Science.gov

Sample records for hydrogen balmer emission

  1. Doppler shift measurement of Balmer-alpha line spectrum emission from a plasma in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Doi, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-04-08

    Balmer-α light emission from the extraction region of the LHD one-third ion source has shown a characteristic Doppler broadening in the wavelength spectrum detected by a high resolution spectrometer. The spectrum resembles Gaussian distribution near the wavelength of the intensity peak, while it has an additional component of a broader foot. The measured broadening near the wavelength of the intensity peak corresponds to 0.6 eV hydrogen atom temperature. The spectrum exhibits a larger expansion in the blue wing which becomes smaller when the line of sight is tilted toward the driver region from the original observation axis parallel to the plasma grid. A surface collision simulation model predicts the possibility of hydrogen reflection at the plasma grid surface to form a broad Balmer-α light emission spectrum.

  2. Cascade excitation in the geocoronal hydrogen Balmer α line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S.; Roesler, F. L.; Coakley, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports high-accuracy measurements of geocoronal Balmer α line profiles and demonstrates that the profiles are well fit with a model which includes cascade excitation by solar Lyman series radiation from n>3 in addition to the direct excitation of n=3 by solar Lyman β. The increase in the signal-to-noise of our data is made possible by the use of the Fabry-Perot annular summing technique implemented at our Fabry-Perot facility at the University of Wisconsin's Pine Bluff Observatory. The new sensitivity has allowed us to make a detailed examination of line profile asymmetries and to conclude that they are compatible with predictions that of the order of 10% of the geocoronal Balmer α emission is caused by the cascade process. Cascade excitation alters the observed profile because it produces Balmer α emission along fine structure paths yielding slightly shifted wavelengths not present in direct Lyman β excitation, which is the predominant excitation mechanism for geocoronal Balmer α. We discuss how fine structure excitation affects studies of non-Maxwellian exospheric hydrogen velocity distributions and effective temperatures through Balmer α line profile measurements. In a broader context, we consider how inclusion of the cascade excited emission in future radiation models can enhance their accuracy and their potential for assisting in the isolation in the data of shorter-term solar geophysical effects and longer timescale changes in exospheric hydrogen densities.

  3. HYDROGEN BALMER CONTINUUM IN SOLAR FLARES DETECTED BY THE INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzel, P.; Kleint, L.

    2014-10-20

    We present a novel observation of the white light flare (WLF) continuum, which was significantly enhanced during the X1 flare on 2014 March 29 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48). Data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in its near-UV channel show that at the peak of the continuum enhancement, the contrast at the quasi-continuum window above 2813 Å reached 100%-200% and can be even larger closer to Mg II lines. This is fully consistent with the hydrogen recombination Balmer-continuum emission, which follows an impulsive thermal and non-thermal ionization caused by the precipitation of electron beams through the chromosphere. However, a less probable photospheric continuum enhancement cannot be excluded. The light curves of the Balmer continuum have an impulsive character with a gradual fading, similar to those detected recently in the optical region on the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. This observation represents a first Balmer-continuum detection from space far beyond the Balmer limit (3646 Å), eliminating seeing effects known to complicate the WLF detection. Moreover, we use a spectral window so far unexplored for flare studies, which provides the potential to study the Balmer continuum, as well as many metallic lines appearing in emission during flares. Combined with future ground-based observations of the continuum near the Balmer limit, we will be able to disentangle various scenarios of the WLF origin. IRIS observations also provide a critical quantitative measure of the energy radiated in the Balmer continuum, which constrains various models of the energy transport and deposit during flares.

  4. Hydrogen Balmer Line Broadening in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Uitenbroek, Han; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Brown, Stephen; Carlsson, Mats; Osten, Rachel A.; Wisniewski, John P.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2017-03-01

    The broadening of the hydrogen lines during flares is thought to result from increased charge (electron, proton) density in the flare chromosphere. However, disagreements between theory and modeling prescriptions have precluded an accurate diagnostic of the degree of ionization and compression resulting from flare heating in the chromosphere. To resolve this issue, we have incorporated the unified theory of electric pressure broadening of the hydrogen lines into the non-LTE radiative-transfer code RH. This broadening prescription produces a much more realistic spectrum of the quiescent, A0 star Vega compared to the analytic approximations used as a damping parameter in the Voigt profiles. We test recent radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the atmospheric response to high nonthermal electron beam fluxes with the new broadening prescription and find that the Balmer lines are overbroadened at the densest times in the simulations. Adding many simultaneously heated and cooling model loops as a “multithread” model improves the agreement with the observations. We revisit the three-component phenomenological flare model of the YZ CMi Megaflare using recent and new RHD models. The evolution of the broadening, line flux ratios, and continuum flux ratios are well-reproduced by a multithread model with high-flux nonthermal electron beam heating, an extended decay phase model, and a “hot spot” atmosphere heated by an ultrarelativistic electron beam with reasonable filling factors: ∼0.1%, 1%, and 0.1% of the visible stellar hemisphere, respectively. The new modeling motivates future work to understand the origin of the extended gradual phase emission.

  5. A Guided-Inquiry Lab for the Analysis of the Balmer Series of the Hydrogen Atomic Spectrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.

    2011-01-01

    A guided-inquiry lab was developed to analyze the Balmer series of the hydrogen atomic spectrum. The emission spectrum of hydrogen was recorded with a homemade benchtop spectrophotometer. By drawing graphs and a trial-and-error approach, students discover the linear relationship presented in the Rydberg formula and connect it with the Bohr model…

  6. Measurement of the deuterium Balmer series line emission on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. R.; Huang, J.; Gao, W.; Gao, W.; Xu, Z.; Chang, J. F.; Hou, Y. M.; Jin, Z.; Xu, J. C.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhang, P. F.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, L.; Wu, Z. W.; Li, J. G.

    2016-11-01

    Volume recombination plays an important role towards plasma detachment for magnetically confined fusion devices. High quantum number states of the Balmer series of deuterium are used to study recombination. On EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), two visible spectroscopic measurements are applied for the upper/lower divertor with 13 channels, respectively. Both systems are coupled with Princeton Instruments ProEM EMCCD 1024B camera: one is equipped on an Acton SP2750 spectrometer, which has a high spectral resolution ˜0.0049 nm with 2400 gr/mm grating to measure the Dα(Hα) spectral line and with 1200 gr/mm grating to measure deuterium molecular Fulcher band emissions and another is equipped on IsoPlane SCT320 using 600 gr/mm to measure high-n Balmer series emission lines, allowing us to study volume recombination on EAST and to obtain the related line averaged plasma parameters (Te, ne) during EAST detached phases. This paper will present the details of the measurements and the characteristics of deuterium Balmer series line emissions during density ramp-up L-mode USN plasma on EAST.

  7. Hydrogen Balmer Series Self-Absorption Measurement in Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Parigger, Christian

    2015-05-01

    In experimental studies of laser-induced plasma, we use focused Nd:YAG laser radiation to generate optical breakdown in laboratory air. A Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and an ICCD camera are utilized to record spatially and temporally resolved spectra. Time-resolved spectroscopy methods are employed to record plasma dynamics for various time delays in the range of 0.300 microsecond to typically 10 microsecond after plasma initiation. Early plasma emission spectra reveal hydrogen alpha and ionized nitrogen lines for time delays larger than 0.3 microsecond, the hydrogen beta line emerges from the free-electron background radiation later in the plasma decay for time delays in excess of 1 microsecond. The self-absorption analyses include comparisons of recorded data without and with the use of a doubling mirror. The extent of self-absorption of the hydrogen Balmer series is investigated for various time delays from plasma generation. There are indications of self-absorption of hydrogen alpha by comparison with ionized nitrogen lines at a time delay of 0.3 microsecond. For subsequent time delays, self-absorption effects on line-widths are hardly noticeable, despite the fact of the apparent line-shape distortions. Of interest are comparisons of inferred electron densities from hydrogen alpha and hydrogen beta lines as the plasma decays, including assessments of spatial variation of electron density.

  8. Use of Fabry-Perot annular summing spectroscopy to acquire geocoronal hydrogen Balmer-α line profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, Susan M.; Roesler, Fred L.; Coakley, Monica M.; Reynolds, Ronald J.

    1996-10-01

    A Fabry-Perot annular summing spectroscopy technique has been sued at the University of Wisconsin's Pine Bluff Observatory to acquire geocoronal Balmer-(alpha) line profile data with significantly improved precision and height resolution. The double-etalon Fabry-Perot interference pattern is imaged onto a photometrics PM512 CCD chip, thus enabling light to be gathered in multiple spectral bins simultaneously. In comparison with scanning systems we used earlier, the high quantum efficiency of the CCD and the multi-channel detection associated with the Fabry-Perot annular summing technique have enabled us to save a factor of about 10 in the integration time required for studies of the line profile. As a result, we are now able to both more precisely observe the line shape of the very faint Balmer- (alpha) emission and obtain data using shorter integration times. Our data illustrate the scientific potential for using this technique for the study of very faint extended emission line sources. The increase in the signal-to-noise of our data has enabled us to examine Balmer-(alpha) profile asymmetries which we have found to be compatible with predictions that on the order of 10 percent of the geocoronal Balmer-(alpha) excitation arises from cascades due to higher-member solar Lyman series excitation. This fine structure was overlooked in previous Balmer-(alpha) studies aimed at determining non-Maxwellian dynamical properties of exospheric hydrogen; we find that cascade excitation largely masks the expected very small dynamical perturbations to the line profile at low shadow heights, and must be more thoroughly studied before drawing conclusions about exospheric dynamics. Accounting for cascade laos leads to more realistic determinations of exospheric hydrogen temperatures near the exobase.

  9. Hydrogen Balmer alpha intensity distributions and line profiles from multiple scattering theory using realistic geocoronal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The H Balmer alpha nightglow is investigated by using Monte Carlo models of asymmetric geocoronal atomic hydrogen distributions as input to a radiative transfer model of solar Lyman-beta radiation in the thermosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that it is essential to include multiple scattering of Lyman-beta radiation in the interpretation of Balmer alpha airglow data. Observations of diurnal variation in the Balmer alpha airglow showing slightly greater intensities in the morning relative to evening are consistent with theory. No evidence is found for anything other than a single sinusoidal diurnal variation of exobase density. Dramatic changes in effective temperature derived from the observed Balmer alpha line profiles are expected on the basis of changing illumination conditions in the thermosphere and exosphere as different regions of the sky are scanned.

  10. Variations of the ultraviolet Fe II and Balmer continuum emission in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maoz, D.; Netzer, H.; Peterson, B. M.; Bechtold, J.; Bertram, R.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Carone, T. E.; Dietrich, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Kollatschny, W.

    1993-01-01

    We present measurements of the Balmer continuum/Fe II emission blend between 2160 and 4130 A in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548. The measurements are from spectra obtained as part of the combined space-based and ground-based monitoring program of this object in 1988-1989. An iterative scheme is used to determine and subtract the continuum emission underlying the emission blend so as to obtain a light curve sampled once every four days. The small blue bump is an important component of the emission-line cooling, constituting about one third of the line flux in this object. Its flux varies with an amplitude of approximately +/- 20 percent about the mean, similar to the amplitude of the Balmer line variations during the same period. Its light curve resembles that of Ly-alpha, with a lag of about 10 days behind the continuum variations. The bump variation amplitude is independent of the wavelength interval where it is measured, which indicates that both the Balmer continuum and Fe II emission have comparable variation amplitudes. These results suggest that the Fe II UV multiplets and the Balmer continuum are emitted in the same parts of the broad-line region as most other broad emission lines in this object.

  11. Anomalous Doppler broadening caused by exothermic reactions: application to hydrogen Balmer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J.; Amorim, J.

    2011-08-01

    The three- and one-dimensional velocity distributions of a product species created by an exothermic reaction are calculated using the energy conservation, with the aim of evaluating the impact of such processes on the anomalous broadening of Doppler lines. The calculations are performed to the reaction H{2/+} + H2 → H{3/+} + H, in which according to Christoffersen (1964) an amount of 1.56 eV is transferred to the product species. It is shown that the deviations relatively to Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions are significant as the internal energy defect ΔE increases, even within energies lower than 1.56 eV, and hence the profiles of excited H∗ atoms, associated with the emission of hydrogen Balmer lines, created in the sequence of H( n = 1) produced by the above reaction are not of Gaussian-type. The profiles are markedly flatter and squarer than Gaussian distributions. The validity of the species temperature determined from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the lines, as well as the fit of the lines by multimodal Gaussian functions, is then analyzed.

  12. Inferring divertor plasma properties from hydrogen Balmer and Paschen series spectroscopy in JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomanowski, B. A.; Meigs, A. G.; Sharples, R. M.; Stamp, M.; Guillemaut, C.; Contributors, JET

    2015-11-01

    A parametrised spectral line profile model is formulated to investigate the diagnostic scope for recovering plasma parameters from hydrogenic Balmer and Paschen series spectroscopy in the context of JET-ILW divertor plasmas. The separate treatment of Zeeman and Stark contributions in the line model is tested against the PPP-B code which accounts for their combined influence on the spectral line shape. The proposed simplified model does not fully reproduce the Stark-Zeeman features for the α and β transitions, but good agreement is observed in the line width and wing profiles, especially for n  >  5. The line model has been applied to infer radial density profiles in the JET-ILW divertor with generally good agreement between the D 5\\to 2 , 5\\to 3 , 6\\to 2 , 7\\to 2 and 9\\to 2 lines for high recycling and detached conditions. In an L-mode detached plasma pulse the Langmuir probe measurements typically underestimated the density by a factor 2-3 and overestimated the electron temperature by a factor of 5-10 compared to spectroscopically derived values. The line model is further used to generate synthetic high-resolution spectra for low-n transitions to assess the potential for parameter recovery using a multi-parametric fitting technique. In cases with 4 parameter fits with a single Maxwellian neutral temperature component the D 4\\to 3 line yields the best results with parameter estimates within 10% of the input values. For cases with 9 parameter fits inclusive of a multi-component neutral velocity distribution function the quality of the fits is degraded. Simultaneous fitting of the D 3\\to 2 and 4\\to 3 profiles improves the fit quality significantly, highlighting the importance of complementary spectroscopic measurements for divertor plasma emission studies.

  13. Stimulated emission and the flat Balmer decrements of cataclysmic variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, M.; Ferland, G. J.; Mathews, S. G.; Shields, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Balmer emission lines from cataclysmic variables often have nearly equal intensities rather than the rapid decrement predicted by simple nebular theory. Traditionally, this has been interpreted in terms of local thermodynamic equilibrium emission from a dense gas with small volume located just above the accretion disk. It is shown that the intense radiation field within a close binary system can affect excited state populations and optical emission in ways which allow a relatively low density gas to closely mimic the high density situation. In at least one case, the old nova V603 Aql, the emitting gas has a low density and nearly fills the orbital plane of the system. If this is characteristic of other systems, then the determination of orbital parameters and masses of cataclysmic variables from emission line radial velocities, as well as the prediction of soft X-ray emission from accreting binaries, will be affected.

  14. Geocoronal Balmer-alpha Emission Observed by the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper During the Southern Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Haffner, L. M.; Nossal, S. M.; Wilson, M. L.; Freer, C. W.; Babler, B.; Gardner, D.; Roesler, F. L.

    2015-12-01

    After a successful eleven-year run at Kitt Peak Observatory (AZ), the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) was moved to Cerro Tololo (Chile) in 2009 to complete the southern portion of the Galactic Balmer-alpha survey. Although WHAM is primarily used for making observations of the interstellar medium, the terrestrial emission present in each of WHAM's astronomical spectra offers a rich resource for studying the Earth's atmosphere. Here we present an overview of the terrestrial Balmer-alpha emission collected during WHAM's first five years of operation under southern skies. Seasonal trends and comparisons with northern hemisphere observations will be discussed. WHAM can detect Balmer-alpha emission as faint as 0.05R in a 30s exposure, covering a 200 km/s (4.4 Angstrom) spectral region with 12 km/s spectral resolution from a 1 degree beam on the sky. With this sensitivity, hundreds of spectra can be collected in a single clear night. Although not capable of fully resolving the geocoronal Balmer-alpha line profile itself, WHAM's sensitivity makes it an exceptional instrument for geocoronal Balmer-alpha intensity observations. This work is supported by NSF award AGS-1352311 and AST-1108911.

  15. Upper Limits to Balmer-Line Emission in Three Z approximately 2 Damped Lyman- alpha Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, E. M.; Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.; Hodapp, K.-W.

    1993-12-01

    We have searched for Hα and Hβ emission in the high-z damped Lyα systems toward the quasars PHL 957, Q0528-250, and Q0836+ 113. We failed to detect the Balmer lines with 2 σ upper limits on Hα of around 2 x 10^-16^ ergs cm^2^ s^-1^, with similar limits on [O III] and Hβ for the first two systems. The results suggest that the weak or undetectable Lyα emission in these systems is not simply a consequence of dust destruction, but reflects a relatively low star-formation rate. For the Lyα emitting companion to PKL 957 we report an Hα flux of 3.6 +/- 1.5 x 10^-16^ ergs cm^2^ s^-1^, implying f(Lyα)/f(Hα) >= 1.6 and suggesting that Lyα cannot be reduced by more than a factor of 10 in this object.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS quasars balmer emission lines (Liu+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Shen, Y.; Bian, F.; Loeb, A.; Tremaine, S.

    2017-03-01

    We start with the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog (Schneider et al. 2010AJ....139.2360S, Cat. VII/260), adopting the spectral measurements of Shen et al. (2011, J/ApJS/194/45). Among the SDSS DR7 quasars, 20,774 are at z < 0.83, where SDSS spectra cover Hβ and [O III] λλ4959, 5007 (hereafter [O III] for short). From this parent sample of 20,774 objects we select a subset of 399 with offset broad Balmer emission lines, based on the spectral region around Hβ and [O III]. Our selection was a combination of automated spectral fitting (Shen et al. 2008, J/ApJ/680/169; 2011, J/ApJS/194/45) and visual examination. Here and throughout, we refer to the 399 objects as the "offset" sample. Using the spectral models, we measure the offset of the broad emission lines relative to the systemic velocity. The systemic redshift is estimated from the core component of [O III], which may be different (by a median offset of 32 km/s with a standard deviation of 125 km/s) from the nominal redshift listed by the DR7 catalog based on the SDSS spectroscopic pipeline (Stoughton et al. 2002AJ....123..485S). Our adopted systemic redshift agrees with the improved redshift for SDSS quasars from Hewett & Wild (2010, J/MNRAS/405/2302) within uncertainties. (1 data file).

  17. Performance of sheath electric field measurement by saturation spectroscopy in Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shusuke; Katayama, Kento; Nakano, Haruhisa; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    We developed a diode laser-based system for measuring the sheath electric fields in low-temperature plasmas. The Stark spectrum of the Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen was measured by saturation spectroscopy with a fine spectral resolution. The spectrum observed experimentally was consistent with the theoretical Stark spectrum, and we succeeded in evaluating the electric field strength on the basis of the experimental Stark spectrum. A sensitive detection limit of 10 V/cm was achieved by the developed system.

  18. On the Origin of the Flare Emission in IRIS’ SJI 2832 Filter:Balmer Continuum or Spectral Lines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleint, Lucia; Heinzel, Petr; Krucker, Säm

    2017-03-01

    Continuum (“white-light,” WL) emission dominates the energetics of flares. Filter-based observations, such as the IRIS SJI 2832 filter, show WL-like brightenings during flares, but it is unclear whether the emission arises from real continuum emission or enhanced spectral lines, possibly turning into emission. The difficulty in filter-based observations, contrary to spectral observations, is to determine which processes contribute to the observed brightening during flares. Here we determine the contribution of the Balmer continuum and the spectral line emission to IRIS’ SJI 2832 emission by analyzing the appropriate passband in simultaneous IRIS NUV spectra. We find that spectral line emission can contribute up to 100% to the observed slitjaw images (SJI) emission, that the relative contributions usually temporally vary, and that the highest SJI enhancements that are observed are most likely because of the Balmer continuum. We conclude that care should be taken when calling SJI 2832 a continuum filter during flares, because the influence of the lines on the emission can be significant.

  19. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  20. Study of neutral hydrogen transport in LHD core plasmas based on high dynamic-range Balmer-α spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2015-06-01

    The radial distributions of the neutral hydrogen atom density and pressure in the large helical device (LHD) and their electron density (ne) dependence were studied. The atom density distribution was determined from a detailed analysis of the intensity-calibrated Balmer-α line profile while the pressure distribution was obtained with a simple one-dimensional analytical model. We determined for the first time the atom density at the centre of a fusion-oriented plasma, which is more than three orders smaller than that at the edge. On the contrary, the atom pressure changes only by a factor of 10 from the edge to core regions. Both the atom density and pressure in the core region have negative ne dependence. The smaller drop of the atom pressure profile and the ne dependence of the atom density were discussed based on the diffusion theory.

  1. Stark spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen balmer-alpha line for electric field measurement in plasmas by saturation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, S.; Katayama, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Detailed structures of electric fields in sheath and pre-sheath regions of various plasmas are interested from the viewpoint of basic plasma physics. Several researchers observed Stark spectra of Doppler-broadened Rydberg states to evaluate electric fields in plasmas; however, these measurements needed high-power, expensive tunable lasers. In this study, we carried out another Stark spectroscopy with a low-cost diode laser system. We applied saturation spectroscopy, which achieves a Doppler-free wavelength resolution, to observe the Stark spectrum of the Balmer-alpha line of atomic hydrogen in the sheath region of a low-pressure hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma was generated in an ICP source which was driven by on-off modulated rf power at 20 kHz. A planar electrode was inserted into the plasma. Weak probe and intense pump laser beams were injected into the plasma from the counter directions in parallel to the electrode surface. The laser beams crossed with a small angle above the electrode. The observed fine-structure spectra showed shifts, deformations, and/or splits when varying the distance between the observation position and the electrode surface. The detection limit for the electric field was estimated to be several tens of V/cm.

  2. On Production Mechanisms For Balmer Line Radiation From 'Cold' Atomic Hydrogen and Deuterium In Fusion Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, John Douglas

    2010-10-29

    Published arguments, which assign dominant roles to atomic metastability and molecular ion dissociation in the production of 'narrow' Zeeman component Balmer line radiation from the tokamak edge plasma, have been examined critically in relation to: l-redistribution by proton collisions, molecular ion-proton equipartition, and ion acceleration by the plasma sheath (scrape-off layer) potential. These processes are found to constrain the contributions from metastable atoms and from dissociative excitation of molecular ions to 'narrow' Balmer spectra emitted from the plasma edge, in relation to the corresponding contributions from electron impact-induced dissociative excitation of neutral molecules.

  3. Emission of fast non-Maxwellian hydrogen atoms in low-density laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Christian; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Pospieszczyk, Albrecht; Dickheuer, Sven

    2017-03-01

    The source of strong and broad emission of the Balmer-α line in mixed plasmas of hydrogen (or deuterium) and noble gases in front of metallic surfaces is a subject of controversial discussion of many plasma types. In this work the excitation source of the Balmer lines is investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy in the plasma device PSI-2. Neutral fast non-Maxwellian hydrogen atoms are produced by acceleration of hydrogen ions towards an electrode immersed into the plasma. By variation of the electrode potential the energy of ions and in turn of reflected fast atoms can be varied in the range of 40-300 eV. The fast atoms in front of the electrode are observed simultaneously by an Echelle spectrometer (0.001 nm/channel) and by an imaging spectrometer (0.01 nm/channel) up to few cm in the plasma. Intense excitation channels of the Balmer lines are observed when hydrogen is mixed with argon or with krypton. Especially in Ar-H and Ar-D mixed plasmas the emission of fast hydrogen atoms is very strong. Intermixing hydrogen with other noble gases (He, Ne or Xe) one observes the same effect however the emission is one order of magnitude less compared to Kr-H or Kr-D plasmas. It is shown, that the key process, impacting this emission, is the binary collision between the fast neutral hydrogen atom and the noble gas atom. Two possible sources of excitation are discussed in details: one is the excitation of hydrogen atoms by argon atoms in the ground state and the second one is the process of the so-called excitation transfer between the metastable states of noble gases and hydrogen. In the latter case the atomic data for excitation of Balmer lines are still not available in literature. Further experimental investigations are required to conclude on the source process of fast atom emission.

  4. Asymmetry of the Balmer-alpha line shape and recovery of the effective hydrogen temperature in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Neverov, V. S. Kukushkin, A. B.; Lisgo, S. W. Kukushkin, A. S.; Alekseev, A. G.

    2015-02-15

    An algorithm for recovering the effective temperature of atoms of hydrogen (and its isotopes) in the tokamak scrape-off layer from the asymmetry of the Balmer-alpha line shape is proposed. The algorithm is based on the parametrization of the asymmetry of the line shape caused by the nonlocal character of neutral hydrogen flux from the wall into the tokamak plasma. The accuracy of the algorithm is tested against the results of simulations of the velocity distribution function of deuterium neutrals in the scrape-off layer by the EIRENE code with the use of the source data on the main plasma component in the quasi-stationary stage of the inductive mode of ITER operation calculated by the SOLPS4.3 (B2-EIRENE) code.

  5. Turbojet emissions, hydrogen versus JP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.; Norgren, C. T.; Anderson, D.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary data from an experimental combustor show that the NOx emission index, g(NO2)/Kg fuel, is about three times greater for hydrogen than for JP at simulated cruise conditions. However, if these results are applied to aircraft designed for a given mission, hydrogen's higher heating value enables the aircraft to have a lower gross weight and a lower fuel flow rate so that the NOx emission rate, Kg (NO2)/hr may be reduced about 30 percent compared to JP. Theoretical kinetics calculations indicate that combustors may be designed for hydrogen that could further decrease NOx emissions by taking advantage of hydrogen's wide flammable limits and high burning velocity.

  6. On the role of atomic metastability in the production of Balmer line radiation from ‘cold’ atomic hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogenic ion impurities in fusion edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2012-03-01

    Published arguments, which assign an important role to atomic metastability in the production of ‘narrow’ Zeeman component radiation from the boundary region of fusion plasmas, are examined critically in relation to l-redistribution by proton and electron collisions, and mixing of unperturbed atomic states by the ion microfield and microfield gradient. It is concluded that these important processes indeed severely constrain the contribution from ‘metastable’ states to the generation of the hydrogen Balmer spectra, for electron concentrations above 1012 cm-3, as pointed out before by the present author (Hey et al 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3555). The analysis of collision-induced l-redistribution represents an extension of that used previously (Hey et al 1996 Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36 583), applicable up to higher electron densities. For comparison purposes, we also consider the question of metastability of ionized helium in a low-temperature plasma, and that of some common hydrogenic impurities (C5+ and Ne9+) in a hydrogen (deuterium) fusion plasma. While for low nuclear charge Z the metastability of 2s1/2 levels is quenched by the plasma environment, it is much reduced in high-Z ions owing to the rapid increase with Z of the two-photon electric dipole (2E1) and magnetic dipole (M1) spontaneous transition rates to the ground state, whereas the role of the plasma in these cases is less important. The main new principle elaborated in this work is the sensitivity of atomic line strengths, and hence collision strengths, to perturbation by the plasma environment for transitions between fine-structure sublevels of the same principal quantum number. As the plasma microfield strength grows, ‘allowed’ transitions diminish in strength, while ‘forbidden’ transitions grow. However, owing to violation of the parity selection rule, there is an overall loss of collision strength available to transitions, resulting from the appearance of significant

  7. Broad Balmer-Line Absorption in SDSS J172341.10+555340.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kentaro

    2010-10-01

    We present the discovery of Balmer-line absorption from Hα to H9 in an iron low-ionizaton broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar, SDSS J172341.10+555340.5, by near-infrared spectroscopy with the Cooled Infrared Spectrograph and Camera for OHS (CISCO) attached to the Subaru Telescope. The redshift of the Balmer-line absorption troughs is 2.0530±0.0003, and it is blueshifted by 5370 km s-1 from the Balmer emission lines. It is more than 4000 km s-1 blueshifted from the previously known UV absorption lines. We detected relatively strong (EWrest = 20 Å) [OIII] emission lines that are similar to those found in other broad absorption line quasars with Balmer-line absorption. We also derived the column density of neutral hydrogen of 5.2 × 1017 cm-2 by using the curve of growth and taking account of Lyα trapping. We searched for UV absorption lines that had the same redshift with Balmer-line absorption, and found Ali III and Fe III absorption lines at z = 2.053 that correspond to previously unidentified absorption lines, and the presence of other blended troughs that were difficult to identify.

  8. The continuum emission spectrum of Hf 2-2 near the Balmer limit and the ORL versus CEL abundance and temperature discrepancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2014-05-01

    The continuum spectrum of the planetary nebula Hf 2-2 close to the Balmer discontinuity is modelled in the context of the long-standing problem of the abundance and temperature discrepancy found when analysing optical recombination lines and collisionally excited forbidden lines in nebulae. Models are constructed using single and double Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions as well as κ-distributions for the energies of the free electrons. New results for the necessary continuum and line emission coefficients are presented calculated with κ-distributed energies. The best fit to the observed continuum spectrum is found to be a model comprising two components with dramatically different temperatures and with a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of electron energies. On the basis of a χ2 analysis, this model is strongly favoured over a model with κ-distributed electron energies.

  9. Geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations and forward-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Bishop, J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.

    2006-05-01

    High spectral resolution geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations from Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) are presented in the context of forward-model analysis. Because Balmer series column emissions depend significantly on multiple scattering, retrieval of hydrogen parameters of general aeronomic interest from these observations (e.g., the hydrogen column abundance) currently requires a forward modeling approach. This capability is provided by the resonance radiative transfer code LYAO_RT. We have recently developed a parametric data-model comparison search procedure employing an extensive grid of radiative transport model input parameters (defining a 6-dimensional parameter space) to map-out bounds for feasible forward model retrieved atomic hydrogen density distributions. We applied this technique to same-night (March, 2000) ground-based Balmer α data from PBO and geocoronal Lyman β measurements from the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) instrument on the Spanish satellite MINISAT-1 (provided by J.F. Gómez and C. Morales of the Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Física Fundamental, INTA, Madrid, Spain) in order to investigate the modeling constraints imposed by two sets of independent geocoronal intensity measurements, both of which rely on astronomical calibration methods. In this poster we explore extending this analysis to the line profile information also contained in the March 2000 PBO Balmer α data set. In general, a decrease in the Doppler width of the Balmer α emission with shadow altitude is a persistent feature in every night of PBO observations in which a wide range of shadow altitudes are observed. Preliminary applications of the LYAO_RT code, which includes the ability to output Doppler line profiles for both the singly and multiply scattered contributions to the Balmer α emission line, displays good qualitative agreement with regard to geocoronal Doppler width trends observed from PBO. Model-data Balmer

  10. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  11. Ultra-fast intensified frame images from an electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasma at 2.45 GHz: some space distributions of visible and monochromatic emissions.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A; Tarvainen, O; Komppula, J; Koivisto, H

    2014-02-01

    First results from an ultra-fast frame image acquisition diagnostic coupled to a 2.45 GHz microwave hydrogen discharge are presented. The plasma reactor has been modified to include a transparent doubled shielded quartz window allowing to viewing the full plasma volume. Pictures describing the breakdown process at 1 μs exposure time have been obtained for integrated visible light signal, Balmer-alpha, Balmer-beta lines, and Fulcher-band. Several different plasma emission distributions are reported. The distribution depends on the magnetic field configuration, incident microwave power, and neutral gas pressure.

  12. Balmer line profiles for infalling T Tauri envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that the Balmer emission lines of T Tauri stars arise in infalling envelopes rather than winds is considered. Line profiles for the upper Balmer lines are presented for models with cone geometry, intended to simulate the basic features of magnetospheric accretion from a circumstellar disk. An escape probability treatment is used to determine line source functions in nonspherically symmetric geometry. Thermalization effects are found to produce nearly symmetric H-alpha line profiles at the same time the higher Balmer series lines exhibit inverse P Cygni profiles. The infall models produce centrally peaked emission line wings, in good agreement with observations of many T Tauri stars. It is suggested that the Balmer emission of many T Tauri stars may be produced in an infalling envelope, with blue shifted absorption contributed by an overlying wind. Some of the observed narrow absorption components with small blueshifts may also arise in the accretion column.

  13. Estrellas Bn: discontinuidad de Balmer; parámetros fundamentales y colores infrarrojos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochetti, Y. R.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L. S.; Granada, A.; Zorec, J.

    2015-08-01

    Bn stars are mainly main sequence objects with B spectral types, that display in their spectra broad hydrogen lines in absorption. This line broadening is originated by high rotational velocities. We know that high rotation is probably an essential factor in the development of the Be phenomenon: B stars with high rotational velocity and hydrogen lines in emission, which present an extended envelope. Thus, it is interesting to analyze Bn stars in a broader context, that includes Be stars, with the purpose of investigating their properties, the link between the formation of the envelopes and rotation, and the conditions which define the presence of emission lines. In this work we study a sample of 62 Bn star and 70 Be star spectra in the Balmer jump region. We analyze the presence and intensity of the second Balmer discontinuity, which reveals the existence of circumstellar material, its correlation with the projected rotational velocity, V sen(i), and the fundamental parameters of the stars. We also study the distribution of both groups in different infrared color-color diagrams, to generate methods to classify them in highly obscured regions. Our study suggests that Bn stars are the late counterpart of Be stars. The high projected rotational velocity, the spectral type distribution in both groups, and the presence of Bn stars with a second Balmer discontinuity in absorption, related with dense material close the photosphere, provide evidence that support this hypothesis.

  14. The Redshifted Hydrogen Balmer and Metastable He 1 Absorption Line System in Mini-FeLoBAL Quasar SDSS J112526.12+002901.3: A Parsec-scale Accretion Inflow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi-Heng; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Ji, Tuo; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhou, Hong-Yan

    2016-10-01

    The accretion of the interstellar medium onto central super-massive black holes is widely accepted as the source of the gigantic energy released by the active galactic nuclei. However, few pieces of observational evidence have been confirmed directly demonstrating the existence of the inflows. The absorption line system in the spectra of quasar SDSS J112526.12+002901.3 presents an interesting example in which the rarely detected hydrogen Balmer and metastable He i absorption lines are found redshifted to the quasar's rest frame along with the low-ionization metal absorption lines Mg ii, Fe ii, etc. The repeated SDSS spectroscopic observations suggest a transverse velocity smaller than the radial velocity. The motion of the absorbing medium is thus dominated by infall. The He i* lines present a powerful probe to the strength of ionizing flux, while the Balmer lines imply a dense environment. With the help of photoionization simulations, we find that the absorbing medium is exposed to the radiation with ionization parameter U ≈ 10-1.8, and the density is n({{H}})≈ {10}9 {{cm}}-3. Thus the absorbing medium is located ˜4 pc away from the central engine. According to the similarity in the distance and physical conditions between the absorbing medium and the torus, we strongly propose the absorption line system as a candidate for the accretion inflow, which originates in the inner surface of the torus.

  15. Formation of broad Balmer wings in symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seok-Jun; Heo, Jeong-Eun; Hong, Chae-Lin; Lee, Hee-Won

    2016-07-01

    Symbiotic stars are binary systems composed of a hot white dwarf and a mass losing giant. In addition to many prominent emission lines symbiotic stars exhibit Raman scattered O VI features at 6825 and 7088 Å. Another notable feature present in the spectra of many symbiotics is the broad wings around Balmer lines. Astrophysical mechanisms that can produce broad wings include Thomson scattering by free electrons and Raman scattering of Ly,β and higher series by neutral hydrogen. In this poster presentation we produce broad wings around Hα and H,β adopting a Monte Carlo techinique in order to make a quantitative comparison of these two mechanisms. Thomson wings are characterized by the exponential cutoff given by the termal width whereas the Raman wings are dependent on the column density and continuum shape in the far UV region. A brief discussion is provided.

  16. The Balmer Lines of He ii in the Blue Wing of the Hydrogen Lyman α Line Observed in a Quiescent Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, J.-C.; Eurin, G.; Curdt, W.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the prominence observations in the Lyman α line of Curdt et al. ( Astron. Astrophys. 511, L4, 2010) and focus on the bump in the blue wing of the line, which we identify with He ii Balmer lines. We determine the transition candidates, derive an upper limit for the width of the profile and an associated non-thermal velocity close to 0 km s-1, with the assumption that the kinetic temperature is equal to the formation temperature. We compare the total intensity with the corresponding H Lyman α intensity and find a ratio much lower than that measured by Ebadi, Vial, and Ajabshirizadeh ( Solar Phys. 257, 91, 2009) in other Lyman lines. We confirm this result with observations performed by Schwartz et al. (private communication, 2014), we discuss a possible interpretation, and suggest that this issue needs to be addressed closely in future observations.

  17. Segunda discontinuidad de Balmer y procesos físicos en envolturas extendidas de estrellas Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibbo, I.; Cruzado, A.; Ringuelet, A.

    We study a group of Be stars in which the second Balmer jump is observed. Our aim is to correlate the second Balmer jump with other spectral features. Spectroscopic observations were performed with the 2.15 m telescope at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito, CASLEO (San Juan, Argentina). In December 2001 and August 2002 high resolution echelle spectra were obtained with a REOSC echelle spectrograph. We find that, when a second Balmer jump in emission is observed, an emission in λ = 4233,17 Å of FeII multiplet 27 is also, generally seen. Besides, the electron temperature of the region of the envelope where the second jump is formed is estimated assuming that radiative recombinations cause the flux emission in the Balmer continuum. The temperature values obtained in this way are found correlated with the measure of the second Balmer jump.

  18. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sam Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-07-07

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer α emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical γ discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  19. Hydrogen/Air Fuel Nozzle Emissions Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.

    2001-01-01

    The use of hydrogen combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines provides significant opportunities to reduce harmful exhaust emissions. Hydrogen has many advantages (no CO2 production, high reaction rates, high heating value, and future availability), along with some disadvantages (high current cost of production and storage, high volume per BTU, and an unknown safety profile when in wide use). One of the primary reasons for switching to hydrogen is the elimination of CO2 emissions. Also, with hydrogen, design challenges such as fuel coking in the fuel nozzle and particulate emissions are no longer an issue. However, because it takes place at high temperatures, hydrogen-air combustion can still produce significant levels of NOx emissions. Much of the current research into conventional hydrocarbon-fueled aircraft gas turbine combustors is focused on NOx reduction methods. The Zero CO2 Emission Technology (ZCET) hydrogen combustion project will focus on meeting the Office of Aerospace Technology goal 2 within pillar one for Global Civil Aviation reducing the emissions of future aircraft by a factor of 3 within 10 years and by a factor of 5 within 25 years. Recent advances in hydrocarbon-based gas turbine combustion components have expanded the horizons for fuel nozzle development. Both new fluid designs and manufacturing technologies have led to the development of fuel nozzles that significantly reduce aircraft emissions. The goal of the ZCET program is to mesh the current technology of Lean Direct Injection and rocket injectors to provide quick mixing, low emissions, and high-performance fuel nozzle designs. An experimental program is planned to investigate the fuel nozzle concepts in a flametube test rig. Currently, a hydrogen system is being installed in cell 23 at NASA Glenn Research Center's Research Combustion Laboratory. Testing will be conducted on a variety of fuel nozzle concepts up to combustion pressures of 350 psia and inlet air temperatures of 1200 F

  20. Hydrogen emission in meteors as a potential marker for the exogenous delivery of organics and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Mandell, Avram M.

    2004-01-01

    We detected hydrogen Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) emission in the spectra of bright meteors and investigated its potential use as a tracer for exogenous delivery of organic matter. We found that it is critical to observe the meteors with high enough spatial resolution to distinguish the 656.46 nm H(alpha) emission from the 657.46 nm intercombination line of neutral calcium, which was bright in the meteor afterglow. The H(alpha) line peak stayed in constant ratio to the atmospheric emissions of nitrogen during descent of the meteoroid. If all of the hydrogen originates in the Earth's atmosphere, the hydrogen atoms are expected to have been excited at T = 4400 K. In that case, we measured an H(2)O abundance in excess of 150 +/- 20 ppm at 80-90 km altitude (assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the air plasma). This compares with an expected <20 ppm from H(2)O in the gas phase. Alternatively, meteoric refractory organic matter (and water bound in meteoroid minerals) could have caused the observed H(alpha) emission, but only if the line is excited in a hot T approximately 10000 K plasma component that is unique to meteoric ablation vapor emissions such as Si(+). Assuming that the Si(+) lines of the Leonid spectrum would need the same hot excitation conditions, and a typical [H]/[C] = 1 in cometary refractory organics, we calculated an abundance ratio [C]/[Si] = 3.9 +/- 1.4 for the dust of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This range agreed with the value of [C]/[Si] = 4.4 measured for comet 1P/Halley dust. Unless there is 10 times more water vapor in the upper atmosphere than expected, we conclude that a significant fraction of the hydrogen atoms in the observed meteor plasma originated in the meteoroid.

  1. Hydrogen emission in meteors as a potential marker for the exogenous delivery of organics and water.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Mandell, Avram M

    2004-01-01

    We detected hydrogen Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) emission in the spectra of bright meteors and investigated its potential use as a tracer for exogenous delivery of organic matter. We found that it is critical to observe the meteors with high enough spatial resolution to distinguish the 656.46 nm H(alpha) emission from the 657.46 nm intercombination line of neutral calcium, which was bright in the meteor afterglow. The H(alpha) line peak stayed in constant ratio to the atmospheric emissions of nitrogen during descent of the meteoroid. If all of the hydrogen originates in the Earth's atmosphere, the hydrogen atoms are expected to have been excited at T = 4400 K. In that case, we measured an H(2)O abundance in excess of 150 +/- 20 ppm at 80-90 km altitude (assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the air plasma). This compares with an expected <20 ppm from H(2)O in the gas phase. Alternatively, meteoric refractory organic matter (and water bound in meteoroid minerals) could have caused the observed H(alpha) emission, but only if the line is excited in a hot T approximately 10000 K plasma component that is unique to meteoric ablation vapor emissions such as Si(+). Assuming that the Si(+) lines of the Leonid spectrum would need the same hot excitation conditions, and a typical [H]/[C] = 1 in cometary refractory organics, we calculated an abundance ratio [C]/[Si] = 3.9 +/- 1.4 for the dust of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This range agreed with the value of [C]/[Si] = 4.4 measured for comet 1P/Halley dust. Unless there is 10 times more water vapor in the upper atmosphere than expected, we conclude that a significant fraction of the hydrogen atoms in the observed meteor plasma originated in the meteoroid.

  2. Searching for the Expelled Hydrogen Envelope in Type I Supernovae via Late-Time Hα Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, J.; Pooley, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Wheeler, J. C.; Szalai, T.; Kelly, P.; MacQueen, P.; Marion, G. H.; Sárneczky, K.

    2017-03-01

    We report the first results from our long-term observational survey aimed at discovering late-time interaction between the ejecta of hydrogen-poor Type I supernovae (SNe I) and the hydrogen-rich envelope expelled from the progenitor star several decades/centuries before explosion. The expelled envelope, moving with a velocity of ∼10–100 km s‑1, is expected to be caught up by the fast-moving SN ejecta several years/decades after explosion, depending on the history of the mass-loss process acting in the progenitor star prior to explosion. The collision between the SN ejecta and the circumstellar envelope results in net emission in the Balmer lines, especially Hα. We look for signs of late-time Hα emission in older SNe Ia/Ibc/IIb with hydrogen-poor ejecta via narrowband imaging. Continuum-subtracted Hα emission has been detected for 13 point sources: 9 SN Ibc, 1 SN IIb, and 3 SN Ia events. Thirty-eight SN sites were observed on at least two epochs, from which three objects (SN 1985F, SN 2005kl, and SN 2012fh) showed significant temporal variation in the strength of their Hα emission in our Direct Imaging Auxiliary Functions Instrument (DIAFI) data. This suggests that the variable emission is probably not due to nearby H ii regions unassociated with the SN and hence is an important additional hint that ejecta–circumstellar medium interaction may take place in these systems. Moreover, we successfully detected the late-time Hα emission from the Type Ib SN 2014C, which was recently discovered as a strongly interacting SN in various (radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray) bands.

  3. Constraining sub-parsec binary supermassive black holes in quasars with multi-epoch spectroscopy. II. The population with kinematically offset broad Balmer emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Bian, Fuyan; Loeb, Abraham; Tremaine, Scott

    2014-07-10

    A small fraction of quasars have long been known to show bulk velocity offsets (of a few hundred to thousands of km s{sup –1}) in the broad Balmer lines with respect to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy. Models to explain these offsets usually invoke broad-line region gas kinematics/asymmetry around single black holes (BHs), orbital motion of massive (∼sub-parsec (sub-pc)) binary black holes (BBHs), or recoil BHs, but single-epoch spectra are unable to distinguish between these scenarios. The line-of-sight (LOS) radial velocity (RV) shifts from long-term spectroscopic monitoring can be used to test the BBH hypothesis. We have selected a sample of 399 quasars with kinematically offset broad Hβ lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release quasar catalog, and have conducted second-epoch optical spectroscopy for 50 of them. Combined with the existing SDSS spectra, the new observations enable us to constrain the LOS RV shifts of broad Hβ lines with a rest-frame baseline of a few years to nearly a decade. While previous work focused on objects with extreme velocity offset (>10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}), we explore the parameter space with smaller (a few hundred km s{sup –1}) yet significant offsets (99.7% confidence). Using cross-correlation analysis, we detect significant (99% confidence) radial accelerations in the broad Hβ lines in 24 of the 50 objects, of ∼10-200 km s{sup –1} yr{sup –1} with a median measurement uncertainty of ∼10 km s{sup –1} yr{sup –1}, implying a high fraction of variability of the broad-line velocity on multi-year timescales. We suggest that 9 of the 24 detections are sub-pc BBH candidates, which show consistent velocity shifts independently measured from a second broad line (either Hα or Mg II) without significant changes in the broad-line profiles. Combining the results on the general quasar population studied in Paper I, we find a tentative anti-correlation between the velocity offset in the

  4. Hydrogen emissivity in realistic nebulae - The effects of velocity fields and internal dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, S. A.; Ferland, G. J.

    1988-03-01

    The paper presents calculations of the H-beta emissivity expected from nebulae with velocity gradients or internal dust. As has been found by Capriotti, Cox, and Mathews, Lyman line escape and destruction can prevent the 100 percent conversion of high-n Lyman lines into Ly-alpha and Balmer lines. For dusty environments such as the Orion Nebula or the general interstellar medium, the H-beta emissivity can be reduced by less than about 15 percent. Lyman line escape may cause still larger deviations in environments such as nova shells where the expansion velocities are large and velocity gradients likely. Although the partial conversion of Lyman lines only lowers the H-beta emissivity by typically less than about 10 percent under most circumstances, this introduces a systematic error in abundance measurements; the abundance of other elements relative to hydrogen will be overestimated by this amount. This effect must be considered in detail if very accurate abundance measurements are to be made. The present predictions of the deviation from case B emissivity are presented in a way in which they can be easily used by observers or incorporated into photoionization or shock codes.

  5. Suppression of Hydrogen Emission in an X-class White-light Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Ondřej; Milligan, Ryan O.; Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Kotrč, Pavel; Mathioudakis, Mihalis

    2017-03-01

    We present unique NUV observations of a well-observed X-class flare from NOAA 12087 obtained at the Ondřejov Observatory. The flare shows a strong white-light continuum but no detectable emission in the higher Balmer and Lyman lines. Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Fermi observations indicate an extremely hard X-ray spectrum and γ-ray emission. We use the RADYN radiative hydrodynamic code to perform two types of simulations: one where an energy of 3 × 1011 erg cm‑2 s‑1 is deposited by an electron beam with a spectral index of ≈3, and a second where the same energy is applied directly to the photosphere. The combination of observations and simulations allows us to conclude that the white-light emission and the suppression or complete lack of hydrogen emission lines is best explained by a model where the dominant energy deposition layer is located in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere, rather than the chromosphere.

  6. Understanding the Balmer Bubble in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Brian; Smith, C.; Points, S.; Heathcote, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopic data and analysis of the Balmer-dominated filament that is ahead of the eastern edge of the radiative shock of Bullet C in the Vela Supernova Remnant. This filament was discovered in 2002 by Carlin & Smith(2002), and was suggested to be a non-radiative shock. Images of the filament were taken using Hα and R band filters on the SMARTS 0.9m telescope at CTIO. These images were then compared to images taken in 2006 using the MOSAIC II imager on the Blanco Telescope at CTIO, in an attempt to detect proper motion of the filament. Comparison over the 7 year baseline failed to show proper motion of the filament. From this result, we are able to place an upper limit of ~270 km/s on the velocity of the Balmer-dominated filament. We also obtained moderate resolution spectra of the Balmer-dominated filament and the radiative shock using the Goodman Spectrograph at SOAR Telescope. Spectroscopic analysis of the Balmer-dominated filament failed to detect a broad component of the Hα emission line, which would be expected for a high velocity non-radiative shock.

  7. Hydrogen emission from Jupiter: Hydrogen emission from sunlit atmosphere of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Holberg, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Successful IUE observations of the equatorial sunlit atmosphere of Jupiter and Saturn have been obtained. Spectra containing atomic and molecular hydrogen and solar reflection continuum emissions have been analyzed, with the purpose of determining the long term temporal behavior of the electroglow process. Quantitative estimates have been established for the first time using a model analysis of the short wavelength region of the spectrum. Both systems show varying degrees of long term variability in hydrogen emission rate, but the time scale is too short to determine whether there is a dependence on solar cycle activity. As part of the emission modeling program, a preliminary point source spreading function for the IUE SWP instrument has been established, suggesting a wavelength dependence in spectral line width different from previous analyses. Further IUE observations are planned for both Jupiter and Saturn.

  8. Balmer's Manuscripts and the Construction of His Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banet, Leo

    1970-01-01

    Presents the results of an analysis of Balmer's draft manuscripts, which revealed new and pertinent details about the genesis of the Balmer series. In particular the origin and nature of Balmer's geometrical construction for the series is described. In addition, it is shown that the Balmer series played a direct role in the formulation of the…

  9. Is there an ADAF in Radio Galaxies with Double-Peaked Balmer Lines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, T.; Murayama, T.; Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.

    In order to examine the prediction that the broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs) with double-peaked Balmer lines harbor an accretion disk characterized by an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) in their nuclei, we investigate narrow emission line flux ratios of the narrow-line regions which are photoionized by nuclear continuum radiation. By carrying out intensive photoionization model calculations, we find that the data of the BLRGs with the double-peaked Balmer lines are consistent with the models adopting the SED without a strong big blue bump, while the data of the BLRGs without the double-peaked emission lines are well described by the models adopting the SED with a strong big blue bump. This result supports the idea that the double-peaked Balmer lines arise at an outer region of an accretion disk which is illuminated by an inner, geometrically thick ADAF.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Emissions from Sow Farm Lagoons across Climates Zones.

    PubMed

    Grant, Richard H; Boehm, Matthew T; Lawrence, Alfred J; Heber, Albert J

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (HS) emissions were measured periodically over the course of 2 yr at three sow waste lagoons representing humid mesothermal (North Carolina, NC), humid microthermal (Indiana, IN), and semiarid (Oklahoma, OK) climates. Emissions were determined using a backward Lagrangian stochastic model in conjunction with line-sampled HS concentrations and measured turbulence. The median annual sow-specific (area-specific) lagoon emissions at the OK farm were approximately 1.6 g head [hd] d (5880 µg m s), whereas those at the IN and NC sow farms were 0.035 g hd d (130 µg m s), and 0.041 g hd d (260 µg m s), respectively. Hydrogen sulfide emissions generally increased with wind speed. The daily HS emissions from the OK lagoon were greatest during the first half of the year and decreased as the year progressed. Emissions were episodic at the NC and IN lagoons. The generally low emissions at the NC and IN lagoons were probably a result of significant populations of purple sulfur bacteria maintained in the humid mesothermal and humid microthermal climates. Most of the large HS emission events at the NC and IN lagoons appeared to be a result of either precipitation events or liquid pump-out events. The high emissions at the OK lagoon in a semiarid climate were largely a result of high wind speeds enhancing both lagoon and air boundary layer mixing. The climate (air temperature, winds, and precipitation) appeared to influence the HS emissions from lagoons.

  11. Nebular Hydrogen Absorption in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of Eta Carinae and immediate ejecta reveal narrow Balmer absorption lines in addition to the nebular-scattered broad P-Cygni absorptions. The narrow absorption correlates with apparent disk structure that separates the two Homunculus lobes. We trace these features about half way up the Northern lobe until the scattered stellar Balmer line doppler-shifts redward beyond the nebular absorption feature. Three-dimensional data cubes, made by mapping the Homunculus at Balmer alpha and Balmer beta with the 52 x 0.1 arcsecond aperture and about 5000 spectral resolving power, demonstrate that the absorption feature changes slowly in velocity with nebular position. We have monitored the stellar Balmer alpha line profile of the central source over the past four years. The equivalent width of the nebular absorption feature changes considerably between observations. The changes do not correlate with measured brightness of Eta Carinae. Likely clumps of neutral hydrogen with a scale size comparable to the stellar disk diameter are passing through the intervening light path on the timescales less than several months. The excitation mechanism involves Lyman alpha radiation (possibly the Lyman series plus Lyman continuum) and collisions leading to populating the 2S metastable state. Before the electron can jump to the ground state by two photon emission (lifetime about 1/8 second), a stellar Balmer photon is absorbed and the electron shifts to an NP level. We see the absorption feature in higher Balmer lines, and but not in Paschen lines. Indeed we see narrow nebular Paschen emission lines. At present, we do not completely understand the details of the absorption. Better understanding should lead to improved insight of the unique conditions around Eta Carinae that leads to these absorptions.

  12. Flare model sensitivity of the Balmer spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falchi, A.; Falciani, R.; Smaldone, L. A.; Tozzi, G. P.

    1989-01-01

    Careful studies of various chromospheric spectral signatures are very important in order to explore their possible sensitivity to the modifications of the thermodynamic quantities produced by the flare occurrence. Pioneer work of Canfield and co-workers have shown how the H alpha behavior is able to indicate different changes in the atmospheric parameters structure associated to the flare event. It was decided to study the behavior of the highest Balmer lines and of the Balmer continuum in different solar flare model atmospheres. These spectral features, originating in the deep photosphere in a quiet area, may have a sensitivity different from H alpha to the modification of a flare atmosphere. The details of the method used to compute the Stark profile of the higher Balmer line (n is greater than or equal to 6) and their merging were extensively given elsewhere (Donati-Falchi et al., 1985; Falchi et al., 1989). The models used were developed by Ricchiazzi in his thesis (1982) evaluating the chromospheric response to both the nonthermal electron flux, for energy greater than 20 kev, (F sub 20) and to the thermal conduction, (F sub c). The effect of the coronal pressure values (P sub O) at the apex of the flare loop is also included.

  13. Secondary-electron emission from hydrogen-terminated diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Wang E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Dimitrov, D.A.; T. Xin, T.

    2012-05-20

    Diamond amplifiers demonstrably are an electron source with the potential to support high-brightness, high-average-current emission into a vacuum. We recently developed a reliable hydrogenation procedure for the diamond amplifier. The systematic study of hydrogenation resulted in the reproducible fabrication of high gain diamond amplifier. Furthermore, we measured the emission probability of diamond amplifier as a function of the external field and modelled the process with resulting changes in the vacuum level due to the Schottky effect. We demonstrated that the decrease in the secondary electrons average emission gain was a function of the pulse width and related this to the trapping of electrons by the effective NEA surface. The findings from the model agree well with our experimental measurements. As an application of the model, the energy spread of secondary electrons inside the diamond was estimated from the measured emission.

  14. Spatial imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, J. T.; Weaver, H. A.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Fastie, W. G.; Opal, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    A sounding rocket measurement of the H I L-alpha emission from Jupiter made on Dec. 1, 1978 shows limb darkening and an average disk brightness of 13 kR. This brightness is significantly higher than in previous measurements, and was confirmed by an IUE observation on Dec. 10, 1978. Comparison with a plane-parallel hydrogen layer model indicates that there is enhanced emission from the equatorial regions, reaching a peak near 80 deg longitude.

  15. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-time Spectra of a Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; de Cia, A.; Masci, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83-148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ˜1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ˜ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70-220 M⊙), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ˜ 1051 erg, Ekin ˜ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmeremission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ˜4500 km s-1 and a ˜300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ˜2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ˜4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M⊙. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M⊙ H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95-150) M⊙ about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ˜15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  16. DETECTION OF BROAD Hα EMISSION LINES IN THE LATE-TIME SPECTRA OF A HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lin; Masci, F.; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; Cia, A. de; Yaron, O.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1}, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day{sup −1}. The measured ejecta velocity is ∼ 13,000 km s{sup −1}. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M{sub ⊙}), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (E{sub rad} ∼ 10{sup 51} erg, E{sub kin} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 53} erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmeremission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ∼4500 km s{sup −1} and a ∼300 km s{sup −1} blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ∼2 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1} as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ∼4 × 10{sup 16} cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M{sub ⊙}. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M{sub ⊙} H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M{sub ⊙} about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ∼15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  17. Hybrid and conventional hydrogen engine vehicles that meet EZEV emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

    1996-12-10

    In this paper, a time-dependent engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. A The validated engine model is then used to calculate fuel economy and emissions for three hydrogen-fueled vehicles: a conventional, a parallel hybrid, and a series hybrid. All vehicles use liquid hydrogen as a fuel. The hybrid vehicles use a flywheel for energy storage. Comparable ultra capacitor or battery energy storage performance would give similar results. This paper analyzes the engine and flywheel sizing requirements for obtaining a desired level of performance. The results indicate that hydrogen lean-burn spark-ignited engines can provide a high fuel economy and Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) levels in the three vehicle configurations being analyzed.

  18. Analysis of experimental hydrogen engine data and hydrogen vehicle performance and emissions simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    This paper reports the engine and vehicle simulation and analysis done at Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) as a part of a joint optimized hydrogen engine development effort. Project participants are: Sandia National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Miami. Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios. NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency. In this paper, a simplified engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. The experimental data are used to adjust the empirical constants in the heat release rate and heat transfer correlation. The results indicate that hydrogen lean-burn spark-ignite engines can provide Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) levels in either a series hybrid or a conventional automobile.

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From Process Vents 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63... to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP... following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and halogen HAP emissions...

  20. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From Process Vents 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63... to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP... following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and halogen HAP emissions...

  1. Balmer-α spectrum measurements of the LHD one-third ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2016-02-15

    Wavelength spectra of Balmer-α light from plasmas in the extraction region of the Large Helical Device-R&D negative ion source, or the LHD one-third ion source have exhibited a blue shift as a negative bias voltage was applied to the plasma grid. The blue shift increased as the negative bias voltage with respect to the local plasma potential was increased. The measured spectra were compared with the velocity distributions of surface reflected hydrogen atoms calculated by atomic collisions in amorphous target code. The arc power and the source H{sub 2} pressure also affected the shift and broadening in the observed Balmer-α spectra. The possibility of identifying the negative hydrogen ions produced at the low work function plasma grid surface by high resolution spectroscopy is discussed.

  2. Hydrogen emission under laser exposure of colloidal solutions of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Simakin, A. V.; Shafeev, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the generation of molecular hydrogen from water by laser irradiation, without any electrodes and photocatalysts. A near infrared pulsed nanosecond laser is used for exposure of colloidal solution of Au nanoparticles suspended in water. Laser exposure of the colloidal solution results in formation of breakdown plasma in liquid and emission of H2. The rate of H2 emission depends critically on the energy of laser pulses. There is a certain threshold in laser fluence in liquid (around 50 J/cm2) below which plasma disappears and H2 emission stops. H2 emission from colloidal solution of Au nanoparticles in ethanol is higher than that from similar water colloid. It is found that formation of plasma and emission of H2 or D2 can be induced by laser exposure of pure liquids, either H2O or D2O, respectively. The results are interpreted as water molecules splitting by direct electron impact from breakdown plasma.

  3. EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS USING HYDROGEN FROM PLASMATRON FUEL CONVERTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, L

    2000-08-20

    Substantial progress in engine emission control is needed in order to meet present and proposed regulations for both spark ignition and diesel engines. Tightening regulations throughout the world reflect the ongoing concern with vehicle emissions. Recently developed compact plasmatron fuel converters have features that are suitable for onboard production of hydrogen for both fuel pretreatment and for exhaust aftertreatment applications. Systems that make use of these devices in conjunction with aftertreatment catalysts have the potential to improve significantly prospects for reduction of diesel engine emissions. Plasmatron fuel converters can provide a rapid response compact means to transform efficiently a wide range of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen rich gas. They have been used to reform natural gas [Bromberg1], gasoline [Green], diesel [Bromberg2] and hard-to-reform biofuels [Cohn1] into hydrogen rich gas (H2 + CO). The development of these devices has been pursued for the purpose of reducing engine exhaust pollutants by providing hydrogen rich gas for combustion in spark ignition and possibly diesel engines, as shown in Figure 1 [Cohn2]. Recent developments in compact plasmatron reformer design at MIT have resulted in substantial decreases in electrical power requirements. These new developments also increase the lifetime of the electrodes.

  4. Winds from T Tauri stars. II - Balmer line profiles for inner disk winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Hewett, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of calculations of Balmer emission line profiles using escape probability methods for T Tauri wind models with nonspherically symmetric geometry. The wind is assumed to originate in the inner regions of an accretion disk surrounding the T Tauri star, and flows outward in a 'cone' geometry. Two types of wind models are considered, both with monotonically increasing expansion velocities as a function of radial distance. For flows with large turbulent velocities, such as the HF Alfven wave-driven wind models, the effect of cone geometry is to increase the blue wing emission, and to move the absorption reversal close to line center. Line profiles for a wind model rotating with the same angular velocity as the inner disk are also calculated. The Balmer lines of this model are significantly broader than observed in most objects, suggesting that the observed emission lines do not arise in a region rotating at Keplerian velocity.

  5. Modeling molecular hydrogen emission in M dwarf exoplanetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evonosky, William; France, Kevin; Kruczek, Nick E.; Youngblood, Allison; Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanet host Stars (MUSCLES)

    2017-01-01

    Exoplanets orbiting low-mass stars are prime candidates for atmospheric characterization due to their astronomical abundance and short orbital periods. These planets orbit stars that are often more active than main sequence solar-type stars. They are exposed to differing levels of ultraviolet radiation which can cause traditional “biosignature” gases to be generated abiotically, potentially causing false-positive identifications of life. We modeled the recently discovered molecular hydrogen emission in the ultraviolet spectra (1350 - 1650 Å) as arising from the stellar surface, excited by radiation generated in the upper chromosphere. The model was compared with observed hydrogen emission from the “Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanet host Stars” (MUSCLES) survey by conducting a grid search and implementing a chi-squared minimization routine. We considered only progressions from the [1, 4] and [1, 7] first excited electronic levels. Our modeling procedure varied the atomic hydrogen column density (in the chromosphere) as well as the photospheric molecular hydrogen column density and temperature. The model required as an input a reconstructed intrinsic Lyman α profile which served as the pumping radiation for the molecular hydrogen. We found that an atomic hydrogen column density of log10N(H I) = 14.13 ± 0.16 cm-2 represents a breaking point above which there is not enough Lyman α flux available to excite a significant molecular hydrogen population into the [1, 7] state. We also present H2 temperatures which may suggest that star spots on low mass stars persist longer, and encompass more area than star spots on solar-type stars.

  6. Is There an Advection-dominated Accretion Flow in Radio Galaxies with Double-peaked Balmer Lines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Tohru; Murayama, Takashi; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2002-03-01

    In order to examine the prediction that the broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs) with double-peaked Balmer lines harbor an accretion disk characterized by an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) in their nuclei, we investigate narrow emission line flux ratios of the narrow-line regions (NLRs) which are photoionized by nuclear continuum radiation. We compile data from the literature and confirm the pioneering work of Eracleous & Halpern that the BLRGs with the double-peaked Balmer emission exhibit larger flux ratios of both [O I] λ6300/[O III] λ5007 and [O II] λ3727/[O III] λ5007 than the BLRGs without the double-peaked Balmer emission. To examine whether or not these properties are attributed to the difference in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the ionizing radiation between the BLRGs with and without the double-peaked Balmer emission, we perform photoionization model calculations using two types of input continuum radiation; one has the strong big blue bump which is expected for standard optically thick accretion disks and the other does not exhibit a strong big blue bump as expected for optically thin ADAFs. We find that the data of the BLRGs with the double-peaked Balmer lines are consistent with the models adopting the SED without a strong big blue bump, while the data of the BLRGs without the double-peaked emission lines are well described by the models adopting the SED with a strong big blue bump. On the other hand, the observed differences in the NLR emission are hard to explain by the difference in the contribution of shocks. These results support the idea that the double-peaked Balmer lines arise at an outer region of an accretion disk which is illuminated by an inner, geometrically thick ADAF.

  7. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From Process Vents 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63..., Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions... limit in the following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and...

  8. Analysis of experimental hydrogen engine data and hydrogen vehicle performance and emissions simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.M.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reports the engine and vehicle simulation and analysis done at Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) as a part of a joint optimized hydrogen engine development effort. Project participants are: Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNLC), responsible for experimental evaluation; Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), responsible for detailed fluid mechanics engine evaluations, and the University of Miami, responsible for engine friction reduction. Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios, so that NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency.

  9. Measurement and Simulation of Deuterium Balmer-Alpha Emission from First-Orbit Fast Ions and the Application to Neutral Density and General Fast-Ion Loss Detection in the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, Nathan Glynn

    Spectra of the Balmer-alpha radiation of first-orbit fast ions after charge exchange with edge neutrals have been measured in the DIII-D tokamak. Several collimated optics systems view the edge region---while avoiding any active beams---and carry light to a spectrometer tuned to the region of the 656.1 nm deuterium-alpha line. Viewing geometry and the high energy of the lost ions produce Doppler shifts, which effectively separate the fast-ion contributions from the bright, cold edge light. Modulation of the fast-ion source allows for time-evolving background subtraction. A model has been developed for the spectra of these first-orbit fast ions. The passive fast-ion D-alpha simulation (P-FIDAsim) is a forward model consisting of an experimentally- validated beam model, an ion orbit-following code, a collisional-radiative model, and a synthetic spectrometer. Eighty-six experimental spectra were obtained using 6 different neutral beam fast-ion sources and 13 different viewing chords. Parameters such as plasma current, toroidal field, electron density, plasma cross-sectional shape, and number of x-points were varied. Uncalibrated experimental spectra have an overall Spearman rank correlation coefficient with the shape of simulated spectra of 0.58 with subsets of cases rising to a correlation of 0.80. A single set of calibrated spectra (shot 152817) was measured and is used to estimate the neutral density throughout the cross-section of the tokamak. This is done by inverting the simulated spectra in order to find the best neutral density (in a least squares sense) required to best match the experimental spectra. The resulting 2D neutral density shows the expected increase toward each x-point. The average neutral density is found to be 3.3 x 105cm -3 a the magnetic axis, 2.3 x 108cm -3 in the core, 8.1 x 109 cm-3 at the plasma boundary, and 1.1 x 10 11cm-3 near the wall. A technique is developed which--after us first-orbit light to calibrate the system--can quantify

  10. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  11. SPITZER IRAC DETECTION AND ANALYSIS OF SHOCKED MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Lada, Elizabeth A.

    2009-04-10

    We use statistical equilibrium equations to investigate the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color space of shocked molecular hydrogen. The location of shocked H{sub 2} in [3.6] - [4.5] versus [4.5] - [5.8] color is determined by the gas temperature and density of neutral atomic hydrogen. We find that high excitation H{sub 2} emission falls in a unique location in the color-color diagram and can unambiguously be distinguished from stellar sources. In addition to searching for outflows, we show that the IRAC data can be used to map the thermal structure of the shocked gas. We analyze archival Spitzer data of Herbig-Haro object HH 54 and create a temperature map, which is consistent with spectroscopically determined temperatures.

  12. Hour-timescale profile variations in the broad Balmer lines of the Seyfert galaxy Hour-timescale profile variations in the broad Balmer lines of the Seyfert galaxy Markarian 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asatrian, Norayr S.

    2014-07-01

    Part of results of the multi-epoch intranight optical spectroscopic monitoring of the Markarian 6 nucleus carried out at the telescopes of 6-m of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia), 2.6-m of the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (Armenia) and 2-m of the Tautenburg Observatory (Germany) is presented. Observations were made in 1979, 1986, 1988-1991 and 2007-2009 during a total of 33 nights with an average sampling rate of 4 spectra per night. TV-scanner and long-slit spectrographs equipped with Image Tube and CCD detector arrays were used. Altogether we analyzed 110 Hβ and 58 Hα region spectra to search for intranight variability in the broad hydrogen emission line profiles. The typical spectral resolutions were 4 Å for scanner spectra, 6 Å for photographic spectra, and 5 Å and 10 Å for CCD spectra. The S/N ratio at the continuum level near the Hβ and Hα lines was in the range 15-50. The purpose of the search was to look for the characteristic variability signatures of different kinematical models of the broad emission-line region. We considered the centering and guiding errors which can result in differences between spectra. We found variations in the broad Balmer line difference profiles on time scale of hour with the level of significance of 3.6 σ to 5.0 σ. Variations take the form of narrow, small bumps located at the blue and red sides or only at the blue side of the lines. In the intermediate level of broad line flux, the Hβ and Hα profiles show fine structure. Detected profile changes occurred at the same radial velocity shifts as the details in the fine structure. The variability is at least 2 orders of magnitude more rapid than any observed for broad Balmer line profiles in AGNs that we are aware of in the literature. Discovered extremely rapid line-profile variability may be associated with reverberation effects. Two-sided profile changes may indicate the response of circularly rotating hydrogen clouds in the BLR to a light pulse

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From Process Vents 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part.... FFFF, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP... limit in the following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and...

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From Process Vents 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part.... FFFF, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63—Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP... limit in the following table that applies to your process vents that contain hydrogen halide and...

  15. Balmer Absorption Lines in FeLoBALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, K.; Iwata, I.; Ohta, K.; Tamura, N.; Ando, M.; Akiyama, M.; Kiuchi, G.; Nakanishi, K.

    2007-10-01

    We discovered non-stellar Balmer absorption lines in two many-narrow-trough FeLoBALs (mntBALs) by the near-infrared spectroscopy with Subaru/CISCO. Presence of the non-stellar Balmer absorption lines is known to date only in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151; thus our discovery is the first cases for quasars. Since all known active galactic nuclei with Balmer absorption lines share similar characteristics, it is suggested that there is a population of BAL quasars which have unique structures at their nuclei or unique evolutionary phase.

  16. A Possible Solution to the Lyman/Balmer Line Problem in Hot DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preval, Simon P.; Barstow, Martin A.; Badnell, Nigel R.; Holberg, Jay B.; Hubeny, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Arguably, the best method for determining the effective temperature (Teff) and surface gravity (log g) of a DA white dwarf is by fitting the Hydrogen Lyman and Balmer absorption features. However, as has been shown for white dwarfs with Teff>50,000K, the calculated value from the Lyman and Balmer lines are discrepant, which worsens with increasing temperature. Many different solutions have been suggested, ranging from the input physics used to calculate the models, to interstellar reddening. We will focus on the former, and consider three variables. The first is the atomic data used, namely the number of transitions included in line blanketing treatments and the photoionization cross sections. The second is the stark broadening treatment used to synthesise the Lyman and Balmer line profiles, namely the calculations performed by Lemke (1997) and Tremblay & Bergeron (2009). Finally, the third is the atmospheric content. The model grids are calculated with a pure H composition, and a metal polluted composition using the abundances of Preval et al. (2013). We present the preliminary results of our analysis, whereby we have determined the Teff for a small selection of white dwarfs. We plan to extend our analysis by allowing metallicity to vary in future model grids.

  17. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles.

    PubMed

    Bond, S W; Alvarez, R; Vollmer, M K; Steinbacher, M; Weilenmann, M; Reimann, S

    2010-08-01

    This study assesses individual-vehicle molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions in exhaust gas from current gasoline and diesel vehicles measured on a chassis dynamometer. Absolute H2 emissions were found to be highest for motorcycles and scooters (141+/-38.6 mg km(-1)), approximately 5 times higher than for gasoline-powered automobiles (26.5+/-12.1 mg km(-1)). All diesel-powered vehicles emitted marginal amounts of H2 ( approximately 0.1 mg km(-1)). For automobiles, the highest emission factors were observed for sub-cycles subject to a cold-start (mean of 53.1+/-17.0 mg km(-1)). High speeds also caused elevated H2 emission factors for sub-cycles reaching at least 150 km h(-1) (mean of 40.4+/-7.1 mg km(-1)). We show that H2/CO ratios (mol mol(-1)) from gasoline-powered vehicles are variable (sub-cycle means of 0.44-5.69) and are typically higher (mean for automobiles 1.02, for 2-wheelers 0.59) than previous atmospheric ratios characteristic of traffic-influenced measurements. The lowest mean individual sub-cycle ratios, which correspond to high absolute emissions of both H2 and CO, were observed during cold starts (for automobiles 0.48, for 2-wheelers 0.44) and at high vehicle speeds (for automobiles 0.73, for 2-wheelers 0.45). This finding illustrates the importance of these conditions to observed H2/CO ratios in ambient air. Overall, 2-wheelers displayed lower H2/CO ratios (0.48-0.69) than those from gasoline-powered automobiles (0.75-3.18). This observation, along with the lower H2/CO ratios observed through studies without catalytic converters, suggests that less developed (e.g. 2-wheelers) and older vehicle technologies are largely responsible for the atmospheric H2/CO ratios reported in past literature.

  18. Hydrogen recombination at high optical depth and the spectrum of SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yueming; Mccray, Richard; Oliva, Ernesto; Randich, Sofia

    1992-01-01

    A general theory is presented for hydrogen recombination line formation in an expanding medium in which some of the lines are optically thick. This theory is used to calculate the time evolution of the hydrogen lines of SN 1987A at t equal to or greater than 150 days, assuming that the supernova envelope is a homologously expanding uniform sphere. The theoretical luminosities and ratios of the recombination lines agree remarkably well with the observations. For the first 2 yr, the supernova envelope is optically thick to Balmer continuum. For t equal to or less than 400 days, hydrogen is ionized primarily from the n = 2 level by Balmer continuum photons, which are provided partly by the two-photon decay of the 2s state and partly by emission lines of heavy elements.

  19. Temperature enhancement of secondary electron emission from hydrogenated diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, A.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Akhvlediani, R.; Michaelson, Sh.; Hoffman, A.

    2009-09-15

    The effect of temperature on the stability of the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield from approx100-nm-thick continuous diamond films is reported. At room temperature, the SEE yield was found to decay as a function of electron irradiation dose. The SEE yield is observed to increase significantly upon heating of the diamond surface. Furthermore, by employing moderate temperatures, the decay of the SEE yield observed at room temperature is inhibited, showing a nearly constant yield with electron dose at 200 deg. C. The results are explained in terms of the temperature dependence of the electron beam-induced hydrogen desorption from the diamond surface and surface band bending. These findings demonstrate that the longevity of diamond films in practical applications of SEE can be increased by moderate heating.

  20. Neutral Hydrogen and Its Emission Lines in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Chane-Yook, Martine

    2016-12-01

    Since the Lyman-α rocket observations of Gabriel ( Solar Phys. 21, 392, 1971), it has been realized that the hydrogen (H) lines could be observed in the corona and that they offer an interesting diagnostic for the temperature, density, and radial velocity of the coronal plasma. Moreover, various space missions have been proposed to measure the coronal magnetic and velocity fields through polarimetry in H lines. A necessary condition for such measurements is to benefit from a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. The aim of this article is to evaluate the emission in three representative lines of H for three different coronal structures. The computations have been performed with a full non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium (non-LTE) code and its simplified version without radiative transfer. Since all collisional and radiative quantities (including incident ionizing and exciting radiation) are taken into account, the ionization is treated exactly. Profiles are presented at two heights (1.05 and 1.9 solar radii, from Sun center) in the corona, and the integrated intensities are computed at heights up to five solar radii. We compare our results with previous computations and observations ( e.g. Lα from Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer) and find a rough (model-dependent) agreement. Since the Hα line is a possible candidate for ground-based polarimetry, we show that in order to detect its emission in various coronal structures, it is necessary to use a very narrow (less than 2 Å wide) bandpass filter.

  1. Molecular Hydrogen Emission from Galaxies: The Cirrus Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalls, James; Bania, Thomas; Boulanger, Francois; Draine, Bruce; Falgarone, Edith; Hily-Blant, Pierre

    2008-08-01

    Are cirrus clouds a major source of molecular hydrogen emission in normal Galaxies? This question caused a considerable debate during the 2007 Spitzer Conference. After the end of the cryogenic Spitzer mission, no existing or planned observatory will be capable of answering it for the known future. To remedy this, we propose a set of Spitzer IRS (LL) pointings to observe the two lowest-lying S(0) (28.2 micron) and S(1) (17.0 micron) pure-rotational transitions of H2 towards 4 translucent 'cirrus' positions in DCld 300.2-16.9, a known source of excited H2. Two of us unexpectedly discovered H2 S(2) emission at 12.3 microns in this cloud as part of our Spitzer GO program to study the 5-15 micron PAH spectrum. Relative to the integrated PAH flux at 7.9 microns, the S(2) flux in our cloud is higher by a factor of about 6 than the S(2) flux in non-active SINGS galaxies. One hypothesis currently in favor argues that H2 emission from the disks of galaxies results from fluorescent excitation by UV photons in dense photodissociation regions with high radiation fluxes. Clearly this cannot be the case for DCld 300.2-16.9, since the UV flux incident on the cloud cannot be greater than the average interstellar value. Yet this cirrus cloud is more efficient at exciting the S(2) transition into emission than the central disks of entire galaxies! A competing scenario is that the H2 rotational lines are excited by collisions in warm pockets of gas where turbulence dissipates. A full understanding of the excitation mechanism responsible for our H2 lines is impossible without measuring the lowest transitions on the rotational ladder. Such observations would also allow us to tally the total energy expended via the rotational transitions, which we can compare with available CII and FIR measurements, both of which are the result of UV heating; as well as planned CO measurements, which trace the turbulent velocity field. We are requesting 5.3 hours to observe 4 positions using Long Low

  2. The variability of the double-peaked Balmer lines in the active nucleus of NGC 1097

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Eracleous, Michael; Livio, Mario; Wilson, Andrew S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the nucleus of the Seyfert/low-ionization nuclear emission-line region galaxy NGC 1097 spanning the period 1991-1994. The goal was to monitor anticipated variations of the broad, double-peaked Balmer lines which appeared abruptly in 1991. We find that the broad Balmer lines have varied significantly over the monitoring period, both in their integrated fluxes and in their profile shapes. The integrated H-alpha flux has decreased by a factor of 2, the (H-alpha)/(H-beta) ratio has increased, and the originally asymmetric H-alpha profile has become symmetric. The decline of the H-alpha flux and the change in the (H-alpha)/(H-beta) ratio can be interpreted as consequences of either increased obscuration along the line of sight, or a decline in the ionizing continuum, but neither of these scenarios can account for the change in profile shapes. A model attributing the line emission to a precessing elliptical ring around a 10(exp 6) solar mass nuclear black hole can reproduce the observed profile variations. In this scenario, the line-emitting ring is the result of the tidal disruption of a star by the black hole. Alternative scenarios associating the broad-line emission with a collimated bipolar outflow also remain viable, but binary black holes and inhomogeneous accretion disks are disfavored by the observed pattern of variability.

  3. Molecular hydrogen emission as a density and temperature indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Ferland, Gary J.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Loh, Edwin D.; Fabian, Andy C.; Williams, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Infrared observations have discovered a variety of objects, including filaments in the Crab Nebula and cool-core clusters of galaxies, where the 1-0 S(1) line is stronger than the infrared H I lines. A variety of processes could be responsible for this emission. Although many complete shock or PDR calculations of emission have been published, we know of no previous simple calculation that shows the emission spectrum and level populations of thermally excited low-density . We present a range of purely thermal collisional simulations, corresponding to constant gas kinetic temperature at different densities. We consider the cases where the collisions affecting H2 are predominantly with atomic or molecular hydrogen. The resulting level population (often called "excitation") diagrams show that excitation temperatures are sometimes lower than the gas kinetic temperature when the density is too low for the level populations to go to LTE. The atomic case goes to LTE at much lower densities than the molecular case due to larger collision rates. At low densities for the v=1 and 2 vibrational manifolds level populations are quasi-thermal, which could be misinterpreted as showing the gas is in LTE at high density. At low densities for the molecular case the level population diagrams are discontinuous between v=0 and 1 vibrational manifolds and between v=2, J=0, 1 and other higher J levels within the same vibrational manifold. These jumps could be used as density diagnostics. We show how much the H2 mass would be underestimated using the 1-0 S(1) line strength if the density is below that required for LTE. We give diagnostic diagrams showing level populations over a range of density and temperature. The density where the level populations are given by a Boltzmann distribution relative to the total molecular abundance (required to get the correct H2 mass), is shown for various cases. We discuss the implications of these results for the interpretation of H2 observations of the

  4. Variation in the Pre-transit Balmer Line Signal Around the Hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam G.; Barman, Travis

    2016-07-01

    As followup to our recent detection of a pre-transit signal around HD 189733 b, we obtained full pre-transit phase coverage of a single planetary transit. The pre-transit signal is again detected in the Balmer lines but with variable strength and timing, suggesting that the bow shock geometry reported in our previous work does not describe the signal from the latest transit. We also demonstrate the use of the Ca ii H and K residual core flux as a proxy for the stellar activity level throughout the transit. A moderate trend is found between the pre-transit absorption signal in the 2013 data and the Ca ii H flux. This suggests that some of the 2013 pre-transit hydrogen absorption can be attributed to varying stellar activity levels. A very weak correlation is found between the Ca ii H core flux and the Balmer line absorption in the 2015 transit, hinting at a smaller contribution from stellar activity compared to the 2013 transit. We simulate how varying stellar activity levels can produce changes in the Balmer line transmission spectra. These simulations show that the strength of the 2013 and 2015 pre-transit signals can be reproduced by stellar variability. If the pre-transit signature is attributed to circumplanetary material, its evolution in time can be described by accretion clumps spiraling toward the star, although this interpretation has serious limitations. Further high-cadence monitoring at Hα is necessary to distinguish between true absorption by transiting material and short-term variations in the stellar activity level.

  5. Study on the asymmetry of the Balmer lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gigosos, Marco Antonio; Gonzalez, Manuel Angel

    2006-12-01

    A comparison between computer simulated Balmer lines and recent experimental profiles is shown in this work. The influence of different effets on the calculated profiles is discussed. Though several points must still be clarified a little deeper, the agreement between experimental and calculated profiles guarantees a good understanding of the relevant physical effects.

  6. Estudio observacional de la segunda discontinuidad de Balmer en estrellas Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochetti, Y. R.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L.; Zorec, J.

    Many Be stars show a second Balmer discontinuity (BD) which is related to the physical properties of their circumstellar envelopes. In this work we analize the presence and appearance (emission or absorption) of this BD in a sample of Be stars. We observe that the second BD is found in absorption among fast rotating mid- and late-B type stars while there is a tendency to observe it in emission among the hottest stars for any value of . This result suggests that the circumstellar envelopes emission volume of the latter group is larger and that the scale height of the disk could be higher than one expected from Keplerian rotation. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  7. Fuel economy and emissions evaluation of BMW hydrogen 7 mono-fuel demonstration vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Gurski, S.; Duoba, M.; Thiel, W.; Martin, D.; Korn, T.; Energy Systems; BMW Group Munich Germany; BMW Group Oxnard USA

    2008-12-01

    This article summarizes the testing of two BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF). The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles are derived from the BMW Hydrogen 7 bi-fuel vehicles and based on a BMW 760iL. The mono-fuel as well as the bi-fuel vehicle(s) is equipped with cryogenic hydrogen on-board storage and a gaseous hydrogen port fuel injection system. The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles were tested for fuel economy as well as emissions on the Federal Test Procedure FTP-75 cold-start test as well as the highway test. The results show that these vehicles achieve emissions levels that are only a fraction of the Super Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (SULEV) standard for nitric oxide (NO{sub x}) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. For non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions the cycle-averaged emissions are actually 0 g/mile, which require the car to actively reduce emissions compared to the ambient concentration. The fuel economy numbers on the FTP-75 test were 3.7 kg of hydrogen per 100 km, which, on an energy basis, is equivalent to a gasoline fuel consumption of 17 miles per gallon (mpg). Fuel economy numbers for the highway cycle were determined to be 2.1 kg of hydrogen per 100 km or 30 miles per gallon of gasoline equivalent (GGE). In addition to cycle-averaged emissions and fuel economy numbers, time-resolved (modal) emissions as well as air/fuel ratio data is analyzed to further investigate the root causes of the remaining emissions traces. The BMW Hydrogen 7 vehicles employ a switching strategy with lean engine operation at low engine loads and stoichiometric operation at high engine loads that avoids the NO{sub x} emissions critical operating regime with relative air/fuel ratios between 1 < {lambda} < 2. The switching between these operating modes was found to be a major source of the remaining NO{sub x} emissions. The emissions results collected

  8. Intermittent control procedures for the Geysers hydrogen sulfide emission abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Buick, B.D.; Mooney, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) operates the world's largest geothermal steam electric power generation facility, currently about 1.140 megawatts (Mw). This facility is located about 80 miles north of San Francisco, California and is within a region referred to as the Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). Pollutants resulting from this method of electric power generation are due to impurities in the geothermal steam. A major contaminate in the steam is hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S), a regulated pollutant in California. The ambient air quality standard (AAQS) for this pollutant in California is 0.03 parts per million (ppM) averaged over one hour. H/sub 2/S is an invisible, unpleasant smelling gas present in varying concentrations in the geothermal steam. Its odor has been compared to the smell of rotten eggs. Since PG and E is increasingly relying on this source of electrical power generation, it has committed millions of dollars to the development, testing, acquisition, and installation of abatement equipment to reduce H/sub 2/S emissions during the past ten years. In order to reduce the number of exceeds of the AAQS during this developmental period, a predictive model was needed for interim abatement purposes. Most of the high hourly H/sub 2/S values occur with meteorological conditions having poor ventilation resulting from a combination of low wind speed and reduced mixing layer depths. This weather condition is most common during the months of June through October in California. A predictive model was developed from three years of hourly H/sub 2/S measurements of 0.03 ppM or greater in populated areas downwind of the generation facility and from observations of associated meteorological data.

  9. On the cometary hydrogen coma and far UV emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. U.

    1976-01-01

    Cometary hydrogen observations are reviewed with emphasis on observations of comet Bennett. The results are theoretically interpreted and a brief summary of ultraviolet observations other than Lyman alpha is given.

  10. [Study on the Emission Spectrum of Hydrogen Production with Microwave Discharge Plasma in Ethanol Solution].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Wang, Bo; Zhu, Xiao-mei; Yan, Zhi-yu; Liu, Yong-jun; Liu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen is regarded as a kind of clean energy with high caloricity and non-pollution, which has been studied by many experts and scholars home and abroad. Microwave discharge plasma shows light future in the area of hydrogen production from ethanol solution, providing a new way to produce hydrogen. In order to further improve the technology and analyze the mechanism of hydrogen production with microwave discharge in liquid, emission spectrum of hydrogen production by microwave discharge plasma in ethanol solution was being studied. In this paper, plasma was generated on the top of electrode by 2.45 GHz microwave, and the spectral characteristics of hydrogen production from ethanol by microwave discharge in liquid were being studied using emission spectrometer. The results showed that a large number of H, O, OH, CH, C2 and other active particles could be produced in the process of hydrogen production from ethanol by microwave discharge in liquid. The emission spectrum intensity of OH, H, O radicals generated from ethanol is far more than that generated from pure water. Bond of O-H split by more high-energy particles from water molecule was more difficult than that from ethanol molecule, so in the process of hydrogen production by microwave discharge plasma in ethanol solution; the main source of hydrogen was the dehydrogenation and restructuring of ethanol molecules instead of water decomposition. Under the definite external pressure and temperature, the emission spectrum intensity of OH, H, O radicals increased with the increase of microwave power markedly, but the emission spectrum intensity of CH, C2 active particles had the tendency to decrease with the increase of microwave power. It indicated that the number of high energy electrons and active particles high energy electron energy increased as the increase of microwave power, so more CH, C2 active particles were split more thoroughly.

  11. Anomalous Balmer continuum temperatures in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Donald L.; Dufour, Reginald J.

    1994-01-01

    New long-slit spectra of the Orion Nebula in the near-ultraviolet were used to calculate the Balmer recombination temperature, T(Bac), from the Balmer discontinuity at 3646 A. The spatially resolved data show a decrease in temperature moving to the west of Theta(sup 1) Ori C, from 8400 K at a distance of 40 sec to a low of 2800 K at a distance of 220 sec. Such values are much lower than previously reported. The effect of scattered starlight on these results is calculated and shown to be less than 10%. Previous studies which found scattered light to be important at the discontinuity are in error. Such low temperatures and their impact on nebular physics and abundances are disconcerting and require further study.

  12. Hydrogen Gas Emissions from Active Faults and Identification of Flow Pathway in a Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, T.; Niwa, M.; Kurosawa, H.; Shimada, K.

    2010-12-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen gas emissions from the subsurface along active faults exceed atmospheric concentrations (e.g. Sugisaki et. al., 1983). Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen gas is generated in a radical reaction of water with fractured silicate minerals due to rock fracturing caused by fault movement (e.g. Kita et al., 1982). Based on such research, we are studying an investigation method for an assessment of fault activity using hydrogen gas emissions from fracture zones. To start, we have devised portable equipment for rapid and simple in situ measurement of hydrogen gas emissions (Shimada et al., 2008). The key component of this equipment is a commercially available and compact hydrogen gas sensor with an integral data logger operable at atmospheric pressure. In the field, we have drilled shallow boreholes into incohesive fault rocks to depths ranging from 15 to 45 cm using a hand-operated drill with a 9mm drill-bit. Then, we have measured the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from active faults such as: the western part of the Atotsugawa fault zone, the Atera fault zone and the Neodani fault in central Japan; the Yamasaki fault zone in southwest Japan; and the Yamagata fault zone in northeast Japan. In addition, we have investigated the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from other major geological features such as tectonic lines: the Butsuzo Tectonic Line in the eastern Kii Peninsula and the Atokura Nappe in the Northeastern Kanto Mountains. As a result of the investigations, hydrogen gas concentration in emissions from the active faults was measured to be in the approximate range from 6,000 ppm to 26,000 ppm in two to three hours after drilling. A tendency for high concentrations of hydrogen gas in active faults was recognized, in contrast with low concentrations in emissions from tectonic lines that were observed to be in the range from 730 ppm to 2,000 ppm. It is inferred that the hydrogen gas migrates to ground

  13. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

  14. Spectral Emission of fast non-Maxwellian Atoms at metallic Surfaces in low density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickheuer, Sven; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Brandt, Christian; Pospieszczyk, Albrecht

    2016-09-01

    We have observed Doppler shifted components of the Balmer-lines emitted by fast non-Maxwellian atoms using different targets in a linear magnetized plasma in the PSI-2 device. In a pure hydrogen plasma the Doppler shifted components of the Balmer emission lines cannot be detected above the signal-to-noise-ratio. However, in a mixed H/Ar plasma with composition of 1:1 the Doppler red- and blue-shifted components can be clearly observed. The Balmer-lines are analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy at observations angles of 35° and 90°. For target materials we use Ag, Pd, Fe and C. An acceleration potential can be applied to the target to change the kinetic energy of the incoming ions between 40 and 200 eV enabling the observation of the Doppler shifted components. The emission mechanism is discussed in details and is probably due to excitation transfer from metastable argon atoms to the fast hydrogen atoms. The Doppler shifted signal can be used to determine the properties of the surfaces, e.g., the energy and angular distribution of reflected atoms. Also the spectral reflectance of the target surface can be obtained and tested against the reference data and measurements with light calibration sources.

  15. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the DC-XA Composite Liquid Hydrogen Tank During Structural Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the DC-XA composite liquid hydrogen tank are presented in this report. The tank was subjected to pressurization, tensile, and compressive loads at ambient temperatures and also while full of liquid nitrogen. The tank was also pressurized with liquid hydrogen. AE was used to monitor the tank for signs of structural defects developing during the test.

  16. Low Emission Hydrogen Combustors for Gas Turbines Using Lean Direct Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John; Smith, Timothy D.; Kundu, Krishna

    2005-01-01

    One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. To investigate the combustion performance of gaseous hydrogen fuel injectors flame tube combustor experiments were performed. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 600 to 1000 deg F, 60 to 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia), and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over seven times that of Jet-A. To reduce the risk, design mixing times were kept short and velocities high to minimize flashback. Five fuel injector designs were tested in 2.5 and 3.5-in. diameter flame tubes with non-vitiated heated air and gaseous hydrogen. Data is presented on measurements of NOx emissions and combustion efficiency for the hydrogen injectors at 1.0, 3.125, and 5.375 in. from the injector face. Results show that for some configurations, NOx emissions are comparable to that of state of the art Jet-A LDI combustor concepts.

  17. Low-Emission Hydrogen Combustors for Gas Turbines Using Lean Direct Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John; Smith, Timothy D.; Kundu, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. To investigate the combustion performance of gaseous hydrogen fuel injectors flame tube combustor experiments were performed. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 588 to 811 K, 0.4 to 1.4 MPa, and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen-based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over 7 times that of Jet-A. To reduce the risk, design mixing times were kept short and velocities high to minimize flashback. Five fuel injector designs were tested in 6.35- and 8.9-cm-diameter flame tubes with non-vitiated heated air and gaseous hydrogen. Data is presented on measurements of NO(x) emissions and combustion efficiency for the hydrogen injectors at 2.540, 7.937, and 13.652 cm from the injector face. Results show that for some configurations, NO(x) emissions are comparable to that of state of the art Jet-A LDI combustor concepts.

  18. Atomic hydrogen and diatomic titanium-monoxide molecular spectroscopy in laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.

    2017-03-01

    This article gives a brief review of experimental studies of hydrogen Balmer series emission spectra. Ongoing research aims to evaluate early plasma evolution following optical breakdown in laboratory air. Of interest is as well laser ablation of metallic titanium and characterization of plasma evolution. Emission of titanium monoxide is discussed together with modeling of diatomic spectra to infer temperature. The behavior of titanium particles in plasma draws research interests ranging from the modeling of stellar atmospheres to the enhancement of thin film production via pulsed laser deposition.

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring of activation behavior of LaNi5 hydrogen storage alloy

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Igor Maria; Dell'Era, Alessandro; Pasquali, Mauro; Santulli, Carlo; Sarasini, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The acoustic emission technique is proposed for assessing the irreversible phenomena occurring during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling in LaNi5. In particular, we have studied, through a parametric analysis of in situ detected signals, the correlation between acoustic emission (AE) parameters and the processes occurring during the activation of an intermetallic compound. Decreases in the number and amplitude of AE signals suggest that pulverization due to hydrogen loading involves progressively smaller volumes of material as the number of cycles increases. This conclusion is confirmed by electron microscopy observations and particle size distribution measurements. PMID:27877423

  20. Detection of auroral hydrogen Lyman-Alpha emission from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.T.

    1982-12-15

    A series of observations of Uranus obtained with the short-wavelength spectrographs of the International Ultraviolet Explorer Observatory in 1982 April and June have revealed unexpectedly strong H Ly..cap alpha.. emission which varied between 430 and 850 Rayleighs in observed disk-averaged brightness over the course of these observations. The variability of the emission alone indicates that much of the emission must be produced by charged particle excitation of H in Uranus's upper atmosphere. In addition, comparison of these data with a model for resonant scattering of solar H Ly..cap alpha.. emission indicates that, over a wide range of model conditions, an emission brightness of even 430 Rayleighs (which was the lowest observed value) corresponds to an H column density on the order of 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -2/ in Uranus's upper atmosphere. At 20 AU from the Sun, solar EUV photodissociation of H/sub 2/ is insufficient to produce such a high column abundance of H, further supporting the identification of charged particle precipitation in Uranus's upper atmosphere. These data thus offer the first strong evidence for the presence of aurorae and therefore a magnetic field on Uranus.

  1. Far-ultraviolet florescent molecular hydrogen emission map of the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Young-soo; Seon, Kwang-il; Min, Kyoung-wook; Edelstein, Jerry; Han, Wonyong

    2017-01-01

    We present the far-ultraviolet fluorescent molecular hydrogen (H2) emission map observed with FIMS/SPEAR for ~76% of the sky. The fluorescent H2 emission is found to be saturated by strong dust extinction at the optically thick, Galactic plane region. Nevertheless, the extinction-corrected intensity of the fluorescent H2 emission is found to have strong linear correlations with the well-known tracers of the cold interstellar medium, such as the E(B-V) color excess, neutral hydrogen column density N(HI), Hα emission, and CO J=1→0 emission. The all-sky molecular hydrogen column density map is also obtained using a simple photodissociation region model with interstellar radiation fields derived from UV star catalogs. We also estimate the hydrogen molecular fraction (fH2), CO-to-H2 conversion factor (XCO), and the gas-to-dust ratio of the diffuse interstellar medium. fH2 gradually increases from less than 1% at optically thin regions with E(B-V)<0.1 to ~50% for E(B-V) = 5. XCO also tends to increase with E(B-V), but converges to the Galactic mean value of 1.8×1020 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s at optically thick regions where E(B-V) is larger than 2.0. The estimated gas-to-dust ratio is consistent with the standard value of 5.8×1021 atoms cm-2 mag-1.

  2. Estimating changes in urban ozone concentrations due to life cycle emissions from hydrogen transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.; Chang, Daniel P. Y.

    Hydrogen has been proposed as a low polluting alternative transportation fuel that could help improve urban air quality. This paper examines the potential impact of introducing a hydrogen-based transportation system on urban ambient ozone concentrations. This paper considers two scenarios, where significant numbers of new hydrogen vehicles are added to a constant number of gasoline vehicles. In our scenarios hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) are introduced in Sacramento, California at market penetrations of 9% and 20%. From a life cycle analysis (LCA) perspective, considering all the emissions involved in producing, transporting, and using hydrogen, this research compares three hypothetical natural gas to hydrogen pathways: (1) on-site hydrogen production; (2) central hydrogen production with pipeline delivery; and (3) central hydrogen production with liquid hydrogen truck delivery. Using a regression model, this research shows that the daily maximum temperature correlates well with atmospheric ozone formation. However, increases in initial VOC and NO x concentrations do not necessarily increase the peak ozone concentration, and may even cause it to decrease. It is found that ozone formation is generally limited by NO x in the summer and is mostly limited by VOC in the fall in Sacramento. Of the three hydrogen pathways, the truck delivery pathway contributes the most to ozone precursor emissions. Ozone precursor emissions from the truck pathway at 9% market penetration can cause additional 3-h average VOC (or NO x) concentrations up to approximately 0.05% (or 1%) of current pollution levels, and at 20% market penetration up to approximately 0.1% (or 2%) of current pollution levels. However, all of the hydrogen pathways would result in very small (either negative or positive) changes in ozone air quality. In some cases they will result in worse ozone air quality (mostly in July, August, and September), and in some cases they will result in better ozone air quality

  3. Exospheric and interplanetary hydrogen sensing from a translunar CubeSat platform by the Tomographic Hydrogen Emission Observatory (THEO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, L.; Sample, J. G.; Doe, R.; Noto, J.; Walsh, B.; Kamalabadi, F.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Kerr, R. B.; Immel, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The evaporation of neutral hydrogen (H) atmospheres into interplanetary space is a near-ubiquitous process in the universe that can be strongly perturbed by charge exchange coupling with ambient ions, influencing atmospheric evolution as well as the dissipation of plasma energy. Space-based observation of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation scattered by H atoms is a powerful means to infer the underlying exospheric density distribution and thus unravel the competing effects of thermal and non-thermal processes on H energization and escape. Numerous past and present NASA missions have obtained measurements of terrestrial H emission at 121.6 nm (Lyman alpha) from earth-orbiting satellite platforms. However, their separate targeting of either the optically thick emission in the lower exosphere or the optically thin emission in the outer exosphere, together with their lack of independent measurement of the interplanetary emission that constitutes a significant background contamination, renders such data insufficient to advance exospheric science beyond current understanding. Here, we describe a new nano-satellite mission concept for exospheric H investigation that overcomes these historical measurement limitations. The mission, known as the Tomographic Hydrogen Emission Observatory (THEO), is designed to provide 3-D photometric measurements of terrestrial H Lyman alpha emission from a highly autonomous, three-axis-stabilized, 6U CubeSat platform along a trans-lunar trajectory that is ideal for the unambiguous estimation of H density from the exobase to the magnetopause and beyond. In particular, we will describe the feasibility of meeting operational challenges associated with satellite navigation and communication at such large distances.

  4. An intensity map of hydrogen 21-cm emission at redshift z approximately 0.8.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Bandura, Kevin; Peterson, Jeffrey B

    2010-07-22

    Observations of 21-cm radio emission by neutral hydrogen at redshifts z approximately 0.5 to approximately 2.5 are expected to provide a sensitive probe of cosmic dark energy. This is particularly true around the onset of acceleration at z approximately 1, where traditional optical cosmology becomes very difficult because of the infrared opacity of the atmosphere. Hitherto, 21-cm emission has been detected only to z = 0.24. More distant galaxies generally are too faint for individual detections but it is possible to measure the aggregate emission from many unresolved galaxies in the 'cosmic web'. Here we report a three-dimensional 21-cm intensity field at z = 0.53 to 1.12. We then co-add neutral-hydrogen (H i) emission from the volumes surrounding about 10,000 galaxies (from the DEEP2 optical galaxy redshift survey). We detect the aggregate 21-cm glow at a significance of approximately 4sigma.

  5. Reduction of gaseous pollutant emissions from gas turbine combustors using hydrogen-enriched jet fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress in an evaluation of the applicability of the hydrogen enrichment concept to achieve ultralow gaseous pollutant emission from gas turbine combustion systems is described. The target emission indexes for the program are 1.0 for oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide, and 0.5 for unburned hydrocarbons. The basic concept utilizes premixed molecular hydrogen, conventional jet fuel, and air to depress the lean flammability limit of the mixed fuel. This is shown to permit very lean combustion with its low NOx production while simulataneously providing an increased flame stability margin with which to maintain low CO and HC emission. Experimental emission characteristics and selected analytical results are presented for a cylindrical research combustor designed for operation with inlet-air state conditions typical for a 30:1 compression ratio, high bypass ratio, turbofan commercial engine.

  6. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by VUV-emission of filament driven hydrogen arc discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laulainen, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H- ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  7. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide emissions from five passenger vehicles.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hua Lu

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, three unregulated components, ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide, emitted from five passenger vehicles are investigated. With focus upon emission factors from existing production technology, vehicles produced between 1989 and 1998 with considerable mileage (7000 to 280,000) are chosen. Among the five vehicles, four were sold in the European market, whereas one was sold in the US market. The vehicles are tested on a chassis dynamometer. An EU2000 Driving Cycle (NEDC) and a US Urban Driving Cycle (UDC) of the Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) are used in the study. The regulated emissions are measured using a Horiba Mexa series. Unregulated emissions, ammonia (NH(3)), nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are analysed by mass spectrometer, gas chromatography and CNT-NA, TIM315-74W method, respectively. Both the unregulated emissions and the regulated emissions show driving cycle dependency; and they are also improved with newer vehicle and emission control technology. However, a gasoline direct injection vehicle (relatively new technology in this study) has rather high regulated emissions, whereas the NH(3), N(2)O and HCN emissions are low.

  8. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. 266.107 Section 266.107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  10. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. 266.107 Section 266.107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  13. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. 266.107 Section 266.107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  14. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. 266.107 Section 266.107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  16. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. 266.107 Section 266.107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  18. Emissions and Total Energy Consumption of a Multicylinder Piston Engine Running on Gasoline and a Hydrogen-gasoline Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    A multicylinder reciprocating engine was used to extend the efficient lean operating range of gasoline by adding hydrogen. Both bottled hydrogen and hydrogen produced by a research methanol steam reformer were used. These results were compared with results for all gasoline. A high-compression-ratio, displacement production engine was used. Apparent flame speed was used to describe the differences in emissions and performance. Therefore, engine emissions and performance, including apparent flame speed and energy lost to the cooling system and the exhaust gas, were measured over a range of equivalence ratios for each fuel. All emission levels decreased at the leaner conditions. Adding hydrogen significantly increased flame speed over all equivalence ratios.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide and nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions from broiler houses in the Southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions from two mechanically ventilated commercial broiler houses located in the Southeastern United States were continuously monitored over 12 flocks during the one-year period of 2006-2007 as a joint effort between Iowa State University a...

  20. Impact of Increased Use of Hydrogen on Petroleum Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, The

    EIA Publications

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Byron L. Dorgan for an analysis of the impacts on U.S. energy import dependence and emission reductions resulting from the commercialization of advanced hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in the transportation and distributed generation markets.

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parigger, Christian G.; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 {mu}s after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the {delta}{nu}=+2 progression of the C2 Swan system are discernable in the H{beta} and H{gamma} plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH4 flow pressures of 2.7x10{sup 5} Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10{sup 5} Pa (80 psig)

  2. Tracing ram-pressure stripping with warm molecular hydrogen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rieke, George H.

    2014-12-01

    We use the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph to study four infalling cluster galaxies with signatures of ongoing ram-pressure stripping. H{sub 2} emission is detected in all four, and two show extraplanar H{sub 2} emission. The emission usually has a warm (T ∼ 115-160 K) and a hot (T ∼ 400-600 K) component that is approximately two orders of magnitude less massive than the warm one. The warm component column densities are typically 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} with masses of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. The warm H{sub 2} is anomalously bright compared with normal star-forming galaxies and therefore may be excited by ram-pressure. In the case of CGCG 97-073, the H{sub 2} is offset from the majority of star formation along the direction of the galaxy's motion in the cluster, suggesting that it is forming in the ram-pressure wake of the galaxy. Another galaxy, NGC 4522, exhibits a warm H{sub 2} tail approximately 4 kpc in length. These results support the hypothesis that H{sub 2} within these galaxies is shock-heated from the interaction with the intracluster medium. Stripping of dust is also a common feature of the galaxies. For NGC 4522, where the distribution of dust at 8 μm is well resolved, knots and ripples demonstrate the turbulent nature of the stripping process. The Hα and 24 μm luminosities show that most of the galaxies have star-formation rates comparable to similar mass counterparts in the field. Finally, we suggest a possible evolutionary sequence primarily related to the strength of ram-pressure that a galaxy experiences to explain the varied results observed in our sample.

  3. Voyager measurements of hydrogen Lyman-α diffuse emission from the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lallement, Rosine; Quémerais, Eric; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Sandel, Bill R; Izmodenov, Vlad

    2011-12-23

    Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha (Lyα) emission from galaxies is currently measured and used in cosmology as an indicator of star formation. Until now, the Milky Way emission has not been detected, owing to far brighter local sources, including the H (hydrogen) glow, i.e., solar Lyα radiation backscattered by interstellar atoms that flow within the solar system. Because observations from the Voyager spacecraft, now leaving the heliosphere, are decreasingly affected by the H glow, the ultraviolet spectrographs are detecting Lyα diffuse emission from our Galaxy. The surface brightness toward nearby star-forming regions is about 3 to 4 rayleighs. The escape fraction of the radiation from the brightest H II regions is on the order of 3% and is highly spatially variable. These results will help in constraining models of Lyα radiation transfer in distant galaxies.

  4. Emissions of hydrogen cyanide from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Samar G.; Leithead, Amy; Li, Shao-Meng; Chan, Tak W.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Stroud, Craig; Zhang, Junhua; Lee, Patrick; Lu, Gang; Brook, Jeffery R.; Hayden, Katherine; Narayan, Julie; Liggio, John

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is considered a marker for biomass burning emissions and is a component of vehicle exhaust. Despite its potential health impacts, vehicular HCN emissions estimates and their contribution to regional budgets are highly uncertain. In the current study, Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) was used to measure HCN emission factors from the exhaust of individual diesel, biodiesel and gasoline vehicles. Laboratory emissions data as a function of fuel type and driving mode were combined with ambient measurement data and model predictions. The results indicate that gasoline vehicles have the highest emissions of HCN (relative to diesel fuel) and that biodiesel fuel has the potential to significantly reduce HCN emissions even at realistic 5% blend levels. The data further demonstrate that gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines emit more HCN than their port fuel injection (PFI) counterparts, suggesting that the expected full transition of vehicle fleets to GDI will increase HCN emissions. Ambient measurements of HCN in a traffic dominated area of Toronto, Canada were strongly correlated to vehicle emission markers and consistent with regional air quality model predictions of ambient air HCN, indicating that vehicle emissions of HCN are the dominant source of exposure in urban areas. The results further indicate that additional work is required to quantify HCN emissions from the modern vehicle fleet, particularly in light of continuously changing engine, fuel and after-treatment technologies.

  5. Micro-Mixing Lean-Premix System for Ultra-Low Emission Hydrogen/Syngas Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Erlendur Steinthorsson; Brian Hollon; Adel Mansour

    2010-06-30

    The focus of this project was to develop the next generation of fuel injection technologies for environmentally friendly, hydrogen syngas combustion in gas turbine engines that satisfy DOE's objectives of reducing NOx emissions to 3 ppm. Building on Parker Hannifin's proven Macrolamination technology for liquid fuels, Parker developed a scalable high-performing multi-point injector that utilizes multiple, small mixing cups in place of a single conventional large-scale premixer. Due to the small size, fuel and air mix rapidly within the cups, providing a well-premixed fuel-air mixture at the cup exit in a short time. Detailed studies and experimentation with single-cup micro-mixing injectors were conducted to elucidate the effects of various injector design attributes and operating conditions on combustion efficiency, lean stability and emissions and strategies were developed to mitigate the impact of flashback. In the final phase of the program, a full-scale 1.3-MWth multi-cup injector was built and tested at pressures from 6.9bar (100psi) to 12.4bar (180psi) and flame temperatures up to 2000K (3150 F) using mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas as fuel with nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The injector operated without flash back on fuel mixtures ranging from 100% natural gas to 100% hydrogen and emissions were shown to be insensitive to combustor pressure. NOx emissions of 3-ppm were achieved at a flame temperature of 1750K (2690 F) when operating on a fuel mixture containing 50% hydrogen and 50% natural gas by volume with 40% nitrogen dilution and 1.5-ppm NOx was achieved at a flame temperature of 1680K (2564 F) using only 10% nitrogen dilution. NOx emissions of 3.5-ppm were demonstrated at a flame temperature of 1730K (2650 F) with only 10% carbon dioxide dilution. Finally, 3.6-ppm NOx emissions were demonstrated at a flame temperature over 1600K (2420 F) when operating on 100% hydrogen fuel with 30% carbon dioxide dilution. Superior operability was

  6. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  7. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, D R; Kim, H S; Saykally, R J

    2000-12-20

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  8. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, D. R.; Kim, H. S.; Saykally, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  9. Circumstellar Variations and Microflaring in FK Comae Berenices: Time-Resolved Balmer Line Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. M.; Foing, B. H.; Gondoin, Ph.; Stempels, H. C.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Le Poole, R. S.; Ehrenfreund, P.; de Jong, J. A.; Schrijvers, C.; Henrichs, H.; ESA-MUSICOS Collaboration

    We present results from the analysis of spectra of the fast rotating giant FK Comae Berenices, obtained with the recently commissioned ESA-MUSICOS spectrograph at the INT and with the Aurelie spectrograph at the OHP. The Balmer lines broad emission is modelled as arising from structures extending up to 4 stellar radii. The absorption is modelled due to the presence of a shell of cold and dense gas (solar-like filaments), near the corotation radius, covering about 20% of the stellar disc. The extended emission is believed to arise in giant structures reminiscent of active loops or prominences. Time resolved Hα emission spectroscopy indicates that these structures undergo continuous microflaring. Based on data sets from May and November 1996 and May and June 1997, we describe different time scales for variability, from yearly rise of activity to hourly microflares. Based on observations with the ESA-MUSICOS spectrograph at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, ING Observatory, Spain and with the Aurelie spectrograph at the 1.52 m Coude Telescope, Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France

  10. Hydrogen Pathways: Updated Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Ten Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsden, T.; Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

    2013-03-01

    This report describes a life-cycle assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of 10 hydrogen production, delivery, dispensing, and use pathways that were evaluated for cost, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This evaluation updates and expands on a previous assessment of seven pathways conducted in 2009. This study summarizes key results, parameters, and sensitivities to those parameters for the 10 hydrogen pathways, reporting on the levelized cost of hydrogen in 2007 U.S. dollars as well as life-cycle well-to-wheels energy use and GHG emissions associated with the pathways.

  11. Mid Infrared Hydrogen Recombination Line Emission from the Maser Star MWC 349A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Strelnitski, V.; Miles, J. W.; Kelly, D. M.; Lacy, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected and spectrally resolved the mid-IR hydrogen recombination lines H6(alpha)(12.372 micrometers), H7(alpha)(19.062 micrometers), H7(beta)(l1.309 micrometers) and H8(gamma)(12.385 micrometers) from the star MWC349A. This object has strong hydrogen maser emission (reported in the millimeter and submillimeter hydrogen recombination lines from H36(alpha) to H21(alpha)) and laser emission (reported in the H15(alpha), H12(alpha) and H10(alpha) lines). The lasers/masers are thought to arise predominantly in a Keplerian disk around the star. The mid-IR lines do not show evident signs of lasing, and can be well modeled as arising from the strong stellar wind, with a component arising from a quasi-static atmosphere around the disk, similar to what is hypothesized for the near IR (less than or equal to 4 micrometers) recombination lines. Since populations inversions in the levels producing these mid-IR transitions are expected at densities up to approximately 10(exp 11)/cu cm, these results imply either that the disk does not contain high-density ionized gas over long enough path lengths to produce a gain approximately 1, and/or that any laser emission from such regions is small compared to the spontaneous background emission from the rest of the source as observed with a large beam. The results reinforce the interpretation of the far-IR lines as true lasers.

  12. Emissions of molecular hydrogen (H2) and its isotopic signature from residential heaters and waste incinerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S. W.; Roeckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric molecular hydrogen (H2) has recently received increased interest in the scientific community because of a potential shift to a global hydrogen energy economy which could potentially alter the atmospheric budget of H2 due to substantial leakage. This calls for an improved understanding of the present day's atmospheric H2 budget. One of the major sources of H2 are emissions from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel. While emissions of H2 from car exhaust have been studied extensively, those from fossil fuel based heating systems have remained a matter of speculation. Here we present results from measurements of a variety of residential heating systems covering oil, gas, and wood heating with various burner capacities. For oil and gas heating systems we surprisingly find no net H2 emissions, i.e. the exhaust air contains H2 at or below the mole fractions of the intake air (approx. 0.5 ppm). While H2 emissions are virtually absent, those of carbon monoxide (CO) are not. As a consequence, caution has to be exercised when modeling H2 emissions based on assumed H2/CO ratios and using CO emission inventories. We also find that the molecular hydrogen in the approx. 0.5 ppm exhaust air is isotopically strongly depleted (-20 permil to -200 permil) compared to the ambient air (+130 permil). This suggests that H2 is involved in the combustion processes, and therefore the H2 of the intake air is not the same H2 in the exhaust air. Exhausts from waste incinerator plants are generally also depleted in H2 mole fractions and in their H/D isotopic composition.

  13. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus draws attention at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC employees, along with Center Director Roy Bridges (second from left), view the hydrogen-oxygen driven engine powering a Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. Available for viewing by employees, the ZE bus is also being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex Oct. 26-27.

  14. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus draws attention at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In front of the Headquarters Building at KSC, Center Director Roy Bridges (left) looks at the hydrogen-oxygen driven engine powering a Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by- product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. Available for viewing by employees, the ZE bus is also being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex Oct. 26-27.

  15. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by VUV-emission of filament driven hydrogen arc discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-08

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H{sup −} ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  16. Operating strategy for a hydrogen engine for improved drive-cycle efficiency and emissions behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Shidore, N.; Energy Systems

    2009-05-01

    Due to their advanced state of development and almost immediate availability, hydrogen internal combustion engines could act as a bridging technology toward a wide-spread hydrogen infrastructure. Extensive research, development and steady-state testing of hydrogen internal combustion engines has been conducted to improve efficiency, emissions behavior and performance. This paper summarizes the steady-state test results of the supercharged hydrogen-powered four-cylinder engine operated on an engine dynamometer. Based on these results a shift strategy for optimized fuel economy is established and engine control strategies for various levels of hybridization are being discussed. The strategies are evaluated on the Urban drive cycle, differences in engine behavior are investigated and the estimated fuel economy and NO{sub x} emissions are calculated. Future work will include dynamic testing of these strategies and powertrain configurations as well as individual powertrain components on a vehicle platform, called Mobile Advanced Technology Testbed (MATT), that was developed and built at Argonne National Laboratory.

  17. Operating strategy for a hydrogen engine for improved drive-cycle efficiency and emissions behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Shidore, N.; Energy Systems

    2009-05-01

    Due to their advanced state of development and almost immediate availability, hydrogen internal combustion engines could act as a bridging technology toward a wide-spread hydrogen infrastructure. Extensive research, development and steady-state testing of hydrogen internal combustion engines has been conducted to improve efficiency, emissions behavior and performance. This paper summarizes the steady-state test results of the supercharged hydrogen-powered four-cylinder engine operated on an engine dynamometer. Based on these results a shift strategy for optimized fuel economy is established and engine control strategies for various levels of hybridization are being discussed. The strategies are evaluated on the Urban drive cycle, differences in engine behavior are investigated and the estimated fuel economy and NO{sub x} emissions are calculated. Future work will include dynamic testing of these strategies and powertrain configurations as well as individual powertrain components on a vehicle platform, called 'Mobile Advanced Technology Testbed' (MATT), that was developed and built at Argonne National Laboratory.

  18. New Insights into White-Light Flare Emission from Radiative-Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Chromospheric Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, S. L.; Carlsson, M.; Allred, J. C.; Uitenbroek, H.; Osten, R. A.; Holman, G.

    2015-12-01

    The heating mechanism at high densities during M-dwarf flares is poorly understood. Spectra of M-dwarf flares in the optical and near-ultraviolet wavelength regimes have revealed three continuum components during the impulsive phase: 1) an energetically dominant blackbody component with a color temperature of T≈104 K in the blue-optical, 2) a smaller amount of Balmer continuum emission in the near-ultraviolet at λ≤3 646 Å, and 3) an apparent pseudo-continuum of blended high-order Balmer lines between λ=3 646 Å and λ≈3 900 Å. These properties are not reproduced by models that employ a typical "solar-type" flare heating level of ≤ 10^{11} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} in nonthermal electrons, and therefore our understanding of these spectra is limited to a phenomenological three-component interpretation. We present a new 1D radiative-hydrodynamic model of an M-dwarf flare from precipitating nonthermal electrons with a high energy flux of 10^{13} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. The simulation produces bright near-ultraviolet and optical continuum emission from a dense (n>10^{15} cm^{-3}), hot (T ≈12 000 - 13 500 K) chromospheric condensation. For the first time, the observed color temperature and Balmer jump ratio are produced self-consistently in a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model. We find that a T≈104 K blackbody-like continuum component and a low Balmer jump ratio result from optically thick Balmer (∞→ n=2) and Paschen recombination (∞→ n=3) radiation, and thus the properties of the flux spectrum are caused by blue (λ≈4 300 Å) light escaping over a larger physical depth range than by red (λ≈6 700 Å) and near-ultraviolet (λ≈3 500 Å) light. To model the near-ultraviolet pseudo-continuum previously attributed to overlapping Balmer lines, we include the extra Balmer continuum opacity from Landau-Zener transitions that result from merged, high-order energy levels of hydrogen in a dense, partially ionized atmosphere. This reveals a new diagnostic of

  19. Emission of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from the Martian subsolar magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.-D.; Alho, M.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have simulated the hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the subsolar magnetosheath of Mars using a hybrid model of the proton plasma charge exchanging with the Martian exosphere to study statistical features revealed from the observations of the Neutral Particle Detectors on Mars Express. The simulations reproduce well the observed enhancement of the hydrogen ENA emissions from the dayside magnetosheath in directions perpendicular to the Sun-Mars line. Our results show that the neutralized protons from the shocked solar wind are the dominant ENA population rather than those originating from the pickup planetary ions. The simulation also suggests that the observed stronger ENA emissions in the direction opposite to the solar wind convective electric field result from a stronger proton flux in the same direction at the lower magnetosheath; i.e., the proton fluxes in the magnetosheath are not cylindrically symmetric. We also confirm the observed increasing of the ENA fluxes with the solar wind dynamical pressure in the simulations. This feature is associated with a low altitude of the induced magnetic boundary when the dynamic pressure is high and the magnetosheath protons can reach to a denser exosphere, and thus, the charge exchange rate becomes higher. Overall, the analysis suggests that kinetic effects play an important and pronounced role in the morphology of the hydrogen ENA distribution and the plasma environment at Mars, in general.

  20. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  1. Componente de la envoltura en la discontinuidad de Balmer de estrellas Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, R. D.; Cidale, L.

    En modelos de atmósferas en expansión de estrellas Be se estudia la contribución al salto de Balmer de una envoltura circunestelar. Se busca relacionar el salto de Balmer fotosférico y el salto de Balmer originado en la envoltura con los distintos parámetros de la atmósfera (dimensión de la cromosfera, ley de expansión, tasa de pérdida de masa, etc.).

  2. Evolution of Balmer jump selected galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso Iribarren, P.; Infante, L.; Padilla, N.; Lacerna, I.; Garcia, S.; Orsi, A.; Muñoz Arancibia, A.; Moustakas, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Moles, M.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Martínez, V. J.; Cerviño, M.; Alfaro, E. J.; Ascaso, B.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; Nieves-Seoane, L.; Benítez, N.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Samples of star-forming galaxies at different redshifts have been traditionally selected via color techniques. The ALHAMBRA survey was designed to perform a uniform cosmic tomography of the Universe, and we here exploit it to trace the evolution of these galaxies. Aims: Our objective is to use the homogeneous optical coverage of the ALHAMBRA filter system to select samples of star-forming galaxies at different epochs of the Universe and study their properties. Methods: We present a new color-selection technique, based on the models of spectral evolution convolved with the ALHAMBRA bands and the redshifted position of the Balmer jump to select star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 Balmer-jump Galaxies (BJGs). We applied the iSEDfit Bayesian approach to fit each detailed spectral energy distribution and determined star-formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, age, and absolute magnitudes. The mass of the halos in which these samples reside were found through a clustering analysis. Results: Five volume-limited BJG subsamples with different mean redshifts are found to reside in halos of median masses ~1012.5 ± 0.2 M⊙ slightly increasing toward z = 0.5. This increment is similar to numerical simulations results, which suggests that we trace the evolution of an evolving population of halos as they grow to reach a mass of ~1012.7 ± 0.1 at z = 0.5. The likely progenitors of our samples at z ~ 3 are Lyman-break galaxies, which at z ~ 2 would evolve into star-forming BzK galaxies, and their descendants in the local Universe are galaxies with luminosities of 1-3 L∗. Hence, this allows us to follow the putative evolution of the SFR, stellar mass, and age of these galaxies. Conclusions: From z ~ 1.0 to z ~ 0.5, the stellar mass of the volume-limited BJG samples changes almost not at all with redshift, suggesting that major mergers play a minor role in the evolution of these galaxies. The SFR evolution accounts for the small

  3. The derived emission limit for tritiated hydrogen gas from the Darlington Tritium Removal Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, Barry C. J.

    1993-06-01

    The derivation of the emission limit for tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) from Tritium Removal Facility is described using the model CEDM-HT. This compartment model assumes equilibrium between HT in air and tritium oxide (HTO) in the soil resulting from HT oxidation by soil bacteria. Subsequent transfer of this HTO occurs to air and food, resulting in dose to people. The factors taken into account in determining the critical group and the dose and emission limit calculations are described. The consumption of local-grown fruits and root vegetables was found to be potentially the major contributor to adult dose resulting from HT emissions. For young children, milk consumption is also potentially significant.

  4. Emissions of oxides of nitrogen from an experimental premixed-hydrogen burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1976-01-01

    Flame-tube experiments using premixed hydrogen and air were conducted to determine the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) resulting from ultralean combustion. Measurements of NOx emissions and combustion efficiency were made for inlet mixture temperatures of 600 and 700 K, pressures of 3.8 x 10 to the 5th power and 5.2 x 10 to the 5th power N/m squared, reference velocities of 15 to 18 m/sec, and equivalence ratios of 0.2 to 0.4. At the 700 K inlet mixture temperature, NOx emissions were 0.06 ppmv, and combustion efficiency was 98 percent at an equivalence ratio of 0.24. The use of a high-blockage (92-percent blockage) flameholder made it possible to conduct tests without upstream burning in the premixing duct for mixtures with equivalence ratios less than 0.4. For richer mixtures upstream burning did occur and prevented further testing.

  5. Large time scale variation in hydrogen emission from Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Hall, D. T.; Holberg, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    The IUE and Voyager spacecraft observations of Jupiter and Saturn were combined to obtain a consistent measurement of temporal variation of the equatorial subsolar hydrogen emission. The outer planets appear to have rather independent behavior over time scales of the order of 10 yr, particularly in emission from the H Ly alpha line. The time interval from 1978 to the present shows variation of mean equatorial H Ly alpha brightness of 2 at Jupiter and 5 at Saturn. The relative magnitudes of the variations is sufficiently different to suggest that response to input from the Sun is at least nonlinear. The brightness of H2 band emission appears to be relatively more stable than H Ly alpha. There is evidence in IUE observations of a moderate increase in H2 band brightness with increasing time at Jupiter, in opposition to the variation in H Ly alpha.

  6. Intensity of Hydrogen Line Emission from Accreting Gas-Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yuhiko; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ikoma, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    Planets have been thought to form in circumstellar gaseous disks. Indeed, a number of young stars surrounded by such disks have been already detected. Recently, there are some reports on detection of gap-like structure in circumstellar disks, which suggests that there are forming massive protoplanets embedded in the disks. A challenging issue is how to find forming planets in circumstellar disks directly. In this study, we investigate whether detectable emission occurs from accreting gas-giant planets. In a circumstellar disk, once a solid core becomes massive enough, it captures the surrounding disk gas gravitationally in a runaway manner. Since the disk gas accretion occurs much faster than angular momentum loss, a circumplanetary disk is formed in the mid-plane of the circumstellar disk. Recent three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations by Tanigawa et al. (2012) revealed that the gas flowed from the cicumstellar disk to the circumplanetary disk not horizontally but vertically. According to those simulations, the disk gas falls onto the circumplanetary disk at a speed comparable to the free fall speed, and the local gas temperature reaches up to tens of thousands of kelvin because of shock heating near the planet. Thus, the presence of an accreting gas giant planet may be found by observation of the radiative emission from such hot gas in the circumplanetary disk, which we quantify in this study. In particular, we focus on the intensity of line emission from hydrogen. We have simulated the post-shock gas flow with non-equilibrium chemical reaction and electron transition. Then, we have found that the intensity of some hydrogen lines is proportional to the number density of the surrounding circumstellar disk gas and square of the planet mass, so the protoplanet’s hydrogen-line emission is less intense by a few orders of magnitude relative to the protostar’s emission under some realistic conditions. Also, the duration time is comparable to the dissipation time

  7. CIRCUMBINARY GAS ACCRETION ONTO A CENTRAL BINARY: INFRARED MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION FROM GG Tau A

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Tracy L.; Lubow, S. H.; Bary, Jeffrey S.; Dutrey, Anne; Guilloteau, Stephane; Pietu, Vincent; Simon, M. E-mail: lubow@stsci.edu E-mail: Anne.Dutrey@obs.u-bordeaux1.fr E-mail: pietu@iram.fr

    2012-07-20

    We present high spatial resolution maps of ro-vibrational molecular hydrogen emission from the environment of the GG Tau A binary component in the GG Tau quadruple system. The H{sub 2} v = 1-0 S(1) emission is spatially resolved and encompasses the inner binary, with emission detected at locations that should be dynamically cleared on several hundred year timescales. Extensions of H{sub 2} gas emission are seen to {approx}100 AU distances from the central stars. The v = 2-1 S(1) emission at 2.24 {mu}m is also detected at {approx}30 AU from the central stars, with a line ratio of 0.05 {+-} 0.01 with respect to the v = 1-0 S(1) emission. Assuming gas in LTE, this ratio corresponds to an emission environment at {approx}1700 K. We estimate that this temperature is too high for quiescent gas heated by X-ray or UV emission from the central stars. Surprisingly, we find that the brightest region of H{sub 2} emission arises from a spatial location that is exactly coincident with a recently revealed dust 'streamer' which seems to be transferring material from the outer circumbinary ring around GG Tau A into the inner region. As a result, we identify a new excitation mechanism for ro-vibrational H{sub 2} stimulation in the environment of young stars. The H{sub 2} in the GG Tau A system appears to be stimulated by mass accretion infall as material in the circumbinary ring accretes onto the system to replenish the inner circumstellar disks. We postulate that H{sub 2} stimulated by accretion infall could be present in other systems, particularly binaries and 'transition disk' systems which have dust-cleared gaps in their circumstellar environments.

  8. H2 emission as a tracer of molecular hydrogen: Large-scale observations of Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhman, M. L.; Jaffe, D. T.; Keller, L. D.; Pak, Soojong

    1994-01-01

    We have detected extremely extended (greater than 1.5 deg, or 12 pc) near-infrared H2 line emission from the Orion A molecular cloud. We have mapped emission in the 1.601 micrometer(s) upsilon = 6 - 4 Q(1) and 2.121 micrometer(s) upsilon = 1 - 0 S(1) lines of H2 along a approx. 2 deg R.A. cut and from a 6' x 6' region near theta(sup 1) Ori C. The surface brightness of the extended H2 line emission is 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -5) ergs/s/sq. cm/sr. Based on the distribution and relative strengths of the H2 lines, we conclude that UV fluorescene is most likely the dominant H2 emission mechanism in the outer parts of the Orion cloud. Shock-heated gas does not make a major contribution to the H2 emission in this region. The fluorescent component of the total H2 upsilon = 1 - 0 S(1) luminosity from Orion is 30-40 solar luminosity. Molecular hydrogen excited by UV radiation from nearby OB stars contributes 98%-99% of the global H2 line emission from the Orion molecular cloud, even though this cloud has a powerful shock-excited H2 source in its core. The ability to detect large-scale H2 directly opens up new possibilities for the study of molecular clouds.

  9. Effect of fuel nitrogen and hydrogen content on emissions in hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Wolfbrandt, G.

    1981-01-01

    How the emissions of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide are affected by: (1) the decreased hydrogen content and (2) the increased organic nitrogen content of coal derived fuels is investigated. Previous CRT experimental work in a two stage flame tube has shown the effectiveness of rich lean two stage combustion in reducing fuel nitrogen conversion to nitrogen oxides. Previous theoretical work gave preliminary indications that emissions trends from the flame tube experiment could be predicted by a two stage, well stirred reactor combustor model using a detailed chemical mechanism for propane oxidation and nitrogen oxide formation. Additional computations are reported and comparisons with experimental results for two additional fuels and a wide range of operating conditions are given. Fuels used in the modeling are pure propane, a propane toluene mixture and pure toluene. These give hydrogen contents 18, 11 and 9 percent by weight, respectively. Fuel bound nitrogen contents of 0.5 and 1.0 percent were used. Results are presented for oxides of nitrogen and also carbon monoxide concentrations as a function of primary equivalence ratio, hydrogen content and fuel bound nitrogen content.

  10. The Effect of Converting to a U.S. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Fleet on Emissions and Energy Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, W. G.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Golden, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    This study analyzes the potential change in emissions and energy use from replacing fossil-fuel based vehicles with hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. This study examines three different hydrogen production scenarios to determine their resultant emissions and energy usage: hydrogen produced via 1) steam reforming of methane, 2) coal gasification, or 3) wind electrolysis. The atmospheric model simulations require two primary sets of data: the actual emissions associated with hydrogen fuel production and use, and the corresponding reduction in emissions associated with reducing fossil fuel use. The net change in emissions is derived using 1) the U.S. EPA's National Emission Inventory (NEI) that incorporates several hundred categories of on-road vehicles and 2) a Process Chain Analysis (PCA) for the different hydrogen production scenarios. NEI: The quantity of hydrogen-related emission is ultimately a function of the projected hydrogen consumption in on-road vehicles. Data for hydrogen consumption from on-road vehicles was derived from the number of miles driven in each U.S. county based on 1999 NEI data, the average fleet mileage of all on-road vehicles, the average gasoline vehicle efficiency, and the efficiency of advanced 2004 fuel cell vehicles. PCA: PCA involves energy and mass balance calculations around the fuel extraction, production, transport, storage, and delivery processes. PCA was used to examine three different hydrogen production scenarios: In the first scenario, hydrogen is derived from natural gas, which is extracted from gas fields, stored, chemically processed, and transmitted through pipelines to distributed fuel processing units. The fuel processing units, situated in similar locations as gasoline refueling stations, convert natural gas to hydrogen via a combination of steam reforming and fuel oxidation. Purified hydrogen is compressed for use onboard fuel cell vehicles. In the second scenario, hydrogen is derived from coal, which is extracted from

  11. White-light emission from solid carbon in aqueous solution during hydrogen generation induced by nanosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Shota; Maeda, Kosuke

    2016-07-01

    We previously discovered a novel method of hydrogen generation from high-grade charcoal in an aqueous solution using nanosecond laser pulse irradiation. In this paper, white-light emission during this reaction is reported: A broad spectrum over the visible range is observed above a threshold excitation energy density. The white-light emission is a simultaneous product of the hydrogen generation reaction and is attributed to blackbody radiation in accordance with Planck's Law at a temperature above 3800 K. Consequently, we propose that hydrogen generation induced by laser irradiation proceeds similarly to classical coal gasification, which features reactions at high pressure and high temperature.

  12. Sodium tetraborate decahydrate treatment reduces hydrogen sulfide emissions and the sulfate reducing bacteria population of swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emission of odorous and toxic gases from stored livestock manure is well documented, and poses a serious health risk to farmers and livestock. Hydrogen sulfide emissions have been sharply rising with more intensive livestock production and are of particular concern due to its acute toxicity. Num...

  13. Combined borax and tannin treatment of stored dairy manure to reduce bacterial populations and hydrogen sulfide emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Anaerobic digestion of organic residues in stored livestock manure is associated with the production of odors and emissions. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one such emission that can reach hazardous levels during manure storage and handling, posing a risk to both farmers and livestock. New te...

  14. Hydrogen line and continuum emission in young stellar objects. III - Line ratios and physical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Costa, Jose L.; Kwan, John

    1990-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the dependence of Br-gamma/Br-alpha and other hydrogen line ratios on nucleon density (over the range 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 12th/cu cm), column density (about 10 to the 18th - 10 to the 24th/sq cm), young stellar object (YSO) luminosity (about 10-10,000 solar luminosities), and distance of the gas cloud from the YSO, r (about 10 to the 12th - 10 to the 14th cm). For a given continuum model, the value of Br-gamma/Br-alpha can provide a constraint on r. The ionization and thermal structures of the emission region are described. The electron fraction is fairly constant and is small (less than 10 percent) in the region where most of the hydrogen line fluxes are produced. The temperature in this region is also quite constant, with a value of 5000-7000 K.

  15. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a swine facility in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunden, Jessica

    Annual global source contributions of sulfur compounds to the natural atmospheric environment are estimated to be 142 x 106 tons. Although not quantified, volatilization from animal wastes may be an important source of gaseous reduced sulfur compounds. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a colorless gas emitted during decomposition of hog manure that produces an offensive "rotten egg" odor. Once released into the atmosphere, H 2S is oxidized and the eventual byproduct, sulfuric acid, may combine with other atmospheric constituents to form aerosol products such as ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate. In recent years, confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have increased in size, resulting in more geographically concentrated areas of animals and, subsequently, animal waste. In North Carolina and across the southeastern United States anaerobic waste treatment lagoons are traditionally used to store and treat hog excreta at commercial hog farms. Currently, no state regulations exist for H2S gaseous emissions from animal production facilities in North Carolina and the amount of H2S being emitted into the atmosphere from these potential sources is widely unknown. In response to the need for data, this research initiative has been undertaken in an effort to quantify emissions of H2S from swine CAFOs. An experimental study was conducted at a commercial swine farm in eastern North Carolina to measure hydrogen sulfide emissions from a hog housing unit utilizing a mechanical fan ventilation system and from an on-site waste storage treatment lagoon. A dynamic flow-through chamber system was employed to make lagoon flux measurements. Semi-continuous measurements were made over a one-year period (2004-2005) for a few days during each of the four predominant seasons in order to assess diurnal and temporal variability in emissions. Fan rpm from the barn was continuously measured and flow rates were calculated in order to accurately assess gaseous emissions from the system

  16. Effect of hydrogen on ethanol-biodiesel blend on performance and emission characteristics of a direct injection diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, M; Isaac JoshuaRamesh Lalvani, J; Dhinesh, B; Annamalai, K

    2016-12-01

    Environment issue is a principle driving force which has led to a considerable effort to develop and introduce alternative fuels for transportation. India has large potential for production of biofuels like biodiesel from vegetable seeds. Use of biodiesel namely, tamanu methyl ester (TME) in unmodified diesel engines leads to low thermal Efficiency and high smoke emission. To encounter this problem hydrogen was inducted by a port fueled injection system. Hydrogen is considered to be low polluting fuel and is the most promising among alternative fuel. Its clean burning characteristic and better performance attract more interest compared to other fuels. It was more active in reducing smoke emission in biodiesel. A main drawback with hydrogen fuel is the increased NOx emission. To reduce NOx emission, TME-ethanol blends were used in various proportions. After a keen study, it was observed that ethanol can be blended with biodiesel up to 30% in unmodified diesel engine. The present work deals with the experimental study of performance and emission characteristic of the DI diesel engine using hydrogen and TME-ethanol blends. Hydrogen and TME-ethanol blend was used to improve the brake thermal efficiency and reduction in CO, NOx and smoke emissions.

  17. Factors Affecting VUV Emission Spectrum near Lyman-{alpha} from a Hydrogen Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.; Kasuya, T.; Shimamoto, S.; Wada, M.; Kimura, Y.; Nishiura, M.

    2011-09-26

    Vacuum ultra violet (VUV) emission spectra from plasmas near walls of different metallic materials were measured to estimate the effect upon the local production rate of vibrational excited hydrogen molecules due to plasma wall interaction. Among Cu, Mo, Ni, Ta and Ti, the intensity of band spectrum around Lyman-{alpha} had become the largest when Cu wall was used while it was the smallest for Ti. The role of particle reflection from the plasma electrode surface upon the H{sup -} production by a pure electron volume process is discussed.

  18. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus draws attention at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KSC workers, with Center Director Roy Bridges (at right next to bus), head for the open door of the Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus and a ride around the center. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. Available to employees for viewing and a ride, the ZE bus is also being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex Oct. 26-27.

  19. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus draws attention at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On view in front of the Headquarters Building, the Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus attracts an interested group of employees, including Center Director Roy Bridges (second from left in foreground). Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. Available for viewing by employees, the ZE bus is also being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex Oct. 26-27.

  20. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus drives around KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus passes a mock-up orbiter named Explorer on a trek through the KSC Visitor Complex. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. The ZE bus is being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex for two days to introduce the public to the concept.

  1. Hydrogen-oxygen driven Zero Emissions bus drives around KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Zero Emissions (ZE) transit bus tours the KSC Visitor Complex for a test ride. In the background are a mock-up orbiter named Explorer (left) and a stack of solid rocket boosters and external tank (right), typically used on Shuttle launches. Provided by dbb fuel cell engines inc. of Vancouver, Canada, the ZE bus was brought to KSC as part of the Center's Alternative Fuel Initiatives Program. The bus uses a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell in which hydrogen and oxygen, from atmospheric air, react to produce electricity that powers an electric motor drive system. The by-product 'exhaust' from the fuel cell is water vapor, thus zero harmful emissions. A typical diesel-powered bus emits more than a ton of harmful pollutants from its exhaust every year. The ZE bus is being used on tour routes at the KSC Visitor Complex for two days to introduce the public to the concept.

  2. Correlations between density distributions, optical spectra, and ion species in a hydrogen plasma (invited).

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2016-02-01

    An experimental study of plasma distributions in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge operated at 100 Hz repetition rate is presented. Ultrafast photography, time integrated visible light emission spectra, time resolved Balmer-alpha emission, time resolved Fulcher Band emission, ion species mass spectra, and time resolved ion species fraction measurements have been implemented as diagnostic tools in a broad range of plasma conditions. Results of plasma distributions and optical emissions correlated with H(+), H2(+), and H3(+) ion currents by using a Wien filter system with optical observation capability are reported. The magnetic field distribution and strength is found as the most critical factor for transitions between different plasma patterns and ion populations.

  3. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  4. Hydrogenic Lamb shift in iron Fe{sup 25+} and fine-structure Lamb shift

    SciTech Connect

    Chantler, C. T.; Laming, J. M.; Dietrich, D. D.; Hallett, W. A.; McDonald, R.; Silver, J. D.

    2007-10-15

    1s-2p Lyman {alpha} transitions in hydrogenic iron Fe{sup 25+} have been observed from a beam-foil source in fourth-order diffraction off ADP 101 and PET 002 crystals, simultaneously with the n=2 to n=4 Balmer {beta} transitions diffracted in first order. Calibration of the local dispersion relation of the spectrometer using Balmer {beta} lines provides measurements of Lyman {alpha} wavelengths. The approach of fitting the full two-dimensional dispersion relation, including other members of Balmer and Lyman series, limits random and systematic correlation of parameters, and reveals a major systematic due to dynamical diffraction depth penetration into a curved crystal. The development of a theory of x-ray diffraction from mosaic crystals was necessary for the accurate interpretation of the experimental data. Photographic theory was also developed in the process of this research. Several systematics are discussed and quantified for the first time for these medium-Z QED comparisons. 2s-1s and 4f-2p satellites are explicitly investigated, and a dominant systematic is uncovered, which is due to the variable location of spectral emission downstream of the beam-foil target. 1s-2p{sub 3/2}, 1s-2p{sub 1/2} iron Lamb shifts are measured to be 35 376{+-}1900 cm{sup -1} and 35 953{+-}1800 cm{sup -1}. These agree with but lie higher than theory. This represents a 5.7% measurement of the hydrogenic 1s-2p{sub 1/2} Lamb shift in iron. The technique also reports the iron 2p{sub 3/2}-2p{sub 1/2} fine structure as 171 108 cm{sup -1}{+-}180 cm{sup -1}, which represents a 51% measurement of the hydrogenic iron fine-structure Lamb shift, and reports measurements of secondary lines.

  5. Atomic hydrogen emission induced by TEA CO(2) laser bombardment on solid samples at low pressure and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Idris, Nasrullah; Terai, Sumito; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Hendrik; Kobayashi, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen emission has been studied in laser plasmas by focusing a TEA CO(2) laser (10.6 microm, 500 mJ, 200 ns) on various types of samples, such as glass, quartz, black plastic sheet, and oil on copper plate sub-target. It was found that H(alpha) emission with a narrow spectral width occurs with high efficiency when the laser plasma is produced in the low-pressure region. On the contrary, the conventional well-known laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), which is usually carried out at atmospheric air pressure, cannot be applied to the analysis of hydrogen as an impurity. By combining low-pressure laser-induced plasma spectroscopy with laser surface cleaning, a preliminary quantitative analysis was made on zircaloy pipe samples intentionally doped with hydrogen. As a result, a good linear relationship was obtained between H(alpha) emission intensity and its concentration.

  6. Plume segregation observed in hydrogen and deuterium containing plasmas produced by laser ablation of carbon fiber tiles from a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercadier, L.; Hermann, J.; Grisolia, C.; Semerok, A.

    2010-08-01

    The plasma produced by the irradiation of a hydrogen and deuterium containing carbon fiber composite with infrared laser pulses of 4-ns pulse duration has been investigated. The experiments were carried out under argon at reduced pressure. Microscopic analyses of the irradiated sample surface were performed to measure the ablation depth. Time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy was applied to characterize the evolution of spectral line emission as a function of time and distance from the surface. Particular attention was paid to the time-of-flight characteristics of the hydrogen and deuterium Balmer α spectral lines. According to the different atomic masses of both isotopes, the expansion of hydrogen into the low pressure argon atmosphere was found to be slightly faster than that of deuterium. The effect of plume segregation is pressure dependent and tends to increase the analytical signal of heavy atoms with respect to lighter ones during laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  7. Role of lubrication oil in particulate emissions from a hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Arthur L; Stipe, Christopher B; Habjan, Matthew C; Ahlstrand, Gilbert G

    2007-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that trace metals emitted by internal combustion engines are derived mainly from combustion of lubrication oil. This hypothesis was examined by investigation of the formation of particulate matter emitted from an internal combustion engine in the absence of fuel-derived soot. Emissions from a modified CAT 3304 diesel engine fueled with hydrogen gas were characterized. The role of organic carbon and metals from lubrication oil on particle formation was investigated under selected engine conditions. The engine produced exhaust aerosol with log normal-size distributions and particle concentrations between 10(5) and 10(7) cm(-3) with geometric mean diameters from 18 to 31 nm. The particles contained organic carbon, little or no elemental carbon, and a much larger percentage of metals than particles from diesel engines. The maximum total carbon emission rate was estimated at 1.08 g h(-1), which is much lower than the emission rate of the original diesel engine. There was also evidence that less volatile elements, such as iron, self-nucleated to form nanoparticles, some of which survive the coagulation process.

  8. Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions of a Supercharged Spark Ignited Hydrogen Fueled Internal Combustion Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieran, Sean

    A spark ignited hydrogen fueled engine was operated at three equivalence ratios (0.4, 0.5, and 0.6) with a supercharger. During steady-state road load conditions, the engine produced exceptionally low unburned hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter emissions. The oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions of the supercharged engine were 31.4, 149.5, and 787.0 mg*NOx/km for the equivalence ratios 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 respectively. Given that the current EPA regulations are 99.4 mg*NOx/km, this engine configuration represents a possible replacement option for gasoline fueled engines without the need for exhaust after treatment. During engine start-up, some of the supercharged tests exhibited particulate matter emission spikes. These particulate matter spikes do not seem to be related to equivalence ratio, coolant temperature, testing order, or start-up acceleration. Currently, there is no explanation why some of the tests produced particulate matter during engine start-up and others did not.

  9. The hydrogen sulfide emissions abatement program at the Geysers Geothermal Power Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. W.; Mccluer, H. K.

    1974-01-01

    The scope of the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) abatement program at The Geysers Geothermal Power Plant and the measures currently under way to reduce these emissions are discussed. The Geysers steam averages 223 ppm H2S by weight and after passing through the turbines leaves the plant both through the gas ejector system and by air-stripping in the cooling towers. The sulfide dissolved in the cooling water is controlled by the use of an oxidation catalyst such as an iron salt. The H2S in the low Btu ejector off gases may be burned to sulfur dioxide and scrubbed directly into the circulating water and reinjected into the steam field with the excess condensate. Details are included concerning the disposal of the impure sulfur, design requirements for retrofitting existing plants and modified plant operating procedures. Discussion of future research aimed at improving the H2S abatement system is also included.

  10. Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Robert C.; Edmonds, Ryan G.; Williams, Joseph T.; Baldwin, Stephen P.

    2009-10-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  11. Measurement of the stratospheric hydrogen peroxide concentration profile using far infrared thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Johnson, D. G.; Traub, W. A.; Jucks, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    The first unequivocal measurement of hydrogen peroxide in the stratosphere have been made, a concentration profile obtained from a balloon platform using Fourier transform thermal emission spectroscopy in the far infrared. Measurements were made using the 112/cm R-Q5 branch of the rotational-torsional spectrum, with some confirmation from the 94/cm R-Q4 branch. The volume mixing ratio of H2O2 is 1.6 x 10 to the -10th at 38.4 km, decreasing to 0.6 x 10 to the -10th at 23.8 km, with uncertainties of about 16 percent. These measurements are compared to a recent stratospheric model calculation.

  12. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  13. New Observations of Balmer Continuum Flux in Solar Flares. Instrument Description and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Procházka, O.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-03-01

    Increase in the Balmer continuum radiation during solar flares was predicted by various authors, but has never been firmly confirmed observationally using ground-based slit spectrographs. Here we describe a new post-focal instrument, the image selector, with which the Balmer continuum flux can be measured from the whole flare area, in analogy to successful detections of flaring dMe stars. The system was developed and put into operation at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA2 of the Ondřejov Observatory. We measure the total flux by a fast spectrometer from a limited but well-defined region on the solar disk. Using a system of diaphragms, the disturbing contribution of a bright solar disk can be eliminated as much as possible. Light curves of the measured flux in the spectral range 350 - 440 nm are processed, together with the Hα images of the flaring area delimited by the appropriate diaphragm. The spectral flux data are flat-fielded, calibrated, and processed to be compared with model predictions. Our analysis of the data proves that the described device is sufficiently sensitive to detect variations in the Balmer continuum during solar flares. Assuming that the Balmer-continuum kernels have at least a similar size as those visible in Hα, we find the flux increase in the Balmer continuum to reach 230 - 550 % of the quiet continuum during the observed X-class flare. We also found temporal changes in the Balmer continuum flux starting well before the onset of the flare in Hα.

  14. The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Ng, H. K.; Peters, R.W.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham

    2007-04-01

    Hydrogen is considered one of the most promising future energy carriers and transportation fuels. Because of the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure and refueling stations, widespread introduction of vehicles powered by pure hydrogen is not likely in the near future. Blending hydrogen with methane could be one solution. Such blends take advantage of the unique combustion properties of hydrogen and, at the same time, reduce the demand for pure hydrogen. In this paper, the authors analyze the combustion properties of hydrogen/methane blends (5% and 20% methane [by volume] in hydrogen equal to 30% and 65% methane [by mass] in hydrogen) and compare them to those of pure hydrogen as a reference. The study confirms that only minor adjustments in spark timing and injection duration are necessary for an engine calibrated and tuned for operation on pure hydrogen to run on hydrogen/methane blends.

  15. Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jr., C. E.

    1981-03-01

    The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics (Thomson scattering, microwave/far-infrared interferometer, pyroelectric radiometer, hard x-ray detector).

  16. Borax and Octabor Treatment of Stored Swine Manure: Reduction in Hydrogen Sulfide Emissions and Phytotoxicity to Agronomic Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gaseous emissions from stored manure have become environmental and health issues for humans and animals as the livestock industry becomes specialized and concentrated. Of particular concern is hydrogen sulfide, which is being targeted for regulatory control in concentrated animal farm operations. ...

  17. Borax and octabor treatment of stored swine manure to reduce sulfate reducing bacteria and hydrogen sulfide emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Odorous gas emissions from stored swine manure are becoming serious environmental and health issues as the livestock industry becomes more specialized, concentrated, and industrialized. These nuisance gasses include hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia, and methane, which are produced as a result of ana...

  18. Flame Emission Spectrometry in General Chemistry Labs: Solubility Product (K[subscript sp]) of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier W.; Cusworth, William, III; Lindquist, David; Mackin, John

    2007-01-01

    In this general chemistry laboratory, flame emission spectrometry is used to determine the potassium ion concentration in saturated solutions of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) in the 0-65 [degree]C temperature range. From these data the solubility products (K[subscript sp]), the Gibbs free energies of solution ([Delta][subscript…

  19. Quantifying Molecular Hydrogen Emissions and an Industrial Leakage Rate for the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, M. C.; Schroeder, J.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The poorly understood atmospheric budget and distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) have invited further research since the discovery that emissions from a hydrogen-based economy could have negative impacts on the global climate system and stratospheric ozone. The burgeoning fuel cell electric vehicle industry in the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) presents an opportunity to observe and constrain urban anthropogenic H2 emissions. This work presents the first H2 emissions estimate for the SoCAB and calculates an upper limit for the current rate of leakage from production and distribution infrastructure within the region. A top-down method utilized whole air samples collected during the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) onboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft from 23-25 June 2015 to estimate H2 emissions from combustion and non-combustion sources. H2:carbon monoxide (CO) and H2:carbon dioxide ratios from airborne observations were compared with experimentally established ratios from pure combustion source ratios and scaled with the well-constrained CO emissions inventory to yield H2 emissions of 24.9 ± 3.6 Gg a-1 (1σ) from combustion engines and 8.2 ± 4.7 Gg a-1 from non-combustion sources. Total daily production of H2 in the SoCAB was compared with the top-down results to estimate an upper limit leakage rate (5%) where all emissions not accounted for by incomplete combustion in engines were assumed to be emitted from H2 infrastructure. For bottom-up validation, the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory dispersion model was run iteratively with all known stationary sources in attempt to constrain emissions. While this investigation determined that H2 emissions from non-combustion sources in the SoCAB are likely significant, more in-depth analysis is required to better predict the atmospheric implications of a hydrogen economy.

  20. Methane and hydrogen sulfide emissions in UASB reactors treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Souza, C L; Chernicharo, C A L; Melo, G C B

    2012-01-01

    The release of CH(4) and H(2)S in UASB reactors was evaluated with the aim to quantify the emissions from the liquid surfaces (three-phase separator and settler compartment) and also from the reactor's discharge hydraulic structures. The studies were carried out in two pilot- (360 L) and one demo-scale (14 m(3)) UASB reactors treating domestic wastewater. As expected, the release rates were much higher across the gas/liquid interfaces of the three-phase separators (5.4-9.7 kg CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) and 23.0-35.8 g S m(-2) d(-1)) as compared with the quiescent settler surfaces (11.0-17.8 g CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) and 0.21 to 0.37 g S m(-2) d(-1)). The decrease of dissolved methane and dissolved hydrogen sulfide was very large in the discharging hydraulic structures very close to the reactor (>60 and >80%, respectively), largely due to the loss to the atmosphere, indicating that the concentration of these compounds will probably fall to values close to zero in the near downstream structures. The emission factors due to the release of dissolved methane in the discharge structure amounted to around 0.040 g CH(4) g COD(infl)(-1) and 0.060 g CH(4) g COD(rem)(-1), representing around 60% of the methane collected in the three-phase separator.

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy of 50 Hz pulsed dc nitrogen-hydrogen plasma in the presence of active screen cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, A.; Abrar, M.; Khan, A. W.; Jan, F.; Khan, B. S.; Shah, H. U.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2016-05-01

    The N2-H2 plasma gas mixture, generated in a 50 Hz pulsed dc discharge system with active screen cage, is characterized by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), as a function of gas pressure, the fractions of hydrogen and current density. The N2 dissociation degree and N atomic density was measured with actinometery where argon gas is used as actinometer. It was shown that the increase in hydrogen fraction enhances the dissociation of N2, until the maximum of 40%. The excitation temperature is determined from Ar-I emission line intensities by using the simple Boltzmann plot method. The dissociation fraction and excitation temperature is found to increase with hydrogen mixing in nitrogen plasma.

  2. BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES BASED ON C IV ARE CONSISTENT WITH THOSE BASED ON THE BALMER LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Assef, R. J.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, B. M.; Kozlowski, S.; Dietrich, M.; Grier, C. J.; Khan, R.; Ageorges, N.; Buschkamp, P.; Gemperlein, H.; Hofmann, R.; Barrows, R. S.; Falco, E.; Kilic, M.; Feiz, C.; Germeroth, A.; Juette, M.; Knierim, V.; Laun, W.; and others

    2011-12-01

    Using a sample of high-redshift lensed quasars from the CASTLES project with observed-frame ultraviolet or optical and near-infrared spectra, we have searched for possible biases between supermassive black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the C IV, H{alpha}, and H{beta} broad emission lines. Our sample is based upon that of Greene, Peng, and Ludwig, expanded with new near-IR spectroscopic observations, consistently analyzed high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) optical spectra, and consistent continuum luminosity estimates at 5100 A. We find that BH mass estimates based on the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of C IV show a systematic offset with respect to those obtained from the line dispersion, {sigma}{sub l}, of the same emission line, but not with those obtained from the FWHM of H{alpha} and H{beta}. The magnitude of the offset depends on the treatment of the He II and Fe II emission blended with C IV, but there is little scatter for any fixed measurement prescription. While we otherwise find no systematic offsets between C IV and Balmer line mass estimates, we do find that the residuals between them are strongly correlated with the ratio of the UV and optical continuum luminosities. This means that much of the dispersion in previous comparisons of C IV and H{beta} BH mass estimates are due to the continuum luminosities rather than to any properties of the lines. Removing this dependency reduces the scatter between the UV- and optical-based BH mass estimates by a factor of approximately two, from roughly 0.35 to 0.18 dex. The dispersion is smallest when comparing the C IV {sigma}{sub l} mass estimate, after removing the offset from the FWHM estimates, and either Balmer line mass estimate. The correlation with the continuum slope is likely due to a combination of reddening, host contamination, and object-dependent SED shapes. When we add additional heterogeneous measurements from the literature, the results are unchanged. Moreover, in a trial observation of a

  3. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ROTATIONAL EMISSION TOWARDS TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, James G.; Bania, T. M.; Boulanger, F.; Draine, B. T.; Falgarone, E.; Hily-Blant, P. E-mail: bania@bu.edu E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu E-mail: pierre.hilyblant@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr

    2011-12-20

    Using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have detected emission in the S(0), S(1), and S(2) pure-rotational (v = 0-0) transitions of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) toward six positions in two translucent high Galactic latitude clouds, DCld 300.2-16.9 and LDN 1780. The detection of these lines raises important questions regarding the physical conditions inside low-extinction clouds that are far from ultraviolet radiation sources. The ratio between the S(2) flux and the flux from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 7.9 {mu}m averages 0.007 for these six positions. This is a factor of about four higher than the same ratio measured toward the central regions of non-active Galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. Thus, the environment of these translucent clouds is more efficient at producing rotationally excited H{sub 2} per PAH-exciting photon than the disks of entire galaxies. Excitation analysis finds that the S(1) and S(2) emitting regions are warm (T {approx}> 300 K), but comprise no more than 2% of the gas mass. We find that UV photons cannot be the sole source of excitation in these regions and suggest mechanical heating via shocks or turbulent dissipation as the dominant cause of the emission. The clouds are located on the outskirts of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association and may be dissipating recent bursts of mechanical energy input from supernova explosions. We suggest that pockets of warm gas in diffuse or translucent clouds, integrated over the disks of galaxies, may represent a major source of all non-active galaxy H{sub 2} emission.

  4. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Detection of Molecular Hydrogen Rotational Emission towards Translucent Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalls, James G.; Bania, T. M.; Boulanger, F.; Draine, B. T.; Falgarone, E.; Hily-Blant, P.

    2011-12-01

    Using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have detected emission in the S(0), S(1), and S(2) pure-rotational (v = 0-0) transitions of molecular hydrogen (H2) toward six positions in two translucent high Galactic latitude clouds, DCld 300.2-16.9 and LDN 1780. The detection of these lines raises important questions regarding the physical conditions inside low-extinction clouds that are far from ultraviolet radiation sources. The ratio between the S(2) flux and the flux from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 7.9 μm averages 0.007 for these six positions. This is a factor of about four higher than the same ratio measured toward the central regions of non-active Galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey. Thus, the environment of these translucent clouds is more efficient at producing rotationally excited H2 per PAH-exciting photon than the disks of entire galaxies. Excitation analysis finds that the S(1) and S(2) emitting regions are warm (T >~ 300 K), but comprise no more than 2% of the gas mass. We find that UV photons cannot be the sole source of excitation in these regions and suggest mechanical heating via shocks or turbulent dissipation as the dominant cause of the emission. The clouds are located on the outskirts of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association and may be dissipating recent bursts of mechanical energy input from supernova explosions. We suggest that pockets of warm gas in diffuse or translucent clouds, integrated over the disks of galaxies, may represent a major source of all non-active galaxy H2 emission.

  5. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  6. Numerical and experimental study of atomic transport and Balmer line intensity in Linac4 negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, T. Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.

    2015-04-08

    Time structure of Balmer H{sub α} line intensity in Linac4 RF plasma has been analyzed by the combined simulation model of atomic transport and Collisional-Radiative models. As a preliminary result, time variation of the line intensity in the ignition phase of RF plasma is calculated and compared with the experimental results by photometry. For the comparison, spatial distribution of the local H{sub α} photon emission rate at each time is calculated from the numerical model. The contribution of the local photon emission rates to the observed line intensity via optical viewing port is also investigated by application of the mock-up of the optical viewing port and the known light source. It has been clarified from the analyses that the higher and the lower peaks of the H{sub α} line intensity observed during 1 RF cycle is mainly due to the different spatial distributions in the electron energy distribution function and the resultant local photon emission rate. These results support previous suggestion that the existence of the capacitive electric field in axial direction leads to the higher/lower peaks of the line intensity.

  7. Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Characterization of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Fueled with Hydrogen/Natural Gas Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby S. Chapman; Amar Patil

    2007-06-30

    Hydrogen is an attractive fuel source not only because it is abundant and renewable but also because it produces almost zero regulated emissions. Internal combustion engines fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) are operated throughout a variety of industries in a number of mobile and stationary applications. While CNG engines offer many advantages over conventional gasoline and diesel combustion engines, CNG engine performance can be substantially improved in the lean operating region. Lean operation has a number of benefits, the most notable of which is reduced emissions. However, the extremely low flame propagation velocities of CNG greatly restrict the lean operating limits of CNG engines. Hydrogen, however, has a high flame speed and a wide operating limit that extends into the lean region. The addition of hydrogen to a CNG engine makes it a viable and economical method to significantly extend the lean operating limit and thereby improve performance and reduce emissions. Drawbacks of hydrogen as a fuel source, however, include lower power density due to a lower heating value per unit volume as compared to CNG, and susceptibility to pre-ignition and engine knock due to wide flammability limits and low minimum ignition energy. Combining hydrogen with CNG, however, overcomes the drawbacks inherent in each fuel type. Objectives of the current study were to evaluate the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas as a fuel for conventional natural gas engines. The experiment and data analysis included evaluation of engine performance, efficiency, and emissions along with detailed in-cylinder measurements of key physical parameters. This provided a detailed knowledge base of the impact of using hydrogen/natural gas blends. A four-stroke, 4.2 L, V-6 naturally aspirated natural gas engine coupled to an eddy current dynamometer was used to measure the impact of hydrogen/natural gas blends on performance, thermodynamic efficiency and exhaust gas emissions

  8. Characterizing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from a swine waste treatment lagoon in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunden, Jessica; Aneja, Viney P.

    Emissions of atmospheric ammonia-nitrogen (NH 3-N, where NH 3-N=(14/17)NH 3) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) from a commercial anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon (17,150 m 2 at normal liquid level) were measured over a 1-year period. Continuous simultaneous measurements were made at the lagoon using a dynamic flow-through chamber system for ˜1 week during four seasons, October-November 2004 (fall), February 2005 (winter), April 2005 (spring), and June 2005 (summer) in an effort to examine diurnal and seasonal variability, and the respective relationships of NH 3-N and H 2S emissions to lagoon physicochemical properties. Continuously measured lagoon physicochemical parameters include lagoon surface temperature and lagoon pH. Aqueous lagoon samples were collected daily and analyzed for total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN), and total sulfide concentration. TKN, TAN, and sulfide concentrations ranged from 400-650, 360-590, and 0.1-13.0 mg L -1, respectively. For NH 3-N, the largest fluxes were observed during the summer (>4200 μg N m -2 min -1). During the fall and spring, average NH 3-N fluxes were 1634±505 and >2495 μg N m -2 min -1, respectively. The lowest fluxes were observed during the winter where average flux values were 1290±246 μg N m -2 min -1. Fluxes for H 2S were negligible during the winter season. Average fluxes increased during the fall (0.3±0.1 μg m -2 min -1) and spring (0.5±1.0 μg m -2 min -1), and highest flux values were observed during the summer (5.3±3.2 μg m -2 min -1). The seasonal NH 3-N and H 2S emission factors ranged from ˜10 to ˜40 kg N AU -1 yr -1 (1 AU=500 kg live animal weight) and ˜0 to ˜0.05 kg H 2S AU -1 yr -1, respectively. Generally, the lagoon emissions for H 2S were ˜3-4 orders of magnitude less than NH 3-N. The gas fluxes were related to various physicochemical parameters including the pH and near-surface temperature of the lagoon, and the aqueous concentration of the respective gas.

  9. On the Early-time Excess Emission in Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Perley, Daniel A.; Quimby, Robert M.; Waldman, Roni; Sullivan, Mark; Yan, Lin; Ofek, Eran O.; Fremling, Christoffer; Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Valenti, Stefano; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Yaron, Ofer; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Cao, Yi; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Horesh, Assaf; Rubin, Adam; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Nugent, Peter E.; Laher, Russ; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, Przemysław; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2017-01-01

    We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe I) PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF 12dam is very similar in duration (∼10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (2–3 mag fainter) compared to that observed in other SLSNe I. In contrast, the long-duration (>30 days) early excess emission in iPTF 13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time decline in the light curves of both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of 56Ni and 56Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF 12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the light curve of iPTF 13dcc. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF 13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc can be adequately fit with the model involving interaction with the circumstellar medium.

  10. THE BALMER-DOMINATED BOW SHOCK AND WIND NEBULA STRUCTURE OF {gamma}-RAY PULSAR PSR J1741-2054

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, Roger W.; Shaw, Michael S.; Camilo, Fernando; Cotter, Garret; Sivakoff, Gregory R. E-mail: msshaw@stanford.ed

    2010-12-01

    We have detected an H{alpha} bow shock nebula around PSR J1741-2054, a pulsar discovered through its GeV {gamma}-ray pulsations. The pulsar is only {approx}1.''5 behind the leading edge of the shock. Optical spectroscopy shows that the nebula is non-radiative, dominated by Balmer emission. The H{alpha} images and spectra suggest that the pulsar wind momentum is equatorially concentrated and implies a pulsar space velocity {approx}150 km s{sup -1}, directed 15{sup 0} {+-} 10{sup 0} out of the plane of the sky. The complex H{alpha} profile indicates that different portions of the post-shock flow dominate line emission as gas moves along the nebula and provide an opportunity to study the structure of this unusual slow non-radiative shock under a variety of conditions. CXO ACIS observations reveal an X-ray pulsar wind nebula within this nebula, with a compact {approx}2.''5 equatorial structure and a trail extending several arcminutes behind. Together these data support a close ({<=}0.5 kpc) distance, a spin geometry viewed edge-on, and highly efficient {gamma}-ray production for this unusual, energetic pulsar.

  11. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on light emission by various strains of marine luminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Katsev, Andrey M; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Szpilewska, Hanna

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting bacteria are the most abundant and widespread luminescent organisms. Most species of such bacteria live in marine environments. However, until recently, biological role of bacterial luminescence remained unknown. Recent studies indicated that light produced in bacterial cells may stimulate DNA repair. Therefore, it is not surprising that agents that cause DNA damage induce expression of lux genes. Moreover, it was proposed previously that bacterial luciferases may be involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Recently, this hypothesis was confirmed experimentally. Here we investigated effects of hydrogen peroxide on light emission by various strains of luminescent bacteria. We found that luminescence of strains with luciferase of fast kinetics of reaction decreased at considerably lower concentrations of H2O2 than that of strains with luciferase of the slow kinetics. The action (either direct or indirect) of luciferases as anti-oxidants seemed to be independent of activity of catalase, which was found to be different in various strains. Therefore, it seems that luciferases of the slow kinetics are more efficient in detoxification of reactive oxygen species than those of the fast kinetics.

  12. Dynamic flux chamber measurements of hydrogen sulfide emission rate from a quiescent surface--A computational evaluation.

    PubMed

    Prata, Ademir A; Santos, Jane M; Beghi, Sandra P; Fernandes, Isabella F; Vom Marttens, Lya L C; Pereira Neto, Leovegildo I; Martins, Ramon S; Reis, Neyval C; Stuetz, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    Enclosure devices have been studied and used for research purposes and practical applications in order to measure the emission rate of odorous pollutants from quiescent liquid surfaces to atmosphere. However, important questions remain about the interference of these measuring devices on the actual emission rate. The main concern regarding the use of a flux chamber is the fact that odorous compounds can accumulate into the chamber and yield gas-phase concentration increase inside the equipment, which causes a reduction of the emission rate during the measurement and thus gives an inaccurate local emission rate. Furthermore, the fluid flow inside the chamber does not reproduce the atmospheric boundary layer flow. This study applied the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique in order to investigate the influence of the fluid flow features inside a flux chamber on the measured hydrogen sulfide emission rate at quiescent liquid surfaces. The flux chamber design and operational conditions are those supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The results show that the US EPA flux chamber presents a fairly well mixed air phase. However, a trend to stagnation and hydrogen sulfide accumulation near chamber walls was detected in the computational simulation, which also indicated that the positioning of the sampling tube in relation to the inlet orifices may lead to deviations in the measurement results. CFD results showed that the wall shear and concentration gradients spatially vary at the gas-liquid interface, and friction velocity inside the chamber does not match typical values of atmospheric flow.

  13. A Zn-Ni coating with both high electrical conductivity and infrared emissivity prepared by hydrogen evolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiacheng; Guo, Xingwu; Xu, Wenbin; Zhang, Zhicheng; Dong, Jie; Peng, Liming; Ding, Wenjiang

    2017-04-01

    A Zn-Ni coating with both high electrical conductivity and infrared emissivity was prepared by hydrogen evolution method in order to satisfy the demand of thermal control in space. The maximum infrared emissivity of 0.91 was obtained, meanwhile the electrical resistivity is lower than 0.01 mΩ/cm. The infrared emissivity of the coating obtained from the experimental result is proportional to the projected area of pores per unit area in the coating. The addition of NH4SCN in the bath can obviously increase the projected area of pores per unit area in the coating and lead to the formation of NiO and ZnO compounds, which further increase the infrared emissivity of the coating. The porous hierarchical structure of Zn-Ni coating can further improve the infrared emissivity, and the infrared emissivity can be tuned by changing the projected area of pores in the coating. Based on the experimental results, a mathematical relationship between infrared emissivity and the projected area of pores per unit area is established. The bond strength and the mass of volatiles of the design of coatings satisfy the technical standard demanded by the satellites in space.

  14. Compound specific carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses of volatile organic compounds in various emissions of combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Christiane D; Grice, Kliti; Ioppolo-Armanios, Marisa; Kelly, David; Gibberd, Mark

    2012-11-01

    This study presents carbon (δ(13)C) and hydrogen (δD) isotope values of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in various emission sources using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TD-GC-irMS). The investigated VOCs ranged from C6 to C10. Samples were taken from (i) car exhaust emissions as well as from plant combustion experiments of (ii) various C3 and (iii) various C4 plants. We found significant differences in δ values of analysed VOCs between these sources, e.g. δ(13)C of benzene ranged between (i) -21.7 ± 0.2 ‰, (ii) -27.6 ± 1.6 ‰ and (iii) -16.3 ± 2.2 ‰, respectively and δD of benzene ranged between (i) -73 ± 13 ‰, (ii) -111 ± 10 ‰ and (iii) -70 ± 24 ‰, respectively. Results of VOCs present in investigated emission sources were compared to values from the literature (aluminium refinery emission). All source groups could be clearly distinguished using the dual approach of δ(13)C and δD analysis. The results of this study indicate that the correlation of compound specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis provides the potential for future research to trace the fate and to determine the origin of VOCs in the atmosphere using thermal desorption compound specific isotope analysis.

  15. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: The Proper Motions of Balmer Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the proper motions of Balmer-dominated filaments in Kepler’s supernova remnant using high resolution images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by about 10 years. We use the improved proper motion measurements and revised values of shock velocities to derive a distance to Kepler of {5.1}-0.7+0.8 kpc. The main shock around the northern rim of the remnant has a typical speed of 1690 km s-1 and is encountering material with densities of about 8 cm-3. We find evidence for the variation of shock properties over small spatial scales, including differences in the driving pressures as the shock wraps around a curved cloud surface. We find that the Balmer filaments ahead of the ejecta knot on the northwest boundary of the remnant are becoming fainter and more diffuse. We also find that the Balmer filaments associated with circumstellar material in the interior regions of the remnant are due to shocks with significantly lower velocities and that the brightness variations among these filaments trace the density distribution of the material, which may have a disk-like geometry. Based on observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  16. Ion Beam Emission within a Low Energy Focus Plasma (0.1 kJ) Operating with Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Aragi, Gamal M.

    2010-07-01

    An investigation of energetic ion beam emission from a low energy plasma focus (0.1 kJ Mather type) device operating with hydrogen gas is studied. The ion beam emission is investigated using time-integrated and time-resolved detectors. The present plasma focus device is powered by a capacitor bank of 1 μF at 18 kV maximum charging voltage. The correlation of ion beam intensity with filling gas pressure indicates that the beam emission is maximized at the optimum pressure for the focus formation at peak current. Energy of ions is determined with a time-of-flight (TOF) method, taking into account distance from the center electrode to the detection plane.

  17. Evaluation of a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Powered Blended-Wing-Body Aircraft Concept for Reduced Noise and Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Freh, Joshua E.; Olson, Erik D.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the analytical modeling and evaluation of an unconventional commercial transport aircraft concept designed to address aircraft noise and emission issues. A blended-wing-body configuration with advanced technology hydrogen fuel cell electric propulsion is considered. Predicted noise and emission characteristics are compared to a current technology conventional configuration designed for the same mission. The significant technology issues which have to be addressed to make this concept a viable alternative to current aircraft designs are discussed. This concept is one of the "Quiet Green Transport" aircraft concepts studied as part of NASA's Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) Program. The RASC Program was initiated to develop revolutionary concepts that address strategic objectives of the NASA Enterprises, such as reducing aircraft noise and emissions, and to identify advanced technology requirements for the concepts.

  18. Evaluation of an Aircraft Concept With Over-Wing, Hydrogen-Fueled Engines for Reduced Noise and Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Olson, Erik D.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the analytical modeling and evaluation of an unconventional commercial transport aircraft concept designed to address aircraft noise and emission issues. A strut-braced wing configuration with overwing, ultra-high bypass ratio, hydrogen fueled turbofan engines is considered. Estimated noise and emission characteristics are compared to a conventional configuration designed for the same mission and significant benefits are identified. The design challenges and technology issues which would have to be addressed to make the concept a viable alternative to current aircraft designs are discussed. This concept is one of the "Quiet Green Transport" aircraft concepts studied as part of NASA's Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) Program. The RASC Program seeks to develop revolutionary concepts that address strategic objectives of the NASA Enterprises, such as reducing aircraft noise and emissions, and to identify enabling advanced technology requirements for the concepts.

  19. Photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous carbons. Wavelength-dependent yield and implications for the extended red emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, M.; Dartois, E.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Hydrogenated amorphous carbons (a-C:H or HAC) have proved to be excellent analogs of interstellar dust observed in galaxies diffuse interstellar medium (DISM) through infrared vibrational absorption bands (3.4 μm, 6.8 μm, and 7.2 μm bands). They exhibit photoluminescence (PL) after excitation by UV-visible photons, and are possible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a broad red emission band observed in various interstellar environments. Aims: As many candidate materials/molecules can photoluminesce in the visible, along with the carrier abundance, the PL efficiency represents one of the strongest constraints set by such ERE observations. We wish to precisely characterize the PL behavior of a-C:H as a family of materials. Methods: The a-C:H samples are produced in the form of films deposited on substrates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The produced films were analyzed in transmission by UV-visible and IR spectroscopy, and the wavelength dependent PL spectra were recorded. The intrinsic absolute quantum yield η was then rigorously calculated taking self-absorption of the PL by the film and interfaces effects into account. Results: A wide range of different laboratory synthesized a-C:H were analyzed. Their PL properties are dependent on the optical gap E_04: when E_04 decreases from 4.3 eV to 2.8 eV, the a-C:H vary from highly (η ˜ 1%) yellow photoluminescent soft materials to hard materials that emit a wider PL band in the red spectral range, with a lower efficiency (η ~ 0.01-0.1%). For any given a-C:H, the PL characteristics (central wavelength, band width and efficiency) are found to be essentially constant over the explored excitation range (λ_exc ⪆ 250 nm). We compared the characteristics of the produced interstellar dust analog to the constraints imposed by the ERE observations. Conclusions: As for ERE observations, PL efficiencies and band widths of a-C:H are both correlated to the PL central wavelengths. The

  20. Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Deng, B. H.; Knapp, K.; Sun, X.; Thompson, M. C.

    2012-10-15

    In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO{sub 2} interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.

  1. Contribution of dissolved sulfates and sulfites in hydrogen sulfide emission from stagnant water bodies in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Kularatne, K I A; Dissanayake, D P; Mahanama, K R R

    2003-08-01

    Accumulation of sulfur-containing compounds and their bacterial mediated reductions have led to the emission of pungent odors from stagnant water bodies. This study is focused on the contribution of inorganic sulfur compounds in the emission of hydrogen sulfide. The measured dissolved oxygen levels have demonstrated good negative correlations with the dissolved sulfide levels implying the oxygen deficiency is the key for the reduction of sulfate ion and sulfite ion to sulfide ion. Particularly, the dissolved molar fractions of sulfide from the total dissolved sulfur compounds (sulfates, sulfites and sulfides) have a very good correlation with the dissolved oxygen for the stagnant water bodies except the artificially aerated prawn farms. For the stagnant water bodies with significant correlations, linear regressions are reported for them to be utilized in estimating one component of the regression from the measurement of the other. The measured data were further utilized to estimate the levels of hydrogen sulfide gas. The pH of the water bodies has confined much of the dissolved sulfides in the form of bisulfide ion and they can be easily escaped to the atmosphere upon acidification due to industrial discharges and/or acidic precipitations. The estimated levels of hydrogen sulfide just above the water surface were plotted for the most polluted stagnant water body in Sri Lanka for the pH range of 5-10 and temperature range of 25-35 degrees C.

  2. Diurnal odor, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide emission profiles of confined swine grower/finisher rooms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gang; Guo, Huiqing; Peterson, Jonathan; Predicala, Bernardo; Laguë, Claude

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain diurnal variation profiles of odor and gas (ammonia [NH3], hydrogen sulfide [H2S], carbon dioxide [CO2]) concentrations and emission rate (OGCER) from confined swine grower/ finisher rooms under three typical weather conditions (warm, mild, and cold weather) in a year. Two grower/ finisher rooms, one with a fully slatted floor and the other with partially slatted floors, were measured for 2 consecutive days under each weather condition. The results revealed that the diurnal OGCER in the room with a fully slatted floor was 9.2-39.4% higher than that with a partially slatted floor; however, no significant differences in the diurnal OGCER were found between these two rooms, except for the NH3 concentrations in August, the NH3 and H2S concentrations and emissions in October, and odor concentrations and emissions in February (p > 0.05). The OGCER variations presented different diurnal patterns as affected by time of day, season, type of floor, ventilation rate, animal growth cycles, in-house manure storage, and weather conditions. Significant diurnal fluctuations in the OGCER (except for the odor concentrations and H2S emissions) were observed in August (p < 0.05); all of the gas emissions in October and the CO2 concentrations and emissions in February also showed significant diurnal variations (p < 0.05). These significant diurnal variations indicated that the OGCER during different periods of a day should be monitored when quantifying OGCER concentrations and emissions; for example, source emission data used in air dispersion modeling to decrease the great incertitude of setback determination using randomly measured data.

  3. Hydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a factor affecting the cosmic 6.2 micron emission band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Harrison, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    While many of the characteristics of the cosmic unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands observed for interstellar and circumstellar sources within the Milky Way and other galaxies, can be best attributed to vibrational modes of the variants of the molecular family known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), there are open questions that need to be resolved. Among them is the observed strength of the 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) band relative to other strong bands, and the generally low strength for measurements in the laboratory of the 1600 cm(-1) skeletal vibration band of many specific neutral PAH molecules. Also, experiments involving laser excitation of some gas phase neutral PAH species while producing long lifetime state emission in the 3.3 micron (3000 cm(-1)) spectral region, do not result in significant 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) emission. A potentially important variant of the neutral PAH species, namely hydrogenated-PAH (H(N)-PAH) which exhibit intriguing spectral correlation with interstellar and circumstellar infrared emission and the 2175 A extinction feature, may be a factor affecting the strength of 6.2 micron emission. These species are hybrids of aromatic and cycloalkane structures. Laboratory infrared absorption spectroscopy augmented by density function theory (DFT) computations of selected partially hydrogenated-PAH molecules, demonstrates enhanced 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) region skeletal vibration mode strength for these molecules relative to the normal PAH form. This along with other factors such as ionization or the incorporation of nitrogen or oxygen atoms could be a reason for the strength of the cosmic 6.2 micron (1600 cm(-1)) feature.

  4. Black Hole Mass Estimates Based on C IV are Consistent with Those Based on the Balmer Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assef, R. J.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, B. M.; Kozłowski, S.; Ageorges, N.; Barrows, R. S.; Buschkamp, P.; Dietrich, M.; Falco, E.; Feiz, C.; Gemperlein, H.; Germeroth, A.; Grier, C. J.; Hofmann, R.; Juette, M.; Khan, R.; Kilic, M.; Knierim, V.; Laun, W.; Lederer, R.; Lehmitz, M.; Lenzen, R.; Mall, U.; Madsen, K. K.; Mandel, H.; Martini, P.; Mathur, S.; Mogren, K.; Mueller, P.; Naranjo, V.; Pasquali, A.; Polsterer, K.; Pogge, R. W.; Quirrenbach, A.; Seifert, W.; Stern, D.; Shappee, B.; Storz, C.; Van Saders, J.; Weiser, P.; Zhang, D.

    2011-12-01

    Using a sample of high-redshift lensed quasars from the CASTLES project with observed-frame ultraviolet or optical and near-infrared spectra, we have searched for possible biases between supermassive black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the C IV, Hα, and Hβ broad emission lines. Our sample is based upon that of Greene, Peng, & Ludwig, expanded with new near-IR spectroscopic observations, consistently analyzed high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) optical spectra, and consistent continuum luminosity estimates at 5100 Å. We find that BH mass estimates based on the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of C IV show a systematic offset with respect to those obtained from the line dispersion, σ l , of the same emission line, but not with those obtained from the FWHM of Hα and Hβ. The magnitude of the offset depends on the treatment of the He II and Fe II emission blended with C IV, but there is little scatter for any fixed measurement prescription. While we otherwise find no systematic offsets between C IV and Balmer line mass estimates, we do find that the residuals between them are strongly correlated with the ratio of the UV and optical continuum luminosities. This means that much of the dispersion in previous comparisons of C IV and Hβ BH mass estimates are due to the continuum luminosities rather than to any properties of the lines. Removing this dependency reduces the scatter between the UV- and optical-based BH mass estimates by a factor of approximately two, from roughly 0.35 to 0.18 dex. The dispersion is smallest when comparing the C IV σ l mass estimate, after removing the offset from the FWHM estimates, and either Balmer line mass estimate. The correlation with the continuum slope is likely due to a combination of reddening, host contamination, and object-dependent SED shapes. When we add additional heterogeneous measurements from the literature, the results are unchanged. Moreover, in a trial observation of a remaining outlier, the origin of the deviation

  5. [Effect of nitrogen-containing compounds on hydrogen light emission and nitrogen fixation by purple bacteria].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'eva, E N; Gogotov, I N; Gruzinskiĭ, I V

    1979-01-01

    The cells of Rhodospirillum rubrum and Thiocapsa roseopersicina grown in media containing glutamate and arginine, respectively, as well as under conditions of nitrogen fixation evolve H2 in the light. If the cultures were grown in media with NH4+, NO3-, urea, glutamine or asparagine, hydrogen photoevolution by the cells and acetylene reduction started after the lag-phase and proceeded at a low rate. Extracts of such cells did not display the activity of nitrogenase which could be assayed by the ATP-dependent evolution of H2 from dithionite. The data obtained confirm the fact that hydrogen photoevolution by purple bacteria involves nitrogenase whose synthesis is regulated (according to the action of glutamine) with the participation of glutamine synthetase. NH4+, glutamine and asparagine inhibit also hydrogen photoproduction by purple bacteria and acetylene photoreduction. However, they have no effect on hydrogen evolution in the dark by the cells of R. rubrum and T. roseopersicina in the presence of formiate or pyruvate, respectively, whereas carbon monoxide inhibits hydrogen production. Therefore, hydrogen production by purple bacteria in the dark must be catalyzed by hydrogenase.

  6. Hydrogen stable isotopic constraints on methane emissions from oil and gas extraction in the Colorado Front Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Botner, E. C.; Jimenez, K.; Blake, N. J.; Schroeder, J.; Meinardi, S.; Barletta, B.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.; Flocke, F. M.; Pfister, G.; Bon, D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The climatic implications of a shift from oil and coal to natural gas depend on the magnitude of fugitive emissions of methane from the natural gas supply chain. Attempts to constrain methane emissions from natural gas production regions can be confounded by other sources of methane. Here we demonstrate the utility of stable isotopes, particularly hydrogen isotopes, for source apportionment of methane emissions. The Denver, Colorado area is home to a large oil and gas field with both conventional oil and gas wells and newer hydraulic fracturing wells. The region also has a large metropolitan area with several landfills and a sizable cattle population. As part of the DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPE field campaigns in summer 2014, we collected three types of canister samples for analysis of stable isotopic composition of methane: 1), samples from methane sources; 2), samples from two stationary ground sites, one in the Denver foothills, and one in an oil and gas field; and 3), from the NCAR C-130 aircraft in samples upwind and downwind of the region. Our results indicate that hydrogen isotope ratios are excellent tracers of sources of methane in the region, as we have shown previously in California and Texas. Use of carbon isotope ratios is complicated by the similarity of natural gas isotope ratios to that of background methane. Our results indicate that, despite the large amount of natural gas production in the region, biological sources such as cattle feedlots and landfills account for at least 50% of total methane emissions in the Front Range. Future work includes comparison of isotopes and alkane ratios as tracers of methane sources, and calculation of total methane fluxes in the region using continuous measurements of methane concentrations during aircraft flights.

  7. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  8. HRI Observations of Balmer Dominated Filaments in the SNR RCW86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Knox S.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project was to use the ROSAT HRI to study the recently discovered optical Balmer-dominated filaments in the young SNR R-CW86. The observations provide complete high-resolution X-ray coverage of the shell of the SNR. These X-ray observations are combined with new optical observations (both imaging and spectroscopic), and new high resolution radio observations to provide a better overall understanding of the state of the remnant (Sedov or reverse shock), its history (as the possible SNR of SN 185 AD), and the physics of non-radiative shocks.

  9. Seasonal odor, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide concentrations and emissions from swine grower-finisher rooms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gang; Guo, Huiqing; Peterson, Jonathan

    2010-04-01

    Seasonal odor and gas (ammonia [NH3], hydrogen sulfide [H2S], and carbon dioxide [CO2]) concentrations and emission rates (OGCERs) from swine facilities are vital for providing accurate source emissions and reducing the uncertainty of setback distances on the basis of emission data. In this study, a repeated measurement experimental method and a split-block statistical model were used to obtain seasonal OGCER profiles from two types of swine grower-finisher rooms in Saskatchewan, Canada, over a 12-month period. The results indicate that the OGCERs were significantly affected by the sampling month and ambient temperature (P < 0.05), which indicates that monthly OGCERs should be measured and used as representative monthly or seasonal values in air dispersion models to reduce uncertainties in setback calculations. It was also found that the seasonal OGCERs from the rooms with fully slatted floors were 6.3-40.6% higher than those with partially slatted floors. The seasonal OGCERs (except for the NH3 concentrations in October, November, and January; the CO2 concentrations in August; and the CO2 emission rates in December) between these two rooms for each measuring month did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). The measured gas concentrations were generally below the permissible exposure limits (PELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) throughout the year except for the NH3 concentrations in cold weather (December, January, and February).

  10. Photoelectron emission yield experiments on evolution of sub-gap states in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films with post deposition hydrogen treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kazushi Hino, Aya; Tao, Hiroaki; Ochi, Mototaka; Goto, Hiroshi; Kugimiya, Toshihiro

    2015-09-14

    Total photoyield emission spectroscopy (TPYS) was applied to study the evolution of sub-gap states in hydrogen-treated amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) thin films. The a-IGZO thin films were subjected to hydrogen radicals and subsequently annealed in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. A clear onset of the electron emission was observed at around 4.3 eV from the hydrogen-treated a-IGZO thin films. After successive UHV annealing at 300 °C, the onset in the TPYS spectra was shifted to 4.15 eV, and the photoelectron emission from the sub-gap states was decreased as the annealing temperature was increased. In conjunction with the results of thermal desorption spectrometer, it was deduced that the hydrogen atoms incorporated in the a-IGZO thin films induced metastable sub-gap states at around 4.3 eV from vacuum level just after the hydrogenation. It was also suggested that the defect configuration was changed due to the higher temperature UHV annealing, and that the hydrogen atoms desorbed with the involvement of Zn atoms. These experiments produced direct evidence to show the formation of sub-gap states as a result of hydrogen incorporation into the a-IGZO thin films.

  11. Emissions of nitrogen oxides from an experimental hydrogen-fueled gas turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of operating variables of a hydrogen fueled combustor on exhaust concentrations of total oxides of nitrogen was determined at inlet-air temperature levels up to 810 K, pressure of 414,000N/sa m, and reference velocity of 21.3 m/sec. The combustor, which was originally designed for hydrocarbon fuel produced a NO(x) concentration of 380 ppm with hydrogen at 810 K inlet-air temperature. A reduction in NO(x) of about 30 % was obtained by modification to a lean or rich primary zone. The lowest NO(x) levels obtained with hydrogen were equivalent to those of the reference combustor burning hydrocarbon fuels.

  12. Highest Redshift Image of Neutral Hydrogen in Emission: A CHILES Detection of a Starbursting Galaxy at z = 0.376

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ximena; Gim, Hansung B.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Yun, Min S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Popping, Attila; Chomiuk, Laura; Hess, Kelley M.; Hunt, Lucas; Kreckel, Kathryn; Lucero, Danielle; Maddox, Natasha; Oosterloo, Tom; Pisano, D. J.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Hales, Christopher A.; Chung, Aeree; Dodson, Richard; Golap, Kumar; Gross, Julia; Henning, Patricia; Hibbard, John; Jaffé, Yara L.; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Meyer, Martin; Sanchez-Barrantes, Monica; Schiminovich, David; Wicenec, Andreas; Wilcots, Eric; Bershady, Matthew; Scoville, Nick; Strader, Jay; Tremou, Evangelia; Salinas, Ricardo; Chávez, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Our current understanding of galaxy evolution still has many uncertainties associated with the details of the accretion, processing, and removal of gas across cosmic time. The next generation of radio telescopes will image the neutral hydrogen (H i) in galaxies over large volumes at high redshifts, which will provide key insights into these processes. We are conducting the COSMOS H i Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, which is the first survey to simultaneously observe H i from z = 0 to z ˜ 0.5. Here, we report the highest redshift H i 21 cm detection in emission to date of the luminous infrared galaxy COSMOS J100054.83+023126.2 at z = 0.376 with the first 178 hr of CHILES data. The total H i mass is (2.9 ± 1.0) × 1010 M ⊙ and the spatial distribution is asymmetric and extends beyond the galaxy. While optically the galaxy looks undisturbed, the H i distribution suggests an interaction with a candidate companion. In addition, we present follow-up Large Millimeter Telescope CO observations that show it is rich in molecular hydrogen, with a range of possible masses of (1.8-9.9) × 1010 M ⊙. This is the first study of the H i and CO in emission for a single galaxy beyond z ˜ 0.2.

  13. First hydrogen operation of NIO1: Characterization of the source plasma by means of an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Barbisan, M. Baltador, C.; Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.; Fantz, U.; Wünderlich, D.; Vialetto, L.

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a compact and flexible radio frequency H{sup −} ion source, developed by Consorzio RFX and INFN-LNL. The aim of the experimentation on NIO1 is the optimization of both the production of negative ions and their extraction and beam optics. In the initial phase of its commissioning, NIO1 was operated with nitrogen, but now the source is regularly operated also with hydrogen. To evaluate the source performances, an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic was installed. The system includes a low resolution spectrometer in the spectral range of 300-850 nm and a high resolution (50 pm) one, to study, respectively, the atomic and the molecular emissions in the visible range. The spectroscopic data have been interpreted also by means of a collisional-radiative model developed at IPP Garching. Besides the diagnostic hardware and the data analysis methods, the paper presents the first plasma measurements across a transition to the full H mode, in a hydrogen discharge. The characteristic signatures of this transition in the plasma parameters are described, in particular, the sudden increase of the light emitted from the plasma above a certain power threshold.

  14. The impact of hydrogen emission on the structure of soil microbial biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanskaya, L. M.; Stepanov, A. L.; Chakmazyan, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    Population density and biomass of microorganisms were studied in background soils and in soils affected by hydrogen degassing. These parameters were lower in the latter soils. Actinomycetes and fungal mycelium could not be isolated from the soils treated with hydrogen already on the fourteenth day of the experiment; the number and biomass of fungal spores decreased to zero levels even earlier, on the seventh day. Fungi represent a specific physiological group, and their capacity for environmental adaptation is much lower than that of bacteria.

  15. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from swine production facilities in North America: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Powers, W; Murphy, J; Maghirang, R

    2014-04-01

    Literature on NH3 and H2S emissions from swine production facilities in North America was reviewed, and a meta-analysis was conducted on measured emissions data from swine houses and manure storage facilities as well as concentration data in the vicinity of swine production facilities. Results from more than 80 studies were compiled with results from the 11 swine sites in the National Air Emissions Monitoring Study (NAEMS). Data across studies were analyzed statistically using the MIXED procedures of SAS. The median emission rates from swine houses across various production stages and manure handling systems were 2.78 and 0.09 kg/yr per pig for NH3 and H2S, respectively. The median emission rates from swine storage facilities were 2.08 and 0.20 kg/yr per pig for NH3 and H2S, respectively. The size of swine farm that may trigger the need to report NH3 emissions under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) is 3,410 pigs on the basis of the median NH3 emission rate (4.86 kg/yr per pig), but the threshold can be as low as 992 pigs on the basis of the 90th-percentile emission rates (16.71 kg/yr per pig). Swine hoop houses had significantly higher NH3 emission rate (14.80 kg/yr per pig) than other manure-handling systems (P < 0.01), whereas deep-pit houses had the highest H2S emission rate (16.03 kg/yr per pig, P = 0.03). Farrowing houses had the highest H2S emission rate (2.50 kg/yr per pig), followed by gestation houses, and finishing houses had the lowest H2S emission rate (P < 0.01). Regression models for NH3 and H2S emission rates were developed for finishing houses with deep pits, recharge pits, and lagoons. The NH3 emission rates increased with increasing air temperature, but effects of air temperature on H2S emission rates were not significant. The recharge interval of manure pits significantly affected H2S but not NH3 emission rates. The H2S emission rates were also influenced by the size of the operation. Although NH3 and H2S

  16. Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions by Hydrogen Peroxide-Enhanced Gas-Phase Oxidation Of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Kasper, John M; Iii, Christian A Clausen; Cooper, C David

    1996-02-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOX) and sulfur oxides (SOX) are criteria air pollutants, emitted in large quantities from fossil-fueled electric power plants. Emissions of SOX are currently being reduced significantly in many places by wet scrubbing of the exhaust or flue gases, but most of the NOX in the flue gases is NO, which is so insoluble that it is virtually impossible to scrub. Consequently, NOX control is mostly achieved by using combustion modifications to limit the formation of NOX, or by using chemical reduction techniques to reduce NOX to N2. Low NOX burners are relatively inexpensive but can only achieve about 50% reduction in NOX emissions; selective catalytic reduction (SCR) can achieve high reductions but is very expensive. The removal of NOX in wet scrubbers could be greatly enhanced by gas-phase oxidation of the NO to NO2, HNO2, and HNO3 (the acid gases are much more soluble in water than NO). This oxidation is accomplished by injecting liquid hydrogen peroxide into the flue gas; the H2O2 vaporizes and dissociates into hydroxyl radicals. The active OH radicals then oxidize the NO and NO2. This NOX control technique might prove economically feasible at power plants with existing SO2 scrubbers. The higher chemical costs for H2O2 would be balanced by the investment cost savings, compared with an alternative such as SCR. The oxidation of NOX by using hydrogen peroxide has been demonstrated in a laboratory quartz tube reactor. NO conversions of 97% and 75% were achieved at hydrogen peroxide/NO mole ratios of 2.6 and 1.6, respectively. The reactor conditions (500 °C, a pressure of one atmosphere, and 0.7 seconds residence time) are representative of flue gas conditions for a variety of combustion sources. The oxidized NOX species were removed by caustic water scrubbing.

  17. What sort of standard candle is Orion for studying molecular hydrogen line emission in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael; Puxley, Phil J.

    1990-01-01

    The total shocked and fluorescent molecular hydrogen 1-0 S(1) line luminosities from Orion have been measured to be about 2.5 solar luminosity and about 2.0 solar luminosity, respectively. The implications for using Orion to study the interstellar medium in galaxies is discussed.

  18. Catalytic process for control of NO.sub.x emissions using hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2010-05-18

    A selective catalytic reduction process with a palladium catalyst for reducing NOx in a gas, using hydrogen as a reducing agent. A zirconium sulfate (ZrO.sub.2)SO.sub.4 catalyst support material with about 0.01-2.0 wt. % Pd is applied to a catalytic bed positioned in a flow of exhaust gas at about 70-200.degree. C. The support material may be (ZrO.sub.2--SiO.sub.2)SO.sub.4. H.sub.2O and hydrogen may be injected into the exhaust gas upstream of the catalyst to a concentration of about 15-23 vol. % H.sub.2O and a molar ratio for H.sub.2/NO.sub.x in the range of 10-100. A hydrogen-containing fuel may be synthesized in an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power plant for combustion in a gas turbine to produce the exhaust gas flow. A portion of the fuel may be diverted for the hydrogen injection.

  19. AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACTS OF HYDROGEN ECONOMY ON TRANSPORTATION, ENERGY USE, AND AIR EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential energy, economic and environmental implications of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (H2-FCV) penetration into the U.S. light duty vehicle fleet. The approach, which uses the U.S. EPA MARKet ALlocation technology database and model, allow...

  20. Development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system for observation of neutral hydrogen atom density distribution in Large Helical Device core plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K. Atsumi, S.; Watanabe, S.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2014-02-15

    We report development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system comprising a spectrometer with 30% throughput and a camera with a low-noise fast-readout complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor. The system achieves a 10{sup 6} dynamic range (∼20 bit resolution) and an instrumental function approximated by a Voigt profile with Gauss and Lorentz widths of 31 and 0.31 pm, respectively, for 656 nm light. The application of the system for line profile observations of the Balmeremissions from high temperature plasmas generated in the Large Helical Device is also presented. In the observed line profiles, emissions are detected in far wings more than 1.0 nm away from the line center, equivalent to neutral hydrogen atom kinetic energies above 1 keV. We evaluate atom density distributions in the core plasma by analyzing the line profiles.

  1. Emission of hydrogen sulfide by leaf tissue in response to L-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, J.; Schmidt, A.; Wilson, L.G.; Filner, P.

    1982-08-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to L-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H/sub 2/S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to L-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H/sub 2/S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar L-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar L-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar L-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H/sub 2/S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to L-cysteine; neither D-cysteine nor L-cysteine elicited H/sub 2/S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H/sub 2/S formation and its release occurred in response to L-cysteine. Feeding experiments with (/sup 35/S)t-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H/sub 2/S was derived from sulfur in the L-cysteine supplied.

  2. H_2 Emission as a Large-Scale Tracer of Molecular Hydrogen in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, M. L.; Jaffe, D. T.

    1994-12-01

    We have detected extremely extended (>1.5deg , or 12 pc) near-infrared H_2 line emission from the Orion A giant molecular cloud. We have used a new instrument, the University of Texas Near-Infrared Fabry-Perot spectrometer, which is optimized for the detection of low surface brightness line emission from 1.4 microns to 2.4 microns (Luhman et al. 1995, PASP, in press). Our Orion observations show that we can directly trace H_2 along the outlying surfaces of interstellar molecular clouds, well away from the star-forming cores. The diffuse, extended H_2 emission provides a unique new view of molecular clouds to complement conventional large-scale tracers such as CO and is an excellent probe of cloud energetics. In Orion, we have mapped the emission in the 1.601 microns v=6--4 Q(1), 2.121 microns v=1--0 S(1), and 2.247 microns v=2--1 S(1) lines of H_2. The surface brightness of the extended H_2 line emission is 10(-6) to 10(-5) ergs s(-1) cm(-2) sr(-1) . Based on the distribution and relative strengths of the H_2 emission lines, we conclude that H_2 excited by ultraviolet radiation dominates the global H_2 line emission from the Orion molecular cloud, even though this cloud has a powerful shock-excited H_2 source in its core. We are comparing our H_2 data and observations of the 63 microns [O I] and 158 microns [C II] emission to the predictions of theoretical models of photodissociation or photon dominated regions to examine the physical conditions throughout the Orion A cloud. This work was supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation through a fellowship to D.T.J. and by a NASA Graduate Traineeship grant NGT-50998 held by M.L.L.

  3. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated Shock in the Cygnus Loop: An Extremely Thin Cosmic-Ray Precursor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Maeda, Keiichi; Ohira, Yutaka; Yatsu, Yoichi; Mori, Koji; Aoki, Wako; Morihana, Kumiko; Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Lee, Jae-Joon; Shimoda, Jiro; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    We present high-resolution long-slit spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated shock in the northeastern limb of the Cygnus Loop with the Subaru high dispersion spectrograph. By setting the slit angle along the shock normal, we investigate variations of the flux and profile of the Hα line from preshock to postshock regions with a spatial resolution of ˜4 × 1015 cm. The Hα line profile can be represented by a narrow (28.9 ± 0.7 km s-1) Gaussian in a diffuse region ahead of the shock, i.e., a photoionization precursor, and narrow (33.1 ± 0.2 km s-1) plus broad (130-230 km s-1) Gaussians at the shock itself. We find that the width of the narrow component abruptly increases up to 33.1 ± 0.2 km s-1, or 38.8 ± 0.4 km s-1 if we eliminate projected emission originating from the photoionization precursor, in an unresolved thin layer (≲4 × 1015 cm at a distance of 540 pc) at the shock. We show that the sudden broadening can be best explained by heating via damping of Alfvén waves in a thin cosmic-ray (CR) precursor, although other possibilities are not fully ruled out. The thickness of the CR precursor in the Cygnus Loop (a soft gamma-ray emitter) is an order of magnitude thinner than that in Tycho’s Knot g (a hard gamma-ray emitter), which may be caused by the different energy distribution of accelerated particles between the two sources. In this context, systematic studies might reveal a positive correlation between the thickness of the CR precursor and the hardness of the CR energy distribution.

  4. THE 217.5 nm BAND, INFRARED ABSORPTION, AND INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Duley, W. W.; Hu, Anming E-mail: a2hu@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-12-20

    We report on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ''slow'' deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility. The initial chemistry leads to the formation of carbon chains, together with a limited range of small aromatic ring molecules, and eventually results in carbon nanoparticles having an sp {sup 2}/sp {sup 3} ratio Almost-Equal-To 0.4. Spectroscopic analysis of particle composition indicates that naphthalene and naphthalene derivatives are important constituents of this material. We suggest that carbon nanoparticles with similar composition are responsible for the appearance of the interstellar 217.5 nm band and outline how these particles can form in situ under diffuse cloud conditions by deposition of carbon on the surface of silicate grains. Spectral data from carbon nanoparticles formed under these conditions accurately reproduce IR emission spectra from a number of Galactic sources. We provide the first detailed fits to observational spectra of Type A and B emission sources based entirely on measured spectra of a carbonaceous material that can be produced in the laboratory.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide gas emission under turbulent conditions - an experimental approach for free-fall drops.

    PubMed

    Matias, N M; Matos, J S; Ferreira, F

    2014-01-01

    Odor nuisance and sulfide corrosion in sewers carrying septic wastewater are accelerated at points of turbulence such as drops in manholes, but accurate methods or empirical expressions to evaluate the gas stripping rate at those particular sites are still missing. With the aim of improving the current knowledge on the influence of free-fall drops on the release of hydrogen sulfide gas, an experimental set-up was built allowing different free-fall drops heights and flows. Three types of experiments were carried out: reaeration tests without sulfide; sulfide oxidation tests; and hydrogen sulfide release tests. With the increase of the free-fall drop height or of the flow, a higher rate of air-to-water mass oxygen transfer was observed. Results regarding sulfide oxidation tests with reaeration through the free-fall have shown that the oxidation rate was correlated with flow. In the hydrogen sulfide release tests, the maximum concentration in the atmosphere reached 500 ppm. Results also showed that increasing the flow rate decreased the time at which the maximum concentrations in the atmosphere were observed.

  6. Emission of Hydrogen Sulfide by Leaf Tissue in Response to l-Cysteine 1

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Jiro; Schmidt, Ahlert; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Filner, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to l-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H2S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to l-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H2S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar l-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar l-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar l-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H2S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to l-cysteine; neither d-cysteine nor l-cystine elicited H2S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H2S formation and its release occurred in response to l-cysteine. Feeding experiments with [35S]l-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H2S was derived from sulfur in the l-cysteine supplied and that the H2S emitted for 9 hours accounted for 7 to 10% of l-cysteine taken up. 35S-labeled SO32− and SO42− were found in the tissue extract in addition to internal soluble S2−. These findings

  7. Cosmology on ultralarge scales with intensity mapping of the neutral hydrogen 21 cm emission: limits on primordial non-Gaussianity.

    PubMed

    Camera, Stefano; Santos, Mário G; Ferreira, Pedro G; Ferramacho, Luís

    2013-10-25

    The large-scale structure of the Universe supplies crucial information about the physical processes at play at early times. Unresolved maps of the intensity of 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen HI at redshifts z=/~1-5 are the best hope of accessing the ultralarge-scale information, directly related to the early Universe. A purpose-built HI intensity experiment may be used to detect the large scale effects of primordial non-Gaussianity, placing stringent bounds on different models of inflation. We argue that it may be possible to place tight constraints on the non-Gaussianity parameter f(NL), with an error close to σ(f(NL))~1.

  8. Emission-line spectra of circumstellar envelopes - Infrared hydrogen line fluxes from Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, S. E.; McGregor, P. J.

    1985-09-01

    Fluxes for eight H I emission lines between 1.28 and 4.67 μm are presented for a sample of seven Be stars. Brα fluxes are given for six additional Be stars. The H I line ratios form the basis for an observational test of models for emission from circumstellar shells that have a range of Brα optical depths well in excess of unity. Enough data on optically thick H I, Ca II, and O I line strengths of circumstellar envelope stars now exist that it should be possible to place detailed radiative-transfer calculations of optically thick envelope emission on a secure observational footing. Comparisons of line ratios with the models by Simon et al. for infrared line emission from stellar winds show promise. The Be star H I line ratios can also be compared with similar data for deeply dust-embedded young stellar objects. These enigmatic objects display stronger H I lines per unit luminosity than the Be stars, but share similar overall envelope physical conditions. Several infrared line ratios are examined to lay the groundwork for extinction determinations and guidelines for radiative-transfer models.

  9. Hydrogen Emission from the Ionized Gaseous Halos of Low-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huanian; Zaritsky, Dennis; Zhu, Guangtun; Ménard, Brice; Hogg, David W.

    2016-12-01

    Using a sample of nearly half a million galaxies, intersected by over 7 million lines of sight from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12, we trace Hα + [N ii] emission from a galactocentric projected radius, r p , of 5 kpc to more than 100 kpc. The emission flux surface brightness is \\propto {r}p-1.9+/- 0.4. We obtain consistent results using only the Hα or [N ii] flux. We measure a stronger signal for the bluer half of the target sample than for the redder half on small scales, r p < 20 kpc. We obtain a 3σ detection of Hα + [N ii] emission in the 50-100 kpc r p bin. The mean emission flux within this bin is (1.10 ± 0.35) × 10-20 erg cm-2 s-1 Å-1, which corresponds to 1.87 × 10-20 erg cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2 or 0.0033 Rayleigh. This detection is 34 times fainter than a previous strict limit obtained using deep narrow-band imaging. The faintness of the signal demonstrates why it has been so difficult to trace recombination radiation out to large radii around galaxies. This signal, combined with published estimates of n H, leads us to estimate the temperature of the gas to be 12,000 K, consistent with independent empirical estimates based on metal ion absorption lines and expectations from numerical simulations.

  10. Measurement of Hydrogen Chloride in Coal-Fired Power Plant Emissions Using Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, K. L.; Chanda, A.; Mackay, G.; Pisano, J. T.; Durbin, T. D.; Crabbe, K.; Smith, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report on TDL HCl measurements obtained at a coal-fi red power plant which indicate that there is a significant perturbation of the HCl absorption feature. A methodology was also developed to remediate this effect and provide accurate measurement that will meet the EPA precision and detection limits currently being developed for HCl measurements of process gas emissions.

  11. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  12. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  13. Effects of borax treatment on hydrogen sulfide emissions and sulfate reducing bacteria in stored swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malodorous compounds and emissions produced from stored swine manure can pose both environmental and health issues. These nuisance odors largely result from compounds such as sulfides, volatile fatty acids, and phenols, which are produced as a result of anaerobic digestion of materials present in t...

  14. Stark broadening measurements in plasmas produced by laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Miloš; Hermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for the measurement of Stark broadening parameters of atomic and ionic spectral lines based on laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds. Therefore, plume emission spectra, recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector, were compared to the spectral radiance of a plasma in local thermal equilibrium. Producing material ablation with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses in argon at near atmospheric pressure, the recordings take advantage of the spatially uniform distributions of electron density and temperature within the ablated vapor. By changing the delay between laser pulse and detector gate, the electron density could be varied by more than two orders of magnitude while the temperature was altered in the range from 6,000 to 14,000 K. The Stark broadening parameters of transitions were derived from their simultaneous observation with the hydrogen Balmer alpha line. In addition, assuming a linear increase of Stark widths and shifts with electron density for non-hydrogenic lines, our measurements indicate a change of the Stark broadening-dependence of Hα over the considered electron density range. The presented results obtained for hydrated calcium sulfate (CaSO4ṡ2H2O) can be extended to any kind of hydrogen containing compounds.

  15. Unmodified versus caustics-impregnated carbons for control of hydrogen sulfide emissions from sewage treatment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bandosz, T.J.; Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Turk, A.

    2000-03-15

    Unmodified and caustic-impregnated carbons were compared as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide in the North River Water Pollution Control Plant in New York City over a period of 2 years. The carbons were characterized using accelerated H{sub 2}S breakthrough capacity tests, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, and thermal analysis. The accelerated laboratory tests indicate that the initial capacity of caustic-impregnated carbons exceeds that of unmodified carbon, but the nature of real-life challenge streams, particularly their lower H{sub 2}S concentrations, nullifies this advantage. As the caustic content of the impregnated carbon is consumed, the situation reverses, and the unmodified carbon becomes more effective. When the concentration of H{sub 2}S is low, the developed surface area and pore volume along with the affinity to retain water create a favorable environment for dissociative adsorption of hydrogen sulfide and its oxidation to elemental sulfur, S{sup 4+}, and S{sup 6+}. In the case of the caustic carbon, the catalytic impact of the carbon surface is limited, and its good performance lasts only while active base is present. The results also show the significant differences in performance of unmodified carbons due to combined effects of their porosity and surface chemistry.

  16. Anomalous Broadening of Balmer H{sub {alpha}} Line in Aluminum and Copper Hollow Cathode Glow Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Sisovic, N. M.; Majstorovic, G. Lj.; Konjevic, N.

    2008-10-22

    The presented results are concerned with the shape of Balmer alpha line emitted from a low pressure DC glow discharge with aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) hollow cathode (HC) in pure H{sub 2} and Ar-H{sub 2} gas mixture. The analysis indicates that the line profile represents a convolution of Gaussian profiles resulting from different collision excitation processes.

  17. Pressure Shift and Gravitational RedShift of Balmer Lines in White Dwarfs: Rediscussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halenka, Jacek; Olchawa, Wieslaw; Madej, Jerzy; Grabowski, Boleslaw

    2015-08-01

    The Stark-induced shift and asymmetry, the so-called pressure shift (PS) of Hα and Hβ Balmer lines in spectra of DA white dwarfs (WDs), have been examined in detail as masking effects in measurements of the gravitational redshift in WDs. The results are compared with our earlier ones from a quarter of a century ago. In these earlier papers, the standard, symmetrical Stark line profiles, as a dominant constituent of the Balmer line profiles but shifted as a whole by the PS effect, were applied to all spectrally active layers of the WD atmosphere. At present, in each of the WD layers, the Stark line profiles (especially of Hβ) are inherently asymmetrical and shifted due to the effects of strong inhomogeneity of the perturbing fields in plasma. To calculate the Stark line profiles in successive layers of the WD atmosphere we used the modified Full Computer Simulation Method, able to take adequately into account the complexity of local elementary quantum processes in plasma. In the case of the Hα line, the present value of Stark-induced shift of the synthetic Hα line profile is about half the previous one and it is negligible in comparison with the gravitational redshift. In the case of the Hβ line, the present value of Stark-induced shift of the synthetic Hβ line profile is about twice the previous one. The source of this extra shift is the asymmetry of Hβ peaks. In memory of Jan Jerzy Kubikowski (1927-1968)—one of the pioneers of plasma in astrophysics.

  18. PRESSURE SHIFT AND GRAVITATIONAL REDSHIFT OF BALMER LINES IN WHITE DWARFS: REDISCUSSION

    SciTech Connect

    Halenka, Jacek; Olchawa, Wieslaw; Madej, Jerzy; Grabowski, Boleslaw E-mail: wolch@uni.opole.pl E-mail: bgrab@uni.opole.pl

    2015-08-01

    The Stark-induced shift and asymmetry, the so-called pressure shift (PS) of H{sub α} and H{sub β} Balmer lines in spectra of DA white dwarfs (WDs), have been examined in detail as masking effects in measurements of the gravitational redshift in WDs. The results are compared with our earlier ones from a quarter of a century ago. In these earlier papers, the standard, symmetrical Stark line profiles, as a dominant constituent of the Balmer line profiles but shifted as a whole by the PS effect, were applied to all spectrally active layers of the WD atmosphere. At present, in each of the WD layers, the Stark line profiles (especially of H{sub β}) are inherently asymmetrical and shifted due to the effects of strong inhomogeneity of the perturbing fields in plasma. To calculate the Stark line profiles in successive layers of the WD atmosphere we used the modified Full Computer Simulation Method, able to take adequately into account the complexity of local elementary quantum processes in plasma. In the case of the H{sub α} line, the present value of Stark-induced shift of the synthetic H{sub α} line profile is about half the previous one and it is negligible in comparison with the gravitational redshift. In the case of the H{sub β} line, the present value of Stark-induced shift of the synthetic H{sub β} line profile is about twice the previous one. The source of this extra shift is the asymmetry of H{sub β} peaks.

  19. H I free-bound emission of planetary nebulae with large abundance discrepancies: Two-component models versus κ-distributed electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    The 'abundance discrepancy' problem in the study of planetary nebulae (PNe), viz., the problem concerning systematically higher heavy-element abundances derived from optical recombination lines relative to those from collisionally excited lines, has been under discussion for decades, but no consensus on its solution has yet been reached. In this paper, we investigate the hydrogen free-bound emission near the Balmer jump region of four PNe that are among those with the largest abundance discrepancies, aiming to examine two recently proposed solutions to this problem: two-component models and κ electron energy distributions. We find that the Balmer jump intensities and the spectrum slopes cannot be simultaneously matched by the theoretical calculations based upon single Maxwell-Boltzmann electron-energy distributions, whereas the fitting can be equally improved by introducing κ electron energy distributions or an additional Maxwell-Boltzmann component. We show that although H I free-bound emission alone cannot distinguish between the two scenarios, it can provide important constraints on the electron energy distributions, especially for cold and low-κ plasmas.

  20. Tracing the Milky Way Nuclear Wind with 21cm Atomic Hydrogen Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence in 21 cm H i emission for voids several kiloparsecs in size centered approximately on the Galactic center, both above and below the Galactic plane. These appear to map the boundaries of the Galactic nuclear wind. An analysis of H i at the tangent points, where the distance to the gas can be estimated with reasonable accuracy, shows a sharp transition at Galactic radii R ≲ 2.4 kpc from the extended neutral gas layer characteristic of much of the Galactic disk, to a thin Gaussian layer with FWHM ˜ 125 pc. An anti-correlation between H i and γ-ray emission at latitudes 10^\\circ ≤slant | b| ≤slant 20^\\circ suggests that the boundary of the extended H i layer marks the walls of the Fermi Bubbles. With H i, we are able to trace the edges of the voids from | z| \\gt 2 {{kpc}} down to z ≈ 0, where they have a radius ˜2 kpc. The extended Hi layer likely results from star formation in the disk, which is limited largely to R ≳ 3 kpc, so the wind may be expanding into an area of relatively little H i. Because the H i kinematics can discriminate between gas in the Galactic center and foreground material, 21 cm H i emission may be the best probe of the extent of the nuclear wind near the Galactic plane.

  1. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Fuel Economy Testing at the U.S. EPA National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory (SAE Paper 2004-01-2900)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The introduction of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and their new technology has created the need for development of new fuel economy test procedures and safety procedures during testing. The United States Environmental Protection Agency-National Vehicle Fuels and Emissions Laborato...

  2. Combination of borax and quebracho condensed tannins treatment to reduce hydrogen sulfide, ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions from stored swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock producers are acutely aware for the need to reduce gaseous emissions from stored livestock waste and have been trying to identify new technologies to address the chronic problem. Besides the malodor issue, toxic gases emitted from stored livestock manure, especially hydrogen sulfide (H2S)...

  3. Pilot-scale testing of renewable biocatalyst for swine manure treatment and mitigation of odorous VOCs, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comprehensive control of odors, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with swine production is a critical need. A pilot-scale experiment was conducted to evaluate the topical application of soybean peroxidase (SBP) and calcium peroxide (CaO2) as a manu...

  4. Best Management Practices to Prevent and Control Hydrogen Sulfide and Reduced Sulfur Compound Emissions at Landfills That Dispose of Gypsum Drywall

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas can be emitted from both construction and demolition (C&D) debris and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. H2S emissions may be problematic at a landfill as they can cause odor, impact surrounding communities, cause wear or dama...

  5. Spontaneous light emission by atomic hydrogen: Fermi's golden rule without cheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debierre, V.; Durt, T.; Nicolet, A.; Zolla, F.

    2015-10-01

    Focusing on the 2 p- 1 s transition in atomic hydrogen, we investigate through first order perturbation theory the time evolution of the survival probability of an electron initially taken to be in the excited (2 p) state. We examine both the results yielded by the standard dipole approximation for the coupling between the atom and the electromagnetic field - for which we propose a cutoff-independent regularisation - and those yielded by the exact coupling function. In both cases, Fermi's golden rule is shown to be an excellent approximation for the system at hand: we found its maximal deviation from the exact behaviour of the system to be of order 10-8 /10-7. Our treatment also yields a rigorous prescription for the choice of the optimal cutoff frequency in the dipole approximation. With our cutoff, the predictions of the dipole approximation are almost indistinguishable at all times from the exact dynamics of the system.

  6. Well-to-wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Hydrogen Produced with Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ye; Wang, Michael Q.; Vyas, Anant D.; Wade, David C.; Taiwo, Temitope A.

    2004-07-01

    A fuel-cycle model-called the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model-has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate well-to-wheels (WTW) energy and emission impacts of motor vehicle technologies fueled with various transportation fuels. The GREET model contains various hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production pathways for fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) applications. In this effort, the GREET model was expanded to include four nuclear H{sub 2} production pathways: (1) H{sub 2} production at refueling stations via electrolysis using Light Water Reactor (LWR)-generated electricity; (2) H{sub 2} production in central plants via thermo-chemical water cracking using steam from High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR); (3) H{sub 2} production in central plants via high-temperature electrolysis using HTGR-generated electricity and steam; and (4) H{sub 2} production at refueling stations via electrolysis using HTGR-generated electricity The WTW analysis of these four options include these stages: uranium ore mining and milling; uranium ore transportation; uranium conversion; uranium enrichment; uranium fuel fabrication; uranium fuel transportation; electricity or H{sub 2} production in nuclear power plants; H{sub 2} transportation; H{sub 2} compression; and H{sub 2} FCVs operation. Due to large differences in electricity requirements for uranium fuel enrichment between gas diffusion and centrifuge technologies, two scenarios were designed for uranium enrichment: (1) 55% of fuel enriched through gaseous diffusion technology and 45% through centrifuge technology (the current technology split for U.S. civilian nuclear power plants); and (2) 100% fuel enrichment using the centrifuge technology (a future trend). Our well-to-pump (WTP) results show that significant reductions in fossil energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are achieved by nuclear-based H{sub 2} compared to natural gas-based H{sub 2} production via steam

  7. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emission control by aerobic sulfate reduction in landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yuyang; Fang, Yuan; Shen, Dongsheng; Feng, Huajun; Chen, Ting

    2016-12-01

    H2S emissions from landfill sites resulting from sulfate reduction has become a serious human health and ecological safety issue. This study investigated H2S emission behavior and sulfate metabolism occurring in simulated landfills under different operating conditions. Under aerobic conditions, great attenuation of the original sulfate content (from around 6000 mg kg‑1 dropped to below 800 mg kg‑1) with corresponding accumulation of sulfides and elemental sulfur were observed, indicating that sulfate reduction processes were intense under such conditions. Analysis of the bacterial community in these landfills showed great abundance (1.10%) and diversity of sulfur reducing types, confirming their active involvement in this process. In particular, the total abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria increased nearly 30 times under aerobic conditions, leading to the transformation of sulfate to sulfide and other reduced sulfur species. Although exposure to air promoted the accumulation of sulfide, it did not lead to an increase in H2S release in these landfills.

  8. Study of a high power hydrogen beam diagnostic based on secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Panasenkov, A.; Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2016-11-01

    In high power neutral beams for fusion, beam uniformity is an important figure of merit. Knowing the transverse power profile is essential during the initial phases of beam source operation, such as those expected for the ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) test facility. To measure it a diagnostic technique is proposed, based on the collection of secondary electrons generated by beam-surface and beam-gas interactions, by an array of positively biased collectors placed behind the calorimeter tubes. This measurement showed in the IREK test stand good proportionality to the primary beam current. To investigate the diagnostic performances in different conditions, we developed a numerical model of secondary electron emission, induced by beam particle impact on the copper tubes, and reproducing the cascade of secondary emission caused by successive electron impacts. The model is first validated against IREK measurements. It is then applied to the HNB case, to assess the locality of the measurement, the proportionality to the beam current density, and the influence of beam plasma.

  9. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Nam, Y. U.

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  10. VUV emission spectroscopy diagnostics of a 14 GHz ECR negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, R. Ichikawa, T.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.; Nishiura, M.; Shimozuma, T.

    2015-04-08

    Vacuum Ultra Violet(VUV) emission from a 4 cm diameter 2 cm long compact ion source excited by 14 GHz microwave has been investigated. Intensity ratio of band spectrum emission near Ly-α to Ly-α line spectrum is determined from the measured spectrum. which shows preferential excitation of molecules near the entrance of microwave input power. The ratio does not depend strongly upon pressure nor the input microwave power when the intensity is integrated over the volume of the plasma. The spatial distribution of the spectrum intensity ratio exhibits concentrations near microwave inlet and the opposite side where the microwave matching structure is located. The ratio at these peripheral regions is about two times as high as that of the central region. The ratio increased in proportion to the ion source pressure up to about 3.0 Pa, indicating efficient production of high energy electrons by ECR up to this pressure.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emission control by aerobic sulfate reduction in landfill

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yuyang; Fang, Yuan; Shen, Dongsheng; Feng, Huajun; Chen, Ting

    2016-01-01

    H2S emissions from landfill sites resulting from sulfate reduction has become a serious human health and ecological safety issue. This study investigated H2S emission behavior and sulfate metabolism occurring in simulated landfills under different operating conditions. Under aerobic conditions, great attenuation of the original sulfate content (from around 6000 mg kg−1 dropped to below 800 mg kg−1) with corresponding accumulation of sulfides and elemental sulfur were observed, indicating that sulfate reduction processes were intense under such conditions. Analysis of the bacterial community in these landfills showed great abundance (1.10%) and diversity of sulfur reducing types, confirming their active involvement in this process. In particular, the total abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria increased nearly 30 times under aerobic conditions, leading to the transformation of sulfate to sulfide and other reduced sulfur species. Although exposure to air promoted the accumulation of sulfide, it did not lead to an increase in H2S release in these landfills. PMID:27909309

  12. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research.

    PubMed

    Lampert, M; Anda, G; Czopf, A; Erdei, G; Guszejnov, D; Kovácsik, Á; Pokol, G I; Réfy, D; Nam, Y U; Zoletnik, S

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  13. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Réfy, D.; Nam, Y. U.; Zoletnik, S.

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  14. Twenty southern peculiar emission-line stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, E. D.; Henize, K. G.

    1979-01-01

    Observational data for 20 southern stars having emission-line spectra that suggest a significant degree of mass ejection are given in order to present an atlas of their spectra and to give a quantitative description of their appearance during the 1961-62 epoch. Most of the stars are P Cygni stars; others include nova-like, peculiar Be, and symbiotic stars, as well as stellar planetary nebulae and emission-line binaries, all of whose spectra were obtained with the Newtonian two-prism Zeiss Spectrograph and the 74-inch reflector at Mount Stromlo Observatory. It is noted that among the P Cygni stars, there is a strong correlation between the a-e expansion velocity and the strength of Balmer emission, while in both the P Cygni and the Bep stars, there is positive dependence of Fe II and negative dependence of (Fe II) emission strengths on Balmer emission strength.

  15. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S. W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-03-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature (δD), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally depleted compared to ambient intake air, while CO was significantly elevated. These findings contradict the often assumed co-occurring net H2 and CO emissions in combustion processes and suggest that previous H2 emissions from combustion may have been overestimated when scaled to CO emissions. For the heater exhausts, H2 and δD generally decrease with increasing fuel-to-air ratio, from ambient values of ∼0.5 ppm and +130‰ to 0.2 ppm and -206‰, respectively. These results are interpreted as a combination of an isotopically light H2 source from fossil fuel combustion and a D/H kinetic isotope fractionation of hydrogen in the advected ambient air during its partial removal during combustion. Diesel exhaust measurements from dynamometer test stand driving cycles show elevated H2 and CO emissions during cold-start and some acceleration phases. Their molar H2/CO ratios are <0.25, significantly smaller than those for gasoline combustion. Using H2/CO emission ratios, along with CO global emission inventories, we estimate global H2 emissions for 2000, 2005, and 2010. For road transportation (gasoline and diesel), we calculate 8.6 ± 2.1 Tg, 6.3 ± 1.5 Tg, and 4.1 ± 1.0 Tg, respectively, whereas the contribution from diesel vehicles has increased from 5% to 8% over this time. Other fossil fuel emissions are believed to be negligible but H2 emissions from coal combustion are unknown. For residential (domestic) emissions, which are likely dominated by biofuel combustion, emissions for the same years are estimated at 2.7 ± 0.7 Tg, 2.8 ± 0.7 Tg, and 3.0 ± 0.8 Tg, respectively. Our wood combustion measurements are combined with results from the literature to calculate

  16. High Spatial Resolution Studies of Epithermal Neutron Emission from the Lunar Poles: Constraints on Hydrogen Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Droege, G. F.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; McClanahan, T. P.; Sanin, A. B.; Litvak, M. L.; Schaffner, M.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J. B.; Harshman, K.; Malakhov, A.; Milikh, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The data from the collimated sensors of the LEND instrument are shown to be of exceptionally high quality. Counting uncertainties are about 0.3% relative and are shown to be the only significant source of random error, thus conclusions based on small differences in count rates are valid. By comparison with the topography of Shoemaker crater, the spatial resolution of the instrument is shown to be consistent with the design value of 5 km for the radius of the circle over which half the counts from the lunar surface would be determined. The observed epithermal-neutron suppression factor due to the hydrogen deposit in Shoemaker crater of 0.25 plus or minus 0.04 cps is consistent with the collimated field-of-view rate of 1.7 cps estimated by Mitrofanov et al. (2010a). The statistical significance of the neutron suppressed regions (NSRs) relative to the larger surrounding polar region is demonstrated, and it is shown that they are not closely related to the permanently shadowed regions. There is a significant increase in H content in the polar regions independent of the H content of the NSRs. The non-NSR H content increases directly with latitude, and the rate of increase is virtually identical at both poles. There is little or no increase with latitude outside the polar region. Various mechanisms to explain this steep increase in the non-NSR polar H with latitude are investigated, and it is suggested that thermal volatilization is responsible for the increase because it is minimized at the low surface temperatures close to the poles.

  17. The hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova iPTF 13ajg and its host galaxy in absorption and emission

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Rubin, Adam; Yaron, Ofer; Tal, David; Ofek, Eran O.; Savaglio, Sandra; Quimby, Robert M.; Sullivan, Mark; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi; Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Leloudas, Giorgos; Arcavi, Iair; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; and others

    2014-12-10

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF 13ajg. At a redshift of z = 0.7403, derived from narrow absorption lines, iPTF 13ajg peaked at an absolute magnitude of M {sub u,} {sub AB} = –22.5, one of the most luminous supernovae to date. The observed bolometric peak luminosity of iPTF 13ajg is 3.2 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}, while the estimated total radiated energy is 1.3 × 10{sup 51} erg. We detect narrow absorption lines of Mg I, Mg II, and Fe II, associated with the cold interstellar medium in the host galaxy, at two different epochs with X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope. From Voigt profile fitting, we derive the column densities log N(Mg I) =11.94 ± 0.06, log N(Mg II) =14.7 ± 0.3, and log N(Fe II) =14.25 ± 0.10. These column densities, as well as the Mg I and Mg II equivalent widths of a sample of hydrogen-poor SLSNe taken from the literature, are at the low end of those derived for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) whose progenitors are also thought to be massive stars. This suggests that the environments of hydrogen-poor SLSNe and GRBs are different. From the nondetection of Fe II fine-structure absorption lines, we derive a lower limit on the distance between the supernova and the narrow-line absorbing gas of 50 pc. The neutral gas responsible for the absorption in iPTF 13ajg exhibits a single narrow component with a low velocity width, ΔV = 76 km s{sup –1}, indicating a low-mass host galaxy. No host galaxy emission lines are detected, leading to an upper limit on the unobscured star formation rate (SFR) of SFR{sub [O} {sub II]}<0.07M{sub ⊙}yr{sup −1}. Late-time imaging shows the iPTF 13ajg host galaxy to be faint, with g {sub AB} ≈ 27.0 and R {sub AB} ≥ 26.0 mag, corresponding to M {sub B,} {sub Vega} ≳ –17.7 mag.

  18. The Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernova iPTF 13ajg and its Host Galaxy in Absorption and Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Savaglio, Sandra; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Quimby, Robert M.; Sullivan, Mark; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Leloudas, Giorgos; Arcavi, Iair; Rubin, Adam; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Cao, Yi; Yaron, Ofer; Tal, David; Ofek, Eran O.; Capone, John; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Toy, Vicki; Nugent, Peter E.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2014-12-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF 13ajg. At a redshift of z = 0.7403, derived from narrow absorption lines, iPTF 13ajg peaked at an absolute magnitude of M u, AB = -22.5, one of the most luminous supernovae to date. The observed bolometric peak luminosity of iPTF 13ajg is 3.2 × 1044 erg s-1, while the estimated total radiated energy is 1.3 × 1051 erg. We detect narrow absorption lines of Mg I, Mg II, and Fe II, associated with the cold interstellar medium in the host galaxy, at two different epochs with X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope. From Voigt profile fitting, we derive the column densities log N(Mg I) =11.94 ± 0.06, log N(Mg II) =14.7 ± 0.3, and log N(Fe II) =14.25 ± 0.10. These column densities, as well as the Mg I and Mg II equivalent widths of a sample of hydrogen-poor SLSNe taken from the literature, are at the low end of those derived for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) whose progenitors are also thought to be massive stars. This suggests that the environments of hydrogen-poor SLSNe and GRBs are different. From the nondetection of Fe II fine-structure absorption lines, we derive a lower limit on the distance between the supernova and the narrow-line absorbing gas of 50 pc. The neutral gas responsible for the absorption in iPTF 13ajg exhibits a single narrow component with a low velocity width, ΔV = 76 km s-1, indicating a low-mass host galaxy. No host galaxy emission lines are detected, leading to an upper limit on the unobscured star formation rate (SFR) of SFR_[O \\scriptsize{II]}<0.07 {M_⊙ yr-1}. Late-time imaging shows the iPTF 13ajg host galaxy to be faint, with g AB ≈ 27.0 and R AB >= 26.0 mag, corresponding to M B, Vega >~ -17.7 mag.

  19. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  20. Measurements of neutral hydrogen profiles on the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch from time-resolved ? line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew-Källne, E.

    1998-09-01

    The investigations of the radial distributions of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission from the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma show that the emission profile varies a lot, even during one plasma discharge. At central electron temperatures of about 150 eV it was expected that the 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission should emerge from the plasma centre. In comparison, 0953-4075/31/17/015/img4 is always observed to radiate from the centre. Our measurements of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission have, however, shown that this is not always the case, the emission often comes from the plasma edge. The analysis of the measurements has led us to conclude that the edge emission comes from charge-exchange recombination with neutral hydrogen near the carbon first wall. These observations provide a way to estimate the change in neutral hydrogen density during local plasma-wall interaction.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide gas emissions during disturbance and removal of stored spent mushroom compost.

    PubMed

    Velusami, B; Curran, T P; Grogan, H M

    2013-10-01

    Spent mushroom compost (SMC) is a by-product of the mushroom industry that is used as an agricultural fertilizer. In Europe, SMC storage and use are governed by EU Nitrates Directive 91/676/EEC to protect waterways against pollution by nitrates. A health and safety risk was identified during the removal of stored SMC for land application, as the stored SMC released high levels of toxic H2S gas into the atmosphere when disturbed. In this study, emissions of H2S were monitored at two outdoor and two indoor locations where stored SMC was being removed for land application. A repeating peak-trough pattern of H2S emissions was detected at all sites, with peaks corresponding to periods of active disturbance of SMC. The highest H2S concentrations (10 s average) detected at the SMC face were, respectively, 680 and 2083 ppm at outdoor sites 1 and 2, and 687 and 89 ppm at indoor sites 3 and 4. Higher concentrations of H2S were released from older SMC compared to newer material. Indoor-stored SMC had lower moisture content (53% to 65%) compared to outdoor-stored material (66% to 72%), while the temperature of indoor-stored SMC was higher (33 degrees C to 51 degrees C) compared to outdoor-stored material (24 degrees C to 36 degreees C). The current short-term exposure limit (STEL) of 10 ppm was exceeded at all sites except site 4, which was smaller than the other sites, indicating a significant health and safety risk associated with working in the vicinity of stored SMC when it is being actively disturbed. Results suggest that SMC stored under cover in small heaps (600 m3) emits less H2S during disturbance and removal compared to SMC stored outdoors in large heaps (> 1500 m3). This should be taken into consideration in the design, construction, and management of SMC storage facilities. Health and safety protocols should be in place at SMC storage facilities to cover the risks of exposure to toxic H2S gas during disturbance of stored SMC.

  2. Estimation of hydrogen sulfide emission rates at several wastewater treatment plants through experimental concentration measurements and dispersion modeling.

    PubMed

    Llavador Colomer, Fernando; Espinós Morató, Héctor; Mantilla Iglesias, Enrique

    2012-07-01

    The management and operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) usually involve the release into the atmosphere of malodorous substances with the potential to reduce the quality of life of people living nearby. In this type of facility, anaerobic degradation processes contribute to the generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), often at quite high concentrations; thus, the presence of this chemical compound in the atmosphere can be a good indicator of the occurrence and intensity of the olfactory impact in a specific area. The present paper describes the experimental and modelling work being carried out by CEAM-UMH in the surroundings of several wastewater treatment plants located in the Valencia Autonomous Community (Spain). This work has permitted the estimation of H2S emission rates at different WWTPs under different environmental and operating conditions. Our methodological approach for analyzing and describing the most relevant aspects of the olfactory impact consisted of several experimental campaigns involving intensive field measurements using passive samplers in the vicinity of several WWTPs, in combination with numerical simulation results from a diagnostic dispersion model. A meteorological tower at each WWTP provided the input values for the dispersion code, ensuring a good fit of the advective component and therefore more confidence in the modelled concentration field in response to environmental conditions. Then, comparisons between simulated and experimental H2S concentrations yielded estimates of the global emission rate for this substance at several WWTPs at different time periods. The results obtained show a certain degree of temporal and spatial (between-plant) variability (possibly due to both operational and environmental conditions). Nevertheless, and more importantly, the results show a high degree of uniformity in the estimates, which consistently stay within the same order of magnitude.

  3. Anomalous hydrogen emissions from the San Andreas fault observed at the Cienega Winery, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sato, M.; Sutton, A.J.; McGee, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    We began continuous monitoring of H2 concentration in soil along the San Andreas and Calaveras faults in central California in December 1980, using small H2/O2 fuel-cell sensors. Ten monitoring stations deployed to date have shown that anomalous H2 emissions take place occasionally in addition to diurnal changes. Among the ten sites, the Cienega Winery site has produced data that are characterized by very small diurnal changes, a stable baseline, and remarkably distinct spike-like H2 anomalies since its installation in July 1982. A major peak appeared on 1-10 November 1982, and another on 3 April 1983, and a medium peak on 1 November 1983. The occurrences of these peaks coincided with periods of very low seismicity within a radius of 50 km from the site. In order to methodically assess how these peaks are related to earthquakes, three H2 degassing models were examined. A plausible correlational pattern was obtained by using a model that (1) adopts a hemicircular spreading pattern of H2 along an incipient fracture plane from the hypocenter of an earthquake, (2) relies on the FeO-H2O reaction for H2 generation, and (3) relates the accumulated amount of H2 to the mass of serpentinization of underlying ophiolitic rocks; the mass was tentatively assumed to be proportional to the seismic energy of the earthquake. ?? 1985 Birkha??user Verlag.

  4. Proton emission from resonant laser absorption and self-focusing effects from hydrogenated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.

    2013-05-01

    Effects of resonant absorption and self-focusing are investigated by using fast and intense laser pulses. The ion emission and acceleration in the non-equilibrium laser-generated plasma are investigated at low and high intensities, from 1010 up to about 1016 W/cm2. The properties of plasma are strongly dependent on the time and space, laser intensity and wavelength. A special interest concerns the energetic and intense proton generation for the multiplicity use that proton beams have in different scientific fields (Nuclear Physics, Astrophysics, Bio-Medicine, Microelecronics, etc.). Investigations have been performed at INFN-LNS of Catania and at PALS Laboratory of Prague, by using thick and thin targets and different technique of ion analysis. The mechanisms of resonant absorption of the laser light, produced in special targets containing nanostructures with dimensions comparable with the laser wavelength, enhances the proton energy. The mechanisms of self-focusing, obtained by changing the laser focal distance from the target surface, increase the local intensity and consequently the high directional ion acceleration. Real-time ion detections were performed through Thomson parabola spectrometer (TPS), ion collectors (IC), SiC detectors and ion energy analyzer (IEA) employed in time-of-flight configuration (TOF). The energy and the amount of ions increase significantly when the two non-linear phenomena occurs, as will be described.

  5. Protein S-glutathionylation alters superoxide/hydrogen peroxide emission from pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Marisa; Chalker, Julia; Slade, Liam; Gardiner, Danielle; Mailloux, Ryan J

    2017-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) is a vital source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in several different tissues. Pdh has also been suggested to serve as a mitochondrial redox sensor. Here, we report that O2(•-)/ H2O2 emission from pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) is altered by S-glutathionylation. Glutathione disulfide (GSSG) amplified O2(•-)/ H2O2 production by purified Pdh during reverse electron transfer (RET) from NADH. Thiol oxidoreductase glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) reversed these effects confirming that Pdh is a target for S-glutathionylation. S-glutathionylation had the opposite effect during forward electron transfer (FET) from pyruvate to NAD(+) lowering O2(•-)/ H2O2 production. Immunoblotting for protein glutathione mixed disulfides (PSSG) following diamide treatment confirmed that purified Pdh can be S-glutathionylated. Similar observations were made with mouse liver mitochondria. S-glutathionylation catalysts diamide and disulfiram significantly reduced pyruvate or 2-oxoglutarate driven O2(•-)/ H2O2 production in liver mitochondria, results that were confirmed using various Pdh, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Ogdh), and respiratory chain inhibitors. Immunoprecipitation of Pdh and Ogdh confirmed that either protein can be S-glutathionylated by diamide and disulfiram. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the S -glutathionylation of Pdh alters the amount of ROS formed by the enzyme complex. We also confirmed that Ogdh is controlled in a similar manner. Taken together, our results indicate that the redox sensing and ROS forming properties of Pdh and Ogdh are linked to S-glutathionylation.

  6. High-Resolution Electron-Impact Study of the Far-Ultraviolet Emission Spectrum of Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xian-Ming; Ahmed, Syed M.; Multari, Rosalie A.; James, Geoffrey K.; Ajello, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    The emission spectrum of molecular hydrogen produced by electron-impact excitation at 100 eV has been measured in the wavelength range 1140-1690 A. High-resolution, optically thin spectra (delta(lambda) = 0.136 A) of the far-ultraviolet (FUV) Lyman and Werner band systems have been obtained with a newly constructed 3 m spectrometer. Synthetic spectral intensities based on the transition probabilities calculated by Abgrall et al. are in very good agreement with experimentally observed intensities. Previous modeling that utilized Allison & Daigarno band transition probabilities with Hoenl-London factors breaks down when the transition moment has significant J dependence or when ro-vibrational coupling is significant. Ro-vibrational perturbation between upsilon = 14 of the B(sup 1)Sigma(sup +, sub u) state and upsilon = 3 of the C(sup 1)Pi(sub u) state and the rotational dependence of the transition moment in the bands of the Lyman system are examined. Complete high-resolution experimental reference FUV spectra, together with the model synthetic spectra based on the Abgrall transition probabilities, are presented. An improved calibration standard is obtained, and an accurate calibration of the 3 m spectrometer has been achieved.

  7. Rapid variations of balmer line strengths in the spectra of Be stars. Ph.D. Thesis; [photoelectric spectrophotometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbeath, K. B.

    1974-01-01

    Low resolution photoelectric spectrophotometric measurements of the first four members of the Balmer series in the spectra of one Be and five Be (shell) stars were obtained with the 92-cm telescope and image dissecting scanner. Equivalent widths were computed for each observation, and their standard deviations from the mean values were examined. Results indicate that in three of the program stars, at least one of the Balmer lines shows significant fluctuations in equivalent width. These fluctuations amount to a few per cent of total line strength and the time scales appear to be on the order of three to thirty minutes. The fluctuations are not always present in a given star, indicating that the mechanism producing them may not be continuous. The noncontinuous and nonperiodic nature of the variations, along with their short time scale suggest some form of flare-like or shock origin for the phenomenon.

  8. The Balmer basin - Regional geology and geochemistry of an ancient lunar impact basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, T. A.; Andre, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Photogeologic, geochemical and geophysical information is cited to support the contention that an ancient multi-ringed basin exists in the east limb region of the moon, centered at 15 deg S and 70 deg E. The inner ring of the basin, with a diameter of 225 km, is composed of isolated rugged mountains of pre-Nectarian terra; the less distinct outer ring, whose diameter is approximately 450 km, is made up of irregular segments of surrounding large craters. It is noted that two units of light plains material occur in this area and that they are confined for the most part to the region within the proposed outer basin ring. According to orbital geochemical data, the younger unit (Imbrian age plains) consists of a mare basalt not unlike others of the nearside. This unit possesses high Mg/Al concentration ratios as determined from X-ray fluorescence data; it is also relatively high in Th and Fe when compared with the surrounding highlands. It is thought that the relatively high albedo of the Balmer plains may derive from either a reworking by numerous secondary craters from the surrounding impacts or a basaltic composition with higher albedo and lower Fe than the nearside maria.

  9. PROJECT VeSElkA: ANALYSIS OF BALMER LINE PROFILES OF SLOWLY ROTATING CHEMICALLY PECULIAR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Khalack, V.; LeBlanc, F.

    2015-07-15

    We present results for the estimation of gravity, effective temperature, and radial velocity of poorly studied chemically peculiar stars recently observed with the spectropolarimeter Echelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for Observations of Stars at the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope in the frame of the Vertical Stratification of Element Abundances project. The effective temperature and surface gravity values are determined for the very first time for four of the stars from our sample (HD 23878, HD 83373, HD 95608, and HD 164584). Grids of stellar atmosphere models with the corresponding fluxes have been calculated using version 15 of the PHOENIX code for effective temperatures in the range of 5000–15,000 K, for the logarithm of surface gravities in the range of 3.0–4.5 and for the metallicities from −1.0 to +1.5. We used these fluxes to fit the Balmer line profiles employing the code FITSB2 that produces estimates of the effective temperature, gravity, and radial velocity for each star. When possible, our results are compared to those previously published. The physical characteristics of 16 program stars are discussed with the future aim to study the abundance anomalies of chemical species and the possible vertical abundance stratification in their stellar atmosphere.

  10. Vacuum Ultraviolet Emission Spectrum Measurement of a Microwave-discharge Hydrogen-flow Lamp in Several Configurations: Application to Photodesorption of CO Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Chuang, K.-J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Nuevo, M.; Chu, C.-C.; Yih, T.-S.; Ip, W.-H.; Wu, C.-Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectra of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp (MDHL), a common tool in astrochemistry laboratories working on ice VUV photoprocessing. The MDHL provides hydrogen Ly-α (121.6 nm) and H2 molecular emission in the 110-180 nm range. We show that the spectral characteristics of the VUV light emitted in this range, in particular the relative proportion of Ly-α to molecular emission bands, strongly depend on the pressure of H2 inside the lamp, the lamp geometry (F type versus T type), the gas used (pure H2 versus H2 seeded in He), and the optical properties of the window used (MgF2 versus CaF2). These different configurations are used to study the VUV irradiation of CO ice at 14 K. In contrast to the majority of studies dedicated to the VUV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs, which have not taken into consideration the emission spectrum of the MDHL, our results show that the processes induced by photons in CO ice from a broad energy range are different and more complex than the sum of individual processes induced by monochromatic sources spanning the same energy range, as a result of the existence of multistate electronic transitions and discrepancy in absorption cross sections between parent molecules and products in the Ly-α and H2 molecular emission ranges.

  11. Vacuum ultraviolet emission spectrum measurement of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp in several configurations: Application to photodesorption of CO ice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Wu, C.-Y. R.; Chuang, K.-J.; Chu, C.-C.; Yih, T.-S.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Nuevo, M.; Ip, W.-H.

    2014-01-20

    We report measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectra of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp (MDHL), a common tool in astrochemistry laboratories working on ice VUV photoprocessing. The MDHL provides hydrogen Ly-α (121.6 nm) and H{sub 2} molecular emission in the 110-180 nm range. We show that the spectral characteristics of the VUV light emitted in this range, in particular the relative proportion of Ly-α to molecular emission bands, strongly depend on the pressure of H{sub 2} inside the lamp, the lamp geometry (F type versus T type), the gas used (pure H{sub 2} versus H{sub 2} seeded in He), and the optical properties of the window used (MgF{sub 2} versus CaF{sub 2}). These different configurations are used to study the VUV irradiation of CO ice at 14 K. In contrast to the majority of studies dedicated to the VUV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs, which have not taken into consideration the emission spectrum of the MDHL, our results show that the processes induced by photons in CO ice from a broad energy range are different and more complex than the sum of individual processes induced by monochromatic sources spanning the same energy range, as a result of the existence of multistate electronic transitions and discrepancy in absorption cross sections between parent molecules and products in the Ly-α and H{sub 2} molecular emission ranges.

  12. A spectroscopic study of hydrogen atom and molecule collision. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kielkopf, John F.

    2002-07-01

    The fundamental processes which occur in low-energy collisions of excited states of the hydrogen atom with other neutral atoms, protons, and electrons in dense plasmas were investigated in this project. Theoretical and experimental results for the Lyman and Balmer series are described here, including references to recent publications resulting from this project.

  13. Discovery of an activity cycle in the solar analog HD 45184. Exploring Balmer and metallic lines as activity proxy candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M.; González, J. F.; Jaque Arancibia, M.; Buccino, A.; Saffe, C.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Most stellar activity cycles similar to that found in the Sun have been detected by using the chromospheric Ca ii H&K lines as stellar activity proxies. However, it is unclear whether such activity cycles can be identified using other optical lines. Aims: We aim to detect activity cycles in solar-analog stars and determine whether they can be identified through other optical lines, such as Fe II and Balmer lines. We study the solar-analog star HD 45184 using HARPS spectra. The temporal coverage and high quality of the spectra allow us to detect both long- and short-term activity variations. Methods: We analysed the activity signatures of HD 45184 by using 291 HARPS spectra obtained between 2003 and 2014. To search for line-core flux variations, we focused on Ca ii H&K and Balmer Hα and Hβ lines, which are typically used as optical chromospheric activity indicators. We calculated the HARPS-S index from Ca ii H&K lines and converted it into the Mount Wilson scale. In addition, we also considered the equivalent widths of Balmer lines as activity indicators. Moreover, we analysed the possible variability of Fe ii and other metallic lines in the optical spectra. The spectral variations were analysed for periodicity using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. Results: We report for the first time a long-term 5.14-yr activity cycle in the solar-analog star HD 45184 derived from Mount Wilson S index. This makes HD 45184 one of most similar stars to the Sun with a known activity cycle. The variation is also evident in the first lines of the Balmer series, which do not always show a correlation with activity in solar-type stars. Notably, unlike the solar case, we also found that the equivalent widths of the high photospheric Fe ii lines (4924 Å, 5018 Å and 5169 Å) are modulated (±2 mÅ) by the chromospheric cycle of the star. These metallic lines show variations above 4σ in the rms spectrum, while some Ba ii and Ti ii lines present variations at 3σ level, which

  14. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S. W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-07-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature (δD), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally depleted compared to ambient intake air, while CO was significantly elevated. These findings contradict the often assumed co-occurring net H2 and CO emissions in combustion processes and suggest that previous H2 emissions from combustion may have been overestimated when scaled to CO emissions. For the gas and oil-fired heater exhausts, H2 and δD generally decrease with increasing CO2, from ambient values of ~0.5 ppm and +130‰ to 0.2 ppm and -206‰, respectively. These results are interpreted as a combination of an isotopically light H2 source from fossil fuel combustion and a D/H kinetic isotope fractionation of hydrogen in the advected ambient air during its partial removal during combustion. Diesel exhaust measurements from dynamometer test stand driving cycles show elevated H2 and CO emissions during cold-start and some acceleration phases. While H2 and CO emissions from diesel vehicles are known to be significantly less than those from gasoline vehicles (on a fuel-energy base), we find that their molar H2/CO ratios (median 0.026, interpercentile range 0.12) are also significantly less compared to gasoline vehicle exhaust. Using H2/CO emission ratios, along with CO global emission inventories, we estimate global H2 emissions for 2000, 2005, and 2010. For road transportation (gasoline and diesel), we calculate 8.3 ± 2.2 Tg, 6.0 ± 1.5 Tg, and 3.8 ± 0.94 Tg, respectively, whereas the contribution from diesel vehicles is low (0.9-1.4%). Other fossil fuel emissions are believed to be negligible but H2 emissions from coal combustion are unknown. For residential (domestic) emissions, which are likely dominated by biofuel combustion, emissions for the same years are

  15. Photoionization-driven Absorption-line Variability in Balmer Absorption Line Quasar LBQS 1206+1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Luming; Zhou, Hongyan; Ji, Tuo; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Wenjuan; Pan, Xiang; Shi, Xiheng; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Zhang, Shaohua; Miller, Lauren P.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of absorption-line variability in mini-BAL quasar LBQS 1206+1052. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum demonstrates that the absorption troughs can be divided into two components of blueshift velocities of ∼700 and ∼1400 km s‑1 relative to the quasar rest frame. The former component shows rare Balmer absorption, which is an indicator of high-density absorbing gas; thus, the quasar is worth follow-up spectroscopic observations. Our follow-up optical and near-infrared spectra using MMT, YFOSC, TSpec, and DBSP reveal that the strengths of the absorption lines vary for both components, while the velocities do not change. We reproduce all of the spectral data by assuming that only the ionization state of the absorbing gas is variable and that all other physical properties are invariable. The variation of ionization is consistent with the variation of optical continuum from the V-band light curve. Additionally, we cannot interpret the data by assuming that the variability is due to a movement of the absorbing gas. Therefore, our analysis strongly indicates that the absorption-line variability in LBQS 1206+1052 is photoionization driven. As shown from photoionization simulations, the absorbing gas with blueshift velocity of ∼700 km s‑1 has a density in the range of 109 to 1010 cm‑3 and a distance of ∼1 pc, and the gas with blueshift velocity of ∼1400 km s‑1 has a density of 103 cm‑3 and a distance of ∼1 kpc.

  16. Emission lines from shocks: water, molecular hydrogen, and low-excitation ions in the Cep A East and HH 7-11 outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, Gary; Watson, Dan

    2004-09-01

    Emission lines from shocks: water, molecular hydrogen, and low-excitation ions in the Cep A East and HH 7-11 outflows PI: Gary Melnick, Center for Astrophysics Co-Is: Ted Bergin, Center for Astrophysics David Neufeld, Johns Hopkins U. Dan Watson, U. Rochester SIRTF and the IRS offer access, at moderate spectral and spatial resolution, to some of the best molecular and atomic probes of the outflows and shocks associated with recent star formation. Here we intend to use IRS for emission-line imaging of Cepheus A East and HH 7-11, two well-known star-formation regions that were studied in detail by SWAS. The maps we obtain will include extended emission by molecular hydrogen (v = 0 S(0)-S(5)) and water (several pure rotational lines), as well as numerous transitions of low-excitation atomic and ionic species associated with jets and shocks. We will use these data, combined with SWAS observations of thermal water-line emission and shorter-wavelength H2 and [Fe II] images, in models of the excitation, energetics and chemistry of the shocked gas.

  17. Determination of the electron temperature by optical emission spectroscopy in a 13.56 MHz dusty methane plasma: Influence of the power

    SciTech Connect

    Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre

    2009-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is applied to the study of a radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) discharge in methane used to obtain hydrogenated carbon films and particles. The methane dissociation allows the creation of species in the plasma bulk as H{sub 2}, H, and CH. The emission lines of these species are studied as a function of time and of incident rf power. The electron temperature is determined from the two line radiance ratio method and the corona balance model using the Balmer lines (H{sub alpha}, H{sub beta}, and H{sub gamma}). The incident rf power enhancement in the range 40-120 W leads to the increase in the emission line intensities as the electron temperature decreases. The temporal variations of CH and hydrogen emission lines, of the dc self-bias voltage, and of the electron temperature are correlated both with the particle behavior and growth in the plasma, and with the coating that grows onto the powered electrode.

  18. Broad Balmer Absorption Line Variability: Evidence of Gas Transverse Motion in the QSO SDSS J125942.80+121312.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiheng; Zhou, Hongyan; Shu, Xinwen; Zhang, Shaohua; Ji, Tuo; Pan, Xiang; Sun, Luming; Zhao, Wen; Hao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    We report on the discovery of broad Balmer absorption lines variability in the QSO SDSS J125942.80+121312.6, based on the optical and near-infrared spectra taken from the SDSS-I, SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), and TripleSpec observations over a timescale of 5.8 years in the QSO's rest-frame. The blueshifted absorption profile of Hβ shows a variation of more than 5σ at a high velocity portion (\\gt 3000 {km} {{{s}}}-1) of the trough. We perform a detailed analysis for the physical conditions of the absorber using Balmer lines as well as metastable He i and optical Fe ii absorptions (λ4233 from b4P5/2 level and λ5169 from a6S5/2) at the same velocity. These Fe ii lines are identified in the QSO spectra for the first time. According to the photoionization simulations, we estimate a gas density of n({{H}})≈ {10}9.1 {{cm}}-3 and a column density of {N}{col}({{H}})≈ {10}23 {{cm}}-2 for the BOSS data, but the model fails to predict the variations of ionic column densities between the SDSS and BOSS observations if changes in ionizing flux are assumed. We thus propose transverse motion of the absorbing gas being the cause of the observed broad Balmer absorption line variability. In fact, we find that the changes in covering factors of the absorber can well-reproduce all of the observed variations. The absorber is estimated ∼0.94 pc away from the central engine, which is where the outflow likely experiences deceleration due to the collision with the surrounding medium. This scheme is consistent with the argument that LoBAL QSOs may represent the transition from obscured star-forming galaxies to classic QSOs.

  19. Characteristics of 1.9 μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-11-01

    We report here the detailed characteristics of 1.9 μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering. A 6.5 m hydrogen-filled Ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak power, narrow linewidth, liner polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064 nm microchip laser, generating pulsed 1908.5 nm vibrational Stokes wave. The linewidth of the pump laser and the vibrational Stokes wave is about 1 GHz and 2 GHz respectively. And the maximum Raman conversion quantum efficiency is about 48%. We also studied the pulse shapes of the pump laser and the vibrational Stokes wave. The polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational stimulated Raman scattering is also investigated. In addition, the beam profile of vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality, which may be taken advantage of in many applications.

  20. Macro-System Model: A Federated Object Model for Cross-Cutting Analysis of Hydrogen Production, Delivery, Consumption and Associated Emissions; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Goldsby, M. E.; Sa, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    It is commonly accepted that the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier for light-duty vehicles involves concomitant technological development of infrastructure elements, such as production, delivery, and consumption, all associated with certain emission levels. To analyze these at a system level, the suite of corresponding models developed by the United States Department of Energy and involving several national laboratories is combined in one macro-system model (MSM). The macro-system model is being developed as a cross-cutting analysis tool that combines a set of hydrogen technology analysis models. Within the MSM, a federated simulation framework is used for consistent data transfer between the component models. The framework is built to suit cross-model as well as cross-platform data exchange and involves features of 'over-the-net' computation.

  1. The potential of hydrogen lines for the spectropolarimetry of the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Chane-Yook, Martine

    2016-07-01

    Neutral Hydrogen lines have been detected in the hot and ionized solar corona as early as 1970 (Gabriel et al. 1971) and since then with the Spartan and UVCS/SoHO space experiments. Moreover, because of the sensitivity of the Lyman lines to the Hanle effect (Bommier and Sahal-Brechot 1982, Trujillo Bueno et al. 2005), polarization measurements in these lines could lead to the diagnostic of weak magnetic fields in the corona (Derouich et al. 2010), a challenge which has led to various space mission proposals such as LYOT/SMESE or MASC. Our investigation concerns the computation of the emission in 10 selected lines of Hydrogen (Lyman, Balmer, and Paschen) taking into account the proper computation of the NonLTE H ionization and atomic levels populations. We present the results for three different coronal models (streamer, quiet Sun and coronal hole) in terms of profiles and absolute intensities at altitudes varying from 1.05 to 1.9 solar radius. These spectrophotometric results could help for the determination of the space and ground-based polarimetric instrumentation best suited for the measurement of the coronal magnetic field.

  2. Emissions of ammonia, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide from swine wastewater during and after acidification treatment: effect of pH, mixing and aeration.

    PubMed

    Dai, X R; Blanes-Vidal, V

    2013-01-30

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of swine slurry acidification and acidification-aeration treatments on ammonia (NH(3)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) emissions during slurry treatment and subsequent undisturbed storage. The study was conducted in an experimental setup consisting of nine dynamic flux chambers. Three pH levels (pH = 6.0, pH = 5.8 and pH = 5.5), combined with short-term aeration and venting (with an inert gas) treatments were studied. Acidification reduced average NH(3) emissions from swine slurry stored after acidification treatment compared to emissions during storage of non-acidified slurry. The reduction were 50%, 62% and 77% when pH was reduce to 6.0, 5.8 and 5.5, respectively. However, it had no significant effect on average CO(2) and H(2)S emissions during storage of slurry after acidification. Aeration of the slurry for 30 min had no effect on average NH(3), CO(2) and H(2)S emissions both during the process and from stored slurry after venting treatments. During aeration treatment, the NH(3), CO(2) and H(2)S release pattern observed was related to the liquid turbulence caused by the gas bubbles rather than to biological oxidation processes in this study.

  3. A comprehensive study of H emission in a TEA CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma for highly sensitive analysis of hydrogen in metal samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Khumaeni, Ali; Niki, Hideaki; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Hedwig, Rinda; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Lee, Yong Inn

    2012-07-01

    Our previous work on an innovative method of hydrogen (H) analysis using the specific characteristics of a TEA CO2 laser, "selective detection method of H", has been improved to realize a high H sensitive analysis with a detection limit of several µg/g. For this purpose, first, we clarified the origin of the H emission disturbance coming from H2O molecules; namely, we showed that most of the H emission came from H2O on the metal surface and not from H2O existing in the surrounding gas when we formed a laser-induced gas plasma. Second, the difference in the emission characteristics between the H emission from H2O on the metal surface and H emission from inside in sample was studied to determine the optimum gating time of the optical multi-channel analyzer (OMA). Third, the gas plasma was totally covered by fresh helium gas using a big pipe (5 mm in diameter) and by flowing a high amount of He (10 l/min). Also, we demonstrated that our methods could potentially be applied to H analysis in steel samples, where an H analysis with a sensitivity of less than 1 µg/g is required without employing a heating process, by removing H2O on the sample surface with the aid of defocused TEA CO2 laser irradiation. Thus, we stress that our method can be used for a highly sensitive, in-situ analysis of H for metal samples.

  4. Emission factors and characteristics of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter at two high-rise layer hen houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ji-Qin; Liu, Shule; Diehl, Claude A.; Lim, Teng-Teeh; Bogan, Bill W.; Chen, Lide; Chai, Lilong; Wang, Kaiying; Heber, Albert J.

    2017-04-01

    Air pollutants emitted from confined animal buildings can cause environmental pollution and ecological damage. Long-term (>6 months) and continuous (or high frequency) monitoring that can reveal seasonal and diurnal variations is needed to obtain emission factors and characteristics about these pollutants. A two-year continuous monitoring of ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon dioxide (CO2) and particulate matter (PM10) emissions from two 218,000-hen high-rise layer houses (H-A and H-B) in Indiana, USA was conducted from June 2007 to May 2009. Gaseous pollutant concentrations were measured with two gas analyzers and PM10 concentrations were measured with three Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalances. The operation and performance of ventilation fans were continuously monitored with multiple methods. Only the emission rates calculated with valid data days (days with more than 18 h, or 75%, of valid data) are reported in this paper. The two-house and two-year mean ± standard deviation emissions per day per hen for NH3, H2S, CO2, and PM10 were 1.08 ± 0.42 g, 1.37 ± 0.83 mg, 76.7 ± 14.6 g, and 20.6 ± 22.5 mg, respectively. Seasonal emission variations were demonstrated for NH3 and CO2, but not evident for H2S and PM10. Ammonia and CO2 emissions were higher in winter than in summer. Significant daily mean emission variations were observed for all four pollutants between the two houses (P < 0.05), and between the two years from the same house (P < 0.01) except for CO2 at one house. Carbon dioxide originated from manure decomposition was >9% of that from bird respiration. Emissions of CO2 during molting were about 80% of those during normal egg production days. Emissions of H2S were not a major concern due to their very low quantities. Emissions of PM10 were more variable than other pollutants. However, not all of the emission statistics are explainable.

  5. Measurement of Anomalously Strong Emission from the 1s-9p Transition in the Spectrum of H-like Phosphorus Following Charge Exchange with Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with approx.6 eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high-end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of two for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements.

  6. Star formation in NGC 4449: MAMA-detector UV imagery and Fabry-Perot Balmer-line imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Robert S.; Home, Allen T.; Smith, Andrew M.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Cheng, K.P.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Balmer-line imagery, we investigate the star formation history of 22 large OB complexes in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449. The FUV luminosity of NGC 4449 is comparable to those of late-type spirals and is greater than that of the LMC by approximately 2.4 mag, indicating substantial star formation in the last 10(exp 8) yr. FUV data were taken using a sounding-rocket telescope with a Multianode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector, and Balmer-line data were taken using the Goddard Fabry-Perot Imager. The resulting imagery shows bright, roughly coincident FUV and H alpha sources throughout the extent of the visible galaxy. We model these sources using cluster-evolution codes. Although all sources are a few Myr old, clear age differences are found. In particular, several of the most recently active star formation regions are located together in the galaxy's northern periphery, which is apparently coincident with a large H I reservoir. The brightest and most massive OB complexes are found along the northeast-southwest surface brightness ridgeline (the 'bar'). Over the entire galaxy, star formation rates are consistent on timescales of 10(exp 6), 10(exp 8), and 10(exp 9) yr. A history of recent star formation is suggested with two main episodes, one predominantly in the bar ending approximately 5 Myr ago, and an ongoing one associated with an observed H I cloud.

  7. Pilot-scale testing of renewable biocatalyst for swine manure treatment and mitigation of odorous VOCs, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Devin L.; Koziel, Jacek A.; Bruning, Kelsey; Parker, David B.

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive control of odors, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with swine production is a critical need. A pilot-scale experiment was conducted to evaluate surface-applied soybean peroxidase (SBP) and calcium peroxide (CaO2) as a manure additive to mitigate emissions of odorous volatile organic compounds (VOC) including dimethyl disulfide/methanethiol (DMDS/MT), dimethyl trisulfide, n-butyric acid, valeric acid, isovaleric acid, p-cresol, indole, and skatole. The secondary impact on emissions of NH3, H2S, and GHG was also measured. The SBP was tested at four treatments (2.28-45.7 kg/m2 manure) with CaO2 (4.2% by weight of SBP) over 137 days. Significant reductions in VOC emissions were observed: DMDS/MT (36.2%-84.7%), p-cresol (53.1%-89.5%), and skatole (63.2%-92.5%). There was a corresponding significant reduction in NH3 (14.6%-67.6%), and significant increases in the greenhouse gases CH4 (32.7%-232%) and CO2 (20.8%-124%). The remaining emissions (including N2O) were not statistically different. At a cost relative to 0.8% of a marketed hog it appears that SBP/CaO2 treatment could be a promising option at the lowest (2.28 kg/m2) treatment rate for reducing odorous gas and NH3 emissions at swine operations, and field-scale testing is warranted.

  8. Associations between immune function in yearling beef cattle and airborne emissions of sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and VOCs from oil and natural gas facilities.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Daniel G; Waldner, Cheryl L; Wickstrom, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Researchers assessed the associations between airborne emissions from oil and gas field facilities and the structure and function of the immune system of yearling beef cattle in 27 herds during spring 2002. They evaluated the immune systems of these animals by enumerating B lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte subtypes (CD4, CD8, gammadelta, and WC1) in peripheral circulation and by measuring systemic antibody production in response to vaccination. Researchers prospectively measured exposure to sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by using air-quality data from passive monitors installed in pastures and wintering areas. They estimated the mean exposure of each animal over the 6-month period before the start of sample collection. The researchers used mixed models, which adjusted for clustering by herd and accounted for known risk factors, to examine potential associations between exposure to airborne sulfur dioxide, VOCs (measured as concentrations of benzene and toluene) and hydrogen sulfide, as well as proximity to emission sources (well-site density), and the immune system outcomes. Increasing exposure to VOCs measured as toluene was associated with significant CD4 T lymphocytopenia. The number of CD4 T lymphocytes was 30% lower in cattle exposed to VOCs measured as toluene in the highest quartile (> 0.823 microg/m3) than in cattle exposed in the lowest quartile (< 0.406 microg/m3).

  9. Laser-induced carbon plasma emission spectroscopic measurements on solid targets and in gas-phase optical breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Nemes, Laszlo; Keszler, Anna M.; Hornkohl, James O.; Parigger, Christian

    2005-06-20

    We report measurements of time- and spatially averaged spontaneous-emission spectra following laser-induced breakdown on a solid graphite/ambient gas interface and on solid graphite in vacuum, and also emission spectra from gas-phase optical breakdown in allene C3H4 and helium, and in CO2 and helium mixtures. These emission spectra were dominated by CII (singly ionized carbon), CIII (doubly ionized carbon), hydrogen Balmer beta (H{sub b}eta), and Swan C2 band features. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium and thin plasma assumptions, we derived electron number density and electron temperature estimates. The former was in the 1016 cm{sup -3} range, while the latter was found to be near 20000 K. In addition, the vibration-rotation temperature of the Swan bands of the C2 radical was determined to be between 4500 and 7000 K, using an exact theoretical model for simulating diatomic emission spectra. This temperature range is probably caused by the spatial inhomogeneity of the laser-induced plasma plume. Differences are pointed out in the role of ambient CO2 in a solid graphite target and in gas-phase breakdown plasma.

  10. Hydrogen Lines in Mira Stars Through Interferometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Chiavassa, A.; Millour, F.; Wittkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Balmer lines in emission are the most prominent features in Mira stars spectra and have a strong potential as a proxy to study the lower atmosphere's dynamics. In Fabas et al. ([1]), we accumulated spectropolarimetric observations of Balmer lines in emission. As the shock is propagating outwards, linear polarization rate increases and the angle of this polarization evolves. Assuming that linear polarization arises from anisotropic scattering, it has the potential of telling us about the geometric structure of the shock as it propagates and the study of such atmospheric structures can typically be performed with interferometry. In 2012, AMBER data on the Mira star omicron Ceti were collected in which the Brackett γ line is studied. The data show signatures in the interferometric observables around this line. Olivier Chesneau was in the jury evaluating the PhD thesis of N. Fabas and he was seduced by the idea to study these shock waves with interferometry and use polarimetry as a complementary study.

  11. Space-resolved visible spectroscopy for two-dimensional measurement of hydrogen and impurity emission spectra and of plasma flow in the edge stochastic layer of LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.

    2017-03-01

    A space-resolved visible spectrometer system has been developed for two-dimensional (2D) distribution measurements of hydrogen and impurity emission spectra and of plasma flow in the edge stochastic layer of Large Helical Device (LHD). Astigmatism of the spectrometer has been suppressed by introducing additional toroidal and spherical mirrors. A good focal image at the exit slit is realized in a wide wavelength range (75 nm) as well as in a wide slit height direction (26 mm) with a 300 grooves/mm grating. The capability of the spectrometer optical system for the 2D measurement and further possible improvements are discussed in detail. An optical fiber array of 130 channels with a lens unit is used to spatially resolve the edge plasma into different magnetic field structure components: divertor strike points, divertor legs, X-point of the legs, the stochastic layer, and the last closed flux surface. With a 300 grooves/mm grating, the 2D distributions of several hydrogen and impurity line emissions are simultaneously obtained with absolute intensities. A clear correlation is obtained between the magnetic field structure and the emission intensity. With a 2400 grooves/mm grating with a good spectral resolution (0.03 nm/pixel), the 2D distributions of impurity flow velocity are obtained from the Doppler shift measurement. The wavelength position is accurately calibrated by investigating the wavelength dispersion as well as by correcting a mechanical error of the optical setting in the spectrometer. The uncertainty in the velocity is reduced to less than 10% of a typical impurity velocity ˜104 m/s. A temporal change in the flow directions is observed at different spatial locations in divertor detachment plasma.

  12. [Study on dynamics of hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide emission fluxes from Suaeda salsa marsh in the Yellow River estuary].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Hua; Guo, Hong-Hai; Yang, Li-Ping; Zhu, Zhen-Lin; Sun, Xiao-Qing

    2014-02-01

    The H2S and COS emission fluxes from Suaeda salsa marsh in the Yellow River estuary were measured using the static chamber and Chromatogram method during the growth season (May to October), the results showed that the seasonal and diurnal variations of H2S and COS emission fluxes were obvious, and Suaeda salsa marsh in the Yellow River estuary was the sources for both H2S and COS during the growth time, and the mean H2S and COS emission fluxes from Suaeda salsa marsh were 4.97 microg x (m2 x h)(-1) and 0.92 microg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively. Different environmental factors had different effects on the emission fluxes of H2S and COS from Suaeda salsa marsh, in which the SO4(2-) content and water content in the soil were the main factors that affected the H2S and COS emission fluxes, respectively. Sulfur gases emissions from Suaeda salsa marsh may be affected by many factors, such as plant, tide status and so on, so that should be further studied.

  13. Summary of Simplified Two Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydrogen/Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John; Molnar, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (greater than l x 10(exp -20)) moles per cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T(sub 4)). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/Air fuel and for H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T(sub 4)) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T(sub 3)). High values of the regression coefficient R squared are obtained.

  14. HST-COS OBSERVATIONS OF HYDROGEN, HELIUM, CARBON, AND NITROGEN EMISSION FROM THE SN 1987A REVERSE SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    France, Kevin; Penton, Steven V.; McCray, Richard; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter; Laming, Martin J.; Bouchet, Patrice; Garnavich, Peter M.; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Lundqvist, Peter; Sollerman, Jesper; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S. J.; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; and others

    2011-12-20

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow ({Delta}v {approx} 300 km s{sup -1}) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad ({Delta}v {approx} 10-20 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise ratio (>40 per resolution element) broad Ly{alpha} emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at {lambda} > 1350 A can be explained by H I two-photon (2s {sup 2} S{sub 1/2}-1s {sup 2} S{sub 1/2}) emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of N V {lambda}1240 emission from the reverse shock and present the first detections of broad He II {lambda}1640, C IV {lambda}1550, and N IV] {lambda}1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 {+-} 0.06. The N V/H{alpha} line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T{sub e} /T{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 0.14-0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance may have been stratified prior to the ring expulsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expulsion of the circumstellar ring.

  15. HST-COS Observations on Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon, and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Penton, Steven V.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter; Laming, J. Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Garnavich, Peter M.; Fransson, Claes; Heng, Kevin; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S. J.; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987 A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (Delta v approximates 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad Delta v approximates 10-20 x 10(exp 3) km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise ratio (>40 per resolution element) broad Ly-alpha emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at lambda > 1350 A can be explained by H-I two-photon (2s(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)-l(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)) emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of N V lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and present the first detections of broad He II lambda1640, C IV lambda 1550, and N IV ] lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The N V /H alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T(sub e)/T(sub p) approximately equal to 0.14-0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance may have been stratified prior to the ring expUlsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expUlsion of the circumstellar ring.

  16. Reconstruction of emission sites in the dwarf nova EX Draconis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joergens, Viki; Mantel, Karl-Heinz; Barwig, Heinz; Bärnbantner, Otto; Fiedler, Hauke

    2000-02-01

    We performed time-resolved spectroscopic studies of the double-eclipsing dwarf nova EX Dra (formerly HS 1804 + 6753) in order to locate line emitting sites in the system. Optical spectra recorded during the quiescent as well as during the outburst state have been analysed by means of Doppler tomography. The computed Doppler images map the system in a variety of emission lines and allow us to compare between different temperatures and accretion states. Our studies revealed that the Balmer and He I emission of EX Dra during quiescence is mainly formed within a fully established disk and within the gas stream. The Doppler map of Halpha shows a second emission spot in the accretion disk located far from the region of interaction between the gas stream and the accretion disk. We have found a weak hint that secondary star emission contributes to the Halpha line in quiescence, obviously caused by photospheric heating due to irradiation by the primary component. During outburst secondary star emission turns into a very strong emission source in the Balmer lines due to the increased accretion rate and an enhanced irradiation by the white dwarf or the boundary layer. The Doppler maps of the Balmer and He I lines during outburst further show emission from the accretion disk. During outburst the gas stream is rarely seen in the Balmer lines but clearly visible in He I and shows that the disk radius during this high accretion state is about 0.2 RL1 larger than during the recorded quiescent state. The origin of the C Ii (lambda 4267 Å) line, which is only detectable during eruption can be located by Doppler imaging close to the primary component and may therefore be formed in the chromosphere of the white dwarf. Based on observations obtained at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, Spain and at Wendelstein Observatory, Germany.

  17. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M.

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  18. An archetype hydrogen atmosphere problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, R. G.; Mihalas, D.; Shine, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Populations for the first three bound states and the continuum of hydrogen are determined for an isothermal hydrostatic atmosphere at 20,000 K. The atmosphere is treated as optically thin in the Balmer and Paschen continua and illuminated by continuum radiation at these wavelengths with prescribed radiation temperatures. The atmosphere is optically thick in the 2-1, 3-1, 3-2 and c-1 transitions. Three stages of approximation are treated: (1) radiative detailed balance in the 2-1, 3-1 and 3-2 transitions, (2) radiative detailed balance in the 3-1 and 3-2 transitions, and (3) all transitions out of detailed balance. The solution of this problem is nontrivial and presents sufficient difficulty to have caused the failure of at least one rather standard technique. The problem is thus a good archetype against which new methods or new implementations of old methods may be tested.

  19. Magnetospheric accretion models for T Tauri stars. 1: Balmer line profiles without rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Hewett, Robert; Calvet, Nuria

    1994-01-01

    We argue that the strong emission lines of T Tauri stars are generally produced in infalling envelopes. Simple models of infall constrained to a dipolar magnetic field geometry explain many peculiarities of observed line profiles that are difficult, if not impossible, to reproduce with wind models. Radiative transfer effects explain why certain lines can appear quite symmetric while other lines simultaneously exhibit inverse P Cygni profiles, without recourse to complicated velocity fields. The success of the infall models in accounting for qualitative features of observed line profiles supports the proposal that stellar magnetospheres disrupt disk accretion in T Tauri stars, that true boundary layers are not usually present in T Tauri stars, and that the observed 'blue veiling' emission arises from the base of the magnetospheric accretion column.

  20. Materials towards carbon-free, emission-free and oil-free mobility: hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles--now and in the future.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Katsuhiko

    2010-07-28

    In the past, material innovation has changed society through new material-induced technologies, adding a new value to society. In the present world, engineers and scientists are expected to invent new materials to solve the global problem of climate change. For the transport sector, the challenge for material engineers is to change the oil-based world into a sustainable world. After witnessing the recent high oil price and its adverse impact on the global economy, it is time to accelerate our efforts towards this change. Industries are tackling global energy issues such as oil and CO2, as well as local environmental problems, such as NO(x) and particulate matter. Hydrogen is the most promising candidate to provide carbon-free, emission-free and oil-free mobility. As such, engineers are working very hard to bring this technology into the real society. This paper describes recent progress of vehicle technologies, as well as hydrogen-storage technologies to extend the cruise range and ensure the easiness of refuelling and requesting material scientists to collaborate with industry to fight against global warming.

  1. Origin and Quenching of Novel ultraviolet and blue emission in NdGaO3: Concept of Super-Hydrogenic Dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Siddhartha; Saha, Surajit; Liu, Zhiqi; Motapothula, M.; Patra, Abhijeet; Yakovlev, Nikolai; Cai, Yao; Prakash, Saurav; Huang, Xiao Hu; Tay, Chuan Beng; Cong, Chun Xiao; Bhatt, Thirumaleshwara; Dolmanan, Surani B.; Chen, Jianqiang; Lü, Weiming; Huang, Zhen; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Chua, Soo Jin; Yu, Ting; Asta, Mark; Ariando, A.; Venkatesan, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this study we report the existence of novel ultraviolet (UV) and blue emission in rare-earth based perovskite NdGaO3 (NGO) and the systematic quench of the NGO photoluminescence (PL) by Ce doping. Study of room temperature PL was performed in both single-crystal and polycrystalline NGO (substrates and pellets) respectively. Several NGO pellets were prepared with varying Ce concentration and their room temperature PL was studied using 325 nm laser. It was found that the PL intensity shows a systematic quench with increasing Ce concentration. XPS measurements indicated that nearly 50% of Ce atoms are in the 4+ state. The PL quench was attributed to the novel concept of super hydrogenic dopant (SHD)”, where each Ce4+ ion contributes an electron which forms a super hydrogenic atom with an enhanced Bohr radius, due to the large dielectric constant of the host. Based on the critical Ce concentration for complete quenching this SHD radius was estimated to be within a range of 0.85 nm and 1.15 nm whereas the predicted theoretical value of SHD radius for NdGaO3 is ~1.01 nm.

  2. Origin and Quenching of Novel ultraviolet and blue emission in NdGaO3: Concept of Super-Hydrogenic Dopants

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Siddhartha; Saha, Surajit; Liu, Zhiqi; Motapothula, M.; Patra, Abhijeet; Yakovlev, Nikolai; Cai, Yao; Prakash, Saurav; Huang, Xiao Hu; Tay, Chuan Beng; Cong, Chun Xiao; Bhatt, Thirumaleshwara; Dolmanan, Surani B.; Chen, Jianqiang; Lü, Weiming; Huang, Zhen; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Chua, Soo Jin; Yu, Ting; Asta, Mark; Ariando, A.; Venkatesan, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we report the existence of novel ultraviolet (UV) and blue emission in rare-earth based perovskite NdGaO3 (NGO) and the systematic quench of the NGO photoluminescence (PL) by Ce doping. Study of room temperature PL was performed in both single-crystal and polycrystalline NGO (substrates and pellets) respectively. Several NGO pellets were prepared with varying Ce concentration and their room temperature PL was studied using 325 nm laser. It was found that the PL intensity shows a systematic quench with increasing Ce concentration. XPS measurements indicated that nearly 50% of Ce atoms are in the 4+ state. The PL quench was attributed to the novel concept of super hydrogenic dopant (SHD)”, where each Ce4+ ion contributes an electron which forms a super hydrogenic atom with an enhanced Bohr radius, due to the large dielectric constant of the host. Based on the critical Ce concentration for complete quenching this SHD radius was estimated to be within a range of 0.85 nm and 1.15 nm whereas the predicted theoretical value of SHD radius for NdGaO3 is ~1.01 nm. PMID:27808272

  3. A Process Based Approach to Modeling Hydrogen Sulfide Emissions Across the Air-Surface Interface of Manure from Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, I. C.; Aneja, V.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are an important concern due to their contribution to odor and their potential to form PMfine. CAFO manure surface emissions occur from barns floors, during waste storage and treatment, and following land application. There is a need for a process based model, which will provide a method for quantifying emissions in different production, management and environmental conditions. A process based air-surface interface mass transfer model with chemical reactions was developed based on theoretical principles and related published information on H2S emissions. Different approaches were used to calculate the three main components of the model: the dissociation constant, the Henry’s law constant, and the overall mass transport coefficient. The dissociation constant was calculated based on thermodynamic principles and was corrected for the ionic strength of the manure. Similarly, the Henry’s law constant was also calculated based on thermodynamic principles. The overall mass transfer coefficient was developed using a previously published air-surface interface mass transport model, which considered the most important properties affecting mass transport to be the diffusivity of H2S in air, the air viscosity, and the air density. These parameters were modeled using dimensional analysis, which identified the variables that needed to be measured to determine the relevant constant and exponents values. By using the previously published study’s model and their measured constant and exponent values, an appropriate overall mass transfer coefficient was developed. Sensitivity analysis of the process based air-surface interface mass transfer model showed predicted fluxes to be most dependent on manure sulfide concentration and manure pH, and to a smaller extent on wind speed and manure temperature. Model predicted fluxes were compared with measured H2S flux and meteorological and physiochemical

  4. Singlet oxygen-sensitized delayed emissions from hydrogen peroxide/gallic acid/potassium ferricyanide systems containing organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroshi; Tsukino, Kazuo; Sekine, Masahiko; Nakata, Munetaka

    2009-06-01

    Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectra of H 2O 2/gallic acid/K 3[Fe(CN) 6] systems containing organic solvents were measured. Emission bands with peaks around 530 and 700 nm were observed in systems containing solvents with a carbonyl group such as N, N-dimethylformamide, and those with a hydroxyl group such as methanol, respectively. The relative band intensities depended strongly on the concentration of these organic solvents. The emission species are attributed to gallic acid-ferricyanide complexes excited by energy transfer from singlet oxygen dimol, ( 1O 2) 2. The effects of organic solvents are interpreted in terms of intermolecular interactions of gallic acid-ferricyanide complexes, water molecules and organic solvents.

  5. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D) from a motor vehicle: implications on atmospheric H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Bond, S. W.; Soltic, P.; Röckmann, T.

    2010-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD), carbon monoxide (CO), and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely reduced downstream of the three-way catalytic converter (TWC) compared to levels upstream, and showed a strong dependence on the air-fuel ratio (expressed as lambda, λ). The isotopic composition of H2 ranged from δD = -140‰ to δD = -195‰ upstream of the TWC but these values decreased to -270‰ to -370‰ after passing through the TWC. Post-TWC δD values for the fuel-rich range showed a strong dependence on TWC temperature with more negative δD for lower temperatures. These effects are attributed to a rapid temperature-dependent H-D isotope equilibration between H2 and water (H2O). In addition, post TWC δD in H2 showed a strong dependence on the fraction of removed H2, suggesting isotopic enrichment during catalytic removal of H2 with enrichment factors (ɛ) ranging from -39.8‰ to -15.5‰ depending on the operating mode. Our results imply that there may be considerable variability in real-world δD emissions from vehicle exhaust, which may mainly depend on TWC technology and exhaust temperature regime. This variability is suggestive of a δD from traffic that varies over time, by season, and by geographical location. An earlier-derived integrated pure (end-member) δD from anthropogenic activities of -270‰ (Rahn et al., 2002) can be explained as a mixture of mainly vehicle emissions from cold starts and fully functional TWCs, but enhanced δD values by >50‰ are likely for regions where TWC technology is not fully implemented. Our results also suggest that a full hydrogen isotope analysis on fuel and exhaust gas may greatly aid at understanding process-level reactions in the exhaust gas, in particular in the TWC.

  6. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D) from a motor vehicle: implications on atmospheric H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Walter, S.; Bond, S. W.; Soltic, P.; Röckmann, T.

    2010-02-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD), carbon monoxide (CO) and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely reduced downstream of the three-way catalytic converter (TWC) compared to levels upstream, and showed a strong dependence on the air-fuel ratio (expressed as lambda, λ). The isotopic composition of H2 ranged from δD=-140‰ to δD=-195‰ upstream of the TWC but these values decreased to -270‰ to -370‰ after passing through the TWC. Post-TWC δD values for the fuel-rich range showed a strong dependence on TWC temperature with more negative δD for lower temperatures. These effects are attributed to a rapid temperature-dependent H-D isotope equilibration between H2 and water (H2O). In addition, post TWC δD in H2 showed a strong dependence on the fraction of removed H2, suggesting isotopic enrichment during catalytic removal of H2 with enrichment factors (ɛ) ranging from -39.8‰ to -15.5‰ depending on the operating mode. Our results imply that there may be considerable variability in real-world δD emissions from vehicle exhaust, which may mainly depend on TWC technology and exhaust temperature regime. This variability is suggestive of a δD from traffic that varies over time, by season, and by geographical location. An earlier-derived integrated pure (end-member) δD from anthropogenic activities of -270‰ (Rahn et al., 2002) can be explained as a mixture of mainly vehicle emissions from cold starts and fully functional TWCs, but enhanced δD values by >50‰ are likely for regions where TWC technology is not fully implemented. Our results also suggest that a full hydrogen isotope analysis on fuel and exhaust gas may greatly aid at understanding process-level reactions in the exhaust gas, in particular in the TWC.

  7. Large-area imager of hydrogen leaks in fuel cells using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Hayano, R S; Fukuta, M; Koyama, T; Nobusue, H; Tanaka, J

    2009-10-01

    We constructed a simple device, which utilized laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to image H2 gas leaking from the surfaces of hydrogen fuel cells to ambient air. Nanosecond laser pulses of wavelength lambda=532 nm emitted from a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser were first compressed to a pulse length Deltat<1 ns using a stimulated Brillouin backscattering cell. Relay-imaging optics then focused this beam onto the H(2) leak and initiated the breakdown plasma. The Balmer-alpha (H-alpha) emission that emerged from this was collected with a 2-m-long macrolens assembly with a 90-mm-diameter image area, which covered a solid angle of approximately 1 x 10(-3)pi steradians seen from the plasma. The H-alpha light was isolated by two 100-mm-diameter interference filters with a 2 nm bandpass, and imaged by a thermoelectrically cooled charge-coupled device camera. By scanning the position of the laser focus, the spatial distribution of H2 gas over a 90-mm-diameter area was photographed with a spatial resolution of < or = 5 mm. Photoionization of the water vapor in the air caused a strong H-alpha background. By using pure N2 as a buffer gas, H2 leaks with rates of <1 cc/min were imaged. We also studied the possibilities of detecting He, Ne, or Xe gas leaks.

  8. Measurement of mesoscopic Si:P delta-doped devices fabricated by rapid STM hydrogen depassivation lithography via field-emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, M.; Carr, S. M.; Subramania, G.; Ten Eyck, G.; Dominguez, J.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.; Bussmann, E.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a method to fabricate nanoelectronic and quantum devices has been developed that utilizes scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to place dopants (P) into Si with deterministic atomic-precision. Dopant placement is achieved via STM hydrogen depassivation lithography (HDL). Typically HDL is performed in a low-voltage tunneling mode where electrons desorb one H at a time, which requires extremely slow scan rates. Here, we introduce a high-voltage field-emission HDL, increasing patterning scan rate by an order of magnitude. Using the field-emission mode, we fabricated several HDL-patterned Si:P delta-doped devices, including a microscale multi-terminal Hall Effect device and a nanoscale quantum point contact. Low temperature transport measurements of the Hall device reveal a dopant density of 1014 cm-2, resistance of 2 k Ω/square, and mobility of 30 cm2/Vs. The quantum point contact showed a blockaded voltage range of 80 mV, comparable to other similar devices patterned using conventional HDL. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Real-Time Observation of Hydrogen Peroxide Transport through the Oil Phase in a W/O/W Double Emulsion with Chemiluminescence Emission.

    PubMed

    Kouno, Hiroshi; Iwai, Yosuke; Uchida, Yoshiaki; Hirota, Yuichiro; Nishiyama, Norikazu

    2017-04-04

    The evaluation of the transport rates of hydrophilic substances is important in agricultural and pharmaceutical chemistry and in the cosmetics and food-processing industries. Although there are some estimation methods focusing on the diffusion of the substances through the oil phase of the W/O/W core-shell double emulsions (oil microcapsules), all of them take several hours or days. This long-time measurement has a risk of rupture of the oil microcapsules, which causes significant errors. If it were possible to measure the transport rate of substances in the oil phase of the oil microcapsules in real time, the risk of rupture could be reduced. Here, we propose a new estimation method for the transport rates of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the oil phase of an oil microcapsule for real-time estimation by means of chemiluminescence (CL) emission of the luminol reaction. We theoretically give the relationship among the CL emission intensity, diffusion coefficient, microcapsule size, and experimental time and successfully estimate the diffusion coefficient of H2O2 in the oil phase of the oil microcapsule from the experimental data. Moreover, we discuss the dependence of the permeation of H2O2 through the oil phase on the concentration of the oil-soluble surfactant; the difference in the permeation rate is likely to be attributed not to the diffusion coefficient but to the partition coefficient of H2O2 in the oil microcapsule.

  10. pH-Regulated Reversible Transition Between Polyion Complexes (PIC) and Hydrogen-Bonding Complexes (HBC) with Tunable Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sidan; Liu, Guhuan; Wang, Xiaorui; Wu, Tao; Yang, Jinxian; Ye, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guoying; Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-02-17

    The mimicking of biological supramolecular interactions and their mutual transitions to fabricate intelligent artificial systems has been of increasing interest. Herein, we report the fabrication of supramolecular micellar nanoparticles consisting of quaternized poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PEO-b-PQDMA) and tetrakis(4-carboxylmethoxyphenyl)ethene (TPE-4COOH), which was capable of reversible transition between polyion complexes (PIC) and hydrogen bonding complexes (HBC) with tunable aggregation-induced emission (AIE) mediated by solution pH. At pH 8, TPE-4COOH chromophores can be directly dissolved in aqueous milieu without evident fluorescence emission. However, upon mixing with PEO-b-PQDMA, polyion complexes were formed by taking advantage of electrostatic interaction between carboxylate anions and quaternary ammonium cations and the most compact PIC micelles were achieved at the isoelectric point (i.e., [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] = 1), as confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. Simultaneously, fluorescence spectroscopy revealed an evident emission turn-on and the maximum fluorescence intensity was observed near the isoelectric point due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation of TPE moieties within the PIC cores. The kinetic study supported a micelle fusion/fission mechanism on the formation of PIC micelles at varying charge ratios, exhibiting a quick time constant (τ1) relating to the formation of quasi-equilibrium micelles and a slow time constant (τ2) corresponding to the formation of final equilibrium micelles. Upon deceasing the pH of PIC micelles from 8 to 2 at the [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] molar ratio of 1, TPE-4COOH chromophores became gradually protonated and hydrophobic. The size of micellar nanoparticles underwent a remarkable decrease, whereas the fluorescence intensity exhibited a further increase by approximately 7.35-fold, presumably because of the formation of HBC micelles comprising cationic PQDMA

  11. Observations of Ellerman bomb emission features in He i D3 and He i 10 830 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libbrecht, Tine; Joshi, Jayant; Rodríguez, Jaime de la Cruz; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Ramos, Andrés Asensio

    2017-01-01

    Context. Ellerman bombs (EBs) are short-lived emission features, characterised by extended wing emission in hydrogen Balmer lines. Until now, no distinct signature of EBs has been found in the He i 10 830 Å line, and conclusive observations of EBs in He i D3 have never been reported. Aims: We aim to study the signature of EBs in neutral helium triplet lines. Methods: The observations consisted of ten consecutive SST/TRIPPEL raster scans close to the limb, featuring the Hβ, He i D3 and He i 10 830 Å spectral regions. We also obtained raster scans with IRIS and made use of the SDO/AIA 1700 Å channel. We used Hazel to invert the neutral helium triplet lines. Results: Three EBs in our data show distinct emission signatures in neutral helium triplet lines, most prominently visible in the He i D3 line. The helium lines have two components: a broad and blueshifted emission component associated with the EB, and a narrower absorption component formed in the overlying chromosphere. One of the EBs in our data shows evidence of strong velocity gradients in its emission component. The emission component of the other two EBs could be fitted using a constant slab. Our analysis hints towards thermal Doppler motions having a large contribution to the broadening for helium and IRIS lines. We conclude that the EBs must have high temperatures to exhibit emission signals in neutral helium triplet lines. An order of magnitude estimate places our observed EBs in the range of T 2 × 104-105 K. Movies associated to Figs. 3-5 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  12. The a 3Σg+ - b 3Σu+ Continuum Emission from Electron Impact of Molecular Hydrogen in Saturn's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. D.; Johnson, P. V.; Liu, X.; Malone, C. P.; Khakoo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Shemansky et al. (2009, Planetary and Space Science 57: 1659-1670) have reported observations of hydrogen atoms flowing out of the top of Saturn's sunlit thermosphere in a confined, distinct plume of ballistic and escaping orbits, and a continuous distribution of H atoms from the top of Saturn's atmosphere to at least 45 Saturn radii (RS) in the satellite orbital plane and to 25 RS azimuthally above and below the plane. These observations have revealed the importance of the excitation of H2 by low energy electrons. H2 is efficiently excited to the triplet states by low energy electrons, and all triplet excitations result in the dissociation of H2 and the production of hot H atoms. Because of this, the electron impact excitation of H2 is an important energy deposition mechanism in the upper atmospheres of Saturn and other giant planets. The a 3Σg+ - b 3Σu continuum transition, which dominates all other H2 transitions in the 168-190 nm region, provides a unique spectral window through which the triplet transition can be observed with the Cassini spacecraft. The excitation and emission cross sections of the a 3Σg+ state and other triplet states are required for the extraction of the triplet emission and excitation rates from the apparent emission rate measured by the spacecraft. These emission and excitation rates, in turn, help to determine the energy deposition rate by electron impact excitation. Unfortunately, large discrepancies exist between published measurements of the a 3Σg+ - b 3Σu continuum transition. In order to begin to address this issue, we have recently revisited the problem by measuring electron impact induced a 3Σg+ - b 3Σu emission cross sections. We have also measured direct excitation cross sections of the triplet a 3Σg+ state. Using these, we are able to partition the excitation function into its direct and cascade components. As stated above, these results will enable improved understanding of phenomena observed in Saturn's atmosphere

  13. Imaging spectroscopy diagnosis of internal electron temperature and density distributions of plasma cloud surrounding hydrogen pellet in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Motojima, G.; Sakamoto, R.; Goto, M.; Matsuyama, A.; Yamada, H.; Mishra, J. S.

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen pellet ablation, a novel method of high-speed imaging spectroscopy has been used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for identifying the internal distribution of the electron density and temperature of the plasma cloud surrounding the pellet. This spectroscopic system consists of a five-branch fiberscope and a fast camera, with each objective lens having a different narrow-band optical filter for the hydrogen Balmer lines and the background continuum radiation. The electron density and temperature in the plasma cloud are obtained, with a spatial resolution of about 6 mm and a temporal resolution of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s, from the intensity ratio measured through these filters. To verify the imaging, the average electron density and temperature also have been measured from the total emission by using a photodiode, showing that both density and temperature increase with time during the pellet ablation. The electron density distribution ranging from 10{sup 22} to 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and the temperature distribution around 1 eV have been observed via imaging. The electron density and temperature of a 0.1 m plasma cloud are distributed along the magnetic field lines and a significant electron pressure forms in the plasma cloud for typical experimental conditions of the LHD.

  14. Imaging spectroscopy diagnosis of internal electron temperature and density distributions of plasma cloud surrounding hydrogen pellet in the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Motojima, G; Sakamoto, R; Goto, M; Matsuyama, A; Mishra, J S; Yamada, H

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen pellet ablation, a novel method of high-speed imaging spectroscopy has been used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for identifying the internal distribution of the electron density and temperature of the plasma cloud surrounding the pellet. This spectroscopic system consists of a five-branch fiberscope and a fast camera, with each objective lens having a different narrow-band optical filter for the hydrogen Balmer lines and the background continuum radiation. The electron density and temperature in the plasma cloud are obtained, with a spatial resolution of about 6 mm and a temporal resolution of 5 × 10(-5) s, from the intensity ratio measured through these filters. To verify the imaging, the average electron density and temperature also have been measured from the total emission by using a photodiode, showing that both density and temperature increase with time during the pellet ablation. The electron density distribution ranging from 10(22) to 10(24) m(-3) and the temperature distribution around 1 eV have been observed via imaging. The electron density and temperature of a 0.1 m plasma cloud are distributed along the magnetic field lines and a significant electron pressure forms in the plasma cloud for typical experimental conditions of the LHD.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide gas emissions in the human-occupied zone during disturbance and removal of stored spent mushroom compost.

    PubMed

    Velusami, B; Curran, T P; Grogan, H M

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas levels were monitored in the human-occupied zone at four spent mushroom compost (SMC) storage sites during removal of SMC for application on agricultural land. During SMC removal operations, H2S gas monitors were mounted on the outside of the tractor positioned at the SMC periphery, and worn by individual tractor drivers. The highest H2S concentrations (10 s average) detected outside the tractor, at the SMC periphery, and for the tractor driver were, respectively, 454, 249, and 100 ppm for the outdoor sites and 214, 75, and 51 ppm for the indoor sites. The highest short-term exposure values (STEV over a 15 min period) outside the tractor at the SMC periphery, and for the tractor driver were 147, 55, and 86 ppm for the outdoor sites and 19, 9, and 10 ppm for the indoor sites. The values exceeded the current maximum permissible concentration limit of 10 ppm for all the sites except for the SMC periphery and tractor driver at the indoor sites. Results suggest that H2S levels detected at indoor storage sites during SMC removal are lower compared to outdoor storage sites. Results indicate that there is a substantial health and safety risk associated with working in the vicinity of stored SMC when it is being disturbed and removed for land application, and that the risk is great for the tractor driver. This article discusses possible control measures and lists recommendations to reduce the risks.

  16. Analysis of photon emission from 50--350-keV proton impact on H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Timpone, Stephanie A.; Monce, Michael N.; Mitchell, Laurel; Griffin, Brian

    2011-04-01

    We have measured photon emission cross sections from neutral fragments produced by collisions of 50-350 keV protons with H2O molecules. Balmer α-δ emissions from both the target and projectile were recorded. We also analyzed A2Σ+-X2Π (0,0) and (1,0) emission from the excited OH fragment produced during target dissociation. Trends in the cross sections revealed two key properties of the collision process: (1) The Bethe theory accurately describes target emission from both H and OH fragments and (2) the ratio of any two Balmer emission cross sections for both the target and projectile can be approximated by simple functions of the respective optical oscillator strengths. Finally, we provide the Bethe fit parameters necessary to calculate the target emission cross sections at all nonrelativistic impact energies.

  17. Control of Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor); Chung, Landy (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce NOx emissions, as well as SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions, from combustion flue gas streams.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Balmer break galaxies at z<1.5 star formation (Diaz Tello+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C.; Padilla, N.; Akiyama, M.; Fujishiro, N.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hanami, H.

    2016-05-01

    The galaxies presented in this article come from a sample constructed to study star formation activity of massive galaxies in the redshift range z=0.1-3.0 (Diaz Tello et al., 2013ApJ...771....7D; hereafter D13). The chosen field, the SXDF (RA=02:18:00, DE=-05:00:00; Furusawa et al., 2008, Cat. J/ApJS/176/1) has the advantage that deep photometric data is available in the bands u, B, R, i, z (Subaru), J, H, K (UKIRT), and in all MIR Spitzer bands. The parent sample was selected using the λ3646 Balmer and λ4000 break features as tracers of redshift, as described by Daddi et al. (2004ApJ...617..746D), utilizing the BzK color-color diagram to select star-forming galaxies in a particular redshift range. Furthermore, we used two color-color diagrams to select star-forming galaxies in a lower redshift range than the BzK diagram; these diagrams were presented in Hanami et al. (2012PASJ...64...70H; uVi and uRJ diagrams). (1 data file).

  19. Simultaneous K- and L-band Spectroscopy of Be Stars: Circumstellar Envelope Properties from Hydrogen Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granada, A.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L. S.

    2010-05-01

    We present medium-resolution K- and L-band spectra of a sample of eight Be stars, obtained with Gemini/NIRI. The IR K and L bands contain many lines of different hydrogen series that are used as a diagnosis to the physical conditions in the circumstellar environments. We make an analysis on the optical depths of the line-forming regions based on the intensity ratios of Pfγ and Brα lines, the behavior of Humphreys' series, and the fluxes of Brα and Brγ lines. All our targets show spectroscopic and photometric long-term variability; thus, time-resolved K- and L-band spectroscopy is an ideal tool for studying the structure and evolution of the innermost regions of the envelope and to test models on the disk-forming mechanism. We note that the instrumental configuration used allowed us to obtain good quality IR observations and to take profit of Gemini band 3 observing time (allocation time for ranked programs in which the observing conditions are relaxed). Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  20. Hα imaging spectroscopy of Balmer-dominated shocks in Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic, Sladjana; Laesker, Ronald; van de Ven, Glenn; Font-Serra, Joan; Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Beckman, John

    2016-06-01

    We present Fabry-Pérot interferometric observations of the narrow Hα component in the shock front of the historical supernova remnant Tycho (SN 1572). Using GHαFaS (Galaxy Hα Fabry-Pérot Spectrometer) on the William Herschel Telescope, we observed a great portion of the shock front in the northeastern (NE) region of the remnant. The angular resolution of ~1" and spectral resolving power of R~21 000 together with the large field-of-view (3.4' × 3.4') of the instrument allow us to measure the narrow Hα -line width in 73 bins across individual parts of the shock simultaneously and thereby study the indicators of several shock precursors in a large variety of shock front conditions. Compared to previous studies, the detailed spatial resolution of the filament also allows us to mitigate possible artificial broadening of the line from unresolved differential motion and projection. Covering one quarter of the remnant's shell, we confirm the broadening of the narrow Hα line beyond its intrinsic width of ~20 km/s and report it to extend over most of the filament, not only the previously investigated dense 'knot g'. Similarly, we confirm and find additional strong evidence for wide-spread intermediate-line (~150 km/s) emission. Our Bayesian analysis approach allows us to quantify the evidence for this intermediate component as well as a possible split in the narrow line. Suprathermal narrow line widths point toward an additional heating mechanism in the form of a cosmic-ray precursor, while the intermediate component, previously only qualitatively reported as a small non-Gaussian contribution to the narrow component, reveals a broad-neutral precursor.

  1. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of anti-tetrol and syn-tetrol dissolved in liquid chloroform II: infrared emission spectra, vibrational excited-state lifetimes, and nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2013-11-21

    The effect of vibrational excitation and relaxation of the hydroxyl stretch on the hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics of stereoselectively synthesized syn-tetrol and anti-tetrol dissolved in deuterated chloroform are investigated via a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation. Emphasis is placed on the changes in hydrogen-bond structure upon photoexcitation and the nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics that follows the subsequent relaxation from the excited to the ground vibrational state. The propensity to form hydrogen bonds is shown to increase upon photoexcitation of the hydroxyl stretch, thereby leading to a sizable red-shift of the infrared emission spectra relative to the corresponding absorption spectra. The vibrational excited state lifetimes are calculated within the framework of Fermi's golden rule and the harmonic-Schofield quantum correction factor, and found to be sensitive reporters of the underlying hydrogen-bond structure. The energy released during the relaxation from the excited to the ground state is shown to break hydrogen bonds involving the relaxing hydroxyl. The spectral signature of this nonequilibrium relaxation process is analyzed in detail.

  2. Characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by vibrational stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-12-01

    We report here the characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from a gas-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). A 6.5-m hydrogen-filled ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power, narrow linewidth, linearly polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064-nm microchip laser, generating a pulsed vibrational Stokes wave at 1908.5 nm. The maximum quantum efficiency of about 48% is obtained, which is mainly limited by the mode mismatch between the pump laser beam and the Stokes wave in the hollow-core fiber. The linewidths of the pump laser and the first-order vibrational Stokes wave are measured to be about 1 and 2 GHz, respectively, by a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The pressure selection phenomenon of the vibrational anti-Stokes waves is also investigated. The pulse duration of the vibrational Stokes wave is recorded to be narrower than that of the pump laser. The polarization properties of the hollow-core fiber and the polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational SRS are also studied. The beam profile of the vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality.

  3. Soft X-ray continuum radiation from low-energy pinch discharges of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R.; Booker, R.; Lu, Y.; Lu

    2013-10-01

    Under a study contracted by GEN3 Partners, spectra of high current pinch discharges in pure hydrogen and helium were recorded in the extreme ultraviolet radiation region at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in an attempt to reproduce experimental results published by BlackLight Power, Inc. (BLP) showing predicted continuum radiation due to hydrogen in the 10-30 nm region (Mills, R. L. and Lu, Y. 2010 Hydrino continuum transitions with cutoffs at 22.8 nm and 10.1 nm. Int. J. Hydrog. Energy 35, 8446-8456, doi:10.1016?j.ijhydene.2010.05.098). Alternative explanations were considered to the claimed interpretation of the continuum radiation as being that emitted during transitions of H to lower-energy states (hydrinos). Continuum radiation was observed at CfA in the 10-30 nm region that matched BLP's results. Considering the low energy of 5.2 J per pulse, the observed radiation in the energy range of about 120-40 eV, reference experiments and analysis of plasma gases, cryofiltration to remove contaminants, and spectra of the electrode metal, no conventional explanation was found in the prior or present work to be plausible including contaminants, electrode metal emission, and Bremsstrahlung, ion recombination, molecular or molecular ion band radiation, and instrument artifacts involving radicals and energetic ions reacting at the charge-coupled device and H2 re-radiation at the detector chamber. Moreover, predicted selective extraordinarily high-kinetic energy H was observed by the corresponding Doppler broadening of the Balmer α line.

  4. Development of a multichannel Fourier-transform spectrometer to measure weak chemiluminescence: Application to the emission of singlet-oxygen dimol in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide with gallic acid and K 3[Fe(CN) 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukino, Kazuo; Satoh, Toshihiro; Ishii, Hiroshi; Nakata, Munetaka

    2008-05-01

    A Fourier-transform spectrometer equipped with a Savart-plate polarization interferometer was developed for observation of weak chemiluminescence and applied to a measurement of emission spectra in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide with gallic acid and K 3[Fe(CN) 6]. The band appearing at ˜580 nm in the chemiluminescence spectrum was assigned to the emission of singlet-oxygen dimol, the peak wavelength being shifted from that observed in the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with sodium hypochlorite, ˜633 nm. The band intensity was increased with the increasing concentration of K 3[Fe(CN) 6] up to ˜100 mM, and thereafter the peak wavelength was shifted from 580 to 700 nm with a decrease in the intensity.

  5. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  6. Hydrogen-powered flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.

    2005-01-01

    As the Nation moves towards a hydrogen economy the shape of aviation will change dramatically. To accommodate a switch to hydrogen the aircraft designs, propulsion, and power systems will look much different than the systems of today. Hydrogen will enable a number of new aircraft capabilities from high altitude long endurance remotely operated aircraft (HALE ROA) that will fly weeks to months without refueling to clean, zero emissions transport aircraft. Design and development of new hydrogen powered aircraft have a number of challenges which must be addressed before an operational system can become a reality. While the switch to hydrogen will be most outwardly noticeable in the aircraft designs of the future, other significant changes will be occurring in the environment. A switch to hydrogen for aircraft will completely eliminate harmful greenhouse gases such as carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur oxides (SOx), unburnt hydrocarbons and smoke. While these aircraft emissions are a small percentage of the amount produced on a daily basis, their placement in the upper atmosphere make them particularly harmful. Another troublesome gaseous emission from aircraft is nitrogen oxides (NOx) which contribute to ozone depletion in the upper atmosphere. Nitrogen oxide emissions are produced during the combustion process and are primarily a function of combustion temperature and residence time. The introduction of hydrogen to a gas turbine propulsion system will not eliminate NOx emissions; however the wide flammability range will make low NOx producing, lean burning systems feasible. A revolutionary approach to completely eliminating NOx would be to fly all electric aircraft powered by hydrogen air fuel cells. The fuel cells systems would only produce water, which could be captured on board or released in the lower altitudes. Currently fuel cell systems do not have sufficient energy densities for use in large aircraft, but the long term potential of eliminating

  7. Oscillator strength spectrum of hydrogen in strong magnetic and electric fields with arbitrary mutual orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Xiaoxu

    2006-08-15

    We present oscillator strength spectra of the hydrogen Balmer {alpha} series in crossed strong magnetic and electric fields. Field strength regimes of interest ({gamma}{<=}0.02 a.u. and F{<=}1x10{sup 8} V/m) are the characteristic strengths observed on the surface of white dwarf stars. Based on the pseudospectral discretization technique, two independent methods have been developed to achieve reliable oscillator strengths in crossed fields. The effect of relative orientation between the magnetic and electric fields is clarified. Compared to the parallel configuration, we have observed that for the field strength regimes of interest, the perpendicular component of electric fields only results in a weaker coupling between the states belonging to the different subspaces of magnetic quantum numbers. This observation explains why the spectrum of oscillator strengths in crossed electric and magnetic fields with arbitrary mutual orientation shows similar behavior compared to that in parallel fields. However, a careful analysis shows that the two stronger transition lines at 5546 and 5620 A ring previously attributed to the Balmer {alpha} series are now identified to belong to the Balmer {beta} series. An effective scheme has also been suggested to calculate the bound-free opacities of hydrogen atoms in crossed fields.

  8. White-light continuum emission from solar flare and plages: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Heinzel, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Observations of flares in optical continuum emission are very rare. Therefore, the analysis of such observations is very useful and may contribute to our understanding of the flaring chromosphere. We study the white-light continuum emission observed during the X6.9 flare observed on August 09, 2011. This emission comes not only from the flare ribbons but also form the nearby plage area observed within the active region. The main aim of this work is to disentangle the flare and plage emission and to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the production of white-light continuum.There are two main mechanisms which can be responsible for the optical continuum emission of the solar atmosphere: enhanced photospheric H- continuum due to the temperature increase below the temperature minimum region, or hydrogen recombination continua (Balmer, Paschen) formed in solar chromosphere. In our work we analyse the physical conditions in solar active atmosphere in order to obtain the contribution from these two mechanisms to the whole continuum emission of the flare and plage.We analyzed the spatial, spectral and temporal evolution study of the flare and plage parameters by analyzing multi-wavelength observations obtained from ground and space based solar observatories. We study the morphological correlation of the white-light continuum emission observed with different instruments. Moreover, we also explore the non-thermal electron beam properties by forward fitting the observed X-ray spectra.The unique opportunity of an intense X6.9 flare occurrence close to the limb enabled us to explore the origin of white-light continuum with better visibility. The analysis of multi-wavelength data revealed the origin of this emission from the foot-points of the loops. Spatial association of HXR foot-points synthesized from RHESSI observations confirmed this finding. In addition, we found a good temporal correlation of hard (>30 keV) X-ray with the white-light emission. However

  9. Hydrogen Fire Spectroscopy Issues Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    The detection of hydrogen fires is important to the aerospace community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has devoted significant effort to the development, testing, and installation of hydrogen fire detectors based on ultraviolet, near-infrared, mid-infrared, andor far-infrared flame emission bands. Yet, there is no intensity calibrated hydrogen-air flame spectrum over this range in the literature and consequently, it can be difficult to compare the merits of different radiation-based hydrogen fire detectors.

  10. The contribution of dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines in hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of molecular dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines is considered for a steady-state hydrogen plasma. If the contribution of dissociative processes is dominant, a substantial simplification in plasma diagnostics can be achieved. Numerical calculations have been performed for the production of Balmer alpha, beta, and gamma lines in hydrogen plasmas with medium and large degrees of ionization (x greater than about 0.0001) and for electron temperatures of 5000-45,000 K and electron densities of 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 16th/cu cm.

  11. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  12. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, STAR FORMATION, AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN BALMER BREAK GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C.; Padilla, N.; Fujishiro, N.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hanami, H.; Hatsukade, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic study with the derivation of the physical properties of 37 Balmer break galaxies, which have the necessary lines to locate them in star-forming-active galactic nuclei (AGNs) diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies span a redshift range from 0.045 to 0.93 and are somewhat less massive than similar samples of previous works. The studied sample has multiwavelength photometric data coverage from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer bands. We investigate the connection between star formation and AGN activity via optical, mass-excitation (MEx), and MIR diagnostic diagrams. Through optical diagrams, 31 (84%) star-forming galaxies, two (5%) composite galaxies, and three (8%) AGNs were classified, whereas from the MEx diagram only one galaxy was classified as AGN. A total of 19 galaxies have photometry available in all the IRAC/Spitzer bands. Of these, three AGN candidates were not classified as AGN in the optical diagrams, suggesting they are dusty/obscured AGNs, or that nuclear star formation has diluted their contributions. By fitting the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies, we derived the stellar masses, dust reddening E(B - V), ages, and UV star formation rates (SFRs). Furthermore, the relationship between SFR surface density ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) and stellar mass surface density per time unit ({Sigma}{sub M{sub */{tau}}}) as a function of redshift was investigated using the [O II] {lambda}3727, 3729, H{alpha} {lambda}6563 luminosities, which revealed that both quantities are larger for higher redshift galaxies. We also studied the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) versus stellar mass and color relations, with the more massive galaxies having higher SFR values but lower SSFR values than less massive galaxies. These results are consistent with previous ones showing that, at a given mass, high-redshift galaxies have on average larger SFR and SSFR values than low-redshift galaxies. Finally, bluer galaxies have larger SSFR values than redder

  13. Physical Properties, Star Formation, and Active Galactic Nucleus Activity in Balmer Break Galaxies at 0 < z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C.; Padilla, N.; Fujishiro, N.; Hanami, H.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hatsukade, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic study with the derivation of the physical properties of 37 Balmer break galaxies, which have the necessary lines to locate them in star-forming-active galactic nuclei (AGNs) diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies span a redshift range from 0.045 to 0.93 and are somewhat less massive than similar samples of previous works. The studied sample has multiwavelength photometric data coverage from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer bands. We investigate the connection between star formation and AGN activity via optical, mass-excitation (MEx), and MIR diagnostic diagrams. Through optical diagrams, 31 (84%) star-forming galaxies, two (5%) composite galaxies, and three (8%) AGNs were classified, whereas from the MEx diagram only one galaxy was classified as AGN. A total of 19 galaxies have photometry available in all the IRAC/Spitzer bands. Of these, three AGN candidates were not classified as AGN in the optical diagrams, suggesting they are dusty/obscured AGNs, or that nuclear star formation has diluted their contributions. By fitting the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies, we derived the stellar masses, dust reddening E(B - V), ages, and UV star formation rates (SFRs). Furthermore, the relationship between SFR surface density (ΣSFR) and stellar mass surface density per time unit (\\Sigma _{M_{\\ast }/\\tau }) as a function of redshift was investigated using the [O II] λ3727, 3729, Hα λ6563 luminosities, which revealed that both quantities are larger for higher redshift galaxies. We also studied the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) versus stellar mass and color relations, with the more massive galaxies having higher SFR values but lower SSFR values than less massive galaxies. These results are consistent with previous ones showing that, at a given mass, high-redshift galaxies have on average larger SFR and SSFR values than low-redshift galaxies. Finally, bluer galaxies have larger SSFR values than redder galaxies and for a given

  14. Hydrogen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veziroglu, T.N.; Zhu, Y.; Bao, D.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on hydrogen fuels. Topics considered at the symposium included hydrogen from fossil fuels, electrolysis, photolytic hydrogen generation, thermochemical and photochemical methods of hydrogen production, catalysts, hydrogen biosynthesis, novel and hybrid methods of hydrogen production, storage and handling, metal hydrides and their characteristics, utilization, hydrogen fueled internal combustion engines, hydrogen gas turbines, hydrogen flow and heat transfer, fuel cells, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels, thermal energy transfer, hydrogen purification, research programs, economics, primary energy sources, environmental impacts, and safety.

  15. The coronal structure of Speedy Mic - II. Prominence masses and off-disc emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstone, N. J.; Collier Cameron, A.; Barnes, J. R.; Jardine, M.

    2006-12-01

    Observations of stellar prominences on young rapidly rotating stars provide unique probes of their magnetic fields out to many stellar radii. We compare two independently obtained data sets of the K3 dwarf Speedy Mic (BO Mic, HD 197890) using the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT). Taken more than a fortnight apart, they provide the first insight into the evolution of the prominence system on such a young rapidly rotating star. The largest prominences observed transiting the stellar disc are found at very similar rotational phases between the epochs. This suggests that the magnetic structures supporting the prominences retain their identity on a two to three week time-scale. By taking advantage of the high signal-to-noise ratio and large wavelength range of the VLT observations, we identify prominences as transient absorption features in all lines of the hydrogen Balmer series down to H10. We use the ratios of the prominence equivalent widths (EWs) in these lines to determine their column densities in the first excited state of hydrogen. We determine the optical depths, finding prominences to be rather optically thick (τ ~ 20) in the Hα line. The total hydrogen column density and thus the prominence masses are determined via observations of the CaII H&K lines. We find typical masses for four of the largest prominences to be in the range 0.5-2.3 × 1014 kg, slightly larger than giant solar prominence masses. Rotationally modulated emission is seen outside of the Hα line. These loops of emission are shown to be caused by prominences seen off the stellar disc. We find that all of the large emission loops can be associated with prominences we see transiting the stellar disc. This, combined with the fact that many prominences appear to eclipse the off-disc emission of others, strongly suggests that the prominence system is highly flattened and likely confined to low stellar latitudes. Based on

  16. Spectroscopic and NMR identification of novel hydride ions in fractional quantum energy states formed by an exothermic reaction of atomic hydrogen with certain catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R.; Ray, P.; Dhandapani, B.; Good, W.; Jansson, P.; Nansteel, M.; He, J.; Voigt, A.

    2004-10-01

    2K+ to K + K2+ and K to K3+ provide a reaction with a net enthalpy equal to one and three times the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, respectively. The presence of these gaseous ions or atoms with thermally dissociated hydrogen formed a so-called resonance transfer (rt)-plasma having strong VUV emission with a stationary inverted Lyman population. Significant line broadening of the Balmer α , β , and γ lines of 18 eV was observed, compared to 3 4 eV from a hydrogen microwave plasma. Emission from rt-plasmas occurred even when the electric field applied to the plasma was zero. The reaction was exothermic since excess power of 20 mW cm-3 was measured by Calvet calorimetry. An energetic catalytic reaction was proposed involving a resonant energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and 2K+ or K to form very stable novel hydride ions H-(1/p) called hydrino hydrides having a fractional principal quantum numbers p = 2 and p = 4, respectively. Characteristic emission was observed from K2+ and K3+ that confirmed the resonant nonradiative energy transfer of 27.2 eV and 3 × 27.2 eV from atomic hydrogen to 2K+ and K, respectively. The product hydride ion H-(1/4) was observed spectroscopically at 110 nm corresponding to its predicted binding energy of 11.2 eV. The 1H MAS NMR spectrum of novel compound KH*Cl relative to external tetramethylsilane (TMS) showed a large distinct upfield resonance at 4.4 corresponding to an absolute resonance shift of 35.9 ppm that matched the theoretical prediction of p = 4. A novel peak of KH*I at 1.5 ppm relative to TMS corresponding to an absolute resonance shift of 33.0 ppm matched the theoretical prediction of p = 2. The predicted catalyst reactions, position of the upfield-shifted NMR peaks for H-(1/4) and H-(1/2), and spectroscopic data for H-(1/4) were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations as well as previously reported spectroscopic data for H-(1/2) and analysis of KH*Cl and KH*I containing these hydride ions.

  17. Measurement and analysis of atomic hydrogen and diatomic molecular AlO, C2, CN, and TiO spectra following laser-induced optical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Parigger, Christian G; Woods, Alexander C; Witte, Michael J; Swafford, Lauren D; Surmick, David M

    2014-02-14

    In this work, we present time-resolved measurements of atomic and diatomic spectra following laser-induced optical breakdown. A typical LIBS arrangement is used. Here we operate a Nd:YAG laser at a frequency of 10 Hz at the fundamental wavelength of 1,064 nm. The 14 nsec pulses with anenergy of 190 mJ/pulse are focused to a 50 µm spot size to generate a plasma from optical breakdown or laser ablation in air. The microplasma is imaged onto the entrance slit of a 0.6 m spectrometer, and spectra are recorded using an 1,800 grooves/mm grating an intensified linear diode array and optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) or an ICCD. Of interest are Stark-broadened atomic lines of the hydrogen Balmer series to infer electron density. We also elaborate on temperature measurements from diatomic emission spectra of aluminum monoxide (AlO), carbon (C2), cyanogen (CN), and titanium monoxide (TiO). The experimental procedures include wavelength and sensitivity calibrations. Analysis of the recorded molecular spectra is accomplished by the fitting of data with tabulated line strengths. Furthermore, Monte-Carlo type simulations are performed to estimate the error margins. Time-resolved measurements are essential for the transient plasma commonly encountered in LIBS.

  18. Measurement and Analysis of Atomic Hydrogen and Diatomic Molecular AlO, C2, CN, and TiO Spectra Following Laser-induced Optical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.; Witte, Michael J.; Swafford, Lauren D.; Surmick, David M.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present time-resolved measurements of atomic and diatomic spectra following laser-induced optical breakdown. A typical LIBS arrangement is used. Here we operate a Nd:YAG laser at a frequency of 10 Hz at the fundamental wavelength of 1,064 nm. The 14 nsec pulses with anenergy of 190 mJ/pulse are focused to a 50 µm spot size to generate a plasma from optical breakdown or laser ablation in air. The microplasma is imaged onto the entrance slit of a 0.6 m spectrometer, and spectra are recorded using an 1,800 grooves/mm grating an intensified linear diode array and optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) or an ICCD. Of interest are Stark-broadened atomic lines of the hydrogen Balmer series to infer electron density. We also elaborate on temperature measurements from diatomic emission spectra of aluminum monoxide (AlO), carbon (C2), cyanogen (CN), and titanium monoxide (TiO). The experimental procedures include wavelength and sensitivity calibrations. Analysis of the recorded molecular spectra is accomplished by the fitting of data with tabulated line strengths. Furthermore, Monte-Carlo type simulations are performed to estimate the error margins. Time-resolved measurements are essential for the transient plasma commonly encountered in LIBS. PMID:24561875

  19. DUST EXTINCTION FROM BALMER DECREMENTS OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT 0.75 {<=} z {<=} 1.5 WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WIDE-FIELD-CAMERA 3 SPECTROSCOPY FROM THE WFC3 INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC PARALLEL SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, A.; Siana, B.; Masters, D.; Henry, A. L.; Martin, C. L.; Scarlata, C.; Bedregal, A. G.; Malkan, M.; Ross, N. R.; Atek, H.; Colbert, J. W.; Teplitz, H. I.; Rafelski, M.; McCarthy, P.; Hathi, N. P.; Dressler, A.; Bunker, A.

    2013-02-15

    Spectroscopic observations of H{alpha} and H{beta} emission lines of 128 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.75 {<=} z {<=} 1.5 are presented. These data were taken with slitless spectroscopy using the G102 and G141 grisms of the Wide-Field-Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel survey. Interstellar dust extinction is measured from stacked spectra that cover the Balmer decrement (H{alpha}/H{beta}). We present dust extinction as a function of H{alpha} luminosity (down to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}), galaxy stellar mass (reaching 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun }), and rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent width. The faintest galaxies are two times fainter in H{alpha} luminosity than galaxies previously studied at z {approx} 1.5. An evolution is observed where galaxies of the same H{alpha} luminosity have lower extinction at higher redshifts, whereas no evolution is found within our error bars with stellar mass. The lower H{alpha} luminosity galaxies in our sample are found to be consistent with no dust extinction. We find an anti-correlation of the [O III] {lambda}5007/H{alpha} flux ratio as a function of luminosity where galaxies with L {sub H{alpha}} < 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} are brighter in [O III] {lambda}5007 than H{alpha}. This trend is evident even after extinction correction, suggesting that the increased [O III] {lambda}5007/H{alpha} ratio in low-luminosity galaxies is likely due to lower metallicity and/or higher ionization parameters.

  20. Determination of the hydrogen-bonding induced local viscosity enhancement in room temperature ionic liquids via femtosecond time-resolved depleted spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaonan; Yan, Linyin; Wang, Xuefei; Guo, Qianjin; Xia, And Andong

    2011-07-14

    The fluorescence depletion dynamics of Rhodamine 700 (R-700) molecules in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([emim][BF(4)]) and 1-hydroxyethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([HOemim][BF(4)]) were investigated to determine the local viscosity of the microenvironment surrounding the fluorescent molecules, which is induced by strong hydrogen bonding interaction between cationic and anionic components in RTILs. The solvation and rotation dynamics of R-700 molecules in RTILs show slower time constants relative to that in conventional protic solvents with the same bulk viscosity, indicating that the probe molecule is facing a more viscous microenvironment in RTILs than in conventional solvents because of the strong hydrogen bonding interaction between cationic and anionic components. In addition, this effect is more pronounced in hydroxyl-functionalized ionic liquid than in the regular RTIL due to the presence of a hydroxyl group as a strong hydrogen bonding donor. The hydrogen-bonding-induced local viscosity enhancement effect related to the heterogeneity character of RTILs is confirmed by the nonexponential rotational relaxation of R-700 determined by time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC). The geometry of hydrogen bonding complexes with different components and sizes are further optimized by density functional theory methods to show the possible hydrogen-bond networks. A model of the hydrogen-bonding network in RTILs is further proposed to interpret the observed specific solvation and local viscosity enhancement effect in RTILs, where most of the fluoroprobes exist as the free nonbonding species in the RTIL solutions and are surrounded by the hydrogen-bonding network formed by the strong hydrogen-bonding between the cationic and anionic components in RTIL. The optimized geometry of hydrogen bonding complexes with different components and sizes by density functional theory methods confirms the local

  1. Modeling of neutrals in the Linac4 H(-) ion source plasma: hydrogen atom production density profile and Hα intensity by collisional radiative model.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Shibata, T; Ohta, M; Yasumoto, M; Nishida, K; Hatayama, A; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Sawada, K; Fantz, U

    2014-02-01

    To control the H(0) atom production profile in the H(-) ion sources is one of the important issues for the efficient and uniform surface H(-) production. The purpose of this study is to construct a collisional radiative (CR) model to calculate the effective production rate of H(0) atoms from H2 molecules in the model geometry of the radio-frequency (RF) H(-) ion source for Linac4 accelerator. In order to validate the CR model by comparison with the experimental results from the optical emission spectroscopy, it is also necessary for the model to calculate Balmer photon emission rate in the source. As a basic test of the model, the time evolutions of H(0) production and the Balmer Hα photon emission rate are calculated for given electron energy distribution functions in the Linac4 RF H(-) ion source. Reasonable test results are obtained and basis for the detailed comparisons with experimental results have been established.

  2. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Joseph [Encino, CA; Oberg, Carl L [Canoga Park, CA; Russell, Larry H [Agoura, CA

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1100.degree. to 1900.degree. C., while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products.

  3. Non-LTE hydrogen-line formation in moving prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinzel, P.; Rompolt, B.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of hydrogen-line brightness variations, depending on the prominence-velocity changes were investigated. By solving the NON-Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) problem for hydrogen researchers determine quantitatively the effect of Doppler brightening and/or Doppler dimming (DBE, DDE) in the lines of Lyman and Balmer series. It is demonstrated that in low-density prominence plasmas, DBE in H alpha and H beta lines can reach a factor of three for velocities around 160 km/sec, while the L alpha line exhibits typical DDE. L beta brightness variations follow from a combined DBE in the H alpha and DDE in L alpha and L beta itself, providing that all relevant multilevel interlocking processes are taken into account.

  4. Spin Changing Collisions of Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygelman, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    We discuss spin changing collisions of hydrogen atoms. Employing a fully quantal theory we calculate and present new collision data. We discuss the respective roles of spin exchange and long range magnetic interactions in collisonal redistribution of sub-level populations. The calculated atomic data is needed for accurate modeling of 21 cm line emission/absorption by primordial hydrogen in the early universe.

  5. Spatial Correlation between Dust and Hα Emission in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy; Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino; Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola; Salmon, Brett; Forrest, Ben

    2016-07-01

    Using a sample of dwarf irregular galaxies selected from the ALFALFA blind H i-survey and observed using the VIMOS IFU, we investigate the relationship between Hα emission and Balmer optical depth ({τ }{{b}}). We find a positive correlation between Hα luminosity surface density and Balmer optical depth in 8 of 11 at ≥0.8σ significance (6 of 11 at ≥1.0σ) galaxies. Our spaxels have physical scales ranging from 30 to 80 pc, demonstrating that the correlation between these two variables continues to hold down to spatial scales as low as 30 pc. Using the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient to test for correlation between {{{Σ }}}{{H}α } and {τ }{{b}} in all the galaxies combined, we find ρ =0.39, indicating a positive correlation at 4σ significance. Our low stellar-mass galaxy results are in agreement with observations of emission line regions in larger spiral galaxies, indicating that this relationship is independent of the size of the galaxy hosting the emission line region. The positive correlation between Hα luminosity and Balmer optical depth within spaxels is consistent with the hypothesis that young star-forming regions are surrounded by dusty birth-clouds. Based on VLT service mode observations (Programs 081.B-0649 and 083.B-0662) gathered at the European Southern Observatory, Chile.

  6. The First Reported Infrared Emission from the SN1006 Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    We report results of infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the SN 1006 remnant, carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24 m image from MIPS clearly shows faint filamentary emission along the northwest rim of the remnant shell, nearly coincident with the Balmer filaments that delineate the present position of the expanding shock. The 24 m emission traces the Balmer filaments almost perfectly, but lies a few arcsec within, indicating an origin in interstellar dust heated by the shock. Subsequent decline in the IR behind the shock is presumably due largely to grain destruction through sputtering. The emission drops far more rapidly than current models predict, however, even for a higher proportion of small grains than would be found closer to the Galactic plane. The rapid drop may result in part from a grain density that has always been lowera relic effect from an earlier epoch when the shock was encountering a lower densitybut higher grain destruction rates still seem to be required. Spectra from three positions along the NW filament from the IRS instrument all show only a featureless continuum, consistent with thermal emission from warm dust. The dust-to-gas mass ratio in the pre-shock interstellar medium is lower than that expected for the Galactic ISM-as has also been observed in the analysis of IR emission from other SNRs but whose cause remains unclear. As with other SNIa remnants, SN1006 shows no evidence for dust grain formation in the supernova ejecta.

  7. A high-resolution field-emission-gun, scanning electron microscope investigation of anisotropic hydrogen decrepitation in Nd-Fe-B-based sintered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderznik, Marko; McGuiness, Paul; Zuzek-Rozman, Kristina; Škulj, Irena; Yan, Gaolin; Kobe, Spomenka

    2010-05-01

    In this investigation commercial magnets based on (Nd,Dy)14(Fe,Co)79B7 were prepared by a conventional powder-metallurgy route with a degree of alignment equal to ˜90% and then exposed to hydrogen at a pressure of 1 bar. The magnets, in the form of cylinders, were observed to decrepitate exclusively from the ends. High-resolution electron microscopy was able to identify the presence of crack formation within the Nd2Fe14B grains, with the cracks running parallel to the c axis of these grains. Based on the concentration profile for hydrogen in a rare-earth transition-metal material, it is clear that the presence of hydrogen-induced cracks running perpendicular to the ends of the magnet provides for a much more rapidly progressing hydrogen front in this direction than from the sides of the magnet. This results in the magnet exhibiting a macroscopic tendency to decrepitate from the poles of the magnet toward the center. This combination of microstructural modification via particle alignment as part of the sintering process and direct observation via high-resolution electron microscopy has led to a satisfying explanation for the anisotropic hydrogen-decrepitation effect.

  8. Advanced hydrogen utilization technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J C; Winsor, R E

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the results of a study done by Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC). DDC used a 6V-92TA engine for experiments with hydrogen fuel. The engine was first baseline tested using methanol fuel and methanol unit injectors. One cylinder of the engine was converted to operate on hydrogen fuel, and methanol fueled the remaining five cylinders. This early testing with only one hydrogen-fueled cylinder was conducted to determine the operating parameters that would later be implemented for multicylinder hydrogen operation. Researchers then operated three cylinders of the engine on hydrogen fuel to verify single-cylinder idle tests. Once it was determined that the engine would operate well at idle, the engine was modified to operate with all six cylinders fueled with hydrogen. Six-cylinder operation on hydrogen provided an opportunity to verify previous test results and to more accurately determine the performance, thermal efficiency, and emissions of the engine.

  9. Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers (LOHCs): Toward a Hydrogen-free Hydrogen Economy.

    PubMed

    Preuster, Patrick; Papp, Christian; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-17

    The need to drastically reduce CO2 emissions will lead to the transformation of our current, carbon-based energy system to a more sustainable, renewable-based one. In this process, hydrogen will gain increasing importance as secondary energy vector. Energy storage requirements on the TWh scale (to bridge extended times of low wind and sun harvest) and global logistics of renewable energy equivalents will create additional driving forces toward a future hydrogen economy. However, the nature of hydrogen requires dedicated infrastructures, and this has prevented so far the introduction of elemental hydrogen into the energy sector to a large extent. Recent scientific and technological progress in handling hydrogen in chemically bound form as liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) supports the technological vision that a future hydrogen economy may work without handling large amounts of elemental hydrogen. LOHC systems are composed of pairs of hydrogen-lean and hydrogen-rich organic compounds that store hydrogen by repeated catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation cycles. While hydrogen handling in the form of LOHCs allows for using the existing infrastructure for fuels, it also builds on the existing public confidence in dealing with liquid energy carriers. In contrast to hydrogen storage by hydrogenation of gases, such as CO2 or N2, hydrogen release from LOHC systems produces pure hydrogen after condensation of the high-boiling carrier compounds. This Account highlights the current state-of-the-art in hydrogen storage using LOHC systems. It first introduces fundamental aspects of a future hydrogen economy and derives therefrom requirements for suitable LOHC compounds. Molecular structures that have been successfully applied in the literature are presented, and their property profiles are discussed. Fundamental and applied aspects of the involved hydrogenation and dehydrogenation catalysis are discussed, characteristic differences for the catalytic conversion of

  10. RESOLVED SHOCK STRUCTURE OF THE BALMER-DOMINATED FILAMENTS IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT: COSMIC-RAY PRECURSOR?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Park, Sangwook; Raymond, John C.; Korreck, Kelly; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Winkler, P. F.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the results from H{alpha} imaging observations of the eastern limb of Tycho's supernova remnant (SN1572) using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We resolve the detailed structure of the fast, collisionless shock wave into a delicate structure of nearly edge-on filaments. We find a gradual increase of H{alpha} intensity just ahead of the shock front, which we interpret as emission from the thin ({approx}1'') shock precursor. We find that a significant amount of the H{alpha} emission comes from the precursor and that this could affect the amount of temperature equilibration derived from the observed flux ratio of the broad and narrow H{alpha} components. The observed H{alpha} emission profiles are fit using simple precursor models, and we discuss the relevant parameters. We suggest that the precursor is likely due to cosmic rays and discuss the efficiency of cosmic-ray acceleration at this position.

  11. Two-photon decay of excited levels in hydrogen: The ambiguity of the separation of cascades and pure two-photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Labzowsky, L.; Solovyev, D.; Plunien, G.

    2009-12-15

    The problem of the evaluation of the two-photon decay width of excited states in hydrogen is considered. Two different approaches to the evaluation of the width including cascades channels are employed: the summation of the transition probabilities for various decay channels and the evaluation of the imaginary part of the Lamb shift. As application, the two-photon decay channels for the 3s level of the hydrogen atom are evaluated, including the cascade transition probability 3s-2p-1s. An important role is assigned to the two-photon decays in astrophysics context, since processes of this kind provide a possibility for the decoupling of radiation and matter in the early universe. We demonstrate the ambiguity of separation of the 'pure' two-photon contribution and criticize the existing methods for such a separation.

  12. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Adlhart, O. J.

    1985-04-23

    This disclosure relates to a replaceable cartridge hydrogen generator of the type which relies at least partially on the process of anodic corrosion to produce hydrogen. A drum contains a plurality of the cartridges.

  13. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in the particulate and gas phase from smoldering mosquito coils containing various atomic hydrogen/carbon ratios.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzu-Ting; Lin, Shaw-Tao; Lin, Tser-Sheng; Chung, Hua-Yi

    2015-02-15

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in particulate and gas phases generated from smoldering mosquito coils containing various atomic H/C ratios were examined. Five types of mosquito coils were burned in a test chamber with a total airflow rate of 8.0 L/min at a constant relative humidity and temperature. The concentrations of individual PAHs were determined using the GC/MS technique. Among the used mosquito coils, the atomic H/C ratio ranged from 1.23 to 1.57, yielding total mass, gaseous, and particulate PAH emission factors of 28.17-78.72 mg/g, 26,139.80-35,932.98 and 5735.22-13,431.51 ng/g, respectively. The various partitions of PAHs in the gaseous and particulate phases were in the ranges, 70.26-83.70% and 16.30-29.74% for the utilized mosquito coils. The carcinogenic potency of PAH emissions in the particulate phase (203.82-797.76 ng/g) was approximately 6.92-25.08 times higher than that of the gaseous phase (26.27-36.07 ng/g). Based on the analyses of PAH emissions, mosquito coils containing the lowest H/C ratio, a low oxygen level, and additional additives (i.e., CaCO3) are recommended for minimizing the production of total PAH emission factors and carcinogenic potency.

  14. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  15. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  16. Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well as the technical challenges and research goals for storing hydrogen on board a vehicle.

  17. 40 CFR 98.163 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.163 Calculating GHG emissions. You must calculate and report the annual process CO2 emissions from each hydrogen production process unit... factor from kg to metric tons. (c) If GHG emissions from a hydrogen production process unit are...

  18. A Classical Description of the Hyperfine Structure of the Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Andrea; Espinosa, James; Woodyard, James

    2010-10-01

    As stronger dispersion gratings are utilized, the Hydrogen spectrum is broken into small groupings. At first, the fine structure was successfully described by Sommerfeld by utilizing the special theory of relativity. The fine structure groupings are three orders of magnitude smaller than the series separations as described by Balmer and others. With even further powerful instruments, Michelson was the first to split these lines into further groupings which are a further two orders of magnitude smaller. It was almost fifty years before Breit used quantum mechanics to describe this hyperfine structure. It is almost universally believed that classical theory utterly fails to describe this phenomenon. We will show how our classical Hydrogen atom based on Ritz's magnetic model can account for the splitting of the 1s state, which is famous for its use by radio astronomers to map out the distribution of hydrogen in the universe.

  19. Emissions of greenhouse gases, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide from pigs fed standard diets and diets supplemented with dried distillers grains with solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine growers are increasingly supplementing animal diets with dried distillers grains soluble (DDGS) to offset cost of a typical corn-soybean meal diet. An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of DDGS diets on both on manure composition and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), ammoni...

  20. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, J.; Oberg, C. L.; Russell, L. H.

    1981-06-23

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

  1. The Distribution of Hydrogen, Nitrogen, and Chlorine Radicals in the Lower Stratosphere: Implications for Changes in O3 due to Emission of NO(y) from Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R. S.; Keim, E. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Koplow, P.; Kohn, D. W.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Pfister, L.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Michelsen, H. A.; Yue, G. K.; Wilson, J. C.; Brock, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    In situ measurements of hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine radicals obtained in the lower stratosphere during the Stratospheric Photochemistry, Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) are compared to results from a photochemical model that assimilates measurements of radical precursors and environmental conditions. Models allowing for heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 agree well with measured concentrations of NO and ClO, but concentrations of HO2 and OH are underestimated by 10 to 25%, concentrations of NO2 are overestimated by 10 to 30%, and concentrations of HCl are overestimated by a factor of 2. Discrepancies for [OH] and [HO2] are reduced if we allow for higher yields of O(sup 1)D) from 03 photolysis and for heterogeneous production of HNO2. The data suggest more efficient catalytic removal of O3 by hydrogen and halogen radicals relative to nitrogen oxide radicals than predicted by models using recommended rates and cross sections. Increases in [O3] in the lower stratosphere may be larger in response to inputs of NO(sub y) from supersonic aircraft than estimated by current assessment models.

  2. The distribution of hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine radicals in the lower stratosphere: Implications for changes in O3 due to emission of NO(y) from supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; We-Nnberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R. S.; Keim, E. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Stimpfle, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    In situ measurements of hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine radicals obtained in the lower statosphere during SPADE are compared to results from a photochemical model that assimilates measurements of radical precursors and environmental conditions. Models allowing for heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 agree well with measured concentrations of NO and ClO, but concentrations of HO2 and OH are underestimated by 10 to 25%, concentrations of NO2 are overestimated by 10 to 30%, and concentrations of HCl are overestimated by a factor of 2. Discrepancies for (OH) and (HO2) are reduced if we allow for higher yields of O((1)D) from O2 photolysis and for heterogeneous production of HNO2. The data suggest more efficent catalytic removal of O3 by hydrogen and halogen radicals relative to nitrogen oxide radicals than predicted by models using recommendend rates and cross sections. Increased in (O3) in the lower stratosphere may be larger in response to inputs of NO(y) from supersonic aircraft than estimated by current assessment models.

  3. Hydrogenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and the 2940 and 2850 Wavenumber (3.40 and 3.51 micron) Infrared Emission Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamadola, Louis J.

    1996-01-01

    The 3150-2700/cm (3.17-3.70 micron) range of the spectra of a number of Ar-matrix-isolated PAHs containing excess H atoms (H(sub n)-PAHS) are presented. This region covers features produced by aromatic and aliphatic C-H stretching vibrations as well as overtone and combination bands involving lower lying fundamentals. The aliphatic C-H stretches in molecules of this type having low to modest excess H coverage provide excellent fits to a number of the weak emission features superposed on the plateau between 3080 and 2700/cm (3.25 and 3.7 micron) in the spectra of many planetary nebulae, reflection nebulae, and H II regions. Higher H coverage is implied for a few objects. We compare these results in context with the other suggested identifications of the emission features in the 2950-2700/cm (3.39-3.70 micron) region and briefly discuss their astrophysical implications.

  4. Emissions of the natural acidic substance in the acid rain region: Dimethyl sulfide and hydrogen sulfide in the region of Xiamen, China

    SciTech Connect

    Yubao Wang; Miaoqin Lu

    1996-12-31

    The global anthropogenic emissions of sulfur, mainly SO2, are relatively well studied for most of the industrialized world, and relatively little is known to date about natural sulfur emission sources, such as, coastal waters and wetland. The most important atmospheric sulfur compounds originating from biogeochemical sources are DMS and H{sub 2}S. Previous studies suggest that biogenic DMS is mainly emitted from oceanic phytoplankton species. The global emission of sulfur by this process was estimated to be 40 Tg S/year. Major sources of biogenic H{sub 2}S in the atmosphere are believed to be bacterial sulfate reduction in anoxic soils and degradation of organic matter. The mentioned reduced sulfur compounds are partially oxidation in the troposphere to SO{sub 2} and further to sulfur acid, another strong acid produced from DMS oxidation is methane sulphonic acid (CH{sub 3}S(O{sub 2})OH). These compounds are strong acid and will influence the pH of precipitation and will be the important impact in acid rain phenomena.

  5. Photo-electron emission and atomic force microscopies of the hydrogen etched 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) surface and the initial growth of GaN and AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Naniwae, K.; Petrich, C.; Nemanich, R. J.; Davis, R. F.

    2005-04-01

    Photo-emission electron microscopy (PEEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to characterize the surfaces of hydrogen etched 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) wafers and the microstructure of the initial stages of growth of GaN and AlN on these surfaces via molecular beam epitaxy. The PEEM images were obtained using a free electron laser as the photon source. A stepped structure was evident in these images of the surfaces etched at 1600-1700 °C for 15 min. Comparison with the AFM images revealed that emission was occurring from the intersection of the steps and the terraces. Images of the initial stages of deposition of the GaN thin films at 700 and 800 °C revealed three-dimensional island growth. The degree of coalescence of these films was dependent upon the step structure: regions containing steps having unit cell height exhibited complete or nearly complete coalescence; regions containing steps with half unit cell height showed voids in the films parallel to the steps. PEEM of the initial stages of growth of AlN revealed immediate nucleation and rapid coalescence during deposition at 900 °C, except in areas on the substrate surface containing steps having half unit cell height. Incomplete coalescence and pits were also observed in the latter areas.

  6. Hydrogen-enrichment-concept preliminary evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    A hydrogen-enriched fuels concept for automobiles is described and evaluated in terms of fuel consumption and engine exhaust emissions through multicylinder (V-8) automotive engine/hydrogen generator tests, single cylinder research engine (CFR) tests, and hydrogen-generator characterization tests. Analytical predictions are made of the fuel consumption and NO/sub x/ emissions which would result from anticipated engine improvements. The hydrogen-gas generator, which was tested to quantify its thermodynamic input-output relationships was used for integrated testing of the V-8 engine and generator.

  7. Hydrogen and OUr Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Tidball; Stu Knoke

    2009-03-01

    In 2003, President George W. Bush announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to accelerate the research and development of hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies that would enable hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to reach the commercial market in the 2020 timeframe. The widespread use of hydrogen can reduce our dependence on imported oil and benefit the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutant emissions that affect our air quality. The Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, reinforces Federal government support for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Title VIII, also called the 'Spark M. Matsunaga Hydrogen Act of 2005' authorizes more than $3.2 billion for hydrogen and fuel cell activities intended to enable the commercial introduction of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2020, consistent with the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. Numerous other titles in the Act call for related tax and market incentives, new studies, collaboration with alternative fuels and renewable energy programs, and broadened demonstrations--clearly demonstrating the strong support among members of Congress for the development and use of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. In 2006, the President announced the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI) to accelerate research on technologies with the potential to reduce near-term oil use in the transportation sector--batteries for hybrid vehicles and cellulosic ethanol--and advance activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The AEI also supports research to reduce the cost of electricity production technologies in the stationary sector such as clean coal, nuclear energy, solar photovoltaics, and wind energy.

  8. Hydrogen energy progress 5678

    SciTech Connect

    Veziroglu, T.N. )

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of the 8th World Hydrogen Energy Conference, and includes: international hydrogen energy programs; hydrogen production; storage of hydrogen; hydrogen transmission and distribution; combustion systems/hydrogen engines; fuel cells; and synfuel production.

  9. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.R.

    1984-06-19

    A hydrogen generator decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen, and includes an induction coil which is electrically heated to a temperature sufficient to decompose water passing therethrough. A generator coil is connected in communicating relation to the induction coil, and is positioned in a fire resistant crucible containing ferrous oxide pellets. Oxygen and hydrogen produced by decomposition of water pass through the ferrous oxide pellets where the oxygen reacts with the ferrous oxide and the hydrogen is burned to produce heat for heating a building, such as a conventional home.

  10. Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap identifies research pathways leading to hydrogen production technologies that produce near-zero net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from highly efficient and diverse renewable energy sources. This roadmap focuses on initial development of the technologies, identifies their gaps and barriers, and describes activities by various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offices to address the key issues and challenges.

  11. Optical hydrogen absorption consistent with a bow shock around the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam G.; Barman, Travis; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.

    Hot Jupiters, i.e., Jupiter-mass planets with orbital semi major axes of <10 stellar radii, can interact strongly with their host stars. If the planet is moving supersonically through the stellar wind, a bow shock will form ahead of the planet where the planetary magnetosphere slams into the the stellar wind or where the planetary outflow and stellar wind meet. Here we present high resolution spectra of the hydrogen Balmer lines for a single transit of the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b. Transmission spectra of the Balmer lines show strong absorption ~70 minutes before the predicted optical transit, implying a significant column density of excited hydrogen orbiting ahead of the planet. We show that a simple geometric bow shock model is able to reproduce the important features of the absorption time series while simultaneously matching the line profile morphology. Our model suggests a large planetary magnetic field strength of ~28 G. Follow-up observations are needed to confirm the pre-transit signal and investigate any variability in the measurement.

  12. Hydrogen-enriched fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, R.

    1998-08-01

    NRG Technologies, Inc. is attempting to develop hardware and infrastructure that will allow mixtures of hydrogen and conventional fuels to become viable alternatives to conventional fuels alone. This commercialization can be successful if the authors are able to achieve exhaust emission levels of less than 0.03 g/kw-hr NOx and CO; and 0.15 g/kw-hr NMHC at full engine power without the use of exhaust catalysts. The major barriers to achieving these goals are that the lean burn regimes required to meet exhaust emissions goals reduce engine output substantially and tend to exhibit higher-than-normal total hydrocarbon emissions. Also, hydrogen addition to conventional fuels increases fuel cost, and reduces both vehicle range and engine output power. Maintaining low emissions during transient driving cycles has not been demonstrated. A three year test plan has been developed to perform the investigations into the issues described above. During this initial year of funding research has progressed in the following areas: (a) a cost effective single-cylinder research platform was constructed; (b) exhaust gas speciation was performed to characterize the nature of hydrocarbon emissions from hydrogen-enriched natural gas fuels; (c) three H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} fuel compositions were analyzed using spark timing and equivalence ratio sweeping procedures and finally; (d) a full size pick-up truck platform was converted to run on HCNG fuels. The testing performed in year one of the three year plan represents a baseline from which to assess options for overcoming the stated barriers to success.

  13. Solar hydrogen for urban trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Provenzano, J.: Scott, P.B.; Zweig, R.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Air Now (CAN) Solar Hydrogen Project, located at Xerox Corp., El Segundo, California, includes solar photovoltaic powered hydrogen generation, compression, storage and end use. Three modified Ford Ranger trucks use the hydrogen fuel. The stand-alone electrolyzer and hydrogen dispensing system are solely powered by a photovoltaic array. A variable frequency DC-AC converter steps up the voltage to drive the 15 horsepower compressor motor. On site storage is available for up to 14,000 standard cubic feet (SCF) of solar hydrogen, and up to 80,000 SCF of commercial hydrogen. The project is 3 miles from Los Angeles International airport. The engine conversions are bored to 2.9 liter displacement and are supercharged. Performance is similar to that of the Ranger gasoline powered truck. Fuel is stored in carbon composite tanks (just behind the driver`s cab) at pressures up to 3600 psi. Truck range is 144 miles, given 3600 psi of hydrogen. The engine operates in lean burn mode, with nil CO and HC emissions. NO{sub x} emissions vary with load and rpm in the range from 10 to 100 ppm, yielding total emissions at a small fraction of the ULEV standard. Two trucks have been converted for the Xerox fleet, and one for the City of West Hollywood. A public outreach program, done in conjunction with the local public schools and the Department of Energy, introduces the local public to the advantages of hydrogen fuel technologies. The Clean Air Now program demonstrates that hydrogen powered fleet development is an appropriate, safe, and effective strategy for improvement of urban air quality, energy security and avoidance of global warming impact. Continued technology development and cost reduction promises to make such implementation market competitive.

  14. Hydrogen Emission and Macromolecular Radiation-Induced Defects in Polyethylene Irradiated under an Inert Atmosphere: The Role of Energy Transfers toward trans-Vinylene Unsaturations.

    PubMed

    Ventura, A; Ngono-Ravache, Y; Marie, H; Levavasseur-Marie, D; Legay, R; Dauvois, V; Chenal, T; Visseaux, M; Balanzat, E

    2016-10-06

    This article is aimed at studying the evolution of H2 release as well as radiation-induced defects in polyethylene (PE), as a function of the irradiation dose under anoxic conditions. We analyze the influence of the energy transfers and trapping toward radiation-induced defects on the evolution of the radiation chemical yields with dose. One key objective herein is to quantify the contribution of these transfers toward trans-vinylene (TV) on H2 emission. For this purpose, pure PE was irradiated in a large dose domain and H2 emission was compared to that in predoped PEs containing chemically inserted TV groups irradiated at low doses. In parallel, evolutions of the concentrations of the TV groups and minor defects (vinyl and trans-trans-diene) as a function of dose were considered. Moreover, measuring simultaneously H2 and unsaturated groups had allowed inferring the cross-linking evolution with dose. With this methodology, we have succeeded in quantifying the efficiency of TVs and cross-links as energy traps and, using simple models, in fully describing the evolution of all of the radiation chemical yields. Besides, irradiations were performed using either low linear energy transfer irradiations (electron beams, γ rays) or ion beams, with the objective to assess the influence of the high ionization and excitation densities induced by the latter on PE ageing and energy transfer processes.

  15. The Herbig AE star AB AUR - absorption along the line of sight and chromospheric emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felenbok, P.; Praderie, F.; Talavera, A.

    1983-11-01

    The H-alpha, He I 5876 A, Na I 5890 A, Ca II IR triplet, and P14-P16 Paschen lines of AB Aur are all brighter than the nearby continuum. The emission lines are examined with regard to their origin as either recombination or chromospheric emission. While He I and H-alpha could be formed simultaneously by recombination under certain circumstances, a deep chromosphere would account for He I 5876, for the Paschen lines in emission, and perhaps even for the Ca II IR triplet in emission. A deep chromosphere would also explain why higher Balmer lines are in absorption and why the Ca II resonance lines have only an autoreversed emission core, despite not being fully in emission.

  16. Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.D.

    1996-03-01

    Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

  17. Hydrogen Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  18. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor); Chung, J. Landy (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. The methods and apparatus may further be modified to reduce NOx emissions. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals. Where removal of NOx emissions is included, nitric acid may also be isolated for use in fertilizer or other industrial applications.

  19. Novel Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer

    2011-02-27

    To reduce dependence on oil and emission of greenhouse gases, hydrogen is favored as an energy carrier for the near future. Hydrogen can be converted to electrical energy utilizing fuel cells and turbines. One way to produce hydrogen is to gasify coal which is abundant in the U.S. The coal gasification produces syngas from which hydrogen is then separated. Designing metallic alloys for hydrogen separation membranes which will work in a syngas environment poses significant challenges. In this presentation, a review of technical targets, metallic membrane development activities at NETL and challenges that are facing the development of new technologies will be given.

  20. Hydrogen carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  1. STRONG RESPONSE OF THE VERY BROAD H{beta} EMISSION LINE IN THE LUMINOUS RADIO-QUIET QUASAR PG 1416-129

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Li, Y.

    2011-11-20

    We report new spectroscopic observations performed in 2010 and 2011 for the luminous radio-quiet quasar PG 1416-129. Our new spectra with high quality cover both H{beta} and H{alpha} regions, and show negligible line profile variation within a timescale of one year. The two spectra allow us to study the variability of the Balmer line profile by comparing the spectra with previous ones taken at 10 and 20 years ago. By decomposing the broad Balmer emission lines into two Gaussian profiles, our spectral analysis suggests a strong response to the continuum level for the very broad component, and significant variations in both bulk blueshift velocity/FWHM and flux for the broad component. The new observations additionally indicate flat Balmer decrements (i.e., too strong H{beta} emission) at the line wings, which is hard to reproduce using recent optically thin models. With these observations we argue that a separate inner optically thin emission-line region might not be necessary in the object to reproduce the observed line profiles.

  2. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Farthing; G. T. Amrhein; G. A. Kudlac; D. A. Yurchison; D. K. McDonald; M. G. Milobowski

    2001-03-31

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. This objective is being met by identifying ways to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (fabric filters), and wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  3. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Farthing

    2001-02-06

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  4. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J

  5. Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydorgen/Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two-time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (> 1 x 10(exp -20) moles/cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/air fuel and for the H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA s Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T4) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T3). High values of the regression coefficient R2 are obtained.

  6. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce NOx, SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of NOx, SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid and nitric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals.

  7. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Dias, Ranga; Noked, Ori; Salamat, Ashkan; Zaghoo, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    One of the great challenges in condensed matter physics has been to produce metallic hydrogen (MH) in the laboratory. There are two approaches: solid molecular hydrogen can be compressed to high density at extreme pressures of order 5-6 megabars. The transition to MH should take place at low temperatures and is expected to occur as a structural first-order phase transition with dissociation of molecules into atoms, rather than the closing of a gap. A second approach is to produce dense molecular hydrogen at pressures of order 1-2 megabars and heat the sample. With increasing temperature, it was predicted that molecular hydrogen first melts and then dissociates to atomic metallic liquid hydrogen as a first-order phase transition. We have observed this liquid-liquid phase transition to metallic hydrogen, also called the plasma phase transition. In low-temperature studies, we have pressurized HD to over 3 megabars and observed two new phases. Molecular hydrogen has been pressurized to 4.2 megabars. A new phase transition has been observed at 3.55 megabars, but it is not yet metallic.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic for temperature and velocity measurements in a hydrogen arcjet plume.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, J G; Hanson, R K; Cappelli, M A

    1993-10-20

    A diagnostic has been developed to measure velocity and translational temperature in the plume of a 1-kW-class arcjet thruster operating on hydrogen. Laser-induced fluorescence with a narrow-band cw laser is used to probe the Balmer α transition of excited atomic hydrogen. The velocity is determined from the Doppler shift of the fluorescence excitation spectrum, whereas the temperature is inferred from the lineshape. Analysis shows that although Doppler broadening is the only significant broadening mechanism, the fine structure of the transition must be taken into account. Near the exit plane, axial velocities vary from 4 to 14 km/s, radial velocities vary from 0 to 4 km/s, and swirl velocities are shown to be relatively small. Temperatures from 1000 to 5000 K indicate high dissociation fractions.

  9. Possibility of nonexistence of hot and superhot hydrogen atoms in electrical discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Loureiro, J.; Amorim, J.

    2010-09-15

    Recently, the existence of extremely energetic hydrogen atoms in electrical discharges has been proposed in the literature with large controversy, from the analysis of the anomalous broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. In this paper, the velocity distribution of H atoms and the profiles of the emitting atom lines created by the exothermic reaction H{sub 2}{sup +}+H{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 3}{sup +}+H+{Delta}E are calculated, as a function of the internal energy defect {Delta}E. The shapes found for the non-Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions resulting in non-Gaussian line profiles raise serious arguments against the existence of hot and superhot H atoms as it has been proposed, at least with those temperatures.

  10. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  11. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    This project was a collaborative effort involving researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), drawing on the experience and expertise of both research organizations. The goal of this study was to assess selected hydrogen technologies for potential application to transportation and power generation. Specifically, this study evaluated scenarios for deploying hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. One study objective was to identify the most promising near-term and long-term hydrogen vehicle technologies based on performance, efficiency, and emissions profiles and compare them to traditional vehicle technologies. Hydrogen vehicle propulsion may take many forms, ranging from hydrogen or hythane fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) to fuel cells and fuel cell hybrid systems. This study attempted to developed performance and emissions profiles for each type (assuming a light duty truck platform) so that effective deployment strategies can be developed. A second study objective was to perform similar cost, efficiency, and emissions analysis related to hydrogen infrastructure deployment in the Southeast. There will be many alternative approaches for the deployment of hydrogen fueling infrastructure, ranging from distributed hydrogen production to centralized production, with a similar range of delivery options. This study attempted to assess the costs and potential emissions associated with each scenario. A third objective was to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen fuel cell technologies for stationary power generation and to identify the advantages and limits of different technologies. Specific attention was given to evaluating different fuel cell membrane types. A final objective was to promote the use and deployment of hydrogen technologies in the Southeast. This effort was to include establishing partnerships with industry as well promoting educational and outreach efforts to public

  12. Hydrogen effects on material behavior; Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on the Effect of Hydrogen on the Behavior of Materials, Moran, WY, Sept. 12-15, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, N.R.; Thompson, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses hydrogen permeation, trapping, and transport in metals, hydrogen-induced phase transformations, hydrogen embrittlement studies on stainless steels, hydrogen effects on advanced materials, hydrogen-associated fracture processes, crack growth susceptibility, and hydrogen-resistant engineering alloys and applications. Attention is given to the behavior of hydrogen in evaporated metal films, hydrogen diffusivity in alpha-beta Zr alloys, acoustic emissions from steels containing hydrogen, synergistic effects of He and H isotopes in FCC metals, hydrogen transport by dislocations in Al alloys, the effect of hydrogen precipitation in an Al-{sup 9}Mg alloy, hydrogen effects on Ti oxidation in water vapor, hydrogen effects on the behavior of duplex stainless steels, hydrogen embrittlement of superalloys, hydrogen embrittlement of TiAl alloys, hydrogen-enhanced decohesion in Fe-Si single crystals, cathodic hydrogen embrittlement of a duplex stainless steel, and hydrogen embrittlement in lean uranium alloys.

  13. 40 CFR 98.163 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.163 Calculating GHG emissions. You must calculate and report the annual CO2 emissions from each hydrogen production process unit using the... associated with each fuel and feedstock used for hydrogen production by following paragraphs (b)(1)...

  14. 40 CFR 98.163 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.163 Calculating GHG emissions. You must calculate and report the annual CO2 emissions from each hydrogen production process unit using the... associated with each fuel and feedstock used for hydrogen production by following paragraphs (b)(1)...

  15. 40 CFR 98.163 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.163 Calculating GHG emissions. You must calculate and report the annual CO2 emissions from each hydrogen production process unit using the... associated with each fuel and feedstock used for hydrogen production by following paragraphs (b)(1)...

  16. 40 CFR 98.163 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.163 Calculating GHG emissions. You must calculate and report the annual CO2 emissions from each hydrogen production process unit using the... associated with each fuel and feedstock used for hydrogen production by following paragraphs (b)(1)...

  17. THE FIRST REPORTED INFRARED EMISSION FROM THE SN 1006 REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, P. Frank; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Raymond, John C. E-mail: brian.j.williams@nasa.gov E-mail: kborkow@ncsu.edu E-mail: pghavamian@towson.edu E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-02-20

    We report results of infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the SN 1006 remnant, carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24 {mu}m image from Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer clearly shows faint filamentary emission along the northwest rim of the remnant shell, nearly coincident with the Balmer filaments that delineate the present position of the expanding shock. The 24 {mu}m emission traces the Balmer filaments almost perfectly but lies a few arcsec within, indicating an origin in interstellar dust heated by the shock. Subsequent decline in the IR behind the shock is presumably due largely to grain destruction through sputtering. The emission drops far more rapidly than current models predict, however, even for a higher proportion of small grains than would be found closer to the Galactic plane. The rapid drop may result in part from a grain density that has always been lower-a relic effect from an earlier epoch when the shock was encountering a lower density-but higher grain destruction rates still seem to be required. Spectra from three positions along the NW filament from the Infrared Spectrometer instrument all show only a featureless continuum, consistent with thermal emission from warm dust. The dust-to-gas mass ratio in the pre-shock interstellar medium (ISM) is lower than that expected for the Galactic ISM-as has also been observed in the analysis of IR emission from other supernova remnants, but whose cause remains unclear. As with other Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) remnants, SN 1006 shows no evidence for dust grain formation in the SN ejecta.

  18. Comparative costs and benefits of hydrogen vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.D.

    1996-10-01

    The costs and benefits of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel are compared to gasoline, natural gas, and battery-powered vehicles. Costs, energy, efficiency, and tail-pipe and full fuel cycle emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases were estimated for hydrogen from a broad range of delivery pathways and scales: from individual vehicle refueling systems to large stations refueling 300 cars/day. Hydrogen production from natural gas, methanol, and ammonia, as well as water electrolysis based on alkaline or polymer electrolytes and steam electrolysis using solid oxide electrolytes are considered. These estimates were compared to estimates for competing fuels and vehicles, and used to construct oil use, air pollutant, and greenhouse gas emission scenarios for the U.S. passenger car fleet from 2005-2050. Fuel costs need not be an overriding concern in evaluating the suitability of hydrogen as a fuel for passenger vehicles. The combined emissions and oil import reduction benefits of hydrogen cars are estimated to be significant, valued at up to {approximately}$400/yr for each hydrogen car when primarily clean energy sources are used for hydrogen production. These benefits alone, however, become tenuous as the basis supporting a compelling rationale for hydrogen fueled vehicles, if efficient, advanced fossil-fuel hybrid electric vehicles (HEV`s) can achieve actual on-road emissions at or below ULEV standards in the 2005-2015 timeframe. It appears a robust rationale for hydrogen fuel and vehicles will need to also consider unique, strategic, and long-range benefits of hydrogen vehicles which can be achieved through the use of production, storage, delivery, and utilization methods for hydrogen which are unique among fuels: efficient use of intermittent renewable energy sources, (e,g, wind, solar), small-scale feasibility, fuel production at or near the point of use, electrolytic production, diverse storage technologies, and electrochemical conversion to electricity.

  19. Effect of Various Factors on Hydrogen Embrittlement of Structural Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanzhin, V. G.; Turilina, V. Yu.; Rogachev, S. O.; Nikitin, A. V.; Belov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    Results of studies of hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels of different strength are presented. The effect of various factors on delayed hydrogen fracture is analyzed using the results of investigations by the methods of acoustic emission, metallography and fractography of bolts under the conditions of tension with bending after galvanic hydrogen charging.

  20. MASSIVE AND NEWLY DEAD: DISCOVERY OF A SIGNIFICANT POPULATION OF GALAXIES WITH HIGH-VELOCITY DISPERSIONS AND STRONG BALMER LINES AT z {approx} 1.5 FROM DEEP KECK SPECTRA AND HST/WFC3 IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska

    2013-02-10

    We present deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging in the rest-frame optical for a sample of eight galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 with high photometrically determined stellar masses. The data are combined with five Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter spectra. We find that these 13 galaxies have high velocity dispersions, with a median of {sigma} = 301 km s{sup -1}. This high value is consistent with their relatively high stellar masses and compact sizes. We study their stellar populations using the strength of Balmer absorption lines, which are not sensitive to dust absorption. We find a large range in Balmer absorption strength, with many galaxies showing very strong lines indicating young ages. The median H{delta}{sub A} equivalent width, determined directly or inferred from the H10 line, is 5.4 A, indicating a luminosity-weighted age of {approx}1 Gyr. Although this value may be biased toward higher values because of selection effects, high-dispersion galaxies with such young ages are extremely rare in the local universe. Interestingly, we do not find a simple correlation with rest-frame U - V color: some of the reddest galaxies have very strong Balmer absorption lines, which may indicate the importance of multiple bursts of star formation. These results demonstrate that many high-dispersion galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 were recently quenched. This implies that there must be a population of star-forming progenitors at z {approx} 2 with high velocity dispersions or linewidths, which are notoriously absent from CO/H{alpha} selected surveys.

  1. Storing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2010-05-31

    Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  2. Studies of solar photovoltaic/electrolytic hydrogen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Joan M.

    1992-12-01

    Hydrogen is a high quality, low polluting fuel, which could replace oil and natural gas for transportation, heating, and power generation. If hydrogen is generated via solar photovoltaic (PV) powered water electrolysis, it would be possible to produce and use energy on a large scale with essentially no greenhouse gas emission and very little local pollution. In previous studies, we investigated some of the implications of projected advances in thin film PV technologies for PV hydrogen production. Here we summarize our findings on the design and economics of PV hydrogen systems, and discuss potential long term applications of PV hydrogen as a transportation fuel for ``zero emissions'' fuel cell vehicles.

  3. Electron Density Measurements in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Detached Divertor Region Using Stark Broadening of Deuterium Infrared Paschen Emission Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Johnson, D W; Kaita, R; Roquemore, A L

    2007-04-27

    Spatially resolved measurements of deuterium Balmer and Paschen line emission have been performed in the divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiment using a commercial 0.5 m Czerny-Turner spectrometer. While the Balmer emission lines, Balmer and Paschen continua in the ultraviolet and visible regions have been extensively used for tokamak divertor plasma temperature and density measurements, the diagnostic potential of infrared Paschen lines has been largely overlooked. We analyze Stark broadening of the lines corresponding to 2-n and 3-m transitions with principle quantum numbers n = 7-12 and m = 10-12 using recent Model Microfield Method calculations (C. Stehle and R. Hutcheon, Astron. Astrophys. Supl. Ser. 140, 93 (1999)). Densities in the range (5-50) x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} are obtained in the recombining inner divertor plasma in 2-6 MW NBI H-mode discharges. The measured Paschen line profiles show good sensitivity to Stark effects, and low sensitivity to instrumental and Doppler broadening. The lines are situated in the near-infrared wavelength domain, where optical signal extraction schemes for harsh nuclear environments are practically realizable, and where a recombining divertor plasma is optically thin. These properties make them an attractive recombining divertor density diagnostic for a burning plasma experiment.

  4. Hydrogen program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gronich, S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  5. Emission Abatement System

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  6. Hydrogen gas purification apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagihara, N.; Gamo, T.; Iwaki, T.; Moriwaki, Y.

    1984-04-24

    A hydrogen gas purification apparatus which includes at least one set of two hydrogen purification containers coupled to each other for heat exchanging therebetween, each of the hydrogen purification containers containing a hydrogen absorbing alloy. The hydrogen gas purification apparatus is so arranged as to cause hydrogen gas to be selectively desorbed from and absorbed into the hydrogen absorbing alloy by the amount of heat produced when the hydrogen gas is selectively absorbed into and desorbed from the hydrogen absorbing alloy.

  7. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  8. Shocked Post-starbust Galaxy Survey: Candidate Post-Starbust Galaxies with Narrow Emission Line Ratios Arising from Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cales, Sabrina; Alatalo, Katherine A.; Appleton, Philip N.; Lisenfeld, Ute; Rich, Jeffrey; Nyland, Kristina; Lacy, Mark; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2015-01-01

    As galaxies age they move from the blue cloud (star forming) to the red sequence (`dead' galaxies) in the color-magnitude diagram of galaxies. Galaxies between the blue cloud and red sequence (i.e., the green valley) are caught in the act of transitioning and they show large Balmer jump and high order Balmer absorption lines in their optical spectra. These galaxies answer to many names (i.e., E+A, K+A, Hdelta-strong, post-starburst), all with similar but slightly different selection criteria. Many studies of transitioning galaxies invoke strong constraints on emission lines in order to guarantee a dominant post-starburst (rather that actively star bursting) stellar population, however these constraints bias the sample against narrow-line emission not arising from star formation, namely active galactic nuclei, low-ionization nuclear emission regions and shocks. Using the Oh-Sarzi-Schawinski-Yi (OSSY) emission and absorption line measurements for SDSS DR7 galaxies we study the intersection between transitioning galaxies and those with shock line ratios. We show that a significant fraction of transitioning galaxies have emission-line ratios indicative of shocks. We postulate that these shocks may be in part responsible for the shepherding of blue star forming galaxies to passive early-types.

  9. Angular distribution of low-energy electron emission in collisions of 6-MeV/u bare carbon ions with molecular hydrogen: Two-center mechanism and interference effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Deepankar; Kelkar, A.; Kadhane, U.; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Y. P.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Fainstein, P. D.

    2007-05-01

    We report the energy and angular distribution of electron double differential cross sections (DDCS) in collision of 6-MeV/uC6+ ions with molecular hydrogen. We explain the observed distributions in terms of the two-center effect and the Young-type interference effect. The secondary electrons having energies between 1 and 1000eV are detected at about 10 different emission angles between 30° and 150° . The measured data are compared with the state-of-the-art continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state and the first Born model calculations which use molecular wave function. The single differential cross sections are derived and compared with the theoretical predictions. The oscillations due to the interference effect are derived in the DDCS ratios using theoretical cross sections for the atomic H target. The effect of the atomic parameters on the observed oscillations is discussed. An evidence of interference effect has also been shown in the single differential cross section. The electron energy dependence of the forward-backward asymmetry parameter shows a monotonically increasing behavior for an atomic target, such as He, which could be explained in terms of the two-center effect only. In contrast, for the molecular H2 the asymmetry parameter reveals an oscillatory behavior due to the Young-type interference effect superimposed with the two-center effect. The asymmetry parameter technique provides a self-normalized method to reveal the interference oscillation which does not require either a theoretical model or complementary measurements on the atomic H target.

  10. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  11. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 03 / 005 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ( CAS No . 7783 - 06 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revie

  12. Hydrogen technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    To the non-nonsense engineer, any talk of a hydrogen economy may seem like so much hot air. This paper reports that as legislative, safety and environmental issues continue to tighten, they're promoting hydrogen's chances as an energy source and, more immediately, its prospects as a chemical feedstock. Paradoxically, the environmental demands that are stimulating hydrogen demand are also inhibiting the gas's production. Previously, gasoline was made with benzene, which means that H{sub 2} was rejected. But now that the laws mandate lower aromatic and higher oxygenate levels in gasolines, there's less H{sub 2} available as byproduct. At the same time, H{sub 2} demand is rising in hydrodesulfurization units, since the same laws require refiners to cut sulfur levels in fuels. Supplementary sources for the gas are also shrinking. In the chlor-alkali industry, H{sub 2} output is dropping, as demand for its coproduct chlorine weakens. At the same time, H{sub 2} demand for the making of hydrogen peroxide is growing, as that environmentally safer bleach gains chlorine's market share.

  13. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  14. Hydrogen powered aircraft : The future of air transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Bhupendra; Karakurt, Adam; Sekaran, Paulas R.; Sethi, Vishal; Singh, Riti

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates properties and traits of hydrogen with regard to environmental concerns and viability in near future applications. Hydrogen is the most likely energy carrier for the future of aviation, a fuel that has the potential of zero emissions. With investigation into the history of hydrogen, this study establishes issues and concerns made apparent when regarding the fuel in aero applications. Various strategies are analyzed in order to evaluate hydrogen's feasibility which includes production, storage, engine configurations and aircraft configurations.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen peroxide is used in these products: Hydrogen peroxide Hair bleach Some contact lens cleaners Note: Household hydrogen peroxide has a 3% concentration. That means it contains 97% water and 3% hydrogen peroxide. Hair ...

  16. A combined optical and X-ray study of unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei - II. Relation between X-ray emission and optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chichuan; Ward, Martin; Done, Chris

    2012-06-01

    In this second paper in a series of three, we study the properties of the various emission features and underlying continuum in the optical spectra of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by using the unobscured hard X-ray emission as a diagnostic. We introduce the use of the 'correlation spectrum technique' (CST) for the first time. We use this to show the strength of the correlation between the hard X-ray luminosity and each wavelength of the optical spectrum. This shows that for broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies all the strong emission lines (the broad component of Hα and Hβ, [Ne III] λλ3869/3967, [O I] λλ6300/6364, [O II] λλ3726/3729 and [O III] λλ4959/5007) and the optical underlying continuum all strongly correlate with the hard X-ray emission. In contrast, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies show a stronger correlation in the optical continuum but a weaker correlation in the lines. A cross-correlation with luminosity between the various Balmer line components and the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) components shows that the best correlation exists between the hard X-ray component and the broad component (BC) of the Balmer lines. Such a correlation is weaker for the intermediate (IC) and narrow components, which supports the view that the broad-line region (BLR) has the closest link with the AGN's compact X-ray emission. The equivalent widths of the Balmer line IC and BC are found to correlate with ?, ?, Balmer line full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and black hole mass. There is a non-linear dependence of the Balmer line IC and BC luminosities with ? and L5100, which suggests that a second-order factor such as the intermediate-line region (ILR) and BLR covering factors affect the Balmer line component luminosities. The Balmer decrement is found to decrease from ˜5 in the line core to ˜2 in the extended wings, with mean decrements of 2.1 in the BLR and 4.8 in the ILR. This suggests different physical conditions in these regions, such as

  17. Hydrogen forming reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Marianowski, L.G.; Fleming, D.K.

    1989-03-07

    A hydrogen forming process is described, comprising: conducting in a hydrogen production zone a chemical reaction forming mixed gases comprising molecular hydrogen; contacting one side of a hydrogen ion porous and molecular gas nonporous metallic foil with the mixed gases in the hydrogen production zone; dissociating the molecular hydrogen to ionic hydrogen on the one side of the metallic foil; passing the ionic hydrogen through the metallic foil to its other side; and withdrawing hydrogen from the other side of the metallic foil, thereby removing hydrogen from the hydrogen production zone.

  18. Dairy gas emissions model: reference manual

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Dairy Gas Emissions Model (DairyGEM) is a software tool for estimating ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of dairy production systems as influenced by climate and farm management. A production system is defined to include emissions during the production of all feeds wh...

  19. Hydrogen scavengers

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, David W.; Salazar, Kenneth V.; Trkula, Mitchell; Sandoval, Cynthia W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a codeposition process for fabricating hydrogen scavengers. First, a .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is prepared by reacting an allylic transition metal halide with an organic ligand complexed with an alkali metal; and then, in a second step, a vapor of the .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is combined with the vapor of an acetylenic compound, irradiated with UV light, and codeposited on a substrate.

  20. In vivo imaging of hydrogen peroxide with chemiluminescent nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwon; Khaja, Sirajud; Velasquez-Castano, Juan C; Dasari, Madhuri; Sun, Carrie; Petros, John; Taylor, W Robert; Murthy, Niren

    2007-10-01

    The overproduction of hydrogen peroxide is implicated in the development of numerous diseases and there is currently great interest in developing contrast agents that can image hydrogen peroxide in vivo. In this report, we demonstrate that nanoparticles formulated from peroxalate esters and fluorescent dyes can image hydrogen peroxide in vivo with high specificity and sensitivity. The peroxalate nanoparticles image hydrogen peroxide by undergoing a three-component chemiluminescent reaction between hydrogen peroxide, peroxalate esters and fluorescent dyes. The peroxalate nanoparticles have several attractive properties for in vivo imaging, such as tunable wavelength emission (460-630 nm), nanomolar sensitivity for hydrogen peroxide and excellent specificity for hydrogen peroxide over other reactive oxygen species. The peroxalate nanoparticles were capable of imaging hydrogen peroxide in the peritoneal cavity of mice during a lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response. We anticipate numerous applications of peroxalate nanoparticles for in vivo imaging of hydrogen peroxide, given their high specificity and sensitivity and deep-tissue-imaging capability.

  1. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  2. Hydrogen-Assisted IC Engine Combustion as a Route to Hydrogen Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Andre Boehman; Daniel Haworth

    2008-09-30

    The 'Freedom Car' Initiative announced by the Bush Administration has placed a significant emphasis on development of a hydrogen economy in the United States. While the hydrogen-fueled fuel-cell vehicle that is the focus of the 'Freedom Car' program would rely on electrochemical energy conversion, and despite the large amount of resources being devoted to its objectives, near-term implementation of hydrogen in the transportation sector is not likely to arise from fuel cell cars. Instead, fuel blending and ''hydrogen-assisted'' combustion are more realizable pathways for wide-scale hydrogen utilization within the next ten years. Thus, a large potential avenue for utilization of hydrogen in transportation applications is through blending with natural gas, since there is an existing market for natural-gas vehicles of various classes, and since hydrogen can provide a means of achieving even stricter emissions standards. Another potential avenue is through use of hydrogen to 'assist' diesel combustion to permit alternate combustion strategies that can achieve lower emissions and higher efficiency. This project focused on developing the underlying fundamental information to support technologies that will facilitate the introduction of coal-derived hydrogen into the market. Two paths were envisioned for hydrogen utilization in transportation applications. One is for hydrogen to be mixed with other fuels, specifically natural gas, to enhance performance in existing natural gas-fueled vehicles (e.g., transit buses) and provide a practical and marketable avenue to begin using hydrogen in the field. A second is to use hydrogen to enable alternative combustion modes in existing diesel engines, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, to permit enhanced efficiency and reduced emissions. Thus, this project on hydrogen-assisted combustion encompassed two major objectives: (1) Optimization of hydrogen-natural gas mixture composition and utilization through laboratory

  3. New potentials for conventional aircraft when powered by hydrogen-enriched gasoline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menard, W. A.; Moynihan, P. I.; Rupe, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen enrichment for aircraft piston engines is studied. The feasibility is examined of inflight injection of hydrogen in general aviation aircraft engines to reduce fuel consumption and to lower emission levels. Results are summarized.

  4. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalbegović, G.; Maksimović, A.; Mohaček-Grošev, V.

    2017-03-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the interstellar medium (ISM) have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles possess magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. FenHm nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and FenHm in the ISM.

  5. Systematic study of hydrogenation in a diamond amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Wu, Q.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Kewisch, J.; Xin, T.

    2011-06-21

    We recently developed a reliable hydrogenation procedure for the diamond amplifier that assures the generation of a high-current, high-brightness beam. In this paper, we compare room-temperature hydrogenation with that at high temperatures. We identified the factors leading to the decay of quantum efficiency. The optimum temperature for heat treatment ranged from 400-450 C; its superiority was proven in the gain test. Hydrogenated diamond amplifiers exposed to N{sub 2} and air exhibited a good emission after being heated to 350 C; the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. Our systematic study of hydrogenation resulted in the reproducible fabrication of diamond amplifiers.

  6. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  7. The extended atmosphere of Lambda Pavonis at the time of the emergence of H-emissions from minimum intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahade, Jorge; Rovira, Marta; Ringuelet, Adela E.; Kondo, Yoji; Cidale, Lydia

    1988-01-01

    A study of the Be star Lambda Pavonis, particularly of the changes in the Balmer discontinuity in the interval 1949-1982, is presented. Nearly simultaneous observations carried out with the ESO 1.5 m reflector at La Silla and with the IUE satellite correspond to an epoch when the H emission is starting to increase intensity immediately after having reached its minimum strength. These observations suggest the presence of four distinct regions of line formation, with the material moving outward in the transition region.

  8. Hydrogen delivery technology rRoadmap

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen holds the long-term potential to solve two critical problems related to the energy infrastructure: U.S. dependence on foreign oil and U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants. The U.S. transportation sector is almost completely reliant on petroleum, over half of which is currently imported, and tailpipe emissions remain one of the country’s key air quality concerns. Fuel cell vehicles operating on hydrogen produced from domestically available resources – including renewable resources, coal with carbon sequestration, or nuclear energy – would dramatically decrease greenhouse gases and other emissions, and would reduce dependence on oil from politically volatile regions of the world. Clean, domestically-produced hydrogen could also be used to generate electricity in stationary fuel cells at power plants, further extending national energy and environmental benefits.

  9. Unusual double-peaked emission in the SDSS quasar J093201.60 + 031858.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, R. S.; Lacy, C. H. S.; Kennefick, D.; Kennefick, J.; Seigar, M. S.

    2011-02-01

    We examine spectral properties of the SDSS quasar J093201.60 + 031858.7, in particular the presence of strong blue peaks in the Balmer emission lines offset from the narrow lines by approximately 4200 km s -1. Asymmetry in the broad central component of the H β line indicates the presence of a double-peaked emitter. However, the strength and sharpness of the blue H β and blue H γ peaks make this quasar spectrum unique among double-peaked emitters identified from SDSS spectra. We fit a disk model to the H β line and compare this object with other unusual double-peaked quasar spectra, particularly candidate binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Under the binary SMBH scenario, we test the applicability of a model in which a second SMBH may produce the strong blue peak in the Balmer lines of a double-peaked emitter. If there were only one SMBH, a circular, Keplerian disk model fit would be insufficient, indicating some sort of asymmetry is required to produce the strength of the blue peak. In either case, understanding the nature of the complex line emission in this object will aid in further discrimination between a single SMBH with a complex accretion disk and the actual case of a binary SMBH.

  10. DISCOVERY OF POLARIZED LINE EMISSION IN SN 1006

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Long, K. S.; Cracraft, M.; Carswell, R. F.

    2015-12-10

    Laming predicted that the narrow Balmer line core of the ∼3000 km s{sup −1} shock in the SN 1006 remnant would be significantly polarized due to electron and proton impact polarization. Here, based on deep spectrally resolved polarimetry obtained with the European Southern Observatory (ESO)’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), we report the discovery of polarized line emission with a polarization degree of 1.3% and position angle orthogonal to the SNR filament. Correcting for an unpolarized broad line component, the implied narrow line polarization is ≈2.0%, close to the predictions of Laming. The predicted polarization is primarily sensitive to shock velocity and post-shock temperature equilibration. By measuring polarization for the SN 1006 remnant, we validate and enable a new diagnostic that has important applications in a wide variety of astrophysical situations, such as shocks, intense radiation fields, high energy particle streams, and conductive interfaces.

  11. Radiation of partially ionized atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soon, W. H.; Kunc, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear collisional-radiative model for determination of production of electrons, positive and negative ions, excited atoms, and spectral and continuum line intensities in stationary partially ionized atomic hydrogen is presented. Transport of radiation is included by coupling the rate equations for production of the electrons, ions, and excited atoms with the radiation escape factors, which are not constant but depend on plasma conditions. It is found that the contribution of the negative ion emission to the total continuum emission can be important. Comparison of the calculated total continuum emission coefficient, including the negative ion emission, is in good agreement with experimental results.

  12. Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T.; Smol, Robert; Farber, Gerald; Naphtali, Leonard M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

  13. Hydrogen: the future energy carrier.

    PubMed

    Züttel, Andreas; Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas; Friedrichs, Oliver

    2010-07-28

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century the limitations of the fossil age with regard to the continuing growth of energy demand, the peaking mining rate of oil, the growing impact of CO2 emissions on the environment and the dependency of the economy in the industrialized world on the availability of fossil fuels became very obvious. A major change in the energy economy from fossil energy carriers to renewable energy fluxes is necessary. The main challenge is to efficiently convert renewable energy into electricity and the storage of electricity or the production of a synthetic fuel. Hydrogen is produced from water by electricity through an electrolyser. The storage of hydrogen in its molecular or atomic form is a materials challenge. Some hydrides are known to exhibit a hydrogen density comparable to oil; however, these hydrides require a sophisticated storage system. The system energy density is significantly smaller than the energy density of fossil fuels. An interesting alternative to the direct storage of hydrogen are synthetic hydrocarbons produced from hydrogen and CO2 extracted from the atmosphere. They are CO2 neutral and stored like fossil fuels. Conventional combustion engines and turbines can be used in order to convert the stored energy into work and heat.

  14. Spectropolarimetry of V854 Centauri at minimum light - Clues to the geometry of the dust and emission-line region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Meade, Marilyn R.

    1992-01-01

    The RCB star V854 Cen is observed during a very deep decline (Delta m = 8.2) at the AAT. The continuum polarization is very high, ranging from 14 percent at 4200 A to about 4 percent at 6500 A. The polarization decreases across the emission lines, but the polarized flux remains constant. This indicates that the emission lines are unpolarized, so the emission probably arises in a region unobscured by dust. In such a deep minimum, the visible continuum flux is probably almost entirely scattered light, which explains its high polarization. The scattered flux may arise in the same clouds contributing to the observed IR flux if the albedo is low and the grains forward throwing. The emission-line spectrum itself is very unusual for an RCB star in decline, with strong C2 bands and Balmer lines.

  15. Hydrogen energy systems studies. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.; Kartha, S.; Iwan, L.

    1996-08-13

    The results of previous studies suggest that the use of hydrogen from natural gas might be an important first step toward a hydrogen economy based on renewables. Because of infrastructure considerations (the difficulty and cost of storing, transmitting and distributing hydrogen), hydrogen produced from natural gas at the end-user`s site could be a key feature in the early development of hydrogen energy systems. In the first chapter of this report, the authors assess the technical and economic prospects for small scale technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas (steam reformers, autothermal reformers and partial oxidation systems), addressing the following questions: (1) What are the performance, cost and emissions of small scale steam reformer technology now on the market? How does this compare to partial oxidation and autothermal systems? (2) How do the performance and cost of reformer technologies depend on scale? What critical technologies limit cost and performance of small scale hydrogen production systems? What are the prospects for potential cost reductions and performance improvements as these technologies advance? (3) How would reductions in the reformer capital cost impact the delivered cost of hydrogen transportation fuel? In the second chapter of this report the authors estimate the potential demand for hydrogen transportation fuel in Southern California.

  16. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  17. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  18. An advanced negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexey A. Dobrovolsky, Andrey N.; Goretskii, Victor P.

    2016-02-15

    The results of investigation of emission productivity of negative particles source with cesiated combined discharge are presented. A cylindrical beam of negative hydrogen ions with density about 2 A/cm{sup 2} in low noise mode on source emission aperture is obtained. The total beam current values are up to 200 mA for negative hydrogen ions and up to 1.5 A for all negative particles with high divergence after source. The source has simple design and can produce stable discharge with low level of oscillation.

  19. Pathways to hydrogen as an energy carrier.

    PubMed

    Sigfusson, Thorsteinn I

    2007-04-15

    When hydrogen is used as an alternative energy carrier, it is very important to understand the pathway from the primary energy source to the final use of the carrier. This involves, for example, the understanding of greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of hydrogen and throughout the lifecycle of a given utilization pathway as well as various energy or exergy efficiencies and aspects involved. This paper which is based on a talk given at the Royal Society in London assesses and reviews the various production pathways for hydrogen with emphasis on emissions, energy use and energy efficiency. The paper also views some aspects of the breaking of the water molecule and examines some new emerging physical evidence which could pave the way to a new and more feasible pathway. A special attention will be given to the use of the renewable energy pathway. As an example of a hydrogen society that could be based on renewable primary energy, the paper describes the hydrogen society experiments in Iceland as well as unconventional hydrogen obtained from geothermal gases. In the light of our experience, attempts will be made to shed light upon drivers as well as obstacles in the development of a hydrogen society.

  20. Colorado Hydrogen Imaging Rocket Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgh, Eric B.; France, K.

    2009-01-01

    We present the design for a rocket-borne narrow-band far-ultraviolet imaging telescope. It will measure the spatial distribution of photo-excited molecular hydrogen emission nearby hot stars by utilizing multi-layer reflection coatings, similar to those used in previous NASA experiments, to obtain two images during a flight: one with a narrow-band filter that captures the 1575/1608A emission features (the "on-band" filter), and a second one that measures the dust-scattered stellar continuum at 1800A (the "off-band" filter). The difference image will then isolate the molecular hydrogen emission by subtracting the underlying scattered-light background. This would be a large improvement over existing studies at ultraviolet wavelengths for which many individual pointings with spectroscopic apertures are required to map the region of interest. These data will complete the picture, combined with far-ultraviolet spectra and near-infrared observations of vibrational emission that we will obtain from ground-based instrumentation, of the physical conditions in sites of recent and on-going star formation. A sounding rocket payload such as this provides the opportunity to perform niche science that other facilities cannot as well as advances the readiness of junior researchers to assume leadership roles on future NASA space flight missions.

  1. 40 CFR 86.143-96 - Calculations; evaporative emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission...) f=final reading. (J) 1=First impinger. (K) 2=Second impinger. (L) Assuming a hydrogen to carbon...= 16.88 g/ft3, density of pure vapor at 68 °F (for hydrogen to carbon ratio of 2.3). (C)...

  2. 40 CFR 86.143-96 - Calculations; evaporative emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission...) f=final reading. (J) 1=First impinger. (K) 2=Second impinger. (L) Assuming a hydrogen to carbon...= 16.88 g/ft3, density of pure vapor at 68 °F (for hydrogen to carbon ratio of 2.3). (C)...

  3. Hydrogen engine performance analysis project. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Adt, Jr., R. R.; Swain, M. R.; Pappas, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in a 3 year research program to evaluate the performance and emission characteristics of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines is reported. Fifteen hydrogen engine configurations will be subjected to performance and emissions characterization tests. During the first two years, baseline data for throttled and unthrottled, carburetted and timed hydrogen induction, Pre IVC hydrogen-fueled engine configurations, with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and water injection, were obtained. These data, along with descriptions of the test engine and its components, the test apparatus, experimental techniques, experiments performed and the results obtained, are given. Analyses of other hydrogen-engine project data are also presented and compared with the results of the present effort. The unthrottled engine vis-a-vis the throttled engine is found, in general, to exhibit higher brake thermal efficiency. The unthrottled engine also yields lower NO/sub x/ emissions, which were found to be a strong function of fuel-air equivalence ratio. (LCL)

  4. Emissions Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page describes the role of emission inventories in the air quality management process, a description of how emission inventories are developed, and where U.S. emission inventory information can be found.

  5. The potential impact of hydrogen energy use on the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruijven, B. J.; Lamarque, J. F.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Kram, T.; Eerens, H.

    2009-04-01

    Energy models show very different trajectories for future energy systems (partly as function of future climate policy). One possible option is a transition towards a hydrogen-based energy system. The potential impact of such hydrogen economy on atmospheric emissions is highly uncertain. On the one hand, application of hydrogen in clean fuel cells reduces emissions of local air pollutants, like SOx and NOx. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen from system leakages are expected to change the atmospheric concentrations and behaviour (see also Price et al., 2007; Sanderson et al., 2003; Schultz et al., 2003; Tromp et al., 2003). The uncertainty arises from several sources: the expected use of hydrogen, the intensity of leakages and emissions, and the atmospheric chemical behaviour of hydrogen. Existing studies to the potential impacts of a hydrogen economy on the atmosphere mostly use hydrogen emission scenarios that are based on simple assumptions. This research combines two different modelling efforts to explore the range of impacts of hydrogen on atmospheric chemistry. First, the potential role of hydrogen in the global energy system and the related emissions of hydrogen and other air pollutants are derived from the global energy system simulation model TIMER (van Vuuren, 2007). A set of dedicated scenarios on hydrogen technology development explores the most pessimistic and optimistic cases for hydrogen deployment (van Ruijven et al., 2008; van Ruijven et al., 2007). These scenarios are combined with different assumptions on hydrogen emission factors. Second, the emissions from the TIMER model are linked to the NCAR atmospheric model (Lamarque et al., 2005; Lamarque et al., 2008), in order to determine the impacts on atmospheric chemistry. By combining an energy system model and an atmospheric model, we are able to consistently explore the boundaries of both hydrogen use, emissions and impacts on atmospheric chemistry. References: Lamarque, J.-F., Kiehl, J. T

  6. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Sidney

    1989-01-01

    It was long known that many strong metals can become weakened and brittle as the result of the accumulation of hydrogen within the metal. When the metal is stretched, it does not show normal ductile properties, but fractures prematurely. This problem can occur as the result of a hydrogen evolution reaction such as corrosion or electroplating, or due to hydrogen in the environment at the metal surface. High strength alloys such as steels are especially susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Nickel-hydrogen cells commonly use Inconel 718 alloy for the pressure container, and this also is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Metals differ in their susceptibility to embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells is analyzed and the reasons why it may or may not occur are discussed. Although Inconel 718 can display hydrogen embrittlement, experience has not identified any problem with nickel-hydrogen cells. No hydrogen embrittlement problem is expected with the 718 alloy pressure container used in nickel-hydrogen cells.

  7. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Herring

    2009-10-13

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, lab

  8. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    ScienceCinema

    Stephen Herring

    2016-07-12

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, lab

  9. Emission line galaxies and active galactic nuclei in WINGS clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Bettoni, D.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fasano, G.; Fritz, J.; Cava, A.; Varela, J.; Omizzolo, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present the analysis of the emission line galaxies members of 46 low-redshift (0.04 < z < 0.07) clusters observed by WINGS (WIde-field Nearby Galaxy cluster Survey). Emission line galaxies were identified following criteria that are meant to minimize biases against non-star-forming galaxies and classified employing diagnostic diagrams. We examined the emission line properties and frequencies of star-forming galaxies, transition objects, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs: LINERs and Seyferts), unclassified galaxies with emission lines, and quiescent galaxies with no detectable line emission. A deficit of emission line galaxies in the cluster environment is indicated by both a lower frequency, and a systematically lower Balmer emission line equivalent width and luminosity with respect to control samples; this implies a lower amount of ionized gas per unit mass and a lower star formation rate if the source is classified as Hii region. A sizable population of transition objects and of low-luminosity LINERs (≈ 10-20% of all emission line galaxies) are detected among WINGS cluster galaxies. These sources are a factor of ≈1.5 more frequent, or at least as frequent, as in control samples with respect to Hii sources. Transition objects and LINERs in clusters are most affected in terms ofline equivalent width by the environment and appear predominantly consistent with so-called retired galaxies. Shock heating can be a possible gas excitation mechanism that is able to account for observed line ratios. Specific to the cluster environment, we suggest interaction between atomic and molecular gas and the intracluster medium as a possible physical cause of line-emitting shocks. The data whose description is provided in Table B.1, and emission line catalog of the WINGS database are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A83

  10. Hydrogen supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Teitel, R.J.

    1981-11-24

    A system for supplying hydrogen to an apparatus which utilizes hydrogen contains a metal hydride hydrogen supply component and a microcavity hydrogen storage hydrogen supply component which in tandem supply hydrogen for the apparatus. The metal hydride hydrogen supply component includes a first storage tank filled with a composition which is capable of forming a metal hydride of such a nature that the hydride will release hydrogen when heated but will absorb hydrogen when cooled. This first storage tank is equipped with a heat exchanger for both adding heat to and extracting heat from the composition to regulate the absorption/deabsorption of hydrogen from the composition. The microcavity hydrogen storage hydrogen supply component includes a second tank containing the microcavity hydrogen supply. The microcavity hydrogen storage contains hydrogen held under high pressure within individual microcavities. The hydrogen is released from the microcavities by heating the cavities. This heating is accomplished by including within the tank for the microcavity hydrogen storage a heating element.

  11. Exergetic life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    Life cycle assessment is extended to exergetic life cycle assessment and used to evaluate the exergy efficiency, economic effectiveness and environmental impact of producing hydrogen using wind and solar energy in place of fossil fuels. The product hydrogen is considered a fuel for fuel cell vehicles and a substitute for gasoline. Fossil fuel technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas and gasoline from crude oil are contrasted with options using renewable energy. Exergy efficiencies and greenhouse gas and air pollution emissions are evaluated for all process steps, including crude oil and natural gas pipeline transportation, crude oil distillation and natural gas reforming, wind and solar electricity generation, hydrogen production through water electrolysis, and gasoline and hydrogen distribution and utilization. The use of wind power to produce hydrogen via electrolysis, and its application in a fuel cell vehicle, exhibits the lowest fossil and mineral resource consumption rate. However, the economic attractiveness, as measured by a "capital investment effectiveness factor," of renewable technologies depends significantly on the ratio of costs for hydrogen and natural gas. At the present cost ratio of about 2 (per unit of lower heating value or exergy), capital investments are about five times lower to produce hydrogen via natural gas rather than wind energy. As a consequence, the cost of wind- and solar-based electricity and hydrogen is substantially higher than that of natural gas. The implementation of a hydrogen fuel cell instead of an internal combustion engine permits, theoretically, an increase in a vehicle's engine efficiency of about of two times. Depending on the ratio in engine efficiencies, the substitution of gasoline with "renewable" hydrogen leads to (a) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions of 12-23 times for hydrogen from wind and 5-8 times for hydrogen from solar energy, and (b) air pollution (AP) emissions reductions of 38

  12. Hydrogen sulphide.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, T L

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is the primary chemical hazard in natural gas production in 'sour' gas fields. It is also a hazard in sewage treatment and manure-containment operations, construction in wetlands, pelt processing, certain types of pulp and paper production, and any situation in which organic material decays or inorganic sulphides exist under reducing conditions. H2S dissociates into free sulphide in the circulation. Sulphide binds to many macromolecules, among them cytochrome oxidase. Although this is undoubtedly an important mechanism of toxicity due to H2S, there may be others H2S provides little opportunity for escape at high concentrations because of the olfactory paralysis it causes, the steep exposure-response relationships, and the characteristically sudden loss of consciousness it can cause which is colloquially termed 'knockdown.' Other effects may include mucosal irritation, which is associated at lower concentrations with a keratoconjunctivitis called 'gas eye' and at higher concentrations with risk of pulmonary oedema. Chronic central nervous system sequelae may possibly follow repeated knockdowns: this is controversial and the primary effects of H2S may be confounded by anoxia or head trauma. Treatment is currently empirical, with a combination of nitrite and hyperbaric oxygen preferred. The treatment regimen is not ideal and carries some risk.

  13. Hydrogen Powered Military Vehicles: A Vision or Reality by 2040

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    hydrogen is used to power the year 2040 generation of the U.S. military vehicles, it will accomplish twice the efficiency of today’s gasoline engines... gasoline engines, with zero air emissions released into the atmosphere. The hydrogen powered military vehicle will become a reality by 2040. The...referenced to gasoline Introduction What follows is a study on

  14. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits and Work Practice Standards for Batch Process Vents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to control organic HAP emissions a. Use a halogen reduction device after the combustion control device; or i. Reduce overall emissions of hydrogen halide and halogen HAP by ≥99 percent; orii. Reduce overall emissions of hydrogen halide and halogen HAP to ≤0.45 kg/hr; or iii. Reduce overall emissions...

  15. Advanced hydrogen/methanol utilization technology demonstration. Phase II: Hydrogen cold start of a methanol vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the Phase 11 Final Report on NREL Subcontract No. XR-2-11175-1 {open_quotes}Advanced Hydrogen/Methane Utilization Demonstration{close_quotes} between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, Golden, Colorado and Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. (HCI), Littleton, Colorado. Mr. Chris Colucci was NREL`s Technical Monitor. Colorado State University`s (CSU) Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory was HCI`s subcontractor. Some of the vehicle test work was carried out at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety (NCVECS) at CSU. The collaboration of the Colorado School of Mines is also gratefully acknowledged. Hydrogen is unique among alternative fuels in its ability to burn over a wide range of mixtures in air with no carbon-related combustion products. Hydrogen also has the ability to burn on a catalyst, starting from room temperature. Hydrogen can be made from a variety of renewable energy resources and is expected to become a widely used energy carrier in the sustainable energy system of the future. One way to make a start toward widespread use of hydrogen in the energy system is to use it sparingly with other alternative fuels. The Phase I work showed that strong affects could be achieved with dilute concentrations of hydrogen in methane (11). Reductions in emissions greater than the proportion of hydrogen in the fuel provide a form of leverage to stimulate the early introduction of hydrogen. Per energy unit or per dollar of hydrogen, a greater benefit is derived than simply displacing fossil-fueled vehicles with pure hydrogen vehicles.

  16. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  17. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  18. Broad Balmer Wings in BA Hyper/Supergiants Distorted by Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Five Examples in the 30 Doradus Region from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Sana, Hugues; Evans, Christopher J.; Taylor, William D.; Sabbi, Elena; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Sota, Alfredo; Dufton, Philip L.; McEvoy, Catherine M.; Clark, J. Simon; Markova, Nevena; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Extremely broad emission wings at Hβ and Hα have been found in VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey data for five very luminous BA supergiants in or near 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The profiles of both lines are extremely asymmetrical, which we have found to be caused by very broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the longward wing of Hβ and the shortward wing of Hα. These DIBs are well known to interstellar but not to many stellar specialists, so that the asymmetries may be mistaken for intrinsic features. The broad emission wings are generally ascribed to electron scattering, although we note difficulties for that interpretation in some objects. Such profiles are known in some Galactic hyper/supergiants and are also seen in both active and quiescent Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs). No prior or current LBV activity is known in these 30 Dor stars, although a generic relationship to LBVs is not excluded; subject to further observational and theoretical investigation, it is possible that these very luminous supergiants are approaching the LBV stage for the first time. Their locations in the HRD and presumed evolutionary tracks are consistent with that possibility. The available evidence for spectroscopic variations of these objects is reviewed, while recent photometric monitoring does not reveal variability. A search for circumstellar nebulae has been conducted, with an indeterminate result for one of them.

  19. BROAD BALMER WINGS IN BA HYPER/SUPERGIANTS DISTORTED BY DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS: FIVE EXAMPLES IN THE 30 DORADUS REGION FROM THE VLT-FLAMES TARANTULA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Sana, Hugues; Sabbi, Elena E-mail: hsana@stsci.edu; and others

    2015-08-10

    Extremely broad emission wings at Hβ and Hα have been found in VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey data for five very luminous BA supergiants in or near 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The profiles of both lines are extremely asymmetrical, which we have found to be caused by very broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the longward wing of Hβ and the shortward wing of Hα. These DIBs are well known to interstellar but not to many stellar specialists, so that the asymmetries may be mistaken for intrinsic features. The broad emission wings are generally ascribed to electron scattering, although we note difficulties for that interpretation in some objects. Such profiles are known in some Galactic hyper/supergiants and are also seen in both active and quiescent Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs). No prior or current LBV activity is known in these 30 Dor stars, although a generic relationship to LBVs is not excluded; subject to further observational and theoretical investigation, it is possible that these very luminous supergiants are approaching the LBV stage for the first time. Their locations in the HRD and presumed evolutionary tracks are consistent with that possibility. The available evidence for spectroscopic variations of these objects is reviewed, while recent photometric monitoring does not reveal variability. A search for circumstellar nebulae has been conducted, with an indeterminate result for one of them.

  20. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  1. Emergence of double-peaked emission lines in the broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Eracleous, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A new optical spectrum of the nearby broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG) Pictor A reveals a prominent double-peaked component of the Balmer lines which does not appear in any historical spectra of this object. Carried out with the hope of obtaining exactly such a result, this observation is a key to the interpretation of double-peaked emitters. If bolsters our previous conclusion that there is a set of additional properties which are associated with the rare class of double-peaked emitters, namely F-R II radio morphology, strong low-ionization forbidden lines, weak UV continuum, and flat far-infrared spectrum. Furthermore, the low-velocity, 'ordinary' broad Balmer lines in Pictor A remained relatively unchanged as the new twin peaks appeared, which justifies the practice of applying models that fit only the double peaks and not the low-velocity components that are often present in spectra of this type. We discuss the relative merits of accretion-disk models and other models for double-peaked emission lines in the light of this new observation.

  2. Hydrogen engines based on liquid fuels, a review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Voecks, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of storing hydrogen as part of a liquid fuel, such as gasoline or methanol, and subsequent onboard generation of the hydrogen from such liquids, is reviewed. Hydrogen generation processes, such as steam reforming, partial oxidation, and thermal decomposition are evaluated in terms of theoretical potential and practical limitations, and a summary is presented on the major experimental work on conversion of gasoline and methanol. Results of experiments indicate that onboard hydrogen generation from methanol is technically feasible and will yield substantial improvements in fuel economy and emissions, especially if methanol decomposition is brought about by the use of engine exhaust heat; e.g., a methanol decomposition reactor of 3.8 provides hydrogen-rich gas for a 4 cylinder engine (1.952), and 80% of the methanol is converted, engine exhaust gas being the only heat supply. A preliminary outline of the development of a methanol-based hydrogen engine and a straight hydrogen engine is presented.

  3. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  4. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  5. A Few Facts about Hydrogen [and] Hydrogen Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, H. Roger

    Divided into two sections, this publication presents facts about and the characteristics of hydrogen and a bibliography on hydrogen. The first section lists nine facts on what hydrogen is, four on where hydrogen is found, nine on how hydrogen is used, nine on how hydrogen can be used, and 14 on how hydrogen is made. Also included are nine…

  6. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1999-09-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from a hydrogen bubble is studied theoretically based on a quasiadiabatic compression model of a bubble collapse. It is clarified that the maximum temperature in a hydrogen bubble in 20 °C water under conditions of SBSL is always about 6000 K due to the effect of chemical reactions inside the bubble. It is suggested that the light emission at such temperature is by the transition from the lowest stable triplet state of the H2 molecule to the repulsive state resulting from two normal atoms (H2*→2H+hν). It is shown that the number of hydrogen molecules inside the bubble remains almost constant in spite of the high temperature and pressure inside the bubble at the collapse. It is also shown that the addition of argon to a hydrogen bubble results in the higher maximum temperature inside the bubble.

  7. Galactic Halos of Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image shows two companion galaxies, NGC 4625 (top) and NGC 4618 (bottom), and their surrounding cocoons of cool hydrogen gas (purple). The huge set of spiral arms on NGC 4625 (blue) was discovered by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Though these arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light, they glow brightly in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light.

    The vibrant spiral arms are also quite lengthy, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far.

    Astronomers do not know why NGC 4625 grew arms while NGC 4618 did not. The purple nebulosity shown here illustrates that hydrogen gas - an ingredient of star formation - is diffusely distributed around both galaxies. This means that other unknown factors led to the development of the arms of NGC 4625.

    Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own.

    The image is composed of ultraviolet, visible-light and radio data, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the California Institute of Technology's Digitized Sky Survey, and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, the Netherlands, respectively. Near-ultraviolet light is colored green; far-ultraviolet light is colored blue; and optical light is colored red. Radio emissions are colored purple.

  8. Hydrogen Macro System Model User Guide, Version 1.2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T.; Goldsby, M.; Genung, K.; Hoseley, R.; Smith, A.; Yuzugullu, E.

    2009-07-01

    The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

  9. Macro-System Model for Hydrogen Energy Systems Analysis in Transportation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, V.; Ruth, M.; Sa, T. J.; Goldsby, M. E.

    2012-06-01

    The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

  10. OPTICAL HYDROGEN ABSORPTION CONSISTENT WITH A THIN BOW SHOCK LEADING THE HOT JUPITER HD 189733B

    SciTech Connect

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam G.; Barman, Travis; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.

    2015-09-01

    Bow shocks are ubiquitous astrophysical phenomena resulting from the supersonic passage of an object through a gas. Recently, pre-transit absorption in UV metal transitions of the hot Jupiter (HJ) exoplanets HD 189733b and WASP12-b have been interpreted as being caused by material compressed in a planetary bow shock. Here we present a robust detection of a time-resolved pre-transit, as well as in-transit absorption signature around the HJ exoplanet HD 189733b using high spectral resolution observations of several hydrogen Balmer lines. The line shape of the pre-transit feature and the shape of the timeseries absorption provide the strongest constraints on the morphology and physical characteristics of extended structures around an exoplanet. The in-transit measurements confirm the previous exospheric Hα detection, although the absorption depth measured here is ∼50% lower. The pre-transit absorption feature occurs 125 minutes before the predicted optical transit, a projected linear distance from the planet to the stellar disk of 7.2 R{sub p}. The absorption strength observed in the Balmer lines indicates an optically thick, but physically small, geometry. We model this signal as the early ingress of a planetary bow shock. If the bow shock is mediated by a planetary magnetosphere, the large standoff distance derived from the model suggests a large planetary magnetic field strength of B{sub eq} = 28 G. Better knowledge of exoplanet magnetic field strengths is crucial to understanding the role these fields play in planetary evolution and the potential development of life on planets in the habitable zone.

  11. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the

  12. Novel Hydrogen Bioreactor and Detection Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Rollin, Joseph A; Ye, Xinhao; Del Campo, Julia Martin; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-01-01

    In vitro hydrogen generation represents a clear opportunity for novel bioreactor and system design. Hydrogen, already a globally important commodity chemical, has the potential to become the dominant transportation fuel of the future. Technologies such as in vitro synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB)-the use of more than 10 purified enzymes to catalyze unnatural catabolic pathways-enable the storage of hydrogen in the form of carbohydrates. Biohydrogen production from local carbohydrate resources offers a solution to the most pressing challenges to vehicular and bioenergy uses: small-size distributed production, minimization of CO2 emissions, and potential low cost, driven by high yield and volumetric productivity. In this study, we introduce a novel bioreactor that provides the oxygen-free gas phase necessary for enzymatic hydrogen generation while regulating temperature and reactor volume. A variety of techniques are currently used for laboratory detection of biohydrogen, but the most information is provided by a continuous low-cost hydrogen sensor. Most such systems currently use electrolysis for calibration; here an alternative method, flow calibration, is introduced. This system is further demonstrated here with the conversion of glucose to hydrogen at a high rate, and the production of hydrogen from glucose 6-phosphate at a greatly increased reaction rate, 157 mmol/L/h at 60 °C.

  13. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  14. Hydrogen conference: Workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Serfass, J.; Bugel, L. )

    1989-10-01

    This meeting was designed to encourage discussion of today's US industrial, utility, space and environmental interests in hydrogen and tommorrow's use of hydrogen as an energy system. The meeting began with a general session during which speakers gave presentations on a variety of hydrogen topics. Discussion following each presentation was lively. Some of the major points of discussion were: interpretation of global warming evidence; relevance of global warming to the interest in hydrogen; cost of hydrogen derived from fossil fuels vs. nuclear vs. solar; likely future importance of hydrogen -- major energy system vs. niche player. A number of interesting points were raised and data presented by speakers and participants. Highlights are presented.

  15. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Powered by Renewable Hydrogen

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently received a Borrego fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) on loan from Kia for display at a variety of summer events. The Borrego is fueled using renewable hydrogen that is produced and dispensed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The hydrogen dispensed at the station is produced via renewable electrolysis as part of the wind-to-hydrogen project, which uses wind turbines and photovoltaic arrays to power electrolyzer stacks that split water into hydrogen and oxygen. The FCEV features state-of-the-art technology with zero harmful emissions.

  16. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Powered by Renewable Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently received a Borrego fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) on loan from Kia for display at a variety of summer events. The Borrego is fueled using renewable hydrogen that is produced and dispensed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The hydrogen dispensed at the station is produced via renewable electrolysis as part of the wind-to-hydrogen project, which uses wind turbines and photovoltaic arrays to power electrolyzer stacks that split water into hydrogen and oxygen. The FCEV features state-of-the-art technology with zero harmful emissions.

  17. Chemical/hydrogen energy systems analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, M.

    1982-12-01

    Four hydrogen energy technologies are addressed including: hydrogen recovery from hydrogen separation using hydride technology, photochemical hydrogen production, anode depolarization in electrolytic hydrogen production.

  18. A Multi-Frequency Study of an X-ray Selected Sample of AGN II: Line Emission Studies and the X-ray Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossan, B.; Remillard, R.; Bradt, H.

    1992-12-01

    We carried out a multi-frequency study of a flux-limited (0.95 mu Jy @ 5 keV) sample of 96 emission-line AGN taken from the HEAO-1 LASS/MC survey. Preliminary results of this study were presented at the Jan. 1992 meeting. Here we present new results from line emission and continuum studies and more details regarding the AGN X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs). We find that narrow [OIII] flux correlates well with X-ray flux. This result is consistent with a simple picture where the photoionizing continuum is distributed over a large solid angle in the narrow line region, and is closely related to the X-ray continuum. Broad Balmer lines do not demonstrate a strong correlation with X-ray flux. The UV continuum ( ~ 1400 Angstroms) does not correlate with any optical line emission we measured, but UV variability could have affected this result. In contrast, we find very strong correlations of high-ionization UV broad line fluxes and the simultaneously measured UV continuum. The geometry and/or obscuration effects in the broad line region may therefore be different than those in the narrow line region. A very large spread in the value of broad line Balmer decrements (Hβ /Hα = 0.13 - 0.40) was observed among objects determined to be un-reddened by the lack of an absorption feature at 2175 Angstroms. If there were an intrinsic Balmer decrement for the broad line regions in AGN, the smallest Hβ /Hα values would correspond to extreme values of reddening (E(B-V) > 1 mag). Therefore, we conclude that the broad line Balmer decrement cannot be used in determining continuum reddening in most AGN. We find that the AGN 2-10 keV XLF is roughly a power law, but steepens with increasing luminosity, and turns over below 10(42) erg s(-1) . The XLF of Seyfert 2's resembles a power law from 10(42) - 10(43.5) erg s(-1) , but at higher luminosity, the XLF steepens. In this sample, the cumulative fraction of Seyfert 2's falls rapidly with luminosity, and the overall fraction of Seyfert 2's

  19. Modeling of neutrals in the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source plasma: Hydrogen atom production density profile and H{sub α} intensity by collisional radiative model

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T. Shibata, T.; Ohta, M.; Yasumoto, M.; Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.; Sawada, K.; Fantz, U.

    2014-02-15

    To control the H{sup 0} atom production profile in the H{sup −} ion sources is one of the important issues for the efficient and uniform surface H{sup −} production. The purpose of this study is to construct a collisional radiative (CR) model to calculate the effective production rate of H{sup 0} atoms from H{sub 2} molecules in the model geometry of the radio-frequency (RF) H{sup −} ion source for Linac4 accelerator. In order to validate the CR model by comparison with the experimental results from the optical emission spectroscopy, it is also necessary for the model to calculate Balmer photon emission rate in the source. As a basic test of the model, the time evolutions of H{sup 0} production and the Balmer H{sub α} photon emission rate are calculated for given electron energy distribution functions in the Linac4 RF H{sup −} ion source. Reasonable test results are obtained and basis for the detailed comparisons with experimental results have been established.

  20. The USDOE Hydrogen Program: Status and Performance Gaps of On-board Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordaz, Grace; Gardiner, Monterey; Read, Carole; Stetson, Ned

    2009-03-01

    The USDOE Hydrogen Program's mission is to reduce oil use and carbon emissions in the US transportation sector and to enable clean, reliable energy for stationary and portable power generation. The requirements for vehicular hydrogen storage continue to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen fueled vehicles. The DOE applied hydrogen storage activity focuses primarily on the research and development of low-pressure, materials-based technologies to allow for a North American market driving range of more than 300 miles (500 km) while meeting packaging, cost, safety, and performance requirements to be competitive with current vehicles. This presentation summarizes the status, recent accomplishments and current performance gaps of hydrogen storage technologies primarily for transportation applications. Materials projects are focused in three main areas: metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage materials, and hydrogen sorbents. A new effort is the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence which will provide a coordinated approach to the engineering research and development of on-board storage and refueling systems. The presentation will especially highlight topics emphasized in the session theme.

  1. 40 CFR 63.7540 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations, fuel specifications and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....7550. (c) If you elected to demonstrate that the unit meets the specifications for hydrogen sulfide and... mixtures of fuels burned would either result in lower emissions of hydrogen chloride and mercury than the... compliance with an applicable hydrogen chloride emission limit through fuel analysis and you plan to burn...

  2. 40 CFR 63.7540 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations, fuel specifications and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....7550. (c) If you elected to demonstrate that the unit meets the specifications for hydrogen sulfide and... mixtures of fuels burned would either result in lower emissions of hydrogen chloride and mercury than the... compliance with an applicable hydrogen chloride emission limit through fuel analysis and you plan to burn...

  3. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  4. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debajyoti; De, Debojyoti; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-01-01

    The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical), Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source. PMID:16371161

  5. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debajyoti; De, Debojyoti; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-12-21

    The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical), Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  6. Nuclear hydrogen : an assessment of product flexibility and market viability.

    SciTech Connect

    Botterud, A.; Yildiz, B.; Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy has the potential to play an important role in the future energy system as a large-scale source of hydrogen without greenhouse gas emissions. Thus far, economic studies of nuclear hydrogen tend to focus on the levelized cost of hydrogen without accounting for the risks and uncertainties that potential investors would face. We present a financial model based on real options theory to assess the profitability of different nuclear hydrogen production technologies in evolving electricity and hydrogen markets. The model uses Monte Carlo simulations to represent uncertainty in future hydrogen and electricity prices. It computes the expected value and the distribution of discounted profits from nuclear hydrogen production plants. Moreover, the model quantifies the value of the option to switch between hydrogen and electricity production, depending on what is more profitable to sell. We use the model to analyze the market viability of four potential nuclear hydrogen technologies and conclude that flexibility in output product is likely to add significant economic value for an investor in nuclear hydrogen. This should be taken into account in the development phase of nuclear hydrogen technologies.

  7. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkin, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  8. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options within a given

  9. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  10. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  11. Purification of Hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Newton, A S

    1950-12-05

    Disclosed is a process for purifying hydrogen containing various gaseous impurities by passing the hydrogen over a large surface of uranium metal at a temperature above the decomposition temperature of uranium hydride, and below the decomposition temperature of the compounds formed by the combination of the uranium with the impurities in the hydrogen.

  12. N Reactor hydrogen control

    SciTech Connect

    Shuford, D.H.; Kripps, L.J.

    1988-08-01

    Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power reactor in the Soviet Union, a number of reviews were conducted of the N Reactor. Hydrogen generation during postulates severe accidents and the possibility of resulting hydrogen deflagrations/detonations that could affect confinement integrity were issues raised in several reviews, along with recommendations for adding hydrogen mitigation features. To respond to these reviews, an N Reactor Safety Enhancement Program and a subsequent Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program were initiated to address all post-Chernobyl N Reactor review findings. The Safety Enhancement Program and Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program efforts involving hydrogen control included the following: Calculate the potential hydrogen source for a range of severe accidents at the N Reactor to establish an acceptable design basis for the hydrogen mitigation system; Analyze the N Reactor confinement hydrogen mixing capability to identify areas of concern and to the verify effectiveness of the hydrogen mitigation system; Select, design, and construct a hydrogen mitigation system to enhance the N Reactor capability to accommodate possible hydrogen generation from postulated severe accidents; Provide post-accident hydrogen monitoring as an operator aid in assessing confinement conditions. In additions, it was necessary to verify that incorporation of the hydrogen mitigation system had no adverse impact N Reactor safety (e.g., radiological consequence analyses). 77 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  14. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  15. Flash hydrogenation of coal

    DOEpatents

    Manowitz, Bernard; Steinberg, Meyer; Sheehan, Thomas V.; Winsche, Warren E.; Raseman, Chad J.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the hydrogenation of coal comprising the contacting of powdered coal with hydrogen in a rotating fluidized bed reactor. A rotating fluidized bed reactor suitable for use in this process is also disclosed. The coal residence time in the reactor is limited to less than 5 seconds while the hydrogen contact time is not in excess of 0.2 seconds.

  16. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  17. Hydrogen Storage Experiments for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course--Clean Energy: Hydrogen/Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Alla; Andrews, Lisa; Khot, Ameya; Rubin, Lea; Young, Jun; Allston, Thomas D.; Takacs, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    Global interest in both renewable energies and reduction in emission levels has placed increasing attention on hydrogen-based fuel cells that avoid harm to the environment by releasing only water as a byproduct. Therefore, there is a critical need for education and workforce development in clean energy technologies. A new undergraduate laboratory…

  18. Direct observation of phonon emission from hot electrons: spectral features in diamond secondary electron emission.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Kane M; Edmonds, Mark T; Ristein, Jürgen; Rietwyk, Kevin J; Tadich, Anton; Thomsen, Lars; Pakes, Christopher I; Ley, Lothar

    2014-10-01

    In this work we use high-resolution synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the low kinetic energy electron emission from two negative electron affinity surfaces of diamond, namely hydrogenated and lithiated diamond. For hydrogen-terminated diamond electron emission below the conduction band minimum (CBM) is clearly observed as a result of phonon emission subsequent to carrier thermalization at the CBM. In the case of lithiated diamond, we find the normal conduction band minimum emission peak is asymmetrically broadened to higher kinetic energies and argue the broadening is a result of ballistic emission from carriers thermalized to the CBM in the bulk well before the onset of band-bending. In both cases the spectra display intensity modulations that are the signature of optical phonon emission as the main mechanism for carrier relaxation. To our knowledge, these measurements represent the first direct observation of hot carrier energy loss via photoemission.

  19. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  20. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Storage Tanks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen halide and halogen HAP by venting emissions through a closed vent system to any combination of... halogen HAP by venting emissions through a closed vent system to any combination of control...