek, M.; Strupiński, W.; Ciepielewski, P.; Borysiuk, J.

    2013-12-09

    Structural investigations of hydrogenated epitaxial graphene grown on SiC(0001) are presented. It is shown that hydrogen plays a dual role. In addition to contributing to the well-known removal of the buffer layer, it goes between the graphene planes, resulting in an increase of the interlayer spacing to 3.6 Å–3.8 Å. It is explained by the intercalation of molecular hydrogen between carbon planes, which is followed by H{sub 2} dissociation, resulting in negatively charged hydrogen atoms trapped between the graphene layers, with some addition of covalent bonding to carbon atoms. Negatively charged hydrogen may be responsible for p-doping observed in hydrogenated multilayer graphene.

  13. Adsorptive capacity and evolution of the pore structure of alumina on reaction with gaseous hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Grant J; Agbenyegah, Gordon E K; Hyland, Margaret M; Metson, James B

    2015-05-19

    Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) specific surface areas are generally used to gauge the propensity of uptake on adsorbents, with less attention paid to kinetic considerations. We explore the importance of such parameters by modeling the pore size distributions of smelter grade aluminas following HF adsorption, an industrially important process in gas cleaning at aluminum smelters. The pore size distributions of industrially fluorinated aluminas, and those contacted with HF in controlled laboratory trials, are reconstructed from the pore structure of the untreated materials when filtered through different models of adsorption. These studies demonstrate the presence of three distinct families of pores: those with uninhibited HF uptake, kinetically limited porosity, and pores that are surface blocked after negligible scrubbing. The surface areas of the inaccessible and blocked pores will overinflate estimates of the adsorption capacity of the adsorbate. We also demonstrate, contrary to conventional understanding, that porosity changes are attributed not to monolayer uptake but more reasonably to pore length attenuation. The model assumes nothing specific regarding the Al2O3-HF system and is therefore likely general to adsorbate/adsorbent phenomena.

  14. CRYOGENIC ADSORPTION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES OVER NANO-STRUCTURED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, S.; Heung, L.

    2010-10-07

    Porous materials such as zeolites, activated carbon, silica gels, alumina and a number of industrial catalysts are compared and ranked for hydrogen and deuterium adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. All samples show higher D{sub 2} adsorption than that of H{sub 2}, in which a HY sample has the greatest isotopic effect while 13X has the highest hydrogen uptake capacity. Material's moisture content has significant impact to its hydrogen uptake. A material without adequate drying could result in complete loss of its adsorption capacity. Even though some materials present higher H{sub 2} adsorption capacity at full pressure, their adsorption at low vapor pressure may not be as good as others. Adsorption capacity in a dynamic system is much less than in a static system. A sharp desorption is also expected in case of temperature upset.

  15. CO2 Hydrogenation to Formic Acid on Ni(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Guowen; Sibener, S. J.; Schatz, George C.; Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2011-12-26

    Periodic, self-consistent, density functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to study CO2 hydrogenation on Ni(111). CO2 hydrogenation with H adsorbed on the surface and with H absorbed in the subsurface is investigated systematically, and the respective microscopic reaction mechanisms are elucidated. We show that on Ni(111) CO2 hydrogenation to formate intermediate is more favorable than to carboxyl intermediate. The hydrogenation to formate goes through the unidentate structure that rapidly transforms into the bidentate structure. Further hydrogenation from formate to formic acid is energetically more difficult than formate formation. Formation of adsorbed formic acid from adsorbed CO2 and surface hydrogen is an endothermic reaction. Because subsurface H in Ni(111) is substantially less stable compared to surface H, its reaction with adsorbed CO2 to adsorbed formic acid is an exothermic one. Finally, our results may have significant implications for the synthesis of liquid fuels from CO2 and for catalytic hydrogenation reactions in general.

  16. States of water adsorbed on perindopril crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. A.; Khmelevskaya, V. S.; Bogdanov, N. Yu.; Gorchakov, K. A.

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between the structural state of adsorbed water, the crystal structure of the substances, and the solubility of the perindopril salt C19H32N2O5 · C4H11N in water was studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The high-frequency shift of the stretching vibrations of adsorbed water and the solubility depend on the crystal structure of the drug substance. A reversible chemical reaction occurred between the adsorbed water and the perindopril salt.

  17. Double hydrogen bond mediating self-assembly structure of cyanides on metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongping; Xiang, Feifei; Lu, Yan; Wei, Sheng; Li, Chao; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lacheng; Wang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Cyanides with different numbers of -C≡N, 1,2,4,5-Tetracyanobenzene (TCNB) and 2,3-Dicyanonaphthalene (2,3-DCN) deposited on Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces, have been investigated by room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (RTSTM), respectively. High resolution STM images show double hydrogen bond is the main driving force to form variety of self-assembly structures, indicating the double hydrogen bond affects the electron distribution of cyanides and leads to a more stable structure with lower energy. In addition, the difference between Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces in their lattice structure induces a bigger assembly structural change of 2,3-DCN than that of 1,2,4,5-TCNB, which confirms the fact that the opposite double hydrogen bond formation formed by 1,2,4,5-TCNB is more stable than the neighboring double hydrogen bond formation formed by molecule 2,3-DCN.

  18. Optical properties of crystalline and amorphous silicon slabs with adsorbed metal clusters and with dopants: A combined ab-initio electronic structure and density matrix treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilin, Dimitri; Micha, David; Ramirez, Jessica

    2011-03-01

    The optical absorbance and surface photovoltage of slabs of Si with varying number of layers have been calculated starting from their atomic structure. Results have been obtained for nanostructured surfaces with adsorbed metal clusters and for group III and V dopants, from ab initio DFT with periodic boundary conditions for extended systems, and from time-dependent DFT for supercells. Density matrix equations of motion (EOM) have been parametrized in a basis set of Kohn-Sham orbitals, for both crystalline and amorphous Si slabs. Results for properties and from electronic charge distributions provide insight on slab confinement effects for electronically excited states and for particle-hole creation. In addition, the integrodifferential EOMs have been solved for an initial femtosecond pulse excitation to analyze the nature of electron transfer at the surfaces, relevant to photovoltaics. Work supported by the NSF and by the Dreyfus Foundation to DM.

  19. Hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation by pressure-swing adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Pan, C.Y.; McMinis, C.W.; Ivory, J.; Ghosh, D.

    1998-07-01

    Hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation by pressure-swing adsorption (PSA) was studied experimentally. The high efficiency of hollow-fiber-based adsorbers for gas separation was illustrated by hydrogen separation using fine-powder-activated carbon and molecular sieve as adsorbents. The adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of the hollow-fiber adsorbers were determined. The pressure drop of the gas flowing through the adsorbers was also examined. The adsorbers were tested for hydrogen separation from nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and a multicomponent gas mixture simulating ammonia synthesis purge gas. The PSA systems using the hollow-fiber adsorbers were very effective for hydrogen purification. The high separation efficiency is derived from the fast mass-transfer rate and low pressure drop, two key features of hollow-fiber-based adsorbers.

  20. Pressure-induced hydrogen bonding: structure of D2S phase I'

    PubMed

    Loveday; Nelmes; Klotz; Besson; Hamel

    2000-07-31

    The full structure of the high-pressure cubic phase I' of hydrogen sulfide has been solved using neutron diffraction data. The molecules are partially rotationally disordered about the <111> axes, as in phase II at ambient pressure but with markedly greater nonuniformity of the toroidal D distribution. The changes in structure at the II-->I' transition signal the onset of significant pressure-induced hydrogen bonding.

  1. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh; R, Kamal Raj.; Kumar, T. J. Dhilip

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  2. Nickel-hydrogen. [metal hydrides, electrochemical corrosion, and structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Because of the disintegration of LaNi5 as the lattice expands on absorbing hydrogen, a nickel hydrogen cell similar to a nickel cadmium cell was designed. The positive electrode is wrapped in a microporous separator and the leads are insulated. A negative conducting grid is inserted and welded to the top of the can into an open ended container which is then turned upside down and filled so that LiNa5 powder occupies all the space not used by the rest of the components. The bottom of the can is then welded on. A fill tube is located either on the bottom or on the top of the can. When welded shut, the cell is put into a pressure bomb and the lanthanum nickel is activated at about 1,000 pounds of hydrogen. Electrolytes are added to the cell as well as whatever amount of hydrogen precharge desired, and the cell is sealed. Advantages and disadvantages of the cell are discussed.

  3. Thermodynamics, structure, and charge state of hydrogen-vacancy complexes in δ-plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher D.; Francis, Michael F.; Schwartz, Daniel S.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy complexes can form in a material due to the exothermic binding of hydrogen atoms to vacancy sites. We explore the structure and electronic properties of hydrogen-vacancy complexes in δ-Pu using a density functional theory supercell approach, with up to eight hydrogen atoms stored in the vacancy site. We find that the hydrogen atoms bind to the inner edge of the vacancy site, preferring pseudo-octahedral configurations that optimize the Pu-H bond length. Hydrogen binding to the vacancy site remains exothermic, with binding energies around -0.4 eV/H atom. A statistical mechanics analysis is derived and applied to reveal the range of hydrogen chemical potentials that would lead to hydrogen-vacancy complex formation. We find that these chemical potentials are higher than those required to form the hydride phase, indicating that hydriding should occur before any appreciable concentration of vacancy-hydrogen complexes is realized. Some remarks are made comparing this theoretical finding to the experimental work on this topic, with suggestions given for future work that may help reconcile some apparent contradictions.

  4. New experimental constraints on polarizability corrections to hydrogen hyperfine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vahagn Nazaryan; Carl Carlson; Keith Griffioen

    2006-04-01

    We present a state-of-the-art evaluation of the polarizability corrections--the inelastic nucleon corrections--to the hydrogen ground-state hyperfine splitting using analytic fits to the most recent data. We find a value {Delta}{sub pol} = 1.3 {+-} 0.3 ppm. This is 1-2 ppm smaller than the value of {Delta}{sub pol} deduced using hyperfine splitting data and elastic nucleon corrections obtained from modern form factor fits.

  5. Hydrogen decoration of radiation damage induced defect structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kirnstötter, S.; Faccinelli, M.; Hadley, P.; Schustereder, W.; Laven, J. G.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2014-02-21

    The defect complexes that are formed when protons with energies in the MeV-range were implanted into high-purity silicon were investigated. After implantation, the samples were annealed at 400 °C or 450 °C for times ranging between 15 minutes and 30 hours. The resistivity of the samples was then analyzed by Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP). The resistivity shows minima where there is a high carrier concentration and it is possible to extract the carrier concentration from the resistivity data. Initially, there is a large peak in the carrier concentration at the implantation depth where most of the hydrogen is concentrated. For longer anneals, this peak widens as the hydrogen diffuses away from the implantation depth. Following the changes in resistivity as a function of annealing time allows us to characterize the diffusion of hydrogen through these samples. Differences in the diffusion were observed depending on whether the silicon was grown by the magnetic Czochralski (m:Cz) method or the Float zone (Fz) method.

  6. Electronic structures of hydrogen functionalized carbon nanotube: Density functional theory (DFT) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Iyama, Tetsuji; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structures and formation mechanism of hydrogen functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) have been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) method. The mechanism of hydrogen addition reaction to the CNT surface was also investigated. Pure and boron-nitrogen (BN) substituted CNT (denoted by CNT and BN-CNT, respectively) were examined as the carbon nanotubes. It was found that the additions of hydrogen atom to B (boron atom) and C (carbon atom) sites of BN-CNT proceed without activation barrier, whereas the hydrogenation of N (nitrogen atom) site needs the activation energy. The electronic states of hydrogen functionalized CNT and BN-CNT were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  7. Measurements of the structure of an ionizing shock wave in a hydrogen-helium mixture.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    Shock structure during ionization of a hydrogen-helium mixture has been followed using hydrogen line and continuum emission measurements. A reaction scheme is proposed which includes hydrogen dissociation and a two-step excitation-ionization mechanism for hydrogen ionization by atom-atom and atom-electron collisions. Agreement has been achieved between numerical calculations and measurements of emission intensity as a function of time for shock velocities from 13 to 20 km/sec in a 0.208 H2-0.792 He mixture. The electron temperature was found to be significantly different from the heavy particle temperature during much of the ionization process. Similar time histories for H beta and continuum emission indicate upper level populations of hydrogen in equilibrium with the electron concentration during the relaxation process.

  8. Measurements of the structure of an ionizing shock wave in a hydrogen-helium mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    Shock structure during ionization of a hydrogen-helium mixture was studied using hydrogen line and continuum emission measurements. A reaction scheme is proposed which includes hydrogen dissociation and a two-step excitation-ionization mechanism for hydrogen ionization by atom-atom and atom-electron collisions. Agreement was achieved between numerical calculations and measurements of emission intensity as a function of time for shock velocities from 13 to 20 km/sec in a 0.208 H2 - 0.792 He mixture. The electron temperature was found to be significantly different from the heavy particle temperature during much of the ionization process. Similar time histories for H beta and continuum emission indicate upper level populations of hydrogen in equilibrium with the electron concentration during the relaxation process.

  9. Toward quantitative STM: Scanning tunneling microscopy study of structure and dynamics of adsorbates on transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dunphy, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    STM was applied to chemisorbed S layers on Re(000l) and Mo(100) surfaces. As function of coverage on both these surfaces, S orders into several different overlayer structures, which have been studied by dynamic LEED. STM images of all these structures were obtained. Approximate location of S atoms in the structures was determined by inspecting the images, especially the regions containing defects. Results are in agreement with LEED except for the p(2{times}l) overlayer of sulfur on Mo(100). The STM images were compared to calculations made with Electron Scattering Quantum Chemistry (ESQC) theory. Variation of contrast in experimental images is explained as a result of changes in STM tip termination structure. STM image contrast is a result of changes in the interference between different paths for the tunneling electrons. The simplest structure on the Mo(100) surface was used as a model for developing and testing a method of quantitative structure determination with the STM. Experimental STM images acquired under a range of tunneling conditions were compared to theoretical calculations of the images as a function of surface structure to determine the structure which best fit. Results matched within approximately 0.1 Angstroms a LEED structural determination. At lower S coverage, diffusion of S atoms over the Re(0001) surface and the lateral interaction between these atoms were investigated by application of a new image analysis technique. The interaction between the S and a coadsorbed CO layer was also studied, and CO was found to induce compression of the S overlayer. A similar result was found for Au deposited on the sulfur covered Mo(100) surface. The interaction between steps on the Mo surface was found to be influenced by S adsorption and this observation was interpreted with the theory of equilibrium crystal shape. Design of an STM instrument which operates at cryogenic and variable sample temperatures, and its future applications, are described.

  10. HYDROGEN SEPARATION MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Donald P. McCollor; John P. Kay

    1999-08-01

    A likely membrane for future testing of high-temperature hydrogen separation from a gasification product stream was targeted as an inorganic analog of a dense-metal membrane, where the hydrogen would dissolve into and diffuse through the membrane structure. An amorphous membrane such as zinc sulfide appeared to be promising. Previously, ZnS film coating tests had been performed using an electron-beam vacuum coating instrument, with zinc films successfully applied to glass substrates. The coatings appeared relatively stable in air and in a simple simulated gasification atmosphere at elevated temperature. Because the electron-beam coating instrument suffered irreparable breakdown, several alternative methods were tested in an effort to produce a nitrogen-impermeable, hydrogen-permeable membrane on porous sintered steel substrates. None of the preparation methods proved successful in sealing the porous substrate against nitrogen gas. To provide a nitrogen-impermeable ZnS material to test for hydrogen permeability, two ZnS infrared sample windows were purchased. These relatively thick ''membranes'' did not show measurable permeation of hydrogen, either due to lack of absorption or a negligible permeation rate due to their thickness. To determine if hydrogen was indeed adsorbed, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses tests were performed on samples of ZnS powder. A significant uptake of hydrogen gas occurred, corresponding to a maximum of 1 mole H{sub 2} per 1 mole ZnS at a temperature of 175 C. The hydrogen remained in the material at ambient temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere, but approximately 50% would be removed in argon. Reheating in a hydrogen atmosphere resulted in no additional hydrogen uptake. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the hydrogen uptake was probably due to the formation of a zinc-sulfur-hydrogen species resulting in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. The zinc sulfide was found to be unstable above approximately 200 C

  11. Hydrogen absorption and structural analysis of TiZrNiV quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hwa; Jo, Youngsoo; Kim, Jaeyong

    2014-12-01

    Ti-based quasicrystals are known to store a high capacity of hydrogen exceeding the density of liquid hydrogen. Because TiZrNi quasicrystals contain a large number of tetrahedral sites formed with Ti and Zr atoms that are chemically favorable to hydrogen, these materials retain strong advantages for hydrogen storage applications in structurally and chemically. In fact, TiZrNi quasicrystals are known to absorb hydrogen maximum of the hydrogen to host metal ratio (H/M) value of near 2.0. The critical disadvantage, however, is that the equilibrium vapor pressure of hydrogen is very low (less than 1 Torr). To overcome this engineering drawback, we added a small amount of vanadium (V) in Ti(53-x)Zr27Ni20V(x), alloys (where x = 0 to 15) and rapidly quenched the molten ingots to form quasicrystals, and investigated the effects of V in terms of changes of structure, the H/M values, and an equilibrium vapor pressure of hydrogen. As the results, an equilibrium vapor pressure significantly increased from 0.84 to 2.16 Torr while the maximum H/M value decreased from 1.32 to 1.11 as increasing x = 0 to 8. After hydrogenation, the main peaks shifted evenly to the lower angle of 20 in X-ray diffraction patterns with uniform expansion of the quasilattice constants which demonstrates that hydrogen atoms homogeneously diffused into the samples. A Laves phase starts to form at x = 13 and the samples completely transformed to the phase at x = 15 suggesting the similarity between the quasicrystal and the Laves phase. PMID:25971068

  12. Hydrogen storage in a chemical bond stabilized Co9S8-graphene layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wei; Han, Lu; Bi, Hai; Jian, Jiahuang; Wu, Xiaohong; Gao, Peng

    2015-11-01

    With the high energy ball milling method, a Co9S8-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite, which shows excellent hydrogen storage capacity, has been successfully fabricated with a well-organized layered structure. Moreover, the stabilized mechanism of the well-organized layered structure is investigated and attributed to the strong interactions between Co9S8 and defective RGO. The C-S bond interaction is identified and the hydrogen storage process is also studied with different analysis methods. Finally, an optimized Co9S8 to RGO weight ratio of 6 : 1 shows excellent electrochemical performances in terms of the excellent cycling stability and competitive hydrogen storage capacity of 4.86 wt%.With the high energy ball milling method, a Co9S8-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite, which shows excellent hydrogen storage capacity, has been successfully fabricated with a well-organized layered structure. Moreover, the stabilized mechanism of the well-organized layered structure is investigated and attributed to the strong interactions between Co9S8 and defective RGO. The C-S bond interaction is identified and the hydrogen storage process is also studied with different analysis methods. Finally, an optimized Co9S8 to RGO weight ratio of 6 : 1 shows excellent electrochemical performances in terms of the excellent cycling stability and competitive hydrogen storage capacity of 4.86 wt%. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06116d

  13. Correlation of structural order, anomalous density, and hydrogen bonding network of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Dibyendu; Mohan, S; Ghosh, S K; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2013-07-25

    We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations employing different state-of-the-art force fields to find a common framework for comparing structural orders and density anomalies as obtained from different water models. It is found that the average number of hydrogen bonds correlates well with various order parameters as well as the temperature of maximum densities across the different models, unifying apparently disparate results from different models and emphasizing the importance of hydrogen bonding in determining anomalous properties and the structure of water. A deeper insight into the hydrogen bond network of water reveals that the solvation shell of a water molecule can be defined by considering only those neighbors that are hydrogen-bonded to it. On the basis of this view, the origin of the appearance of a non-tetrahedral peak at a higher temperature in the distribution of tetrahedral order parameters has been explained. It is found that a neighbor that is hydrogen-bonded to the central molecule is tetrahedrally coordinated even at higher temperatures. The non-tetrahedral peak at a higher temperature arises due to the strained orientation of the neighbors that are non-hydrogen-bonded to the central molecule. With the new definition of the solvation shell, liquid water can be viewed as an instantaneously changing random hydrogen-bonded network consisting of differently coordinated hydrogen-bonded molecules with their distinct solvation shells. The variation of the composition of these hydrogen-bonded molecules against temperature accounts for the density anomaly without introducing the concept of large-scale structural polyamorphism in water.

  14. Control of changes in the defect structure of titanium saturated with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. V.; Lider, A. M.; Laptev, R. S.

    2016-06-01

    The hydrogenated samples of technical titanium were investigated using the EPA method and the measurements of the thermal electromotive force for these samples saturated with a different amount of hydrogen. The structure of the hydrogenated samples was studied by the X-ray diffraction method. The results have shown that the hydrogenated titanium structure starts changing at the same time, depending on the amount of added hydrogen. The intensity of the annihilation process increases with the increase in the hydrogen concentration in a-titanium up to the values of 4% wt and does not change up to the values of 5% wt (α + δ) - titanium. At the same time, the value of the thermal electromotive force decreases in this range of values. The annihilation intensity is stabilized for the values of 5% wt, and the value of the thermal electromotive force is increased. The inflection point for the thermal electromotive force versus the hydrogen concentration corresponds to the formation of δ - hydrides. The increase in the positron lifetime starts in the concentration range of 6-8% and moves to the stable level up to the concentrations of 21-22%. In this range, there is a transition from the (α + β) to the (α + δ) phase. The lifetime of positrons and the number of defects are increased, the value of the thermal electromotive force is reduced (up to the concentration of 24%), then there is a stabilization mode for all these parameters up to the values 32% wt.

  15. Effect of gravity on the stability and structure of lean hydrogen-air flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, G.; Kailasanath, K.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed, time-dependent, 2D numerical simulations with full hydrogen-oxygen chemistry are used to investigate the effects of gravity on the stability and structure of laminar flames in lean, premixed hydrogen-air mixtures. The calculations show that the effects of gravity becomes more important as the lean flammability limit is approached. In a 12 percent hydrogen-air mixture, gravity plays only a secondary role in determining the multidimensional structure of the flame with the stability and structure of the flame controlled primarily by the thermo-diffusive instability mechanism. However, in leaner hydrogen-air mixtures gravity becomes more important. Upward-propagating flames are highly curved and evolve into a bubble rising upwards in the tube. Downward-propagating flames are flat or even oscillate between structures with concave and convex curvatures. The zero-gravity flame shows only cellular structures. Cellular structures which are present in zero gravity can be suppressed by the effect of buoyancy for mixtures leaner than 11 percent hydrogen. These observations are explained on the basis of an interaction between the processes leading to buoyancy-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the thermo-diffusive instability.

  16. Crystal structure of (ferrocenylmeth-yl)di-methyl-ammonium hydrogen oxalate.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Mamadou; Samb, Abdoulaye; Diop, Libasse; Maris, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, [Fe(C5H5)(C8H13N)](HC2O4), consists of discrete (ferrocenylmeth-yl)di-methyl-ammonium cations and hydrogen oxalate anions. The anions are connected through a strong O-H⋯O hydrogen bond, forming linear chains running parallel to [100]. The cations are linked to the anions through bifurcated N-H⋯(O,O') hydrogen bonds. Weak C-H⋯π inter-actions between neighbouring ferrocenyl moieties are also observed. PMID:26396763

  17. Crystal structure of (ferrocenylmeth­yl)di­methyl­ammonium hydrogen oxalate

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Mamadou; Samb, Abdoulaye; Diop, Libasse; Maris, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, [Fe(C5H5)(C8H13N)](HC2O4), consists of discrete (ferrocenylmeth­yl)di­methyl­ammonium cations and hydrogen oxalate anions. The anions are connected through a strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bond, forming linear chains running parallel to [100]. The cations are linked to the anions through bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O′) hydrogen bonds. Weak C—H⋯π inter­actions between neighbouring ferrocenyl moieties are also observed. PMID:26396763

  18. Characterization of pore structure of a strong anion-exchange membrane adsorbent under different buffer and salt concentration conditions.

    PubMed

    Tatárová, Ivana; Fáber, René; Denoyel, Renaud; Polakovic, Milan

    2009-02-01

    The quantitative characterization of pore structure of Sartobind Q, a strongly basic membrane anion exchanger that is formed by cross-linked cellulose support and a hydrogel layer on its pore surface, was made combining the results obtained by several experimental techniques: liquid impregnation, batch size-exclusion, inverse size-exclusion chromatography, and permeability. Mercury intrusion and nitrogen sorption porosimetry were carried out for a dry cellulose support membrane in order to get additional information for building a model of the bimodal pore structure. The model incorporated the distribution of the total pore volume between transport and gel-layer pores and the partitioning of solutes of different molecular weights was expressed through the cylindrical pore model for the transport pores and random plane model for the gel layer. The effect of composition of liquid phase on the pore structure was investigated in redistilled water, phosphate and Tris-HCl buffers containing up to 1M NaCl. Evident differences in the bimodal pore structure were observed here when both the specific volume and size of the hydrogel layer pores significantly decreased with the ionic strength of liquid phase. PMID:19117574

  19. TEMPEST code simulations of hydrogen distribution in reactor containment structures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.

    1985-03-01

    The mass transport version of the TEMPEST computer code was used to simulate hydrogen distribution in geometric configurations relevant to reactor containment structures. Predicted results of Battelle-Frankfurt hydrogen distribution tests 1 to 6, and 12 are presented. Agreement between predictions and experimental data is good. Best agreement is obtained using the k-epsilon turbulence model in TEMPEST in flow cases where turbulent diffusion and stable stratification are dominant mechanisms affecting transport. The code's general analysis capabilities are summarized.

  20. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the DC-XA Composite Liquid Hydrogen Tank During Structural Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the DC-XA composite liquid hydrogen tank are presented in this report. The tank was subjected to pressurization, tensile, and compressive loads at ambient temperatures and also while full of liquid nitrogen. The tank was also pressurized with liquid hydrogen. AE was used to monitor the tank for signs of structural defects developing during the test.

  1. Structural and energy properties of interstitial molecular hydrogen in single-crystal silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, V. V.

    2015-06-15

    The structural and energy characteristics of interstitial molecular hydrogen in single-crystal silicon are theoretically studied. The dependence of the potential energy of the system on the position and orientation of the interstitial defect is investigated, and the mechanism of interaction of a hydrogen molecule with a silicon crystal is considered. A three-dimensional model is employed to calculate the energy spectrum of H{sub 2} in Si, and the obtained dispersion law is analyzed.

  2. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  3. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Tadatsugu

    2007-05-21

    Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.

  4. Structure sensitivity in the nonscalable regime explored via catalysed ethylene hydrogenation on supported platinum nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Crampton, Andrew S; Rötzer, Marian D; Ridge, Claron J; Schweinberger, Florian F; Heiz, Ueli; Yoon, Bokwon; Landman, Uzi

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity, or insensitivity, of catalysed reactions to catalyst structure is a commonly employed fundamental concept. Here we report on the nature of nano-catalysed ethylene hydrogenation, investigated through experiments on size-selected Ptn (n=8-15) clusters soft-landed on magnesia and first-principles simulations, yielding benchmark information about the validity of structure sensitivity/insensitivity at the bottom of the catalyst size range. Both ethylene-hydrogenation-to-ethane and the parallel hydrogenation-dehydrogenation ethylidyne-producing route are considered, uncovering that at the <1 nm size-scale the reaction exhibits characteristics consistent with structure sensitivity, in contrast to structure insensitivity found for larger particles. The onset of catalysed hydrogenation occurs for Ptn (n ≥ 10) clusters at T>150 K, with maximum room temperature reactivity observed for Pt13. Structure insensitivity, inherent for specific cluster sizes, is induced in the more active Pt13 by a temperature increase up to 400 K leading to ethylidyne formation. Control of sub-nanometre particle size may be used for tuning catalysed hydrogenation activity and selectivity. PMID:26817713

  5. The structure and reactivity of adsorbates on stepped Rh and Pt surfaces investigated by LEED, HREELS, TPD, XPS and STM

    SciTech Connect

    Batteas, J.D. |

    1995-06-01

    Defects on surfaces such as steps play an important role in surface chemistry. In order to obtain an understanding of the influence of steps in surface chemical reactions, the structure and reactivity of small molecules (O{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}S, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) on atomically stepped surfaces of RH and Pt have been investigated. The detailed structures of CO and oxygen bonded to the Rh(110) surface were determined. The CO molecules bond near the short bridge sites with the CO molecular axis tilted approximately 24{degree} from the surface normal. Oxygen atoms are bound asymmetrically in the 3-fold fcc hollow-sites to the (111) facets of the steps. The interactions of CO and oxygen on the Rh(311) surface were examined. The reaction of CO with the ordered phases of O shows two distinct reaction channels, a low temperature reaction limited channel (200 K) and a high temperature diffusion limited channel (350 K). Models of the reaction geometry and dynamics are proposed. The thermal decomposition of ethylene was examined on the Rh(311) surface. The stable decomposition species (C{sub 2}H, CH and C{sub 2}) are formed near 300 K, approximately 100 K lower on the stepped Rh(311) than on the flatter Rh(111) surface. The formation of these species at lower temperatures is attributed to the stepped nature of the surface. Finally, in situ STM was used to examine surface structural changes of a stepped Pt(111) crystal under coadsorption of sulfur and CO. This is the first direct evidence for a new mechanism by which a surface covered with an unreactive, strongly chemisorbed overlayer can form new sites, for bonding and reactions to occur, by massive surface restructuring at the step edges. This new surface phenomenon answers some of the puzzles of metal surface catalysis and its implications are described. 278 refs.

  6. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lösche, M; Piepenstock, M; Diederich, A; Grünewald, T; Kjaer, K; Vaknin, D

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of approximately 40 A. A systematic dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state depends on the dipole moment density at the interface. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE A1 PMID:8298041

  7. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  8. ATR-FTIR and density functional theory study of the structures, energetics, and vibrational spectra of phosphate adsorbed onto goethite.

    PubMed

    Kubicki, James D; Paul, Kristian W; Kabalan, Lara; Zhu, Qing; Mrozik, Michael K; Aryanpour, Masoud; Pierre-Louis, Andro-Marc; Strongin, Daniel R

    2012-10-16

    Periodic plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) and molecular cluster hybrid molecular orbital-DFT (MO-DFT) calculations were performed on models of phosphate surface complexes on the (100), (010), (001), (101), and (210) surfaces of α-FeOOH (goethite). Binding energies of monodentate and bidentate HPO(4)(2-) surface complexes were compared to H(2)PO(4)(-) outer-sphere complexes. Both the average potential energies from DFT molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations and energy minimizations were used to estimate adsorption energies for each configuration. Molecular clusters were extracted from the energy-minimized structures of the periodic systems and subjected to energy reminimization and frequency analysis with MO-DFT. The modeled P-O and P---Fe distances were consistent with EXAFS data for the arsenate oxyanion that is an analog of phosphate, and the interatomic distances predicted by the clusters were similar to those of the periodic models. Calculated vibrational frequencies from these clusters were then correlated with observed infrared bands. Configurations that resulted in favorable adsorption energies were also found to produce theoretical vibrational frequencies that correlated well with experiment. The relative stability of monodentate versus bidentate configurations was a function of the goethite surface under consideration. Overall, our results show that phosphate adsorption onto goethite occurs as a variety of surface complexes depending on the habit of the mineral (i.e., surfaces present) and solution pH. Previous IR spectroscopic studies may have been difficult to interpret because the observed spectra averaged the structural properties of three or more configurations on any given sample with multiple surfaces.

  9. Hydrogen-bonded glycine-HCN complexes in gas phase: structure, energetics, electric properties and cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado da Silva, Arnaldo; Chakrabarty, Sumana; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    2015-03-01

    Twelve hydrogen-bonded complexes of glycine and hydrogen cyanide have been studied using high-level quantum-chemical calculations in gas phase. In particular, six 1:1 glycine-HCN dimers and six 1:2 glycine-HCN trimers have been considered. Besides the characteristics of the hydrogen bonds and their effect on molecular structure and energetics, several molecular electric properties have been calculated utilising two different models: MP2/6-31++G(d,p) and DFT-B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p). Although the structural parameters calculated by the two models are similar, equilibrium electronic energies of the clusters show model dependence. The lowest energy dimer is same in both the models which is ca. 3.0 kcal/mol more stable than the highest energy dimer. However, the lowest energy trimer is different in two methods. The energetic difference of stability between the highest and lowest trimer is 4.2 kcal/mol (4.4 kcal/mol) at an MP2 (B3LYP) level of calculation. The bond angles of glycine, in particular, are quite sensitive to the hydrogen-bond formation. Four out of six trimers are found to be strongly cooperative in both the models. Significant changes of dipole moments and polarisabilities of isolated glycine and hydrogen cyanide are observed due to the formation of hydrogen bonding. The Rayleigh scattering intensities of all clusters are much larger than those of their constituent monomers.

  10. Doped penta-graphene and hydrogenation of its related structures: a structural and electronic DFT-D study.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Briones, J J; Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of penta-graphene (penta-C), an irregular pentagonal two-dimensional (2D) structure, has been predicted recently. In this communication we carried out a dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) study of the penta-C doped with Si, Ge and Sn atoms and its related hydrogenated penta-C structures (H-penta-C-X). We predict various new structures as thermally stable based on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations. Moreover, their dynamical stability is attested by phonon dispersions spectra. In general, we found that the bandgap value of doped structures reduces, while H-penta-C-X show large bandgap values. This feature can be exploited for potential uses of hydrogenated doped-penta-C structures as dielectric layers in electronic devices.

  11. Doped penta-graphene and hydrogenation of its related structures: a structural and electronic DFT-D study.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Briones, J J; Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of penta-graphene (penta-C), an irregular pentagonal two-dimensional (2D) structure, has been predicted recently. In this communication we carried out a dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) study of the penta-C doped with Si, Ge and Sn atoms and its related hydrogenated penta-C structures (H-penta-C-X). We predict various new structures as thermally stable based on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations. Moreover, their dynamical stability is attested by phonon dispersions spectra. In general, we found that the bandgap value of doped structures reduces, while H-penta-C-X show large bandgap values. This feature can be exploited for potential uses of hydrogenated doped-penta-C structures as dielectric layers in electronic devices. PMID:27220553

  12. Promotion of CO oxidation on PdO(101) by adsorbed H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juhee; Pan, Li; Mehar, Vikram; Zhang, Feng; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the influence of adsorbed H2O on the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) using temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that water inhibits CO adsorption on PdO(101) by site blocking, but also provides a more facile pathway for CO oxidation compared with the bare oxide surface. In the presence of adsorbed H2O, the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) produces a CO2 TPRS peak that is centered at a temperature ~ 50 K lower than the main CO2 TPRS peak arising from CO oxidation on clean PdO(101) (~ 330 vs. 380 K). RAIRS shows that CO continues to adsorb on atop-Pd sites of PdO(101) when H2O is co-adsorbed, and provides no evidence of other reactive intermediates. DFT calculations predict that the CO oxidation mechanism follows the same steps for CO adsorbed on PdO(101) with and without co-adsorbed H2O, wherein an atop-CO species recombines with an oxygen atom from the oxide surface lattice. According to DFT, hydrogen bonding interactions with adsorbed H2O species stabilize the carboxyl-like transition structure and intermediate that result from the initial recombination of CO and O on the PdO(101) surface. This stabilization lowers the energy barrier for CO oxidation on PdO(101) by ~ 10 kJ/mol, in good agreement with our experimental estimate.

  13. The intermolecular hydrogen-hydrogen structure of chain-molecule liquids from neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, J. D.; Annis, B. K.; Turner, J. Z.; Soper, A. K.

    1994-11-01

    Neutron diffraction isotopic substitution experiments on liquid n-decane (C10H22) and n-eicosane (C20H42) are described. The intermolecular H-H structure function hHH(Q) and the intermolecular H-H correlation function ginterHH(r) are obtained without recourse to models of the intramolecular structure. The structure of the ginterHH(r) found at 2.5, 5.0, and 7.0 Å corresponds to different shells in the H-H pair correlation function. In addition, ginterHH(r)<1 for a considerable range, due to the screening of intermolecular correlations by intramolecular correlations. This ``correlation hole'' effect is accentuated by extrapolation of the structure functions to the expected infinite wavelength limit, and shows good agreement with values determined from small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data. All of these features are in good agreement with the results of molecular dynamics simulations for the closely related system C13H28.

  14. Mesoporous Silica: A Suitable Adsorbent for Amines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous silica with KIT-6 structure was investigated as a preconcentrating material in chromatographic systems for ammonia and trimethylamine. Its adsorption capacity was compared to that of existing commercial materials, showing its increased adsorption power. In addition, KIT-6 mesoporous silica efficiently adsorbs both gases, while none of the employed commercial adsorbents did. This means that KIT-6 Mesoporous silica may be a good choice for integrated chromatography/gas sensing micro-devices. PMID:20628459

  15. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  16. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  17. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  18. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P. L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2012-06-01

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  19. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  20. Hydrogen Diffusion Behavior in Titanium-Chromium Hydrides with Laves Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman Jr., R.C.; Craft, B.D.; Attalla, A.; Johnson, J.R.

    1981-03-31

    Extensive NMR measurements of the proton relaxation times have been performed on low (i.e., alpha-phase) and intermediate (i.e., alpha'-phase) hydrogen concentrations in TiCr{sub}2H{sub}x with both the hexagonal Cl4 and cubic Cl5 Laves structures. The relaxation times indicate rapid diffusion rates above 200 K for all the TiCr{sub}2H{sub}x phases; however, large differences in the diffusion activation energies are observed. This behavior is associated with the hydrogen interstitial site occupancies and diffusion pathways becoming restricted in the Cl4 structure.

  1. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale phenomena in hydrogen storage Nanoscale phenomena in hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajo, John; Pinkerton, Fred; Stetson, Ned

    2009-05-01

    Future energy technologies that use hydrogen as an energy carrier offer the tantalizing prospect of operating essentially free of pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions while utilizing hydrogen produced from a diverse range of renewable sources. To realize these technologies, such as hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, improved approaches are needed for the high-capacity storage of hydrogen at temperatures ranging from near ambient to about 100 °C and at pressures below about 100 bar. These conditions favor storage based on the interaction of hydrogen with solid materials, rather than storage based on compressed or liquid hydrogen, which requires high pressures (700 bar) or low temperatures (20 K), respectively. Significant advances have recently been made, both in materials that store hydrogen as H2 molecules adsorbed on suitable supports and in materials that bind hydrogen chemically in the form of atoms, protons (cations) or hydride anions. Advances in molecular storage have come largely from a detailed understanding of the structures and bonding processes in traditional adsorbents and the development of new high-surface-area adsorbent materials with structures tailored on the molecular scale. Much of the emphasis has been on further increasing the number of adsorption sites to improve storage capacity. The low adsorption energies of current materials present another challenge because the weakly bound H2 can achieve technologically significant capacities only at cryogenic temperatures (50-80 K). Ongoing efforts to improve the thermodynamics of adsorption are primarily focused on composition and structure modifications. For chemically bound hydrogen, advances have come from investigation into light-element binary and complex hydrides, which inherently have high hydrogen capacities. The polar covalent bonding that characterizes these hydrides leads to very slow kinetics for hydrogen exchange, so here the emphasis is on improving kinetics through

  2. Using specialized adsorbents for remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, D.P.; Grant, A.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes two remediation case studies in which specialized adsorbents were used. In one case, the adsorbents were used to treat effluent from a soil vapor extraction system. In the other case, the adsorbents were used to treat air from a groundwater air stripper. The specialized adsorbents effectively removed volatile organic compounds from each air stream.

  3. Structure sensitivity in the nonscalable regime explored via catalysed ethylene hydrogenation on supported platinum nanoclusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crampton, Andrew S.; Rötzer, Marian D.; Ridge, Claron J.; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Heiz, Ueli; Yoon, Bokwon; Landman, Uzi

    2016-01-28

    The sensitivity, or insensitivity, of catalysed reactions to catalyst structure is a commonly employed fundamental concept. Here we report on the nature of nano-catalysed ethylene hydrogenation, investigated through experiments on size-selected Ptn (n=8-15) clusters soft-landed on magnesia and first-principles simulations, yielding benchmark information about the validity of structure sensitivity/insensitivity at the bottom of the catalyst size range. Both ethylene-hydrogenation-to-ethane and the parallel hydrogenation–dehydrogenation ethylidyne-producing route are considered, uncovering that at the <1 nm size-scale the reaction exhibits characteristics consistent with structure sensitivity, in contrast to structure insensitivity found for larger particles. The onset of catalysed hydrogenation occurs for Ptn (n≥10)more » clusters at T>150 K, with maximum room temperature reactivity observed for Pt13. Structure insensitivity, inherent for specific cluster sizes, is induced in the more active Pt13 by a temperature increase up to 400 K leading to ethylidyne formation. As a result, control of sub-nanometre particle size may be used for tuning catalysed hydrogenation activity and selectivity.« less

  4. Structure sensitivity in the nonscalable regime explored via catalysed ethylene hydrogenation on supported platinum nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Andrew S.; Rötzer, Marian D.; Ridge, Claron J.; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Heiz, Ueli; Yoon, Bokwon; Landman, Uzi

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity, or insensitivity, of catalysed reactions to catalyst structure is a commonly employed fundamental concept. Here we report on the nature of nano-catalysed ethylene hydrogenation, investigated through experiments on size-selected Ptn (n=8–15) clusters soft-landed on magnesia and first-principles simulations, yielding benchmark information about the validity of structure sensitivity/insensitivity at the bottom of the catalyst size range. Both ethylene-hydrogenation-to-ethane and the parallel hydrogenation–dehydrogenation ethylidyne-producing route are considered, uncovering that at the <1 nm size-scale the reaction exhibits characteristics consistent with structure sensitivity, in contrast to structure insensitivity found for larger particles. The onset of catalysed hydrogenation occurs for Ptn (n≥10) clusters at T>150 K, with maximum room temperature reactivity observed for Pt13. Structure insensitivity, inherent for specific cluster sizes, is induced in the more active Pt13 by a temperature increase up to 400 K leading to ethylidyne formation. Control of sub-nanometre particle size may be used for tuning catalysed hydrogenation activity and selectivity. PMID:26817713

  5. Quasiparticle band structure of infinite hydrogen fluoride and hydrogen chloride chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buth, Christian

    2006-10-01

    We study the quasiparticle band structure of isolated, infinite (HF)∞ and (HCl)∞ bent (zigzag) chains and examine the effect of the crystal field on the energy levels of the constituent monomers. The chains are one of the simplest but realistic models of the corresponding three-dimensional crystalline solids. To describe the isolated monomers and the chains, we set out from the Hartree-Fock approximation, harnessing the advanced Green's function methods local molecular orbital algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) scheme and local crystal orbital ADC (CO-ADC) in a strict second order approximation, ADC(2,2) and CO-ADC(2,2), respectively, to account for electron correlations. The configuration space of the periodic correlation calculations is found to converge rapidly only requiring nearest-neighbor contributions to be regarded. Although electron correlations cause a pronounced shift of the quasiparticle band structure of the chains with respect to the Hartree-Fock result, the bandwidth essentially remains unaltered in contrast to, e.g., covalently bound compounds.

  6. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures. Final report, October 1975-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, O.A.; Arefian, V.V.; Warren, H.A.; Vuigner, A.A.; Pohlman, M.J.

    1985-11-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  7. Structure of hydrogenous liquids: separation of coherent and incoherent cross sections using polarised neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunault, A.; Vial, S.; Pusztai, L.; Cuello, G. J.; Temleitner, L.

    2016-04-01

    The determination of the coherent structure factor of hydrogenous liquids is very difficult: while X-rays are barely sensitive to hydrogen, neutrons results still lack accuracy due to the contamination of the scattering intensities by a huge spin-incoherent signal from the 1H atoms. Using polarised neutrons with polarisation analysis, one can experimentally separate the coherent and incoherent contributions to the scattered intensity. We present the upgrade of the D3 polarised hot neutron diffractometer at ILL to study hydrogenated liquids. We show first data obtained from a test sample of water and detail the data reduction leading to an unprecedented accuracy in the extraction of the coherent signal, representative of the structure.

  8. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure

    PubMed Central

    May, Matthias M.; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators. PMID:26369620

  9. Effect of boron and hydrogen on the electronic structure of Ni{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Kioussi, N.; Watanabe, H.; Hemker, R.G.; Gourdin, W.: Gonis, A.; Johnson, P.E.

    1993-11-19

    Using first-principles electronic structure calculations based on the Linear-Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method, we have investigated the effects of interstitial born and hydrogen on the electronic structure of the Ll{sub 2} ordered intermetallic Ni{sub 3}Al. When it occupies an octahedral interstitial site entirely coordinated by six Ni atoms, we find that boron enhances the charge distribution found in the strongly-bound ``pure`` Ni{sub 3}Al crystal: Charge is depleted at Ni and Al region. Substitution Al atoms for two of the Ni atoms coordinating the boron, however, reduces the interstitial charge density between atomic planes. In contrast to boron, hydrogen appears to deplete the interstitial charge, even when fully coordinated by Ni atoms. We suggest that these results are broadly consistent with the notion of boron as a cohesion enhancer and hydrogen as an embrittler.

  10. Hydrogen storage in a chemical bond stabilized Co9S8-graphene layered structure.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Han, Lu; Bi, Hai; Jian, Jiahuang; Wu, Xiaohong; Gao, Peng

    2015-12-21

    With the high energy ball milling method, a Co9S8-decorated reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite, which shows excellent hydrogen storage capacity, has been successfully fabricated with a well-organized layered structure. Moreover, the stabilized mechanism of the well-organized layered structure is investigated and attributed to the strong interactions between Co9S8 and defective RGO. The C-S bond interaction is identified and the hydrogen storage process is also studied with different analysis methods. Finally, an optimized Co9S8 to RGO weight ratio of 6:1 shows excellent electrochemical performances in terms of the excellent cycling stability and competitive hydrogen storage capacity of 4.86 wt%.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics: Relationship between structural phases and the sound velocity in dense hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Carlo L.; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Perlado, Jose M.

    2014-10-01

    The phase diagram and the possible stable structures of molecular solid hydrogen are intriguing physical phenomena that still remain to be fully unveiled. Particularly, its transition to metallic hydrogen at high pressures is currently a hot topic of discussion. This letter reports a simulation method that links the ab initio, quantum molecular dynamic and mechanical properties calculations to study the relation between the structural phase transitions and sound velocity in solid molecular hydrogen. The pressure range studied is from 0.1 GPa to 180 GPa, at 15 K temperature, thereby our aim is to simulate the conditions of manufacture, handling and early stages of compression of the target fuel used in confinement inertial fusion. Phase I degeneration below 1 GPa is discussed.

  12. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Matthias M.; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators.

  13. Efficient direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion by in situ interface transformation of a tandem structure.

    PubMed

    May, Matthias M; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank; Hannappel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis is nature's route to convert intermittent solar irradiation into storable energy, while its use for an industrial energy supply is impaired by low efficiency. Artificial photosynthesis provides a promising alternative for efficient robust carbon-neutral renewable energy generation. The approach of direct hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting utilizes customized tandem absorber structures to mimic the Z-scheme of natural photosynthesis. Here a combined chemical surface transformation of a tandem structure and catalyst deposition at ambient temperature yields photocurrents approaching the theoretical limit of the absorber and results in a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 14%. The potentiostatically assisted photoelectrode efficiency is 17%. Present benchmarks for integrated systems are clearly exceeded. Details of the in situ interface transformation, the electronic improvement and chemical passivation are presented. The surface functionalization procedure is widely applicable and can be precisely controlled, allowing further developments of high-efficiency robust hydrogen generators. PMID:26369620

  14. Magnetocaloric properties of distilled gadolinium: Effects of structural inhomogeneity and hydrogen impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhanov, G. S.; Kolchugina, N. B.; Chzhan, V. B.; Chistyakov, O. D.; Tereshina, E. A.; Tereshina, I. S.; Politova, G. A.; Badurski, D.; Drulis, H.; Paukov, M.; Havela, L.

    2014-06-16

    High-purity Gd prepared by distillation is a structurally inhomogeneous system consisting of needle-shaped crystals of cross section 0.5–2.5 μm with near-c-axis orientation embedded in a matrix of nanosized (30–100 nm) grains. By measuring the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) directly, we find that the MCE values differ markedly for the plate-shaped samples cut out of a distillate along and perpendicular to the crystals. The effect of small controlled amounts of impurity (hydrogen) on the properties of distilled Gd is further studied. We observe opposite trends in the MCE response to hydrogen charging with respect to the crystal's orientation within the samples and discuss mechanisms interrelating the unique structural morphology with the impurity behavior. As an overall assessment, the Curie temperatures of α-GdH{sub x} solid solutions increase from 291 K up to 294 K when increasing hydrogen concentration x from 0 to 0.15. Hydrogenation is found to broaden the ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic phase transition. Hydrogen-containing specimens demonstrate reversibility of MCE at these temperatures.

  15. Calibrating the Bending of Molecule Adsorbed Nanoscale Si Cantilevers with a Modified Stoney Formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Ji; Liu, Feng

    2007-03-01

    Fundamental understanding of mechanical bending of molecule adsorbed nanoscale thin films is of both scientific and technological importance. Our current understanding, however, is limited within macroscopic analysis that neglects the atomic details of film structure and surface effects. Here, we report atomistic simulation and theoretical analysis of bending of freestanding nanometer-thick silicon (Si) films induced by adsorption of hydrogen and acetylene molecules. It reveals the dominant role of atomic surface structure and surface stress in governing their bending behavior. We show that the bending curvature of molecule adsorbed Si nanofilm does not follow the classical Stoney formula, and we develop a modified Stoney formula by taking into account of the effects arising from atomic surface reconstruction and surface stress. Our findings suggest that re-calibration has to be made in detecting trace amount of molecules by nanoscale Si mechanochemical sensors.

  16. Compensation of logarithmic corrections in calculating the fine structure of levels in hydrogen-like atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Boikova, N. A. Tyukhtyaev, Yu. N.; Faustov, R. N.

    2011-01-15

    Special features of the quasipotential approach to calculating logarithmic (in the fine-structure constant) contributions to the fine splitting of energy levels in hydrogen-like atoms are analyzed. The boundaries of the region of applicability of the Fell technique are indicated, and the order of corrections beyond this region is estimated.

  17. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  18. Simulation of polyethylene oxide: Improved structure using better models for hydrogen and flexible walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halley, J. W.; Duan, Yuhua; Nielsen, B.; Redfern, Paul C.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2001-08-01

    We describe calculations of the structure of amorphous polyethylene oxide using a previously reported model, but with better treatment of hydrogen positions and in a code which allows relaxation of stresses in the polymerized sample by Rahman-Parrinello techniques. We also report the effects of two different intermolecular force field potentials and find that our earlier, empirical force field produces better agreement with experimental neutron scattering results than a force field derived from ab initio electronic structure calculations.

  19. Simulation of polyethylene oxide : improved structure using better models for hydrogen and flexible walls.

    SciTech Connect

    Halley, J. W.; Duan, Y.; Nielsen, B.; Redfern, P. C.; Curtiss, L. A.; Univ. of Minnesota

    2001-08-22

    We describe calculations of the structure of amorphous polyethylene oxide using a previously reported model, but with better treatment of hydrogen positions and in a code which allows relaxation of stresses in the polymerized sample by Rahman-Parrinello techniques. We also report the effects of two different intermolecular force field potentials and find that our earlier, empirical force field produces better agreement with experimental neutron scattering results than a force field derived from ab initio electronic structure calculations.

  20. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaobo; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  1. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-08-28

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  2. Hydrogen-induced modification of the medium-range structural order in amorphous silicon films

    SciTech Connect

    Nittala, L.N.; Jayaraman, S.; Sperling, B.A.; Abelson, J.R.

    2005-12-12

    We use fluctuation electron microscopy to determine changes in the medium-range structural order of un-hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films after they are exposed to atomic hydrogen at a substrate temperature of 230 deg. C. The films are deposited by magnetron sputtering at either 230 or 350 deg. C substrate temperature to obtain starting states with small or large initial medium-range order, respectively. The in-diffusion of atomic hydrogen causes the medium-range order to decrease for the small initial order but to increase for the large initial order. We suggest that this behavior can be understood in terms of classical nucleation theory: The ordered regions of small diameter are energetically unstable and can lower their energy by evolving towards a continuous random network, whereas the ordered regions of large diameter are energetically stable and can lower their energy by coarsening towards the nanocrystalline state.

  3. Structures and the Hydrogen Bonding Abilities of Estrogens Studied by Supersonic Jet/laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Fumiya; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki

    2013-06-01

    Estrone, estradiol, estriol are known as endogenous estrogen which have the same steroidal frame with different substituent, leading to difference of physiological activity upon the formation of hydrogen bond with estrogen receptor. In the present study, structures of estrogens and their hydrated clusters in a supersonic jet have been studied by various laser spectroscopic techniques and density functional theory calculation to study how the difference of substituents affects their hydrogen bonding ability. Infrared spectra in the OH stretching region indicate a formation of intramolecular hydrogen-bond in estriol, which may lead to weaker physiological activity among the three estrogens. We also measured electronic and infrared spectra of 1:1 hydrated clusters of estrogen. The results show a switch of stable hydration site from the phenolic OH group to the five member ring by substituting one more OH group.

  4. The structure-function relationship for alumina supported platinum during the formation of ammonia from nitrogen oxide and hydrogen in the presence of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Adams, Emma Catherine; Merte, Lindsay Richard; Hellman, Anders; Skoglundh, Magnus; Gustafson, Johan; Bendixen, Eva Charlotte; Gabrielsson, Pär; Bertram, Florian; Evertsson, Jonas; Zhang, Chu; Carlson, Stefan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2016-04-28

    We study the structure-function relationship of alumina supported platinum during the formation of ammonia from nitrogen oxide and dihydrogen by employing in situ X-ray absorption and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Particular focus has been directed towards the effect of oxygen on the reaction as a model system for emerging technologies for passive selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides. The suppressed formation of ammonia observed as the feed becomes net-oxidizing is accompanied by a considerable increase in the oxidation state of platinum as well as the formation of surface nitrates and the loss of NH-containing surface species. In the presence of (excess) oxygen, the ammonia formation is proposed to be limited by weak interaction between nitrogen oxide and the oxidized platinum surface. This leads to a slow dissociation rate of nitrogen oxide and thus low abundance of the atomic nitrogen surface species that can react with the adsorbed hydrogen species. In this case the consumption of hydrogen through the competing water formation reaction and decomposition/oxidation of ammonia are of less importance for the net ammonia formation. PMID:27039829

  5. Extending the range of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) surface structure determination: Co-adsorbed molecules, incommensurate overlayers and alloy surface order studied by new video and electron counting LEED techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.

    1986-11-01

    LEED multiple scattering theory is briefly summarized, and aspects of electron scattering with particular significance to experimental measurements such as electron beam coherence, instrument response and phonon scattering are analyzed. Diffuse LEED experiments are discussed. New techniques that enhance the power of LEED are described, including a real-time video image digitizer applied to LEED intensity measurements, along with computer programs to generate I-V curves. The first electron counting LEED detector using a ''wedge and strip'' position sensitive anode and digital electronics is described. This instrument uses picoampere incident beam currents, and its sensitivity is limited only by statistics and counting times. Structural results on new classes of surface systems are presented. The structure of the c(4 x 2) phase of carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pt(111) has been determined, showing that carbon monoxide molecules adsorb in both top and bridge sites, 1.85 +- 0.10 A and 1.55 +- 0.10 A above the metal surface, respectively. The structure of an incommensurate graphite overlayer on Pt(111) is analyzed. The graphite layer is 3.70 +- 0.05 A above the metal surface, with intercalated carbon atoms located 1.25 +- 0.10 A above hollow sites supporting it. The (2..sqrt..3 x 4)-rectangular phase of benzene and carbon monoxide coadsorbed on Pt(111) is analyzed. Benzene molecules adsorb in bridge sites parallel to and 2.10 +- 0.10 A above the surface. The carbon ring is expanded, with an average C-C bond length of 1.72 +- 0.15 A. The carbon monoxide molecules also adsorb in bridge sites. The structure of the (..sqrt..3 x ..sqrt..3) reconstruction on the (111) face of the ..cap alpha..-CuAl alloy has been determined.

  6. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of AdsorbateStructure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions: Novel Design of anUltra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling MicroscopeSystem for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, David Chi-Wai

    2005-05-16

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope’s (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 °C).

  7. A revised structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II from a neutron fiber diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, P.; Nishiyama, Y.; Chanzy, H.

    1999-11-03

    The crystal and molecular structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II have been revised using new neutron diffraction data extending to 1.2 {angstrom} resolution collected from two highly crystalline fiber samples of mercerized flax. Mercerization was achieved in NaOH/H{sub 2}O for one sample and in NaOD/D{sub 2}O for the other, corresponding to the labile hydroxymethyl moieties being hydrogenated and deuterated, respectively. Fourier difference maps were calculated in which neutron difference amplitudes were combined with phases calculated from two revised X-ray models of cellulose II. The revised phasing models were determined by refinement against the X-ray data set of Kolpak and Blackwell, using the LALS methodology. Both models have two antiparallel chains organized in a P2{sub 1} space group and unit cell parameters: a = 8.01 {angstrom}, b = 9.04 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, and {gamma} = 117.1{degree}. One has equivalent backbone conformations for both chains but different conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties: gt for the origin chain and tg for the center chain. The second model based on the recent crystal structures of cellotetraose, has different conformations for the two chains but nearly equivalent conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties. On the basis of the X-ray data alone, the models could not be differentiated. From the neutron Fourier difference maps, possible labile hydrogen atom positions were identified for each model and refined using LALS. The second model is significantly different from previous proposals based on the crystal structures of cellotetraose, MD simulations of cellulose II, and any potential hydrogen-bonding network in the structure of cellulose II determined in earlier X-ray fiber diffraction studies. The exact localization of the labile hydrogen atoms involved in this bonding, together with their donor and acceptor characteristics, is presented and discussed. This study provides, for the first time

  8. Black titania: effect of hydrogenation on structural and thermal stability of nanotitania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanam, Rizwin; Taparia, Dolly; Mondal, Biplob; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2016-02-01

    We report on the effect of hydrogenation on sol-gel-derived, anatase-phase TiO2 nanoparticles. The structural analysis of white nanotitania (W-TiO2) and hydrogenated black titania (B-TiO2) has been carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, which confirms anatase phase for both the cases, but with weak diffraction signals in the latter system. Upon hydrogenation, nanotitania system is believed to acquire a disordered phase in the form of a thin amorphous layer surrounding the nanoparticles, which can be realized through transmission electron microscopy analyses. As compared to W-TiO2 (~3.15 eV), the optical band gap of B-TiO2 is substantially reduced with respective band gap values of ~1.99 and 1.53 eV for 0.5 and 1 % H2 inclusion cases. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis reveals high temperature thermal stability of B-TiO2 system, especially in the range of 350-600 °C. Exploiting thermal, optical and electronic properties of hydrogenated nanotitania could find scope in infrared optics, hydrogen storage and suitable photocatalytic applications.

  9. Electronic structure characterization and bandgap engineeringofsolar hydrogen materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jinghua

    2007-11-01

    Bandgap, band edge positions as well as the overall band structure of semiconductors are of crucial importance in photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic applications. The energy position of the band edge level can be controlled by the electronegativity of the dopants, the pH of the solution (flatband potential variation of 60 mV per pH unit), as well as by quantum confinement effects. Accordingly, band edges and bandgap can be tailored to achieve specific electronic, optical or photocatalytic properties. Synchrotron radiation with photon energy at or below 1 keV is giving new insight into such areas as condensed matter physics and extreme ultraviolet optics technology. In the soft x-ray region, the question tends to be, what are the electrons doing as they migrated between the atoms. In this paper, I will present a number of soft x-ray spectroscopic study of nanostructured 3d metal compounds Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO.

  10. Hydrogen program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gronich, S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  11. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: An agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-11-07

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here, we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding – a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems, and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a hydrogen-bonded configuration. We introduce here a definition that is univocal, unbiased, and adaptive, based on our machine-learning analysis of an atomistic simulation. The strategy we propose could be easily adapted to similar scenarios, where one has to recognize or classify structural patterns in a material or chemical compound.

  12. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: an agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-11-01

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here, we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding--a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems, and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a hydrogen-bonded configuration. We introduce here a definition that is univocal, unbiased, and adaptive, based on our machine-learning analysis of an atomistic simulation. The strategy we propose could be easily adapted to similar scenarios, where one has to recognize or classify structural patterns in a material or chemical compound. PMID:25381505

  13. Recognizing molecular patterns by machine learning: An agnostic structural definition of the hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-11-01

    The concept of chemical bonding can ultimately be seen as a rationalization of the recurring structural patterns observed in molecules and solids. Chemical intuition is nothing but the ability to recognize and predict such patterns, and how they transform into one another. Here, we discuss how to use a computer to identify atomic patterns automatically, so as to provide an algorithmic definition of a bond based solely on structural information. We concentrate in particular on hydrogen bonding - a central concept to our understanding of the physical chemistry of water, biological systems, and many technologically important materials. Since the hydrogen bond is a somewhat fuzzy entity that covers a broad range of energies and distances, many different criteria have been proposed and used over the years, based either on sophisticate electronic structure calculations followed by an energy decomposition analysis, or on somewhat arbitrary choices of a range of structural parameters that is deemed to correspond to a hydrogen-bonded configuration. We introduce here a definition that is univocal, unbiased, and adaptive, based on our machine-learning analysis of an atomistic simulation. The strategy we propose could be easily adapted to similar scenarios, where one has to recognize or classify structural patterns in a material or chemical compound.

  14. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    SciTech Connect

    Mudiyanselage, K.; Xu, F.; Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Waluyo, I.; Boscoboinik, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.

    2014-12-09

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sites of the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.

  15. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mudiyanselage, K.; Xu, F.; Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Waluyo, I.; Boscoboinik, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.

    2014-12-09

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sitesmore » of the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.« less

  16. Hydrogen segregation and its roles in structural stability and metallization: silane under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wenwen; Shi, Jingming; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun; Wang, Hui; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    We present results from first-principles calculations on silane (SiH4) under pressure. We find that a three dimensional P-3 structure becomes the most stable phase above 241 GPa. A prominent structural feature, which separates the P-3 structure from previously observed/predicted SiH4 structures, is that a fraction of hydrogen leaves the Si-H bonding environment and forms segregated H2 units. The H2 units are sparsely populated in the system and intercalated with a polymeric Si-H framework. Calculations of enthalpy of formation suggest that the P-3 structure is against the decomposition into Si-H binaries and/or the elemental crystals. Structural stability of the P-3 structure is attributed to the electron-deficient multicenter Si-H-Si interactions when neighboring silicon atoms are linked together through a common hydrogen atom. Within the multicenter bonds, electrons are delocalized and this leads to a metallic state, possibly also a superconducting state, for SiH4. An interesting outcome of the present study is that the enthalpy sum of SiH4 (P-3 structure) and Si (fcc structure) appears to be lower than the enthalpy of disilane (Si2H6) between 200 and 300 GPa (for all previously predicted crystalline forms of Si2H6), which calls for a revisit of the stability of Si2H6 under high pressure. PMID:26266340

  17. Hydrogen segregation and its roles in structural stability and metallization: silane under pressure.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenwen; Shi, Jingming; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun; Wang, Hui; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    We present results from first-principles calculations on silane (SiH4) under pressure. We find that a three dimensional P-3 structure becomes the most stable phase above 241 GPa. A prominent structural feature, which separates the P-3 structure from previously observed/predicted SiH4 structures, is that a fraction of hydrogen leaves the Si-H bonding environment and forms segregated H2 units. The H2 units are sparsely populated in the system and intercalated with a polymeric Si-H framework. Calculations of enthalpy of formation suggest that the P-3 structure is against the decomposition into Si-H binaries and/or the elemental crystals. Structural stability of the P-3 structure is attributed to the electron-deficient multicenter Si-H-Si interactions when neighboring silicon atoms are linked together through a common hydrogen atom. Within the multicenter bonds, electrons are delocalized and this leads to a metallic state, possibly also a superconducting state, for SiH4. An interesting outcome of the present study is that the enthalpy sum of SiH4 (P-3 structure) and Si (fcc structure) appears to be lower than the enthalpy of disilane (Si2H6) between 200 and 300 GPa (for all previously predicted crystalline forms of Si2H6), which calls for a revisit of the stability of Si2H6 under high pressure.

  18. Frequent side chain methyl carbon-oxygen hydrogen bonding in proteins revealed by computational and stereochemical analysis of neutron structures.

    PubMed

    Yesselman, Joseph D; Horowitz, Scott; Brooks, Charles L; Trievel, Raymond C

    2015-03-01

    The propensity of backbone Cα atoms to engage in carbon-oxygen (CH · · · O) hydrogen bonding is well-appreciated in protein structure, but side chain CH · · · O hydrogen bonding remains largely uncharacterized. The extent to which side chain methyl groups in proteins participate in CH · · · O hydrogen bonding is examined through a survey of neutron crystal structures, quantum chemistry calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations. Using these approaches, methyl groups were observed to form stabilizing CH · · · O hydrogen bonds within protein structure that are maintained through protein dynamics and participate in correlated motion. Collectively, these findings illustrate that side chain methyl CH · · · O hydrogen bonding contributes to the energetics of protein structure and folding.

  19. Structural Arrangement Trade Study. Volume 1: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the first of a three volume set that discusses the structural arrangement trade study plan that will identify the most suitable configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Primary Structures most suitable for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. This executive summary presents the trade study process, the selection process, requirements used, analysis performed and data generated. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented.

  20. Structural arrangement trade study. Volume 3: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the third of a 3 volume set that addresses the structural trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The most suitable Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Tank System (GCPS) composite materials for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. Vehicle resizing charts, selection criteria and back-up charts, parametric costing approach and the finite element method analysis are discussed.

  1. Unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertel, E.

    1991-11-01

    Experimental work on unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems on metallic substrates is reviewed with emphasis on recent developments. The first part is devoted to molecular adsorbates. Weakly chemisorbed hydrocarbons are briefly discussed. An exhaustive inverse photoemission (IPE) study of the CO bond to the transition metals Ni, Pb, and Pt is presented. Adsorbed NO is taken as an example to demonstrate the persisting discrepancies in the interpretation of IPE spectra. Atomic adsorbates are discussed in the second part. The quantum well state model is applied to interpret the surface states in reconstructing and non-reconstructing adsorption systems of alkali metals and hydrogen. A recent controversy on the unoccupied electronic states of the Cu(110)/O p(2×1) surface is critically reviewed. The quantum well state model is then compared to tight binding and local-density-functional calculations of the unoccupied bands and the deficiencies of the various approaches are pointed out. Finally, the relation between the surface state model and more chemically oriented models of surface bonding is briefly discussed.

  2. Structure and hydrogen storage properties of the hexagonal Laves phase Sc(Al1-xNix)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlberg, Martin; Ångström, Jonas; Zlotea, Claudia; Beran, Premysl; Latroche, Michel; Pay Gómez, Cesar

    2012-12-01

    The crystal structures of hydrogenated and unhydrogenated Sc(Al1-xNix)2 Laves phases have been studied by combining several diffraction techniques and it is shown that hydrogen is situated interstitially in the A2B2-sites, which have the maximum number of scandium neighbours. The hydrogen absorption/desorption behaviour has also been investigated. It is shown that a solid solution of hydrogen forms in the mother compound. The hydrogen storage capacity exceeds 1.7 H/f.u. at 374 K, and the activation energy of hydrogen desorption was determined to 4.6 kJ/mol H2. It is shown that these compounds share the same local coordination as Frank-Kasper-type approximants and quasicrystals, which opens up the possibility of finding many new hydride phases with these types of crystal structures.

  3. DFT STUDY OF HYDROGEN STORAGE ON Li- AND Na-DOPED C59B HETEROFULLERENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Ehsan; Mozaffari, Majid

    2014-05-01

    Effect of light alkali metal (Li and Na) decorated on the C59B heterofullerene for hydrogen storage is considered using DFT-MPW1PW91 method. Results show that Li and Na atoms strongly prefer to adsorb on top of five-member and six-member ring where a carbon atom is replaced by a boron atom. Significant charge transfer from the alkali metal to the C59B compensates for the electron deficiency of C59B and makes the latter aromatic in nature. Corrected binding energies of hydrogen molecule on the alkali-doped C59B using counterpoise method, structural properties and NBO analysis indicate that first hydrogen molecule is adsorbed physically and does not support minimal conditions of DOE requirement. Finally, positive values of binding energies for the adsorption of a second hydrogen molecule show that alkali doped C59B are capable of storing a maximum of one hydrogen molecule.

  4. Structural influence on the solid state intermolecular hydrogen bonding of substituted thioureas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, T. K.; Sudbeck, E.; Uckun, F. M.

    2005-09-01

    Several thiourea derivatives have been found to possess biological activity. In particular, phenethyl thiazolyl thiourea derivatives with a heterocyclic ring exhibit potent antiviral activity. These thiourea derivatives were also found to inhibit RT, the reverse transcriptase enzyme, by binding the non-nucleoside inhibitor site of RT. To better understand the nature of the binding of these compounds a detailed crystal structure analysis on these thiourea compounds was undertaken. Here, we report, the results of our X-ray crystal structure study of substituted thiourea compounds. Comparison of the hydrogen bonding characteristics exhibited by structurally distinct thiourea analogs was informative concerning their inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Additionally, we found that among the thioureas studied, the 2,5-dimethoxy substituted phenethyl thiourea had strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding forming a nine-member ring in the crystal lattice that was absent in the other methoxy substituted phenethyl thioureas examined. Comparison of the structures demonstrated that the presence of a heterocyclic nitrogen atom in the ring results in the formation of a stable six-member ring rather than a nine-member ring.

  5. Structural evolution and electronic properties of n-type doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Li, Wei; Xu, Rui; Qi, Kang-Cheng; Jiang, Ya-Dong

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between structure and electronic properties of n-type doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films was investigated. Samples with different features were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at various substrate temperatures. Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the structural evolution, meanwhile, electronic-spin resonance (ESR) and optical measurement were applied to explore the electronic properties of P-doped a-Si:H thin films. Results reveal that the changes in materials structure affect directly the electronic properties and the doping efficiency of dopant.

  6. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    average diameter size at less than 1 nm. However, initial tests performed at our collaborator’s lab at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) did not indicate improved hydrogen sorption properties for the smaller-diameter nanotubes (compared with other types of nanotubes). As work continued, the difficulties in purification, large-scale synthesis, and stability of small diameter SWNTs became a major concern. In 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) made a no-go decision on future applied R&D investment in pure, undoped, single-walled carbon nanotubes for vehicular hydrogen storage.2 The second phase of the project involved developing a low-cost and scalable approach for the synthesis of microporous carbon materials with well-controlled pore sizes that would be suitable for hydrogen storage. The team studied several approaches, including the use of different zeolites as a template, the use of organic micelle structures as a template, and the slow oxidation of polymer precursors. Among them, the slow activation of Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) under either CO2 environment or H2O vapor produced microporous carbon with an average pore size of less than 2 nm. Initial testing at 77K at both NREL and the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) showed that these materials can store ~5.1 wt% hydrogen (excess) at 40 bar and 77K. The main feature to note with this material is that while the excess gravimetric capacities (>5 wt% at 77K) and specific surface areas (>3100 m2/g) are similar to AX-21 and other “super activated” commercial carbon sorbents at the same temperatures and pressures, due to the smaller pore sizes, bulk densities greater than 0.7 g/ml can be achieved, enabling excess volumetric capacities greater than 35 g/L; more than double that of AX-21.

  7. Structural and electronic properties of free standing one-sided and two-sided hydrogenated silicene: A first principle study

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Brij Kumar, Ashok Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-04-24

    We performed first-principle study of the structural and electronic properties of two-dimensional hydrogenated silicene for two configurations; one is hydrogenation along one side of silicene sheet and second is hydrogenation in both sides of silicene sheet. The one-side hydrogenated silicene is found stable at planar geometry while increased buckling of 0.725 Å is found for both-side hydrogenated silicene. The result shows that the hydrogenation occupy the extended π-bonding network of silicene, and thus it exhibits semi-conducting behaviour with a band gap of 1.77 eV and 2.19 eV for one-side hydrogenated silicene and both-side hydrogenated silicene respectively. However, both-side hydrogenated silicene of binding energy 4.56 eV is more stable than one-side hydrogenated silicene of binding energy 4.30 eV, but experimentally silicene is synthesized on substrates which interacts one side of silicene layer and only other side is available for H-atoms. Therefore, practically one-side hydrogenation is also important.

  8. Polyaniline as a material for hydrogen storage applications.

    PubMed

    Attia, Nour F; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2013-07-12

    The main challenge of commercialization of the hydrogen economy is the lack of convenient and safe hydrogen storage materials, which can adsorb and release a significant amount of hydrogen at ambient conditions. Finding and designing suitable cost-effective materials are vital requirements to overcome the drawbacks of investigated materials. Because of its outstanding electronic, thermal, and chemical properties, the electrically conducting polyaniline (PANI) has a high potential in hydrogen storage applications. In this review, the progress in the use of different structures of conducting PANI, its nanocomposites as well as activated porous materials based on PANI as hydrogen storage materials is presented and discussed. The effect of the unique electronic properties based on the π-electron system in the backbone of these materials in view of the hydrogen uptake and the relevant mechanisms are highlighted.

  9. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.

  10. Bibliography of information on mechanics of structural failure (hydrogen embrittlement, protective coatings, composite materials, NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 1,600 reference citations related to four problem areas in the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period 1962-1976, the effort being largely limited to documents published in the United States. Listings are subdivided into the four problem areas: Hydrogen Embrittlement; Protective Coatings; Composite Materials; and Nondestructive Evaluation. An author index is included.

  11. Hydrogen-bond-assisted "gold cold fusion" for fabrication of 2D web structures.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Saikat; Shundo, Atsuomi; Acharya, Somobrata; Hill, Jonathan P; Ji, Qingmin; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2009-07-01

    Keeping their cool: Fabrication of a 2D weblike nanonetwork of gold was successfully demonstrated through a two-step procedure including complexation of gold precursors to a weblike supramolecular assembly of surfactant followed by in situ reduction of the precursors to gold. Molecular assemblies stabilized by hydrogen bonding provided a sound template, leading to the highly integrated structure of gold through room-temperature (cold) nanostructure fusion.

  12. Application of the TEMPEST computer code for simulating hydrogen distribution in model containment structures. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.

    1982-09-01

    In this study several aspects of simulating hydrogen distribution in geometric configurations relevant to reactor containment structures were investigated using the TEMPEST computer code. Of particular interest was the performance of the TEMPEST turbulence model in a density-stratified environment. Computed results illustrated that the TEMPEST numerical procedures predicted the measured phenomena with good accuracy under a variety of conditions and that the turbulence model used is a viable approach in complex turbulent flow simulation.

  13. Determination of Hydrogen Bond Structure in Water versus Aprotic Environments To Test the Relationship Between Length and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Sigala, Paul A.; Ruben, Eliza A.; Liu, Corey W.; Piccoli, Paula M. B.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Martinez, Todd J.; Schultz, Arthur J.; Herschiag, Daniel

    2015-05-06

    Hydrogen bonds profoundly influence the architecture and activity of biological macromolecules. Deep appreciation of hydrogen bond contributions to biomolecular function thus requires a detailed understanding of hydrogen bond structure and energetics and the relationship between these properties. Hydrogen bond formation energies (Delta G(f)) are enormously more favorable in aprotic solvents than in water, and two classes of contributing factors have been proposed to explain this energetic difference, focusing respectively on the isolated and hydrogen-bonded species: (I) water stabilizes the dissociated donor and acceptor groups much better than aprotic solvents, thereby reducing the driving force for hydrogen bond formation; and (II) water lengthens hydrogen bonds compared to aprotic environments, thereby decreasing the potential energy within the hydrogen bond. Each model has been proposed to provide a dominant contribution to Delta G(f), but incisive tests that distinguish the importance of these contributions are lacking. Here we directly test the structural basis of model II. Neutron crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that O-H center dot center dot center dot O hydrogen bonds in crystals, chloroform, acetone, and water have nearly identical lengths and very similar potential energy surfaces despite Delta G(f) differences >8 kcal/mol across these solvents. These results rule out a substantial contribution from solvent-dependent differences in hydrogen bond structure and potential energy after association (model II) and thus support the conclusion that differences in hydrogen bond Delta G(f) are predominantly determined by solvent interactions with the dissociated groups (model I). These findings advance our understanding of universal hydrogen-bonding interactions and have important implications for biology and engineering.

  14. Determination of Hydrogen Bond Structure in Water versus Aprotic Environments To Test the Relationship Between Length and Stability.

    PubMed

    Sigala, Paul A; Ruben, Eliza A; Liu, Corey W; Piccoli, Paula M B; Hohenstein, Edward G; Martínez, Todd J; Schultz, Arthur J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen bonds profoundly influence the architecture and activity of biological macromolecules. Deep appreciation of hydrogen bond contributions to biomolecular function thus requires a detailed understanding of hydrogen bond structure and energetics and the relationship between these properties. Hydrogen bond formation energies (ΔGf) are enormously more favorable in aprotic solvents than in water, and two classes of contributing factors have been proposed to explain this energetic difference, focusing respectively on the isolated and hydrogen-bonded species: (I) water stabilizes the dissociated donor and acceptor groups much better than aprotic solvents, thereby reducing the driving force for hydrogen bond formation; and (II) water lengthens hydrogen bonds compared to aprotic environments, thereby decreasing the potential energy within the hydrogen bond. Each model has been proposed to provide a dominant contribution to ΔGf, but incisive tests that distinguish the importance of these contributions are lacking. Here we directly test the structural basis of model II. Neutron crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that O-H···O hydrogen bonds in crystals, chloroform, acetone, and water have nearly identical lengths and very similar potential energy surfaces despite ΔGf differences >8 kcal/mol across these solvents. These results rule out a substantial contribution from solvent-dependent differences in hydrogen bond structure and potential energy after association (model II) and thus support the conclusion that differences in hydrogen bond ΔGf are predominantly determined by solvent interactions with the dissociated groups (model I). These findings advance our understanding of universal hydrogen-bonding interactions and have important implications for biology and engineering.

  15. Molecular hydrogen messengers can lead to structural infidelity: A cautionary tale of protonated glycine.

    PubMed

    Masson, Antoine; Williams, Evan R; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2015-09-14

    The effects of tagging protonated glycine with either He or between 1 and 14 H2 molecules on the infrared photodissociation spectra and the ion structure were investigated. Differences in the IR spectra with either a single He atom or H2 molecule attached indicate that even a single H2 molecule can affect the frequencies of some vibrational bands of this simple ion. The protonation site is the preferred location of the tag with He and with up to two H2 molecules, but evidence for H2 attachment to the hydrogen atom of the uncharged carboxylic acid is observed for ions tagged with three or more H2 molecules. This results in a 55 cm(-1) red shift in the carboxylic acid OH stretch, and evidence for some structural isomers where the hydrogen bond between the protonated nitrogen and the carbonyl oxygen is partially broken; as a result H2 molecules attached to this site are observed. These results are supported by theory, which indicates that H2 molecules can effectively break this weak hydrogen bond with three or more H2 molecules. These results indicate that large spectral shifts as a result of H2 molecules attaching to sites remote from the charge can occur and affect stretching frequencies as a result of charge transfer, and that tagging with multiple H2 molecules can change the structure of the ion itself.

  16. ''Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Periodic Density Functional Studies of Hydrogen Bonded Structures''

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce S. Hudson

    2004-10-27

    This project is directed at a fundamental understanding of hydrogen bonding, the primary reversible interaction leading to defined geometries, networks and supramolecular aggregates formed by organic molecules. Hydrogen bonding is still not sufficiently well understood that the geometry of such supramolecular aggregates can be predicted. In the approach taken existing quantum chemical methods capable of treating periodic solids have been applied to hydrogen bonded systems of known structure. The equilibrium geometry for the given space group and packing arrangement were computed and compared to that observed. The second derivatives and normal modes of vibration will then be computed and from this inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra were computed using the normal mode eigenvectors to compute spectral intensities. Appropriate inclusion of spectrometer line width and shape was made in the simulation and overtones, combinations and phonon wings were be included. These computed spectra were then compared with experimental results obtained for low-temperature polycrystalline samples at INS spectrometers at several facilities. This procedure validates the computational methodology for describing these systems including both static and dynamic aspects of the material. The resulting description can be used to evaluate the relative free energies of two or more proposed structures and so ultimately to be able to predict which structure will be most stable for a given building block.

  17. Molecular hydrogen messengers can lead to structural infidelity: A cautionary tale of protonated glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Antoine; Williams, Evan R.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of tagging protonated glycine with either He or between 1 and 14 H2 molecules on the infrared photodissociation spectra and the ion structure were investigated. Differences in the IR spectra with either a single He atom or H2 molecule attached indicate that even a single H2 molecule can affect the frequencies of some vibrational bands of this simple ion. The protonation site is the preferred location of the tag with He and with up to two H2 molecules, but evidence for H2 attachment to the hydrogen atom of the uncharged carboxylic acid is observed for ions tagged with three or more H2 molecules. This results in a 55 cm-1 red shift in the carboxylic acid OH stretch, and evidence for some structural isomers where the hydrogen bond between the protonated nitrogen and the carbonyl oxygen is partially broken; as a result H2 molecules attached to this site are observed. These results are supported by theory, which indicates that H2 molecules can effectively break this weak hydrogen bond with three or more H2 molecules. These results indicate that large spectral shifts as a result of H2 molecules attaching to sites remote from the charge can occur and affect stretching frequencies as a result of charge transfer, and that tagging with multiple H2 molecules can change the structure of the ion itself.

  18. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-01-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm−2 and 100 mA cm−2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation. PMID:26892437

  19. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm-2 and 100 mA cm-2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.

  20. A highly-active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-19

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superiormore » activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm–2 and 100 mA cm–2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Lastly, phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.« less

  1. Titanium-based icosahedral quasicrystals and approximants: Phase formation, cluster structure, and hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoub, Eric Hish

    Equilibrium phase formation is reported for ternary Ti-Zr-Ni alloys near the icosahedral phase (i-phase) forming composition. The i-phase forms over a small compositional range from a high-temperature equilibrium phase mixture of the Laves and alpha(Ti/Zr) solid solution phases. Additions of small amounts of Pb, 1--2 at. %, are demonstrated to substantially effect the equilibrium phase formation and extend the stability of the i-phase to nearly 700°C. An electrochemical method was used to hydrogenate Ti-based quasicrystals and their crystal approximants. This technique gives a consistently high hydrogen to metal atom ratio of 1.9, without crystal hydride formation in the quasicrystal. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements of the hydrogen dipole-dipole interaction were made using hydrided i-phase samples. Comparisons with simulations based on hydrogen filling of the approximant-phase tetrahedral interstitials reveals that any filling order is consistent with the experimental data. Studies of the atomic structure of hydrided and unhydrided i-TiZrNi quasicrystal and its approximant are reported. We construct constrained icosahedral glass models using Bergman and Mackay clusters to describe the i-phase in Ti-Zr-Ni and Ti-TM-Si-O. A comparison of simulated and experimental diffraction reveals that, the Bergman and Mackay clusters are the fundamental clusters in i-TiZrNi and i-TiMnSiO, respectively.

  2. Electronic Structure of Hydrogen Donors in Semiconductors and Insulators Probed by Muon Spin Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Koichiro; Ito, Takashi U.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators plays a crucial role in their electric conductivity. Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts have been made to establish this hypothesis in the last decade, and the muon spin rotation technique has played a pioneering role. Positive muons implanted into such low-carrier systems often form a muonium (an analogue of hydrogen, the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Although its dynamical aspect may be different from the heavier hydrogen, the electronic structure of the muonium is expected to be identical to that of hydrogen after a small correction of the reduced mass (˜0.4%). Since the discovery of a shallow muonium in CdS, its properties have been intensively studied in many semiconductors and insulators, and then it was interpreted as a possible origin of n-type conductivity under the context of a classical shallow donor model. In this article, we will describe the principle of muonium experiments and survey recent achievements in this field.

  3. A systematic structural study of halogen bonding versus hydrogen bonding within competitive supramolecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Aakeröy, Christer B.; Spartz, Christine L.; Dembowski, Sean; Dwyre, Savannah; Desper, John

    2015-01-01

    As halogen bonds gain prevalence in supramolecular synthesis and materials chemistry, it has become necessary to examine more closely how such interactions compete with or complement hydrogen bonds whenever both are present within the same system. As hydrogen and halogen bonds have several fundamental features in common, it is often difficult to predict which will be the primary interaction in a supramolecular system, especially as they have comparable strength and geometric requirements. To address this challenge, a series of molecules containing both hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were co-crystallized with various monotopic, ditopic symmetric and ditopic asymmetric acceptor molecules. The outcome of each reaction was examined using IR spectroscopy and, whenever possible, single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 24 crystal structures were obtained and subsequently analyzed, and the synthon preferences of the competing hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were rationalized against a background of calculated molecular electrostatic potential values. It has been shown that readily accessible electrostatic potentials can offer useful practical guidelines for predicting the most likely primary synthons in these co-crystals as long as the potential differences are weighted appropriately. PMID:26306192

  4. Direct observation and modelling of ordered hydrogen adsorption and catalyzed ortho-para conversion on ETS-10 titanosilicate material.

    PubMed

    Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Vitillo, Jenny G; Cocina, Donato; Gribov, Evgueni N; Zecchina, Adriano

    2007-06-01

    Hydrogen physisorption on porous high surface materials is investigated for the purpose of hydrogen storage and hydrogen separation, because of its simplicity and intrinsic reversibility. For these purposes, the understanding of the binding of dihydrogen to materials, of the structure of the adsorbed phase and of the ortho-para conversion during thermal and pressure cycles are crucial for the development of new hydrogen adsorbents. We report the direct observation by IR spectroscopic methods of structured hydrogen adsorption on a porous titanosilicate (ETS-10), with resolution of the kinetics of the ortho-para transition, and an interpretation of the structure of the adsorbed phase based on classical atomistic simulations. Distinct infrared signals of o- and p-H2 in different adsorbed states are measured, and the conversion of o- to p-H2 is monitored over a timescale of hours, indicating the presence of a catalyzed reaction. Hydrogen adsorption occurs in three different regimes characterized by well separated IR manifestations: at low pressures ordered 1:1 adducts with Na and K ions exposed in the channels of the material are formed, which gradually convert into ordered 2:1 adducts. Further addition of H2 occurs only through the formation of a disordered condensed phase. The binding enthalpy of the Na+-H2 1:1 adduct is of -8.7+/-0.1 kJ mol(-1), as measured spectroscopically. Modeling of the weak interaction of H2 with the materials requires an accurate force field with a precise description of both dispersion and electrostatics. A novel three body force field for molecular hydrogen is presented, based on the fitting of an accurate PES for the H2-H2 interaction to the experimental dipole polarizability and quadrupole moment. Molecular mechanics simulations of hydrogen adsorption at different coverages confirm the three regimes of adsorption and the structure of the adsorbed phase.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of MnPS{sub 3} for hydrogen sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, N.; Temerk, Y.M.; El-Meligi, A.A.; Badr, M.A.; Madian, M.

    2010-05-15

    Single phase MnPS{sub 3} powder was prepared by solid state reaction between Mn, S and P carried out at 650 deg. C in evacuated silica tube. The structure, morphology and sorption characteristics of the prepared solid were investigated. The results revealed that the obtained MnPS{sub 3} compound was capable of adsorbing 3.5 wt% hydrogen at -193 deg. C and a pressure of 30 bar. Little amount of hydrogen (0.07 wt%) was adsorbed at room temperature. The hydrogen adsorption/desorption cycles at various temperatures did not result in irreversible chemical structural changes of the MnPS{sub 3} compound, but the microstructure after hydrogen cycling diminished and became finer. - Graphical abstract: Atomic building of MPS{sub 3}

  6. Crystal structure of 2-methyl­piperazine-1,4-diium bis­(hydrogen maleate)

    PubMed Central

    Wecharine, Intissar; Valkonen, Arto; Rzaigui, Mohamed; Smirani Sta, Wajda

    2015-01-01

    In the title salt, C5H14N2 2+·2C4H3O4 −, the asymmetric unit contains two independent 2-methyl­piperazinium dications, which comprise a racemic pair, and four hydrogen maleate monoanions. In the roughly planar hydrogen maleate anions, intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds generate S(7) rings. In the crystal, the four independent anions are linked to the 2-methyl­piperazinium cations through N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming two-dimensional layered structures lying parallel to (001). PMID:25844244

  7. Facile synthesis of hydrogenated carbon nanospheres with a graphite-like ordered carbon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Junping; Yao, Mingguang; Zhu, Kai; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Shijia; Lu, Shuangchen; Liu, Bo; Cui, Wen; Liu, Bingbing

    2013-10-01

    We report a synthesis of hydrogenated carbon nanospheres (HCNSs) via a facile solvothermal route at low temperatures (60-100 °C), using CHCl3 as the carbon source and potassium (K) as the reductant. Selective cleavage of the relatively lower stable C-Cl bonds (compared to C-H bonds) of the carbon precursor (CHCl3) by K metal results in the growth of HCNSs. The diameter of HCNSs ranges from 40 to 90 nm. The HCNSs have a graphite-like ordered carbon structure in spite of their high degree of hydrogenation. The HCNSs exhibit an average Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 43 m2 g-1, containing a small amount of mesopores and macropores in the structure. The nanospheres' sample as an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) has been studied. It exhibits a high discharge capacity (3539 mA h g-1 in the first cycle, 978 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles) and good cycling stability, demonstrating advantages as a promising candidate for anode materials in LIBs. The high capacity of the HCNSs is due to their unique nanostructures and high percentage hydrogenation, as well as hydrogenation induced structural defects.We report a synthesis of hydrogenated carbon nanospheres (HCNSs) via a facile solvothermal route at low temperatures (60-100 °C), using CHCl3 as the carbon source and potassium (K) as the reductant. Selective cleavage of the relatively lower stable C-Cl bonds (compared to C-H bonds) of the carbon precursor (CHCl3) by K metal results in the growth of HCNSs. The diameter of HCNSs ranges from 40 to 90 nm. The HCNSs have a graphite-like ordered carbon structure in spite of their high degree of hydrogenation. The HCNSs exhibit an average Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 43 m2 g-1, containing a small amount of mesopores and macropores in the structure. The nanospheres' sample as an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) has been studied. It exhibits a high discharge capacity (3539 mA h g-1 in the first cycle, 978 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles

  8. Effect of hydrogen atoms on the structures of trinuclear metal carbonyl clusters: trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-mei; Wang, Chao-yang; Li, Qian-shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-05-18

    The structures of the trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 12, 11, 10, 9) have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). Optimization of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) gives the experimentally known structure in which all carbonyl groups are terminal and each edge of a central Mn(3) equilateral triangle is bridged by a single hydrogen atom. This structure establishes the canonical distance 3.11 A for the Mn-Mn single bond satisfying the 18-electron rule. The central triangular (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) unit is retained in the lowest energy structure of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(11), which may thus be derived from the H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) structure by removal of a carbonyl group with concurrent conversion of one of the remaining carbonyl groups into a semibridging carbonyl group to fill the resulting hole. The potential energy surface of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) is relatively complicated with six singlet and five triplet structures. One of the lower energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structures has one of the hydrogen atoms bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle and the other two hydrogen atoms bridging Mn-Mn edges. This H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure achieves the favored 18-electron configuration with a very short MnMn triple bond of 2.36 A. The other low energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure retains the (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) core of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) but has a unique six-electron donor eta(2)-mu(3) carbonyl group bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle similar to the unique carbonyl group in the known compound Cp(3)Nb(3)(CO)(6)(eta(2)-mu(3)-CO). For H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(9) a structure with a central (mu(3)-H)(2)Mn(3) trigonal bipyramid lies >20 kcal/mol below any of the other structures. Triplet structures were found for the unsaturated H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 11, 10, 9) systems but at significantly higher energies than the lowest lying singlet structures.

  9. Microscopic structure factor of liquid hydrogen by neutron-diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Celli, M.; Bafile, U.; Zoppi, M.; Cuello, G.J.; Formisano, F.; Magli, R.; Neumann, M.

    2005-01-01

    The center-of-mass structure factor of liquid para hydrogen has been measured, using neutron diffraction, in four thermodynamic states close to the triple point. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out at the same temperatures and densities. The present experimental data are in reasonable quantitative agreement with the simulations and closer to these results than previous neutron determinations available in the literature. The thermodynamic derivatives of the structure factor, from both experiment and simulation, have been compared to previous measurements obtaining a quantitative consistency.

  10. Electronic structures of hybrid graphene/boron nitride nanoribbons with hydrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chi-Hsuan; Yang, Chih-Kai

    Electronic properties of hybrid graphene/boron nitride nanoribbons are investigated using density functional calculations. It is found that hydrogen adsorption on a graphene nanoribbon alters band structures drastically. Furthermore, H-vacancy chains and lines can effectively shape the conduction properties. Influences of edge atoms with nonzero magnetic moments and the interface between B and N are also prominent in the electronic structures. This work was supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Republic of China under Grant Number MOST 104-2112-M-004-003.

  11. Electronic Structure of Single-Crystal Monolayer Graphene on Hydrogen-Terminated Germanium Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Joon; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joung Real; Whang, Dongmok

    2015-03-01

    Graphene, atomically flat 2-Dimensional layered nano material, has a lot of interesting characteristics from its unusual electronic structure. Almost properties of graphene are influenced by its crystallinity, therefore the uniform growth of single crystal graphene and layer control over the wafer scale areas remains a challenge in the fields of electronic, photonic and other devices based on graphene. Here, we report the method to make wafer scale single crystal monolayer graphene on hydrogen terminated germanium(110) surface and properties and electronic band structure of the graphene by using the tool of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electron transport measurement, electron diffraction and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  12. Changes in protein structure monitored by use of gas‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, Helen S.; Ault, James R.; Pringle, Steven D.; Brown, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein conformation by solution‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to MS is well documented. This involves monitoring the exchange of backbone amide protons with deuterium and provides details concerning the protein's tertiary structure. However, undesired back‐exchange during post‐HDX analyses can be difficult to control. Here, gas‐phase HDX‐MS, during which labile hydrogens on amino acid side chains are exchanged in sub‐millisecond time scales, has been employed to probe changes within protein structures. Addition of the solvent 2,2,2‐trifluoroethanol to a protein in solution can affect the structure of the protein, resulting in an increase in secondary and/or tertiary structure which is detected using circular dichroism. Using a Synapt G2‐S ESI‐mass spectrometer modified to allow deuterated ammonia into the transfer ion guide (situated between the ion mobility cell and the TOF analyser), gas‐phase HDX‐MS is shown to reflect minor structural changes experienced by the proteins β‐lactoglobulin and ubiquitin, as observed by the reduction in the level of deuterium incorporation. Additionally, the use of gas‐phase HDX‐MS to distinguish between co‐populated proteins conformers within a solution is demonstrated with the disordered protein calmodulin; the gas‐phase HDX‐MS results correspond directly with complementary data obtained by use of ion mobility spectrometry‐MS. PMID:25603979

  13. Vibrational assignment, structure and intramolecular hydrogen bond of 4-methylamino-3-penten-2-one.

    PubMed

    Raissi, Heidar; Moshfeghi, Effat; Farzad, Farzaneh

    2005-12-01

    The molecular structure, intramolecular hydrogen and vibrational frequencies of 4-methylamino-3-penten-2-one were investigated by a series of density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations and ab initio calculation at the post-Hartree-Fock (MP2) level. Fourier transform infrared and Fourier transform Raman spectra of this compound and its deuterated analogue were clearly assigned. The calculated geometrical parameters show a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond with a N...O distance of 2.622-2.670 A. This bond length is about 0.02 A shorter than that in its parent, 4-amino-3- penten-2-one which is in agreement with spectroscopic results. Furthermore, the conformations of methyl groups with respect to the plane of the molecule and with respect to each other were investigated.

  14. Hydrogen bonding as a modulator of aromaticity and electronic structure of selected ortho-hydroxybenzaldehyde derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J; Szatyłowicz, Halina; Krygowski, Tadeusz Marek

    2012-01-12

    Properties of hydrogen bonds can induce changes in geometric or electronic structure parameters in the vicinity of the bridge. Here, we focused primarily on the influence of intramolecular H-bonding on the molecular properties in selected ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, with additional restricted insight into substituent effects. Static models were obtained in the framework of density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level. The electronic structure parameters evolution was analyzed on the basis of Atoms In Molecules (AIM) and Natural Bond Orbitals methods. The aromaticity changes related to the variable proton position and presence of substituents were studied using Harmonic Oscillator Model of Aromaticity (HOMA), Nucleus-Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) and AIM-based parameter of Matta and Hernández-Trujillo. Finally, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics was applied to study variability of the hydrogen bridge dynamics. The interplay between effects of the substitution and variable position of the bridged proton was discussed. It was found that the hydrogen bond energies are ca. 9-10 kcal/mol, and the bridged proton exhibits some degree of penetration into the acceptor region. The covalent character of the studied hydrogen bond was most observable when the bridged proton reached the middle position between the donor and acceptor regions. The aromaticity indexes showed that the aromaticity of the central phenyl ring is strongly dependent on the bridged proton position. Correlations between these parameters were found and discussed. In the applied time-scale, the analysis of time evolution of geometric parameters showed that the resonance strengthening does not play a crucial role in the studied compounds. PMID:22129217

  15. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of hydrogenated chromium-doped CdO films

    SciTech Connect

    Dakhel, A.A.; Hamad, H.

    2013-12-15

    Cadmium oxide thin films doped with different amounts of chromium and annealed in hydrogen atmosphere have been grown on glass substrates by means of physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of the prepared Cr-doped CdO (CdO:Cr–H) films were systematically studied. The structural investigations show that the incorporated Cr ions mainly occupied locations in interstitial positions of CdO lattice. The bandgap engineer by Cr incorporation and hydrogenation were studied. The variations of the electrical parameters of CdO:Cr–H films with Cr incorporation and hydrogenation were investigated. It was established that among the investigated samples, the largest mobility and conductivity were measured with 1.5%:Cr–H film. Therefore, hydrogenated CdO:Cr films can be effectively used in different applications of near infrared-transparent-conducting-oxide (NIR-TCO). - Graphical abstract: Optoelectronic properties of synthesised chromium-doped CdO thin films. It was established that the largest mobility (53.4 cm{sup 2}/V.s) and conductivity (2136.8 S/cm) were measured in 1.5%:Cr–H doped CdO film. Therefore, such films can be effectively used in near infrared-transparent-conducting-oxide (NIR-TCO). - Highlights: • The properties of CdO films annealed in H{sub 2} gas were systematically studied. • Cr{sup 3+} ions most likely occupied interstitial locations in CdO lattice and as donors. • Improvement of conductivity parameters with Cr doping and H annealing. • Bandgap narrowing observed with Cd-doping.

  16. Fluoroolefins as peptide mimetics: a computational study of structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joseph J; Tillman, Brendon G; Cronin, William Andrew

    2006-09-28

    The design of peptide mimetic compounds is greatly facilitated by the identification of functionalities that can act as peptide replacements. The fluoroalkene moiety has recently been employed for that purpose. The purpose of this work is to characterize prototypical fluoroalkenes (fluoroethylene and 2-fluoro-2-butene) with respect to key properties of peptides (amides) including structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding. The results are compared to those obtained for model peptides (formamide, N-methylacetamide). Calculations have been carried out at the MP2 and B3LYP levels of theory with the 6-311++G(2d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis sets. The results suggest that the fluoroalkene is similar in steric requirements to a peptide bond but that there is less charge separation. Calculations of the hydration free energies with the PCM bulk continuum solvent model indicate that the fluoroalkene has much smaller hydration free energies than an amide but that the difference in solvation free energy for cis and trans isomers is comparable. In studies of complexes with water molecules, the fluoroalkene is found to engage in interactions that are analogous to backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions that govern many properties of natural peptides and proteins but with smaller interaction energies. In addition, key structural differences are noted when the fluoroalkene is playing the role of hydrogen-bond acceptor which may have implications in binding, aggregation, and conformational preferences in fluoroalkene peptidomimetics. The issue of cooperativity in hydrogen-bonding interactions in complexes with multiple waters has also been investigated. The fluoroalkene is found to exhibit cooperative effects that mirror those of the peptide but are smaller in magnitude. Thus, pairwise addivitity of interactions appears to more adequately describe the fluoroalkenes than the peptides they are intended to mimic.

  17. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins. PMID:27166805

  18. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins.

  19. Understanding the electronic structure, reactivity, and hydrogen bonding for a 1,2-diphosphonium dication.

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, David J; Weigand, Jan J; Davidson, Reagan J; Pearson, Jason K; Cameron, T Stanley

    2008-04-17

    The experimental charge density for hexamethyldiphosphonium ditriflate has been determined from low-temperature high-resolution X-ray diffraction data. These results have been compared with theoretically calculated values for the isolated gas-phase compound. Analysis of the topological and atomic basin properties has provided insight into the exact nature of the P-P bond in both the crystalline and the gas-phase structures. The rho(b)(r) and nabla2rho(b)(r) values highlight the covalent nature of the P-P bond, while the atomic charges indicate a localization of the positive charges on the two phosphorus atoms. This seems to indicate that a covalent bond is formed despite a strong electrostatic repulsion between these two heteroatoms. The topological properties and electrostatic potentials have also been shown to provide significant insight into the chemical reactivity of the title compound. A topological analysis of P2Me4, P2Me5(+), and P2Me6(+2) species has provided information about the progression of the P-P bond in the synthesis of the title compound. An investigation of the different hydrogen-bonding networks present in the crystalline and gas-phase structures, along with their affect on the electronic structure of the title compound has also been investigated. This has all led to significant new insight into the electronic structure, reactivity, and weak hydrogen bonding in prototypical 1,2-diphosphonium dications.

  20. The influence of hydrogen contamination on the structural stability of CoSn under compression.

    PubMed

    Mikhaylushkin, A S

    2010-11-01

    The binary CoSn compound has a unique ground state large-void crystal structure, whose stability under pressure has recently been examined. Whereas theoretical results predicted a series of phase transformations, the room temperature experiments did not observe any structural change. We suggest that the large void of a CoSn-type structure could contain natural impurities such as hydrogen, which can influence the thermodynamic stability of a CoSn system and explain the unusual disagreement between the theoretical and experimental results. Based on first-principles calculations we reveal that the contamination of CoSn by hydrogen only results in a subtle change of structural parameters and the equation of state of CoSn, but drastically increases the stability of the CoSn-type phase in comparison with the high-pressure phases predicted earlier. We argue that the hardly detectable natural impurities of light elements in porous compounds like CoSn are able to change the phase equilibria. PMID:21403329

  1. Hydrogen diffusion kinetics and structural integrity of superhigh pressure Mg-5 wt%Ni alloys with dendrite interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hui; Wu, Wenshi; Dou, Yang; Liu, Baozhong; Li, Hanning; Peng, Qiuming

    2016-07-01

    A strategy of low-angle orientation dendrite interface-high index planes-which prepared by super-high pressure (SHP) technique, is proposed and successfully improved the hydrogen storage properties of Mg based materials for the first time, wherein a simple binary Mg-Ni alloy is used as a sample to elucidate its related mechanisms. The phase composition, morphology variation and hydrogen storage properties of the as-cast and SHP Mg-5Ni alloys in the temperature range of 1100-1600 °C are systemically investigated. The reversible hydrogen storage capacities and plateau hydrogen pressure of the as-cast and SHP alloys are close due to the same hydrogen storage phases (Mg and Mg2Ni). Note that although SHP treatment at 1600 °C has a large weight fraction of Mg6Ni compound, it still effectively reduces the onset temperature of dehydriding (∼262 °C), as well as improves the hydrogen desorption kinetics at low temperatures and structural integrity. The low onset temperature and outstanding hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics are mainly associated with the formation of a large number of dendrite interface, in which the hydrogen atoms readily occur "zig-zag" jumps along {11-20} prismatic planes. This dendrite interface of high index planes which prepared by SHP technique paves a new pathway to enhance the hydrogen storage performances of magnesium based alloys.

  2. A Multi-technique Characterization of Adsorbed Protein Films: Orientation and Structure by ToF-SIMS, NEXAFS, SFG, and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baio, Joseph E.

    There are many techniques that allow surface scientists to study interfaces. However, few are routinely applied to probe biological surfaces. The work presented here demonstrates how detailed information about the conformation, orientation, chemical state, and molecular structure of biological molecules immobilized onto a surface can be assessed by electron spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy techniques. This investigation began with the development of simple model systems (small proteins, and peptides) and evolved into a study of more complex --- real world systems. Initially, two model systems based on the chemical and electrostatic immobilization of a small rigid protein (Protein G B1 domain, 6kDa) were built to develop the capabilities of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToFSIMS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy as tools to probe the structure of surface immobilized proteins. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to measure the amount of immobilized protein and ToF-SIMS sampled the amino acid composition of the exposed surface of the protein film. Within the ToF-SIMS spectra, an enrichment of secondary ions from amino acids located at opposite ends of the proteins were used to describe protein orientation. SFG spectral peaks characteristic of ordered alpha-helix and beta-sheet elements were observed for both systems and the phase of the peaks indicated a predominantly upright orientation for both the covalent and electrostatic configurations. Polarization dependence of the NEXAFS signal from the N 1s to pi* transition of the peptide bonds that make up the beta-sheets also indicated protein ordering at the surface. Building upon the Protein G B1 studies, the orientation and structure of a surface immobilized antibody (HuLys Fv: variant of humanized anti-lysozyme variable fragment, 26kDa) was characterized across two

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies of Adsorbates on Metal and Silicon Single Crystal Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Andrew B.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The design of an experiment to investigate the surface chemistry of silicon, with specific application to the study of intermediates formed during the chemical vapour deposition of silicon from silane homologues was considered in a theoretical manner using classical optical techniques, and experimental verification of the ability to detect multilayers of physically adsorbed species was performed. Both reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy and transmission infrared spectroscopy were investigated. Some of the steps involved in the cleaning of a silicon wafer were investigated. Chemical etching of the wafers was simulated using hydrofluoric acid solutions and hydrogen peroxide/sulphuric acid rinses and monitored using transmission infrared spectroscopy. Thermal annealing and argon ion sputter etching were investigated using transmission infrared spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. The adsorption of disilane, Si_{z}H_{rm e} on Si(100) was investigated at a variety of temperatures. Contamination was demonstrated to be significant in the passivation of the surface to a point where little reactivity could be observed at room temperature. Physical adsorption was seen to occur in a dynamic pressure of disilane at ca. 130K. The adsorption of disilane at temperatures ranging from 100K to 300K was investigated on Ru(0001). At low temperatures, disilane was seen to adsorb molecularly at 100K, with partial decomposition in the first layer. Annealing to higher temperatures and adsorption at 160K was seen to produce adsorbed SiH_{n } (n = 1-3), which desorbed above 270K. At room temperature, disilane adsorbed dissociatively to form an SiH species which formed a variety of structures at increasing coverage, evidenced by complex LEED patterns. At higher temperatures, the adsorbed silicon reacted with the ruthenium crystal to form a ruthenium silicide as an incommensurate

  4. Influences of Dilute Organic Adsorbates on the Hydration of Low-Surface-Area Silicates.

    PubMed

    Sangodkar, Rahul P; Smith, Benjamin J; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J; Roberts, Lawrence R; Funkhouser, Gary P; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2015-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of dilute quantities of certain organic molecules and water at silicate surfaces strongly influence the rates of silicate dissolution, hydration, and crystallization. Here, we determine the molecular-level structures, compositions, and site-specific interactions of adsorbed organic molecules at low absolute bulk concentrations on heterogeneous silicate particle surfaces at early stages of hydration. Specifically, dilute quantities (∼0.1% by weight of solids) of the disaccharide sucrose or industrially important phosphonic acid species slow dramatically the hydration of low-surface-area (∼1 m(2)/g) silicate particles. Here, the physicochemically distinct adsorption interactions of these organic species are established by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced solid-state NMR techniques. These measurements provide significantly improved signal sensitivity for near-surface species that is crucial for the detection and analysis of dilute adsorbed organic molecules and silicate species on low-surface-area particles, which until now have been infeasible to characterize. DNP-enhanced 2D (29)Si{(1)H}, (13)C{(1)H}, and (31)P{(1)H} heteronuclear correlation and 1D (29)Si{(13)C} rotational-echo double-resonance NMR measurements establish hydrogen-bond-mediated adsorption of sucrose at distinct nonhydrated and hydrated silicate surface sites and electrostatic interactions with surface Ca(2+) cations. By comparison, phosphonic acid molecules are found to adsorb electrostatically at or near cationic calcium surface sites to form Ca(2+)-phosphonate complexes. Although dilute quantities of both types of organic molecules effectively inhibit hydration, they do so by adsorbing in distinct ways that depend on their specific architectures and physicochemical interactions. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNP-enhanced NMR techniques to measure and assess dilute adsorbed molecules and their molecular interactions on low

  5. The formation, structure, and hydrogen storage properties of titanium/zironcium/hafnium based quasicrystals and related phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huett, Van Thi

    Previous studies of hydrogen storage in Ti-Zr-Ni quasicrystals are reviewed and expanded. Based on the new results presented in this thesis hydrogen may be used as a probe of local structure if elastic and electronic interactions of the hydrogen atom with the lattice and other hydrogen atoms in the lattice are better understood. As-cast and as-quenched phases found in the Ti-Hf-Ni ternary system are surveyed. A high order (3/2) rational approximant to the quasicrystal and a metallic glass were some of the phases found in the as-quenched survey. These two phases were further studied showing that the 3/2 rational approximant is metastable, transforming to a stable Ti2Ni-type phase upon heating. The metallic glass found in this system has a 65°C separation between the glass transition and the first crystallization event to a nano-domained icosahedrally ordered phase. Hydrogenation studies of the 3/2 rational approximant and the metallic glass in Ti-Hf-Ni were also performed. These studies show that the structures around the hydrogen atoms are similar in both phases. The structures are also similar to the Ti-Zr-Ni quasicrystals. Other hydrogen storage methods were explored. Mechanically alloyed Ti-Zr-Ni quasicrystals and metallic glasses have a potential to be used as hydrogen storage materials. These mechanically alloyed phases do not need to have their surfaces prepared or activated for hydrogenation to occur, and show little formation of the irreversible hydride phase. Pressure composition isotherms at higher pressures than have been performed before on these alloys were examined. This required a new high-pressure Sievart's type apparatus to be built. The initial results from pressure composition isotherm measurements show that there is another pressure plateau, above the one previously found at low pressures. This higher pressure plateau is a region of pressure and temperature suitable for hydrogen storage applications.

  6. Hunting for hydrogen: random structure searching and prediction of NMR parameters of hydrous wadsleyite.

    PubMed

    Moran, Robert F; McKay, David; Pickard, Chris J; Berry, Andrew J; Griffin, John M; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2016-04-21

    The structural chemistry of materials containing low levels of nonstoichiometric hydrogen is difficult to determine, and producing structural models is challenging where hydrogen has no fixed crystallographic site. Here we demonstrate a computational approach employing ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to generate a series of candidate structures for hydrous wadsleyite (β-Mg2SiO4 with 1.6 wt% H2O), a high-pressure mineral proposed as a repository for water in the Earth's transition zone. Aligning with previous experimental work, we solely consider models with Mg3 (over Mg1, Mg2 or Si) vacancies. We adapt the AIRSS method by starting with anhydrous wadsleyite, removing a single Mg(2+) and randomly placing two H(+) in a unit cell model, generating 819 candidate structures. 103 geometries were then subjected to more accurate optimisation under periodic DFT. Using this approach, we find the most favourable hydration mechanism involves protonation of two O1 sites around the Mg3 vacancy. The formation of silanol groups on O3 or O4 sites (with loss of stable O1-H hydroxyls) coincides with an increase in total enthalpy. Importantly, the approach we employ allows observables such as NMR parameters to be computed for each structure. We consider hydrous wadsleyite (∼1.6 wt%) to be dominated by protonated O1 sites, with O3/O4-H silanol groups present as defects, a model that maps well onto experimental studies at higher levels of hydration (J. M. Griffin et al., Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 1523). The AIRSS approach adopted herein provides the crucial link between atomic-scale structure and experimental studies. PMID:27020937

  7. Hunting for hydrogen: random structure searching and prediction of NMR parameters of hydrous wadsleyite.

    PubMed

    Moran, Robert F; McKay, David; Pickard, Chris J; Berry, Andrew J; Griffin, John M; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2016-04-21

    The structural chemistry of materials containing low levels of nonstoichiometric hydrogen is difficult to determine, and producing structural models is challenging where hydrogen has no fixed crystallographic site. Here we demonstrate a computational approach employing ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to generate a series of candidate structures for hydrous wadsleyite (β-Mg2SiO4 with 1.6 wt% H2O), a high-pressure mineral proposed as a repository for water in the Earth's transition zone. Aligning with previous experimental work, we solely consider models with Mg3 (over Mg1, Mg2 or Si) vacancies. We adapt the AIRSS method by starting with anhydrous wadsleyite, removing a single Mg(2+) and randomly placing two H(+) in a unit cell model, generating 819 candidate structures. 103 geometries were then subjected to more accurate optimisation under periodic DFT. Using this approach, we find the most favourable hydration mechanism involves protonation of two O1 sites around the Mg3 vacancy. The formation of silanol groups on O3 or O4 sites (with loss of stable O1-H hydroxyls) coincides with an increase in total enthalpy. Importantly, the approach we employ allows observables such as NMR parameters to be computed for each structure. We consider hydrous wadsleyite (∼1.6 wt%) to be dominated by protonated O1 sites, with O3/O4-H silanol groups present as defects, a model that maps well onto experimental studies at higher levels of hydration (J. M. Griffin et al., Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 1523). The AIRSS approach adopted herein provides the crucial link between atomic-scale structure and experimental studies.

  8. Theoretical and spectroscopic studies on molecular structure and hydrogen bonding of 2-trifluoroacetylphenol.

    PubMed

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2015-01-25

    The molecular structure, intramolecular hydrogen bonding, and vibrational frequencies of 2-trifluoroacetylphenol (TFAP), were investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and NMR, IR, and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The calculated theoretical and observed experimental results were compared with the corresponding data for salicylaldehyde (SA). Calculations were performed at the B3LYP level, using 6-311++G(**) basis set. The observed vibrational frequencies of TFAP were assigned with aid of theoretical calculations. The scaled frequencies at the B3LYP/6-311++G(**) level are in good agreement with the corresponding observed values by acceptable deviations. To investigate the effect of CF3 group on the hydrogen bond strength, the charge distributions, steric effects, and electron delocalization in TFAP and SA are studied using the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The computations were further complemented with an atoms-in-molecules (AIM) topological analysis to characterize the nature of the intramolecular hydrogen bond, IHB, in the considered molecules. The contradiction between experimental and theoretical results was interpreted by considering the opposite effects of steric effect and electron withdrawing nature of CF3 group.

  9. Structure and screening in molecular and metallic hydrogen at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    A variational wavefunction is used to express the (spin restricted) Hartree-Fock energy as reciprocal lattice sums for static lattice FCC monatomic hydrogen and diatomic Pa3 molecular hydrogen. In the monatomic phase the hydrogenic orbital range closely parallels the inverse Thomas-Fermi wavevector; the corresponding energy E has a minimum of -0.929 Ryd/electron at r sub s = 1.67. For the diatomic phase E(r sub s) is similar, but the constituent energies, screening, and bond length reflect a qualitative change in the nature of the solid at r sub s = 2.8. This change is interpreted in terms of a transition from protons as structural units (at high density) to weakly interacting models (at low density). Insensitivity of the total energy to a rapid fall in the bond length suggests association with the rotational transition where the rapid molecular orientations characteristic of high pressures disappear and the molecules rotate freely at low pressure.

  10. Pressure-induced chemistry in a nitrogen-hydrogen host-guest structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaulding, Dylan K.; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Fréderic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2014-12-01

    New topochemistry in simple molecular systems can be explored at high pressure. Here we examine the binary nitrogen/hydrogen system using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure van der Waals compounds, which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 and N2(H2)2. The former represents a new type of van der Waals host-guest compound in which hydrogen molecules are contained within channels in a nitrogen lattice. This compound shows evidence for a gradual, pressure-induced change in bonding from van der Waals to ionic interactions near 50 GPa, forming an amorphous dinitrogen network containing ionized ammonia in a room-temperature analogue of the Haber-Bosch process. Hydrazine is recovered on decompression. The nitrogen-hydrogen system demonstrates the potential for new pressure-driven chemistry in high-pressure structures and the promise of tailoring molecular interactions for materials synthesis.

  11. Structural Evidence for Inter-Residue Hydrogen Bonding Observed for Cellobiose in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, William B.; Baker, David C.; McLain, Sylvia E.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the disaccharide cellulose subunit cellobiose (4-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucose) in solution has been determined via neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS), computer modeling and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies. This study shows direct evidence for an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the reducing ring HO3 hydroxyl group and the non-reducing ring oxygen (O5′) that has been previously predicted by computation and NMR analysis. Moreover, this work shows that hydrogen bonding to the non-reducing ring O5′ oxygen is shared between water and the HO3 hydroxyl group with an average of 50% occupancy by each hydrogen-bond donor. The glycosidic torsion angles φH and ψH from the neutron diffraction-based model show a fairly tight distribution of angles around approximately 22° and −40°, respectively, in solution, consistent with the NMR measurements. Similarly, the hydroxymethyl torsional angles for both reducing and non-reducing rings are broadly consistent with the NMR measurements in this study, as well as with those from previous measurements for cellobiose in solution. PMID:23056199

  12. Pressure-induced chemistry in a nitrogen-hydrogen host-guest structure.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Dylan K; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Fréderic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2014-01-01

    New topochemistry in simple molecular systems can be explored at high pressure. Here we examine the binary nitrogen/hydrogen system using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure van der Waals compounds, which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 and N2(H2)2. The former represents a new type of van der Waals host-guest compound in which hydrogen molecules are contained within channels in a nitrogen lattice. This compound shows evidence for a gradual, pressure-induced change in bonding from van der Waals to ionic interactions near 50 GPa, forming an amorphous dinitrogen network containing ionized ammonia in a room-temperature analogue of the Haber-Bosch process. Hydrazine is recovered on decompression. The nitrogen-hydrogen system demonstrates the potential for new pressure-driven chemistry in high-pressure structures and the promise of tailoring molecular interactions for materials synthesis. PMID:25484135

  13. Adsorption of molecular hydrogen on Pd(Pt) decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan; Khaniya, Asim; Lamichhane, Saran; Pantha, Nurapati

    2015-03-01

    We have performed the first-principles based Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the stability, geometrical structures, and electronic properties of a Pd(Pt) atom adsorbed graphene to investigate the possibility of using Pd(Pt) decorated graphene as energy storage materials with reference to pristine graphene. The London dispersion forces have been incorporated by the DFT-D2 levels of calculations implemented in Quantum Espresso packages. Our findings show that Pd and Pt both adsorb on graphene at Bridge site. The electronic structures of Pd(Pt) adsorbed graphene possesses band gap opening due to breaking of the symmetry of graphene. Further we have studied the adsorption of moelcular hydrogen ((H 2) n , n = 1-7) on the Pd(Pt)-graphene system. The adatom Pd(Pt) enhances the binding energy per hydrogen molecule in Pd(Pt)-graphene system in comparison to that in the pristine graphene. The binding energy per hydrogen molecule of the adatom-graphene system decreases as the number of H 2 molecules increases and finally it saturates to 0.15 eV (0.16 eV) per hydrogen molecule for Pd-graphene (Pt-graphene) systems respectively. ICTP-NET 56/TWAS.

  14. Turning things downside up: Adsorbate induced water flipping on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Gregory A.; Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-11-14

    We have examined the adsorption of the weakly bound species N2, O2, CO and Kr on the water monolayer on Pt(111) using a combination of molecular beam dosing, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In contrast to multilayer crystalline ice, the adsorbate-free water monolayer is characterized by a lack of dangling OH bonds protruding into the vacuum (H-up). Instead, the non-hydrogen-bonded OH groups are oriented downward (H-down) to maximize their interaction with the underlying Pt(111) substrate. Adsorption of Kr and O2 have little effect on the structure and vibrational spectrum of the “ ” water monolayer while adsorption of both N2, and CO are effective in “flipping” H-down water molecules into an H-up configuration. This “flipping” occurs readily upon adsorption at temperatures as low as 20 K and the water monolayer transforms back to the H-down, “ ” structure upon adsorbate desorption above 35 K, indicating small energy differences and barriers between the H-down and H-up configurations. The results suggest that converting water in the first layer from H-down to H-up is mediated by the electrostatic interactions between the water and the adsorbates.

  15. Turning things downside up: Adsorbate induced water flipping on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Greg A. E-mail: bruce.kay@pnnl.gov; Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kay, Bruce D. E-mail: bruce.kay@pnnl.gov

    2014-11-14

    We have examined the adsorption of the weakly bound species N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and Kr on the (√(37)×√(37))R25.3{sup ∘} water monolayer on Pt(111) using a combination of molecular beam dosing, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. In contrast to multilayer crystalline ice, the adsorbate-free water monolayer is characterized by a lack of dangling OH bonds protruding into the vacuum (H-up). Instead, the non-hydrogen-bonded OH groups are oriented downward (H-down) to maximize their interaction with the underlying Pt(111) substrate. Adsorption of Kr and O{sub 2} have little effect on the structure and vibrational spectrum of the “√(37)” water monolayer while adsorption of both N{sub 2}, and CO are effective in “flipping” H-down water molecules into an H-up configuration. This “flipping” occurs readily upon adsorption at temperatures as low as 20 K and the water monolayer transforms back to the H-down, “√(37)” structure upon adsorbate desorption above 35 K, indicating small energy differences and barriers between the H-down and H-up configurations. The results suggest that converting water in the first layer from H-down to H-up is mediated by the electrostatic interactions between the water and the adsorbates.

  16. A regenerable oxide-based H2S adsorbent with nanofibrous morphology.

    PubMed

    Behl, Mayank; Yeom, Junghoon; Lineberry, Quentin; Jain, Prashant K; Shannon, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen sulphide is found in raw fuels such as natural gas and coal/biomass-derived syngas. It is poisonous to catalysts and corrosive to metals and therefore needs to be removed. This is often achieved using metal oxides as reactive adsorbents, but metal oxides perform poorly when subjected to repeated cycles of sulphidation and re-oxidation as a result of complex structural and chemical changes. Here, we show that Zn-Ti-O-based adsorbents with nanofibrous morphology can sustain their initial reactivity and sulphur removal capacity over multiple regeneration cycles. These nanostructured sorbents offer rapid reaction rates that overcome the gas-transport limitations of conventional pellet-based sorbents and allow all of the material to be used efficiently. Regeneration can be carried out at the same temperature as the sulphidation step because of the higher reactivity, which prevents sorbent deterioration and reduces energy use. The efficient regeneration of the adsorbent is also aided by structural features such as the growth of hierarchical nanostructures and preferential stabilization of a wurtzite phase in the sulphidation product.

  17. A regenerable oxide-based H2S adsorbent with nanofibrous morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, Mayank; Yeom, Junghoon; Lineberry, Quentin; Jain, Prashant K.; Shannon, Mark A.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen sulphide is found in raw fuels such as natural gas and coal/biomass-derived syngas. It is poisonous to catalysts and corrosive to metals and therefore needs to be removed. This is often achieved using metal oxides as reactive adsorbents, but metal oxides perform poorly when subjected to repeated cycles of sulphidation and re-oxidation as a result of complex structural and chemical changes. Here, we show that Zn-Ti-O-based adsorbents with nanofibrous morphology can sustain their initial reactivity and sulphur removal capacity over multiple regeneration cycles. These nanostructured sorbents offer rapid reaction rates that overcome the gas-transport limitations of conventional pellet-based sorbents and allow all of the material to be used efficiently. Regeneration can be carried out at the same temperature as the sulphidation step because of the higher reactivity, which prevents sorbent deterioration and reduces energy use. The efficient regeneration of the adsorbent is also aided by structural features such as the growth of hierarchical nanostructures and preferential stabilization of a wurtzite phase in the sulphidation product.

  18. Molecular hydrogen messengers can lead to structural infidelity: A cautionary tale of protonated glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, Antoine Rizzo, Thomas R. E-mail: thomas.rizzo@epfl.ch; Williams, Evan R. E-mail: thomas.rizzo@epfl.ch

    2015-09-14

    The effects of tagging protonated glycine with either He or between 1 and 14 H{sub 2} molecules on the infrared photodissociation spectra and the ion structure were investigated. Differences in the IR spectra with either a single He atom or H{sub 2} molecule attached indicate that even a single H{sub 2} molecule can affect the frequencies of some vibrational bands of this simple ion. The protonation site is the preferred location of the tag with He and with up to two H{sub 2} molecules, but evidence for H{sub 2} attachment to the hydrogen atom of the uncharged carboxylic acid is observed for ions tagged with three or more H{sub 2} molecules. This results in a 55 cm{sup −1} red shift in the carboxylic acid OH stretch, and evidence for some structural isomers where the hydrogen bond between the protonated nitrogen and the carbonyl oxygen is partially broken; as a result H{sub 2} molecules attached to this site are observed. These results are supported by theory, which indicates that H{sub 2} molecules can effectively break this weak hydrogen bond with three or more H{sub 2} molecules. These results indicate that large spectral shifts as a result of H{sub 2} molecules attaching to sites remote from the charge can occur and affect stretching frequencies as a result of charge transfer, and that tagging with multiple H{sub 2} molecules can change the structure of the ion itself.

  19. Structural determination of hydrogen-bonded clusters nucleated by large aromatic hydrocarbons and 7- aminocoumarins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Phillip Mark

    IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy of hydrogen-bonded clusters of water and methanol nucleated by the aromatic hydrocarbons perylene and anthracene, as well as a series of 7-aminocoumarins are investigated. These clusters have been mass selected using near-threshold R2PI in a linear TOF-MS. Infrared spectra in the fundamental OH stretch region, 3000-3800 cm -1 coupled with DFT vibrational simulations permit structural assignment for many of the clusters investigated. While methanol clusters on anthracene and perylene are similar to their benzene counterparts, the IR spectra of perylene-based water clusters display a new type of hydrogen bonding not found in other systems. In one instance, perylene: (H2O)6, the IR spectrum suggests the presence of a structure different from the cage found for the pure and benzene systems. MRES of anthracene: (H2O)n, n = 1-16, suggest structures based on fused tetramer and penatmer rings are particularly stable in the jet expansion. Studies on C151: (H2O)n, n = 1-5, C152A: (H2O)n, n = 1-3, and C153: (H2O) n, n = 1-2, indicate that not only is the site of hydrogen-bonding interaction dependent on the substitution pattern of the coumarin, but is also cluster-size dependent. Each of the coumarins showed two n = 1 conformers, each species demonstrating very different electronic properties, both in electronic excitation and ionization. This thesis has been organized into four sections: Introduction, Experimental, Hydrocarbons, and 7- Aminocoumarins. While there is continuity between the chapters, each can be read separately without much loss of understanding or confusion. This being said, a brief glance through the Experimental will get one familiar with many of the acronyms used later in the thesis.

  20. Hydrogen passivation of N(+)-P and P(+)-N heteroepitaxial InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Basab; Davis, William C.; Ringel, Steve A.; Hoffman, Richard, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Dislocations and related point defect complexes caused by lattice mismatch currently limit the performance of heteroepitaxial InP cells by introducing shunting paths across the active junction and by the formation of deep traps within the base region. We have previously demonstrated that plasma hydrogenation is an effective and stable means to passivate the electrical activity of such defects in specially designed heteroepitaxial InP test structures to probe hydrogen passivation at typical base depths within a cell structure. In this work, we present our results on the hydrogen passivation of actual heteroepitaxial n-p and p-n InP cell structures grown on GaAs substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We have found that a 2 hour exposure to a 13.56 MHz hydrogen plasma at 275 C reduces the deep level concentration in the base regions of both n(+)-p and p(+)-n heteroepitaxial InP cell structures from as-grown values of 5-7 x 10(exp 14) cm(exp -3), down to 3-5 x 10(exp 12) cm(exp -3). All dopants were successfully reactivated by a 400 C, 5 minute anneal with no detectable activation of deep levels. One to five analysis indicated a subsequent approximately 100 fold decrease in reverse leakage current at -1 volt reverse bias, and an improved built in voltage for the p(+)-n structures. In addition to being passivated, dislocations are also shown to participate in secondary interactions during hydrogenation. We find that the presence of dislocations enhances hydrogen diffusion into the cell structure, and lowers the apparent dissociation energy of Zn-H complexes from 1.19 eV for homoepitaxial Zn-doped InP to 1.12 eV for heteroepitaxial Zn-doped InP. This is explained by additional hydrogen trapping at dislocations subsequent to the reactivation of Zn dopants after hydrogenation.

  1. Hydrogen Passivation of N(+)P and P(+)N Heteroepitaxial InP Solar Cell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, B.; Davis, W. C.; Ringel, S. A.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Dislocations and related point defect complexes caused by lattice mismatch currently limit the performance of heteroepitaxial InP cells by introducing shunting paths across the active junction and by the formation of deep traps within the base region. We have previously demonstrated that plasma hydrogenation is an effective and stable means to passivate the electrical activity of such defects in specially designed heteroepitaxial InP test structures to probe hydrogen passivation at typical base depths within a cell structure. In this work, we present our results on the hydrogen passivation of actual heteroepitaxial n(+)p and p(+)n InP cell structures grown on GaAs substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We have found that a 2 hour exposure to a 13.56 MHz hydrogen plasma at 275 C reduces the deep level concentration in the base regions of both n(+)p and p(+)n heteroepitaxial InP cell structures from as-grown values of 5 - 7 x 10(exp 14)/cc, down to 3 - 5 x 10(exp 12)/cc. All dopants were successfully reactivated by a 400 C, 5 minute anneal With no detectable activation of deep levels. I-V analysis indicated a subsequent approx. 100 fold decrease In reverse leakage current at -1 volt reverse bias, and an improved built in voltage for the p(+)n structures. ln addition to being passivated,dislocations are also shown to participate in secondary interactions during hydrogenation. We find that the presence of dislocations enhances hydrogen diffusion into the cell structure, and lowers the apparent dissociation energy of Zn-H complexes from 1.19 eV for homoepitaxial Zn-doped InP to 1.12 eV for heteroepitaxial Zn-doped InP. This is explained by additional hydrogen trapping at dislocations subsequent to the reactivation of Zn dopants after hydrogenation.

  2. Size Dependence of Atomically Precise Gold Nanoclusters in Chemoselective Hydrogenation and Active Site Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gao; Jiang, Deen; Kumar, Santosh; Chen, Yuxiang; Jin, Rongchao

    2014-01-01

    We here investigate the catalytic properties of water-soluble Aun(SG)m nanocluster catalysts (H-SG = glutathione) of different sizes, including Au15(SG)13, Au18(SG)14, Au25(SG)18, Au38(SG)24, and captopril-capped Au25(Capt)18 nanoclusters. These Aun(SR)m nanoclusters (-SR represents thiolate generally) are used as homogeneous catalysts (i.e., without supports) in the chemoselective hydrogenation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (4-NO2PhCHO) to 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol (4-NO2PhCH2OH) in water with H2 gas (20 bar) as the hydrogen source. These nanocluster catalysts, except Au18(SG)14, remain intact after the catalytic reaction, evidenced by UV-vis spectra which are characteristic of each sized nanoclusters and thus serve as spectroscopic fingerprints . We observe a drastic size-dependence and steric effect of protecting ligands on the gold nanocluster catalysts in the hydrogenation reaction. Density functional theory (DFT) modeling of the 4-nitrobenzaldehyde adsorption shows that both the CHO and NO2 groups are in close interact with the S-Au-S staples on the gold nanocluster surface; the adsorption of the 4-nitrobenzaldehyde molecule on the four different sized Aun(SR)m nanoclusters are moderately strong and similar in strength. The DFT results suggest that the catalytic activity of the Aun(SR)m nanoclusters is primarily determined by the surface area of the Au nanocluster, consistent with the observed trend of the conversion of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde versus the cluster size. Overall, this work offers the molecular insight into the hydrogenation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the catalytically active site structure on gold nanocluster catalysts.

  3. The FORMAMIDE_2-H_2O Complex: Structure and Hydrogen Bond Cooperative Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Susana; Pinacho, Pablo; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The adduct formamide_2-H_20 has been detected in a supersonic expansion and its rotational spectra in the 5-13 GHz frequency region characterized by narrow-band molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (MB-FTMW). The spectrum shows the hyperfine structure due to the presence of two 14N-nuclei. This hyperfine structure has been analyzed and the determined quadrupole coupling constants together with the rotational constants have been a key for the identification of the adduct structure on the light of ab initio computations. The rotational parameters are consistent with the formation of a three body cycle thanks to the double proton acceptor/proton donor character of both formamide and water. The low value of the planar moment of inertia Pcc indicates that the heavy atom skeleton of the cluster is essentially planar. A detailed analysis of the results reveals the subtle effects of hydrogen bond cooperative effects in this system.

  4. Structure-forming units of amino acid maleates. Case study of L-valinium hydrogen maleate.

    PubMed

    Rychkov, Denis; Arkhipov, Sergey; Boldyreva, Elena

    2016-02-01

    A new salt of L-valinium hydrogen maleate was used as an example to study structure-forming units in amino acid maleates. This compound was crystallized, its structure solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, and the phase purity of the bulk powder sample confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction and FT-IR spectra. The stability of the new salt was analyzed using density functional theory and PIXEL calculations with focus on the C(2)2(12) structure-forming crystallographic motif. This motif was of particular interest as it is common for almost all maleates. The exceptionally high ability of maleic acid to form salts with various amino acids was rationalized. PMID:26830808

  5. Hydrogen-bonded structure and mechanical chiral response of a silver nanoparticle superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Bokwon; Luedtke, W. D.; Barnett, Robert N.; Gao, Jianping; Desireddy, Anil; Conn, Brian E.; Bigioni, Terry; Landman, Uzi

    2014-08-01

    Self-assembled nanoparticle superlattices—materials made of inorganic cores capped by organic ligands, of varied structures, and held together by diverse binding motifs—exhibit size-dependent properties as well as tunable collective behaviour arising from couplings between their nanoscale constituents. Here, we report the single-crystal X-ray structure of a superlattice made in the high-yield synthesis of Na4Ag44(p-MBA)30 nanoparticles, and find with large-scale quantum-mechanical simulations that its atomically precise structure and cohesion derive from hydrogen bonds between bundledp-MBA ligands. We also find that the superlattice’s mechanical response to hydrostatic compression is characterized by a molecular-solid-like bulk modulus B0 = 16.7 GPa, exhibiting anomalous pressure softening and a compression-induced transition to a soft-solid phase. Such a transition involves ligand flexure, which causes gear-like correlated chiral rotation of the nanoparticles. The interplay of compositional diversity, spatial packing efficiency, hydrogen-bond connectivity, and cooperative response in this system exemplifies the melding of the seemingly contrasting paradigms of emergent behaviour ‘small is different’ and ‘more is different’.

  6. Hydrogen versus fluorine: effects on molecular structure and intermolecular interactions in a platinum isocyanate complex.

    PubMed

    Raven, William; Joschko, Thomas; Kalf, Irmgard; Englert, Ulli

    2016-03-01

    At the molecular level, the enantiomerically pure square-planar organoplatinum complex (SP-4-4)-(R)-[2-(1-aminoethyl)-5-fluorophenyl-κ(2)C(1),N][(R)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)ethylamine-κN](isocyanato-κN)platinum(II), [Pt(C8H9FN)(NCO)(C8H10FN)], and its congener without fluorine substituents on the aryl rings adopt the same structure within error. The similarities between the compounds extend to the most relevant intermolecular interactions, i.e. N-H...O and N-H...N hydrogen bonds link neighbouring molecules into chains along the shortest lattice parameter in each structure. Differences between the crystal structures of the fluoro-substituted and parent complex become obvious with respect to secondary interactions perpendicular to the classical hydrogen bonds; the fluorinated compound features short C-H...F contacts with an F...H distance of ca 2.6 Å. The fluorine substitution is also reflected in reduced backbonding from the metal cation to the isocyanate ligand. PMID:26942427

  7. Hydrogen versus fluorine: effects on molecular structure and intermolecular interactions in a platinum isocyanate complex.

    PubMed

    Raven, William; Joschko, Thomas; Kalf, Irmgard; Englert, Ulli

    2016-03-01

    At the molecular level, the enantiomerically pure square-planar organoplatinum complex (SP-4-4)-(R)-[2-(1-aminoethyl)-5-fluorophenyl-κ(2)C(1),N][(R)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)ethylamine-κN](isocyanato-κN)platinum(II), [Pt(C8H9FN)(NCO)(C8H10FN)], and its congener without fluorine substituents on the aryl rings adopt the same structure within error. The similarities between the compounds extend to the most relevant intermolecular interactions, i.e. N-H...O and N-H...N hydrogen bonds link neighbouring molecules into chains along the shortest lattice parameter in each structure. Differences between the crystal structures of the fluoro-substituted and parent complex become obvious with respect to secondary interactions perpendicular to the classical hydrogen bonds; the fluorinated compound features short C-H...F contacts with an F...H distance of ca 2.6 Å. The fluorine substitution is also reflected in reduced backbonding from the metal cation to the isocyanate ligand.

  8. Hydrogen from Water over Openly-Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride Polymer through Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhijun; Li, Fengbo; Chen, Bingfeng; Yuan, Guoqing

    2016-03-01

    Openly-structured g-C3 N4 microspheres (CNMS) are developed through a well-controlled strategy. These materials have unique features of open 3 D structure, ordered hierarchical porosity, and improved optical and electronic properties. Hydrogen evolution from water is performed under a 300 W Xe lamp with a cut-off filter (λ>420 nm) and Pt nanoparticles are used as the co-catalyst (3.0 wt%). The catalyst prepared at 600 °C (CNMS-600) has a hydrogen evolution rate (HER) of 392 μmol h(-1) (apparent quantum yield, AQY=6.3%) at 420 nm. This value is higher than that of g-C3 N4 nanosheets prepared through thermal oxidation, liquid exfoliation, or chemical exfoliation. The HER value is only 27 μmol h(-1) (AQY=0.43%) at 420 nm for bulk g-C3 N4 from melamine. The evolution of openly-structured CNMS was investigated by TEM, FTIR, and XRD. The improved optical and electronic properties were demonstrated through UV/Vis absorption spectra, valence-band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  9. Solid-state structures and properties of scandium hydride; hydrogen storage and switchable mirrors application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodja, Khadidja; Bouhadda, Youcef; Seddik, Larbi; Benyelloul, Kamel

    2016-05-01

    First-principles calculation has been performed on the rare earth hydride ScH2 for hydrogen storage and switchable mirror applications, using the pseudo-potentials and plane waves based on the density-functional theory (DFT). The electronic and structural properties are studied within both local-density and generalized gradient approximations for exchange energy. The formation energy and the optical properties have been investigated and discussed. Our calculated results are generally in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  10. Hydrogen bond removal of pterin derivative whose structure is similar to nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Nonogawa, Mitsuru; Arai, Toshiyuki; Endo, Nobuyuki; Pack, Seung Pil; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    Pterin, an analog of guanine, is an electron transfer compound in biological systems. Among the analogs, 6-formylpterin (6FP) has been demonstrated to have many marked physiological and pharmacological activities and it is, therefore, worthwhile to elucidate whole mechanism of its activities. Unfortunately, however, 6FP is hardly soluble in water and organic solvents. Like nucleic acid bases, 6FP makes intermolecular hydrogen bonds and forms stacking structure causing such drawback nature. This has made mechanistic studies on 6FP activities extremely difficult. In this study, we carried out derivatization for 6FP and succeeded in increasing water solubility with maintaining its physiological activities. PMID:17150758

  11. SISGR - Hydrogen Caged in Carbon-Exploration of Novel Carbon-Hydrogen Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lueking, Angela; Badding, John; Crespi, Vinent

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen trapped in a carbon cage, captured through repulsive interactions, is a novel concept in hydrogen storage. Trapping hydrogen via repulsive interactions borrows an idea from macroscale hydrogen storage (i.e. compressed gas storage tanks) and reapplies these concepts on the nanoscale in specially designed molecular containers. Under extreme conditions of pressure, hydrogen solubility in carbon materials is expected to increase and carbon is expected to restructure to minimize volume via a mixed sp2/sp3 hydrogenated state. Thermodynamics dictate that pre-formed C-H structures will rearrange with increased pressure, yet the final carbon-hydrogen interactions may be dependent upon the mechanism by which hydrogen is introduced. Gas “trapping” is meant to denote gas present in a solid in a high density, adsorbed-like state, when the external pressure is much less than that necessary to provide a comparable fluid density. Trapping thus denotes a kinetically metastable state rather than thermodynamic equilibrium. This project probed mechanochemical means to polymerize select hydrocarbons in the presence of gases, in an attempt to form localized carbon cages that trap gases via repulsive interactions. Aromatic, polyaromatic, and hydroaromatic molecules expected to undergo cyclo-addition reactions were polymerized at high (~GPa) pressures to form extended hydrogenated amorphous carbon networks. Notably, aromatics with a pre-existing internal free volume (such as Triptycene) appeared to retain an internal porosity upon application of pressure. However, a high photoluminescence background after polymerization precluded in situ identification of trapped gases. No spectroscopic evidence was found after depressurization that would be indicative of pockets of trapped gases in a localized high-pressure environment. Control studies suggested this measurement may be insensitive to gases at low pressure. Similarly, no spectral fingerprint was found for gas-imbued spherical

  12. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on the properties of double wall BN and (BN)xCy nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A.; Azevedo, S.; Kaschny, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution, we apply first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to study the effects of hydrogen adsorption on the structural and electronic properties of boron nitride and hybrid carbon-boron nitride double wall nanotubes. The results demonstrate that the hydrogen decoration induces significant structural deformation and an appreciable reduction in the gap energy. When the number of hydrogen atoms introduced on the outer wall is increased, desorption of hydrogen pairs are observed. The calculations indicate that each adsorbed hydrogen atom induces a structural deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. It is also found that the introduction of hydrogen atoms can be applied as an efficient tool for tuning the electronic properties of such structures.

  13. Hydrogen Passivation of Interstitial Zn Defects in Heteroepitaxial InP Cell Structures and Influence on Device Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringel, S. A.; Chatterjee, B.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen passivation of heteroepitaxial InP solar cells is of recent interest for deactivation of dislocations and other defects caused by the cell/substrate lattice mismatch that currently limit the photovoltaic performance of these devices. In this paper we present strong evidence that, in addition to direct hydrogen-dislocation interactions, hydrogen forms complexes with the high concentration of interstitial Zn defects present within the p(+) Zn-doped emitter of MOCVD-grown heteroepitaxial InP devices, resulting in a dramatic increase of the forward bias turn-on voltage by as much as 280 mV, from 680 mV to 960 mV. This shift is reproducible and thermally reversible and no such effect is observed for either n(+)p structures or homoepitaxial p(+)n structures grown under identical conditions. A combination of photoluminescence (PL), electrochemical C-V dopant profiling, SIMS and I-V measurements were performed on a set of samples having undergone a matrix of hydrogenation and post-hydrogenation annealing conditions to investigate the source of this voltage enhancement and confirm the expected role of interstitial Zn and hydrogen. A precise correlation between all measurements is demonstrated which indicates that Zn interstitials within the p(+) emitter and their interaction with hydrogen are indeed responsible for this device behavior.

  14. Crystal structures of morpholinium hydrogen bromanilate at 130, 145 and 180 K

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Kazuma; Tahara, Yuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Crystal structures of the title compound (systematic name: morpholin-4-ium 2,5-di­bromo-4-hy­droxy-3,6-dioxo­cyclo­hexa-1,4-dien-1-olate), C4H10NO+·C6HBr2O4 −, were determined at three temperatures, viz. 130, 145 and 180 K. The asymmetric unit comprises one morpholinium cation and two halves of crystallographically independent bromanilate monoanions, which are located on inversion centres. The conformations of the two independent bromanilate anions are different from each other with respect to the O—H orientation. In the crystal, the two different anions are linked alternately into a chain along [211] through a short O—H⋯O hydrogen bond, in which the H atom is disordered over two positions. The refined site-occupancy ratios, which are almost constant in the temperature range studied, are 0.49 (3):0.51 (3), 0.52 (3):0.48 (3) and 0.50 (3):0.50 (3), respectively, at 130, 145 and 180 K, and no significant difference in the mol­ecular geometry and the mol­ecular packing is observed at the three temperatures. The morpholinium cation links adjacent chains of anions via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a sheet structure parallel to (-111). PMID:26594413

  15. Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Buchko, Garry W.; Reback, Matthew L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-10-05

    The synthesis, catalytic activity, and structural features of a rhodium-based hydrogenation catalyst containing a phosphine ligand coupled to a 14-residue peptide are reported. Both CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide adopts a helical structure in 1:1:1 TFE/MeCN/H2O that is maintained when the peptide is attached to the ligand and when the ligand is attached to the metal complex. The metal complex hydrogenates aqueous solutions of 3-butenol to 1-butanol at 360 ± 50 turnovers/Rh/h at 294 K. This peptide- based catalyst represents a starting point for developing and characterizing a peptide-based outer-coordination sphere that can be used to introduce enzyme-like features into molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (AJ, JCL and WJS), the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (GWB, MLR and WJS). Part of the research was conducted at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biolog-ical and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Di-hydrogen contact induced lattice instabilities and structural dynamics in complex hydride perovskites.

    PubMed

    Schouwink, P; Hagemann, H; Embs, J P; D'Anna, V; Černý, R

    2015-07-01

    The structural phase transitions occurring in a series of perovskite-type complex hydrides based on the tetrahydroborate anion BH4(-) are investigated by means of in situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, thermal methods and ab initio calculations in the solid state. Structural dynamics of the BH4 anion are followed with quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We show that unexpected temperature-induced lattice instabilities in perovskite-type ACa(BH4)3 (A = K, Rb, Cs) have their origin in close hydridic di-hydrogen contacts. The rich lattice dynamics lead to coupling between internal B-H vibrations and phonons, resulting in distortions in the high-temperature polymorph that are identical in symmetry to well-known instabilities in oxide perovskites, generally condensing at lower temperatures. It is found that anion-substitution BH4(-) <-> (X = Halide) can relax distortions in ACa(BH4)3 by eliminating coulomb repulsive H(-)···H(-) effects. The interesting nature of phase transition in ACa(BH4)3 enters an unexplored field of weak interactions in ceramic-like host lattices and is the principal motivation for this study. Close di-hydrogen contacts suggest new concepts to tailor crystal symmetries in complex hydride perovskites in the future. PMID:26076047

  17. Neutral Hydrogen Structures Trace Dust Polarization Angle: Implications for Cosmic Microwave Background Foregrounds.

    PubMed

    Clark, S E; Hill, J Colin; Peek, J E G; Putman, M E; Babler, B L

    2015-12-11

    Using high-resolution data from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-Hi) survey, we show that linear structure in Galactic neutral hydrogen (Hi) correlates with the magnetic field orientation implied by Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission. The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. At high Galactic latitudes, where the Planck data are noise dominated, the Hi data provide an independent constraint on the Galactic magnetic field orientation, and hence the local dust polarization angle. We detect strong cross-correlations between template maps constructed from estimates of dust intensity combined with either Hi-derived angles, starlight polarization angles, or Planck 353 GHz angles. The Hi data thus provide a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination. PMID:26705622

  18. Incorporation of hydrogen in CuInSe{sub 2}: Improvements of the structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yakushev, M. V.; Ogorodnikov, I. I.; Volkov, V. A.; Mudryi, A. V.

    2011-09-15

    CuInSe{sub 2} single crystals were ion implanted with a dose of 3 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} by 2.5 keV H{sup +} at 150 and 250 deg. C Before and after the implantation the crystals were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering/channeling (RBS/C) along the <112> axis using 2 MeV He{sup +}. The RBS/C spectra indicate that the implantation at 150 deg. C introduces a layer of radiation damage, whereas after the implantation at 250 deg. C no structural deterioration of the lattice can be seen. Quite the contrary, the RBS/C spectra reveal a considerable decrease in the dechanneling parameters suggesting improvements in the lattice structural quality attributed to the incorporation of hydrogen.

  19. Intermolecular hydrogen bonded and self-assembled β-pleated sheet structures of β-sulfidocarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Sahid; Das, Gopal; Chaudhuri, Mihir K.

    2007-06-01

    The three crystal structures of β-sulfidocarbonyls 1, 2 and 3 synthesized from the reaction of acryl amide with cystiene, 1,2-dithiol and 1,3-dithiols, respectively, in water catalyzed by borax, have been determined at 273 K. The characteristic features of the structures are self-assembly through intermolecular hydrogen bonding leading to infinite chains of molecules in one direction, in addition to the stacking of layers of such molecular chains in the perpendicular direction ultimately giving rise to β-pleated sheets of 3D molecular network involving N-H⋯O, C-H⋯O and C-H⋯S bonding in the crystal lattice.

  20. A fresh look at dense hydrogen under pressure. IV. Two structural models on the road from paired to monatomic hydrogen, via a possible non-crystalline phase.

    PubMed

    Labet, Vanessa; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W

    2012-02-21

    In this paper, we examine the transition from a molecular to monatomic solid in hydrogen over a wide pressure range. This is achieved by setting up two models in which a single parameter δ allows the evolution from a molecular structure to a monatomic one of high coordination. Both models are based on a cubic Bravais lattice with eight atoms in the unit cell; one belongs to space group Pa3, the other to space group R3m. In Pa3 one moves from effective 1-coordination, a molecule, to a simple cubic 6-coordinated structure but through a very special point (the golden mean is involved) of 7-coordination. In R3m, the evolution is from 1 to 4 and then to 3 to 6-coordinate. If one studies the enthalpy as a function of pressure as these two structures evolve (δ increases), one sees the expected stabilization of minima with increased coordination (moving from 1 to 6 to 7 in the Pa3 structure, for instance). Interestingly, at some specific pressures, there are in both structures relatively large regions of phase space where the enthalpy remains roughly the same. Although the structures studied are always higher in enthalpy than the computationally best structures for solid hydrogen - those emerging from the Pickard and Needs or McMahon and Ceperley numerical laboratories - this result is suggestive of the possibility of a microscopically non-crystalline or "soft" phase of hydrogen at elevated pressures, one in which there is a substantial range of roughly equi-enthalpic geometries available to the system. A scaling argument for potential dynamic stabilization of such a phase is presented.

  1. Control of acid gases using a fluidized bed adsorber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Bo-Chin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Yeh, Chia-Lin

    2003-08-01

    During incineration, secondary pollutants such as acid gases, organic compounds, heavy metals and particulates are generated. Among these pollutants, the acid gases, including sulfur oxides (SO(x)) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), can cause corrosion of the incinerator piping and can generate acid rain after being emitted to the atmosphere. To address this problem, the present study used a novel combination of air pollution control devices (APCDs), composed of a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter. The major objective of the work is to demonstrate the performance of a fluidized bed adsorber for removal of acid gases from flue gas of an incinerator. The adsorbents added in the fluidized bed adsorber were mainly granular activated carbon (AC; with or without chemical treatment) and with calcium oxide used as an additive. The advantages of a fluidized bed reactor for high mass transfer and high gas-solid contact can enhance the removal of acid gases when using a dry method. On the other hand, because the fluidized bed can filter particles, fine particles prior to and after passing through the fluidized bed adsorber were investigated. The competing adsorption on activated carbon between different characteristics of pollutants was also given preliminary discussion. The results indicate that the removal efficiencies of the investigated acid gases, SO(2) and HCl, are higher than 94 and 87%, respectively. Thus, a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter has the potential to replace conventional APCDs, even when there are other pollutants at the same time.

  2. Strong intermolecular vibrational coupling through cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures revealed by ultrafast continuum mid-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stingel, Ashley M; Calabrese, Carmella; Petersen, Poul B

    2013-12-12

    Cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures are common motifs in biological systems, providing structural stability and mediating proton transfer for redox reactions. The mechanism of proton transfer across hydrogen-bonded interfaces depends on the strength of the intermolecular coupling between bridging OH/NH vibrational modes. Here we present a novel ultrafast continuum mid-IR spectroscopy experiment to study the vibrational dynamics of the 7-azaindole-acetic acid (7AI-Ac) heterodimer as a model system for asymmetric cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures. In addition to spreading of the excitation across the whole OH band within the time resolution of the experiment, excitation of a 300 cm(-1) region of the ∼1000 cm(-1) broad OH stretching mode of the acetic acid monomer leads to a frequency shift in the NH stretching mode of the 7AI monomer. This indicates that the NH and OH stretching modes located on the two monomers are strongly coupled despite being separated by 750 cm(-1). The strong coupling further causes the OH and NH bands to decay with a common decay time of ∼2.5 ps. This intermolecular coupling is mediated through the hydrogen-bonded structure of the 7AI-Ac heterodimer and is likely a general property of cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures. Characterizing the vibrational dynamics of and the coupling between the high-frequency OH/NH modes will be important for understanding proton transfer across such molecular interfaces.

  3. COGNAC: a web server for searching and annotating hydrogen-bonded base interactions in RNA three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed

    Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof; Nadzirin, Nurul; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Willett, Peter; Artymiuk, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen bonds are crucial factors that stabilize a complex ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule's three-dimensional (3D) structure. Minute conformational changes can result in variations in the hydrogen bond interactions in a particular structure. Furthermore, networks of hydrogen bonds, especially those found in tight clusters, may be important elements in structure stabilization or function and can therefore be regarded as potential tertiary motifs. In this paper, we describe a graph theoretical algorithm implemented as a web server that is able to search for unbroken networks of hydrogen-bonded base interactions and thus provide an accounting of such interactions in RNA 3D structures. This server, COGNAC (COnnection tables Graphs for Nucleic ACids), is also able to compare the hydrogen bond networks between two structures and from such annotations enable the mapping of atomic level differences that may have resulted from conformational changes due to mutations or binding events. The COGNAC server can be accessed at http://mfrlab.org/grafss/cognac. PMID:24831543

  4. General Motors: Final Report for Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Mei; Chakraborty, Amlan; Hou, Peter; Kaisare, Niklet; Jorgensen, Scott; Kumar, Sudarshan; Li, Changpeng; Ortmann, Jerome; Raju, M.; Vadivelu, S. Kumar

    2015-06-30

    As part of the HSECoE team, the GM team built system models and detailed transport models for on-board hydrogen storage systems using metal hydrides and adsorbent materials. Detailed transport models have been developed for both the metal hydride and adsorbent systems with a focus on optimization of heat exchanger designs with the objective of minimizing the heat exchanger mass. We also performed work in collaboration with our partners on storage media structuring and enhancement studies for the metal hydride and adsorbent materials. Since the hydrogen storage materials are generally characterized by low density and low thermal conductivity, we conducted experiments to form pellets and add thermal conductivity enhancers to the storage material, and to improve cycling stability and durability of the metal hydride and adsorbent materials. Refueling of a MOF-5 pellet with cryogenic hydrogen was studied by developing a detailed two-dimensional axisymmetric COMSOL® model of the process. The effects of pellet permeability, thermal conductivity, and thermal conductivity enhancers were investigated. Our key area of focus has been on designing and building a cryo-adsorption vessel for validation of cryo-adsorption models. The 3-L cryogenic tank was used to study the fast fill and discharge dynamics of a cryo-adsorbent storage system, both experimentally and numerically.

  5. Communication: Dynamical and structural analyses of solid hydrogen under vapor pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2015-11-07

    Nuclear quantum effects play a dominant role in determining the phase diagram of H{sub 2}. With a recently developed quantum molecular dynamics simulation method, we examine dynamical and structural characters of solid H{sub 2} under vapor pressure, demonstrating the difference from liquid and high-pressure solid H{sub 2}. While stable hexagonal close-packed lattice structures are reproduced with reasonable lattice phonon frequencies, the most stable adjacent configuration exhibits a zigzag structure, in contrast with the T-shape liquid configuration. The periodic angular distributions of H{sub 2} molecules indicate that molecules are not a completely free rotor in the vapor-pressure solid reflecting asymmetric potentials from surrounding molecules on adjacent lattice sites. Discrete jumps of librational and H–H vibrational frequencies as well as H–H bond length caused by structural rearrangements under vapor pressure effectively discriminate the liquid and solid phases. The obtained dynamical and structural information of the vapor-pressure H{sub 2} solid will be useful in monitoring thermodynamic states of condensed hydrogens.

  6. Communication: Dynamical and structural analyses of solid hydrogen under vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear quantum effects play a dominant role in determining the phase diagram of H2. With a recently developed quantum molecular dynamics simulation method, we examine dynamical and structural characters of solid H2 under vapor pressure, demonstrating the difference from liquid and high-pressure solid H2. While stable hexagonal close-packed lattice structures are reproduced with reasonable lattice phonon frequencies, the most stable adjacent configuration exhibits a zigzag structure, in contrast with the T-shape liquid configuration. The periodic angular distributions of H2 molecules indicate that molecules are not a completely free rotor in the vapor-pressure solid reflecting asymmetric potentials from surrounding molecules on adjacent lattice sites. Discrete jumps of librational and H-H vibrational frequencies as well as H-H bond length caused by structural rearrangements under vapor pressure effectively discriminate the liquid and solid phases. The obtained dynamical and structural information of the vapor-pressure H2 solid will be useful in monitoring thermodynamic states of condensed hydrogens.

  7. Computer simulations of adsorbed liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Greg D.; Cleaver, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    The structures adopted by adsorbed thin films of Gay-Berne particles in the presence of a coexisting vapour phase are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The films are adsorbed at a flat substrate which favours planar anchoring, whereas the nematic-vapour interface favours normal alignment. On cooling, a system with a high molecule-substrate interaction strength exhibits substrate-induced planar orientational ordering and considerable stratification is observed in the density profiles. In contrast, a system with weak molecule-substrate coupling adopts a director orientation orthogonal to the substrate plane, owing to the increased influence of the nematic-vapour interface. There are significant differences between the structures adopted at the two interfaces, in contrast with the predictions of density functional treatments of such systems.

  8. Preparation, structural properties, and hydrogenation activity of highly porous palladium-titania aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Wildberger, M.; Maciejewski, M.; Duff, D.G.; Mallat, T.; Baiker, A. )

    1994-08-01

    Mesoporous to macroporous palladium-titania aerogels with high surface area have been synthesized by the sol-gel-aerogel route. A titania gel was prepared by the addition of an acidic hydrolysant to tetrabutoxytitanium(IV) in methanol. The palladium precursor solutions, added after the redispersion of the titania gel, were either Na[sub 2]PdCl[sub 4], (NH[sub 4])[sub 2]PdCl[sub 4], Pd(acac)[sub 2], or Pd(OAc)[sub 2] dissolved in protic or aprotic solvents. The palladium-titania aerogels have a BET surface area of 170-190 m[sup 2]g[sup [minus]1] after a thermal treatment up to 673 K and contain well-developed anatase crystallites of about 7-8 nm mean size. Depending on the palladium precursor used, the volume-weighted-mean particle size, determined by TEM, varies significantly in the range 21-224 nm, this being independently consistent with XRD line-broadening results. All aerogel samples showed pronounced structural stability of both the titania matrix and the palladium particles towards the pretreatment media used (air or hydrogen) at temperatures up to 773 K. Thermal analysis, combined with mass spectrometry, revealed that the untreated catalysts contain a considerable amount of entrapped organic impurities after high-temperature supercritical drying. Liquid-phase hydrogenations of tras-stilbene and benzophenone were used as test reactions for characterizing the activity and accessibility of the palladium particles. A comparison of the best dispersed Pd(OAc)[sub 2]-derived aerogel catalysts with conventionally impregnated titania-supported palladium catalysts in the liquid-phase hydrogenation of 4-methylbenzaldehyde reveals superior activity and selectivity for the aerogel catalysts. 32 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. ON THE APPARENT ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL HYDROGEN STRUCTURE AND (WMAP) HIGH-FREQUENCY CONTINUUM EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2010-03-10

    Galactic neutral hydrogen (H I) within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun contains structure with an angular distribution that is similar to small-scale structure observed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). A total of 108 associated pairs of associated H I and WMAP features have now been cataloged using H I data mapped in 2 km s{sup -1} intervals and these pairs show a typical offset of 0.{sup 0}8. A large-scale statistical test for a direct association is carried out that casts little additional light on whether the these small offsets are merely coincidental or carry information. To pursue the issue further, the nature of several of the features within the foreground H I most closely associated with WMAP structure is examined in detail and it is shown that the cross-correlation coefficient for well-matched pairs of structures is of order unity. It is shown that free-free emission from electrons in unresolved density enhancements in interstellar space could theoretically produce high-frequency radio continuum radiation at the levels observed by WMAP and that such emission will appear nearly flat across the WMAP frequency range. Evidence for such structure in the interstellar medium already exists in the literature. Until higher angular resolution observations of the high-frequency continuum emission structure as well as the apparently associated H I structure become available, it may be difficult to rule out the possibility that some if not all the small-scale structure usually attributed to the cosmic microwave background may have a galactic origin.

  10. Hydrogen Bonding and Multiphonon Structure in One- and Two-Dimensional Polymeric Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musfeldt, J. L.; Brown, S.; Cao, J.; Conner, M. M.; McConnell, A. C.; Southerland, H. I.; Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Phillips, M. D.; Turnbull, M. M.; Landee, C. P.

    2007-03-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the temperature dependent infrared vibrational spectra of a family of chemically related coordination polymeric magnets based upon two different bridging anions, fluoride (F^-) and bifluoride (HF2^-), in copper-pyrazine complexes including Cu(HF2)(pyz)2BF4, Cu(HF2)(pyz)2ClO4, and CuF2(H2O)(pyz)). We compare our results with several one- and two-dimensional prototype materials including Cu(NO3)2(pyz) and Cu(ClO4)(pyz) 2. Unusual low temperature hydrogen bonding, local structural transitions associated with stronger low-temperature hydrogen bonding, and striking multiphonon effects that derive from coupling of an infrared-active fundamental with strong Raman-active modes of the pyrazine building-block molecule are observed. Based on the spectroscopic evidence, these interactions are common to this family of coordination polymers and work to stabilize the low temperature magnetic state. Similar interactions are likely to be present in other molecule-based magnets.

  11. A Combined Covalent-Electrostatic Model of Hydrogen Bonding Improves Structure Prediction with Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Matthew J.; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Tyka, Mike; Stein, Amelie; Houlihan, Kevin; DiMaio, Frank; Bradley, Philip; Kortemme, Tanja; Baker, David; Snoeyink, Jack; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between polar atoms are challenging to model because at very short ranges they form hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) that are partially covalent in character and exhibit strong orientation preferences; at longer ranges the orientation preferences are lost, but significant electrostatic interactions between charged and partially charged atoms remain. To simultaneously model these two types of behavior, we refined an orientation dependent model of hydrogen bonds [Kortemme et al. 2003] used by the molecular modeling program Rosetta and then combined it with a distance-dependent Coulomb model of electrostatics. The functional form of the H-bond potential is physically motivated and parameters are fit so that H-bond geometries that Rosetta generates closely resemble H-bond geometries in high-resolution crystal structures. The combined potentials improve performance in a variety of scientific benchmarks including decoy discrimination, side chain prediction, and native sequence recovery in protein design simulations, and establishes a new standard energy function for Rosetta. PMID:25866491

  12. Molecular Structure and Photoinduced Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in 2-Pyrrolylmethylidene Cycloalkanones.

    PubMed

    Sigalov, Mark; Shainyan, Bagrat; Chipanina, Nina; Oznobikhina, Larisa; Strashnikova, Natalia; Sterkhova, Irina

    2015-11-01

    The structures of pyrrolylmethylidene derivatives of 2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-one (3), 3,4-dihydro-naphthalen-1(2H)-one (4), and cycloalkanones (5-7) were studied for the first time in the solid state and solution by NMR, IR, and UV spectroscopies supported by DFT quantum mechanical calculations. It was shown that all studied compounds except cycloheptanone derivative 7 both in crystal and in solution exist in the form of dimers where single E or E,E configuration with respect to the exocyclic C═C bond is stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-H···O═C. UV irradiation at a wavelength of 365 nm of MeCN or DMSO solutions of 3-6 results, depending on the exposition time and solvent, partial to complete isomerization to the Z or Z,E isomers (in the case of 6, also the Z,Z isomer). The NMR and IR spectroscopy data show the existence of a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond N-H···O═C in the Z moieties of isomerized compounds. The studied compounds are protonated by trifluoroacetic acid at the carbonyl oxygen, in spite of the reverse order of basicity and nucleophilicity of the carbonyl group and the pyrrole ring. Investigation of the behavior of compound 6 with respect to acetate and fluoride anions allows one to consider it as a potential fluoride sensor. PMID:26457975

  13. A new family of metal borohydride guanidinate complexes: Synthesis, structures and hydrogen-storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Zhou, Xiuquan; Rodriguez, Efrain E.; Zhou, Wei; Udovic, Terrence J.; Yildirim, Taner; Rush, John J.

    2016-10-01

    We report on a new class of complex hydrides: borohydride guanidinate complexes (MBH4·nCN3H5, M=Li, Mg, and Ca). They can be prepared via facile solid-state synthesis routes. Their crystal structures were successfully determined using a combination of X-ray diffraction, first-principles calculations and neutron vibrational spectroscopy. Among these compounds, Mg(BH4)2·6CN3H5 is composed of large complex Mg[CN3H5]62+ cations and surrounding BH4- ions, while Ca(BH4)2·2CN3H5 possesses layers of corner-sharing Ca[BH4]4(CN3H5)2 octahedra. Our dehydrogenation results show that ≈10 wt% hydrogen can be released from MBH4·nCN3H5 (M=Li, Mg, and Ca) at moderate temperatures with minimal ammonia and diborane contamination thanks to the synergistic effect of C-N bonds from guanidine and hydridic H from borohydrides leading to a weakening of the N-H bonds, thus impeding ammonia gas liberation. Further tuning the dehydrogenation with different cation species indicates that Mg(BH4)2·nCN3H5 can exhibit the optimum properties with nearly thermally neutral dehydrogenation and very high purity hydrogen release.

  14. Influence of dense quantum plasmas on fine-structure splitting of Lyman doublets of hydrogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    De, Madhab Ray, Debasis

    2015-05-15

    Relativistic calculations are performed to study the effects of oscillatory quantum plasma screening on the fine-structure splitting between the components of Lyman-α and β line doublets of atomic hydrogen and hydrgen-like argon ion within dense quantum plasmas, where the effective two-body (electron–nucleus) interaction is modeled by the Shukla–Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential. The numerical solutions of the radial Dirac equation for the quantum plasma-embedded atomic systems reveal that the oscillatory quantum screening effect suppresses the doublet (energy) splitting substantially and the suppression becomes more prominent at large quantum wave number k{sub q}. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, much larger amount of suppression is noticed at larger values of k{sub q}, and the corresponding results represent the screening effect of an exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction. The Z{sup 4} scaling of the Lyman doublet splitting in low-Z hydrogen isoelectronic series of ions in free space is violated in dense quantum plasma environments. The relativistic data for the doublet splitting in the zero screening (k{sub q} = 0) case are in very good agreement with the NIST reference data, with slight discrepancies (∼0.2%) arising from the neglect of the quantum electrodynamic effects.

  15. Aerospike thrust chamber program. [cumulative damage and maintenance of structural members in hydrogen oxygen engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J., Jr.; Cobb, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    An existing, but damaged, 25,000-pound thrust, flightweight, oxygen/hydrogen aerospike rocket thrust chamber was disassembled and partially repaired. A description is presented of the aerospike chamber configuration and of the damage it had suffered. Techniques for aerospike thrust chamber repair were developed, and are described, covering repair procedures for lightweight tubular nozzles, titanium thrust structures, and copper channel combustors. Effort was terminated prior to completion of the repairs and conduct of a planned hot fire test program when it was found that the copper alloy walls of many of the thrust chamber's 24 combustors had been degraded in strength and ductility during the initial fabrication of the thrust chamber. The degradation is discussed and traced to a reaction between oxygen and/or oxides diffused into the copper alloy during fabrication processes and the hydrogen utilized as a brazing furnace atmosphere during the initial assembly operation on many of the combustors. The effects of the H2/O2 reaction within the copper alloy are described.

  16. Influence of dense quantum plasmas on fine-structure splitting of Lyman doublets of hydrogenic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Madhab; Ray, Debasis

    2015-05-01

    Relativistic calculations are performed to study the effects of oscillatory quantum plasma screening on the fine-structure splitting between the components of Lyman-α and β line doublets of atomic hydrogen and hydrgen-like argon ion within dense quantum plasmas, where the effective two-body (electron-nucleus) interaction is modeled by the Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential. The numerical solutions of the radial Dirac equation for the quantum plasma-embedded atomic systems reveal that the oscillatory quantum screening effect suppresses the doublet (energy) splitting substantially and the suppression becomes more prominent at large quantum wave number kq. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, much larger amount of suppression is noticed at larger values of kq, and the corresponding results represent the screening effect of an exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction. The Z4 scaling of the Lyman doublet splitting in low-Z hydrogen isoelectronic series of ions in free space is violated in dense quantum plasma environments. The relativistic data for the doublet splitting in the zero screening (kq = 0) case are in very good agreement with the NIST reference data, with slight discrepancies (˜0.2%) arising from the neglect of the quantum electrodynamic effects.

  17. The interplay of hydrogen bonding and dispersion in phenol dimer and trimer: structures from broadband rotational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Nathan A; Steber, Amanda L; Neill, Justin L; Pérez, Cristóbal; Zaleski, Daniel P; Pate, Brooks H; Lesarri, Alberto

    2013-07-21

    The structures of the phenol dimer and phenol trimer complexes in the gas phase have been determined using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in the 2-8 GHz band. All fourteen (13)C and (18)O phenol dimer isotopologues were assigned in natural abundance. A full heavy atom experimental substitution structure was determined, and a least-squares fit ground state r0 structure was determined by proper constraint of the M06-2X/6-311++g(d,p) ab initio structure. The structure of phenol dimer features a water dimer-like hydrogen bond, as well as a cooperative contribution from inter-ring dispersion. Comparisons between the experimental structure and previously determined experimental structures, as well as ab initio structures from various levels of theory, are discussed. For phenol trimer, a C3 symmetric barrel-like structure is found, and an experimental substitution structure was determined via measurement of the six unique (13)C isotopologues. The least-squares fit rm((1)) structure reveals a similar interplay between hydrogen bonding and dispersion in the trimer, with water trimer-like hydrogen bonding and C-H···π interactions.

  18. Three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded framework structures in flunarizinium nicotinate and flunarizinediium bis(4-toluenesulfonate) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Channappa N; Yathirajan, Hemmige S; Kaur, Manpreet; Hosten, Eric C; Betz, Richard; Glidewell, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    The structures of two salts of flunarizine, namely 1-bis[(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-[(2E)-3-phenylprop-2-en-1-yl]piperazine, C26H26F2N2, are reported. In flunarizinium nicotinate {systematic name: 4-bis[(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-1-[(2E)-3-phenylprop-2-en-1-yl]piperazin-1-ium pyridine-3-carboxylate}, C26H27F2N2(+)·C6H4NO2(-), (I), the two ionic components are linked by a short charge-assisted N-H...O hydrogen bond. The ion pairs are linked into a three-dimensional framework structure by three independent C-H...O hydrogen bonds, augmented by C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bonds and an aromatic π-π stacking interaction. In flunarizinediium bis(4-toluenesulfonate) dihydrate {systematic name: 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-[(2E)-3-phenylprop-2-en-1-yl]piperazine-1,4-diium bis(4-methylbenzenesulfonate) dihydrate}, C26H28F2N2(2+)·2C7H7O3S(-)·2H2O, (II), one of the anions is disordered over two sites with occupancies of 0.832 (6) and 0.168 (6). The five independent components are linked into ribbons by two independent N-H...O hydrogen bonds and four independent O-H...O hydrogen bonds, and these ribbons are linked to form a three-dimensional framework by two independent C-H...O hydrogen bonds, but C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bonds and aromatic π-π stacking interactions are absent from the structure of (II). Comparisons are made with some related structures.

  19. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  20. Structural micellar transition for fluorinated and hydrogenated sodium carboxylates induced by solubilization of benzyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo; Ruso, Juan M; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2004-09-28

    The solubility of benzyl alcohol in micellar solutions of sodium octanoate and sodium perfluorooctanoate was studied. From the isotherms of specific conductivity versus molality at different alcohol concentrations, the critical micelle concentration and the degree of ionization of the micelles were determined. The cmc linearly decreases upon increasing the amount of benzyl alcohol present in aqueous solutions with two distinct slopes. This phenomenon was interpreted as a clustering of alcohol molecules above a critical point, around 0.1 mol kg(-1). Attending to the equivalent conductivity versus square root of molality, the presence of a second micellar structure for the fluorinated compound was assumed. The thermodynamic parameters associated with the process of micellization were estimated by applying Motomura's model for binary surfactant mixtures, modified by Pérez-Villar et al. (Colloid Polym. Sci 1990, 268, 965) for the case of alcohol-surfactant solutions. A comparison of the hydrogenated and fluorinated compounds was carried out and discussed.

  1. Effect of hydrogen passivation on the electronic structure of ionic semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hui-Xiong; Li, Shu-Shen; Li, Jingbo; Wei, Su-Huai

    2012-05-01

    In theoretical studies of thin film and nanostructured semiconductors, pseudohydrogen (PH) is widely used to passivate the surface dangling bonds. Based on these calculations, it is often believed that nanostructured semiconductors, due to quantum confinement, have a larger band gap than their bulk counterparts. Using first-principles band structure theory calculation and comparing systematically the differences between PH-passivated and real-hydrogen-passivated (RH-passivated) semiconductor surfaces and nanocrystals, we show that, unlike PH passivation that always increases the band gap with respect to the bulk value, RH passivation of the nanostructured semiconductors can either increase or decrease the band gap, depending on the ionicity of the nanocompounds. The differences between PH and RH passivations decreases when the covalency of the semiconductor increases and can be explained using a band coupling model. This observation greatly increases the tunability of nanostructured semiconductor properties, especially for wide-gap ionic semiconductors.

  2. Studies of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IMHB): crystal and molecular structure of 2-(2'-hydroxy-phenyl)imidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foces-Foces, Concepción; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Claramunt, Rosa María; Cabildo, Pilar; Elguero, José

    1998-01-01

    The molecular and crystal structure of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)imidazole (2) and 1-methyl-2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)imidazole (5) have been determined by X-ray analysis. Compound (2) presents a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) responsible for the planarity of the molecule. In both compounds the molecules form chains through NH…O (compound 2) and OH…N hydrogen bonds (compound 5) but giving rise to the same packing mode. Ab initio calculations (6-31G∗∗) have been carried out on both compounds in order to study the effect of the IMHB on the structure.

  3. Structural Sensitivity of Carbon Monoxide Hydrogenation by Nano-Structured Iron Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Pour, Ali Nakhaei; Chekreh, Soheila; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Eftekhari, Ali

    2016-06-01

    A new size dependence kinetic equation for chain growth factor in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) was developed using a thermodynamic analysis method. For evaluation of structural sensitivity of FTS reaction, a series of iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared as a catalyst via precipitation by microemulsion method. The experimental results indicated that the difference between activation energies for propagation and termination reactions (Et-Ep) decreased with decreasing the catalyst particle size. Calculated size dependent model parameters were employed for evaluation of surface tension energy (σ) and size-independent activation energy for chain growth probabilities. PMID:27427644

  4. Neutral hydrogen associated with shells and other fine structure in NGC 2865: A dynamically young elliptical?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiminovich, D.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Van Der Hulst, J. M.; Malin, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    We report the discovery of neutral hydrogen in a second elliptical galaxy with shells, NGC 2865. Very Large Array (VLA) images reveal an association between the neutral hydrogen (H I) and the fine structure (shells, tails, and loops) in the galaxy. Similar to what we previously observed in NGC 5128 (Centaurus A), most of the 6 x 10(exp 8)/h(exp 2) solar mass of cold gas is found in a broken ring in the outer regions of NGC 2865 (beyond 0.5D(sub 25)) and is displaced to the outside of the shells and loops. The measured velocities cover a range of 500 km/s around the systematic velocity. The velocity field of the outer H I has the same sense and magnitude (and line of nodes) as that of the stars in the elliptical body. Although NGC 2865 appears to be a relaxed elliptical galaxy, deep images, photometry, and spectroscopy suggest that the galaxy might be the recent (less than 7 Gyr) product of a major disk-disk merger -- a 'dynamically young elliptical.' Our H I data support this hypothesis. Nevertheless, the association between gas and stellar fine structure, with gas displaced outward from the stars in projected position, implies gas motions not predicted by any of the current merger scenarios. Using the H I ring and assuming nearly circular motion, we measure M/L(sub B) at large radii (4 x 0.5D(sub 25)). We find M/L(sub B) = 33 +/- 4 h, a factor of 5 greater than the value of M/L(sub B) found for the central regions, indicating the presence of a dark halo.

  5. Electronic structure, stacking energy, partial charge, and hydrogen bonding in four periodic B-DNA models.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Lokendra; Rulis, Paul; Liang, Lei; Ching, W Y

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structure of four periodic B-DNA models labeled (AT)(10), (GC)(10), (AT)(5)(GC)(5), and (AT-GC)(5) where A denotes adenine, T denotes thymine, G denotes guanine, and C denotes cytosine. Each model has ten base pairs with Na counterions to neutralize the negative phosphate group in the backbone. The (AT)(5)(GC)(5) and (AT-GC)(5) models contain two and five AT-GC bilayers, respectively. When compared against the average of the two pure models, we estimate the AT-GC bilayer interaction energy to be 19.015 Kcal/mol, which is comparable to the hydrogen bonding energy between base pairs obtained from the literature. Our investigation shows that the stacking of base pairs plays a vital role in the electronic structure, relative stability, bonding, and distribution of partial charges in the DNA models. All four models show a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap ranging from 2.14 to 3.12 eV with HOMO states residing on the PO(4) + Na functional group and LUMO states originating from the bases. Our calculation implies that the electrical conductance of a DNA molecule should increase with increased base-pair mixing. Interatomic bonding effects in these models are investigated in detail by analyzing the distributions of the calculated bond order values for every pair of atoms in the four models including hydrogen bonding. The counterions significantly affect the gap width, the conductivity, and the distribution of partial charge on the DNA backbone. We also evaluate quantitatively the surface partial charge density on each functional group of the DNA models.

  6. Luminescent lanthanide complexes with 4-acetamidobenzoate: Synthesis, supramolecular assembly via hydrogen bonds, crystal structures and photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Xia; Fan Jun; Wang Zhihong; Zheng Shengrun; Tan Jingbo; Zhang Weiguang

    2011-07-15

    Four new luminescent complexes, namely, [Eu(aba){sub 2}(NO{sub 3})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH){sub 2}] (1), [Eu(aba){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].0.5 (4, 4'-bpy).2H{sub 2}O (2), [Eu{sub 2}(aba){sub 4}(2, 2'-bpy){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}].4H{sub 2}O (3) and [Tb{sub 2}(aba){sub 4}(phen){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}].2C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH (4) were obtained by treating Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O and 4-acetamidobenzoic acid (Haba) with different coligands (4, 4'-bpy=4, 4'-bipyridine, 2, 2'-bpy=2, 2'-bipyridine, and phen=1, 10-phenanthroline). They exhibit 1D chains (1-2) and dimeric structures (3-4), respectively. This structural variation is mainly attributed to the change of coligands and various coordination modes of aba molecules. Moreover, the coordination units are further connected via hydrogen bonds to form 2D even 3D supramolecular networks. These complexes show characteristic emissions in the visible region at room temperature. In addition, thermal behaviors of four complexes have been investigated under air atmosphere. The relationship between the structures and physical properties has been discussed. - Graphical abstract: Structure variation of four complexes is attributed to the change of coligands and various coordination modes of aba molecules. Moreover, they show characteristic emissions in the visible region. Highlights: > Auxiliary ligands have played the crucial roles on the structures of the resulting complexes. > Isolated structure units are further assembled via H-bonds to form supramolecular networks. > These solid-state complexes exhibit strong, characteristic emissions in the visible region.

  7. The effect of nitrogen incorporation on the bonding structure of hydrogenated carbon nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Camero, M.; Buijnsters, J. G.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Gago, R.; Caretti, I.; Jimenez, I.

    2007-03-15

    This work describes the composition and bonding structure of hydrogenated carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}:H) films synthesized by electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition using as precursor gases argon, methane, and nitrogen. The composition of the films was derived from Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis and the bonding structure was examined by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). By varying the nitrogen to methane ratio in the applied gas mixture, polymeric a-CN{sub x}:H films with N/C contents varying from 0.06 to 0.49 were obtained. Remarkably, the H content of the films ({approx}40 at. %) was rather unaffected by the nitrogenation process. The different bonding states as detected in the measured XANES C(1s) and N(1s) spectra have been correlated with those of a large number of reference samples. The XANES and IR spectroscopy results indicate that N atoms are efficiently incorporated into the amorphous carbon network and can be found in different bonding environments, such as pyridinelike, graphitelike, nitrilelike, and amino groups. The nitrogenation of the films results in the formation of N-H bonding environments at the cost of C-H structures. Also, the insertion of N induces a higher fraction of double bonds in the structure at the expense of the linear polymerlike chains, hence resulting in a more cross-linked solid. The formation of double bonds takes place through complex C=N structures and not by formation of graphitic aromatic rings. Also, the mechanical and tribological properties (hardness, friction, and wear) of the films have been studied as a function of the nitrogen content. Despite the major modifications in the bonding structure with nitrogen uptake, no significant changes in these properties are observed.

  8. Surface Segregation in a PdCu Alloy Hydrogen Separation Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.B.; Matranga, C.S.; Gellman, A.J.

    2007-06-01

    Separation of hydrogen from mixed gas streams is an important step for hydrogen generation technologies, including hydrocarbon reforming and coal/biomass gasification. Dense palladium-based membranes have received significant attention for this application because of palladium’s ability to dissociatively adsorb molecular hydrogen at its surface for subsequent transport of hydrogen atoms through its bulk. Alloying palladium with minor components, like copper, has been shown to improve both the membrane’s structural characteristics and resistance to poisoning of its catalytic surface [1]. Surface segregation—a composition difference between the bulk material and its surface—is common in alloys and can affect important surface processes. Rational design of alloy membranes requires that surface segregation be understood, and possibly controlled. In this work, we examine surface segregation in a polycrystalline Pd70Cu30 hydrogen separation membrane as a function of thermal treatment and adsorption of hydrogen sulfide.

  9. Metal-inorganic-organic matrices as efficient sorbents for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Abdelkrim; Nousir, Saadia; Bouazizi, Nabil; Roy, René

    2015-03-01

    Stabilization of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) without re-aggregation is a major challenge. An unprecedented strategy is developed for achieving high dispersion of copper(0) or palladium(0) on montmorillonite-supported diethanolamine or thioglycerol. This results in novel metal-inorganic-organic matrices (MIOM) that readily capture hydrogen at ambient conditions, with easy release under air stream. Hydrogen retention appears to involve mainly physical interactions, slightly stronger on thioglycerol-based MIOM (S-MIOM). Thermal enhancement of desorption suggests also a contribution of chemical interactions. The increase of hydrogen uptake with prolonged contact times arises from diffusion hindrance, which appears to be beneficial by favoring hydrogen entrapment. Even with compact structures, MIOMs act as efficient sorbents with much higher efficiency factor (1.14-1.17 mmol H 2 m(-2)) than many other sophisticated adsorbents reported in the literature. This opens new prospects for hydrogen storage and potential applications in microfluidic hydrogenation reactions.

  10. Structure and stability of weakly chemisorbed ethene adsorbed on low-index Cu surfaces: performance of density functionals with van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Felix; Dyer, Matthew S.; Björk, Jonas; Persson, Mats

    2012-10-01

    We have investigated the performance of popular density functionals that include van der Waals interactions for the experimentally well-characterized problem of ethene (C2H4) adsorbed on the low-index surfaces of copper. This set of functionals does not only include three van der Waals density functionals—vdwDF-PBE, vdwDF-revPBE and optB86b-vdwDF—and two dispersion-corrected functionals—Grimme and TS-but also local and semi-local functionals such as LDA and PBE. The adsorption system of ethene on copper was chosen because it is a weakly chemisorbed system for which the vdW interactions are expected to give a significant contribution to the adsorption energy. Overall the density functionals that include vdW interactions increased substantially the adsorption energies compared to the PBE density functional but predicted the same adsorption sites and very similar C-C bonding distances except for two of the van der Waals functionals. The top adsorption site was predicted almost exclusively for all functionals on the (110), (100) and (111) surfaces, which is in agreement with experiment for the (110) surface but not for the (100) surface. On the (100) surface, all functionals except two van der Waals density functionals singled out the observed cross-hollow site from the calculated C-C bonding distances and adsorption heights. On the top sites on the (110) surface and the cross-hollow site on the Cu(100) surface, the ethene molecule was found to form a weak chemisorption bond. On the (111) surface, all functionals gave a C-C bonding distance and an adsorption height more typical for physisorption, in agreement with experiments.

  11. The entropies of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Charles T; Sellers, Jason R V

    2012-10-31

    Adsorbed molecules are involved in many reactions on solid surface that are of great technological importance. As such, there has been tremendous effort worldwide to learn how to predict reaction rates and equilibrium constants for reactions involving adsorbed molecules. Theoretical calculation of both the rate and equilibrium constants for such reactions requires knowing the entropy and enthalpy of the adsorbed molecule. While much effort has been devoted to measuring and calculating the enthalpies of well-defined adsorbates, few measurements of the entropies of adsorbates have been reported. We present here a new way to determine the standard entropies of adsorbed molecules (S(ad)(0)) on single crystal surfaces from temperature programmed desorption data, prove its accuracy by comparison to entropies measured by equilibrium methods, and apply it to published data to extract new entropies. Most importantly, when combined with reported entropies, we find that at high coverage, they linearly track the entropy of the gas-phase molecule at the same temperature (T), such that S(ad)(0)(T) = 0.70 S(gas)(0)(T) - 3.3R (R = the gas constant), with a standard deviation of only 2R over a range of 50R. These entropies, which are ~2/3 of the gas, are huge compared to most theoretical predictions. This result can be extended to reliably predict prefactors in the Arrhenius rate constant for surface reactions involving such species, as proven here for desorption. PMID:23033909

  12. Hollow Structured Micro/Nano MoS₂ Spheres for High Electrocatalytic Activity Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Li, Honglin; Song, Haili; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Tan, Yinghua; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2016-03-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted extensive attention as a non-noble metal electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Controlling the skeleton structure at the nanoscale is paramount to increase the number of active sites at the surface. However, hydrothermal synthesis favors the presence of the basal plane, limiting the efficiency of catalytic reaction. In this work, perfect hollow MoS2 microspheres capped by hollow MoS2 nanospheres (hH-MoS2) were obtained for the first time, which creates an opportunity for improving the HER electrocatalytic performance. Benefiting from the controllable hollow skeleton structure and large exposed edge sites, high-efficiency HER activity was obtained for stacked MoS2 thin shells with a mild degree of disorder, proving the presence of rich active sites and the validity of the combined structure. In general, the obtained hollow micro/nano MoS2 nanomaterial exhibits optimized electrocatalytic activity for HER with onset overpotential as low as 112 mV, low Tafel slope of 74 mV decade(-1), high current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at η = 214 mV, and high TOF of 0.11 H2 s(-1) per active site at η = 200 mV.

  13. Hollow Structured Micro/Nano MoS₂ Spheres for High Electrocatalytic Activity Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Li, Honglin; Song, Haili; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Tan, Yinghua; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2016-03-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted extensive attention as a non-noble metal electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Controlling the skeleton structure at the nanoscale is paramount to increase the number of active sites at the surface. However, hydrothermal synthesis favors the presence of the basal plane, limiting the efficiency of catalytic reaction. In this work, perfect hollow MoS2 microspheres capped by hollow MoS2 nanospheres (hH-MoS2) were obtained for the first time, which creates an opportunity for improving the HER electrocatalytic performance. Benefiting from the controllable hollow skeleton structure and large exposed edge sites, high-efficiency HER activity was obtained for stacked MoS2 thin shells with a mild degree of disorder, proving the presence of rich active sites and the validity of the combined structure. In general, the obtained hollow micro/nano MoS2 nanomaterial exhibits optimized electrocatalytic activity for HER with onset overpotential as low as 112 mV, low Tafel slope of 74 mV decade(-1), high current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at η = 214 mV, and high TOF of 0.11 H2 s(-1) per active site at η = 200 mV. PMID:26840506

  14. Luminescent lanthanide complexes with 4-acetamidobenzoate: Synthesis, supramolecular assembly via hydrogen bonds, crystal structures and photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xia; Fan, Jun; Wang, Zhi Hong; Zheng, Sheng Run; Tan, Jing Bo; Zhang, Wei Guang

    2011-07-01

    Four new luminescent complexes, namely, [Eu(aba) 2(NO 3)(C 2H 5OH) 2] ( 1), [Eu(aba) 3(H 2O) 2]·0.5 (4, 4'-bpy)·2H 2O ( 2), [Eu 2(aba) 4(2, 2'-bpy) 2(NO 3) 2]·4H 2O ( 3) and [Tb 2(aba) 4(phen) 2(NO 3) 2]·2C 2H 5OH ( 4) were obtained by treating Ln(NO 3) 3·6H 2O and 4-acetamidobenzoic acid (Haba) with different coligands (4, 4'-bpy=4, 4'-bipyridine, 2, 2'-bpy=2, 2'-bipyridine, and phen=1, 10-phenanthroline). They exhibit 1D chains ( 1- 2) and dimeric structures ( 3- 4), respectively. This structural variation is mainly attributed to the change of coligands and various coordination modes of aba molecules. Moreover, the coordination units are further connected via hydrogen bonds to form 2D even 3D supramolecular networks. These complexes show characteristic emissions in the visible region at room temperature. In addition, thermal behaviors of four complexes have been investigated under air atmosphere. The relationship between the structures and physical properties has been discussed.

  15. Power of a remote hydrogen bond donor: anion recognition and structural consequences revealed by IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samet, Masoud; Danesh-Yazdi, Mohammad; Fattahi, Alireza; Kass, Steven R

    2015-01-16

    Natural and synthetic anion receptors are extensively employed, but the structures of their bound complexes are difficult to determine in the liquid phase. Infrared spectroscopy is used in this work to characterize the solution structures of bound anion receptors for the first time, and surprisingly only two of three hydroxyl groups of the neutral aliphatic triols are found to directly interact with Cl(–). The binding constants of these triols with zero to three CF3 groups were measured in a polar environment, and KCD3CN(Cl(–)) = 1.1 × 10(6) M(–1) for the tris(trifluoromethyl) derivative. This is a remarkably large value, and high selectivity with respect to interfering anions such as, Br(–), NO3(–) and NCS(–) is also displayed. The effects of the third “noninteracting” hydroxyl groups on the structures and binding constants were also explored, and surprisingly they are as large or larger than the OH substituents that hydrogen bond to Cl(–). That is, a remote hydroxyl group can play a larger role in binding than two OH substituents that directly interact with an anionic center.

  16. Cooperative intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded motif in the structure of 2:2 complex of TBD with 4-nitrocatechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S. W.; Naumov, P.; Chantrapromma, S.; Raj, S. S. S.; Fun, H.-K.; Ibrahim, A. R.; Wojciechowski, G.; Brzezinski, B.

    2001-07-01

    In the crystal of the 2:2 complex of 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene with 4-nitrocatechol the proton from 1-hydroxyl group of 4-nitrocatechol moiety is transferred to TBD to form ion-pair; two adjacent ion-pairs are linked across a center of inversion. The structure exhibits a cooperative, intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded motif. The hydrogen bonds are relatively long and, and they display only minor proton polarizability. The structure of the complex is retained in chloroform solution, as shown by FT-IR and 1H NMR measurement; in acetonitrile, the compound partially dissociates. The partial dissociation is implied by the presence of free cations, and also by that of the (O⋯H⋯O) - hydrogen bonds formed between two mono-deprotonated 4-nitrocatechol molecules.

  17. Process stability and microbial community structure in anaerobic hydrogen-producing microflora from food waste containing kimchi.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ji Hye; Jeon, Che Ok; Lee, Dae Sung; Park, Jong Moon

    2007-09-15

    Hydrogen production by the dark fermentation of food wastes is an economic and environmentally friendly technology to produce the clean energy source as well as to treat the problematic wastes. However, the long-term operations of the continuous anaerobic reactor for fermentative hydrogen production were frequently unstable. In this study, the structure of microbial community within the anaerobic reactor during unstable hydrogen production was examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) techniques. The changes in microbial community from H(2)-producing Clostridium spp. to lactic acid-producing Lactobacillus spp. were well coincident with the unexpected process failures and the changes of metabolites concentrations in the effluent of the anaerobic reactor. As the rate of hydrogen production decreased, effluent lactic acid concentration increased. Low rate of hydrogen production and changes in microbial community were related to the 'kimchi' content and storage temperature of food waste feed solution. After low temperature control of the storage tank of the feed solution, any significant change in microbial community within the anaerobic reactor did not occur and the hydrogen production was very stably maintained for a long time.

  18. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  19. Novel adhesion properties of irreversibly adsorbed polymer chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhizhao; Sen, Mani; Cheung, Justin; Barkley, Deborah; Jiang, Naisheng; Zeng, Wenduo; Endoh, Maya K.; Koga, Tadanori

    The stability of thin polymer films on solids is of vital interest in traditional technologies and in new emerging nanotechnologies. We recently found that nanoscale structures of polymer chains adsorbed onto a silicon (Si) substrate (``adsorbed nanolayers'') play a crucial role in the thermal stability of the film. To understand the adhesion mechanism at the adsorbed polymer-free polymer interface, we mimicked the interface by preparing bilayers where a 200 nm-thick polymer film and an adsorbed nanolayer, both prepared on Si, were pressed together at high temperature. The bilayers were then subjected to an adhesion test by measuring the critical normal force required to separate the two films. Polystyrene was used as a model. The results are intriguing as they show an absence of adhesion between the ``flattened'' adsorbed chains, which lie flat on the solid, and the chemically identical free chains. On the other hand, the ``loosely adsorbed'' polymer chains, which are formed as a result of limited adsorption space on the solid surface, do display a degree of adhesion with the bulk polymer. We postulate that the loosely adsorbed chains act as ``connectors'' which promote adhesion effectively across the solid-polymer interface. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  20. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  1. Triphosphine-Ligated Copper Hydrides for CO2 Hydrogenation: Structure, Reactivity, and Thermodynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Zall, Christopher M; Linehan, John C; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    The copper(I) triphosphine complex LCu(MeCN)PF6 (L = 1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphinomethyl)ethane), which we recently demonstrated is an active catalyst precursor for hydrogenation of CO2 to formate, reacts with H2 in the presence of a base to form a cationic dicopper hydride, [(LCu)2H]PF6. [(LCu)2H](+) is also an active precursor for catalytic CO2 hydrogenation, with equivalent activity to that of LCu(MeCN)(+), and therefore may be a relevant catalytic intermediate. The thermodynamic hydricity of [(LCu)2H](+) was determined to be 41.0 kcal/mol by measuring the equilibrium constant for this reaction using three different bases. [(LCu)2H](+) and the previously reported dimer (LCuH)2 can be synthesized by the reaction of LCu(MeCN)(+) with 0.5 and 1 equiv of KB(O(i)Pr)3H, respectively. The solid-state structure of [(LCu)2H](+) shows threefold symmetry about a linear Cu-H-Cu axis and significant steric strain imposed by bringing two LCu(+) units together around the small hydride ligand. [(LCu)2H](+) reacts stoichiometrically with CO2 to generate the formate complex LCuO2CH and the solvento complex LCu(MeCN)(+). The rate of the stoichiometric reaction between [(LCu)2H](+) and CO2 is dramatically increased in the presence of bases that coordinate strongly to the copper center, e.g. DBU and TMG. In the absence of CO2, the addition of a large excess of DBU to [(LCu)2H](+) results in an equilibrium that forms LCu(DBU)(+) and also presumably the mononuclear hydride LCuH, which is not directly observed. Due to the significantly enhanced CO2 reactivity of [(LCu)2H](+) under these catalytically relevant conditions, LCuH is proposed to be the catalytically active metal hydride. PMID:27434540

  2. Ab initio cluster calculations of hydrogenated GaAs(001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Q.; Li, L.; Hicks, R. F.

    2000-04-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on the (2×4) and (4×2) reconstructions of gallium arsenide (001) has been studied by internal reflectance infrared spectroscopy and ab initio cluster calculations with density-functional theory. The calculations are made on Ga5As4H11,13, Ga4As5H11,13, and Ga7As8H19 clusters, which model the arsenic- and gallium-dimer termination of the semiconductor surface. Excellent agreement has been achieved between the vibrational frequencies predicted by the theory and those observed in experiments. On the (2×4), hydrogen adsorbs on arsenic dimers to form isolated and coupled arsenic-monohydrogen bonds, and arsenic-dihydrogen bonds. Conversely, on the (4×2), hydrogen adsorbs on gallium dimers to form terminal and bridged gallium hydrides. The latter species occur in isolated or coupled structures involving two or three Ga atoms.

  3. Photoelectrochemical characterization of hydrogenated TiO2 nanotubes as photoanodes for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Qiu, Jingxia; Ling, Min; Peng, Feng; Wood, Barry; Zhang, Shanqing

    2013-11-13

    In this work, hydrogenated TiO2 nanotubes (H-TNTs) electrodes were successfully fabricated via the anodization of a titanium sheet followed by a hydrogenation process. Oxygen vacancies were induced in the crystalline structure of TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) as shallow donors that enhance the electronic conductivity of the TNTs. This improvement in the electronic conductivity and photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) performance was confirmed and evaluated by a photoelectrochemical characterization. Most importantly, the H-TNTs electrode was able to degrade potassium hydrogen phthalate (strong adsorbent) and glucose (weak adsorbent) indiscriminately. The corresponding photocurrents at the H-TNTs were 2-fold greater than that of the TNTs samples for the same concentrations of the organic compounds. This suggests that the H-TNTs electrode can be a promising sensor for the PEC determination of individual organic compounds or as an aggregative parameter of organic compounds (e.g., chemical oxygen demand). PMID:24083843

  4. Crystal structures of halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyases from Corynebacterium sp. N-1074.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiaki; Yu, Fujio; Ohtaki, Akashi; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Noguchi, Keiichi; Yohda, Masafumi; Odaka, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyase (H-Lyase) is a bacterial enzyme that is involved in the degradation of halohydrins. This enzyme catalyzes the intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of a halogen by a vicinal hydroxyl group in halohydrins to produce the corresponding epoxides. The epoxide products are subsequently hydrolyzed by an epoxide hydrolase, yielding the corresponding 1, 2-diol. Until now, six different H-Lyases have been studied. These H-Lyases are grouped into three subtypes (A, B, and C) based on amino acid sequence similarities and exhibit different enantioselectivity. Corynebacterium sp. strain N-1074 has two different isozymes of H-Lyase, HheA (A-type) and HheB (B-type). We have determined their crystal structures to elucidate the differences in enantioselectivity among them. All three groups share a similar structure, including catalytic sites. The lack of enantioselectivity of HheA seems to be due to the relatively wide size of the substrate tunnel compared to that of other H-Lyases. Among the B-type H-Lyases, HheB shows relatively high enantioselectivity compared to that of HheBGP1 . This difference seems to be due to amino acid replacements at the active site tunnel. The binding mode of 1, 3-dicyano-2-propanol at the catalytic site in the crystal structure of the HheB-DiCN complex suggests that the product should be (R)-epichlorohydrin, which agrees with the enantioselectivity of HheB. Comparison with the structure of HheC provides a clue for the difference in their enantioselectivity.

  5. Crystal structures of halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyases from Corynebacterium sp. N-1074.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiaki; Yu, Fujio; Ohtaki, Akashi; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Noguchi, Keiichi; Yohda, Masafumi; Odaka, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyase (H-Lyase) is a bacterial enzyme that is involved in the degradation of halohydrins. This enzyme catalyzes the intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of a halogen by a vicinal hydroxyl group in halohydrins to produce the corresponding epoxides. The epoxide products are subsequently hydrolyzed by an epoxide hydrolase, yielding the corresponding 1, 2-diol. Until now, six different H-Lyases have been studied. These H-Lyases are grouped into three subtypes (A, B, and C) based on amino acid sequence similarities and exhibit different enantioselectivity. Corynebacterium sp. strain N-1074 has two different isozymes of H-Lyase, HheA (A-type) and HheB (B-type). We have determined their crystal structures to elucidate the differences in enantioselectivity among them. All three groups share a similar structure, including catalytic sites. The lack of enantioselectivity of HheA seems to be due to the relatively wide size of the substrate tunnel compared to that of other H-Lyases. Among the B-type H-Lyases, HheB shows relatively high enantioselectivity compared to that of HheBGP1 . This difference seems to be due to amino acid replacements at the active site tunnel. The binding mode of 1, 3-dicyano-2-propanol at the catalytic site in the crystal structure of the HheB-DiCN complex suggests that the product should be (R)-epichlorohydrin, which agrees with the enantioselectivity of HheB. Comparison with the structure of HheC provides a clue for the difference in their enantioselectivity. PMID:26422370

  6. Coordination polymer structure and revisited hydrogen evolution catalytic mechanism for amorphous molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Phong D.; Tran, Thu V.; Orio, Maylis; Torelli, Stephane; Truong, Quang Duc; Nayuki, Keiichiro; Sasaki, Yoshikazu; Chiam, Sing Yang; Yi, Ren; Honma, Itaru; Barber, James; Artero, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Molybdenum sulfides are very attractive noble-metal-free electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water. The atomic structure and identity of the catalytically active sites have been well established for crystalline molybdenum disulfide (c-MoS2) but not for amorphous molybdenum sulfide (a-MoSx), which exhibits significantly higher HER activity compared to its crystalline counterpart. Here we show that HER-active a-MoSx, prepared either as nanoparticles or as films, is a molecular-based coordination polymer consisting of discrete [Mo3S13]2- building blocks. Of the three terminal disulfide (S22-) ligands within these clusters, two are shared to form the polymer chain. The third one remains free and generates molybdenum hydride moieties as the active site under H2 evolution conditions. Such a molecular structure therefore provides a basis for revisiting the mechanism of a-MoSx catalytic activity, as well as explaining some of its special properties such as reductive activation and corrosion. Our findings open up new avenues for the rational optimization of this HER electrocatalyst as an alternative to platinum.

  7. Structural stability of hydrogenated (100) surface of cubic boron nitride in comparison with diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, S.; Yarbrough, W.; Moriyoshi, Y.

    1997-06-01

    In view of (1{times}1):2H dihydride/(2{times}1):H monohydride reconstruction, structural stability of (100) surfaces of both cBN and diamond was comparatively investigated by semiempirical molecular orbital methods using isoelectronic clusters of B{sub 52}N{sub 42}H{sub 80{minus}2n}{sup (10{minus})}, N{sub 52}B{sub 42}H{sub 80{minus}2n}{sup (10+)}, and C{sub 94}H{sub 80{minus}2n}, to model (100)B and (100)N of cBN, and diamond surface, respectively, where n=0, 1, 2, or 3. The n denotes the number of monohydride dimers formed. These clusters were nanometer-sized pyramidal crystallites bound by four of {l_brace}111{r_brace} faces and one (100). The (100)N of cBN was found unique because of the great stability as (1{times}1):2H dihydride phase, which retains the bulk structure truncated at the surface without reconstruction and is expected to be chemically inert. This passivation seems to be related to the difficulty in chemical vapor deposition of high quality cBN. The (100)B of cBN was predicted to stabilize as (2{times}1):H monohydride phase as much as hydrogenated (100) of diamond does. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Triacylglycerol structure and composition of hydrogenated soybean oil margarine and shortening basestocks.

    PubMed

    List, Gary R; Byrdwell, William C; Steidley, Kevin R; Adlof, Richard O; Neff, William E

    2005-06-15

    The composition and structures of triacylglycerols (TAG) in a commercially prepared hydrogenated soybean oil margarine basestock [iodine value (IV) 65, 39.7% trans fatty acids] were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in tandem with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS). The basestock was separated by preparative HPLC into four fractions. Fractions 1 and 4, constituting approximately 8% of the total, were shown to consist of LOO, PLO, and LLS and OSS and PSS, respectively (where L = linoleic, O = oleic, S = stearic, and P = palmitic). APCI will not distinguish between O, oleic cis C18:1, and E, elaidic trans C18:1. Thus, O and E may be used interchangeably in discussion of TAG isomer structures. Fraction 2 consisted of OOO and POO. Fraction 3 consisted of OOO, POO, OOS, and POS. About 80% of the total triglycerides consisted of OOO, POO, and OOS. The trans fatty acid content of the fractions was determined, and the results showed that 92% of the total trans content was found in fractions 2 and 3. A shortening basestock (IV 81.7, 31.8% trans fatty acids) was partially characterized.

  9. Coordination polymer structure and revisited hydrogen evolution catalytic mechanism for amorphous molybdenum sulfide.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phong D; Tran, Thu V; Orio, Maylis; Torelli, Stephane; Truong, Quang Duc; Nayuki, Keiichiro; Sasaki, Yoshikazu; Chiam, Sing Yang; Yi, Ren; Honma, Itaru; Barber, James; Artero, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Molybdenum sulfides are very attractive noble-metal-free electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water. The atomic structure and identity of the catalytically active sites have been well established for crystalline molybdenum disulfide (c-MoS2) but not for amorphous molybdenum sulfide (a-MoSx), which exhibits significantly higher HER activity compared to its crystalline counterpart. Here we show that HER-active a-MoSx, prepared either as nanoparticles or as films, is a molecular-based coordination polymer consisting of discrete [Mo3S13](2-) building blocks. Of the three terminal disulfide (S2(2-)) ligands within these clusters, two are shared to form the polymer chain. The third one remains free and generates molybdenum hydride moieties as the active site under H2 evolution conditions. Such a molecular structure therefore provides a basis for revisiting the mechanism of a-MoSx catalytic activity, as well as explaining some of its special properties such as reductive activation and corrosion. Our findings open up new avenues for the rational optimization of this HER electrocatalyst as an alternative to platinum. PMID:26974410

  10. Orbital tomography for highly symmetric adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtmüller, B.; Willenbockel, M.; Reinisch, E. M.; Ules, T.; Bocquet, F. C.; Soubatch, S.; Puschnig, P.; Koller, G.; Ramsey, M. G.; Tautz, F. S.; Kumpf, C.

    2012-10-01

    Orbital tomography is a new and very powerful tool to analyze the angular distribution of a photoemission spectroscopy experiment. It was successfully used for organic adsorbate systems to identify (and consequently deconvolute) the contributions of specific molecular orbitals to the photoemission data. The technique was so far limited to surfaces with low symmetry like fcc(110) oriented surfaces, owing to the small number of rotational domains that occur on such surfaces. In this letter we overcome this limitation and present an orbital tomography study of a 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetra-carboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer film adsorbed on Ag(111). Although this system exhibits twelve differently oriented molecules, the angular resolved photoemission data still allow a meaningful analysis of the different local density of states and reveal different electronic structures for symmetrically inequivalent molecules. We also discuss the precision of the orbital tomography technique in terms of counting statistics and linear regression fitting algorithm. Our results demonstrate that orbital tomography is not limited to low-symmetry surfaces, a finding which makes a broad field of complex adsorbate systems accessible to this powerful technique.

  11. Resonance assisted hydrogen bonds in open-chain and cyclic structures of malonaldehyde enol: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sanz, Goar; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    In 1989 Gilli, Bellucci, Ferretti and Bertolasi introduced the notion of Resonance Assisted Hydrogen Bonding (RAHB) one of the most fruitful concepts in structural chemistry. After reviewing our previous contributions to this topic, the present work analyzes theoretically this concept especially in non-cyclic structures. Geometries, electron densities and Laplacian at the bond critical points, cooperativity through many body interaction energies, deformation energies as well as NMR properties (chemical shifts and 2hJOO coupling constants) are used for the discussion.

  12. Local atomic structural investigations of precursory phenomenon of the hydrogen release from LiAlD4

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Toyoto; Tomiyasu, Dr. Keisuke; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Local atomic structural investigations of LiAlD4, which is composed of Li+ and [AlD4], at 40 300 K were studied by total neutron scattering combined with pair distribution function (PDF) analysis for understanding of hydrogen release from LiAlD4. The results showed that the Al D pair distribution almost unchanged, while the Li D pair distribution clearly started to broaden and shrink above 200 250 K. The shrinking of the Li D pair distribution might lead to the local generation of LiD, which was speculated as the precursory phenomenon for the hydrogen release from LiAlD4.

  13. Equilibrium molecular theory of two-dimensional adsorbate drops on surfaces of heterogeneous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2016-08-01

    A molecular statistical theory for calculating the linear tension of small multicomponent droplets in two-dimensional adsorption systems is developed. The theory describes discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a scale comparable to molecular size) and continuous distributions of molecules (at short distances inside cells) in their translational and vibrational motions. Pair intermolecular interaction potentials (the Mie type potential) in several coordination spheres are considered. For simplicity, it is assumed that distinctions in the sizes of mixture components are slight and comparable to the sizes of adsorbent adsorption centers. Expressions for the pressure tensor components inside small droplets on the heterogeneous surface of an adsorbent are obtained, allowing calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of a vapor-fluid interface, including linear tension. Problems in refining the molecular theory are discussed: describing the properties of small droplets using a coordination model of their structure, considering the effect an adsorbate has on the state of a near-surface adsorbent region, and the surface heterogeneity factor in the conditions for the formation of droplets.

  14. Radiation grafted adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Nasef, Mohamed; Ting, T. M.; Abbasi, Ali; Layeghi-moghaddam, Alireza; Sara Alinezhad, S.; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation induced grafting (RIG) is acquired to prepare a number of adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications using a single route involving RIG of glycidymethacrylate (GMA) onto polyethylene-polypropylene (PE-PP) non-woven fabric. The grafted fabric was subjected to one of three functionalization reactions to impart desired ionic characters. This included treatment with (1) N-dimethyl-D-glucamine, (2) triethylamine and (3) triethylamine and alkalisation with KOH. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to study the changes in chemical and physical structures of the obtained fibrous adsorbents. The potential applications of the three adsorbents for removal of boron from solutions, capturing CO2 from CO2/N2 mixtures and catalysing transesterification of triacetin/methanol to methyl acetate (biodiesel) were explored. The obtained fibrous adsorbents provide potential alternatives to granular resins for the investigated applications and require further development.

  15. Mycotoxin detoxication of animal feed by different adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Huwig, A; Freimund, S; Käppeli, O; Dutler, H

    2001-06-20

    The contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins represents a worldwide problem for farmers. These toxins originate from molds whose growth on living and stored plants is almost unavoidable particularly under moist conditions. Mycotoxin-containing feed can cause serious diseases in farm animals resulting in suffering and even death and thus can cause substantial economic losses. The most applied method for protecting animals against mycotoxicosis is the utilization of adsorbents mixed with the feed which are supposed to bind the mycotoxins efficiently in the gastro-intestinal tract. Aluminosilicates are the preferred adsorbents, followed by activated charcoal and special polymers. The efficiency of mycotoxin binders, however, differs considerably depending mainly on the chemical structure of both the adsorbent and the toxin. This review describes the most important types of adsorbents and the respective mechanisms of adsorption. Data of the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of detoxication are given.

  16. Structure of hydrogen-rich transverse jets in a vitiated turbulent flow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lyra, Sgouria; Wilde, Benjamin; Kolla, Hemanth; Seitzman, Jerry M.; Lieuwen, Timothy C.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2014-11-24

    Our paper reports the results of a joint experimental and numerical study of the flow characteristics and flame structure of a hydrogen rich jet injected normal to a turbulent, vitiated crossflow of lean methane combustion products. Simultaneous high-speed stereoscopic PIV and OH PLIF measurements were obtained and analyzed alongside three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of inert and reacting JICF with detailed H2/COH2/CO chemistry. Both the experiment and the simulation reveal that, contrary to most previous studies of reacting JICF stabilized in low-to-moderate temperature air crossflow, the present conditions lead to a burner-attached flame that initiates uniformly around the burner edge. Significantmore » asymmetry is observed, however, between the reaction zones located on the windward and leeward sides of the jet, due to the substantially different scalar dissipation rates. The windward reaction zone is much thinner in the near field, while also exhibiting significantly higher local and global heat release than the much broader reaction zone found on the leeward side of the jet. The unsteady dynamics of the windward shear layer, which largely control the important jet/crossflow mixing processes in that region, are explored in order to elucidate the important flow stability implications arising in the inert and reacting JICF. The paper concludes with an analysis of the ignition, flame characteristics, and global structure of the burner-attached flame. FurthermoreChemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) shows that the entire windward shear layer, and a large region on the leeward side of the jet, are highly explosive prior to ignition and are dominated by non-premixed flame structures after ignition. The predominantly mixing limited nature of the flow after ignition is examined by computing the Takeno flame index, which shows that ~70% of the heat release occurs in non-premixed regions.« less

  17. Structure of hydrogen-rich transverse jets in a vitiated turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Sgouria; Wilde, Benjamin; Kolla, Hemanth; Seitzman, Jerry M.; Lieuwen, Timothy C.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2014-11-24

    Our paper reports the results of a joint experimental and numerical study of the flow characteristics and flame structure of a hydrogen rich jet injected normal to a turbulent, vitiated crossflow of lean methane combustion products. Simultaneous high-speed stereoscopic PIV and OH PLIF measurements were obtained and analyzed alongside three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of inert and reacting JICF with detailed H2/COH2/CO chemistry. Both the experiment and the simulation reveal that, contrary to most previous studies of reacting JICF stabilized in low-to-moderate temperature air crossflow, the present conditions lead to a burner-attached flame that initiates uniformly around the burner edge. Significant asymmetry is observed, however, between the reaction zones located on the windward and leeward sides of the jet, due to the substantially different scalar dissipation rates. The windward reaction zone is much thinner in the near field, while also exhibiting significantly higher local and global heat release than the much broader reaction zone found on the leeward side of the jet. The unsteady dynamics of the windward shear layer, which largely control the important jet/crossflow mixing processes in that region, are explored in order to elucidate the important flow stability implications arising in the inert and reacting JICF. The paper concludes with an analysis of the ignition, flame characteristics, and global structure of the burner-attached flame. FurthermoreChemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) shows that the entire windward shear layer, and a large region on the leeward side of the jet, are highly explosive prior to ignition and are dominated by non-premixed flame structures after ignition. The predominantly mixing limited nature of the flow after ignition is examined by computing the Takeno flame index, which shows that ~70% of the heat release occurs in non-premixed regions.

  18. Fabrication of two-dimensional visible wavelength nanoscale plasmonic structures using hydrogen silsesquioxane based resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kyle Z.; Gadde, Akshitha; Kadiyala, Anand; Dawson, Jeremy M.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, the global market for biosensors has continued to increase in combination with their expanding use in areas such as biodefense/detection, home diagnostics, biometric identification, etc. A constant necessity for inexpensive, portable bio-sensing methods, while still remaining simple to understand and operate, is the motivation behind novel concepts and designs. Labeled visible spectrum bio-sensing systems provide instant feedback that is both simple and easy to work with, but are limited by the light intensity thresholds required by the imaging systems. In comparison, label-free bio-sensing systems and other detection modalities like electrochemical, frequency resonance, thermal change, etc., can require additional technical processing steps to convey the final result, increasing the system's complexity and possibly the time required for analysis. Further decrease in the detection limit can be achieved through the addition of plasmonic structures into labeled bio-sensing systems. Nano-structures that operate in the visible spectrum have feature sizes typically in the order of the operating wavelength, calling for high aspect ratio nanoscale fabrication capabilities. In order to achieve these dimensions, electron beam lithography (EBL) is used due to its accurate feature production. Hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) based electron beam resist is chosen for one of its benefits, which is after exposure to oxygen plasma, the patterned resist cures into silicon dioxide (SiO2). These cured features in conjunction with nanoscale gold particles help in producing a high electric field through dipole generation. In this work, a detailed process flow of the fabrication of square lattice of plasmonic structures comprising of gold coated silicon dioxide pillars designed to operate at 560 nm wavelength and produce an intensity increase of roughly 100 percent will be presented.

  19. Hydrogen Rearrangement Rules: Computational MS/MS Fragmentation and Structure Elucidation Using MS-FINDER Software.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Kind, Tobias; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yukihira, Daichi; Tanaka, Wataru; Cajka, Tomas; Saito, Kazuki; Fiehn, Oliver; Arita, Masanori

    2016-08-16

    Compound identification from accurate mass MS/MS spectra is a bottleneck for untargeted metabolomics. In this study, we propose nine rules of hydrogen rearrangement (HR) during bond cleavages in low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). These rules are based on the classic even-electron rule and cover heteroatoms and multistage fragmentation. We evaluated our HR rules by the statistics of MassBank MS/MS spectra in addition to enthalpy calculations, yielding three levels of computational MS/MS annotation: "resolved" (regular HR behavior following HR rules), "semiresolved" (irregular HR behavior), and "formula-assigned" (lacking structure assignment). With this nomenclature, 78.4% of a total of 18506 MS/MS fragment ions in the MassBank database and 84.8% of a total of 36370 MS/MS fragment ions in the GNPS database were (semi-) resolved by predicted bond cleavages. We also introduce the MS-FINDER software for structure elucidation. Molecular formulas of precursor ions are determined from accurate mass, isotope ratio, and product ion information. All isomer structures of the predicted formula are retrieved from metabolome databases, and MS/MS fragmentations are predicted in silico. The structures are ranked by a combined weighting score considering bond dissociation energies, mass accuracies, fragment linkages, and, most importantly, nine HR rules. The program was validated by its ability to correctly calculate molecular formulas with 98.0% accuracy for 5063 MassBank MS/MS records and to yield the correct structural isomer with 82.1% accuracy within the top-3 candidates. In a test with 936 manually identified spectra from an untargeted HILIC-QTOF MS data set of human plasma, formulas were correctly predicted in 90.4% of the cases, and the correct isomer structure was retrieved at 80.4% probability within the top-3 candidates, including for compounds that were absent in mass spectral libraries. The MS-FINDER software is freely available at http

  20. Hydrogen Rearrangement Rules: Computational MS/MS Fragmentation and Structure Elucidation Using MS-FINDER Software.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Kind, Tobias; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yukihira, Daichi; Tanaka, Wataru; Cajka, Tomas; Saito, Kazuki; Fiehn, Oliver; Arita, Masanori

    2016-08-16

    Compound identification from accurate mass MS/MS spectra is a bottleneck for untargeted metabolomics. In this study, we propose nine rules of hydrogen rearrangement (HR) during bond cleavages in low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). These rules are based on the classic even-electron rule and cover heteroatoms and multistage fragmentation. We evaluated our HR rules by the statistics of MassBank MS/MS spectra in addition to enthalpy calculations, yielding three levels of computational MS/MS annotation: "resolved" (regular HR behavior following HR rules), "semiresolved" (irregular HR behavior), and "formula-assigned" (lacking structure assignment). With this nomenclature, 78.4% of a total of 18506 MS/MS fragment ions in the MassBank database and 84.8% of a total of 36370 MS/MS fragment ions in the GNPS database were (semi-) resolved by predicted bond cleavages. We also introduce the MS-FINDER software for structure elucidation. Molecular formulas of precursor ions are determined from accurate mass, isotope ratio, and product ion information. All isomer structures of the predicted formula are retrieved from metabolome databases, and MS/MS fragmentations are predicted in silico. The structures are ranked by a combined weighting score considering bond dissociation energies, mass accuracies, fragment linkages, and, most importantly, nine HR rules. The program was validated by its ability to correctly calculate molecular formulas with 98.0% accuracy for 5063 MassBank MS/MS records and to yield the correct structural isomer with 82.1% accuracy within the top-3 candidates. In a test with 936 manually identified spectra from an untargeted HILIC-QTOF MS data set of human plasma, formulas were correctly predicted in 90.4% of the cases, and the correct isomer structure was retrieved at 80.4% probability within the top-3 candidates, including for compounds that were absent in mass spectral libraries. The MS-FINDER software is freely available at http://prime.psc.riken.jp/ .

  1. Pressure-Induced Phase Transition in Guanidinium Perchlorate: A Supramolecular Structure Directed by Hydrogen Bonding and Electrostatic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shourui; Li, Qian; Wang, Kai; Tan, Xiao; Zhou, Mi; Li, Bing; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-01-20

    In situ Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments have been performed to investigate the response of guanidinium perchlorate (C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup +} {center_dot} ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, GP) to high pressures of {approx}11 GPa. GP exhibits a typical supramolecular structure of two-dimensional (2D) hydrogen-bonded ionic networks at ambient conditions. A subtle phase transition, accompanied by the symmetry transformation from R3m to C2, has been confirmed by obvious changes in both Raman and XRD patterns at 4.5 GPa. The phase transition is attributed to the competition between hydrogen bonds and close packing of the supramolecular structure at high pressure. Hydrogen bonds have been demonstrated to evolve into a distorted state through the phase transition, accompanied by the reduction in separation of oppositely charged ions in adjacent sheet motifs. A detailed mechanism of the phase transition, as well as the cooperativity between hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions, is discussed by virtue of the local nature of the structure.

  2. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  3. Hydrogen passivation of n+p and p+n heteroepitaxial InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, B.; Ringel, S. A.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    High-efficiency, heteroepitaxial (HE) InP solar cells, grown on GaAs, Si or Ge substrates, are desirable for their mechanically strong, light-weight and radiation-hard properties. However, dislocations, caused by lattice mismatch, currently limit the performance of the HE cells. This occurs through shunting paths across the active photovoltaic junction and by the formation of deep levels. In previous work we have demonstrated that plasma hydrogenation is an effective and stable means to passivate the electrical activity of dislocations in specially designed HE InP test structures. In this work, we present the first report of successful hydrogen passivation in actual InP cell structures grown on GaAs substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We have found that a 2 hour exposure to a 13.56 MHz hydrogen plasma at 275 C reduces the deep level concentration in HE n+n InP cell structures from as-grown values of approximately 10(exp 15)/cm(exp -3), down to 1-2 x 10(exp 13)/cm(exp -3). The deep levels in the p-type base region of the cell structure match those of our earlier p-type test structures, which were attributed to dislocations or related point defect complexes. All dopants were successfully reactivated by a 400 C, 5 minute anneal with no detectable activation of deep levels. I-V analysis indicated a subsequent approximately 10 fold decrease in reverse leakage current at -1 volt reverse bias, and no change in the forward biased series resistance of the cell structure which indicates complete reactivation of the n+ emitter. Furthermore, electrochemical C-V profiling indicates greatly enhanced passivation depth, and hence hydrogen diffusion, for heteroepitaxial structures when compared with identically processed homoepitaxial n+p InP structures. An analysis of hydrogen diffusion in dislocated InP will be discussed, along with comparisons of passivation effectiveness for n+p versus p+n heteroepitaxial cell configurations. Preliminary hydrogen

  4. Effects of Lewis acid catalysts on the hydrogenation and cracking of two-ring aromatic and hydroaromatic structures related to coal

    SciTech Connect

    Salim, Sadie S.; Bell, Alexis T.

    1982-08-01

    Little is known about the hydrogenation of fused aromatic nuclei during the liquefaction of coal under the influence of Lewis acid catalysts. For this paper, this study was conducted to establish the effects of catalyst acidity on the activity and selectivity of Lewis acid catalysts, the sources of hydrogen involved in hydrogenation and cracking, and the relations between reactant structure and reactivity. Two-ring aromatic and hydroaromatic compounds were used to simulate some of the structural units present in coal. The catalysts examined were ZnCl2 and AlCl3. ZnCl2 is less active than AlCl3 for both hydrogenation and cracking but it does not promote the formation of tars via Scholl condensation: Methyl or hydroxyl substitution of the reactants greatly enhances their reactivity towards hydrogenation and cracking. The source of hydrogen consumed during hydrogenation depends on the choice of catalyst. In the presence of AlCl3, Scholl condensation of aromatic nuclei serves as the principal source of hydrogen. Molecular hydrogen is used exclusively, though, when hydrogenation is catalysed by ZnCl2. The formation of reaction products and the trends in reactant reactivity can be interpreted on the basis of carbonium ion mechanisms. Finally, the results of this study provide a basis for assessing the extent of hydrogenation occurring during the liquefaction of coal using ZnCl2 or AlCl3.

  5. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filali, Larbi; Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine; Bouhekka, Ahmed; Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1-3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) on the hydrogen-rich surfaces. The most important result is that the surface hydrogen content was the dominant factor, compared to wettability and morphology, for protein adsorption.

  6. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species.

  7. Liquid structures of water, methanol, and hydrogen fluoride at ambient conditions from first principles molecular dynamics simulations with a dispersion corrected density functional.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Matthew J; Kuo, I-Feng William; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2011-11-28

    Using first principles molecular dynamics simulations in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble (T = 300 K, p = 1 atm) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange/correlation functional and a dispersion correction due to Grimme, the hydrogen bonding networks of pure liquid water, methanol, and hydrogen fluoride are probed. Although an accurate density is found for water with this level of electronic structure theory, the average liquid densities for both hydrogen fluoride and methanol are overpredicted by 50 and 25%, respectively. The radial distribution functions indicate somewhat overstructured liquid phases for all three compounds. The number of hydrogen bonds per molecule in water is about twice as high as for methanol and hydrogen fluoride, though the ratio of cohesive energy over number of hydrogen bonds is lower for water. An analysis of the hydrogen-bonded aggregates revealed the presence of mostly linear chains in both hydrogen fluoride and methanol, with a few stable rings and chains spanning the simulation box in the case of hydrogen fluoride. Only an extremely small fraction of smaller clusters was found for water, indicating that its hydrogen bond network is significantly more extensive. A special form of water with on average about two hydrogen bonds per molecule yields a hydrogen-bonding environment significantly different from the other two compounds.

  8. Effects of hydrogen on film structure and pitting susceptibility of nickel and 310 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.M.; Chu, W.Y.; Qiao, L.J.; Yang, Q.; Luo, J.L.

    1998-12-31

    Effects of hydrogen on the pitting susceptibility of Ni and 310 stainless steel (SS) were investigated. The results showed that hydrogen changed p-type oxide of 310 SS to n-type while it did not change the p-type oxide of Ni. Hydrogen enhanced remarkably pitting susceptibility of 310 SS. No pitting occurred for over 6 days for the samples without precharged hydrogen in 6% FeCl{sub 3} solution at room temperature. For samples precharged with very small current density of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, pitting occurred within 80 minutes. The pitting even occurred within 2 minutes for the charged samples with current density of 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Hydrogen decreased pitting incubation time, increased pitting initiation density and growth rate. Average pit diameter D increased linearly with logarithm of immersion time t, i.e., D = {alpha} ln(t) + {beta}, where {alpha} and {beta} are constants. The value of constant {alpha} increased with the rise of charging current density. Effect of hydrogen on the pitting of Ni was not so obvious as on 310 SS. The hydrogen interactions with defects both in surface film and metal were used to explain the hydrogen deleterious effects on the resistance to pitting corrosion.

  9. Three-dimensional porous structural MoP2 nanoparticles as a novel and superior catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tianli; Pi, Mingyu; Zhang, Dingke; Chen, Shijian

    2016-10-01

    Transition metal phosphides (TMPs) are burgeoning as novel electrocatalysts to replace noble metals for electrochemical production of hydrogen. In this work, we propose a novel and cost-effective catalyst, molybdenum diphosphide (MoP2) three-dimensional porous structural nanoparticles with superior activity towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). MoP2 nanoparticles catalyst exhibits an onset overpotential of -38 mV, a Tafel slope of 52 mV dev-1 and an exchange current density of 0.038 mA cm-2. Furthermore, the catalyst only needs low overpotentials of -121 and -193 mV to produce operationally relevant cathodic current densities of -10 and -100 mA cm-2, respectively, and its catalytic activity is maintained for at least 24 h. Comparative study with MoP nanoparticles as electrocatalyst for HER clearly indicates that MoP2 with high phosphor component can potentially improve the electrocatalytic activities. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation shows that the higher electrocatalytic activity of MoP2 over MoP can be attributed to a longer Hsbnd P bond length, lower hydrogen adsorption energy, lower HER energy barrier and luxuriant surface active sites. This work may expand the TMPs family to poly-phosphides as active and cost-effective hydrogen electrode for the large-scale hydrogen production.

  10. Enhanced Bio-hydrogen Production from Protein Wastewater by Altering Protein Structure and Amino Acids Acidification Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Naidong; Chen, Yinguang; Chen, Aihui; Feng, Leiyu

    2014-02-01

    Enhanced bio-hydrogen production from protein wastewater by altering protein structure and amino acids acidification type via pH control was investigated. The hydrogen production reached 205.2 mL/g-protein when protein wastewater was pretreated at pH 12 and then fermented at pH 10. The mechanism studies showed that pH 12 pretreatment significantly enhanced protein bio-hydrolysis during the subsequent fermentation stage as it caused the unfolding of protein, damaged the protein hydrogen bonding networks, and destroyed the disulfide bridges, which increased the susceptibility of protein to protease. Moreover, pH 10 fermentation produced more acetic but less propionic acid during the anaerobic fermentation of amino acids, which was consistent with the theory of fermentation type affecting hydrogen production. Further analyses of the critical enzymes, genes, and microorganisms indicated that the activity and abundance of hydrogen producing bacteria in the pH 10 fermentation reactor were greater than those in the control.

  11. The Fine-Structure Lines of Hydrogen in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Brian; Turner, B. E.; Minter, Anthony H.

    2005-11-01

    The 2s1/2 state of hydrogen is metastable and overpopulated in H II regions. In addition, the 2p states may be pumped by ambient Lyα radiation. Fine-structure transitions between these states may be observable in H II regions at 1.1 GHz (2s1/2-2p1/2) and/or 9.9 GHz (2s1/2-2p3/2), although the details of absorption versus emission are determined by the relative populations of the 2s and 2p states. The n=2 level populations are solved with a parameterization that allows for Lyα pumping of the 2p states. The Lyα pumping rate has long been considered uncertain, as it involves solution of the difficult Lyα transfer problem. The density of Lyα photons is set by their creation rate, easily determined from the recombination rate, and their removal rate. Here we suggest that the dominant removal mechanism of Lyα radiation in H II regions is absorption by dust. This circumvents the need to solve the Lyα transfer problem and provides an upper limit to the rate at which the 2p states are populated by Lyα photons. In virtually all cases of interest, the 2p states are predominantly populated by recombination, rather than Lyα pumping. We then solve the radiative transfer problem for the fine-structure lines in the presence of free-free radiation. In the likely absence of Lyα pumping, the 2s1/2-->2p1/2 lines will appear in stimulated emission, and the 2s1/2-->2p3/2 lines in absorption. Because the final 2p states are short lived, these lines are dominated by intrinsic line width (99.8 MHz). In addition, each fine-structure line is a multiplet of three blended hyperfine transitions. Searching for the 9.9 GHz lines in high emission measure H II regions offers the best prospects for detection. The lines are predicted to be weak; in the best cases, line-to-continuum ratios of several tenths of a percent might be expected with line strengths of tens to a hundred mK with the Green Bank Telescope. Predicted line strengths, at both 1.1 and 9.9 GHz, are given for a number of H II

  12. Quasi-particle corrections to the LSDA+U electronic structure of solid bcc hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2005-03-01

    Quasi-particle calculations within the GW approximation usually start with the LDA electronic structure as mean field solution, which works well for moderately correlated materials. For strongly correlated systems, such as the transition metal oxides, LSDA can give qualitatively wrong ground states, making any further improvement difficult. By starting with the LSDA+U mean field results in the GW approximation calculation of the electron self-energy, we expect to have a better understanding of the quasi-particle properties in these systems. We employ this approach in the study of solid hydrogen, a model system for which previous results exist in the literature. This will test the applicability of the technique to more realistic systems. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR04-39768 and by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Computational resources have been provided by NSF at the National Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (NPACI) and DOE at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)

  13. Structural and Vibrational Properties of Nitrogen-Hydrogen Mixtures at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaulding, Dylan; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Frederic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The chemistry and equations of state of simple molecular systems (e.g. N2, H2, H2O, CO2, CH4 etc.) in the dense fluid state are of extreme importance to planetary astrophysics and are model systems for understanding the effects of pressure on chemical bonding, reactivity in the solid solution and potentially new routes to pressure-induced metallization. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of the binary N2/H2 system in the diamond anvil cell using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron infrared micro-spectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure compounds which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 (R-3m) and N2(H2)2 (Pm-3m) using single-crystal x-ray diffraction. The former has a novel rhombohedral structure in which groups of hydrogen molecules are contained by the nitrogen lattice. We discuss further infrared absorption studies on this compound, including evidence for a gradual transformation from van der Waals to ionic interactions with pressure. A phase transition to an ionic compound with the same stoichiometry is observed at 55 GPa. Compression of this compound was carried out up to 200 GPa to investigate possible metallization.

  14. Modification of structure and magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial CoFe₂O₄ films by hydrogen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiping; Poudyal, Narayan; Xiong, Jie; Liu, J. Ping; Jia, Quanxi

    2015-03-16

    Heteroepitaxial CoFe₂O₄ (CFO) thin films with different thicknesses were deposited on MgO (001) substrates. The as-deposited CFO films show a clear switching of magnetic anisotropy with increasing film thickness. The thinner films (<100 nm) show a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to the out-of-plane compressive strain. The thicker films exhibit an in-plane easy axis owing to the dominating shape anisotropy effect. The magnetostriction coefficient of CFO films is estimated to be λ[001] =-188 × 10⁻⁶. Metallic CoFe₂ films were obtained by annealing the as-deposited CFO films in forming gas (Ar 93% + H₂ 7%) at 450 °C. XRD shows that CoFe₂ films are textured out-of-plane and aligned in-plane, owing to lattice matching between CoFe₂ and MgO substrate. TEM results indicate that as-deposited films are continuous while the annealed films exhibit a nanopore mushroom structure. The magnetic anisotropy of CoFe₂ films is dominated by the shape effect. The results demonstrate that hydrogen reduction can be effectively used to modify microstructures and physical properties of complex metal oxide materials.

  15. A New Molybdenum Nitride Catalyst with Rhombohedral MoS2 Structure for Hydrogenation Applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Shanmin; Ge, Hui; Sun, Shouli; Zhang, Jianzhong; Liu, Fangming; Wen, Xiaodong; Yu, Xiaohui; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Hongwu; et al

    2015-03-23

    Nitrogen-rich transition-metal nitrides hold great promise to be the next-generation catalysts for clean and renewable energy applications. However, incorporation of nitrogen into the crystalline lattices of transition metals is thermodynamically unfavorable at atmospheric pressure; most of the known transition metal nitrides are nitrogen-deficient with molar ratios of N:metal less than a unity. In this work, we have formulated a high-pressure route for the synthesis of a nitrogen-rich molybdenum nitride through a solid-state ion-exchange reaction. The newly discovered nitride, 3R-MoN2, adopts a rhombohedral R3m structure, isotypic with MoS2. This new nitride exhibits catalytic activities that are three times more active thanmore » the traditional catalyst MoS2 for the hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene and more than twice as high in the selectivity to hydrogenation. The nitride is also catalytically active in sour methanation of syngas with >80% CO and H2 conversion at 723 K. Lastly, our formulated route for the synthesis of 3R-MoN2 is at a moderate pressure of 3.5 GPa and, thus, is feasible for industrial-scale catalyst production.« less

  16. Modification of structure and magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial CoFe₂O₄ films by hydrogen reduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Aiping; Poudyal, Narayan; Xiong, Jie; Liu, J. Ping; Jia, Quanxi

    2015-03-16

    Heteroepitaxial CoFe₂O₄ (CFO) thin films with different thicknesses were deposited on MgO (001) substrates. The as-deposited CFO films show a clear switching of magnetic anisotropy with increasing film thickness. The thinner films (<100 nm) show a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to the out-of-plane compressive strain. The thicker films exhibit an in-plane easy axis owing to the dominating shape anisotropy effect. The magnetostriction coefficient of CFO films is estimated to be λ[001] =-188 × 10⁻⁶. Metallic CoFe₂ films were obtained by annealing the as-deposited CFO films in forming gas (Ar 93% + H₂ 7%) at 450 °C. XRD shows that CoFe₂more » films are textured out-of-plane and aligned in-plane, owing to lattice matching between CoFe₂ and MgO substrate. TEM results indicate that as-deposited films are continuous while the annealed films exhibit a nanopore mushroom structure. The magnetic anisotropy of CoFe₂ films is dominated by the shape effect. The results demonstrate that hydrogen reduction can be effectively used to modify microstructures and physical properties of complex metal oxide materials.« less

  17. Silicon network structure and 29Si spin-lattice relaxation in amorphous hydrogenated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Man Ken; Petrich, Mark A.

    1992-04-01

    We report a NMR study of amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) that measures the 29Si spin-lattice relaxation time T1. Measurements of 29Si T1 are useful in learning about the silicon network structure and the localized states within the mobility gap. Coupling to paramagnetic dangling bonds is the predominant 29Si spin-lattice relaxation mechanism in a-Si:H. Spin flipping of paramagnetic electrons, caused by coupling to the lattice, produces fluctuating local fields that stimulate nuclear spin-lattice relaxation. By comparing our experimental results with existing theory, we find that dangling bonds are randomly distributed in device-quality materials but are inhomogeneously distributed in non-device-quality materials. We also find that there are two simultaneously occurring dangling-bond spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms: one through the spin-orbit coupling modulated by thermal excitation of ``two-level systems,'' and the other through hopping conduction between localized states near the Fermi level. Simple chemical-shift measurements are also helpful in characterizing a-Si:H. We find that the 29Si resonance shifts upfield with increasing microstructure in the material.

  18. Structure of Nanoporous Biocarbon for Hydrogen Storage as Determined by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Mikael; Burress, J.; Pobst, J.; Carter, S.; Pfeifer, P.; Wexler, C.; Shah, P.; Suppes, G.

    2008-03-01

    As a member of the Alliance for Collaborative Research in Alternative Fuel Technology (ALL-CRAFT) our research group studies the properties of nanoporous biocarbon, produced from waste corn cob, with the goal of achieving the Department of Energy's gravimetric and volumetric standards for both hydrogen and methane gas storage. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) is a valuable tool in our investigation of the geometry of the pore space in our carbon samples. In this talk, we will compare the experimental SAXS data with theoretical results for various pore geometries to determine which pore models are consistent with experiment. Using data from nitrogen adsorption isotherms, along with SAXS, yields significant structural information about the pore space. This analysis should allow us to fully optimize our production process and to achieve the DOE's target storage capacities. This work supported by: 1. National Science Foundation (PFI-0438469) 2. U.S. Department of Education (P200A040038) 3. U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-06CH11357) 4. University of Missouri (RB-06-040) 5. U.S. Department of Defense (N00164-07-P-1306) 6. U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-07ER46411)

  19. Li-Ge-H system: Hydrogenation and structural properties of LiGeHx (0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuk, V.; Ciesielski, W.; Kulawik, D.; Prochwicz, W.; Rożdżyńska-Kiełbik, B.

    2016-11-01

    The synthesis, isothermal section at 450 °C of the Li-Ge-H system in the concentration region from 40 at.% Li