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Sample records for hydrogen bond donors

  1. Hydroperoxides as Hydrogen Bond Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møller, Kristian H.; Tram, Camilla M.; Hansen, Anne S.; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2016-06-01

    Hydroperoxides are formed in the atmosphere following autooxidation of a wide variety of volatile organics emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources. This raises the question of whether they can form hydrogen bonds that facilitate aerosol formation and growth. Using a combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, FT-IR, and ab initio calculations, we have compared the gas phase hydrogen bonding ability of tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBuOOH) to that of tert-butanol (tBuOH) for a series of bimolecular complexes with different acceptors. The hydrogen bond acceptor atoms studied are nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulphur. Both in terms of calculated redshifts and binding energies (BE), our results suggest that hydroperoxides are better hydrogen bond donors than the corresponding alcohols. In terms of hydrogen bond acceptor ability, we find that nitrogen is a significantly better acceptor than the other three atoms, which are of similar strength. We observe a similar trend in hydrogen bond acceptor ability with other hydrogen bond donors including methanol and dimethylamine.

  2. Nanostructure, hydrogen bonding and rheology in choline chloride deep eutectic solvents as a function of the hydrogen bond donor.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Ryan; Ludwig, Michael; Webber, Grant B; Atkin, Rob; Page, Alister J

    2017-01-25

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are a mixture of a salt and a molecular hydrogen bond donor, which form a eutectic liquid with a depressed melting point. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulations have been used to probe the 1 : 2 choline chloride-urea (ChCl : U), choline chloride-ethylene glycol (ChCl : EG) and choline chloride-glycerol (ChCl : Gly) DESs. DES nanostructure and interactions between the ions is used to rationalise differences in DES eutectic point temperatures and viscosity. Simulations show that the structure of the bulk hydrogen bond donor is largely preserved for hydroxyl based hydrogen bond donors (ChCl:Gly and ChCl:EG), resulting in a smaller melting point depression. By contrast, ChCl:U exhibits a well-established hydrogen bond network between the salt and hydrogen bond donor, leading to a larger melting point depression. This extensive hydrogen bond network in ChCl:U also leads to substantially higher viscosity, compared to ChCl:EG and ChCl:Gly. Of the two hydroxyl based DESs, ChCl:Gly also exhibits a higher viscosity than ChCl:EG. This is attributed to the over-saturation of hydrogen bond donor groups in the ChCl:Gly bulk, which leads to more extensive hydrogen bond donor self-interaction and hence higher cohesive forces within the bulk liquid.

  3. Chiral Squaramide Derivatives are Excellent Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Malerich, Jeremiah P.; Hagihara, Koji; Rawal, Viresh H.

    2009-01-01

    Thioureas represent the dominant platform for hydrogen bond promoted asymmetric catalysts. A large number of reactions, reported in scores of publications, have been successfully promoted by chiral thioureas. The present paper reports the use of squaramides as a highly effective new scaffold for the development of chiral hydrogen bond donor catalysts. squaramide catalysts are very simple to prepare. The (-)-cinchonine modified squaramide (5), easily prepared through a two step process from methyl squarate, was shown to be an effective catalyst, even at catalyst loadings as low as 0.1 mol%, for the conjugate addition reactions of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds to β-nitrostyrenes. The addition products were obtained in high yields and excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:18847268

  4. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Beletskiy, Evgeny V.; Schmidt, Jacob C.; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2012-11-14

    Enzymes and their mimics use hydrogen bonds to catalyze chemical transformations. Small molecule transition state analogs of oxyanion holes are characterized by gas phase IR and photoelectron spectroscopy and their binding constants in acetonitrile. As a result, a new class of hydrogen bond catalysts is proposed (OH donors that can contribute three hydrogen bonds to a single functional group) and demonstrated in a Friedel-Crafts reaction.

  5. Enhancement in Organic Photovoltaic Efficiency through the Synergistic Interplay of Molecular Donor Hydrogen Bonding and -Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Shewmon, Nathan; Watkins, Davita; Galindo, Johan; Zerdan, Raghida; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Roitberg, Adrian; Xue, Jiangeng; Castellano, Ronald

    2015-07-20

    For organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells based on the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure, it remains challenging to rationally control the degree of phase separation and percolation within blends of donors and acceptors to secure optimal charge separation and transport. Reported is a bottom-up, supramolecular approach to BHJ OPVs wherein tailored hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) interactions between π-conjugated electron donor molecules encourage formation of vertically aligned donor π-stacks while simultaneously suppressing lateral aggregation; the programmed arrangement facilitates fine mixing with fullerene acceptors and efficient charge transport. The approach is illustrated using conventional linear or branched quaterthiophene donor chromophores outfitted with terminal functional groups that are either capable or incapable of self-complementary H-bonding. When applied to OPVs, the H-bond capable donors yield a twofold enhancement in power conversion efficiency relative to the comparator systems, with a maximum external quantum efficiency of 64%. H-bond promoted assembly results in redshifted absorption (in neat films and donor:C 60 blends) and enhanced charge collection efficiency despite disparate donor chromophore structure. Both features positively impact photocurrent and fill factor in OPV devices. Film structural characterization by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering reveals a synergistic interplay of lateral H-bonding interactions and vertical π-stacking for directing the favorable morphology of the BHJ.

  6. Enhancement in Organic Photovoltaic Efficiency through the Synergistic Interplay of Molecular Donor Hydrogen Bonding and -Stacking

    DOE PAGES

    Shewmon, Nathan; Watkins, Davita; Galindo, Johan; ...

    2015-07-20

    For organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells based on the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure, it remains challenging to rationally control the degree of phase separation and percolation within blends of donors and acceptors to secure optimal charge separation and transport. Reported is a bottom-up, supramolecular approach to BHJ OPVs wherein tailored hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) interactions between π-conjugated electron donor molecules encourage formation of vertically aligned donor π-stacks while simultaneously suppressing lateral aggregation; the programmed arrangement facilitates fine mixing with fullerene acceptors and efficient charge transport. The approach is illustrated using conventional linear or branched quaterthiophene donor chromophores outfitted with terminal functional groupsmore » that are either capable or incapable of self-complementary H-bonding. When applied to OPVs, the H-bond capable donors yield a twofold enhancement in power conversion efficiency relative to the comparator systems, with a maximum external quantum efficiency of 64%. H-bond promoted assembly results in redshifted absorption (in neat films and donor:C 60 blends) and enhanced charge collection efficiency despite disparate donor chromophore structure. Both features positively impact photocurrent and fill factor in OPV devices. Film structural characterization by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering reveals a synergistic interplay of lateral H-bonding interactions and vertical π-stacking for directing the favorable morphology of the BHJ.« less

  7. Activation of Electron-Deficient Quinones through Hydrogen-Bond-Donor-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Turek, Amanda K; Hardee, David J; Ullman, Andrew M; Nocera, Daniel G; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2016-01-11

    Quinones are important organic oxidants in a variety of synthetic and biological contexts, and they are susceptible to activation towards electron transfer through hydrogen bonding. Whereas this effect of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) has been observed for Lewis basic, weakly oxidizing quinones, comparable activation is not readily achieved when more reactive and synthetically useful electron-deficient quinones are used. We have successfully employed HBD-coupled electron transfer as a strategy to activate electron-deficient quinones. A systematic investigation of HBDs has led to the discovery that certain dicationic HBDs have an exceptionally large effect on the rate and thermodynamics of electron transfer. We further demonstrate that these HBDs can be used as catalysts in a quinone-mediated model synthetic transformation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes of Phenylacetylene-Acetylene: Who is the Proton Donor?

    PubMed

    Verma, Kanupriya; Dave, Kapil; Viswanathan, K S

    2015-12-24

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes of C2H2 and phenylacetylene (PhAc) were studied using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical computations. Both C2H2 and PhAc, being potential proton donors, the question arises as to which of the two species would be the proton donor in the PhAc-C2H2 complex; a question that this work primarily addresses. The molecular structures, vibrational frequencies, and interaction energies of the PhAc-C2H2 complexes were calculated at the M06-2X and MP2 levels of theory, employing both 6-311++G(d,p) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. At the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ level, two nearly isoenergetic complexes (BSSE corrected) were indicated to be the global minima; one a C-H···π complex, where C2H2 served as a proton donor to the phenyl π-system in PhAc, and the other a C-H···π complex, where C2H2 served as a proton donor to the acetylene π-system in PhAc. Of the two, only the second complex was identified in the matrix, evidenced by a characteristic large shift in the ≡C-H stretch of C2H2. Experiments were also performed using PhAc deuterated at the acetylene hydrogen (PhAcD) to study the isotopic effects on the vibrational spectra of complexes. The isotopic studies further confirmed the structure of the complex trapped in the matrix, thereby presenting unambiguous evidence that C2H2 served as the proton donor to the acetylene π-system of PhAc. The theory of atoms-in-molecules (AIM), energy decomposition (EDA), and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis were performed to understand the nature of the interactions involved in the complexes.

  9. An Electrically Conductive Single-Component Donor-Acceptor-Donor Aggregate with Hydrogen-Bonding Lattice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikihiro; Otsubo, Kazuya; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Komatsu, Tokutaro; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-12-19

    An electrically conductive D-A-D aggregate composed of a single component was first constructed by use of a protonated bimetal dithiolate (complex 1H2). The crystal structure of complex 1H2 has one-dimensional (1-D) π-stacking columns where the D and A moieties are placed in a segregated-stacking manner. In addition, these segregated-stacking 1-D columns are stabilized by hydrogen bonds. The result of a theoretical band calculation suggests that a conduction pathway forms along these 1-D columns. The transport property of complex 1H2 is semiconducting (Ea = 0.29 eV, ρrt = 9.1 × 10(4) Ω cm) at ambient pressure; however, the resistivity becomes much lower upon applying high pressure up to 8.8 GPa (Ea = 0.13 eV, ρrt = 6.2 × 10 Ω cm at 8.8 GPa). The pressure dependence of structural and optical changes indicates that the enhancement of conductivity is attributed to not only an increase of π-π overlapping but also a unique pressure-induced intramolecular charge transfer from D to A moieties in this D-A-D aggregate.

  10. Hydrogen Bond Donor/Acceptor Cosolvent-Modified Choline Chloride-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashish; Bhawna; Dhingra, Divya; Pandey, Siddharth

    2017-04-27

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have emerged as nontoxic and inexpensive alternatives not only to the common organic solvents but to the ionic liquids as well. Some of the common and popular, and perhaps the most investigated, DESs are the ones comprising an ammonium salt and an appropriate hydrogen bond (HB) donor in a predetermined mole ratio. The formation of the DES is attributed to the H-bonding interaction(s) present between the salt and the HB donor. Consequently, addition of a predominantly HB donor or a predominantly HB acceptor cosolvent to such DESs may result in intriguing features and properties. We present investigation of two DESs constituted of salt choline chloride along with HB donors urea and glycerol, respectively, in 1:2 mol ratio, named reline and glyceline as the cosolvent of very high HB donating acidity and no HB accepting basicity 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) and of very high HB accepting basicity and no HB donating acidity hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA), respectively, is added. TFE shows up to 0.25 mole fraction miscibility with both reline and glyceline. While up to 0.25 mole fraction HMPA in glyceline results in transparent mixtures, this cosolvent is found to be completely immiscible with reline. From the perspective of the solvatochromic absorbance and fluorescence probes, it is established that the cybotactic region dipolarity within up to 0.25 mole fraction TFE/HMPA-added DES strongly depends on the functionalities present on the solute. Fourier transform infrared absorbance and Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal no major shifts in vibrational transitions as TFE/HMPA is added to the DES; spectral band broadening, albeit small, is observed nonetheless. Excess molar volumes and excess logarithmic viscosities of the mixtures indicate that while TFE may interstitially accommodate itself within H-bonded network of reline, it does appear to form H-bonds with the constituents of the glyceline. Increase in overall net repulsive

  11. Selective stabilization of the chorismate mutase transition state by a positively charged hydrogen bond donor.

    PubMed

    Kienhöfer, Alexander; Kast, Peter; Hilvert, Donald

    2003-03-19

    Citrulline was incorporated via chemical semisynthesis at position 90 in the active site of the AroH chorismate mutase from Bacillus subtilis. The wild-type arginine at this position makes hydrogen-bonding interactions with the ether oxygen of chorismate. Replacement of the positively charged guanidinium group with the isosteric but neutral urea has a dramatic effect on the ability of the enzyme to convert chorismate into prephenate. The Arg90Cit variant exhibits a >104-fold decrease in the catalytic rate constant kcat with a 2.7-fold increase in the Michaelis constant Km. In contrast, its affinity for a conformationally constrained inhibitor molecule that effectively mimics the geometry but not the dissociative character of the transition state is only reduced by a factor of approximately 6. These results show that an active site merely complementary to the reactive conformation of chorismate is insufficient for catalysis of the mutase reaction. Instead, electrostatic stabilization of the polarized transition state by provision of a cationic hydrogen bond donor proximal to the oxygen in the breaking C-O bond is essential for high catalytic efficiency.

  12. Dinuclear zinc(II) complexes with hydrogen bond donors as structural and functional phosphatase models.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Simone; Comba, Peter; Gahan, Lawrence R; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-09-02

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the secondary coordination sphere can have a crucial role in determining the functional properties of biomimetic metal complexes. We have therefore designed and prepared a variety of ligands as metallo-hydrolase mimics, where hydrogen bonding in the second coordination sphere is able to influence the structure of the primary coordination sphere and the substrate binding. The assessment of a structure-function relationship is based on derivates of 2,6-bis{[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}-4-methylphenol (HBPMP = HL(1)) and 2-{[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}-6-{[(2-hydroxybenzyl)(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}-4-methylphenol (H2BPBPMP = H2L(5)), well-known phenolate-based ligands for metallo-hydrolase mimics. The model systems provide similar primary coordination spheres but site-specific modifications in the secondary coordination sphere. Pivaloylamide and amine moieties were chosen to mimic the secondary coordination sphere of the phosphatase models, and the four new ligands H3L(2), H3L(3), HL(4), and H4L(6) vary in the type and geometric position of the H-bond donors and acceptors, responsible for the positioning of the substrate and release of the product molecules. Five dinuclear Zn(II) complexes were prepared and structurally characterized in the solid, and four also in solution. The investigation of the phosphatase activity of four model complexes illustrates the impact of the H-bonding network: the Michaelis-Menten constants (catalyst-substrate binding) for all complexes that support hydrogen bonding are smaller than for the reference complex, and this generally leads to higher catalytic efficiency and higher turnover numbers.

  13. Binding characteristics of homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers for acyclovir using an (acceptor-donor-donor)-(donor-acceptor-acceptor) hydrogen-bond strategy, and analytical applications for serum samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqin; Tan, Lei; Wang, Ganquan; Peng, Guiming; Kang, Chengcheng; Tang, Youwen

    2013-04-12

    This paper demonstrates a novel approach to assembling homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) based on mimicking multiple hydrogen bonds between nucleotide bases by preparing acyclovir (ACV) as a template and using coatings grafted on silica supports. (1)H NMR studies confirmed the AAD-DDA (A for acceptor, D for donor) hydrogen-bond array between template and functional monomer, while the resultant monodisperse molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) were evaluated using a binding experiment, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and solid phase extraction. The Langmuir isothermal model and the Langmuir-Freundlich isothermal model suggest that ACV-MIMs have more homogeneous binding sites than MIPs prepared through normal imprinting. In contrast to previous MIP-HPLC columns, there were no apparent tailings for the ACV peaks, and ACV-MIMs had excellent specific binding properties with a Ka peak of 3.44 × 10(5)M(-1). A complete baseline separation is obtained for ACV and structurally similar compounds. This work also successfully used MIMs as a specific sorbent for capturing ACV from serum samples. The detection limit and mean recovery of ACV was 1.8 ng/mL(-1) and 95.6%, respectively, for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction coupled with HPLC. To our knowledge, this was the first example of MIPs using AAD-DDA hydrogen bonds.

  14. Hydrogen bonding and anaesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sándorfy, C.

    2004-12-01

    General anaesthetics act by perturbing intermolecular associations without breaking or forming covalent bonds. These associations might be due to a variety of van der Waals interactions or hydrogen bonding. Neurotransmitters all contain OH or NH groups, which are prone to form hydrogen bonds with those of the neurotransmitter receptors. These could be perturbed by anaesthetics. Aromatic rings in amino acids can act as weak hydrogen bond acceptors. On the other hand the acidic hydrogen in halothane type anaesthetics are weak proton donors. These two facts together lead to a probable mechanism of action for all general anaesthetics.

  15. Do Halogen-Hydrogen Bond Donor Interactions Dominate the Favorable Contribution of Halogens to Ligand-Protein Binding?

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Yu; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2017-07-20

    Halogens are present in a significant number of drugs, contributing favorably to ligand-protein binding. Currently, the contribution of halogens, most notably chlorine and bromine, is largely attributed to halogen bonds involving favorable interactions with hydrogen bond acceptors. However, we show that halogens acting as hydrogen bond acceptors potentially make a more favorable contribution to ligand binding than halogen bonds based on quantum mechanical calculations. In addition, bioinformatics analysis of ligand-protein crystal structures shows the presence of significant numbers of such interactions. It is shown that interactions between halogens and hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) are dominated by perpendicular C-X···HBD orientations. Notably, the orientation dependence of the halogen-HBD (X-HBD) interactions is minimal over greater than 100° with favorable interaction energies ranging from -2 to -14 kcal/mol. This contrasts halogen bonds in that X-HBD interactions are substantially more favorable, being comparable to canonical hydrogen bonds, with a smaller orientation dependence, such that they make significant, favorable contributions to ligand-protein binding and, therefore, should be actively considered during rational ligand design.

  16. An atom in molecules study of infrared intensity enhancements in fundamental donor stretching bands in hydrogen bond formation.

    PubMed

    Terrabuio, Luiz A; Richter, Wagner E; Silva, Arnaldo F; Bruns, Roy E; Haiduke, Roberto L A

    2014-12-07

    Vibrational modes ascribed to the stretching of X-H bonds from donor monomers (HXdonor) in complexes presenting hydrogen bonds (HF···HF, HCl···HCl, HCN···HCN, HNC···HNC, HCN···HF, HF···HCl and H2O···HF) exhibit large (4 to 7 times) infrared intensity increments during complexation according to CCSD/cc-pVQZ-mod calculations. These intensity increases are explained by the charge-charge flux-dipole flux (CCFDF) model based on multipoles from the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) as resulting from a reinforcing interaction between two contributions to the dipole moment derivatives with respect to the vibrational displacements: charge and charge flux. As such, variations that occur in their intensity cross terms in hydrogen bond formation correlate nicely with the intensity enhancements. These stretching modes of HXdonor bonds can be approximately modeled by sole displacement of the positively charged hydrogens towards the acceptor terminal atom with concomitant electronic charge transfers in the opposite direction that are larger than those occurring for the H atom displacements of their isolated donor molecules. This analysis indicates that the charge-charge flux interaction reinforcement on H-bond complexation is associated with variations of atomic charge fluxes in both parent molecules and small electronic charge transfers between them. The QTAIM/CCFDF model also indicates that atomic dipole flux contributions do not play a significant role in these intensity enhancements.

  17. Unique Reactivity Patterns Catalyzed by Internal Lewis Acid Assisted Hydrogen Bond Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auvil, Tyler Jay

    The advancement of hydrogen bond donor (HBD) organocatalysis has been inhibited by a number of challenges. Conventional HBDs suffer from high catalyst loadings and operate in only limited types of reactions, typically the activation of 1,2- and 1,4-acceptors for nucleophilic attack. One strategy to address the shortcomings of HBD catalysis is to design innovative catalysts with improved reactivity. To this end, boronate ureas have been developed as a new family of enhanced HBD catalysts that enable useful new reactivity patterns. Boronate ureas are easily-accessible, small organic molecules that benefit from improved catalytic abilities plausibly due to internal coordination of the urea carbonyl to a strategically placed Lewis acid. Optimization of the boronate urea scaffold has revealed their enhanced catalytic activity, enabling new directions in HBD catalysis. The discovery of boronate ureas has allowed for the unveiling of new HBD activation modes, providing unique reactivity patterns that are inaccessible with conventional HBD catalysts. Among these reactivity patterns is the activation of strained nitrocyclopropane carboxylates for nucleophilic ring-opening reactions, which affords a swift route to access gamma-amino-alpha-nitroester building blocks. The ring-opening method was highlighted by its utilization in the total synthesis of a CB-1 receptor inverse agonist, which was recently patented by Eli Lilly. Additionally, boronate ureas can elicit carbene-like reactivity from alpha-diazocarbonyl compounds, allowing for organocatalytic heteroatom-hydrogen insertions reactions, the first of their kind. The boronate urea activation of alpha-nitrodiazoesters has permitted the development of an unsymmetric double alpha-arylation process, affording a synthetically challenging motif in a single flask. The alpha-arylation reaction proceeds through a conceptually novel organocatalytic transient N--H insertion process, employing anilines as carbene activators. The use

  18. Recent advances in asymmetric organocatalysis mediated by bifunctional amine-thioureas bearing multiple hydrogen-bonding donors.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Wang, Chun-Jiang

    2015-01-25

    Organocatalysis has proven to be one of the most rapidly developing and competitive research areas in asymmetric catalysis since 2000, and has become a third branch besides biocatalysis and transition metal catalysis. In this feature article, recent progress from our research group on asymmetric organocatalysis, focusing on fine-tunable amine-thiourea catalysis, is described. Design of novel bifunctional amine-thiourea organocatalysts based upon the synergistic activation strategy via multiple hydrogen bonds and their applications in asymmetric C-C, C-N, and C-S bond-forming reactions under mild conditions are discussed in detail. The most attractive feature of the newly designed fine-tunable amine-thiourea catalysts is the incorporation of multiple hydrogen bonding donors and stereogenic centers.

  19. Two different hydrogen bond donor ligands together: a selectivity improvement in organometallic {Re(CO)3} anion hosts.

    PubMed

    Ion, Laura; Nieto, Sonia; Pérez, Julio; Riera, Lucía; Riera, Víctor; Díaz, Jesús; López, Ramón; Anderson, Kirsty M; Steed, Jonathan W

    2011-09-05

    Rhenium(I) compounds [Re(CO)(3)(Hdmpz)(2)(ampy)]BAr'(4) and [Re(CO)(3)(N-MeIm)(2)(ampy)]BAr'(4) (Hdmpz = 3,5-dimethylpyrazole, N-MeIm = N-methylimidazole, ampy = 2-aminopyridine or 3-aminopyridine) have been prepared stepwise as the sole reaction products in good yields. The cationic complexes feature two different types of hydrogen bond donor ligands, and their anion binding behavior has been studied both in solution and in the solid state. Compounds with 2-ampy ligands are labile in the presence of nearly all of the anions tested. The X-ray structure of the complex [Re(CO)(3)(Hdmpz)(2)(ampy)](+) (2) shows that the 2-ampy ligand is metal-coordinated through the amino group, a fact that can be responsible for its labile character. The 3-ampy derivatives (coordinated through the pyridinic nitrogen atom) are stable toward the addition of several anions and are more selective anion hosts than their tris(pyrazole) or tris(imidazole) counterparts. This selectivity is higher for compound [Re(CO)(3)(N-MeIm)(2)(MeNA)]BAr'(4) (5·BAr'(4), MeNA = N-methylnicotinamide) that features an amido moiety, which is a better hydrogen bond donor than the amino group. Some of the receptor-anion adducts have been characterized in the solid state by X-ray diffraction, showing that both types of hydrogen bond donor ligands of the cationic receptor participate in the interaction with the anion hosts. DFT calculations suggest that coordination of the ampy ligands is more favorable through the amino group only for the cationic complex 2, as a consequence of the existence of a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond. In all other cases, the pyridinic coordination is clearly favored.

  20. Hydrogen bond donors accelerate vibrational cooling of hot purine derivatives in heavy water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Chen, Jinquan; Kohler, Bern

    2013-08-08

    Natural nucleobases and many of their derivatives have ultrashort excited state lifetimes that make them excellent model systems for studying intermolecular energy flow from a hot solute molecule to the solvent. UV-pump/broadband-mid-IR-probe transient absorption spectra of canonical purine nucleobases and several xanthine derivatives were acquired in D2O and acetonitrile in the probe frequency range of 1500-1750 cm(-1). The spectra reveal that vibrationally hot ground state molecules created by ultrafast internal conversion return to thermal equilibrium in several picoseconds by dissipating their excess energy to solvent molecules. In acetonitrile solution, where hydrogen bonding is minimal, vibrational cooling (VC) occurs with the same time constant of 10 ± 3 ps for paraxanthine, theophylline, and caffeine within experimental uncertainty. In D2O, VC by these molecules occurs more rapidly and at different rates that are correlated with the number of N-D bonds. Hypoxanthine has a VC time constant of 3 ± 1 ps, while similar lifetimes of 2.3 ± 0.8 ps and 3.1 ± 0.3 ps are seen for 5'-adenosine monophosphate and 5'-guanosine monophosphate, respectively. All three molecules have at least two N-D bonds. Slightly slower VC time constants are measured for paraxanthine (4 ± 1 ps) and theophylline (5.1 ± 0.8 ps), dimethylated xanthines that have only one N-D bond. Caffeine, a trimethylated xanthine with no N-D bonds, has a VC time constant of 7.7 ± 0.9 ps, the longest ever observed for any nucleobase in aqueous solution. Hydrogen bond donation by solute molecules is proposed to enable rapid energy disposal to water via direct coupling of high frequency solute-solvent modes.

  1. Theoretical study of dihydrogen bonds between (XH)2, X = Li, Na, BeH, and MgH, and weak hydrogen bond donors (HCN, HNC, and HCCH).

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Zborowski, Krzysztof; Elguero, Jose; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2006-08-31

    The dihydrogen-bonded (DHB) complexes formed by (XH)2, with X = Li, Na, BeH, and MgH, with one, two, and four protonic molecules (HCN, HNC, and HCCH) have been studied. These complexes have been compared to those of the XH monomers with the same hydrogen bond donor molecules. The energetic results have been rationalized based on the electrostatic potential of the isolated hydridic systems. The electron density properties have been analyzed within the AIM methodology, both at the bond critical points and the integrated values at the atomic basins. Exponential relationships between several properties calculated at the bond critical points (rho,nabla2rho, lambdai, G, and V) and variation of integrated properties (energy, charge, and volume) vs the DHB distance have been obtained.

  2. Introducing ligand-based hydrogen bond donors to a receptor: both selectivity and binding affinity for anion recognition in water can be improved.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feihu; Cheng, Chen; Feng, Guoqiang

    2012-12-21

    Introducing hydrogen bond donors to a receptor was found to be an effective approach to improve both its selectivity and binding affinity for pyrophosphate in water. The crystal structure of Zn3-ADP complex showed the improvements come from the combination of H-bonding and metal coordination in a manner similar to many metalloenzymes.

  3. Hydrogen Bonds between Nitrogen Donors and the Semiquinone in the Qi-site of the bc1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Dikanov, Sergei A.; Holland, J. Todd; Endeward, Burkhard; Kolling, Derrick R. J.; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Prisner, Thomas F.; Antony R., Crofts

    2011-01-01

    The ubisemiquinone stabilized at the Qi-site of the bc1 complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides forms a hydrogen bond with a nitrogen from the local protein environment, tentatively identified as ring N from His-217. The interactions of 14N and 15N have been studied by X-band (~9.7 GHz) and S-band (3.4 GHz) pulsed EPR spectroscopy. The application of S-band spectroscopy has allowed us to determine the complete nuclear quadrupole tensor of the 14N involved in H-bond formation and to assign it unambiguously to the Nε of His-217. This tensor has distinct characteristics in comparison with H-bonds between semiquinones and Nδ in other quinone-processing sites. The experiments with 15N showed that the Nε of His-217 was the only nitrogen carrying any considerable unpaired spin density in the ubiquinone environment, and allowed calculation of the isotropic and anisotropic couplings with the Nε of His-217. From these data, we could estimate the unpaired spin density transferred onto 2s and 2p orbitals of nitrogen and the distance from the nitrogen to the carbonyl oxygen of 2.38 ± 0.13Å. The hyperfine coupling of other protein nitrogens with semiquinone is <0.1 MHz. This did not exclude the nitrogen of the Asn-221 as a possible hydrogen bond donor to the methoxy oxygen of the semiquinone. A mechanistic role for this residue is supported by kinetic experiments with mutant strains N221T, N221H, N221I, N221S, N221P, and N221D, all of which showed some inhibition but retained partial turnover. PMID:17616531

  4. Hydrogen bonded binary molecular adducts derived from exobidentate N-donor ligand with dicarboxylic acids: Acid⋯imidazole hydrogen-bonding interactions in neutral and ionic heterosynthons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathalikkattil, Amal Cherian; Damodaran, Subin; Bisht, Kamal Kumar; Suresh, Eringathodi

    2011-01-01

    Four new binary molecular compounds between a flexible exobidentate N-heterocycle and a series of dicarboxylic acids have been synthesized. The N-donor 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene (bix) was reacted with flexible and rigid dicarboxylic acids viz., cyclohexane-1,4-dicarboxylic acid (H 2chdc), naphthalene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid (H 2npdc) and 1H-pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylic acid (H 2pzdc), generating four binary molecular complexes. X-ray crystallographic investigation of the molecular adducts revealed the primary intermolecular interactions carboxylic acid⋯amine (via O-H⋯N) as well as carboxylate⋯protonated amine (via N-H +⋯O -) within the binary compounds, generating layered and two-dimensional sheet type H-bonded networks involving secondary weak interactions (C-H⋯O) including the solvent of crystallization. Depending on the differences in p Ka values of the selected base/acid (Δp Ka), diverse H-bonded supramolecular assemblies could be premeditated. This study demonstrates the H-bonding interactions between imidazole/imidazolium cation and carboxylic acid/carboxylate anion in providing sufficient driving force for the directed assembly of binary molecular complexes. In the two-component solid form of hetero synthons involving bix and dicarboxylic acid, only H 2chdc exist as cocrystal with bix, while all the other three compounds crystallized exclusively as salt, in agreement with the Δp Ka values predicted for the formation of salts/cocrystals from the base and acid used in the synthesis of supramolecular solids.

  5. A Comparative PCET Study of a Donor-Acceptor Pair Linked by Ionized and Non-ionized Asymmetric Hydrogen-Bonded Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Young, Elizabeth R.; Rosenthal, Joel; Hodgkiss, Justin M.

    2012-01-01

    A Zn(II) porphyrin-amidinium is the excited state electron donor (D) to a naphthalene diimide acceptor (A) appended with either a carboxylate or sulfonate functionality. The two-point hydrogen bond (---[H+]---) formed between the amidinium and carboxylate or sulfonate establishes a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) pathway for charge transfer. The two D---[H+]---A assemblies differ only by the proton configuration within the hydrogen bonding interface. Specifically, the amidinium transfers a proton to the carboxylate to form a non-ionized amidine-carboxylic acid two-point hydrogen network whereas the amidinium maintains both protons when bound to the sulfonate functionality forming an ionized amidinium-sulfonate two-point hydrogen network. These two interface configurations within the dyads thus allow for a direct comparison of PCET kinetics for the same donor and acceptor juxtaposed by an ionized and non-ionized hydrogen-bonded interface. Analysis of PCET kinetics ascertained from transient absorption and transient emission spectroscopy reveal that the ionized interface is more strongly impacted by the local solvent environment, thus establishing that the initial static configuration of the proton interface is a critical determinant to the kinetics of PCET. PMID:19489645

  6. Organocatalytic asymmetric Henry reaction of 1H-pyrrole-2,3-diones with bifunctional amine-thiourea catalysts bearing multiple hydrogen-bond donors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Liang; Yue, Deng-Feng; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Summary For the first time, a catalytic asymmetric Henry reaction of 1H-pyrrole-2,3-diones was achieved with a chiral bifunctional amine-thiourea as a catalyst possessing multiple hydrogen-bond donors. With this developed method, a range of 3-hydroxy-3-nitromethyl-1H-pyrrol-2(3H)-ones bearing quaternary stereocenters were obtained in acceptable yield (up to 75%) and enantioselectivity (up to 73% ee). PMID:26977188

  7. A study of hierarchy of hydrogen and halogen bonds in the molecular complexes of 4-iodophenol with various aza-donor compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Amrita; Pedireddi, V. R.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular complexes of 4-iodophenol, 1 with various aza-donor compounds, 4,4‧-bipyridine (a), 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane (b), 4,4‧-azopyridine (c), 1,10-phenanthroline (d), phenazine (e), 1,4-diazabicyclo [2.2.2]octane (DABCO)(f), 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene (g) and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (h), have been prepared by co-crystallization. All the complexes were analysed by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Amongst, in the complexes, 1a, 1b and 1c, each di-acceptor moiety is connected to two molecules of phenol, 1 through a hydrogen (Osbnd H⋯N) and a halogen bond (I⋯N), while in the complexes 1c‧,1d - 1f, the constituents recognise each other only through Osbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds. However, in the complexes of 1g and 1h, both the halo and hydrogen interactions express themselves exclusively as well as independently within the same crystals. An analysis of hierarchy of Osbnd H⋯N and I⋯N non-covalent interactions suggests that both hydrogen and halogen bonds are realized equally with diacceptor aza-compounds with twisted conformation, while in the complexes with planar diacceptor moieties either hydrogen or halogen bonds show equal propensity independently. This analysis is supported by Hirshfeld surface analysis of the diacceptors of the co-crystals.

  8. Reinforced self-assembly of donor-acceptor π-conjugated molecules to DNA templates by dipole-dipole interactions together with complementary hydrogen bonding interactions for biomimetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanggui; Chen, Yali; Wong, Man Shing; Lo, Pik Kwan

    2012-10-08

    One of the most important criteria for the successful DNA-templated polymerization to generate fully synthetic biomimetic polymers is to design the complementary structural monomers, which assemble to the templates strongly and precisely before carrying polymerization. In this study, water-soluble, laterally thymine-substituted donor-acceptor π-conjugated molecules were designed and synthesized to self-assemble with complementary oligoadenines templates, dA(20) and dA(40), into stable and tubular assemblies through noncovalent interactions including π-π stacking, dipole-dipole interactions, and the complementary adenine-thymine (A-T) hydrogen-bonding. UV-vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to investigate the formation of highly robust nanofibrous structures. Our results have demonstrated for the first time that the dipole-dipole interactions are stronger and useful to reinforce the assembly of donor-acceptor π-conjugated molecules to DNA templates and the formation of the stable and robust supramolecular nanofibrous complexes together with the complementary hydrogen bonding interactions. This provides an initial step toward DNA-templated polymerization to create fully synthetic DNA-mimetic polymers for biotechnological applications. This study also presents an opportunity to precisely position donor-acceptor type molecules in a controlled manner and tailor-make advanced materials for various biotechnological applications.

  9. Controlled energy transfer between isolated donor-acceptor molecules intercalated in thermally self-ensemble two-dimensional hydrogen bonding cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Attar, Hameed A.; Monkman, Andrew P.

    2012-12-01

    Thermally assembled hydrogen bonding cages which are neither size nor guest specific have been developed using a poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) host. A water-soluble conjugated polymer poly(2,5-bis(3-sulfonatopropoxy)-1,4-phenylene, disodium salt-alt-1,4-phenylene) (PPP-OPSO3) as a donor and tris(2,2-bipyridyl)- ruthenium(II) [Ru(bpy)32+] as an acceptor have been isolated and trapped in such a PVA matrix network. This is a unique system that shows negligible exciton diffusion and the donor and acceptor predominantly interact by a direct single step excitation transfer process (DSSET). Singlet and triplet exciton quenching have been studied. Time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurement at different acceptor concentrations has enabled us to determine the dimensionality of the energy-transfer process within the PVA scaffold. Our results reveal that the PVA hydrogen bonding network effectively isolates the donor-acceptor molecules in a two-dimensional layer structure (lamella) leading to the condition where a precise control of the energy and charge transfer is possible.

  10. Facile and promising method for michael addition of indole and pyrrole to electron-deficient trans-β-nitroolefins catalyzed by a hydrogen bond donor catalyst Feist's acid and preliminary study of antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Al Majid, Abdullah M A; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Barakat, Assem; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H M; Naushad, Mu

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cooperative hydrogen-bonding effects has been demonstrated using novel 3-methylenecyclopropane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (Feist's acid (FA)) as hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the addition of indole and pyrrole to trans-β-nitrostyrene derivatives. Because of the hydrogen bond donor (HBD) ability, Feist's acid (FA) has been introduced as a new class of hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the activation of nitroolefin towards nucleophilic substitution reaction. It has effectively catalyzed the Michael addition of indoles and pyrrole to β-nitroolefins under optimum reaction condition to furnish the corresponding Michael adducts in good to excellent yields (up to 98%). The method is general, atom-economical, convenient, and eco-friendly and could provide excellent yields and regioselectivities. Some newly synthesized compounds were for examined in vitro antimicrobial activity and their preliminary results are reported.

  11. Facile and Promising Method for Michael Addition of Indole and Pyrrole to Electron-Deficient trans-β-Nitroolefins Catalyzed by a Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalyst Feist's Acid and Preliminary Study of Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Majid, Abdullah M. A.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Barakat, Assem; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H. M.; Naushad, Mu.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cooperative hydrogen-bonding effects has been demonstrated using novel 3-methylenecyclopropane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (Feist's acid (FA)) as hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the addition of indole and pyrrole to trans-β-nitrostyrene derivatives. Because of the hydrogen bond donor (HBD) ability, Feist's acid (FA) has been introduced as a new class of hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the activation of nitroolefin towards nucleophilic substitution reaction. It has effectively catalyzed the Michael addition of indoles and pyrrole to β-nitroolefins under optimum reaction condition to furnish the corresponding Michael adducts in good to excellent yields (up to 98%). The method is general, atom-economical, convenient, and eco-friendly and could provide excellent yields and regioselectivities. Some newly synthesized compounds were for examined in vitro antimicrobial activity and their preliminary results are reported. PMID:24574906

  12. On the Versatility of BH2 X (X=F, Cl, Br, and I) Compounds as Halogen-, Hydrogen-, and Triel-Bond Donors: An Ab Initio Study.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2016-10-18

    In this manuscript, the ability of BH2 X compounds (X=F, Cl, Br, and I) to establish halogen-, hydrogen-, and triel-bonding interactions was studied at the RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory. Several homodimers were taken into account, highlighting the versatility of these compounds to act as both electron donors and electron acceptors. Natural bond orbital analysis showed that orbital effects were important contributors to the global stabilization of the σ- and π-hole bonded complexes studied. Finally, some X-ray solid-state structures retrieved from the Cambridge structural database were described to demonstrate the importance of these interactions involving boron derivatives in the solid state.

  13. Monofunctional platinum(II) complexes with potent tumor cell growth inhibitory activity: the effect of a hydrogen-bond donor/acceptor N-heterocyclic ligand.

    PubMed

    Margiotta, Nicola; Savino, Salvatore; Gandin, Valentina; Marzano, Christine; Natile, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the possibility of further increase the role of the N-donor aromatic base in antitumor Hollis-type compounds by conferring the possibility to act as a hydrogen-bond donor/acceptor. Therefore, we synthesized the Pt(II) complex cis-[PtCl(NH3 )2 (naph)]NO3 (1) containing the 1,8-naphthyridine (naph) ligand. The naphthyridine ligand is generally monodentate, and the second nitrogen atom can act as H-bond donor/acceptor depending upon its protonation state. The possibility of forming such an H-bond could be crucial in the interaction of the drug with DNA or proteins. Apart from the synthesis of the compound, in this study we evaluated its in vitro antitumor activity in a wide panel of tumor cell lines, also including cells selected for their sensitivity/resistance to oxaliplatin, which was compared with that of previously reported complex 2 ([PtI(2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline)(1-methyl-cytosine)]I) and oxaliplatin and cisplatin as reference compounds. The cytotoxicity data were correlated with the cellular uptake and the DNA platination levels. Finally, the reactivity of 1 towards guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) and glutathione was investigated to provide insights into its mechanism of action.

  14. Hydrogen multicentre bonds.

    PubMed

    Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G

    2007-01-01

    The concept of a chemical bond stands out as a major development in the process of understanding how atoms are held together in molecules and solids. Lewis' classical picture of chemical bonds as shared-electron pairs evolved to the quantum-mechanical valence-bond and molecular-orbital theories, and the classification of molecules and solids in terms of their bonding type: covalent, ionic, van der Waals and metallic. Along with the more complex hydrogen bonds and three-centre bonds, they form a paradigm within which the structure of almost all molecules and solids can be understood. Here, we present evidence for hydrogen multicentre bonds-a generalization of three-centre bonds-in which a hydrogen atom equally bonds to four or more other atoms. When substituting for oxygen in metal oxides, hydrogen bonds equally to all the surrounding metal atoms, becoming fourfold coordinated in ZnO, and sixfold coordinated in MgO. These multicentre bonds are remarkably strong despite their large hydrogen-metal distances. The calculated local vibration mode frequency in MgO agrees with infrared spectroscopy measurements. Multicoordinated hydrogen also explains the dependence of electrical conductivity on oxygen partial pressure, resolving a long-standing controversy on the role of point defects in unintentional n-type conductivity of ZnO (refs 8-10).

  15. Hydrogen bonding. Part 25. The nature of the hydrogen bond in hydroxytropenylium chloride (tropone hydrochloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Cross, Joan E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.

    1988-08-01

    Hydroxytropenylium iodide and bromide contain normal electrostatic OH⋯X - hydrogen bonds. Hydroxytropenylium chloride, however, contains a hydrogen bond intermediate between the normal electrostatic type and the very strong covalent type, similar to the hydrogen bonds found in choline fluoride or the Type I C∞v hydrogen dihalide ions. Infrared comparisons with compounds previously studied demonstrate that the hydroxytropenylium ion is a stronger hydrogen bond donor than either choline cation or protonated betaine cation, and suggest that hydroxytropenylium fluoride, if it can be prepared, should contain a three-center covalent hydrogen bond.

  16. Experimental evidence for the blue-shifted hydrogen-bonded complexes of CHF3 with π-electron donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopi, R.; Ramanathan, N.; Sundararajan, K.

    2017-06-01

    Blue-shifted hydrogen-bonded complexes of fluoroform (CHF3) with benzene (C6H6) and acetylene (C2H2) have been investigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and ab initio computations. For CHF3-C6H6 complex, calculations performed at the B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory using 6-311 ++G (d,p) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets discerned two minima corresponding to a 1:1 hydrogen-bonded complex. The global minimum correlated to a structure, where the interaction is between the hydrogen of CHF3 and the π-electrons of C6H6 and a weak local minimum was stabilized through H…F interaction. For the CHF3-C2H2 complex, computation performed at MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory yielded two minima, corresponding to the cyclic C-H…π complex A (global) and a linear C-H…F (n-σ) complex B (local). Experimentally a blue-shift of 32.3 cm- 1 and 7.7 cm- 1 was observed in the ν1 C-H stretching mode of CHF3 sub-molecule in Ar matrix for the 1:1 C-H…π complexes of CHF3 with C6H6 and C2H2 respectively. Natural bond orbital (NBO), Atoms-in-molecule (AIM) and energy decomposition (EDA) analyses were carried out to explain the blue-shifting and the nature of the interaction in these complexes.

  17. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nadas, Janos I; Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  18. Native Mannose-Dominant Extraction by Pyridine-Phenol Alternating Oligomers Having an Extremely Efficient Repeating Motif of Hydrogen-Bonding Acceptors and Donors.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Yuki; Abe, Hajime; Inouye, Masahiko

    2015-11-09

    Pyridine-phenol alternating oligomers in which pyridine and phenol moieties are alternatingly linked through acetylene bonds at the 2,6-positions of the aromatic rings were designed and synthesized. The pyridine nitrogen atom and the neighboring phenolic hydroxyl group were oriented so that they do not form an intramolecular hydrogen bond but cooperatively act as hydrogen-bonding acceptor and donor in a push-pull fashion for the hydroxyl group of saccharides. The longer oligomer strongly bound to lipophilic glycosides in 1,2-dichloroethane, and association constants approached 10(8)  M(-1) . Moreover, the oligomer extracted native saccharides from a solid phase to apolar organic solvents up to the extent of an equal amount of the oligomer and showed mannose-dominant extraction among naturally abundant hexoses. The oligomer bound to native saccharides even in 20 % DMSO-containing 1,2-dichloroethane and exhibited association constants of greater than 10 M(-1) for D-mannose and D-glucose. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-07

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  20. Hydrogen bonds between nitrogen donors and the semiquinone in the Q(B) site of bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I; Narasimhulu, Kupala V; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2010-08-25

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides have identical ubiquinone-10 molecules functioning as primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) electron acceptors. X-band 2D pulsed EPR spectroscopy, called HYSCORE, was applied to study the interaction of the Q(B) site semiquinone with nitrogens from the local protein environment in natural and (15)N uniformly labeled reactions centers. (14)N and (15)N HYSCORE spectra of the Q(B) semiquinone show the interaction with two nitrogens carrying transferred unpaired spin density. Quadrupole coupling constants estimated from (14)N HYSCORE spectra indicate them to be a protonated nitrogen of an imidazole residue and amide nitrogen of a peptide group. (15)N HYSCORE spectra allowed estimation of the isotropic and anisotropic couplings with these nitrogens. From these data, we calculated the unpaired spin density transferred onto 2s and 2p orbitals of nitrogen and analyzed the contribution of different factors to the anisotropic hyperfine tensors. The hyperfine coupling of other protein nitrogens with the semiquinone is weak (<0.1 MHz). These results clearly indicate that the Q(B) semiquinone forms hydrogen bonds with two nitrogens and provide quantitative characteristics of the hyperfine couplings with these nitrogens, which can be used in theoretical modeling of the Q(B) site. On the basis of the quadrupole coupling constant, one nitrogen can only be assigned to N(delta) of His-L190, consistent with all existing structures. However, we cannot specify between two candidates the residue corresponding to the second nitrogen. Further work employing multifrequency spectroscopic approaches or selective isotope labeling would be desirable for unambiguous assignment of this nitrogen.

  1. Charge-Assisted Hydrogen-Bonded Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Michael D.

    The importance of hydrogen bonds is widely recognized because of their role in defining the structure and properties of many compounds, including water, proteins, DNA, and polymers. Hydrogen bonding also has emerged as a critical tool in solid-state chemistry, in which the versatility of organic synthesis has been combined with the structure-directing properties of hydrogen-bond donor-acceptor pairs to steer molecular assembly into networks that reflect the symmetries of their molecular constituents. Although these efforts have been largely empirical, the dominance of hydrogen bonding among the multitude of intermolecular forces often leads to predictable control of crystal structure. Although charge-assisted hydrogen bonds (donors and acceptors with ionic character that reinforce the electrostatic character of the hydrogen bond) have been recognized for decades, their use in network design, particularly for “crystal engineering,” has grown substantially in the past decade. The evidence suggests that charge-assisted hydrogen bonds introduce extraordinary robustness to molecular networks that reflects a combination of strong intermolecular forces and structural compliance, thus facilitating design of organic solid-state materials.

  2. Natural energy decomposition analysis: An energy partitioning procedure for molecular interactions with application to weak hydrogen bonding, strong ionic, and moderate donor-acceptor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendening, Eric D.; Streitwieser, Andrew

    1994-02-01

    We present a procedure for partitioning the Hartree-Fock self-consistent-field (SCF) interaction energy into electrostatic, charge transfer, and deformation components. The natural bond orbital (NBO) approach of Weinhold and co-workers is employed to construct intermediate supermolecule and fragment wave functions that satisfy the Pauli exclusion principle, thereby avoiding the principal deficiency of the popular Kitaura-Morokuma energy decomposition scheme. The function counterpoise method of Boys and Bernardi enters the procedure naturally, providing an estimate of basis set superposition error (BSSE). We find that the energy components exhibit little basis set dependence when BSSE is small. Applications are presented for several representative molecular and ion complexes: the weak hydrogen bond of the water dimer, the strong ionic interaction of the alkali metal hydrides, and the moderate donor-acceptor interactions of BH3NH3 and BH3CO. Electrostatic interaction dominates the long-range region of the potential energy surface and charge transfer is strongly stabilizing for fragments within van der Waals contact. The repulsive interaction in the short range region of the potential arises from deformation as the fragment wave functions distort to avoid significant interpenetration.

  3. Polarization-induced σ-holes and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Hennemann, Matthias; Murray, Jane S; Politzer, Peter; Riley, Kevin E; Clark, Timothy

    2012-06-01

    The strong collinear polarizability of the A-H bond in A-H···B hydrogen bonds is shown to lead to an enhanced σ-hole on the donor hydrogen atom and hence to stronger hydrogen bonding. This effect helps to explain the directionality of hydrogen bonds, the well known cooperative effect in hydrogen bonding, and the occurrence of blue-shifting. The latter results when significant additional electron density is shifted into the A-H bonding region by the polarization effect. The shift in the A-H stretching frequency is shown to depend essentially linearly on the calculated atomic charge on the donor hydrogen for all donors in which A belongs to the same row of the periodic table. A further result of the polarization effect, which is also expected for other σ-hole bonds, is that the strength of the non-covalent interaction depends strongly on external electric fields.

  4. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-06-07

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics–quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid—alcohols—has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  5. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols.

    PubMed

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V; Jansen, Thomas L C; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S

    2015-06-07

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics-quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid--alcohols--has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  6. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics-quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid—alcohols—has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  7. Hydrogen-accelerated thermal donor formation in Czochralski silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, H.J. ); Hahn, S.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Acceleration of thermal donor formation at 400 {degree}C in Czochralski Si by a hydrogen plasma has been observed using low-temperature infrared absorption and spreading resistance probe measurements. The accelerated formation in as-grown Si is attributed to hydrogen diffusion and catalyzed conversion of electrically inactive nuclei to thermal donors. When the nuclei concentration is small such as in rapid thermal annealed Si, hydrogen interaction at SiO bonds is suggested as the rate-limiting step in thermal donor formation.

  8. Hypoxia-selective 3-alkyl 1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxides: the influence of hydrogen bond donors on extravascular transport and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Hay, Michael P; Pchalek, Karin; Pruijn, Frederik B; Hicks, Kevin O; Siim, Bronwyn G; Anderson, Robert F; Shinde, Sujata S; Phillips, Victoria; Denny, William A; Wilson, William R

    2007-12-27

    Tirapazamine (TPZ) and related 1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4 dioxides (BTOs) are selectively toxic under hypoxia, but their ability to kill hypoxic cells in tumors is generally limited by their poor extravascular transport. Here we show that removing hydrogen bond donors by replacing the 3-NH2 group of TPZ with simple alkyl groups increased their tissue diffusion coefficients as measured in multicellular layer cultures. This advantage was largely retained using solubilizing 3-alkylaminoalkyl substituents provided these were sufficiently lipophilic at pH 7.4. The high reduction potentials of such compounds resulted in rates of metabolism too high for optimal penetration into hypoxic tissue, but electron-donating 6- and 7-substituents moderated metabolism. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model-guided screening was used to select BTOs with optimal extravascular transport and hypoxic cytotoxicity properties for evaluation against HT29 human tumor xenografts in combination with radiation. This identified four novel 3-alkyl BTOs providing greater clonogenic killing of hypoxic cells than TPZ at equivalent host toxicity, with the 6-morpholinopropyloxy-BTO 22 being 3-fold more active.

  9. Cationic reverse micelles create water with super hydrogen-bond-donor capacity for enzymatic catalysis: hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl acetate by alpha-chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Fernando; Falcone, R Dario; Mejuto, J C; Silber, Juana J; Correa, N Mariano

    2010-08-02

    Reverse micelles (RMs) are very good nanoreactors because they can create a unique microenvironment for carrying out a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions. The aim of the present work is to determine the influence of different RM interfaces on the hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl acetate (2-NA) by alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-CT). The reaction was studied in water/benzyl-n-hexadecyldimethylammonium chloride (BHDC)/benzene RMs and, its efficiency compared with that observed in pure water and in sodium 1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT) RMs. Thus, the hydrolysis rates of 2-NA catalyzed by alpha-CT were determined by spectroscopic measurements. In addition, the method used allows the joint evaluation of the substrate partition constant K(p) between the organic and the micellar pseudophase and the kinetic parameters: catalytic rate constant k(cat), and the Michaelis constant K(M) of the enzymatic reaction. The effect of the surfactant concentration on the kinetics parameters was determined at constant W(0)=[H(2)O]/[surfactant], and the variation of W(0) with surfactant constant concentration was investigated. The results show that the classical Michaelis-Menten mechanism is valid for alpha-CT in all of the RMs systems studied and that the reaction takes place at both RM interfaces. Moreover, the catalytic efficiency values k(cat)/K(M) obtained in the RMs systems are higher than that reported in water. Furthermore, there is a remarkable increase in alpha-CT efficiency in the cationic RMs in comparison with the anionic system, presumably due to the unique water properties found in these confined media. The results show that in cationic RMs the hydrogen-bond donor capacity of water is enhanced due to its interaction with the cationic interface. Hence, entrapped water can be converted into "super-water" for the enzymatic reaction studied in this work.

  10. Predictive Models for the Free Energy of Hydrogen Bonded Complexes with Single and Cooperative Hydrogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Glavatskikh, Marta; Madzhidov, Timur; Solov'ev, Vitaly; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we report QSPR modeling of the free energy ΔG of 1 : 1 hydrogen bond complexes of different H-bond acceptors and donors. The modeling was performed on a large and structurally diverse set of 3373 complexes featuring a single hydrogen bond, for which ΔG was measured at 298 K in CCl4 . The models were prepared using Support Vector Machine and Multiple Linear Regression, with ISIDA fragment descriptors. The marked atoms strategy was applied at fragmentation stage, in order to capture the location of H-bond donor and acceptor centers. Different strategies of model validation have been suggested, including the targeted omission of individual H-bond acceptors and donors from the training set, in order to check whether the predictive ability of the model is not limited to the interpolation of H-bond strength between two already encountered partners. Successfully cross-validating individual models were combined into a consensus model, and challenged to predict external test sets of 629 and 12 complexes, in which donor and acceptor formed single and cooperative H-bonds, respectively. In all cases, SVM models outperform MLR. The SVM consensus model performs well both in 3-fold cross-validation (RMSE=1.50 kJ/mol), and on the external test sets containing complexes with single (RMSE=3.20 kJ/mol) and cooperative H-bonds (RMSE=1.63 kJ/mol).

  11. Hyperfine and Nuclear Quadrupole Tensors of Nitrogen Donors in the QA Site of Bacterial Reaction Centers: Correlation of the Histidine Nδ Tensors with Hydrogen Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X- and Q-band pulsed EPR spectroscopy was applied to study the interaction of the QA site semiquinone (SQA) with nitrogens from the local protein environment in natural abundance 14N and in 15N uniformly labeled photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole tensors for His-M219 Nδ and Ala-M260 peptide nitrogen (Np) were estimated through simultaneous simulation of the Q-band 15N Davies ENDOR, X- and Q-band 14,15N HYSCORE, and X-band 14N three-pulse ESEEM spectra, with support from DFT calculations. The hyperfine coupling constants were found to be a(14N) = 2.3 MHz, T = 0.3 MHz for His-M219 Nδ and a(14N) = 2.6 MHz, T = 0.3 MHz for Ala-M260 Np. Despite that His-M219 Nδ is established as the stronger of the two H-bond donors, Ala-M260 Np is found to have the larger value of a(14N). The nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were estimated as e2Qq/4h = 0.38 MHz, η = 0.97 and e2Qq/4h = 0.74 MHz, η = 0.59 for His-M219 Nδ and Ala-M260 Np, respectively. An analysis of the available data on nuclear quadrupole tensors for imidazole nitrogens found in semiquinone-binding proteins and copper complexes reveals these systems share similar electron occupancies of the protonated nitrogen orbitals. By applying the Townes–Dailey model, developed previously for copper complexes, to the semiquinones, we find the asymmetry parameter η to be a sensitive probe of the histidine Nδ–semiquinone hydrogen bond strength. This is supported by a strong correlation observed between η and the isotropic coupling constant a(14N) and is consistent with previous computational works and our own semiquinone-histidine model calculations. The empirical relationship presented here for a(14N) and η will provide an important structural characterization tool in future studies of semiquinone-binding proteins. PMID:25026433

  12. Local anesthetics: significance of hydrogen bonding in mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Sax, M; Pletcher, J

    1969-12-19

    The action of local anesthetics is considered in terms of their ability to function as the donor in a hydrogen bond. The formation of a hydrogen-bonded complex between the drug and an acceptor group on the neural membrane is suggested as a feature in the action of local anesthetics.

  13. Hydrogen Bonding in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase: Electronic Inductive Effects and Hydrogen Bond Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Sigala, Paul A.; Herschlag, Daniel; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Computational studies are performed to analyze the physical properties of hydrogen bonds donated by Tyr16 and Asp103 to a series of substituted phenolate inhibitors bound in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). As the solution pKa of the phenolate increases, these hydrogen bond distances decrease, the associated NMR chemical shifts increase, and the fraction of protonated inhibitor increases, in agreement with prior experiments. The quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations provide insight into the electronic inductive effects along the hydrogen-bonding network that includes Tyr16, Tyr57, and Tyr32, as well as insight into hydrogen bond coupling in the active site. The calculations predict that the most-downfield NMR chemical shift observed experimentally corresponds to the Tyr16-phenolate hydrogen bond and that Tyr16 is the proton donor when a bound naphtholate inhibitor is observed to be protonated in electronic absorption experiments. According to these calculations, the electronic inductive effects along the hydrogen-bonding network of tyrosines cause the Tyr16 hydroxyl to be more acidic than the Asp103 carboxylic acid moiety, which is immersed in a relatively nonpolar environment. When one of the distal tyrosine residues in the network is mutated to phenylalanine, thereby diminishing this inductive effect, the Tyr16-phenolate hydrogen bond lengthens, and the Asp103-phenolate hydrogen bond shortens, as observed in NMR experiments. Furthermore, the calculations suggest that the differences in the experimental NMR data and electronic absorption spectra for pKSI and tKSI, two homologous bacterial forms of the enzyme, are due predominantly to the third tyrosine that is present in the hydrogen-bonding network of pKSI but not tKSI. These studies also provide experimentally testable predictions about the impact of mutating the distal tyrosine residues in this hydrogen-bonding network on the NMR chemical shifts and electronic absorption spectra

  14. Water's dual nature and its continuously changing hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Henchman, Richard H

    2016-09-28

    A model is proposed for liquid water that is a continuum between the ordered state with predominantly tetrahedral coordination, linear hydrogen bonds and activated dynamics and a disordered state with a continuous distribution of multiple coordinations, multiple types of hydrogen bond, and diffusive dynamics, similar to that of normal liquids. Central to water's heterogeneous structure is the ability of hydrogen to donate to either one acceptor in a conventional linear hydrogen bond or to multiple acceptors as a furcated hydrogen. Linear hydrogen bonds are marked by slow, activated kinetics for hydrogen-bond switching to more crowded acceptors and sharp first peaks in the hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. Furcated hydrogens, equivalent to free, broken, dangling or distorted hydrogens, have barrierless, rapid kinetics and poorly defined first peaks in their hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. They involve the weakest donor in a local excess of donors, such that barrierless whole-molecule vibration rapidly swaps them between the linear and furcated forms. Despite the low number of furcated hydrogens and their transient existence, they are readily created in a single hydrogen-bond switch and free up the dynamics of numerous surrounding molecules, bringing about the disordered state. Hydrogens in the ordered state switch with activated dynamics to make the non-tetrahedral coordinations of the disordered state, which can also combine to make the ordered state. Consequently, the ordered and disordered states are both connected by diffusive dynamics and differentiated by activated dynamics, bringing about water's continuous heterogeneity.

  15. Hydrogen bonded arrays: the power of multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Alireza; Schmidt, Jacob; Wang, Xue-Bin; Kass, Steven R

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen bond interactions in small covalent model compounds (i.e., deprotonated polyhydroxy alcohols) were measured by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally determined vertical and adiabatic electron detachment energies for (HOCH(2)CH(2))(2)CHO(-)(2a), (HOCH(2)CH(2))(3)CO(-) (3a), and (HOCH(2)CH(2)CH(OH)CH(2))(3)CO(-) (4a)reveal that hydrogen-bonded networks can provide enormous stabilizations and that a single charge center not only can be stabilized by up to three hydrogen bonds but also can increase the interaction energy between noncharged OH groups by 5.8 kcal mol(-1) or more per hydrogen bond. This can lead to pK(a) values that are very different from those in water and can provide some of the impetus for catalytic processes.

  16. Hydrogen Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Shokri, Alireza; Schmidt, Jacob C.; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen bond interactions in small covalent model compounds (i.e. deprotonated polyhydroxy alcohols) were measured by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally determined vertical and adiabatic electron detachment energies for (HOCH2CH2)2CHO (2a), (HOCH2CH2) 3CO (3a) and (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2)3CO (4a) reveal that hydrogen-bonded networks can provide enormous stabilizations, and that a single charge center not only can be stabilized by up to 3 hydrogen bonds but it can increase the interaction energy between non-charged OH groups by 5.8 kcal mol1 or more per hydrogen bond. This can lead to pKa values that are very different than in water, and provide some of the impetus for catalytic processes.

  17. Semiquantal analysis of hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Koji

    2006-07-01

    The semiquantal time-dependent Hartree (SQTDH) theory is applied to the coupled Morse and modified Lippincott-Schroeder (LS) model potentials of hydrogen bond. The structural correlation between the heavy atoms distance and the proton position, the geometric isotope effect, the energy of hydrogen bond formation, and the proton vibrational frequency shift are examined in a broad range of structural parameters. In particular, the geometric isotope effect is found to depend notably on the choice of the potential model, for which the LS potential gives the isotope shift of the heavy atoms distance in the range of 0.02-0.04Å, in quantitative agreement with the experimental findings from assortment of hydrogen bonding crystals. The fourth-order expansion approximation to the semiquantal extended potential was confirmed to be highly accurate in reproducing the full SQTDH results. The approximation is computationally efficient and flexible enough to be applied to general models of hydrogen bond.

  18. Bifunctional hydrogen bonds in monohydrated cycloether complexes.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Margarita M; Angelina, Emilio L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2010-03-04

    In this work, the cooperative effects implicated in bifunctional hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) were studied (in monohydrated six-membered cycloether) within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and of the natural bond orbitals (NBO) analysis. The study was carried out in complexes formed by six-membered cycloether compounds (tetrahydropyrane, 1,4-dioxane, and 1,3-dioxane) and a water molecule. These compounds were used as model systems instead of more complicated molecules of biological importance. All the results were obtained at the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) level theory using a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Attention was focused on the indicators of the cooperative effects that arise when a water molecule interacts simultaneously with a polar and a nonpolar portion of a six-membered cycloether (via bifunctional hydrogen bonds) and compared with conventional H-bonds where the water molecule only interacts with the polar portion of the cycloether. Different indicators of H-bonds strength, such as structural and spectroscopic data, electron charge density, population analysis, hyperconjugation energy and charge transference, consistently showed significant cooperative effects in bifunctional H-bonds. From the AIM, as well as from the NBO analysis, the obtained results allowed us to state that in the monohydrated six-membered cycloether, where the water molecule plays a dual role, as proton acceptor and proton donor, a mutual reinforcement of the two interactions occurs. Because of this feature, the complexes engaged by bifunctional hydrogen bonds are more stabilized than the complexes linked by conventional hydrogen bonds.

  19. Interplay between interstitial and substitutional hydrogen donors in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, S. Â. G.; Lavrov, E. Â. V.; Weber, J.

    2014-06-01

    A Raman study on hydrogen donors in ZnO reveals the properties of bond-centered hydrogen (HBC) and hydrogen trapped in the oxygen vacancy (HO). The donors are identified by their electronic 1s→2s(2p) transitions and their characteristic local vibrational modes. The HO donor was detected preferentially below the sample surface, where a high oxygen vacancy concentration is generated by thermal treatment of the samples. HBC and HO exhibit different thermal stabilities and their concentrations depend strongly on the sample history. Molecular hydrogen is an essential part of the interplay of the two hydrogen donors.

  20. Hydrogen shallow donors in ZnO and rutile TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jörg; Lavrov, Edward V.; Herklotz, Frank

    2012-05-01

    A combined study of IR absorption, photoconductivity, photoluminescence and Raman measurements in ZnO samples supports the theoretical suggestions of a shallow bond-centered hydrogen donor and a shallow hydrogen donor within the oxygen vacancy. In rutile TiO2 we also identify a shallow hydrogen donor in contrast to recent theoretical predictions. A possible solution to this obvious discrepancy is proposed.

  1. On how hydrogen bonds affect foam stability.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Hamann, Martin; Preisig, Natalie; Chauhan, Vinay; Bordes, Romain

    2017-02-08

    Do intermolecular H-bonds between surfactant head groups play a role for foam stability? From the literature on the foam stability of various surfactants with C12 alkyl chains but different head groups a clear picture emerges: stable foams are only generated when hydrogen bonds can form between the head groups, i.e. when the polar head group has a hydrogen bond donor and a proton acceptor. Stable foams can therefore be generated with surfactants having a sugar unit, a glycine, an amine oxide (at pH~5), or a carboxylic acid (at pH~pKa) as polar head group. On the other hand, aqueous foams stabilized with surfactants having oligo(ethylene oxide), phosphine oxide, quaternary ammonium, sulfate, sarcosine, amine oxide (at pH≠5), or carboxylic acid (at pH≠pKa) are not very stable. These observations suggest that hydrogen bonds between neighbouring molecules at the surface enhance foam stability. Formation of hydrogen bonds between surfactant head groups gives rise to a short-range attractive interaction that may restrict the surfactant's mobility while providing a more elastic surfactant layer which can counteract deformations. To support our hypothesis we carried out a systematic foaming study of two types of surfactants, one of them being capable of forming H-bonds and the other one not. Generating foams of all surfactants mentioned above with the same foaming conditions we found that stable foams are obtained when the head group is capable of forming intersurfactant H-bonds. The outcome of this study constitutes a new step towards the implementation of H-bonds in the future design of surfactants.

  2. Hydrogen-donor coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Jr., Edward L.; Mitchell, Willard N.

    1980-01-01

    Improved liquid yields are obtained during the hydrogen-donor solvent liquefaction of coal and similar carbonaceous solids by maintaining a higher concentration of material having hydrogenation catalytic activity in the downstream section of the liquefaction reactor system than in the upstream section of the system.

  3. Geometrical features of hydrogen bonded complexes involving sterically hindered pyridines.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Daria V; Ip, Brenda; Gurinov, Andrey A; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Shenderovich, Ilja G; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2006-09-21

    The ability of strongly sterically hindered pyridines to form hydrogen bonded complexes was inspected using low-temperature 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy in a liquefied Freon mixture. The proton acceptors were 2,6-di(tert-butyl)-4-methyl- and 2,6-di(tert-butyl)-4-diethylaminopyridine; the proton donors were hydrogen tetrafluoroborate, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. The presence of the tert-butyl groups in the ortho positions dramatically perturbed the geometry of the forming hydrogen bonds. As revealed by experiment, the studied crowded pyridines could form hydrogen bonded complexes with proton donors exclusively through their protonation. Even the strongest small proton acceptor, anion F-, could not be received by the protonated base. Instead, the simplest hydrogen bonded complex involved the [FHF]- anion. This complex was characterized by the shortest possible N...F distance of about 2.8 A. Because the ortho tert-butyl groups did not prevent the hydrogen bond interaction between the protonated center and the anion completely, an increase of the pyridine basicity caused a further shortening of the N-H distance and a weakening of the hydrogen bond to the counterion.

  4. Formaldoxime hydrogen bonded complexes with ammonia and hydrogen chloride.

    PubMed

    Golec, Barbara; Mucha, Małgorzata; Sałdyka, Magdalena; Barnes, Austin; Mielke, Zofia

    2015-02-05

    An infrared spectroscopic and MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) study of hydrogen bonded complexes of formaldoxime with ammonia and hydrogen chloride trapped in solid argon matrices is reported. Both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes between formaldoxime and ammonia, hydrogen chloride have been identified in the CH2NOH/NH3/Ar, CH2NOH/HCl/Ar matrices, respectively, their structures were determined by comparison of the spectra with the results of calculations. In the 1:1 complexes present in the argon matrices the OH group of formaldoxime acts as a proton donor for ammonia and the nitrogen atom acts as a proton acceptor for hydrogen chloride. In the 1:2 complexes ammonia or hydrogen chloride dimers interact both with the OH group and the nitrogen atom of CH2NOH to form seven membered cyclic structures stabilized by three hydrogen bonds. The theoretical spectra generally agree well with the experimental ones, but they seriously underestimate the shift of the OH stretch for the 1:1 CH2NOH⋯NH3 complex.

  5. Efficient electronic communication between two identical ferrocene centers in a hydrogen-bonded dimer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Steeb, Jennifer; Kaifer, Angel E

    2006-03-08

    A novel ferrocene derivative that contains a donor-donor-acceptor-acceptor (DDAA) hydrogen bonding motif forms highly stable, noncovalent dimers in chloroform and dichloromethane solutions. Its voltammetric behavior and the observation of an intervalence charge-transfer band reveal that the two equivalent ferrocene centers in the hydrogen-bonded dimer exhibit a surprisingly efficient level of electronic communication.

  6. The influence of hydrogen bonding on partition coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Nádia Melo; Kenny, Peter W.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Prokopczyk, Igor M.; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    This Perspective explores how consideration of hydrogen bonding can be used to both predict and better understand partition coefficients. It is shown how polarity of both compounds and substructures can be estimated from measured alkane/water partition coefficients. When polarity is defined in this manner, hydrogen bond donors are typically less polar than hydrogen bond acceptors. Analysis of alkane/water partition coefficients in conjunction with molecular electrostatic potential calculations suggests that aromatic chloro substituents may be less lipophilic than is generally believed and that some of the effect of chloro-substitution stems from making the aromatic π-cloud less available to hydrogen bond donors. Relationships between polarity and calculated hydrogen bond basicity are derived for aromatic nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen. Aligned hydrogen bond acceptors appear to present special challenges for prediction of alkane/water partition coefficients and this may reflect `frustration' of solvation resulting from overlapping hydration spheres. It is also shown how calculated hydrogen bond basicity can be used to model the effect of aromatic aza-substitution on octanol/water partition coefficients.

  7. The influence of hydrogen bonding on partition coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Nádia Melo; Kenny, Peter W.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Prokopczyk, Igor M.; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    This Perspective explores how consideration of hydrogen bonding can be used to both predict and better understand partition coefficients. It is shown how polarity of both compounds and substructures can be estimated from measured alkane/water partition coefficients. When polarity is defined in this manner, hydrogen bond donors are typically less polar than hydrogen bond acceptors. Analysis of alkane/water partition coefficients in conjunction with molecular electrostatic potential calculations suggests that aromatic chloro substituents may be less lipophilic than is generally believed and that some of the effect of chloro-substitution stems from making the aromatic π-cloud less available to hydrogen bond donors. Relationships between polarity and calculated hydrogen bond basicity are derived for aromatic nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen. Aligned hydrogen bond acceptors appear to present special challenges for prediction of alkane/water partition coefficients and this may reflect `frustration' of solvation resulting from overlapping hydration spheres. It is also shown how calculated hydrogen bond basicity can be used to model the effect of aromatic aza-substitution on octanol/water partition coefficients.

  8. The influence of hydrogen bonding on partition coefficients.

    PubMed

    Borges, Nádia Melo; Kenny, Peter W; Montanari, Carlos A; Prokopczyk, Igor M; Ribeiro, Jean F R; Rocha, Josmar R; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    This Perspective explores how consideration of hydrogen bonding can be used to both predict and better understand partition coefficients. It is shown how polarity of both compounds and substructures can be estimated from measured alkane/water partition coefficients. When polarity is defined in this manner, hydrogen bond donors are typically less polar than hydrogen bond acceptors. Analysis of alkane/water partition coefficients in conjunction with molecular electrostatic potential calculations suggests that aromatic chloro substituents may be less lipophilic than is generally believed and that some of the effect of chloro-substitution stems from making the aromatic π-cloud less available to hydrogen bond donors. Relationships between polarity and calculated hydrogen bond basicity are derived for aromatic nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen. Aligned hydrogen bond acceptors appear to present special challenges for prediction of alkane/water partition coefficients and this may reflect 'frustration' of solvation resulting from overlapping hydration spheres. It is also shown how calculated hydrogen bond basicity can be used to model the effect of aromatic aza-substitution on octanol/water partition coefficients.

  9. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between Atmospheric Gaseous Amides and Methanol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailiang; Tang, Shanshan; Xu, Xiang; Du, Lin

    2016-12-30

    Amides are important atmospheric organic-nitrogen compounds. Hydrogen bonded complexes of methanol (MeOH) with amides (formamide, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, acetamide, N-methylacetamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide) have been investigated. The carbonyl oxygen of the amides behaves as a hydrogen bond acceptor and the NH group of the amides acts as a hydrogen bond donor. The dominant hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the carbonyl oxygen and the OH group of methanol as well as the interaction between the NH group of amides and the oxygen of methanol. However, the hydrogen bonds between the CH group and the carbonyl oxygen or the oxygen of methanol are also important for the overall stability of the complexes. Comparable red shifts of the C=O, NH- and OH-stretching transitions were found in these MeOH-amide complexes with considerable intensity enhancement. Topological analysis shows that the electron density at the bond critical points of the complexes fall in the range of hydrogen bonding criteria, and the Laplacian of charge density of the O-H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond slightly exceeds the upper value of the Laplacian criteria. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the hydrogen bonding interaction energies can be mainly attributed to the electrostatic, exchange and dispersion components.

  10. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between Atmospheric Gaseous Amides and Methanol

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hailiang; Tang, Shanshan; Xu, Xiang; Du, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Amides are important atmospheric organic–nitrogen compounds. Hydrogen bonded complexes of methanol (MeOH) with amides (formamide, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, acetamide, N-methylacetamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide) have been investigated. The carbonyl oxygen of the amides behaves as a hydrogen bond acceptor and the NH group of the amides acts as a hydrogen bond donor. The dominant hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the carbonyl oxygen and the OH group of methanol as well as the interaction between the NH group of amides and the oxygen of methanol. However, the hydrogen bonds between the CH group and the carbonyl oxygen or the oxygen of methanol are also important for the overall stability of the complexes. Comparable red shifts of the C=O, NH- and OH-stretching transitions were found in these MeOH–amide complexes with considerable intensity enhancement. Topological analysis shows that the electron density at the bond critical points of the complexes fall in the range of hydrogen bonding criteria, and the Laplacian of charge density of the O–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond slightly exceeds the upper value of the Laplacian criteria. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the hydrogen bonding interaction energies can be mainly attributed to the electrostatic, exchange and dispersion components. PMID:28042825

  11. Cobalt(III) Werner Complexes with 1,2-Diphenylethylenediamine Ligands: Readily Available, Inexpensive, and Modular Chiral Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts for Enantioselective Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle G; Ghosh, Subrata K; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai; Gladysz, John A

    2015-03-25

    In the quest for new catalysts that can deliver single enantiomer pharmaceuticals and agricultural chemicals, chemists have extensively mined the "chiral pool", with little in the way of inexpensive, readily available building blocks now remaining. It is found that Werner complexes based upon the D3 symmetric chiral trication [Co(en)3](3+) (en = 1,2-ethylenediamine), which features an earth abundant metal and cheap ligand type, and was among the first inorganic compounds resolved into enantiomers 103 years ago, catalyze a valuable carbon-carbon bond forming reaction, the Michael addition of malonate esters to nitroalkenes, in high enantioselectivities and without requiring inert atmosphere conditions. The title catalysts, [Co((S,S)-dpen)3](3+) ((S,S)-3 (3+)) 3X(-), employ a commercially available chiral ligand, (S,S)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine. The rates and ee values are functions of the configuration of the cobalt center (Λ/Δ) and the counteranions, which must be lipophilic to solubilize the trication in nonaqueous media. The highest enantioselectivities are obtained with Λ and 2Cl(-)BArf (-), 2BF4 (-)BArf (-), or 3BF4 (-) salts (BArf (-) = B(3,5-C6H3(CF3)2)4 (-)). The substrates are not activated by metal coordination, but rather by second coordination sphere hydrogen bonding involving the ligating NH2 groups. Crystal structures and NMR data indicate enthalpically stronger interactions with the NH moieties related by the C3 symmetry axis, as opposed to those related by the C2 symmetry axes; rate trends and other observations suggest this to be the catalytically active site. Both Λ- and Δ-(S,S)-3 (3+) 2Cl(-)BArf (-) are effective catalysts for additions of β-ketoesters to RO2CN=NCO2R species (99-86% yields, 81-76% ee), which provide carbon-nitrogen bonds and valuable precursors to α-amino acids.

  12. Cobalt(III) Werner Complexes with 1,2-Diphenylethylenediamine Ligands: Readily Available, Inexpensive, and Modular Chiral Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts for Enantioselective Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the quest for new catalysts that can deliver single enantiomer pharmaceuticals and agricultural chemicals, chemists have extensively mined the “chiral pool”, with little in the way of inexpensive, readily available building blocks now remaining. It is found that Werner complexes based upon the D3 symmetric chiral trication [Co(en)3]3+ (en = 1,2-ethylenediamine), which features an earth abundant metal and cheap ligand type, and was among the first inorganic compounds resolved into enantiomers 103 years ago, catalyze a valuable carbon–carbon bond forming reaction, the Michael addition of malonate esters to nitroalkenes, in high enantioselectivities and without requiring inert atmosphere conditions. The title catalysts, [Co((S,S)-dpen)3]3+ ((S,S)-33+) 3X–, employ a commercially available chiral ligand, (S,S)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine. The rates and ee values are functions of the configuration of the cobalt center (Λ/Δ) and the counteranions, which must be lipophilic to solubilize the trication in nonaqueous media. The highest enantioselectivities are obtained with Λ and 2Cl–BArf–, 2BF4–BArf–, or 3BF4– salts (BArf– = B(3,5-C6H3(CF3)2)4–). The substrates are not activated by metal coordination, but rather by second coordination sphere hydrogen bonding involving the ligating NH2 groups. Crystal structures and NMR data indicate enthalpically stronger interactions with the NH moieties related by the C3 symmetry axis, as opposed to those related by the C2 symmetry axes; rate trends and other observations suggest this to be the catalytically active site. Both Λ- and Δ-(S,S)-33+ 2Cl–BArf– are effective catalysts for additions of β-ketoesters to RO2CN=NCO2R species (99–86% yields, 81–76% ee), which provide carbon–nitrogen bonds and valuable precursors to α-amino acids. PMID:27162946

  13. Characteristics of hydrogen bond revealed from water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yan; Chen, Hongshan; Zhang, Cairong; Zhang, Yan; Yin, Yuehong

    2014-09-01

    The hydrogen bond network is responsible for the exceptional physical and chemical properties of water, however, the description of hydrogen bond remains a challenge for the studies of condensed water. The investigation of structural and binding properties of water clusters provides a key for understanding the H-bonds in bulk water. In this paper, a new set of geometric parameters are defined to describe the extent of the overlap between the bonding orbital of the donor OH and the nonbonding orbital of the lone-pair of the acceptor molecule. This orbital overlap plays a dominant role for the strength of H-bonds. The dependences of the binding energy of the water dimer on these parameters are studied. The results show that these parameters properly describe the H-bond strength. The ring, book, cage and prism isomers of water hexamer form 6, 7, 8 and 9 H-bonds, and the strength of the bonding in these isomers changes markedly. The internally-solvated and the all-surface structures of (H2O) n for n = 17, 19 and 21 are nearly isoenergetic. The internally-solvated isomers form fewer but stronger H-bonds. The hydrogen bonding in the above clusters are investigated in detail. The geometric parameters can well describe the characters of the H-bonds, and they correlate well with the H-bond strength. For the structures forming stronger H-bonds, the H-bond lengths are shorter, the angle parameters are closer to the optimum values, and their rms deviations are smaller. The H-bonds emanating from DDAA and DDA molecules as H-donor are relatively weak. The vibrational spectra of (H2O) n ( n = 17, 19 and 21) are studied as well. The stretching vibration of the intramolecular OH bond is sensitive to its bonding environment. The H-bond strength judged from the geometric parameters is in good agreement with the bonding strength judged from the stretching frequencies.

  14. "Union is strength": how weak hydrogen bonds become stronger.

    PubMed

    Melandri, Sonia

    2011-08-21

    Recently reported rotational spectroscopic studies on small dimers and oligomers bound by weak hydrogen bonds show that the driving forces, the spatial arrangement and the dynamical features displayed are very different from those involved in stronger and conventional hydrogen bonds. The very small binding energies (similar to those of van der Waals interactions) imply that the stabilization of the dimer is often obtained by networks of weak hydrogen bonds. Even in the presence of multiple bonds the partner molecules show a high degree of internal freedom within the complex. This paper analyses several examples of molecular adducts bound by weak hydrogen bonds formed in free jet expansions and recently characterized by rotational spectroscopy. They include weakly bound complexes of weak donors with strong acceptors (C-H···O,N, S-H···O,N), strong donors (O-H, N-H) with weak acceptors such as the halogen atoms and π systems but also the elusive interactions between weak donors and weak acceptors (C-H···π and C-H···halogen). Examples are also given where rotational spectroscopy highlights that weak hydrogen bonds are extremely important in chiral recognition phenomena and as driving forces of the conformational landscape of important biomolecules.

  15. Characterization of the hydrolytic activity of a polyclonal catalytic antibody preparation by pH-dependence and chemical modification studies: evidence for the involvement of Tyr and Arg side chains as hydrogen-bond donors.

    PubMed Central

    Resmini, M; Vigna, R; Simms, C; Barber, N J; Hagi-Pavli, E P; Watts, A B; Verma, C; Gallacher, G; Brocklehurst, K

    1997-01-01

    The hydrolyses of 4-nitrophenyl 4'-(3-aza-2-oxoheptyl)phenyl carbonate and of a new, more soluble, substrate, 4-nitrophenyl 4'-(3-aza-7-hydroxy-2-oxoheptyl)phenyl carbonate, each catalysed by a polyclonal antibody preparation elicited in a sheep by use of an analogous phosphate immunogen, were shown to adhere closely to the Michaelis-Menten equation, in accordance with the growing awareness that polyclonal catalytic antibodies may be much less heterogeneous than had been supposed. The particular value of studies on polyclonal catalytic antibodies is discussed briefly. Both the kcat and kcat/K(m) values were shown to increase with increase in pH across a pKa of approx. 9. Group-selective chemical modification studies established that the side chains of tyrosine and arginine residues are essential for catalytic activity, and provided no evidence for the involvement of side chains of lysine, histidine or cysteine residues. The combination of evidence from the kinetic and chemical modification studies and from studies on the pH-dependence of binding suggests that catalysis involves assistance to the reaction of the substrate with hydroxide ions by hydrogen-bond donation at the reaction centre by tyrosine and arginine side chains. This combination of hydrogen-bond donors appears to be a feature common to a number of other hydrolytic catalytic antibodies. High-pKa acidic side chains may be essential for the effectiveness of catalytic antibodies that utilize hydroxide ions. PMID:9337880

  16. Hydrogen introduction and hydrogen-enhanced thermal donor formation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, H.J. ); Hahn, S. )

    1994-04-01

    Hydrogen has been introduced from a rf plasma into Czochralski Si at 275 [degree]C. Most of the hydrogen is trapped near the surface where it forms Si---H bonds, but a small fraction diffuses into the Si. This fraction enhances oxygen-related thermal donor (TD) formation rates in a diffusionlike profile during subsequent furnace anneals between 350 and 400 [degree]C. A hydrogen concentration that is only a few percent of the oxygen concentration is sufficient to enhance the TD formation rate, indicative of a hydrogen-catalyzed process. Maximum concentrations for TDs after annealing at 400 [degree]C exceed that for retained hydrogen. A mechanism of hydrogen diffusion through oxygen traps and correlated hydrogen-promoted oxygen diffusion is proposed to explain the enhanced TD formation rates.

  17. Hydrogen donor in anatase TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    An IR absorption study of hydrogen-related defects in natural single-crystalline anatase TiO2 has been carried out. A complex with IR absorption lines at 3412 and 3417 cm-1 is shown to act as a donor with ionization energy of tens of meV. The two lines are identified as stretching local vibrational modes of the O-H bonds of the donor in the neutral and positive charge states, respectively. The defect is unstable against annealing at approximately 300 ∘C and a storage at room temperature on the time scale of a few weeks. These findings suggest that interstitial hydrogen is a plausible model of this defect.

  18. Red-Shifting versus Blue-Shifting Hydrogen Bonds: Perspective from Ab Initio Valence Bond Theory.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xin; Zhang, Yang; Weng, Xinzhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-05

    Both proper, red-shifting and improper, blue-shifting hydrogen bonds have been well-recognized with enormous experimental and computational studies. The current consensus is that there is no difference in nature between these two kinds of hydrogen bonds, where the electrostatic interaction dominates. Since most if not all the computational studies are based on molecular orbital theory, it would be interesting to gain insight into the hydrogen bonds with modern valence bond (VB) theory. In this work, we performed ab initio VBSCF computations on a series of hydrogen-bonding systems, where the sole hydrogen bond donor CF3H interacts with ten hydrogen bond acceptors Y (═NH2CH3, NH3, NH2Cl, OH(-), H2O, CH3OH, (CH3)2O, F(-), HF, or CH3F). This series includes four red-shifting and six blue-shifting hydrogen bonds. Consistent with existing findings in literature, VB-based energy decomposition analyses show that electrostatic interaction plays the dominating role and polarization plays the secondary role in all these hydrogen-bonding systems, and the charge transfer interaction, which denotes the hyperconjugation effect, contributes only slightly to the total interaction energy. As VB theory describes any real chemical bond in terms of pure covalent and ionic structures, our fragment interaction analysis reveals that with the approaching of a hydrogen bond acceptor Y, the covalent state of the F3C-H bond tends to blue-shift, due to the strong repulsion between the hydrogen atom and Y. In contrast, the ionic state F3C(-) H(+) leads to the red-shifting of the C-H vibrational frequency, owing to the attraction between the proton and Y. Thus, the relative weights of the covalent and ionic structures essentially determine the direction of frequency change. Indeed, we find the correlation between the structural weights and vibrational frequency changes.

  19. AAA-DDD triple hydrogen bond complexes.

    PubMed

    Blight, Barry A; Camara-Campos, Amaya; Djurdjevic, Smilja; Kaller, Martin; Leigh, David A; McMillan, Fiona M; McNab, Hamish; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2009-10-07

    Experiment and theory both suggest that the AAA-DDD pattern of hydrogen bond acceptors (A) and donors (D) is the arrangement of three contiguous hydrogen bonding centers that results in the strongest association between two species. Murray and Zimmerman prepared the first example of such a system (complex 3*2) and determined the lower limit of its association constant (K(a)) in CDCl(3) to be 10(5) M(-1) by (1)H NMR spectroscopy (Murray, T. J. and Zimmerman, S. C. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1992, 114, 4010-4011). The first cationic AAA-DDD pair (3*4(+)) was described by Bell and Anslyn (Bell, D. A. and Anslyn, E. A. Tetrahedron 1995, 51, 7161-7172), with a K(a) > 5 x 10(5) M(-1) in CH(2)Cl(2) as determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. We were recently able to quantify the strength of a neutral AAA-DDD arrangement using a more chemically stable AAA-DDD system, 6*2, which has an association constant of 2 x 10(7) M(-1) in CH(2)Cl(2) (Djurdjevic, S., Leigh, D. A., McNab, H., Parsons, S., Teobaldi, G. and Zerbetto, F. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 476-477). Here we report on further AA(A) and DDD partners, together with the first precise measurement of the association constant of a cationic AAA-DDD species. Complex 6*10(+)[B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)C(6)H(3))(4)(-)] has a K(a) = 3 x 10(10) M(-1) at RT in CH(2)Cl(2), by far the most strongly bound triple hydrogen bonded system measured to date. The X-ray crystal structure of 6*10(+) with a BPh(4)(-) counteranion shows a planar array of three short (NH...N distances 1.95-2.15 A), parallel (but staggered rather than strictly linear; N-H...N angles 165.4-168.8 degrees), primary hydrogen bonds. These are apparently reinforced, as theory predicts, by close electrostatic interactions (NH-*-N distances 2.78-3.29 A) between each proton and the acceptor atoms of the adjacent primary hydrogen bonds.

  20. Hydrogen-donor solvents in biomass liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilakos, N.P.; Austgen, D.M.

    1985-04-01

    The liquefaction of pure number61-cellulose with hydrogen-donor solvents such as tetralin and 2-propano was studied in a batch autoclave system under both inert and hydrogen atmospheres. Reaction conditions involved temperatures between 270 and 400/sup 0/ C, residence times between 0 and 60 min, and hydrogen pressures between 0 and 500 psi. The use of homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrogenolysis catalysts was also investigated. Unde these conditions, up to 100% of the initial cellulose feed was converted, resulting in oil yields greate than 50%. The oxygen content of the product oil was significantly lower than that of the cellulose feed (less than 25 wt % in most cases), and it generally decreased with increasing reaction temperature. Low and intermediate temperatures less than or equal to360 /sup 0/C) favored oil production, while higher temperatures induced severe hydrocracking of the product oil to gases.

  1. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Protein Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Nick

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(Δ G), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A (1.1Å), Y51F(1.5Å), and T95A(1.3Å). The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners always form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in the mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions: 1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. 2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. 5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein.

  2. Contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Schell, David; Thurlkill, Richard L; Imura, Satoshi; Scholtz, J Martin; Gajiwala, Ketan; Sevcik, Jozef; Urbanikova, Lubica; Myers, Jeffery K; Takano, Kazufumi; Hebert, Eric J; Shirley, Bret A; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(ΔG), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A, Y51F, and T95A. The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in all three mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions. (1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. (2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. (5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein. PMID:24591301

  3. Adding hydrogen donor to visbreaking improves distillate yields

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, A.S.; Lutz, I.H.

    1987-07-13

    Hydrogen donor visbreaking can be an attractive process for improving distillate yields when upgrading heavy crude oils and resids. Hydrogen donor visbreaking is a process in which a donor is provided to supply the hydrogen needed to obtain good distillate from residual materials. The process is a combination of two proven processes: visbreaking and mild gas-oil hydrogenation. It can be readily adapted to existing refinery equipment.

  4. Synthesis and structure of ruthenium(IV) complexes featuring N-heterocyclic ligands with an N-H group as the hydrogen-bond donor: hydrogen interactions in solution and in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Díez, Josefina; Gimeno, José; Merino, Isabel; Rubio, Eduardo; Suárez, Francisco J

    2011-06-06

    The synthesis and characterization of novel ruthenium(IV) complexes [Ru(η(3):η(3)-C(10)H(16))Cl(2)L] [L = 3-methylpyrazole (2b), 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (2c), 3-methyl-5-phenylpyrazole (2d), 2-(1H-pyrazol-5-yl)phenol (2e), 6-azauracile (3), and 1H-indazol-3-ol (4)] are reported. Complex 2e is converted to the chelated complex [Ru(η(3):η(3)-C(10)H(16))Cl(κ(2)-N,O-2-(1H-pyrazol-3-yl)phenoxy)] (5) by treatment with an excess of NaOH. All of the ligands feature N-H, O-H, or C═O as the potential hydrogen-bonding group. The structures of complexes 2a-2c, 2e, 3, and 5 in the solid state have been determined by X-ray diffraction. Complexes 2a-2c and 3, which contain the pyrazole N-H group, exhibit intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds with chloride ligands [N-H···Cl distances (Å): intramolecular, 2.30-2.78; intermolecular, 2.59-2.77]. Complexes 2e and 3 bearing respectively O-H and C═O groups also feature N-H···O interactions [intramolecular (2e), 2.27 Å; intermolecular (3), 2.00 Å]. Chelated complex 5, lacking the O-H group, only shows an intramolecular N-H···Cl hydrogen bonding of 2.42 Å. The structure of complex 3, which turns out to be a dimer in the solid state through a double intermolecular N-H···O hydrogen bonding, has also been investigated in solution (CD(2)Cl(2)) by NMR diffusion studies. Diffusion-ordered spectroscopy experiments reveal an equilibrium between monomer and dimer species in solution whose extension depends on the temperature, concentration, and coordinating properties of the solvent. Preliminary catalytic studies show that complex 3 is highly active in the redox isomerization of the allylic alcohols in an aqueous medium under very mild reaction conditions (35 °C) and in the absence of a base.

  5. Crystal engineering of analogous and homologous organic compounds: hydrogen bonding patterns in trimethoprim hydrogen phthalate and trimethoprim hydrogen adipate

    PubMed Central

    Muthiah, Packianathan Thomas; Francis, Savarimuthu; Rychlewska, Urszula; Warżajtis, Beata

    2006-01-01

    Background Trimethoprim [2,4-diamino-5-(3',4',5'-trimethoxybenzyl)pyrimidine] is an antifolate drug. It selectively inhibits the bacterial dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) enzyme. Results In the crystal structures of trimethoprim (TMP)-hydrogen phthalate (1) and trimethoprim-hydrogen adipate (2), one of the N atoms of the pyrimidine ring is protonated and it interacts with the deprotonated carboxylate oxygens through a pair of nearly parallel N-H...O hydrogen bonds to form a fork-like interaction. In the compound 1, the pyrimidine moieties of the TMP cations are centrosymmetrically paired through a pair of N-H...N hydrogen bonds involving 4-amino group and the N (N3) atom of the pyrimidine rings to form a 8-membered hydrogen bonded ring [R22(8)]. The 4-amino group of one TMP moiety and 2-amino group of another TMP moiety (both moieties are members of a base pair) are bridged by the carbonyl oxygen of the phthalate moiety through N-H...O hydrogen bonds forming 8-membered hydrogen-bonded ring [R22(8)]. The characteristic hydrogen-bonded rings observed in the structure aggregate into a supramolecular ladder consisting of a pair of chains, each of which is built up of alternate TMP and hydrogen phthalate ions. In the compound 2, two TMP cations and two hydrogen adipate anions are arranged about an inversion center so that the complementary DDAA (D = donor, A = acceptor) arrays of quadruple hydrogen-bonding patterns are formed. The head-to-tail arrangement of the hydrogen adipate ions leads to a hydrogen-bonded supramolecular chain. From crystal engineering point of view, it is interesting to note that the compound 1 has a hydrogen-bonded network remarkably identical with its aliphatic analogue, trimethoprim hydrogen maleate. Similarly the compound 2, resembles its homolog trimethoprim hydrogen glutarate. Conclusion In the crystal structure of trimethoprim hydrogen phthalate, the hydrogen-bonded network is remarkably identical with its aliphatic analogue, trimethoprim

  6. Hydrogen bonding in the hexagonal ice surface.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Irene Li; Groenzin, Henning; Shultz, Mary Jane

    2011-06-16

    A recently developed technique in sum frequency generation spectroscopy, polarization angle null (or PAN-SFG), is applied to two orientations of the prism face of hexagonal ice. It is found that the vibrational modes of the surface are similar in different faces. As in the basal face, the prism face of ice contains five dominant resonances: 3096, 3146, 3205, 3253, and 3386 cm(-1). On the basal face, the reddest resonance occurs at 3098 cm(-1); within the bandwidth, the same as the prism face. On both the prism and basal faces, this mode contains a significant quadrupole component and is assigned to the bilayer stitching hydrogen bonds. The bluest of the resonances, 3386 cm(-1), occurs slightly blue-shifted at 3393 cm(-1) in the basal face. The prism face has two orientations: one with the optic or c axis in the input plane (the plane formed by the surface normal and the interrogating beam propagation) and one with the c axis perpendicular to the input plane. The 3386 cm(-1) mode has significant intensity only with the c axis in the input plane. On the basis of these orientation characteristics, the 3386 cm(-1) mode is assigned to double-donor molecules in either the top half bilayer or in the lower half bilayer. On the basis of frequency considerations, it is assigned to double-donor molecules in the top half bilayer. These are water molecules containing a nonbonded lone pair. In addition to identification of the components of the broad hydrogen-bonded region, PAN-SFG measures the tangential vs longitudinal content of the vibrational modes. In accord with previous suggestions, the lower frequency modes are predominantly tangential, whereas the higher frequency modes are mainly longitudinal. On the prism face, the 3386 cm(-1) mode is entirely longitudinal.

  7. Counting peptide-water hydrogen bonds in unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haipeng; Porter, Lauren L; Rose, George D

    2011-02-01

    It is often assumed that the peptide backbone forms a substantial number of additional hydrogen bonds when a protein unfolds. We challenge that assumption in this article. Early surveys of hydrogen bonding in proteins of known structure typically found that most, but not all, backbone polar groups are satisfied, either by intramolecular partners or by water. When the protein is folded, these groups form approximately two hydrogen bonds per peptide unit, one donor or acceptor for each carbonyl oxygen or amide hydrogen, respectively. But when unfolded, the backbone chain is often believed to form three hydrogen bonds per peptide unit, one partner for each oxygen lone pair or amide hydrogen. This assumption is based on the properties of small model compounds, like N-methylacetamide, or simply accepted as self-evident fact. If valid, a chain of N residues would have approximately 2N backbone hydrogen bonds when folded but 3N backbone hydrogen bonds when unfolded, a sufficient difference to overshadow any uncertainties involved in calculating these per-residue averages. Here, we use exhaustive conformational sampling to monitor the number of H-bonds in a statistically adequate population of blocked polyalanyl-six-mers as the solvent quality ranges from good to poor. Solvent quality is represented by a scalar parameter used to Boltzmann-weight the population energy. Recent experimental studies show that a repeating (Gly-Ser) polypeptide undergoes a denaturant-induced expansion accompanied by breaking intramolecular peptide H-bonds. Results from our simulations augment this experimental finding by showing that the number of H-bonds is approximately conserved during such expansion⇋compaction transitions.

  8. Hydrogen multicenter bond in oxide and nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janotti, Anderson

    2009-03-01

    Hydrogen is a very reactive atom, occurring in virtually all organic and in many inorganic compounds. It can form a purely covalent bond, in which two hydrogen atoms share a pair of electrons in a two-electron two-center bond, as well as polar covalent bonds, such as in an H2O molecule. In solids, hydrogen is usually considered as an interstitial impurity. In elemental semiconductors, such as silicon, hydrogen forms a three-center bond when located at the bond center. In compound semiconductors, hydrogen bonds to the anionic species in p-type material, and to the cationic species in n-type. Thus far, hydrogen in solids has been found to form chemical bonds with one, two, or at most three other atoms. Higher coordination numbers are exceedingly rare and have been reported only for clusters. In this talk we will show that hydrogen is capable of forming multicenter bonds in solids, occupying substitutional sites. As examples, we discuss substitutional hydrogen impurities in oxides (ZnO, MgO, SnO2, TiO2) [1,2] and nitrides (InN, AlN, GaN) [3]. Based on first-principles calculations we show that hydrogen replaces oxygen (nitrogen) and forms genuine chemical bonds with multiple metal atoms, in truly multicoordinated configurations. These multicenter bonds are surprisingly strong despite the large hydrogen-metal distances when compared to typical values in hydrogen two-center bonds. Hydrogen in the multicenter bond configuration is a shallow donor in a number of materials. In conducting oxides, it provides a consistent explanation for the observed dependence of electrical conductivity on oxygen partial pressure, thus resolving a long-standing controversy on the role of point defects in unintentional n-type conductivity [1,2]. [4pt] [1] A. Janotti and C. G Van de Walle, Nature Materials 6, 44 (2007). [0pt] [2] A. K. Singh, A. Janotti, M. Scheffler, and C. G. Van de Walle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 055502 (2008). [0pt] [3] A. Janotti and C. G. Van de Walle, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92

  9. Hydrogen-bonded sheets in benzylmethylammonium hydrogen maleate.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Lynay; Abonia, Rodrigo; Cobo, Justo; Low, John N; Glidewell, Christopher

    2007-10-01

    In the title compound, C(8)H(12)N(+).C(4)H(3)O(4)(-), there is a short and almost linear but asymmetric O-H...O hydrogen bond in the anion. The ions are linked into C(2)(2)(6) chains by two short and nearly linear N-H...O hydrogen bonds and the chains are further weakly linked into sheets by a single C-H...O hydrogen bond.

  10. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  11. Strengths of hydrogen bonds involving phosphorylated amino acid side chains.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Daniel J; Chorny, Ilya; Groban, Eli S; Wong, Sergio E; Levine, Elisheva; Rapp, Chaya S; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2007-01-31

    Post-translational phosphorylation plays a key role in regulating protein function. Here, we provide a quantitative assessment of the relative strengths of hydrogen bonds involving phosphorylated amino acid side chains (pSer, pAsp) with several common donors (Arg, Lys, and backbone amide groups). We utilize multiple levels of theory, consisting of explicit solvent molecular dynamics, implicit solvent molecular mechanics, and quantum mechanics with a self-consistent reaction field treatment of solvent. Because the approximately 6 pKa of phosphate suggests that -1 and -2 charged species may coexist at physiological pH, hydrogen bonds involving both protonated and deprotonated phosphates for all donor-acceptor pairs are considered. Multiple bonding geometries for the charged-charged interactions are also considered. Arg is shown to be capable of substantially stronger salt bridges with phosphorylated side chains than Lys. A pSer hydrogen-bond acceptor tends to form more stable interactions than a pAsp acceptor. The effect of phosphate protonation state on the strengths of the hydrogen bonds is remarkably subtle, with a more pronounced effect on pAsp than on pSer.

  12. Observation of proton-coupled electron transfer by transient absorption spectroscopy in a hydrogen-bonded, porphyrin donor-acceptor assembly.

    PubMed

    Damrauer, Niels H; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Rosenthal, Joel; Nocera, Daniel G

    2004-05-20

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) kinetics of a Zn(II) porphyrin donor noncovalently bound to a naphthalene-diimide acceptor through an amidinium-carboxylate interface have been investigated by time-resolved spectroscopy. The S1 singlet excited-state of a Zn(II) 2-amidinium-5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrin chloride (ZnP-beta-AmH+) donor is sufficiently energetic (2.04 eV) to reduce a carboxylate-diimide acceptor (DeltaG degrees = -460 mV, THF). Static quenching of the porphyrin fluorescence is observed and time-resolved measurements reveal more than a 3-fold reduction in the S1 lifetime of the porphyrin upon amidinium-carboxylate formation (THF, 298 K). Picosecond transient absorption spectra of the free ZnP-beta-AmH+ in THF reveal the existence of an excited-state isosbestic point between the S1 and T1 states at lambdaprobe = 650 nm, providing an effective 'zero-kinetics' background on which to observe the formation of PCET photoproducts. Distinct rise and decay kinetics are attributed to the build-up and subsequent loss of intermediates resulting from a forward and reverse PCET reaction, respectively (kPCET(fwd) = 9 x 108 s-1 and kPCET(rev) = 14 x 108 s-1). The forward rate constant is nearly 2 orders of magnitude slower than that measured for covalently linked Zn(II) porphyrin-acceptor dyads of comparable driving force and D-A distance, establishing the importance of a proximal proton network in controlling charge transport.

  13. Design and synthesis of polymeric hydrogen sulfide donors.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Urara; van der Vlies, André J

    2014-07-16

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gaseous signaling molecule that has several important biological functions in the human body. Because of the difficulties of handling H2S gas, small organic compounds that release H2S under physiological conditions have been developed. The observed bioactivities of these H2S donors have generally been directly correlated with their H2S release properties. However, apart from H2S release, these H2S donors also exert biological effects by direct interaction with intracellular components within the cytoplasm after passive diffusion across cellular membranes. Here we report polymeric H2S donors based on ADT-OH which would alter cellular trafficking of ADT-OH to minimize the unfavorable interactions with intracellular components. We designed and synthesized a poly(ethylene glycol)-ADT (PEG-ADT) conjugate having ADT linked via an ether bond. Whereas ADT-OH significantly reduced cell viability in murine macrophages, the PEG-ADT conjugate did not show obvious cytotoxicity. The PEG-ADT conjugate released H2S in murine macrophages but not in the presence of serum proteins. The PEG-ADT conjugate was taken up by the cell through the endocytic pathway and stayed inside endolysosomes, which is different from the small amphiphilic donor ADT-OH that can directly enter the cytoplasm. Furthermore, PEG-ADT was capable of potentiating LPS-induced inflammation. This polymeric H2S donor approach may help to better understand the H2S bioactivities of the H2S donor ADT-OH.

  14. HYDROGEN BONDING IN THE METHANOL DIMER

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this work, two methanol molecules are placed in different arrangements to study hydrogen bonding in carbohydrate materials such as cellulose. Energy was calculated as a function of both hydrogen bond length and angle over wide ranges, using quantum mechanics (QM). The QM wavefunctions are analyze...

  15. Carboxylic Acid to Thioamide Hydrogen Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Suchitra; Lightner, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The lactam groups of dipyrrinones avidly engage in amide-amide hydrogen bonding to form dimeric association complexes in nonpolar solvents (in CHCl3, KD ~25,000 M-1 at 22°C). The corresponding thioamides (dipyrrinthiones), prepared from dipyrrinones by reaction with Lawesson’s reagent, also form intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded dimers in nonpolar solvents, albeit with much weaker association constants (in CHCl3, KD ~200 M-1 at 22°C). When a carboxylic acid group is tethered to C(9) of the dipyrrinone, as in the hexanoic acid of [6]-semirubin, tight intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carboxylic acid group and the lactam moiety (intramolecular Kassoc ≫25,000) is found in CHCl3 with no evidence of dimers. In contrast, the analogous dipyrrinthione, [6]-thiosemirubin, eschews intramolecular hydrogen bonds, as determined using NMR spectroscopy and vapor pressure osmometry, preferring to form intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded dimers of the thioamide-thioamide type. PMID:20049064

  16. Comparative study of halogen- and hydrogen-bond interactions between benzene derivatives and dimethyl sulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Deng, Geng; Zhou, Yu; Sun, Hai-Yuan; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2015-08-24

    The halogen bond, similar to the hydrogen bond, is an important noncovalent interaction and plays important roles in diverse chemistry-related fields. Herein, bromine- and iodine-based halogen-bonding interactions between two benzene derivatives (C6 F5 Br and C6 F5 I) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are investigated by using IR and NMR spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The results are compared with those of interactions between C6 F5 Cl/C6 F5 H and DMSO. First, the interaction energy of the hydrogen bond is stronger than those of bromine- and chlorine-based halogen bonds, but weaker than iodine-based halogen bond. Second, attractive energies depend on 1/r(n) , in which n is between three and four for both hydrogen and halogen bonds, whereas all repulsive energies are found to depend on 1/r(8.5) . Third, the directionality of halogen bonds is greater than that of the hydrogen bond. The bromine- and iodine-based halogen bonds are strict in this regard and the chlorine-based halogen bond only slightly deviates from 180°. The directional order is iodine-based halogen bond>bromine-based halogen bond>chlorine-based halogen bond>hydrogen bond. Fourth, upon the formation of hydrogen and halogen bonds, charge transfers from DMSO to the hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors. The CH3 group contributes positively to stabilization of the complexes.

  17. A cooperative hydrogen bonding system with a Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond in ofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiuxiang; Liu, Yufeng; Li, Huizhen; Bian, Jiang; Zhao, Ying; Cao, Ye; Mao, Yuezhi; Li, Xin; Xu, Yizhuang; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Wu, Jinguang

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated a cooperative hydrogen bonding system with a Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond in ofloxacin by using NMR, UV-Vis spectra together with quantum chemistry calculation. Both pH-dependent NMR experiments and DFT calculation indicate that the intra-molecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond between an aromatic proton and an oxygen atom from the carboxyl group is formed. Notably, the Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond forms a cooperative hydrogen bonding system with a neighboring Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond between the carboxyl group and the keto oxygen. The cooperative hydrogen bonding system makes the formation and disruption of the Osbnd H⋯O and Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds in a synergistic manner. Comparison on the pKa value of the carboxylic group in different fluoroquinolones compounds indicates that the Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond plays a significant role in stabilizing the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. In addition, the formation and disruption of the cooperative hydrogen bonding system could regulate the conformation of the carboxyl group, which affects the size of the conjugated system and spectral behavior of π-π transition of ofloxacin.

  18. Selective perrhenate recognition in pure water by halogen bonding and hydrogen bonding alpha-cyclodextrin based receptors.

    PubMed

    Cornes, Stuart P; Sambrook, Mark R; Beer, Paul D

    2017-03-20

    Alpha-cyclodextrin based anion receptors functionalised with pendant arms containing halogen and hydrogen bond donor motifs display selective association of perrhenate in aqueous media at neutral pH. NMR and ITC anion binding investigations reveal the halogen bonding receptor to be the superior host.

  19. Water’s dual nature and its continuously changing hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henchman, Richard H.

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for liquid water that is a continuum between the ordered state with predominantly tetrahedral coordination, linear hydrogen bonds and activated dynamics and a disordered state with a continuous distribution of multiple coordinations, multiple types of hydrogen bond, and diffusive dynamics, similar to that of normal liquids. Central to water’s heterogeneous structure is the ability of hydrogen to donate to either one acceptor in a conventional linear hydrogen bond or to multiple acceptors as a furcated hydrogen. Linear hydrogen bonds are marked by slow, activated kinetics for hydrogen-bond switching to more crowded acceptors and sharp first peaks in the hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. Furcated hydrogens, equivalent to free, broken, dangling or distorted hydrogens, have barrierless, rapid kinetics and poorly defined first peaks in their hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. They involve the weakest donor in a local excess of donors, such that barrierless whole-molecule vibration rapidly swaps them between the linear and furcated forms. Despite the low number of furcated hydrogens and their transient existence, they are readily created in a single hydrogen-bond switch and free up the dynamics of numerous surrounding molecules, bringing about the disordered state. Hydrogens in the ordered state switch with activated dynamics to make the non-tetrahedral coordinations of the disordered state, which can also combine to make the ordered state. Consequently, the ordered and disordered states are both connected by diffusive dynamics and differentiated by activated dynamics, bringing about water’s continuous heterogeneity.

  20. Aqueous hydrogen bonding probed with polarization and matrix isolation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Bisson, Patrick; Buch, Victoria; Groenzin, Henning; Li, Irene

    2010-05-01

    A major challenge in hydrogen-bond research is interpreting the vibrational spectrum of water, arguably the most fundamental hydrogen bonding system. This challenge remains despite over a half century of progress in vibrational spectroscopy, largely due to a combination of the huge oscillator strength and the enormous width of the hydrogen-bond region. Lack of assignment of the resonances in the hydrogen-bond region hinders investigation of interactions between water and solutes. This lack-of-interpretation issue is an even more significant problem for studies of the aqueous interface. Numerous solutes are known to have an effect, some very dramatic, on the shape of the surface spectrum. These effects, however, are but tantalizing teasers because lack of interpretation means that the changes cannot be used to diagnose the effect of solutes or impinging gas-phase molecules on the surface. In the reported work two techniques are used to probe the origin of vibrational resonances in the H-bonded region: the surface sensitive technique sum frequency generation (SFG) and room-temperature matrix isolation spectroscopy (RT-MIS). A polarization technique called polarization angle null (PAN) has been developed that extends SFG and enables identification of resonances. The result of applying PAN-SFG to single crystal, I h ice is identification of at least nine underlying resonances and assignment of two of these. One resonance is correlated with the crystal temperature and is a sensitive probe for interactions that disrupt long range order on the surface - it is a morphology reporter. The second is associated with weakly bonded, double-donor water molecules. This resonance is sensitive to interaction of hydrogen bond donors, i.e. acids, with the surface. Both modes are more correctly pictured as collective modes. These two assignments are the first definitive assignments in the hydrogen-bond region for the aqueous surface. The effect of salts on the vibrational spectrum of

  1. The single donator-single acceptor hydrogen bonding structure in water probed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang

    2010-02-07

    In this work, the Raman spectra of aqueous C(12)E(5) solutions are recorded and utilized to demonstrate the existence of single donator-single acceptor (DA) hydrogen bonding in water. From Raman OH stretching bands of aqueous C(12)E(5) solutions, the relative intensity of 3430 cm(-1) subband increases with C(12)E(5) concentrations. For confined water, the DA hydrogen bonding can be expected to be the important hydrogen bonding species. Therefore, the 3430 cm(-1) component can be ascribed to OH vibration engaged in DA hydrogen bonding. This is in agreement with our recent explanation on Raman OH stretching band of water. For water at ambient conditions, the double donor-double acceptor (DDAA) and DA should be the dominant hydrogen bonding species, the ratio of DDAA to DA can be approximately to be 0.75:1, and the mean hydrogen bonding can be determined to be 2.75.

  2. The single donator-single acceptor hydrogen bonding structure in water probed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the Raman spectra of aqueous C12E5 solutions are recorded and utilized to demonstrate the existence of single donator-single acceptor (DA) hydrogen bonding in water. From Raman OH stretching bands of aqueous C12E5 solutions, the relative intensity of 3430 cm-1 subband increases with C12E5 concentrations. For confined water, the DA hydrogen bonding can be expected to be the important hydrogen bonding species. Therefore, the 3430 cm-1 component can be ascribed to OH vibration engaged in DA hydrogen bonding. This is in agreement with our recent explanation on Raman OH stretching band of water. For water at ambient conditions, the double donor-double acceptor (DDAA) and DA should be the dominant hydrogen bonding species, the ratio of DDAA to DA can be approximately to be 0.75:1, and the mean hydrogen bonding can be determined to be 2.75.

  3. Hydrogen bond migration between molecular sites observed with ultrafast 2D IR chemical exchange spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Daniel E; Kwak, Kyungwon; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Fayer, M D

    2010-02-25

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes between phenol and phenylacetylene are studied using ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) chemical exchange spectroscopy. Phenylacetylene has two possible pi hydrogen bonding acceptor sites (phenyl or acetylene) that compete for hydrogen bond donors in solution at room temperature. The OD stretch frequency of deuterated phenol is sensitive to which acceptor site it is bound. The appearance of off-diagonal peaks between the two vibrational frequencies in the 2D IR spectrum reports on the exchange process between the two competitive hydrogen-bonding sites of phenol-phenylacetylene complexes in the neat phenylacetylene solvent. The chemical exchange process occurs in approximately 5 ps and is assigned to direct hydrogen bond migration along the phenylacetylene molecule. Other nonmigration mechanisms are ruled out by performing 2D IR experiments on phenol dissolved in the phenylacetylene/carbon tetrachloride mixed solvent. The observation of direct hydrogen bond migration can have implications for macromolecular systems.

  4. Multicomponent, hydrogen-bonded cylindrical capsules.

    PubMed

    Ajami, Dariush; Rebek, Julius

    2009-09-04

    Self-assembled, hydrogen-bonded capsules emerge from synthetic resorcinarene-derived cavitands and soluble glycolurils when appropriate guest molecules are present. The assembly consists of 2 cavitands, 4 glycolurils and guest(s), and the arrangement of glycolurils leads to a chiral structure. The capsule features a space of approximately 620 A(3) and accommodates narrow guests such as n-alkanes from C(14) to C(19), or other molecules (e.g., capsaicin) and combinations of molecules of up to approximately 22 A in length (e.g., two p-methylstyrene molecules). Positions of encapsulated nuclei can be predicted from NMR chemical shifts, with intense shielding of deltaDelta = -5 ppm near the resorcinarene ends and mild deshielding of +0.5 to 1 ppm near the glycolurils at the capsule's center. Computational methods using nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) were used to map the induced magnetic shielding/deshielding for the inner space of the cavity. The asymmetric arrangement of the spacers creates a chiral steric and magnetic environment in the capsule and the geminal hydrogen atoms of encapsulated alkanes show diastereotopic proton signals. The two enantiomers interconvert (racemize) through an achiral intermediate involving a slight rotation of the spacers and lengthening of the cavity. Accordingly, longer, compressed alkanes accelerate the racemization by applying pressure from the inside on the capsule's ends. Guests that place hydrogen bond donors and acceptors near the glycolurils in the middle (e.g., p-isopropylbenzyl alcohol) also accelerate the racemization by facilitating the rotation of the glycolurils. Slow tumbling of guest on the NMR time scale inside the capsule leads to social isomerism of para-disubstituted benzenes such as p-methylstyrene. Flexible guests such as hexane tumble inside the cavity with an activation barrier of DeltaG(++) =16.2 kcal/mol. The middle of the extended capsule is narrow, but still accommodates phenyl groups such as those

  5. Thermodynamics of hydrogen bonding in hydrophilic and hydrophobic media.

    PubMed

    van der Spoel, David; van Maaren, Paul J; Larsson, Per; Tîmneanu, Nicusor

    2006-03-09

    The thermodynamics of hydrogen bond breaking and formation was studied in solutions of alcohol (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol) molecules. An extensive series of over 400 molecular dynamics simulations with an aggregate length of over 900 ns was analyzed using an analysis technique in which hydrogen bond (HB) breaking is interpreted as an Eyring process, for which the Gibbs energy of activation DeltaG can be determined from the HB lifetime. By performing simulations at different temperatures, we were able to determine the enthalpy of activation DeltaH and the entropy of activation TDeltaS for this process from the Van't Hoff relation. The equilibrium thermodynamics was determined separately, based on the number of donor hydrogens that are involved in hydrogen bonds. Results (DeltaH) are compared to experimental data from Raman spectroscopy and found to be in good agreement for pure water and methanol. The DeltaG as well as the DeltaG are smooth functions of the composition of the mixtures. The main result of the calculations is that DeltaG is essentially independent of the environment (around 5 kJ/mol), suggesting that buried hydrogen bonds (e.g., in proteins) do not contribute significantly to protein stability. Enthalpically HB formation is a downhill process in all substances; however, for the alcohols there is an entropic barrier of 6-7 kJ/mol, at 298.15 K, which cannot be detected in pure water.

  6. Looking at hydrogen bonds in cellulose.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Langan, Paul; Wada, Masahisa; Forsyth, V Trevor

    2010-11-01

    A series of cellulose crystal allomorphs has been studied using high-resolution X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction to locate the positions of H atoms involved in hydrogen bonding. One type of position was always clearly observed in the Fourier difference map (F(d)-F(h)), while the positions of other H atoms appeared to be less well established. Despite the high crystallinity of the chosen samples, neutron diffraction data favoured some hydrogen-bonding disorder in native cellulose. The presence of disorder and a comparison of hydrogen-bond geometries in different allomorphs suggests that although hydrogen bonding may not be the most important factor in the stabilization of cellulose I, it is essential for stabilizing cellulose III, which is the activated form, and preventing it from collapsing back to the more stable cellulose I.

  7. A prevalent intraresidue hydrogen bond stabilizes proteins

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Robert W.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    Current limitations in de novo protein structure prediction and design suggest an incomplete understanding of the interactions that govern protein folding. Here we demonstrate that previously unappreciated hydrogen bonds occur within proteins between the amide proton and carbonyl oxygen of the same residue. Quantum calculations, infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy show that these interactions share hallmark features of canonical hydrogen bonds. Biophysical analyses demonstrate that selective attenuation or enhancement of these C5 hydrogen bonds affects the stability of synthetic β-sheets. These interactions are common, affecting approximately 5% of all residues and 94% of proteins, and their cumulative impact provides several kcal/mol of conformational stability to a typical protein. C5 hydrogen bonds stabilize, especially, the flat β-sheets of the amyloid state, which is linked with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Inclusion of these interactions in computational force fields would improve models of protein folding, function, and dysfunction. PMID:27748749

  8. Halogen-bond and hydrogen-bond interactions between three benzene derivatives and dimethyl sulphoxide.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Wang, Nan-Nan; Zhou, Yu; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2014-04-21

    Halogen-bonds, like hydrogen-bonds, are a kind of noncovalent interaction and play an important role in diverse fields including chemistry, biology and crystal engineering. In this work, a comparative study was carried out to examine the halogen/hydrogen-bonding interactions between three fluoro-benzene derivatives and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO). A number of conclusions were obtained by using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and ab initio calculations. Electrostatic surface potential, geometry, energy, vibrational frequency, intensity and the natural population analysis (NPA) of the monomers and complexes are studied at the MP2 level of theory with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. First, the interaction strength decreases in the order C6F5H-DMSO ∼ ClC6F4H-DMSO > C6F5Cl-DMSO, implying that the hydrogen-bond is stronger than the halogen-bond in the systems and, when interacting with ClC6F4H, DMSO favors the formation of a hydrogen-bond rather than a halogen-bond. Second, attractive energy dependences on 1/r(3.3) and 1/r(3.1) were established for the hydrogen-bond and halogen-bond, respectively. Third, upon the formation of a hydrogen-bond and halogen-bond, there is charge transfer from DMSO to the hydrogen-bond and halogen-bond donor. The back-group CH3 was found to contribute positively to the stabilization of the complexes. Fourth, an isosbestic point was detected in the ν(C-Cl) absorption band in the C6F5Cl-DMSO-d6 system, indicating that there exist only two dominating forms of C6F5Cl in binary mixtures; the non-complexed and halogen-bond-complexed forms. The presence of stable complexes in C6F5H-DMSO and ClC6F4H-DMSO systems are evidenced by the appearance of new peaks with fixed positions.

  9. Hydrogen donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Plumlee, Karl W.

    1978-01-01

    An indigenous hydrocarbon product stream boiling within a range of from about C.sub.1 -700.degree. F., preferably C.sub.1 -400.degree. F., is treated to produce an upgraded hydrocarbon fuel component and a component which can be recycled, with a suitable donor solvent, to a coal liquefaction zone to catalyze the reaction. In accordance therewith, a liquid hydrocarbon fraction with a high end boiling point range up to about 700.degree. F., preferably up to about 400.degree. F., is separated from a coal liquefaction zone effluent, the separated fraction is contacted with an alkaline medium to provide a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous extract phase, the aqueous phase is neutralized, and contacted with a peroxygen compound to convert indigenous components of the aqueous phase of said hydrocarbon fraction into catalytic components, such that the aqueous stream is suitable for recycle to the coal liquefaction zone. Naturally occurring phenols and alkyl substituted phenols, found in the aqueous phase, are converted, by the addition of hydroxyl constituents to phenols, to dihydroxy benzenes which, as disclosed in copending Application Ser. Nos. 686,813 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,536; 686,814 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,537; 686,827 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,012 and 686,828, K. W. Plumlee et al, filed May 17, 1976, are suitable hydrogen transfer catalysts.

  10. Hydrogen bonding in a mixture of protic ionic liquids: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Paschek, Dietmar; Golub, Benjamin; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-04-07

    We report results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations characterising the hydrogen bonding in mixtures of two different protic ionic liquids sharing the same cation: triethylammonium-methylsulfonate (TEAMS) and triethylammonium-triflate (TEATF). The triethylammonium-cation acts as a hydrogen-bond donor, being able to donate a single hydrogen-bond. Both, the methylsulfonate- and the triflate-anions can act as hydrogen-bond acceptors, which can accept multiple hydrogen bonds via their respective SO3-groups. In addition, replacing a methyl-group in the methylsulfonate by a trifluoromethyl-group in the triflate significantly weakens the strength of a hydrogen bond from an adjacent triethylammonium cation to the oxygen-site in the SO3-group of the anion. Our MD simulations show that these subtle differences in hydrogen bond strength significantly affect the formation of differently-sized hydrogen-bonded aggregates in these mixtures as a function of the mixture-composition. Moreover, the reported hydrogen-bonded cluster sizes can be predicted and explained by a simple combinatorial lattice model, based on the approximate coordination number of the ions, and using statistical weights that mostly account for the fact that each anion can only accept three hydrogen bonds.

  11. Topological hydrogen-bond definition to characterize the structure and dynamics of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Henchman, Richard H; Irudayam, Sheeba Jem

    2010-12-23

    A definition that equates a hydrogen bond topologically with a local energy well in the potential energy surface is used to study the structure and dynamics of liquid water. We demonstrate the robustness of this hydrogen-bond definition versus the many other definitions which use fixed, arbitrary parameters, do not account for variable molecular environments, and cannot effectively resolve transition states. Our topology definition unambiguously shows that most water molecules are double acceptors but sizable proportions are single or triple acceptors. Almost all hydrogens are found to take part in hydrogen bonds. Broken hydrogen bonds only form when two molecules try to form two hydrogen bonds between them. The double acceptors have tetrahedral geometry, lower potential energy, entropy, and density, and slower dynamics. The single and triple acceptors have trigonal and trigonal bipyramidal geometry and when considered together have higher density, potential energy, and entropy, faster dynamics, and a tendency to cluster. These calculations use an extended theory for the entropy of liquid water that takes into account the variable number of hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen-bond switching is shown to depend explicitly on the variable number of hydrogen bonds accepted and the presence of interstitial water molecules. Transition state theory indicates that the switching of hydrogen bonds is a mildly activated process, requiring only a moderate distortion of hydrogen bonds. Three main types of switching events are observed depending on whether the donor and acceptor are already sharing a hydrogen bond. The switch may proceed with no intermediate or via a bifurcated-oxygen or cyclic dimer, both of which have a broken hydrogen bond and symmetric and asymmetric forms. Switching is found to be strongly coupled to whole-molecule vibration, particularly for the more mobile single and triple acceptors. Our analysis suggests that even though water is heterogeneous in terms of the

  12. The pnicogen bond: its relation to hydrogen, halogen, and other noncovalent bonds.

    PubMed

    Scheiner, Steve

    2013-02-19

    Among a wide range of noncovalent interactions, hydrogen (H) bonds are well known for their specific roles in various chemical and biological phenomena. When describing conventional hydrogen bonding, researchers use the notation AH···D (where A refers to the electron acceptor and D to the donor). However, the AH molecule engaged in a AH···D H-bond can also be pivoted around by roughly 180°, resulting in a HA···D arrangement. Even without the H atom in a bridging position, this arrangement can be attractive, as explained in this Account. The electron density donated by D transfers into a AH σ* antibonding orbital in either case: the lobe of the σ* orbital near the H atom in the H-bonding AH···D geometry, or the lobe proximate to the A atom in the HA···D case. A favorable electrostatic interaction energy between the two molecules supplements this charge transfer. When A belongs to the pnictide family of elements, which include phosphorus, arsenic, antimony, and bismuth, this type of interaction is called a pnicogen bond. This bonding interaction is somewhat analogous to the chalcogen and halogen bonds that arise when A is an element in group 16 or 17, respectively, of the periodic table. Electronegative substitutions, such as a F for a H atom opposite the electron donor atom, strengthen the pnicogen bond. For example, the binding energy in FH(2)P···NH(3) greatly exceeds that of the paradigmatic H-bonding water dimer. Surprisingly, di- or tri-halogenation does not produce any additional stabilization, in marked contrast to H-bonds. Chalcogen and halogen bonds show similar strength to the pnicogen bond for a given electron-withdrawing substituent. This insensitivity to the electron-acceptor atom distinguishes these interactions from H-bonds, in which energy depends strongly upon the identity of the proton-donor atom. As with H-bonds, pnicogen bonds can extract electron density from the lone pairs of atoms on the partner molecule, such as N, O, and

  13. Hydrogen bonded network properties in liquid formamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakó, Imre; Megyes, Tünde; Bálint, Szabolcs; Chihaia, Viorel; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire; Krienke, Hartmut; Kopf, Andreas; Suh, Soong-Hyuck

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for liquid formamide using two different types of potential model (OPLS, Cordeiro). The structural results obtained from simulation were compared to experimental (x-ray and neutron diffraction measurements) outcomes. A generally good agreement for both models examined has been found, but in the hydrogen bonded region (2.9 Å) the Cordeiro model shows a slightly better fit. Besides the evaluation of partial radial distribution functions, orientational correlation functions and energy distribution functions, describing the hydrogen bonded structure, have been calculated based on the statistical analysis of configurations, resulting into a new insight in the clustering properties and topology of hydrogen bonded network. It has been shown that in liquid formamide exists a continuous hydrogen bonded network and from the analysis of the distribution of small rings revealed the ring size distribution in liquid formamide. Our study resulted that the ring size distribution of the hydrogen bonded liquid formamide shows a broad distribution with a maximum around 11. It has been found that the topology in formamide is significantly different than in water.

  14. Fano resonances in photoconductivity spectra of hydrogen donors in ZnO and rutile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, E. V.; Herklotz, F.; Weber, J.

    2015-02-01

    The results of photoconductivity studies of hydrogen donors in ZnO and rutile TiO2 are presented. It is shown that local vibrational modes of O-H bonds comprising donors in both semiconductors can be detected in photoconductivity spectra as Fano resonances at 3611 and 3290 cm-1 in the case of ZnO and TiO2, respectively. The frequencies of these features red-shift in energy down to 2668 (ZnO) and 2445 cm-1 (TiO2) if hydrogen is substituted by deuterium. Based on the frequency of the deuterium resonance it is concluded that the ionization energy of the hydrogen donor in TiO2 is less than 300 meV, which is in variance with predictions of theory. The reasons for such a discrepancy are discussed.

  15. A theoretical study on the hydrogen-bonding interactions between flavonoids and ethanol/water.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yu; Liang, Qin; Chen, Da-Fu; Guo, Rui

    2016-04-01

    Ethanol and water are the solvents most commonly used to extract flavonoids from propolis. Do hydrogen-bonding interactions exist between flavonoids and ethanol/water? In this work, this question was addressed by using density functional theory (DFT) to provide information on the hydrogen-bonding interactions between flavonoids and ethanol/water. Chrysin and Galangin were chosen as the representative flavonoids. The investigated complexes included chrysin-H2O, chrysin-CH3CH2OH, galangin-H2O and galangin-CH3CH2OH dyads. Molecular geometries, hydrogen-bond binding energies, charges of monomers and dyads, and topological analysis were studied at the B3LYP/M062X level of theory with the 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. The main conclusions were: (1) nine and ten optimized hydrogen-bond geometries were obtained for chrysin-H2O/CH3CH2OH and galangin-H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, respectively. (2) The hydrogen atoms except aromatic H1 and H5 and all of the oxygen atoms can form hydrogen-bonds with H2O and CH3CH2OH. Ethanol and water form strong hydrogen-bonds with the hydroxyl, carbonyl and ether groups in chrysin/galangin and form weak hydrogen-bonds with aromatic hydrogen atoms. Except in structures labeled A and B, chrysin and galangin interact more strongly with H2O than CH3CH2OH. (3) When chrysin and galangin form hydrogen-bonds with H2O and CH3CH2OH, charge transfers from the hydrogen-bond acceptor (H2O and CH3CH2OH in structures A, B, G, H, I, J) to the hydrogen-bond donor (chrysin and galangin in structure A, B, G, H, I, J). The stronger hydrogen-bond makes the hydrogen-bond donor lose more charge (A> B> G> H> I> J). (4) Most of the hydrogen-bonds in chrysin/galangin-H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes may be considered as electrostatic dominant, while C-O2···H in structures labeled E and C-O5···H in structures labeled J are hydrogen-bonds combined of electrostatic and covalent characters. H9, H7, and O4 are the preferred hydrogen-bonding sites.

  16. Sharing in covalent and hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perhacs, Pablo

    1998-11-01

    The sharing of a single electron between two spatial and spin coordinates ζ and ζsp/prime in a many electron system is discussed in terms of the single particle sharing amplitude, bonding is distinguished from non-bonding and anti- bonding. Molecules studied are the diatomics of seven of the first nine elements and the hydrides of the first row of eight elements. Analysis is extended to the complex of methane and hydrogen fluoride and to pairs of hydrogen fluoride, water, and ammonia. The behavior of hydrogen bonded complexes, is shown to have all the characteristics of covalent bonding. The ammonia dimer is shown not to be hydrogen bonded.

  17. Hydrogen-bond symmetry in difluoromaleate monoanion.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Charles L; Karri, Phaneendrasai; Moore, Curtis; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2012-05-09

    The symmetry of the hydrogen bond in hydrogen difluoromaleate monoanion is probed by X-ray crystallography and by the NMR method of isotopic perturbation in water, in two aprotic organic solvents, and in an isotropic liquid crystal. The X-ray crystal structure of potassium hydrogen difluoromaleate shows a remarkably short O-O distance of 2.41 Å and equal O-H distances of 1.206 Å, consistent with a strong and symmetric hydrogen bond. Incorporation of (18)O into one carboxyl group allows investigation of the symmetry of the H-bond in solution by the method of isotopic perturbation. The (19)F NMR spectra of the mono-(18)O-substituted monoanion in water, CD(2)Cl(2), and CD(3)CN show an AB spin system, corresponding to fluorines in different environments. The difference is attributed to the perturbation of the acidity of a carboxylic acid by (18)O, not to the mere presence of the (18)O, because the mono-(18)O dianion shows equivalent fluorines. Therefore, it is concluded that the monoanion exists as an equilibrating pair of interconverting tautomers and not as a single symmetric structure not only in water but also in organic solvents. However, in the isotropic liquid crystal phase of 4-cyanophenyl 4-heptylbenzoate, tetrabutylammonium hydrogen difluoromaleate-(18)O shows equivalent fluorines, consistent with a single symmetric structure. These results support earlier studies, which suggested that the symmetry of hydrogen bonds can be determined by the local environment.

  18. Subtle differences in the hydrogen bonding of alcohol to divalent oxygen and sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lin; Tang, Shanshan; Hansen, Anne S.; Frandsen, Benjamin N.; Maroun, Zeina; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2017-01-01

    The Osbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯S hydrogen bonds were investigated by gas phase FTIR spectroscopy of alcohol-dimethylether and alcohol-dimethylsulfide complexes, with alcohols of increasing hydrogen bond donor strength; methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE). The TFE complexes are more stable and form stronger hydrogen bonds compared to complexes with MeOH and EtOH, which are comparable, and only for the stronger hydrogen bond donor (TFE) are the small differences in acceptor molecules highlighted. The equilibrium constant for complex formation was determined from the experimental and calculated intensity of the OH-stretching transition. The interactions are illustrated by theoretical calculations and topological analysis.

  19. Characterization of intramolecular hydrogen bonds by atomic charges and charge fluxes.

    PubMed

    Baranović, Goran; Biliškov, Nikola; Vojta, Danijela

    2012-08-16

    The electronic charge redistribution and the infrared intensities of the two types of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, O-H···O and O-H···π, of o-hydroxy- and o-ethynylphenol, respectively, together with a set of related intermolecular hydrogen bond complexes are described in terms of atomic charges and charge fluxes derived from atomic polar tensors calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The polarizable continuum model shows that both the atomic charges and charge fluxes are strongly dependent on solvent. It is shown that their values for the OH bond in an intramolecular hydrogen bond are not much different from those for the "free" OH bond, but the changes are toward the values found for an intermolecular hydrogen bond. The intermolecular hydrogen bond is characterized not only by the decreased atomic charge but also by the enlarged charge flux term of the same sign producing thus an enormous increase in IR intensity. The overall behavior of the charges and fluxes of the hydrogen atom in OH and ≡CH bonds agree well with the observed spectroscopic characteristics of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The main reason for the differences between the two types of the hydrogen bond lies in the molecular structure because favorable linear proton donor-acceptor arrangement is not possible to achieve within a small molecule. The calculated intensities (in vacuo and in polarizable continuum) are only in qualitative agreement with the measured data.

  20. Hydrogen-bonding directed crystal engineering of some molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Feng

    2000-10-01

    The design of crystalline clathrates and microporous solids is a contemporary goal in crystal engineering, in which hydrogen bonds play a central role because of their strength, directionality and flexibility. We have constructed various layer- and channel-type host structures by using hydrogen-bonding interactions. A novel hydrogen-bonded supramolecular rosette structure is generated from guanidinium and hydrogen carbonate ions in (1) and ( 2). The rosettes are fused into linear ribbons, which are cross-linked by terephthalate or 4-nitrobenzoate ions functioning as hydrogen-bond acceptors, resulting in anionic host layers with tetra-n-butylammonium guest species sandwiched between them. In (3) ˜ (6), new crystalline adducts of tetraalkylammonium terephthalate/trimesate with urea and water molecules result from hydrogen-bond directed assembly of complementary acceptors and donors that generate anionic channel- and layer-type host lattices for the accommodation of bulky hydrophobic cations. Some 4,4'-disubstituted biphenyls manifest their robustness and flexibility as supramolecular building blocks to construct host structures. 4,4'-biphenyl dicarboxylate ion has a strong tendency in generating ladder-type structure in (7) ˜ (10) due to its rigidity and effectiveness as a bifunctional hydrogen-bond acceptor. In (11) ˜ (15), 4,4 '-dicyanobiphenyl, 4,4'-bipyridine-N,N '-dioxide and 4,4'-dinitrobiphenyl exhibit a constructive interplay of strong and weak hydrogen bond functionalities that generate robust synthons. 4-Tritylbenzoic acid crystallizes via the carboxyl dimer supramolecular synthon to produce a wheel-and-axle host lattice that includes different aromatic solvents in its microporous framework in (16) ˜ (25 ), in which the host architecture is robust and yet adaptive. Based on the trigonal symmetry of 2,4,6-tris-4-(halo-phenoxy)-1,3,5-triazines (halo = chloro, bromo) and the Br3 or Cl3 supramolecular synthon, a new hexagonal host lattice has been designed

  1. Electrostatically enhanced FF interactions through hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding and metal coordination: an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2016-07-27

    In this manuscript the ability of hydrogen and halogen bonding interactions, as well as metal coordination to enhance FF interactions involving fluorine substituted aromatic rings has been studied at the RI-MP2/def2-TZVPD level of theory. We have used 4-fluoropyridine, 4-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-(4-fluorophenyl)propiolonitrile and their respective meta derivatives as aromatic compounds. In addition, we have used HF and IF as hydrogen and halogen bond donors, respectively, and Ag(i) as the coordination metal. Furthermore, we have also used HF as an electron rich fluorine donor entity, thus establishing FF interactions with the above mentioned aromatic systems. Moreover, a CSD (Cambridge Structural Database) search has been carried out and some interesting examples have been found, highlighting the impact of FF interactions involving aromatic fluorine atoms in solid state chemistry. Finally, cooperativity effects between FF interactions and both hydrogen and halogen bonding interactions have been analyzed and compared. We have also used Bader's theory of "atoms in molecules" to further describe the cooperative effects.

  2. Character and Structure of Hydrogen Bonding in Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinghua; Luo, Yi; Augustsson, Andreas; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Sathe, Conny; Agren, Hans; Siegbahn, Hans; Nordgren, Joseph

    2003-03-01

    Pauling stated in the 50s that electron sharing between water molecules results in a covalency in the hydrogen bond. Many attempts have been made in the past to verify PaulingÂ's prediction, but without much success due to the limitation of experimental access to the electronic structure of liquids. We reported the first X-ray emission spectra of liquid water. X-ray emission is a direct probe of the local electronic structure of complex systems. Our experimental and theoretical studies on liquid water provide clear evidence that an electron sharing takes place between water molecules. Such a sharing mainly involves the so-called 3a1 orbital, which is a mixing of oxygen 2p and hydrogen 2s atomic orbitals. The outermost "lone pair" orbital (1b_1), however, hardly shows any change upon solvation, which is in contradiction with the normal definition of so-called coordinate-covalent bonding (also called donor-acceptor or Lewis acid-base bonding). Moreover, the X-ray emission spectra of liquid water nicely show the origin for the increasing of dipole moment in liquid water, and they have also been used to separately determine a particular structure with broken hydrogen bonding.

  3. Short intramolecular hydrogen bonds: derivatives of malonaldehyde with symmetrical substituents.

    PubMed

    Hargis, Jacqueline C; Evangelista, Francesco A; Ingels, Justin B; Schaefer, Henry F

    2008-12-24

    A systematic study of various derivatives of malonaldehyde has been carried out to explore very short hydrogen bonds (r(OO) < 2.450 A). Various electron-withdrawing groups, including CN, NO(2), and BH(2), have been attached to the central carbon atom, C(2). To C(1) and C(3), strong electron donors and/or sterically hindered substituents were used to strengthen the intramolecular hydrogen bond, including but not limited to NH(2), N(CH(3))(2), and C(CH(3))(3). Seven molecules (Figure 2 ) were found to have extremely short intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The chemical systems investigated are intriguing due to their low energetic barriers for the intramolecular hydrogen atom transfers. Classical barriers were predicted using correlated methods including second-order perturbation theory and coupled cluster theory in conjunction with the Dunning hierarchy of correlation consistent basis sets, cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, Q, 5). Focal point analyses allowed for the barriers to be evaluated at the CBS limit including core correlation and zero-point vibrational energy corrections. B3LYP energies are benchmarked against highly accurate correlated energies for intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems. The focal point extrapolated method, including coupled cluster full triple excitation contributions, gives a hydrogen transfer barrier for malonaldehyde of approximately 4 kcal mol(-1). We describe two compounds with extremely low classical barriers, nitromalonamide (0.43 kcal mol(-1)) and 2-borylmalonamide (0.60 kcal mol(-1)). An empirical relationship was drawn between the B3LYP energetic barriers and the predicted coupled cluster barriers at the CBS limit. By relating these two quantities, barrier heights may be estimated for systems too large to presently use highly correlated electronic structure methods.

  4. Ranking relative hydrogen-bond strengths in hydroxybenzoic acids for crystal-engineering purposes.

    PubMed

    Aakeröy, Christer B; Epa, Kanishka; Forbes, Safiyyah; Schultheiss, Nathan; Desper, John

    2013-10-25

    Systematic co-crystallizations resulting in a total of six new crystal structures involving either 3-hydroxy- or 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, complemented by calculated molecular electrostatic potential surfaces and existing structural data, have shown that in a competitive molecular recognition situation, the -OH moiety is a more effective hydrogen-bond donor than the -COOH moiety which, in turn, highlights that electrostatic charge can offer more useful guidance than acidity for predicting competitive hydrogen-bond preferences.

  5. A DONOR COMPLEX WITH TUNNELING HYDROGEN IN PURE GERMANIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Joos, B.; Haller, E.E.; Falicov, L.M.

    1980-02-01

    A shallow donor complex observed by several authors in ultrapure germanium grown in a hydrogen atmosphere is attributed to an oxygen-hydrogen system. Photoconductivity data under stress are presented. An abrupt transition in the spectra at a well-defined stress (2.1 x 10{sup 8} dyn cm{sup -2}) is found. It is explained by a theory which involves dynamic tunneling of the hydrogen in the vicinity of an oxygen center. The comparison with other complex donors and acceptors supports the model.

  6. Molecular tectonics: polymorphism and enhancement of network dimensionality by a combination of primary and secondary hydrogen bond sites.

    PubMed

    Dechambenoit, Pierre; Ferlay, Sylvie; Hosseini, Mir Wais; Kyritsakas, Nathalie

    2007-11-28

    A dicationic tecton bearing four NH and two OH groups, as primary and secondary hydrogen bond donor sites, respectively, leads, in the presence of [M(CN)(4)](2-) anions, to the formation of polymorphic 2- and 3-D hydrogen-bonded networks.

  7. An unconventional halogen bond with carbene as an electron donor: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingzhong; Wang, Yilei; Liu, Zhenbo; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Gong, Baoan; Sun, Jiazhong

    2009-02-01

    An unconventional halogen bond has been proved to exist in H2C-BrH complex. The halogen bond energy of H2C-BrH complex is calculated at four levels of theory [MP2, MP4, CCSD, and CCSD(T)]. The result shows that the carbene is a better electron donor. The substitution effect is prominent in this interaction. For example, the interaction energy in H2C-BrCN complex is increased by more than 300% relative to H2C-BrH complex. The analyses of NBO, AIM, and energy components were used to unveil the nature of the interaction. The results show that this novel halogen bond has similar characteristics to hydrogen bonds.

  8. The Effect of Axial Mg{sup 2+} Ligation and Peripheral Hydrogen Bonding on Chlorophyll a

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuming; Wang, Hezhou; Zhao, Fuli; Sun, Jinzuo

    2004-03-21

    Model systems of the chlorophyll a (Chla) molecule were studied using density functional theory. Dependence of structure variation of Chla on the polarity of ligand was described. The hydrogen bonding (H-bond) donated to the 13{sup 1}-keto carbonyl oxygen favors the ionic resonance structure of the 13{sup 1}-keto carbonyl bond. Such a H-bond causes spin density redistribution in anion, and charge transfer in cation from donor of H-bond to the porphyrin plane of Chla because of orbital admixing, which indicates that the spin density of chlorophyll cation could be easily regulated by its peripheral H-bond.

  9. An AAA-DDD triply hydrogen-bonded complex easily accessible for supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi-Fei; Chen, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Bo; Yuan, Ying-Xue; Wu, Na-Na; Song, Xiang-Zhi; Yang, Lan

    2014-12-15

    For a complementary hydrogen-bonded complex, when every hydrogen-bond acceptor is on one side and every hydrogen-bond donor is on the other, all secondary interactions are attractive and the complex is highly stable. AAA-DDD (A=acceptor, D=donor) is considered to be the most stable among triply hydrogen-bonded sequences. The easily synthesized and further derivatized AAA-DDD system is very desirable for hydrogen-bonded functional materials. In this case, AAA and DDD, starting from 4-methoxybenzaldehyde, were synthesized with the Hantzsch pyridine synthesis and Friedländer annulation reaction. The association constant determined by fluorescence titration in chloroform at room temperature is 2.09×10(7)  M(-1) . The AAA and DDD components are not coplanar, but form a V shape in the solid state. Supramolecular polymers based on AAA-DDD triply hydrogen bonded have also been developed. This work may make AAA-DDD triply hydrogen-bonded sequences easily accessible for stimuli-responsive materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Interplay of hydrogen bonds and n→π* interactions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Gail J; Newberry, Robert W; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T; Woolfson, Derek N

    2013-12-11

    Protein structures are stabilized by multiple weak interactions, including the hydrophobic effect, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic effects, and van der Waals interactions. Among these interactions, the hydrogen bond is distinct in having its origins in electron delocalization. Recently, another type of electron delocalization, the n→π* interaction between carbonyl groups, has been shown to play a role in stabilizing protein structure. Here we examine the interplay between hydrogen bonding and n→π* interactions. To address this issue, we used data available from high-resolution protein crystal structures to interrogate asparagine side-chain oxygen atoms that are both acceptors of a hydrogen bond and donors of an n→π* interaction. Then we employed natural bond orbital analysis to determine the relative energetic contributions of the hydrogen bonds and n→π* interactions in these systems. We found that an n→π* interaction is worth ~5-25% of a hydrogen bond and that stronger hydrogen bonds tend to attenuate or obscure n→π* interactions. Conversely, weaker hydrogen bonds correlate with stronger n→π* interactions and demixing of the orbitals occupied by the oxygen lone pairs. Thus, these two interactions conspire to stabilize local backbone-side-chain contacts, which argues for the inclusion of n→π* interactions in the inventory of non-covalent forces that contribute to protein stability and thus in force fields for biomolecular modeling.

  11. NMR properties of hydrogen-bonded glycine cluster in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Jorge R.; da Silva, Arnaldo Machado; Ghosh, Angsula; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    2016-11-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the effect of the hydrogen bond formation on the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) parameters of hydrogen-bonded clusters of glycine molecules in gas-phase. DFT predicted isotropic chemical shifts of H, C, N and O of the isolated glycine with respect to standard reference materials are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The variations of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts for all atoms constituting these clusters containing up to four glycine molecules have been investigated systematically employing gradient corrected hybrid B3LYP functional with three different types of extended basis sets. The clusters are mainly stabilized by a network of strong hydrogen bonds among the carboxylic (COOH) groups of glycine monomers. The formation of hydrogen bond influences the molecular structure of the clusters significantly which, on the other hand, gets reflected in the variations of NMR properties. The carbon (C) atom of the sbnd COOH group, the bridging hydrogen (H) and the proton-donor oxygen (O) atom of the Osbnd H bond suffer downfield shift due to the formation of hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bond lengths and the structural complexity of the clusters are found to vary with the number of participating monomers. A direct correlation between the hydrogen bond length and isotropic chemical shift of the bridging hydrogen is observed in all cases. The individual variations of the principal axis elements in chemical shift tensor provide additional insight about the different nature of the monomers within the cluster.

  12. Estimation on the individual hydrogen-bond strength in molecules with multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hao; Hua, Weijie; Li, Shuhua

    2007-04-19

    A simple atom-replacement approach is proposed for estimating the individual contributions of each intermolecular hydrogen bond (HB) in multiple hydrogen-bonded systems. The approach is validated by calculations on the homodimer of formylformamide and then applied to nucleic acid base pairs (adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine) and some quadruply hydrogen-bonded dimers. With the help of this method, it is easy to distinguish the relative strength of each HB, and identify the main factors contributing to the total binding energies of multiple HBs.

  13. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  14. Multiple hydrogen bonds in cytosinium zoledronate trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Ravikumar, Krishnan

    2011-03-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound [systematic name: 4-amino-2-oxo-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-1-ium 1-hydroxy-2-(1H,3H-imidazol-3-ium-1-yl)ethylidenediphosphonate trihydrate], C(4)H(6)N(3)O(+)·C(5)H(9)N(2)O(7)P(2)(-)·3H(2)O, contains one cytosinium cation, one zoledronate anion and three water molecules. The zoledronate anion has a zwitterionic character, in which each phosphonate group is singly deprotonated and an imidazole N atom is protonated. Furthermore, proton transfer takes place from one of the phosphonic acid groups of the zoledronate anion to one of the N atoms of the cytosinium cation. The cytosinium cation forms a C(6) chain, while the zoledronate anion forms a rectangular-shaped centrosymmetric dimer through N-H...O hydrogen bonds. The cations and anions are held together by N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds to form a one-dimensional polymeric tape. The three water molecules play a crucial role in hydrogen bonding, resulting in a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network.

  15. Hydrogen bonds in methane-water clusters.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Cano, Juan-Ramón; Guevara-García, Alfredo; Vargas, Rubicelia; Restrepo, Albeiro; Garza, Jorge

    2016-08-24

    Characterization of hydrogen bonds in CH4-(H2O)12 clusters was carried out by using several quantum chemistry tools. An initial stochastic search provided around 2 500 000 candidate structures, then, using a convex-hull polygon criterion followed by gradient based optimization under the Kohn-Sham scheme, a total of 54 well defined local minima were located in the Potential Energy Surface. These structures were further analyzed through second-order many-body perturbation theory with an extended basis set at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level. Our analysis of Gibbs energies at several temperatures clearly suggests a structural preference toward compact water clusters interacting with the external methane molecule, instead of the more commonly known clathrate-like structures. This study shows that CH4-(H2O)12 clusters may be detected at temperatures up to 179 K, this finding provides strong support to a recently postulated hypothesis that suggests that methane-water clusters could be present in Mars at these conditions. Interestingly, we found that water to water hydrogen bonding is strengthened in the mixed clusters when compared to the isolated water dimer, which in turn leads to a weakening of the methane to water hydrogen bonding when compared to the CH4-(H2O) dimer. Finally, our evidence places a stern warning about the abilities of popular geometrical criteria to determine the existence of hydrogen bonds.

  16. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  17. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Bernd; Mohr, Peter; Stahl, Martin

    2010-03-25

    The formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds has a very pronounced effect on molecular structure and properties. We study both aspects in detail with the aim of enabling a more rational use of this class of interactions in medicinal chemistry. On the basis of exhaustive searches in crystal structure databases, we derive propensities for intramolecular hydrogen bond formation of five- to eight-membered ring systems of relevance in drug discovery. A number of motifs, several of which are clearly underutilized in drug discovery, are analyzed in more detail by comparing small molecule and protein-ligand X-ray structures. To investigate effects on physicochemical properties, sets of closely related structures with and without the ability to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds were designed, synthesized, and characterized with respect to membrane permeability, water solubility, and lipophilicity. We find that changes in these properties depend on a subtle balance between the strength of the hydrogen bond interaction, geometry of the newly formed ring system, and the relative energies of the open and closed conformations in polar and unpolar environments. A number of general guidelines for medicinal chemists emerge from this study.

  18. Direct evaluation of individual hydrogen bond energy in situ in intra- and intermolecular multiple hydrogen bonds system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2012-02-05

    The results of evaluating the individual hydrogen bond (H-bond) strength are expected to be helpful for the rational design of new strategies for molecular recognition or supramolecular assemblies. Unfortunately, there is few obvious and unambiguous means of evaluating the energy of a single H-bond within a multiple H-bonds system. We present a local analytic model, ABEEMσπ H-bond energy (HBE) model based on ab initio calculations (MP2) as benchmark, to directly and rapidly evaluate the individual HBE in situ in inter- and intramolecular multiple H-bonds system. This model describes the HBE as the sum of electrostatic and van der Waals (vdW) interactions which all depend upon the geometry and environment, and the ambient environment of H-bond in the model is accounted fairly. Thus, it can fairly consider the cooperative effect and secondary effect. The application range of ABEEMσπ HBE model is rather wide. This work has discussed the individual H-bond in DNA base pair and protein peptide dimers. The results indicate that the interactions among donor H atom, acceptor atom as well as those atoms connected to them with 1,2 or 1,3 relationships are all important for evaluating the HBE, although the interaction between the donor H atom and the acceptor atom is large. Furthermore, our model quantitatively indicates the polarization ability of N, O, and S in a new style, and gives the percentage of the polarization effect in HBE, which can not be given by fixed partial charge force field.

  19. Photochromic supramolecular azopolyimides based on hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa; Flakus, Henryk; Jarczyk-Jedryka, Anna; Konieczkowska, Jolanta; Siwy, Mariola; Bijak, Katarzyna; Sobolewska, Anna; Stumpe, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    The approach of deriving new photoresponsive active supramolecular azopolymers based on the hydrogen bonds is described. Polymers with imide rings, i.e., poly(esterimide)s and poly(etherimide)s, with phenolic hydroxyl or carboxylic groups were applied as matrixes for the polymer-dye supramolecular systems. Supramolecular films were built on the basis of the hydrogen bonds between the functional groups of the polymers and various azochromophores, that is, 4-phenylazophenol, 4-[4-(6-hydroxyhexyloxy)phenylazo]benzene, 4-[4-(6-hexadecaneoxy)phenylazo]pyridine and 4-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)pyridine. The hydrogen bonding interaction in azo-systems were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and for selected assembles by 1H NMR technique. The obtained polyimide azo-assembles were characterized by X-ray diffraction and DSC measurements. H-bonds allow attaching a chromophore to each repeating unit of the polymer, thereby suppressing the macroscopic phase separation except for the systems based on 4-[4-(6-hydroxyhexyloxy)phenylazo]benzene. H-bonds systems were amorphous and revealed glass transition temperatures lower than for the polyimide matrixes (170-260 °C). The photoresponsive behavior of the azo-assemblies was tasted in holographic recording experiment.

  20. Lewis acid-water/alcohol complexes as hydrogen atom donors in radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Povie, Guillaume; Renaud, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Water or low molecular weight alcohols are, due to their availability, low price and low toxicity ideal reagents for organic synthesis. Recently, it was reported that, despite the very strong BDE of the O-H bond, they can be used as hydrogen atom donors in place of expensive and/or toxic group 14 metal hydrides when boron and titanium(III) Lewis acids are present. This finding represents a considerable innovation and uncovers a new perspective on the paradigm of hydrogen atom transfers to radicals. We discuss here the influence of complex formation and other association processes on the efficacy of the hydrogen transfer step. A delicate balance between activation by complex formation and deactivation by further hydrogen bonding is operative.

  1. Unusual hydrogen bonding in L-cysteine hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    Minkov, V S; Ghazaryan, V V; Boldyreva, E V; Petrosyan, A M

    2015-08-01

    L-Cysteine hydrogen fluoride, or bis(L-cysteinium) difluoride-L-cysteine-hydrogen fluoride (1/1/1), 2C3H8NO2S(+)·2F(-)·C3H7NO2S·HF or L-Cys(+)(L-Cys···L-Cys(+))F(-)(F(-)...H-F), provides the first example of a structure with cations of the 'triglycine sulfate' type, i.e. A(+)(A···A(+)) (where A and A(+) are the zwitterionic and cationic states of an amino acid, respectively), without a doubly charged counter-ion. The salt crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the space group P2(1). The dimeric (L-Cys···L-Cys(+)) cation and the dimeric (F(-)···H-F) anion are formed via strong O-H···O or F-H···F hydrogen bonds, respectively, with very short O···O [2.4438 (19) Å] and F···F distances [2.2676 (17) Å]. The F···F distance is significantly shorter than in solid hydrogen fluoride. Additionally, there is another very short hydrogen bond, of O-H···F type, formed by a L-cysteinium cation and a fluoride ion. The corresponding O···F distance of 2.3412 (19) Å seems to be the shortest among O-H···F and F-H···O hydrogen bonds known to date. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction study was complemented by IR spectroscopy. Of special interest was the spectral region of vibrations related to the above-mentioned hydrogen bonds.

  2. C-H…O hydrogen bonds in FK506-binding protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Sreekanth; Baek, Kwanghee; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen bonds are important interaction forces observed in protein structures. They can be classified as stronger or weaker depending on their energy, thereby reflecting on the type of donor. The contribution of weak hydrogen bonds is deemed as an important factor toward structure stability along with the stronger bonds. One such bond, the C-H…O type hydrogen bond, is shown to make a contribution in maintaining three dimensional structures of proteins. Apart from their presence within protein structures, the role of these bonds in protein-ligand interactions is also noteworthy. In this study, we present a statistical analysis on the presence of C-H…O hydrogen bonds observed between FKBPs and their cognate ligands. The FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) carry peptidyl cis-trans isomerase activity apart from the immunosuppressive property by binding to the immunosuppressive drugs FK506 or rapamycin. Because the active site of FKBPs is lined up by many hydrophobic residues, we speculated that the prevalence of C-H…O hydrogen bonds will be considerable. In a total of 25 structures analyzed, a higher frequency of C-H…O hydrogen bonds is observed in comparison with the stronger hydrogen bonds. These C-H…O hydrogen bonds are dominated by a highly conserved donor, the C(α/β) of Val55 and an acceptor, the backbone oxygen of Glu54. Both these residues are positioned in the β4-α1 loop, whereas the other residues Tyr26, Phe36 and Phe99 with higher frequencies are lined up at the opposite face of the active site. These preferences could be implicated in FKBP pharmacophore models toward enhancing the ligand affinity. This study could be a prelude to studying other proteins with hydrophobic pockets to gain better insights into ligand recognition.

  3. The effects of hydrogen bonds on metal-mediated O2 activation and related processes

    PubMed Central

    Shook, Ryan L.; Borovik, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds stabilize and direct chemistry performed by metalloenzymes. With inspiration from enzymes, we will utilize an approach that incorporates intramolecular hydrogen bond donors to determine their effects on the stability and reactivity of metal complexes. Our premise is that control of secondary coordination sphere interactions will promote new function in synthetic metal complexes. Multidentate ligands have been developed that create rigid organic structures around metal ions. These ligands place hydrogen bond (H-bond) donors proximal to the metal centers, forming specific microenvironments. One distinguishing attribute of these systems is that site-specific modulations in structure can be readily accomplished, in order to evaluate correlations with reactivity. A focus of this research is consideration of dioxygen binding and activation by metal complexes, including developing structure–function relationships in metal-assisted oxidative catalysis. PMID:19082087

  4. Rotational Spectra of Hydrogen Bonded Networks of Amino Alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    The rotational spectra of several different amino alcohols including D/L-allo-threoninol, 2-amino-1,3-propanediol and 1,3-diamino-2-propanol over the 6.5-18.5 GHz range have been investigated under jet-cooled conditions using chirped-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Despite the small size of these molecules, a great variety of conformations have been observed in the molecular expansion. While the NH2 group is typically thought of as a H-bond acceptor, it often acts both as acceptor and donor in forming H-bonded networks. With three adjacent H-bonding substituents (a combination of OH and NH2 groups), many different hydrogen bonding patterns are possible, including H-bonded chains and H-bonded cycles. Since many of these structures differ primarily by the relative orientation of the H-atoms, the analysis of these rotational spectra are challenging. Only through an exhaustive conformational search and the comparison with the experimental rotational constants, nuclear quadrupolar splittings, and line strengths are we able to understand the complex nature of these interactions. The ways in which the presence and number of NH2 groups affects the relative energies, and distorts the structures will be explored.

  5. Correlation of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction Efficiencies for Aryl Radicals with their Vertical Electron Affinities and the Vertical Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Atom Donors

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT – ICR). Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropanol, were measured for twenty-three structurally different, positively-charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for three of the aryl radicals with isopropanol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of several different hydrogen-atom donors with a few selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X – H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of twenty-nine different aryl radicals and eighteen different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state as the energy difference between the neutral and ionic reactants decreases. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be “tuned” by structural changes that influence either

  6. Correlation of hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for aryl radicals with their vertical electron affinities and the vertical ionization energies of the hydrogen-atom donors.

    PubMed

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2008-12-31

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropyl alcohol, were measured for 23 structurally different, positively charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for the reaction of three of the aryl radicals with isopropyl alcohol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of 15 different hydrogen-atom donors with two selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X-H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of 29 different aryl radicals and 18 different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be "tuned" by structural changes that influence either the vertical EA of the aryl radical or the vertical IE of the hydrogen atom donor.

  7. Ultrafast 2D IR anisotropy of water reveals reorientation during hydrogen-bond switching.

    PubMed

    Ramasesha, Krupa; Roberts, Sean T; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2011-08-07

    Rearrangements of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water are believed to involve rapid and concerted hydrogen bond switching events, during which a hydrogen bond donor molecule undergoes large angle molecular reorientation as it exchanges hydrogen bonding partners. To test this picture of hydrogen bond dynamics, we have performed ultrafast 2D IR spectral anisotropy measurements on the OH stretching vibration of HOD in D(2)O to directly track the reorientation of water molecules as they change hydrogen bonding environments. Interpretation of the experimental data is assisted by modeling drawn from molecular dynamics simulations, and we quantify the degree of molecular rotation on changing local hydrogen bonding environment using restricted rotation models. From the inertial 2D anisotropy decay, we find that water molecules initiating from a strained configuration and relaxing to a stable configuration are characterized by a distribution of angles, with an average reorientation half-angle of 10°, implying an average reorientation for a full switch of ≥20°. These results provide evidence that water hydrogen bond network connectivity switches through concerted motions involving large angle molecular reorientation.

  8. Denitrification of groundwater with methane as sole hydrogen donor.

    PubMed

    Eisentraeger, A; Klag, P; Vansbotter, B; Heymann, E; Dott, W

    2001-06-01

    It was examined, whether methane can be used as hydrogen donor for an in situ denitrification of groundwater. It is demonstrated, that groundwater can serve as liquid medium and that the denitrification can occur at 10 degrees C. Efforts to enrich methanotrophic bacteria under anoxic conditions have not been successful. No methane oxidation occurred in the absence of oxygen. For this reason, the denitrification with methane must be performed in a two-stage process with aerobic methanotrophic bacteria producing metabolites, that are used as hydrogen donor by non-methanotrophic bacteria in anoxic areas. This kind of indirect denitrification was proved by quantifying nitrogen and nitrous oxide in enrichment cultures that were not stirred or shaken. Large numbers of non-methanotrophic bacteria being able to denitrify with methanol, acetate or proteins as sole hydrogen donor were enriched besides the methanotrophic bacteria under these conditions.

  9. Cyclic olefins as new hydrogen donor compounds for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, M.W.; Curtis, C.W. )

    1990-01-01

    A new set of hydrogen donor compounds, cyclic olefins (CLO), has been evaluated to determine their effectiveness as hydrogen donors to coal. These cyclic olefins are hydroaromatic species which do not contain aromatic rings. The efficacy of these donors has been compared to conventional hydroaromatics. The CLO's under study are 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene, also known as isotetralin, and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene. In this paper, the thermal and catalytic reactivity of the CLO's under nitrogen and hydrogen at coal liquefaction temperature is discussed. Results for the reactions of the CLO's and their conventional hydroaromatic analogues, e.g. tetralin, 9,10-dihydroanthracene, and octahydroanthracene, with Western Kentucky No. 9 coal are discussed.

  10. Halogen bonds in crystal engineering: like hydrogen bonds yet different.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arijit; Tothadi, Srinu; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2014-08-19

    The halogen bond is an attractive interaction in which an electrophilic halogen atom approaches a negatively polarized species. Short halogen atom contacts in crystals have been known for around 50 years. Such contacts are found in two varieties: type I, which is symmetrical, and type II, which is bent. Both are influenced by geometric and chemical considerations. Our research group has been using halogen atom interactions as design elements in crystal engineering, for nearly 30 years. These interactions include halogen···halogen interactions (X···X) and halogen···heteroatom interactions (X···B). Many X···X and almost all X···B contacts can be classified as halogen bonds. In this Account, we illustrate examples of crystal engineering where one can build up from previous knowledge with a focus that is provided by the modern definition of the halogen bond. We also comment on the similarities and differences between halogen bonds and hydrogen bonds. These interactions are similar because the protagonist atoms-halogen and hydrogen-are both electrophilic in nature. The interactions are distinctive because the size of a halogen atom is of consequence when compared with the atomic sizes of, for example, C, N, and O, unlike that of a hydrogen atom. Conclusions may be drawn pertaining to the nature of X···X interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). There is a clear geometric and chemical distinction between type I and type II, with only type II being halogen bonds. Cl/Br isostructurality is explained based on a geometric model. In parallel, experimental studies on 3,4-dichlorophenol and its congeners shed light on the nature of halogen···halogen interactions and reveal the chemical difference between Cl and Br. Variable temperature studies also show differences between type I and type II contacts. In terms of crystal design, halogen bonds offer a unique opportunity in the strength, atom size and interaction gradation; this may be

  11. Influence of Intramolecular Charge Transfer and Nuclear Quantum Effects on Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in Azopyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Bártová, Kateřina; Čechová, Lucie; Procházková, Eliška; Socha, Ondřej; Janeba, Zlatko; Dračínský, Martin

    2017-10-06

    Intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IMHBs) in 5-azopyrimidines are investigated by NMR spectroscopy and DFT computations that involve nuclear quantum effects. A series of substituted 5-phenylazopyrimidines with one or two hydrogen bond donors able to form IMHBs with the azo group is prepared by azo coupling. The barrier of interconversion between two rotamers of the compounds with two possible IMHBs is determined by variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and it is demonstrated that the barrier is significantly affected by intramolecular charge transfer. Through-hydrogen-bond scalar coupling is investigated in (15)N labeled compounds and the stability of the IMHBs is correlated with experimental NMR parameters and rationalized by path integral molecular dynamics simulations that involve nuclear quantum effects. Detailed information on the hydrogen bond geometry upon hydrogen-to-deuterium isotope exchange is obtained from a comparison of experimental and calculated NMR data.

  12. Parameter-Free Hydrogen-Bond Definition to Classify Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Hasti; Higham, Jonathan; Henchman, Richard H

    2016-08-25

    DSSP is the most commonly used method to assign protein secondary structure. It is based on a hydrogen-bond definition with an energy cutoff. To assess whether hydrogen bonds defined in a parameter-free way may give more generality while preserving accuracy, we examine a series of hydrogen-bond definitions to assign secondary structure for a series of proteins. Assignment by the strongest-acceptor bifurcated definition with provision for unassigned donor hydrogens, termed the SABLE method, is found to match DSSP with 95% agreement. The small disagreement mainly occurs for helices, turns, and bends. While there is no absolute way to assign protein secondary structure, avoiding molecule-specific cutoff parameters should be advantageous in generalizing structure-assignment methods to any hydrogen-bonded system.

  13. Spectroscopic identification of ethanol-water conformers by large-amplitude hydrogen bond librational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.; Wugt Larsen, R.; Heimdal, J.

    2015-12-14

    The far-infrared absorption spectra have been recorded for hydrogen-bonded complexes of water with ethanol embedded in cryogenic neon matrices at 2.8 K. The partial isotopic H/D-substitution of the ethanol subunit enabled by a dual inlet deposition procedure enables the observation and unambiguous assignment of the intermolecular high-frequency out-of-plane and the low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational modes for two different conformations of the mixed binary ethanol/water complex. The resolved donor OH librational bands confirm directly previous experimental evidence that ethanol acts as the O⋯HO hydrogen bond acceptor in the two most stable conformations. In the most stable conformation, the water subunit forces the ethanol molecule into its less stable gauche configuration upon dimerization owing to a cooperative secondary weak O⋯HC hydrogen bond interaction evidenced by a significantly blue-shift of the low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational band origin. The strong correlation between the low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational motion and the secondary intermolecular O⋯HC hydrogen bond is demonstrated by electronic structure calculations. The experimental findings are further supported by CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVQZ calculations of the conformational energy differences together with second-order vibrational perturbation theory calculations of the large-amplitude donor OH librational band origins.

  14. Quantum Calculations On Hydrogen Bonds In Certain Water Clusters Show Cooperative Effects

    PubMed Central

    ZNAMENSKIY, VASILIY S.; GREEN, MICHAEL E.

    2008-01-01

    Water molecules in clefts and small clusters are in a significantly different environment than in bulk water. We have carried out ab initio calculations that demonstrate this in a series of clusters, showing that cooperative effects must be taken into account in the treatment of hydrogen bonds and water clusters in such bounded systems. Hydrogen bonds between water molecules in simulations are treated most frequently by using point charge water potentials, such as TIP3P or SPC, sometimes with a polarizable extension. These produce excellent results in bulk water, for which they are calibrated. Clefts are different from bulk; it is necessary to look at smaller systems, and investigate the effect of limited numbers of neighbors. We start with a study of isolated clusters of water with varying numbers of neighbors of a hydrogen bonded pair of water molecules. The cluster as a whole is in vacuum. The clusters are defined so as to provide the possible arrangements of nearest neighbors of a central hydrogen bonded pair of water molecules. We then scan the length and angles of the central hydrogen bond of the clusters, using density functional theory, for each possible arrangement of donor and acceptor hydrogen bonds on the central hydrogen bonding pair; the potential of interaction of two water molecules varies with the number of donor and of acceptor neighbors. This also involves changes in charge on the water molecules as a function of bond length, and changes in energy and length as a function of number of neighboring donor and acceptor molecules. Energy varies by approximately 6 kBT near room temperature from the highest to the lowest energy when bond length alone is varied, enough to seriously affect simulations. PMID:19169381

  15. Hydrogen transfer from alcohol donors to aromatic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Garry, M.J.; Virk, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen transfer reactions between cyclohexanol (CHL) donor and each of anthracene (ANT) and phenanthrene (PHE) acceptors have been studied in the liquid phase at temperatures from 300 to 425 C, times from 0.16 to 12.0 hr and initial donor/acceptor ratios of 0.125 to 15.4. In addition to the desired hydrogen transfer reaction (Rl), two other pathways were observed, namely, (R2) reversion of the hydrogenated acceptor to original acceptor by way of both hydrogen elimination (R2') and disproportionation (R2''); and (R3) pyrolytic donor decomposition. The kinetics of (R2) and R3) were also investigated and it was found that (R2) was small and (R3) negligible relative to (Rl). The hydrogen transfer reactions were bimolecular, being of order one in each of donor and acceptor. Arrhenius parameters were respectively for CHL-ANT (6.0 +- 0.2, 33.1 +- 0.6) and for CHL-PHE (7.6 +- 0.6, 42.5 +- 3.5). The observed molecularity and Arrhenius parameters suggest a concerted pericyclic mechanism for the hydrogen transfer with a relatively tight transition state akin to that well known for Diels-Alder cycloaddition. Hydrogen elimination from dihydroanthracene (DHA) and dihydrophenthrene (DHP) liquids was studied at temperatures from 300 to 450 C, times from 0.16 to 10.0 hrs and substrate concentration ranges of 0.2 to 4.0 mol/liter. The hydrogen elimination reactions were strictly unimolecular. Arrhenius parameters were respectively for DHA (12.6 +- 0.6, 50.8 +- 0.8) and for DHP (12.6 +- 0.3, 58.1 +- 0.8). The observed hydrogen elimination from DHA to ANT is strikingly analogous to that from 1,4 cyclohexadiene to benzene and suggests a similar concerted pericyclic group transfer reaction.

  16. On the nature of blueshifting hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yirong; Wang, Changwei; Guan, Liangyu; Braïda, Benoît; Hiberty, Philippe C; Wu, Wei

    2014-07-01

    The block-localized wave function (BLW) method can derive the energetic, geometrical, and spectral changes with the deactivation of electron delocalization, and thus provide a unique way to elucidate the origin of improper, blueshifting hydrogen bonds versus proper, redshifting hydrogen bonds. A detailed analysis of the interactions of F(3)CH with NH(3) and OH(2) shows that blueshifting is a long-range phenomenon. Since among the various energy components contributing to hydrogen bonds, only the electrostatic interaction has long-range characteristics, we conclude that the contraction and blueshifting of a hydrogen bond is largely caused by electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, lengthening and redshifting is primarily due to the short-range n(Y)→σ*(X-H) hyperconjugation. The competition between these two opposing factors determines the final frequency change direction, for example, redshifting in F(3)CH⋅⋅⋅NH(3) and blueshifting in F(3)CH⋅⋅⋅OH(2). This mechanism works well in the series F(n)Cl(3)-n CH⋅⋅⋅Y (n=0-3, Y=NH(3), OH(2), SH(2)) and other systems. One exception is the complex of water and benzene. We observe the lengthening and redshifting of the O-H bond of water even with the electron transfer between benzene and water completely quenched. A distance-dependent analysis for this system reveals that the long-range electrostatic interaction is again responsible for the initial lengthening and redshifting. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Hydrated alizarin complexes: hydrogen bonding and proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Huh, Hyun; Cho, Sung Haeng; Heo, Jiyoung; Kim, Nam Joon; Kim, Seong Keun

    2012-07-07

    We investigated the hydrogen bonding structures and proton transfer for the hydration complexes of alizarin (Az) produced in a supersonic jet using fluorescence excitation (FE), dispersed laser induced fluorescence (LIF), visible-visible hole burning (HB), and fluorescence detected infrared (FDIR) spectroscopy. The FDIR spectrum of bare Az with two O-H groups exhibits two vibrational bands at 3092 and 3579 cm(-1), which, respectively, correspond to the stretching vibration of O1-H1 that forms a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond with the C9=O9 carbonyl group and the stretching vibration of O2-H2 that is weakly hydrogen-bonded to O1-H1. For the 1:1 hydration complex Az(H(2)O)(1), we identified three conformers. In the most stable conformer, the water molecule forms hydrogen bonds with the O1-H1 and O2-H2 groups of Az as a proton donor and proton acceptor, respectively. In the other conformers, the water binds to the C10=O10 group in two nearly isoenergetic configurations. In contrast to the sharp vibronic peaks in the FE spectra of Az and Az(H(2)O)(1), only broad, structureless absorption was observed for Az(H(2)O)(n) (n≥ 2), indicating a facile decay process, possibly due to proton transfer in the electronic excited state. The FDIR spectrum with the wavelength of the probe laser fixed at the broad band exhibited a broad vibrational band near the O2-H2 stretching vibration frequency of the most stable conformer of Az(H(2)O)(1). With the help of theoretical calculations, we suggest that the broad vibrational band may represent the occurrence of proton transfer by tunnelling in the electronic ground state of Az(H(2)O)(n) (n≥ 2) upon excitation of the O2-H2 vibration.

  18. The nature of hydrogen bonding in protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert; Imberti, Silvia; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2013-04-22

    The size, direction, strength, and distribution of hydrogen bonds in several protic ionic liquids (PILs) has been elucidated using neutron diffraction and computer simulation. There is significant variation in PIL hydrogen bond interactions ranging from short and linear to long and bi-/trifurcated. The nature of the PIL's hydrogen bonds reflects its macroscopic properties.

  19. Hydrogen-bonding Interactions between Apigenin and Ethanol/Water: A Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yu; Liang, Qin; Chen, Da-Fu; Guo, Rui; Lai, Rong-Cai

    2016-10-01

    In this work, hydrogen-bonding interactions between apigenin and water/ethanol were investigated from a theoretical perspective using quantum chemical calculations. Two conformations of apigenin molecule were considered in this work. The following results were found. (1) For apigenin monomer, the molecular structure is non-planar, and all of the hydrogen and oxygen atoms can be hydrogen-bonding sites. (2) Eight and seven optimized geometries are obtained for apigenin (I)–H2O/CH3CH2OH and apigenin (II)–H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, respectively. In apigenin, excluding the aromatic hydrogen atoms in the phenyl substituent, all other hydrogen atoms and the oxygen atoms form hydrogen-bonds with H2O and CH3CH2OH. (3) In apigenin–H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, the electron density and the E(2) in the related localized anti-bonding orbital are increased upon hydrogen-bond formation. These are the cause of the elongation and red-shift of the X‑H bond. The sum of the charge change transfers from the hydrogen-bond acceptor to donor. The stronger interaction makes the charge change more intense than in the less stable structures. (4) Most of the hydrogen-bonds in the complexes are electrostatic in nature. However, the C4‑O5···H, C9‑O4···H and C13‑O2···H hydrogen-bonds have some degree of covalent character. Furthermore, the hydroxyl groups of the apigenin molecule are the preferred hydrogen-bonding sites.

  20. Hydrogen-bonding Interactions between Apigenin and Ethanol/Water: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yu; Liang, Qin; Chen, Da-Fu; Guo, Rui; Lai, Rong-Cai

    2016-01-01

    In this work, hydrogen-bonding interactions between apigenin and water/ethanol were investigated from a theoretical perspective using quantum chemical calculations. Two conformations of apigenin molecule were considered in this work. The following results were found. (1) For apigenin monomer, the molecular structure is non-planar, and all of the hydrogen and oxygen atoms can be hydrogen-bonding sites. (2) Eight and seven optimized geometries are obtained for apigenin (I)–H2O/CH3CH2OH and apigenin (II)–H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, respectively. In apigenin, excluding the aromatic hydrogen atoms in the phenyl substituent, all other hydrogen atoms and the oxygen atoms form hydrogen-bonds with H2O and CH3CH2OH. (3) In apigenin–H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, the electron density and the E(2) in the related localized anti-bonding orbital are increased upon hydrogen-bond formation. These are the cause of the elongation and red-shift of the X−H bond. The sum of the charge change transfers from the hydrogen-bond acceptor to donor. The stronger interaction makes the charge change more intense than in the less stable structures. (4) Most of the hydrogen-bonds in the complexes are electrostatic in nature. However, the C4−O5···H, C9−O4···H and C13−O2···H hydrogen-bonds have some degree of covalent character. Furthermore, the hydroxyl groups of the apigenin molecule are the preferred hydrogen-bonding sites. PMID:27698481

  1. Alcohols as hydrogen-donor solvents for treatment of coal

    DOEpatents

    Ross, David S.; Blessing, James E.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the hydroconversion of coal by solvent treatment at elevated temperatures and pressure wherein an alcohol having an .alpha.-hydrogen atom, particularly a secondary alcohol such as isopropanol, is utilized as a hydrogen donor solvent. In a particular embodiment, a base capable of providing a catalytically effective amount of the corresponding alcoholate anion under the solvent treatment conditions is added to catalyze the alcohol-coal reaction.

  2. Deterministic features of side-chain main-chain hydrogen bonds in globular protein structures.

    PubMed

    Eswar, N; Ramakrishnan, C

    2000-04-01

    A total of 19 835 polar residues from a data set of 250 non-homologous and highly resolved protein crystal structures were used to identify side-chain main-chain (SC-MC) hydrogen bonds. The ratio of the number of SC-MC hydrogen bonds to the total number of polar residues is close to 1:2, indicating the ubiquitous nature of such hydrogen bonds. Close to 56% of the SC-MC hydrogen bonds are local involving side-chain acceptor/donor ('i') and a main-chain donor/acceptor within the window i-5 to i+5. These short-range hydrogen bonds form well defined conformational motifs characterized by specific combinations of backbone and side-chain torsion angles. (a) The Ser/Thr residues show the greatest preference in forming intra-helical hydrogen bonds between the atoms O(gamma)(i) and O(i-4). More than half the examples of such hydrogen bonds are found at the middle of alpha-helices rather than at their ends. The most favoured motif of these examples is alpha(R)alpha(R)alpha(R)alpha(R)(g(-)). (b) These residues also show great preference to form hydrogen bonds between O(gamma)(i) and O(i-3), which are closely related to the previous type and though intra-helical, these hydrogen bonds are more often found at the C-termini of helices than at the middle. The motif represented by alpha(R)alpha(R)alpha(R)alpha(R)(g(+)) is most preferred in these cases. (c) The Ser, Thr and Glu are the most frequently found residues participating in intra-residue hydrogen bonds (between the side-chain and main-chain of the same residue) which are characterized by specific motifs of the form beta(g(+)) for Ser/Thr residues and alpha(R)(g(-)g(+)t) for Glu/Gln. (d) The side-chain acceptor atoms of Asn/Asp and Ser/Thr residues show high preference to form hydrogen bonds with acceptors two residues ahead in the chain, which are characterized by the motifs beta (tt')alphaR and beta(t)alpha(R), respectively. These hydrogen bonded segments, referred to as Asx turns, are known to provide stability to type I

  3. Isotopic fractionation in proteins as a measure of hydrogen bond length

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2015-07-28

    If a deuterated molecule containing strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds is placed in a hydrogenated solvent, it may preferentially exchange deuterium for hydrogen. This preference is due to the difference between the vibrational zero-point energy for hydrogen and deuterium. It is found that the associated fractionation factor Φ is correlated with the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. This correlation has been used to determine the length of the H-bonds (donor-acceptor separation) in a diverse range of enzymes and has been argued to support the existence of short low-barrier H-bonds. Starting with a potential energy surface based on a simple diabatic state model for H-bonds, we calculate Φ as a function of the proton donor-acceptor distance R. For numerical results, we use a parameterization of the model for symmetric O–H⋯O bonds [R. H. McKenzie, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 196 (2012)]. We consider the relative contributions of the O–H stretch vibration, O–H bend vibrations (both in plane and out of plane), tunneling splitting effects at finite temperature, and the secondary geometric isotope effect. We compare our total Φ as a function of R with NMR experimental results for enzymes, and in particular with an earlier model parametrization Φ(R), used previously to determine bond lengths.

  4. Isotopic fractionation in proteins as a measure of hydrogen bond length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2015-07-01

    If a deuterated molecule containing strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds is placed in a hydrogenated solvent, it may preferentially exchange deuterium for hydrogen. This preference is due to the difference between the vibrational zero-point energy for hydrogen and deuterium. It is found that the associated fractionation factor Φ is correlated with the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. This correlation has been used to determine the length of the H-bonds (donor-acceptor separation) in a diverse range of enzymes and has been argued to support the existence of short low-barrier H-bonds. Starting with a potential energy surface based on a simple diabatic state model for H-bonds, we calculate Φ as a function of the proton donor-acceptor distance R. For numerical results, we use a parameterization of the model for symmetric O-H⋯O bonds [R. H. McKenzie, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 196 (2012)]. We consider the relative contributions of the O-H stretch vibration, O-H bend vibrations (both in plane and out of plane), tunneling splitting effects at finite temperature, and the secondary geometric isotope effect. We compare our total Φ as a function of R with NMR experimental results for enzymes, and in particular with an earlier model parametrization Φ(R), used previously to determine bond lengths.

  5. Hydrogen donors and acceptors and basic amino acids jointly contribute to carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Man; Zhou, Yanchao; Li, Yiqi; Zou, Juntong; Yang, Beicheng; Cai, Li; Zhang, Xuelan; Liu, Qiuyun

    2017-01-01

    A hypothesis is postulated that high content of hydrogen donors and acceptors, and basic amino acids cause the intracellular trapping of the H(+) and Cl(-) ions, which increases cancer risks as local formation of HCl is mutagenic to DNA. Other cations such as Ca(2+), and weak acids such as short-chain organic acids may attenuate the intracellular gathering of the H(+) and Cl(-), two of the most abundant ions in the cells. Current data on increased cancer risks in diabetic and obese patients are consistent with the assumption that hydrogen bonding propensity on glucose, triglycerides and other molecules is among the causative factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrostatic model for hydrogen bonds in alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.A.; Pigeon-Gosselin, M.

    1988-11-01

    The authors have measured the Raman spectra of liquid methanol at temperatures between 50/sup 0/ and -77/sup 0/C. The weak O-H stretching bands appear, under amplification, more and more asymmetric as the temperature is lowered. They can be decomposed into three Gaussian components centered at about 3220, 3310, and 3400 cm/sup -1/. The former, predominant at low temperature, corresponds to single, linear hydrogen bonds (LHB) between two molecules. The other two are assigned to branched hydrogen bonds, respectively bifurcated (BHB), between three molecules, and trifurcated (THB), between four molecules. They conclude that the molecular structure of liquid alcohols is not chain-like, as presumed so far, but a three-dimensional network featuring a mixture of single (LBH), and multiple hydrogen bonds (BHB, and THB). They are mainly electrostatic in nature, their relative proportions and geometry governed by the packing conditions for minimum energy. They form distinct trimers and tetramers in dilute solutions of alcohols in inert solvents and frozen matrices, and the latter even in the vapor.

  7. Anesthesia cutoff phenomenon: Interfacial hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, J.S.; Ma, S.M.; Kamaya, H.; Ueda, I. )

    1990-05-04

    Anesthesia cutoff refers to the phenomenon of loss of anesthetic potency in a homologous series of alkanes and their derivatives when their sizes become too large. In this study, hydrogen bonding of 1-alkanol series (ethanol to eicosanol) to dipalmitoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in DPPC-D2O-in-CCl4 reversed micelles. The alkanols formed hydrogen bonds with the phosphate moiety of DPPC and released the DPPC-bound deuterated water, evidenced by increases in the bound O-H stretching signal of the alkanol-DPPC complex and also in the free O-D stretching band of unbound D2O. These effects increased according to the elongation of the carbon chain of 1-alkanols from ethanol (C2) to 1-decanol (C10), but suddenly almost disappeared at 1-tetradecanol (C14). Anesthetic potencies of these alkanols, estimated by the activity of brine shrimps, were linearly related to hydrogen bond-breaking activities below C10 and agreed with the FTIR data in the cutoff at C10.

  8. An extremely stable, self-complementary hydrogen-bonded duplex

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Huang; Yang, Xiaowu; Brown, A L.; Martinovic, Suzana; Smith, Richard D.; Gong, Bing

    2003-07-30

    This paper describes the design, synthesis and characterization of a self-complementary six-H-bonded duplex with an association constant greater than 10{sup 9}/M in CHCl3. Numerous unnatural self-assembly systems have been developed in recent years. Most of these previously described systems are case-dependent, i.e., the individual components carry the information that defines only the formation of the specific assembly. An alternative approach involves the design of highly specific and highly stable recognition units (modules)that are compatible with a variety of structural components. Such recognition modules or ''molecular glues'' then direct the assembly of these structural components. In this regard,hydrogen-bonded complexes based on rigid heterocycles with multiple H-bonding donor (D) and acceptor (A) sites have received the most attention in recent years. Other complexes, most based on H-bonding interactions, have also been reported. Highly stable, self-complementary H-bonded complexes are particularly attractive for developing supramolecular homopolymers of very high molecular weights. In spite of the intriguing perspective, only a very small number of self-complementary H-bonded complexes with high stabilities are known. The best known examples involve two pairs of quadruply H-bonded, self-complementary complexes, both based on the AADD-DDAA array, and with association constants greater than 10{sup 7}/M. We report here the design and characterization of our first six-H-bonded, self-complementary duplex that contains the AADADD-DDADAA array.

  9. Strengthening of hydrogen bonding with the push-pull effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yunwen; Zou, Wenli; Kraka, Elfi

    2017-10-01

    Theoretical studies of hydrogen-bonding based on cluster models tend to overlook the peripheral monomers which are influential. By revisiting thirteen hydrogen-bonded complexes of H2O, HF and NH3, the "push-pull" effect is identified as a general mechanism that strengthens a hydrogen bond. Enhanced Lp (X) →σ∗ (X‧ - H) charge transfer is proved to be the core of the "push-pull" effect. The charge transfer can convert an electrostatic hydrogen bond into a covalent hydrogen bond.

  10. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  11. On the physical origin of the cation-anion intermediate bond in ionic liquids Part I. Placing a (weak) hydrogen bond between two charges.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Sebastian B C; Roatsch, Martin; Schöppke, Matthias; Kirchner, Barbara

    2010-07-21

    The intermediate bond forces in ionic liquids are investigated from static quantum chemical calculations at various methods and two basis sets. The experimentally observed red-shift of the donor-proton bond stretching frequency due to a bond elongation is confirmed by all methods. Comparing Hartree-Fock to second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the Hartree-Fock method gives in many cases an erroneous description of the geometries. Furthermore, the Hartree-Fock interaction energies can deviate up to 60 kJ mol(-1) from Møller-Plesset perturbation theory indicating the importance of dispersion interaction. While the usual trends of decreasing stability or interaction energies with increasing ion sizes are found, the geometries involving hydrogen atoms do not change this order of total interaction energies. Therefore, the hydrogen bond is not the most important interaction for ion pairs with regard to the total interaction energy. On the other hand, the different established analysis methods give rise to hydrogen bonding in several ion pairs. Charge analysis reveals the hydrogen-bonding character of the ion pair and shows, depending on the type of ions combined and further on the type of conformers considered, that a hydrogen bond can be present. The possibility of hydrogen bonding is also shown by an analysis of the frontier orbitals. Calculating potential energy surfaces and observing from this the change in the donor proton bond indicates that regular hydrogen bonds are possible in ion pairs of ionic liquids. Thereby, the maximum of bond elongation exceeds the one of a usual hydrogen bond by far. The more salt-like hydrogen-bonded ion pair [NH(4)][BF(4)] exhibits a steeper maximum than the more ionic liquid like ion pair [EtNH(3)][BF(4)]. The fact that imidazolium-based ionic liquids as [Emim][Cl] can display two faces, hydrogen bonding and purely ionic bonding, points to a disturbing rather than stabilizing role of hydrogen bonding on the interaction of

  12. Quest for hydrogen environments in hydrogen-bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se-Hun

    2017-03-01

    We performed proton high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on KH2PO4 ferroelectrics. The 1H high-resolution NMR measurements were performed using the magic-angle spinning technique, which removes the proton-proton dipolar coupling and the chemical shift anisotropy in solid-state materials. High-resolution magic-angle spinning 1H NMR spectroscopy provides information on the chemical structure in the KH2PO4 system. From the measured chemical shift data, we determined the oxygen separation distance of the O-H···O hydrogen bond. The localized hydrogen position of the environments near heavy atoms can be depicted using Morse potentials, which provide the wave function of the eigenstate and the probability distribution of hydrogen in the local structure based on the solutions of the Schr¨odinger equation.

  13. Strength of the Calpha H..O hydrogen bond of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Scheiner, S; Kar, T; Gu, Y

    2001-03-30

    Although the peptide C(alpha)H group has historically not been thought to form hydrogen bonds within proteins, ab initio quantum calculations show it to be a potent proton donor. Its binding energy to a water molecule lies in the range between 1.9 and 2.5 kcal/mol for nonpolar and polar amino acids; the hydrogen bond (H-bond) involving the charged lysine residue is even stronger than a conventional OH..O interaction. The preferred H-bond lengths are quite uniform, about 3.32 A. Formation of each interaction results in a downfield shift of the bridging hydrogen's chemical shift and a blue shift in the C(alpha)H stretching frequency, potential diagnostics of the presence of such an H-bond within a protein.

  14. Case study of hydrogen bonding in a hydrophobic cavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Cheng, Chao-Sheng; Tjong, Siu-Cin; Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Sue, Shih-Che

    2014-12-18

    Protein internal hydrogen bonds and hydrophobicity determine protein folding and structure stabilization, and the introduction of a hydrogen bond has been believed to represent a better interaction for consolidating protein structure. We observed an alternative example for chicken IL-1β. The native IL-1β contains a hydrogen bond between the Y157 side-chain OηH and I133 backbone CO, whereby the substitution from Tyr to Phe abolishes the connection and the mutant without the hydrogen bond is more stable. An attempt to explain the energetic view of the presence of the hydrogen bond fails when only considering the nearly identical X-ray structures. Here, we resolve the mechanism by monitoring the protein backbone dynamics and interior hydrogen bond network. IL-1β contains a hydrophobic cavity in the protein interior, and Y157 is one of the surrounding residues. The Y157 OηH group introduces an unfavorable energy in the hydrophobic cavity, therefore sequestering itself by forming a hydrogen bond with the proximate residue I133. The hydrogen bonding confines Y157 orientation but exerts a force to disrupt the hydrogen bond network surrounding the cavity. The effect propagates over the entire protein and reduces the stability, as reflected in the protein backbone dynamics observed by an NMR hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange experiment. We describe the particular case in which a hydrogen bond does not necessarily confer enhanced protein stability while the disruption of hydrophobicity must be integrally considered.

  15. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2NO(PH 3) 2 and a small proton donor H 2O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H⋯H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  16. Hydrogen bonding. Part 15. Infrared study of hydrogen bonding in betaine hydrate and betaine hydrofluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Avci, Günsel F.

    1984-07-01

    Infrared spectroscopy at 300 and 10 K. deuterium labeling, internal coordinate analysis, and comparison with the spectra of compounds of known structure have been used to elucidate the nature of bound water in betaine hydrate. All evidence is consonant with a structure in which two carboxylate oxygens, one from each of two betaines, are mutually bridged by two water molecules to give a dimeric water—anion unit of D2h symmetry. The infrared spectrum of betaine hydrofluoride shows the presence of a very strong OHF hydrogen bond in this compound, in contrast to the normal OH⋯Cl hydrogen bond in betaine hydrochloride.

  17. Nature of hydrogen bonding in charged hydrogen-bonded complexes and imidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2011-12-15

    The nature of hydrogen bonding was compared in neutral complexes and negatively charged complexes consisting of either the HF molecule or the halide anion (fluoride and chloride) and the C-H bond in the methane molecule with a varying degree of fluorination (such as CH(4), CH(2)F(2), and CHF(3)). Both linear (C(3v) symmetry) and nonlinear (C(2v) symmetry) hydrogen-bonded complexes were studied. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory was used to decompose interaction energies into fundamental components such as Coulomb, repulsion, induction and dispersion to analyze the interplay among these forces in stabilizing hydrogen bonding. In the linear charged complexes, both Coulomb attraction and induction significantly contributed to the stabilization of hydrogen bonding. In the nonlinear charged complexes, mainly Coulomb attraction contributed to the HB complex stabilization, with the inductive forces playing a less important role. Contrary to the neutral complexes, dispersion forces played only a marginal role in the charged complexes. Interplay between the fundamental forces was also investigated in the ion pairs of the imidazolium-based ionic liquid, [C(2)mim]Cl, that were categorized as either (1) typical ion-ion interaction, with the anion interacting from above or below the imidazolium plane; or (2) hydrogen-bonding interaction, with the anion interacting with the C2-H bond of the imidazolium cation. Both types of interactions were found to induce similar charge transfers, and the analysis of the energetic components revealed only a slight difference in the ion pairs studied: (1) both interactions were electrostatically driven, between 86% and 88% of the overall attractive energy, with the electrostatic component being slightly lower in the hydrogen-bonded ion pairs by ~8 kJ mol(-1); and (2) dispersion forces were found to be stronger in the typical ion-ion interactions by ~15 kJ mol(-1) and could be possible only due to the fact that the anion was able to move

  18. Nuclear quantum effects and hydrogen bonding in liquids.

    PubMed

    Raugei, Simone; Klein, Michael L

    2003-07-30

    We have employed ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the role of nuclear quantum effects on the strength of hydrogen bonds in liquid hydrogen fluoride. Nuclear quantum effects are shown to be responsible for a stronger hydrogen bond and an enhanced dipole-dipole interaction, which lead, in turn, to a shortening of the H...F intrachain distance. The simulation results are analyzed in terms of the electronic density shifts with respect to a purely classical treatment of the nuclei. The observed enhanced hydrogen-bond interaction, which arises from a coupling of intra- and intermolecular effects, should be a general phenomenon occurring in all hydrogen-bonded systems.

  19. Hydrogen Bonding Characteristics of Crystalline Water in Inorganic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangfang; Li, Keyan; Xue, Dongfeng

    From the chemical bond viewpoint, the microscopic characterstatics of hydrogen bonds in Mi—OH2⋯O (M is the metal cation coordinated to water molecule and i is the number of M) systems were comprehensively studied. It is shown that the original O—OH and H⋯O bond lengths of each hydrogen bonding system are evidently influenced by the crystalline environment and strongly dependent on the corresponding average bond lengths of each system, bar d{O - {H}} and bar d{H ... {O}}. Furthermore, the hydrogen bonding capability of water molecules coordinated to various metal cations was properly estimated and found to be related to the ionic electronegativities of these metal cations. The current work provides a useful route to calculating hydrogen bond valences within reasonable accuracy and sheds light on the rational utilization of hydrogen bonds in crystal design.

  20. Diverse world of unconventional hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Belkova, Natalia V; Shubina, Elena S; Epstein, Lina M

    2005-08-01

    This Account presents our view of unconventional intermolecular hydrogen bonds (HBs) for organometallic complexes and transition-metal or main-group hydrides. Over the past decade, low-temperature spectroscopic (IR, UV, and NMR) studies combined with theoretical calculations have disclosed the static and dynamic features of different HBs. Their guiding role in the proton-transfer processes was determined, as well as the energetic characteristics of HB intermediates and the activation barriers. Nevertheless, there is still much to explore in terms of the prediction of HB properties and control of protonation/deprotonation processes.

  1. Communication: Frequency shifts of an intramolecular hydrogen bond as a measure of intermolecular hydrogen bond strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Quanli; Trindle, Carl; Knee, J. L.

    2012-09-01

    Infrared-ultraviolet double resonance spectroscopy has been applied to study the infrared spectra of the supersonically cooled gas phase complexes of formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, formamide, and water with 9-hydroxy-9-fluorenecarboxylic acid (9HFCA), an analog of glycolic acid. In these complexes each binding partner to 9HFCA can function as both proton donor and acceptor. Relative to its frequency in free 9HFCA, the 9-hydroxy (9OH) stretch is blue shifted in complexes with formic, acetic, and propionic acids, but is red shifted in the complexes with formamide and water. Density functional calculations on complexes of 9HFCA to a variety of H bonding partners with differing proton donor and acceptor abilities reveal that the quantitative frequency shift of the 9OH can be attributed to the balance struck between two competing intermolecular H bonds. More extensive calculations on complexes of glycolic acid show excellent consistency with the experimental frequency shifts.

  2. Communication: Frequency shifts of an intramolecular hydrogen bond as a measure of intermolecular hydrogen bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Gu, Quanli; Trindle, Carl; Knee, J L

    2012-09-07

    Infrared-ultraviolet double resonance spectroscopy has been applied to study the infrared spectra of the supersonically cooled gas phase complexes of formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, formamide, and water with 9-hydroxy-9-fluorenecarboxylic acid (9HFCA), an analog of glycolic acid. In these complexes each binding partner to 9HFCA can function as both proton donor and acceptor. Relative to its frequency in free 9HFCA, the 9-hydroxy (9OH) stretch is blue shifted in complexes with formic, acetic, and propionic acids, but is red shifted in the complexes with formamide and water. Density functional calculations on complexes of 9HFCA to a variety of H bonding partners with differing proton donor and acceptor abilities reveal that the quantitative frequency shift of the 9OH can be attributed to the balance struck between two competing intermolecular H bonds. More extensive calculations on complexes of glycolic acid show excellent consistency with the experimental frequency shifts.

  3. Insights into hydrogen bonding via ice interfaces and isolated water.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Bisson, Patrick; Vu, Tuan Hoang

    2014-11-14

    Water in a confined environment has a combination of fewer available configurations and restricted mobility. Both affect the spectroscopic signature. In this work, the spectroscopic signature of water in confined environments is discussed in the context of competing models for condensed water: (1) as a system of intramolecular coupled molecules or (2) as a network with intermolecular dipole-dipole coupled O-H stretches. Two distinct environments are used: the confined asymmetric environment at the ice surface and the near-isolated environment of water in an infrared transparent matrix. Both the spectroscopy and the environment are described followed by a perspective discussion of implications for the two competing models. Despite being a small molecule, water is relatively complex; perhaps not surprisingly the results support a model that blends inter- and intramolecular coupling. The frequency, and therefore the hydrogen-bond strength, appears to be a function of donor-acceptor interaction and of longer-range dipole-dipole alignment in the hydrogen-bonded network. The O-H dipole direction depends on the local environment and reflects intramolecular O-H stretch coupling.

  4. Insights into hydrogen bonding via ice interfaces and isolated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Bisson, Patrick; Vu, Tuan Hoang

    2014-11-01

    Water in a confined environment has a combination of fewer available configurations and restricted mobility. Both affect the spectroscopic signature. In this work, the spectroscopic signature of water in confined environments is discussed in the context of competing models for condensed water: (1) as a system of intramolecular coupled molecules or (2) as a network with intermolecular dipole-dipole coupled O-H stretches. Two distinct environments are used: the confined asymmetric environment at the ice surface and the near-isolated environment of water in an infrared transparent matrix. Both the spectroscopy and the environment are described followed by a perspective discussion of implications for the two competing models. Despite being a small molecule, water is relatively complex; perhaps not surprisingly the results support a model that blends inter- and intramolecular coupling. The frequency, and therefore the hydrogen-bond strength, appears to be a function of donor-acceptor interaction and of longer-range dipole-dipole alignment in the hydrogen-bonded network. The O-H dipole direction depends on the local environment and reflects intramolecular O-H stretch coupling.

  5. Compressed hydrogen-bond effects in the pressure-frozen chloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Roman; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    The competing effects of squeezed OH...O bonds, destabilizing the H-atom position, and of displaced hydrogen donor and acceptor groups, favouring the ordered H-atom sites, have been tuned by pressure in the pressure-frozen dichloroacetic acid. Its structure has been determined at 0.1, 0.7, 0.9 and 1.4 GPa: in this pressure range the crystals are stable in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n. The molecules are O-H...O hydrogen bonded into dimers, which in turn interact via a unique pattern of halogen...halogen contacts. Between 0.1 and 1.4 GPa the OH...O bond is squeezed from 2.674 (13) to 2.632 (9) A. Within the pressure range investigated the hydrogen bonds are squeezed and the shear displacement of the molecules compensate, and the H atoms remain ordered.

  6. Tetrahedrality and hydrogen bonds in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, Eszter; Varga, Imre K.; Baranyai, András

    2016-06-01

    We carried out extensive calculations of liquid water at different temperatures and pressures using the BK3 model suggested recently [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. In particular, we were interested in undercooled regions to observe the propensity of water to form tetrahedral coordination of closest neighbors around a central molecule. We compared the found tetrahedral order with the number of hydrogen bonds and with the partial pair correlation functions unfolded as distributions of the closest, the second closest, etc. neighbors. We found that contrary to the number of hydrogen bonds, tetrahedrality changes substantially with state variables. Not only the number of tetrahedral arrangements increases with lowering the pressure, the density, and the temperature but the domain size of connecting tetrahedral structures as well. The difference in tetrahedrality is very pronounced between the two sides of the Widom line and even more so between the low density amorphous (LDA) and high density amorphous (HDA) phases. We observed that in liquid water and in HDA, the 5th water molecule, contrary to ice and LDA, is positioned between the first and the second coordination shell. We found no convincing evidence of structural heterogeneity or regions referring to structural transition.

  7. Hydrogen Bond Basicity Prediction for Medicinal Chemistry Design.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Peter W; Montanari, Carlos A; Prokopczyk, Igor M; Ribeiro, Jean F R; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2016-05-12

    Hydrogen bonding is discussed in the context of medicinal chemistry design. Minimized molecular electrostatic potential (Vmin) is shown to be an effective predictor of hydrogen bond basicity (pKBHX), and predictive models are presented for a number of hydrogen bond acceptor types relevant to medicinal chemistry. The problems posed by the presence of nonequivalent hydrogen bond acceptor sites in molecular structures are addressed by using nonlinear regression to fit measured pKBHX to calculated Vmin. Predictions are made for hydrogen bond basicity of fluorine in situations where relevant experimental measurements are not available. It is shown how predicted pKBHX can be used to provide insight into the nature of bioisosterism and to profile heterocycles. Examples of pKBHX prediction for molecular structures with multiple, nonequivalent hydrogen bond acceptors are presented.

  8. Theoretical study on electronic and vibrational properties of hydrogen bonds in glycine-water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yulei; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Jiang, Wanrun; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen bond (H-bond) in organic-water molecules is essential in nature, and it present unique properties distinct from those in pure water or organic clusters. Combining with the charge-transfer and energy decomposition analyses, we investigated the penetrating molecular-orbitals in glycine-water clusters, which give evidences of the covalent-like characteristics of H-bonds in this system. Besides, the infrared spectral features provide a rare opportunity to discover the exceedingly-evident redshifts of symmetric stretching modes (Symst) in water on forming H-bond, in contrast to the slightly-redshifted asymmetric stretching modes (Asyst) in water. To explain these intriguing behaviors, we further analyzed the nuclear vibrating patterns, which clearly reveal that H-bond retains two unexpected effects on nuclear motions in water: (i) Intensifying donor Symst, and (ii) Inhibiting donor Asyst. Furthermore, we also quantified the impact of anharmonic quantum fluctuations on each hydrogen bond. For the stretching modes involved in H-bonds, red shifts up to more than one hundred wave numbers are observed under anharmonic vibration, explicitly indicating the increased 'covalency' of H-bonds. These finds shed light on the essential understanding of H-bonding comprehensively, and should provide incentives for future experimental studies.

  9. Short Carboxylic Acid-Carboxylate Hydrogen Bonds Can Have Fully Localized Protons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiusheng; Pozharski, Edwin; Wilson, Mark A

    2017-01-17

    Short hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) have been proposed to play key functional roles in several proteins. The location of the proton in short H-bonds is of central importance, as proton delocalization is a defining feature of low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs). Experimentally determining proton location in H-bonds is challenging. Here, bond length analysis of atomic (1.15-0.98 Å) resolution X-ray crystal structures of the human protein DJ-1 and its bacterial homologue, YajL, was used to determine the protonation states of H-bonded carboxylic acids. DJ-1 contains a buried, dimer-spanning 2.49 Å H-bond between Glu15 and Asp24 that satisfies standard donor-acceptor distance criteria for a LBHB. Bond length analysis indicates that the proton is localized on Asp24, excluding a LBHB at this location. However, similar analysis of the Escherichia coli homologue YajL shows both residues may be protonated at the H-bonded oxygen atoms, potentially consistent with a LBHB. A Protein Data Bank-wide screen identifies candidate carboxylic acid H-bonds in approximately 14% of proteins, which are typically short [⟨dO-O⟩ = 2.542(2) Å]. Chemically similar H-bonds between hydroxylated residues (Ser/Thr/Tyr) and carboxylates show a trend of lengthening O-O distance with increasing H-bond donor pKa. This trend suggests that conventional electronic effects provide an adequate explanation for short, charge-assisted carboxylic acid-carboxylate H-bonds in proteins, without the need to invoke LBHBs in general. This study demonstrates that bond length analysis of atomic resolution X-ray crystal structures provides a useful experimental test of certain candidate LBHBs.

  10. Hydrogen-bonded side chain liquid crystalline block copolymer: Molecular design, synthesis, characterization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chi-Yang

    Block copolymers can self-assemble into highly regular, microphase-separated morphologies with dimensions at nanometer length scales. Potential applications such as optical wavelength photonic crystals, templates for nanolithographic patterning, or nanochannels for biomacromolecular separation take advantage of the well-ordered, controlled size microdomains of block copolymers. Side-chain liquid crystalline block copolymers (SCLCBCPs) are drawing increasing attention since the incorporation of liquid crystallinity turns their well-organized microstructures into dynamic functional materials. As a special type of block copolymer, hydrogen-bonded SCLCBCPs are unique, compositionally tunable materials with multiple dynamic functionalities that can readily respond to thermal, electrical and mechanical fields. Hydrogen-bonded SCLCBCPs were synthesized and assembled from host poly(styrene- b-acrylic acid) diblock copolymers with narrow molecular weight distributions as proton donors and guest imidazole functionalized mesogenic moieties as proton acceptors. In these studies non-covalent hydrogen bonding is employed to connect mesogenic side groups to a block copolymer backbone, both for its dynamic character as well as for facile materials preparation. The homogeneity and configuration of the hydrogen-bonded complexes were determined by both the molecular architecture of imidazolyl side groups and the process conditions. A one-dimensional photonic crystal composed of high molecular weight hydrogen-bonded SCLCBCP, with temperature dependent optical wavelength stop bands was successfully produced. The microstructures of hydrogen-bonded complexes could be rapidly aligned in an AC electric field at temperatures below the order-disorder transition but above their glass transitions. Remarkable dipolar properties of the mesogenic groups and thermal dissociation of hydrogen bonds are key elements to fast orientation switching. Studies of a wide range of mesogen and polymer

  11. Pyranose sulfamates: conformation and hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicki, Maciej; Codding, Penelope W.; Litster, Stephen A.; Szkaradziñska, Maria B.; Bassyouni, Hanan A. R.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of a new anticonvulsant drug, topiramate — 2,3:4,5-bis- O-(1-methylethylidene)- β-D-fructopyranose sulfamate ( 1), together with those of three similar but biologically almost inactive sugar sulfamates: 4,5- O-cyclohexylidene-2,3- O-(1-methyl-ethylidene)- β-D-fructopyranose sulfamate ( 2), 2,3:- O-(1-methylethylidene)- β-D-fructo-pyranose sulfamate ( 3), and 1,2:3,4-bis- O-(1-methylethylidene)- α-D-galactopyranose sulfamate ( 4), have been determined by X-rays. The pyranose rings adopt distorted twist-boat 2S O conformations as a result of flattening of the chair conformation, observed in free pyranoses, by the fused five-membered ring(s). In 3 an unfavourable gauche-trans conformation about C1-C2 bond is observed. The active compound, topiramate ( 1), shows, in comparison with the other three compounds, a different disposition of nitrogen and oxygen atoms from the sulfamate group with respect to the O1-S1 bond. As a result, the nitrogen atom in 1 is ca. 1 Å farther from the O6 pyranose ring oxygen atom than in the other three compounds. This difference describes the mutual disposition of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts of the molecule, and can be related to the difference in biological activity. In all compounds, hydrogen bonds connect molecules into three-dimensional networks; simple chains and more complicated rings are found and described using the graph set notation.

  12. Hydrogen-bonding molecular ruler surfactants as probes of specific solvation at liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Siler, A Renee; Brindza, Michael R; Walker, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    Resonance-enhanced, second harmonic generation (SHG) is used to measure the electronic structure of solutes sensitive to specific solvation adsorbed to liquid/liquid and liquid/solid interfaces. Here, specific solvation refers to solvent-solute interactions that are directional and localized. N-methyl-p-methoxyaniline (NMMA) is a solute whose first allowed electronic transition wavelength remains almost constant (approximately 315 nm) in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents regardless of solvent polarity. However, in hydrogen-bond-accepting solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide, NMMA's absorbance shifts to longer wavelengths (320 nm), whereas in hydrogen-bond-donating solvents (e.g., water), the absorbance shifts to shorter wavelengths (approximately 300 nm). SHG experiments show that at alkane/silica interfaces, surface silanol groups serve as moderately strong hydrogen-bond donors as evidenced by NMMA's absorbance of 307 nm. At the carbon tetrachloride/water interface, NMMA absorbance also shifts to slightly shorter wavelengths (298 nm) implying that water molecules at this liquid/liquid interface are donating strong hydrogen bonds to the adsorbed NMMA solutes. In contrast, experiments using newly developed molecular ruler surfactants with NMMA as a model hydrophobic solute and a hydrophilic, cationic headgroup imply that, as NMMA migrates across an aqueous/alkane interface, it carries with it water that functions as a hydrogen-bond-accepting partner.

  13. Explicit consideration of spatial hydrogen bonding direction for activity coefficient prediction based on implicit solvation calculations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Lin; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2017-08-09

    The activity coefficient of a chemical in a mixture is important in understanding the thermodynamic properties and non-ideality of the mixture. The COSMO-SAC model based on the result of quantum mechanical implicit solvation calculations has been shown to provide reliable predictions of activity coefficients for mixed fluids. However, it is found that the prediction accuracy is in general inferior for associating fluids. Existing methods for describing the hydrogen-bonding interaction consider the strength of the interaction based only on the polarity of the screening charges, neglecting the fact that the formation of hydrogen bonds requires a specific orientation between the donor and acceptor pairs. In this work, we propose a new approach that takes into account the spatial orientational constraints in hydrogen bonds. Based on the Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) theory, the molecular surfaces associated with the formation of hydrogen bonds are limited to those in the projection of the lone pair electrons of hydrogen bond acceptors, in addition to the polarity of the surface screening charges. Our results show that this new directional hydrogen bond approach, denoted as the COSMO-SAC(DHB) model, requires fewer universal parameters and is significantly more accurate and reliable compared to previous models for a variety of properties, including vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE), infinite dilution activity coefficient (IDAC) and water-octanol partition coefficient (Kow).

  14. HYDROGEN-BONDED DIMERS OF ADENINE AND URACIL DERIVATIVES.

    PubMed

    HAMLIN, R M; LORD, R C; RICH, A

    1965-06-25

    In concentrated solutions of either 9-ethyladenine or 1-cyclohexyluracil in deuterochloroform, absorption bands in the infrared spectrum demonstrate hydrogen bonding of the adenine and uracil derivatives with themselves. In dilute solutions, there is very little hydrogen bonding. However, when dilute solutions of 9-ethyladenine and 1-cyclohexyluracil are mixed, a series of bands appear which show that these molecules are hydrogen-bonding with each other much more strongly than with themselves. A study of the stoichiometry of this association indicates formation of 1:1 hydrogen-bonded pairs in solution.

  15. Routes to Hydrogen Bonding Chain-End Functionalized Polymers.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Arthur; Lortie, Frédéric; Bernard, Julien

    2012-12-21

    The contribution of supramolecular chemistry to polymer science opens new perspectives for the design of polymer materials exhibiting valuable properties and easier processability due to the dynamic nature of non-covalent interactions. Hydrogen bonding polymers can be used as supramolecular units for yielding larger assemblies that possess attractive features, arising from the combination of polymer properties and the responsiveness of hydrogen bonds. The post-polymerization modification of reactive end-groups is the most common procedure for generating such polymers. Examples of polymerizations mediated by hydrogen bonding-functionalized precursors have also recently been reported. This contribution reviews the current synthetic routes toward hydrogen bonding sticker chain-end functionalized polymers.

  16. A triclinic polymorph of benzanilide: disordered molecules form hydrogen-bonded chains.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Katharine F; Glidewell, Christopher; Low, John N; Skakle, Janet M S; Wardell, James L

    2003-01-01

    In the P-1 polymorph of benzanilide or N-phenylbenzamide, C(13)H(11)NO, the molecules are linked into simple C(4) chains by N-H...O hydrogen bonds. The molecules exhibit orientational disorder, but the donor and acceptor in a given hydrogen bond may occur, independently, in either the major or the minor orientation, such that all four possible N-H.O combinations have very similar geometries. The structure of this P-1 polymorph can be related to that of a previously reported C2/c polymorph.

  17. Hydrogen Bonding Cluster-Enabled Addition of Sulfonic Acids to Haloalkynes: Access to Both (E)- and (Z)-Alkenyl Sulfonates.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaojun; Liu, Shiwen; Shi, Zhenyu; Xu, Bo

    2016-10-07

    We developed an efficient synthesis of alkenyl sulfonates via hydrogen bonding cluster-enabled addition of sulfonic acids to haloalkynes. The reactivity of sulfonic acids could be significantly enhanced in the presence of strong hydrogen bonding donors. This metal-free method results in good chemical yields for a wide range of haloalkyne substrates and demonstrates good functional group tolerance. What is more, we can control the stereoselectivity of addition (cis vs trans) by varying the steric bulk of the sulfonic acid.

  18. Determination of Hydrogen Bond Structure in Water versus Aprotic Environments To Test the Relationship Between Length and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Sigala, Paul A.; Ruben, Eliza A.; Liu, Corey W.; Piccoli, Paula M. B.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Martinez, Todd J.; Schultz, Arthur J.; Herschiag, Daniel

    2015-05-06

    Hydrogen bonds profoundly influence the architecture and activity of biological macromolecules. Deep appreciation of hydrogen bond contributions to biomolecular function thus requires a detailed understanding of hydrogen bond structure and energetics and the relationship between these properties. Hydrogen bond formation energies (Delta G(f)) are enormously more favorable in aprotic solvents than in water, and two classes of contributing factors have been proposed to explain this energetic difference, focusing respectively on the isolated and hydrogen-bonded species: (I) water stabilizes the dissociated donor and acceptor groups much better than aprotic solvents, thereby reducing the driving force for hydrogen bond formation; and (II) water lengthens hydrogen bonds compared to aprotic environments, thereby decreasing the potential energy within the hydrogen bond. Each model has been proposed to provide a dominant contribution to Delta G(f), but incisive tests that distinguish the importance of these contributions are lacking. Here we directly test the structural basis of model II. Neutron crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that O-H center dot center dot center dot O hydrogen bonds in crystals, chloroform, acetone, and water have nearly identical lengths and very similar potential energy surfaces despite Delta G(f) differences >8 kcal/mol across these solvents. These results rule out a substantial contribution from solvent-dependent differences in hydrogen bond structure and potential energy after association (model II) and thus support the conclusion that differences in hydrogen bond Delta G(f) are predominantly determined by solvent interactions with the dissociated groups (model I). These findings advance our understanding of universal hydrogen-bonding interactions and have important implications for biology and engineering.

  19. C-H...O hydrogen bonds in the nuclear receptor RARgamma--a potential tool for drug selectivity.

    PubMed

    Klaholz, Bruno; Moras, Dino

    2002-09-01

    Hydrogen bonds between polarized atoms play a crucial role in protein interactions and are often used in drug design, which usually neglects the potential of C-H...O hydrogen bonds. The 1.4 A resolution crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of the retinoic acid receptor RARgamma complexed with the retinoid SR11254 reveals several types of C-H...O hydrogen bonds. A striking example is the hydroxyl group of the ligand that acts as an H bond donor and acceptor, leading to a synergy between classical and C-H...O hydrogen bonds. This interaction introduces both specificity and affinity within the hydrophobic ligand pocket. The similarity of intraprotein and protein-ligand C-H...O interactions suggests that such bonds should be considered in rational drug design approaches.

  20. Self-assembled multiwalled carbon nanotube films assisted by ureidopyrimidinone-based multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sumin; Guo, Hao; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Qiguan; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Xinhai

    2014-11-04

    Self-assembled functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films were successfully constructed, linked by a kind of strong binding strength from the self-complementary hydrogen-bonding array of ureidopyrimidinone-based modules (UPM) attached. Employing the feasible reaction of isocyanate containing ureidopyrimidinone with amine modified MWNTs, the UPMs composed of ureidopyrimidinone and ureido were attached to MWNTs with the content as low as 0.6 mmol/g MWNTs. Upon multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions from incorporation of the AADD (A, hydrogen-bonding acceptor; D, hydrogen-bonding donor) quadruple hydrogen bonds of ureidopyrimidinone and the double hydrogen bonds of ureido group, UPM functionalized MWNTs (MWNT-UPM) can be well dispersed in the polar solvent of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), while they tend to self-assemble to give a self-supported film in the apolar solvent of CHCl3. In addition, by using the multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions as the driving force, the layer-by-layer (LBL) MWNT-UPM films with high coverage on solid slides can be processed. Because of the self-association of MWNT-UPM in apolar solvent, it was found that the LBL assembly of MWNT-UPM was more favorable in the polar solvent of DMF than in the apolar solvent of CHCl3. Moreover, the hydrogen-bonding linked MWNT-UPM films showed good stability upon soaking in different solvents. Furthermore, the as-prepared LBL films showed electrochemical active behaviors, exhibiting a remarkable catalytic effect on the reduction of nifedipine.

  1. Hydrogen bonding motifs of protein side chains: descriptions of binding of arginine and amide groups.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, L.; Glusker, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    The modes of hydrogen bonding of arginine, asparagine, and glutamine side chains and of urea have been examined in small-molecule crystal structures in the Cambridge Structural Database and in crystal structures of protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein complexes. Analysis of the hydrogen bonding patterns of each by graph-set theory shows three patterns of rings (R) with one or two hydrogen bond acceptors and two donors and with eight, nine, or six atoms in the ring, designated R2(2)(8), R2(2)(9), and R1(2)(6). These three patterns are found for arginine-like groups and for urea, whereas only the first two patterns R2(2)(8) and R2(2)(9) are found for asparagine- and glutamine-like groups. In each case, the entire system is planar within 0.7 A or less. On the other hand, in macromolecular crystal structures, the hydrogen bonding patterns in protein-nucleic acid complexes between the nucleic acid base and the protein are all R2(2)(9), whereas hydrogen bonding between Watson-Crick-like pairs of nucleic acid bases is R2(2)(8). These two hydrogen bonding arrangements [R2(2)(9)] and R2(2)(8)] are predetermined by the nature of the groups available for hydrogen bonding. The third motif identified, R1(2)(6), involves hydrogen bonds that are less linear than in the other two motifs and is found in proteins. PMID:7773178

  2. Porous Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi-Fei; Yuan, Ying-Xue; Wang, Hong-Bo

    2017-02-13

    Ordered porous solid-state architectures constructed via non-covalent supramolecular self-assembly have attracted increasing interest due to their unique advantages and potential applications. Porous metal-coordination organic frameworks (MOFs) are generated by the assembly of metal coordination centers and organic linkers. Compared to MOFs, porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) are readily purified and recovered via simple recrystallization. However, due to lacking of sufficiently ability to orientate self-aggregation of building motifs in predictable manners, rational design and preparation of porous HOFs are still challenging. Herein, we summarize recent developments about porous HOFs and attempt to gain deeper insights into the design strategies of basic building motifs.

  3. Hydrogen bonds in concreto and in computro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stouten, Pieter F. W.; Kroon, Jan

    1988-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water and liquid methanol have been carried out. For both liquids an effective pair potential was used. The models were fitted to the heat of vaporization, pressure and various radial distribution functions resulting from diffraction experiments on liquids. In both simulations 216 molecules were put in a cubic periodical ☐. The system was loosely coupled to a temperature bath and to a pressure bath. Following an initial equilibration period relevant data were sampled during 15 ps. The distributions of oxygen—oxygen distances in hydrogen bonds obtained from the two simulations are essentially the same. The distribution obtained from crystal data is somewhat different: the maximum has about the same position, but the curve is much narrower, which can be expected merely from the fact that diffraction experiments only supply average atomic positions and hence average interatomic distances. When thermal motion is taken into account a closer likeness is observed.

  4. Conformation and hydrogen bonding in 4-Aminobutanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Andrew S.; Duguay, Taylor M.; Lavrich, Richard J.

    2017-06-01

    Rotational spectra of the most abundant and four 13C isotopomers of 4-aminobutanol have been recorded in natural abundance using a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. For the most abundant isotopomer, 56 hyperfine components from the fifteen a- and b-type transitions measured were fit to the quadupole coupling constants, χaa = -3.843(3) MHz, χbb = 1.971(3) MHz. Rotational and centrifugal distortion constants determined from fits of the resulting unsplit line centers to the Watson A-reduction Hamiltonian are A = 4484.893(3) MHz, B = 2830.721(1) MHz, C = 1942.9710(3) MHz, ΔJ = 0.98(3) kHz, ΔJK = 1.4(1) kHz, ΔK = - 2.6(5) kHz, δJ = 0.27(1) kHz, and δK = 1.7(1) kHz. Between nine and eleven rotational transitions were measured for the 13C isotopes and rotational constants were determined by fixing the distortion constants to the values found for the normal isotope. The five sets of moments of inertia were used to determine the 4-aminobutanol substitution structure as well to perform a least-squares fit of the lowest energy ab initio structure. The heavy atom coordinates determined from these two methods are in excellent agreement. The conformation of 4-aminobutanol is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond from the alcohol proton to amino nitrogen with a resulting hydrogen bond distance of 1.891 Å. The experimental structure is consistent with the lowest energy ab initio [MP2/6-311++G(d,p)] structure.

  5. Weak Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds with Fluorine: Detection and Implications for Enzymatic/Chemical Reactions, Chemical Properties, and Ligand/Protein Fluorine NMR Screening.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2016-05-23

    It is known that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. However, weak or very weak hydrogen bonds, which are often difficult to detect and characterize, may also be relevant in many recognition and reaction processes. Fluorine serving as a hydrogen-bond acceptor has been the subject of many controversial discussions and there are different opinions about it. It now appears that there is compelling experimental evidence for the involvement of fluorine in weak intramolecular or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Using established NMR methods, we have previously characterized and measured the strengths of intermolecular hydrogen-bond complexes involving the fluorine moieties CH2 F, CHF2 , and CF3 , and have compared them with the well-known hydrogen-bond complex formed between acetophenone and the strong hydrogen-bond donor p-fluorophenol. We now report evidence for the formation of hydrogen bonds involving fluorine with significantly weaker donors, namely 5-fluoroindole and water. A simple NMR method is proposed for the simultaneous measurement of the strengths of hydrogen bonds between an acceptor and a donor or water. Important implications of these results for enzymatic/chemical reactions involving fluorine, for chemical and physical properties, and for ligand/protein (19) F NMR screening are analyzed through experiments and theoretical simulations.

  6. Toward accurate prediction of potential energy surfaces and the spectral density of hydrogen bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekik, Najeh

    2014-03-01

    Despite the considerable progress made in quantum theory and computational methods, detailed descriptions of the potential energy surfaces of hydrogen-bonded systems have not yet been achieved. In addition, the hydrogen bond (H-bond) itself is still so poorly understood at the fundamental level that it remains unclear exactly what geometry constitutes a “real” H-bond. Therefore, in order to investigate features essential for hydrogen bonded complexes, a simple, efficient, and general method for calculating matrix elements of vibrational operators capable of describing the stretching modes and the H-bond bridges of hydrogen-bonded systems is proposed. The derived matrix elements are simple and computationally easy to evaluate, which makes the method suitable for vibrational studies of multiple-well potentials. The method is illustrated by obtaining potential energy surfaces for a number of two-dimensional systems with repulsive potentials chosen to be in Gaussian form for the stretching mode and of the Morse-type for the H-bond bridge dynamics. The forms of potential energy surfaces of weak and strong hydrogen bonds are analyzed by varying the asymmetry of the Gaussian potential. Moreover, the choice and applicability of the selected potential for the stretching mode and comparison with other potentials used in the area of hydrogen bond research are discussed. The approach for the determination of spectral density has been constructed in the framework of the linear response theory for which spectral density is obtained by Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. The approach involves anharmonic coupling between the high frequency stretching vibration (double well potential) and low-frequency donor-acceptor stretching mode (Morse potential) as well as the electrical anharmonicity of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. A direct relaxation mechanism is incorporated through a time decaying exponential

  7. Dependence of (35)Cl NQR on hydrogen bonding and temperature in dichlorophenol-aniline charge transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Ramananda, D; Ramesh, K P; Uchil, J

    2007-10-01

    The hydrogen-bonded charge transfer complexes of aniline with pi-acceptors (or proton donors) such as 2,5-, 2,6-, 3,4- and 3,5-dichlorophenol were prepared. The (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequencies of these charge transfer complexes in the temperature range 77-300 K were measured to ascertain the existence or otherwise of a phase transition upon complex formation. Further, the NQR frequency and asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient at the site of quadrupole nucleus were used to estimate the chemical bond parameters, namely ionic bond, double bond character of the carbon-chlorine(C--Cl) bond and the percentage charge transfer between the donor-acceptor components in charge transfer complexes. The effect of hydrogen bonding and temperature on the charge transfer process is analysed. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  9. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M; Savidge, Tor C

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power.

  10. Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystal Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Roohnikan, Mahdi; Toader, Violeta; Rey, Alejandro; Reven, Linda

    2016-08-23

    Nanoparticle-liquid crystal (NP-LC) composites based on hydrogen bonding were explored using a model system. The ligand shells of 3 nm diameter zirconium dioxide nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) were varied to control their interaction with 4-n-hexylbenzoic acid (6BA). The miscibility and effect of the NPs on the nematic order as a function of particle concentration was characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM), fluorescence microscopy and (2)H NMR spectroscopy. Nonfunctionalized ZrO2 NPs have the lowest miscibility and strongest effect on the LC matrix due to irreversible binding of 6BA to the NPs via a strong zirconium carboxylate bond. The ZrO2 NPs were functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid (6PHA) or 4-(6-phosphonohexyloxy)benzoic acid (6BPHA) which selectively bind to the ZrO2 NP surface via the phosphonic acid groups. The miscibility was increased by controlling the concentration of the pendant CO2H groups by adding hexylphosphonic acid (HPA) to act as a spacer group. Fluorescence microscopy of lanthanide doped ZrO2 NPs showed no aggregates in the nematic phase below the NP concentration where aggregates are observed in the isotropic phase. The functionalized NPs preferably concentrate into LC defects and any remaining isotropic liquid but are still present throughout the nematic liquid at a lower concentration.

  11. Competition between Hydrogen Bonds and Coordination Bonds Steered by the Surface Molecular Coverage.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liangliang; Sun, Qiang; Bao, Meiling; Ma, Honghong; Yuan, Chunxue; Xu, Wei

    2017-04-25

    In addition to the choices of metal atoms/molecular linkers and surfaces, several crucial parameters, including surface temperature, molecular stoichiometric ratio, electrical stimulation, concentration, and solvent effect for liquid/solid interfaces, have been demonstrated to play key roles in the formation of on-surface self-assembled supramolecular architectures. Moreover, self-assembled structural transformations frequently occur in response to a delicate control over those parameters, which, in most cases, involve either conversions from relatively weak interactions to stronger ones (e.g., hydrogen bonds to coordination bonds) or transformations between the comparable interactions (e.g., different coordination binding modes or hydrogen bonding configurations). However, intermolecular bond conversions from relatively strong coordination bonds to weak hydrogen bonds were rarely reported. Moreover, to our knowledge, a reversible conversion between hydrogen bonds and coordination bonds has not been demonstrated before. Herein, we have demonstrated a facile strategy for the regulation of stepwise intermolecular bond conversions from the metal-organic coordination bond (Cu-N) to the weak hydrogen bond (CH···N) by increasing the surface molecular coverage. From the DFT calculations we quantify that the loss in intermolecular interaction energy is compensated by the increased molecular adsorption energy at higher molecular coverage. Moreover, we achieved a reversible conversion from the weak hydrogen bond to the coordination bond by decreasing the surface molecular coverage.

  12. Helical polymers based on intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded aromatic polyamides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Xuan; Shi, Zhu-Ming; Li, Zhan-Ting; Guan, Zhibin

    2010-12-21

    Inspired by arylamide-based oligomeric foldermers that are stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding, a series of polyamides with intramolecular hydrogen-bonding motifs were synthesized via polycondensation reactions. These polymers can fold into helical conformation different from their linear control. The chirality of helical conformation can further be tuned via acid-base complexation using chiral residues.

  13. How Do Organic Chemistry Students Understand and Apply Hydrogen Bonding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderleiter, J.; Smart, R.; Anderson, J.; Elian, O.

    2001-01-01

    Examines how students completing a two-semester organic sequence understand, explain, and apply hydrogen bonding to determine the physical attributes of molecules. Suggests that some students completing what is typically their second year of college-level chemistry still possess misconceptions about hydrogen bonds. (Contains 21 references.) (ASK)

  14. Kinetic solvent effects on hydrogen abstraction reactions from carbon by the cumyloxyl radical. The role of hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Salamone, Michela

    2010-08-20

    A kinetic study of the H-atom abstraction reactions from 1,4-cyclohexadiene and triethylamine by the cumyloxyl radical has been carried out in different solvents. Negligible effects are observed with 1,4-cyclohexadiene, whereas with triethylamine a significant decrease in rate constant (k(H)) is observed on going from benzene to MeOH. A good correlation between log k(H) and the solvent hydrogen bond donor parameter alpha is observed, indicative of an H-bonding interaction between the amine lone pair and the solvent.

  15. Hydrogen Bonding in 4-AMINOPHENYL Ethanol: a Combined Ir-Uv Double Resonance and Microwave Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Caitlin; Rivera, Cara Rae; Arsenault, E. A.; Obenchain, Daniel A.; Novick, Stewart E.; Knee, Joseph L.

    2015-06-01

    Both amine and hydroxyl functional groups are present in 4-aminophenyl ethanol (4-AE), and each functional group can form hydrogen bonds with carboxylic acids, such as formic acid and acetic acid. Predicting the structures of such complexes involving 4-AE is rather complex, given the many possible conformations and their similar (and method and basis-dependent) energies. In particular, the carboxyl group, -COOH, can act as both as a hydrogen bond donor or acceptor, or both at once. In this study we report the formic acid - 4-AE hydrogen bonded complex. An infrared-ultraviolet double resonance spectrometer is used to examine the shifts in IR frequencies of 4-AE from the monomer to the complex. Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy is used to determine structures of the species. Results from both experiments are compared to DFT and ab initio results. Time permitting, results of the water complex with 4-AE will also be presented.

  16. O-H hydrogen bonding promotes H-atom transfer from α C-H bonds for C-alkylation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Jenna L; Terrett, Jack A; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-09-25

    The efficiency and selectivity of hydrogen atom transfer from organic molecules are often difficult to control in the presence of multiple potential hydrogen atom donors and acceptors. Here, we describe the mechanistic evaluation of a mode of catalytic activation that accomplishes the highly selective photoredox α-alkylation/lactonization of alcohols with methyl acrylate via a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism. Our studies indicate a particular role of tetra-n-butylammonium phosphate in enhancing the selectivity for α C-H bonds in alcohols in the presence of allylic, benzylic, α-C=O, and α-ether C-H bonds.

  17. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  18. Hydrogen bonding in phytohormone-auxin (IAA) and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojić-Prodić, Biserka; Kroon, Jan; Puntarec, Vitomir

    1994-06-01

    The significant importance of hydrogen bonds in biological structures and enzymatic reactions has been demonstrated in many examples. As a part of the molecular recognition study of auxins (plant growth hormones) the influence of hydrogen bonding on molecular conformation, particularly of the carboxyl group, which is one of the biologically active ligand sites, has been studied by X-ray diffraction and computational chemistry methods. The survey includes about 40 crystal structures of free auxins such as indol-3-ylacetic acid and its n-alkylated and halogenated derivatives but also bound auxins such as N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-amino acids, and carbohydrate conjugates. The study includes hydrogen bonds of the NH⋯O and OH⋯O types. The classification of hydrogen bond patterns based on the discrimination between the centrosymmetric and non-centrosymmetric space groups and several examples of hydrogen bond systematics on graph set analysis are also shown.

  19. Hydrogen Bonding Between FNO and H2O: Structure and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Melodie; Peters, Nancy J. S.

    2009-09-01

    Nitrosyl fluoride, of some interest in atmospheric chemistry, has three atoms which could potentially serve as proton acceptors in the formation of hydrogen bonds. The optimized structure of FNO and H2O was determined at the MP4/6-31G** level of calculation. In the resulting structure, the hydrogen bonds at the fluorine with an energy of 5.15 kcal/mol, contrary to the prediction that less electronegative atoms make better proton acceptors/electron donors but consistent with results of proton affinity studies and with the contribution of a resonance structure with no bond between the N and F and a negative charge on the fluorine atom. The resulting structure also shows a significant increase in the length of the NF bond from 1.51 to 1.61 Å.

  20. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in Low-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene Glycol.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, Mariana; Goclon, Jakub; Rodziewicz, Pawel

    2016-04-18

    We used static DFT calculations to analyze, in detail, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds formed in low-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) with two to five repeat subunits. Both red-shifted O-H⋅⋅⋅O and blue-shifting C-H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds, which control the structural flexibility of PEG, were detected. To estimate the strength of these hydrogen bonds, the quantum theory of atoms in molecules was used. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations were used to mimic the structural rearrangements and hydrogen-bond breaking/formation in the PEG molecule at 300 K. The time evolution of the H⋅⋅⋅O bond length and valence angles of the formed hydrogen bonds were fully analyzed. The characteristic hydrogen-bonding patterns of low-molecular-weight PEG were described with an estimation of their lifetime. The theoretical results obtained, in particular the presence of weak C-H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds, could serve as an explanation of the PEG structural stability in the experimental investigation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Hydrogen Bonding and Vibrational Spectroscopy: A Theoretical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of hydrogen bonding on vibrational spectra are studied for several hydrogen-bonded complexes, in which hydrogen bonding ranges from weak (<5 kcal/mol) to very strong (>25 kcal/mol). The systems studied include complexes of inorganic acids and salts with water and ammonia, as well as complexes of several organic molecules (nitriles and amino acids) with water. Since anharmonic effects are very strong in hydrogen-bonded systems, anharmonic vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities are computed using the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field (CC-VSCF) method with ab initio potential surfaces at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels. The most common spectral effects induced by hydrogen bonding are red shifts of stretching vibrational frequencies ranging from approx.200/cm to over 2000/cm and significant increases of infrared intensities for those bonds that participate in hydrogen bonding. However, some systems (e.g. nitrile-water complexes) exhibit shifts in the opposite direction (to the blue) upon formation of hydrogen bonds.

  2. A diabatic state model for double proton transfer in hydrogen bonded complexes.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Ross H

    2014-09-14

    Four diabatic states are used to construct a simple model for double proton transfer in hydrogen bonded complexes. Key parameters in the model are the proton donor-acceptor separation R and the ratio, D1/D2, between the proton affinity of a donor with one and two protons. Depending on the values of these two parameters the model describes four qualitatively different ground state potential energy surfaces, having zero, one, two, or four saddle points. Only for the latter are there four stable tautomers. In the limit D2 = D1 the model reduces to two decoupled hydrogen bonds. As R decreases a transition can occur from a synchronous concerted to an asynchronous concerted to a sequential mechanism for double proton transfer.

  3. Hydrogen bonding. Part 69. Inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding effects on the structure, solubility, and reactivity of 4,5-dicarboxyimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Gill, Stacee H.; Rasmussen, Paul G.; Hardgrove, George L., Jr.

    1999-03-01

    1-Methyl-4,5-dicarboxyimidazole (H 2MDCI) and 4,5-dicarboxyimidazole (H 2DCI) are both zwitterionic, with one acidic hydrogen on a ring nitrogen and one in an O-H-O hydrogen bond between carboxylate groups. H 2MDCI is relatively soluble in H 2O, and further diacid is taken into saturated aqueous solution in the presence of F - with removal of O-H-O hydrogen and formation of HMDCI - and HF 2-. In contrast, H 2DCI is almost completely insoluble in H 2O and, unlike other similar dicarboxylic acids we have studied, is completely unaffected by added F -. We have used titrametric analysis, molecular modeling, infrared spectra, molecular orbital calculations and X-ray crystallography to elucidate the properties of H 2DCI and H 2MDCI. The crystal structure of H 2MDCI was solved in the P2 1/c space group with Z = 4, a = 4.6402(5), b = 15.070(2), c = 9.6786(11), β = 94.928(2)° and V = 674.32(13) Å 3. The structure shows two hydrogen bonds, one intramolecular and one intermolecular per molecule. The reduced solubility of H 2DCI arises from facile formation of four N-H ⋯O intermolecular hydrogen bonds by each molecule (2 donor and 2 acceptor). The failure of H 2DCI to react with F - is ascribed to lowered acidity of H 2DCI, relative to that of structurally quite similar H 2MDCI, which in turn results, in part, from the presence of a symmetric O-H-O hydrogen bond in the C2v H 2DCI zwitterion, which is stronger than the unsymmetrical O-H-O bond in the Cs zwitterion of H 2MDCI.

  4. DNA polymerase catalysis in the absence of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Potapova, Olga; Chan, Chikio; DeLucia, Angela M.; Helquist, Sandra A.; Kool, Eric T.; Grindley, Nigel D. F.; Joyce, Catherine M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first pre-steady-state kinetic studies of DNA replication in the absence of hydrogen bonds. We have used nonpolar nucleotide analogues that mimic the shape of a Watson-Crick base pair in order to investigate the kinetic consequences of a lack of hydrogen bonds in the polymerase reaction catalyzed by the Klenow fragment of DNA Polymerase I from Escherichia coli. With a thymine isostere lacking hydrogen bonding ability in the nascent pair, the efficiency (kpol/Kd) of the polymerase reaction is decreased by 30-fold, affecting ground state (Kd) and transition state (kpol) approximately equally. When both thymine and adenine analogues in the nascent pair lack hydrogen bonding ability, the efficiency of the polymerase reaction is decreased by about 1000-fold, with most the decrease attributable to the transition state. Reactions using nonpolar analogues at the primer terminal base pair demonstrated the requirement for a hydrogen bond between the polymerase and the minor groove of the primer-terminal base. The R668A mutation of Klenow fragment abolished this requirement, identifying R668 as the probable hydrogen bond donor. Detailed examination of the kinetic data suggested that Klenow fragment has an extremely low tolerance of even minor deviations of the analogue base pairs from ideal Watson-Crick geometry. Consistent with this idea, some analogue pairings were better tolerated by Klenow fragment mutants having more spacious active sites. By contrast, the Y-family polymerase Dbh was much less sensitive to changes in base pair dimensions, and more dependent on hydrogen bonding between base-paired partners. PMID:16411765

  5. Spectroscopic, DFT, and XRD Studies of Hydrogen Bonds in N-Unsubstituted 2-Aminobenzamides.

    PubMed

    Mphahlele, Malose Jack; Maluleka, Marole Maria; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Mampa, Richard Mokome

    2017-01-04

    The structures of the mono- and the dihalogenated N-unsubstituted 2-aminobenzamides were characterized by means of the spectroscopic (¹H-NMR, UV-Vis, FT-IR, and FT-Raman) and X-ray crystallographic techniques complemented with a density functional theory (DFT) method. The hindered rotation of the C(O)-NH₂ single bond resulted in non-equivalence of the amide protons and therefore two distinct resonances of different chemical shift values in the ¹H-NMR spectra of these compounds were observed. 2-Amino-5-bromobenzamide (ABB) as a model confirmed the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds between oxygen and the amine hydrogen. However, intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the amine protons was not observed in the solution phase due to a rapid exchange of these two protons with the solvent and fast rotation of the Ar-NH₂ single bond. XRD also revealed the ability of the amide unit of these compounds to function as a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor simultaneously to form strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding between oxygen of one molecule and the NH moiety of the amine or amide group of the other molecule and between the amine nitrogen and the amide hydrogen of different molecules. DFT calculations using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set revealed that the conformer (A) with oxygen and 2-amine on the same side predominates possibly due to the formation of a six-membered intramolecular ring, which is assisted by hydrogen bonding as observed in the single crystal XRD structure.

  6. Understanding the Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Bonding in Alcohol-Containing Mixtures: Cross-Association.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Wael A; Wang, Le; Haghmoradi, Amin; Asthagiri, D; Chapman, Walter G

    2016-04-07

    The thermodynamics of hydrogen bonding in 1-alcohol + water binary mixtures is studied using molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and the polar and perturbed chain form of the statistical associating fluid theory (polar PC-SAFT). The fraction of free monomers in pure saturated liquid water is computed using both TIP4P/2005 and iAMOEBA simulation water models. Results are compared to spectroscopic data available in the literature as well as to polar PC-SAFT. Polar PC-SAFT models hydrogen bonds using single bondable association sites representing electron donors and electron acceptors. The distribution of hydrogen bonds in pure alcohols is computed using the OPLS-AA force field. Results are compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations available in the literature as well as to polar PC-SAFT. The analysis shows that hydrogen bonding in pure alcohols is best predicted using a two-site model within the SAFT framework. On the other hand, molecular simulations show that increasing the concentration of water in the mixture increases the average number of hydrogen bonds formed by an alcohol molecule. As a result, a transition in association scheme occurs at high water concentrations where hydrogen bonding is better captured within the SAFT framework using a three-site alcohol model. The knowledge gained in understanding hydrogen bonding is applied to model vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) and liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) of mixtures using polar PC-SAFT. Predictions are in good agreement with experimental data, establishing the predictive power of the equation of state.

  7. The IR evidence of H 2O-aromatic hydrocarbons single hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, Jan Cz.; Jamróz, Michał H.

    1993-03-01

    The ν 3 and ν 1 IR bands of water dissolved in benzene, toluene, cumene, xylenes, CCl 2FCClF 2, CCl 4, CS 2, CDCl 3 and CH 2ClCH 2Cl were observed. On the basis of the ν 3 to ν 1 band intensity ratio it is concluded that in aromatic solvents water forms a single hydrogen bond and acts as the proton donor. Additionally based on band shifts it is suggested that water in CH 2ClCH 2Cl, CDCl 3 and CS 2 plays electron donor role.

  8. A computational study on the enhanced stabilization of aminophenol derivatives by internal hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, José R. B.; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A. V.

    2006-05-01

    The stabilization of aminophenol derivatives and their radicals due to internal hydrogen bonding has been analyzed by means of density functional theory and by topological electron density analysis. The calculations have been carried out at the B3LYP level of theory, using several basis sets, and by means of the CBS-4M composite approach. A strong O-H⋯NH 2 hydrogen bond is found to stabilize the aminophenol with the lone-pair of the nitrogen atom co-planar with the aromatic ring, contrasting with the optimized structure found for aniline. The effect of electron donors and electron acceptors on the strength of the internal hydrogen bond is also analyzed. For one of the species studied, 2,6-diaminophenol, the computed O-H bond dissociation enthalpy is only 300 kJ/mol, the lowest value found so far for phenol and other compounds containing the O-H bond, almost 25 kJ/mol lower than those found experimentally for pyrogallol and for vitamin E. The explanation for such a small value comes from the enhanced stabilization of the corresponding radical species by internal hydrogen bonding, combined with a decrease of the steric effects caused by rotation of the amino groups.

  9. Hydrogen-Bonding Surfaces for Ice Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Hadley, Kevin R.; McDougall, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Ice formation on aircraft, either on the ground or in-flight, is a major safety issue. While ground icing events occur predominantly during the winter months, in-flight icing can happen anytime during the year. The latter is more problematic since it could result in increased drag and loss of lift. Under a Phase I ARMD NARI Seedling Activity, coated aluminum surfaces possessing hydrogen-bonding groups were under investigation for mitigating ice formation. Hydroxyl and methyl terminated dimethylethoxysilanes were prepared via known chemistries and characterized by spectroscopic methods. These materials were subsequently used to coat aluminum surfaces. Surface compositions were based on pure hydroxyl and methyl terminated species as well as mixtures of the two. Coated surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry. Receding water contact angle data suggested several potential surfaces that may exhibit reduced ice adhesion. Qualitative icing experiments performed under representative environmental temperatures using supercooled distilled water delivered via spray coating were inconclusive. Molecular modeling studies suggested that chain mobility affected the interface between ice and the surface more than terminal group chemical composition. Chain mobility resulted from the creation of "pockets" of increased free volume for longer chains to occupy.

  10. Effect of hydrogen bonds on optical nonlinearities of inorganic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Dongfeng; Zhang, Siyuan

    1999-03-01

    This work probes the role of hydrogen bonds (such as O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O) in some inorganic nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals, such as HIO 3, NH 4H 2PO 4 (ADP), K[B 5O 6(OH) 4]·2H 2O (KB 5) and K 2La(NO 3) 5·2H 2O (KLN), from the chemical bond standpoint. Second order NLO behaviors of these four typical inorganic crystals have been quantitatively studied, results show hydrogen bonds play a very important role in NLO contributions to the total nonlinearity. Conclusions derived here concerning the effect of hydrogen bonds on optical nonlinearities of inorganic crystals have important implications with regard to the utilization of hydrogen bonds in the structural design of inorganic NLO crystals.

  11. Hydrogen bonding definitions and dynamics in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Schmidt, J R; Skinner, J L

    2007-05-28

    X-ray and neutron diffractions, vibrational spectroscopy, and x-ray Raman scattering and absorption experiments on water are often interpreted in terms of hydrogen bonding. To this end a number of geometric definitions of hydrogen bonding in water have been developed. While all definitions of hydrogen bonding are to some extent arbitrary, those involving one distance and one angle for a given water dimer are unnecessarily so. In this paper the authors develop a systematic procedure based on two-dimensional potentials of mean force for defining cutoffs for a given pair of distance and angular coordinates. They also develop an electronic structure-based definition of hydrogen bonding in liquid water, related to the electronic occupancy of the antibonding OH orbitals. This definition turns out to be reasonably compatible with one of the distance-angle geometric definitions. These two definitions lead to an estimate of the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule in liquid simple point charge/extended (SPC/E) water of between 3.2 and 3.4. They also used these and other hydrogen-bond definitions to examine the dynamics of local hydrogen-bond number fluctuations, finding an approximate long-time decay constant for SPC/E water of between 0.8 and 0.9 ps, which corresponds to the time scale for local structural relaxation.

  12. CH-π hydrogen bonds in biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Motohiro; Umezawa, Yoji; Fantini, Jacques; Weiss, Manfred S; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2014-07-07

    This is a sequel to the previous Perspective "The CH-π hydrogen bond in chemistry. Conformation, supramolecules, optical resolution and interactions involving carbohydrates", which featured in a PCCP themed issue on "Weak Hydrogen Bonds - Strong Effects?": Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 13873-13900. Evidence that weak hydrogen bonds play an enormously important role in chemistry and biochemistry has now accumulated to an extent that the rigid classical concept of hydrogen bonds formulated by Pauling needs to be seriously revised and extended. The concept of a more generalized hydrogen bond definition is indispensable for understanding the folding mechanisms of proteins. The CH-π hydrogen bond, a weak molecular force occurring between a soft acid CH and a soft base π-electron system, among all is one of the most important and plays a functional role in defining the conformation and stability of 3D structures as well as in many molecular recognition events. This concept is also valuable in structure-based drug design efforts. Despite their frequent occurrence in organic molecules and bio-molecules, the importance of CH-π hydrogen bonds is still largely unknown to many chemists and biochemists. Here we present a review that deals with the evidence, nature, characteristics and consequences of the CH-π hydrogen bond in biological macromolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and polysaccharides). It is hoped that the present Perspective will show the importance of CH-π hydrogen bonds and stimulate interest in the interactions of biological macromolecules, one of the most fascinating fields in bioorganic chemistry. Implication of this concept is enormous and valuable in the scientific community.

  13. Hydrogen and Dihydrogen Bonds in the Reactions of Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Filippov, Oleg A; Shubina, Elena S

    2016-08-10

    The dihydrogen bond-an interaction between a transition-metal or main-group hydride (M-H) and a protic hydrogen moiety (H-X)-is arguably the most intriguing type of hydrogen bond. It was discovered in the mid-1990s and has been intensively explored since then. Herein, we collate up-to-date experimental and computational studies of the structural, energetic, and spectroscopic parameters and natures of dihydrogen-bonded complexes of the form M-H···H-X, as such species are now known for a wide variety of hydrido compounds. Being a weak interaction, dihydrogen bonding entails the lengthening of the participating bonds as well as their polarization (repolarization) as a result of electron density redistribution. Thus, the formation of a dihydrogen bond allows for the activation of both the MH and XH bonds in one step, facilitating proton transfer and preparing these bonds for further transformations. The implications of dihydrogen bonding in different stoichiometric and catalytic reactions, such as hydrogen exchange, alcoholysis and aminolysis, hydrogen evolution, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation, are discussed.

  14. Carbon-hydrogen bonding in near-frictionless carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jackie A.; Woodford, John B; Rajput, Deepak; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Schleuter, John A; Eryilmaz, Osman L; Erdemir, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The uniquely low friction behavior of near frictionless carbon (NFC) as compared to conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) is determined by the bonding within the film. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to probe the bonding environment of carbon and hydrogen; both INS and FTIR can probe the whole sample. Previous work has focused on surface studies; the present results show that in the film as a whole the majority of the hydrogen is adjacent to sp3-bonded carbon. In addition this work has determined the absence of any molecular hydrogen in NFC.

  15. Carbon-hydrogen bonding in near-frictionless carbon.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J. A.; Woodford, J. B.; Rajput, D.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Schleuter, J. A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Univ. of Tennessee Space Inst.; ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The uniquely low friction behavior of near-frictionless carbon (NFC) as compared to conventional diamondlike carbon (DLC) is determined by the bonding within the film. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to probe the bonding environment of carbon and hydrogen; both INS and FTIR can probe the whole sample. Previous work has focused on surface studies; the present results show that in the film as a whole the majority of the hydrogen is adjacent to sp{sup 3}-bonded carbon. In addition this work has determined the absence of any molecular hydrogen in NFC.

  16. Carbon-hydrogen bonding in near-frictionless carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. A.; Woodford, J. B.; Rajput, D.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Schleuter, J. A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.

    2008-09-01

    The uniquely low friction behavior of near-frictionless carbon (NFC) as compared to conventional diamondlike carbon (DLC) is determined by the bonding within the film. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to probe the bonding environment of carbon and hydrogen; both INS and FTIR can probe the whole sample. Previous work has focused on surface studies; the present results show that in the film as a whole the majority of the hydrogen is adjacent to sp3-bonded carbon. In addition this work has determined the absence of any molecular hydrogen in NFC.

  17. A Simple Model of Hydrogenation in Tetrahedrally Bonded Disordered Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Toshio; Matsubara, Takeo

    1982-02-01

    Coherent potential approximation (CPA) is applied to evaluate the total density of states (DOS) and local density of states (LDS) for hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si: H). Three configurations SiH, SiHHSi and SiHSi are considered for the silicon-hydrogen bonding states. Instead of calculating the electronic states of a-Si: H, the effect of hydrogenation is renormalized into an effective Si*-Si* bond so that the problem may be reduced to that of a-Si* with random effective bonds. The calculated Si*-LDS and DOS for three configurations are compared with other theory and experiments.

  18. Effect of pressure on methylated glycine derivatives: relative roles of hydrogen bonds and steric repulsion of methyl groups.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Eugene A; Minkov, Vasily S; Boldyreva, Elena V

    2014-06-01

    Infinite head-to-tail chains of zwitterions present in the crystals of all amino acids are known to be preserved even after structural phase transitions. In order to understand the role of the N-H...O hydrogen bonds linking zwitterions in these chains in structural rearrangements, the crystal structures of the N-methyl derivatives of glycine (N-methylglycine, or sarcosine, with two donors for hydrogen bonding; two polymorphs of N,N-dimethylglycine, DMG-I and DMG-II, with one donor for hydrogen bond; and N,N,N-trimethylglycine, or betaine, with no hydrogen bonds) were studied at different pressures. Methylation has not only excluded the formation of selected hydrogen bonds, but also introduced bulky mobile fragments into the structure. The effects of pressure on the systems of the series were compared with respect to distorting and switching over hydrogen bonds and inducing reorientation of the methylated fragments. Phase transitions with fragmentation of the single crystals into fine powder were observed for partially methylated N-methyl- and N,N-dimethylglycine, whereas the structural changes in betaine were continuous with some peculiar features in the 1.4-2.9 GPa pressure range and accompanied by splitting of the crystals into several large fragments. Structural rearrangements in sarcosine and betaine were strongly dependent on the rate of pressure variation: the higher the rate of increasing pressure, the lower the pressure at which the phase transition occurred.

  19. Hydrogen-Bond Networks: Strengths of Different Types of Hydrogen Bonds and An Alternative to the Low Barrier Hydrogen-Bond Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Shokri, Alireza; Wang, Yanping; O'Doherty, George A.; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2013-11-27

    We report quantifying the strengths of different types of hydrogen bonds in hydrogen bond networks (HBNs) via measurement of the adiabatic electron detachment energy of the conjugate base of a small covalent polyol model compound (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) in the gas phase and the pKa of the corresponding acid in DMSO. The latter result reveals that the hydrogen bonds to the charged center and those that are one solvation shell further away (i.e., primary and secondary) provide 5.3 and 2.5 pKa units of stabilization per hydrogen bond in DMSO. Computations indicate that these energies increase to 8.4 and 3.9 pKa units in benzene and that the total stabilizations are 16 (DMSO) and 25 (benzene) pKa units. Calculations on a larger linear heptaol (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) reveal that the terminal hydroxyl groups each contribute 0.6 pKa units of stabilization in DMSO and 1.1 pKa units in benzene. All of these results taken together indicate that the presence of a charged center can provide a powerful energetic driving force for enzyme catalysis and conformational changes such as in protein folding due to multiple hydrogen bonds in a HBN.

  20. Hydrogen-bond networks: strengths of different types of hydrogen bonds and an alternative to the low barrier hydrogen-bond proposal.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Alireza; Wang, Yanping; O'Doherty, George A; Wang, Xue-Bin; Kass, Steven R

    2013-11-27

    We report quantifying the strengths of different types of hydrogen bonds in hydrogen-bond networks (HBNs) via measurement of the adiabatic electron detachment energy of the conjugate base of a small covalent polyol model compound (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) in the gas phase and the pKa of the corresponding acid in DMSO. The latter result reveals that the hydrogen bonds to the charged center and those that are one solvation shell further away (i.e., primary and secondary) provide 5.3 and 2.5 pKa units of stabilization per hydrogen bond in DMSO. Computations indicate that these energies increase to 8.4 and 3.9 pKa units in benzene and that the total stabilizations are 16 (DMSO) and 25 (benzene) pKa units. Calculations on a larger linear heptaol (i.e., (HOCH2CH2CH(OH)CH2CH(OH)CH2)2CHOH) reveal that the terminal hydroxyl groups each contribute 0.6 pKa units of stabilization in DMSO and 1.1 pKa units in benzene. All of these results taken together indicate that the presence of a charged center can provide a powerful energetic driving force for enzyme catalysis and conformational changes such as in protein folding due to multiple hydrogen bonds in a HBN.

  1. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: A theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-01-28

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water.

  2. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: a theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations.

    PubMed

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-01-28

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water.

  3. Hirshfeld atom refinement for modelling strong hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Woińska, Magdalena; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Spackman, Mark A; Edwards, Alison J; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Grabowsky, Simon

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution low-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction data of the salt L-phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate are used to test the new automated iterative Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) procedure for the modelling of strong hydrogen bonds. The HAR models used present the first examples of Z' > 1 treatments in the framework of wavefunction-based refinement methods. L-Phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate exhibits several hydrogen bonds in its crystal structure, of which the shortest and the most challenging to model is the O-H...O intramolecular hydrogen bond present in the hydrogen maleate anion (O...O distance is about 2.41 Å). In particular, the reconstruction of the electron density in the hydrogen maleate moiety and the determination of hydrogen-atom properties [positions, bond distances and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs)] are the focus of the study. For comparison to the HAR results, different spherical (independent atom model, IAM) and aspherical (free multipole model, MM; transferable aspherical atom model, TAAM) X-ray refinement techniques as well as results from a low-temperature neutron-diffraction experiment are employed. Hydrogen-atom ADPs are furthermore compared to those derived from a TLS/rigid-body (SHADE) treatment of the X-ray structures. The reference neutron-diffraction experiment reveals a truly symmetric hydrogen bond in the hydrogen maleate anion. Only with HAR is it possible to freely refine hydrogen-atom positions and ADPs from the X-ray data, which leads to the best electron-density model and the closest agreement with the structural parameters derived from the neutron-diffraction experiment, e.g. the symmetric hydrogen position can be reproduced. The multipole-based refinement techniques (MM and TAAM) yield slightly asymmetric positions, whereas the IAM yields a significantly asymmetric position.

  4. How resonance assists hydrogen bonding interactions: an energy decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck, John Frederick; Mo, Yirong

    2007-01-15

    Block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is a variant of the ab initio valence bond (VB) theory, was employed to explore the nature of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHBs) and to investigate the mechanism of synergistic interplay between pi delocalization and hydrogen-bonding interactions. We examined the dimers of formic acid, formamide, 4-pyrimidinone, 2-pyridinone, 2-hydroxpyridine, and 2-hydroxycyclopenta-2,4-dien-1-one. In addition, we studied the interactions in beta-diketone enols with a simplified model, namely the hydrogen bonds of 3-hydroxypropenal with both ethenol and formaldehyde. The intermolecular interaction energies, either with or without the involvement of pi resonance, were decomposed into the Hitler-London energy (DeltaEHL), polarization energy (DeltaEpol), charge transfer energy (DeltaECT), and electron correlation energy (DeltaEcor) terms. This allows for the examination of the character of hydrogen bonds and the impact of pi conjugation on hydrogen bonding interactions. Although it has been proposed that resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds are accompanied with an increasing of covalency character, our analyses showed that the enhanced interactions mostly originate from the classical dipole-dipole (i.e., electrostatic) attraction, as resonance redistributes the electron density and increases the dipole moments in monomers. The covalency of hydrogen bonds, however, changes very little. This disputes the belief that RAHB is primarily covalent in nature. Accordingly, we recommend the term "resonance-assisted binding (RAB)" instead of "resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RHAB)" to highlight the electrostatic, which is a long-range effect, rather than the electron transfer nature of the enhanced stabilization in RAHBs. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Competing Intramolecular vs. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Peter I.

    2014-01-01

    A hydrogen bond for a local-minimum-energy structure can be identified according to the definition of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC recommendation 2011) or by finding a special bond critical point on the density map of the structure in the framework of the atoms-in-molecules theory. Nonetheless, a given structural conformation may be simply favored by electrostatic interactions. The present review surveys the in-solution competition of the conformations with intramolecular vs. intermolecular hydrogen bonds for different types of small organic molecules. In their most stable gas-phase structure, an intramolecular hydrogen bond is possible. In a protic solution, the intramolecular hydrogen bond may disrupt in favor of two solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The balance of the increased internal energy and the stabilizing effect of the solute-solvent interactions regulates the new conformer composition in the liquid phase. The review additionally considers the solvent effects on the stability of simple dimeric systems as revealed from molecular dynamics simulations or on the basis of the calculated potential of mean force curves. Finally, studies of the solvent effects on the type of the intermolecular hydrogen bond (neutral or ionic) in acid-base complexes have been surveyed. PMID:25353178

  6. Complexes between hypohalous acids and phosphine derivatives. Pnicogen bond versus halogen bond versus hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingzhong; Zhu, Hongjie; Zhuo, Hongying; Yang, Xin; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo

    2014-11-01

    The complexes of HOBr:PH2Y (Y = H, F, Cl, Br, CH3, NH2, OH, and NO2), HOCl:PH2F, and HOI:PH2F have been investigated with ab initio calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Four types of structures (1, 2, 3a, and 3b) were observed for these complexes. 1 is stabilized by an O⋯P pnicogen bond, 2 by a P⋯X halogen bond, 3a by a H⋯P hydrogen bond and a P⋯X pnicogen bond, and 3b by H⋯P and H⋯Br hydrogen bonds. Their relative stability is related to the halogen X of HOX and the substituent Y of PH2Y. These structures can compete with interaction energy of -10.22 ∼ -29.40 kJ/mol. The Hsbnd O stretch vibration shows a small red shift in 1, a small irregular shift in 2, but a prominent red shift in 3a and 3b. The Xsbnd O stretch vibration exhibits a smaller red shift in 1, a larger red shift in 2, but an insignificant blue shift in 3a and 3b. The Psbnd Y stretch vibration displays a red shift in 1 but a blue shift in 2, 3a, and 3b. The formation mechanism, stability, and properties of these structures have been analyzed with molecular electrostatic potentials, orbital interactions, and non-covalent interaction index.

  7. Hydrogen bonding characterization in water and small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2017-06-01

    The prototypical hydrogen bond in water dimer and hydrogen bonds in the protonated water dimer, in other small molecules, in water cyclic clusters, and in ice, covering a wide range of bond strengths, are theoretically investigated by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, considering not only a standard generalized gradient approximation functional but also, for the water dimer, hybrid and van der Waals corrected functionals. We compute structural, energetic, and electrostatic (induced molecular dipole moments) properties. In particular, hydrogen bonds are characterized in terms of differential electron density distributions and profiles, and of the shifts of the centres of maximally localized Wannier functions. The information from the latter quantities can be conveyed to a single geometric bonding parameter that appears to be correlated with the Mayer bond order parameter and can be taken as an estimate of the covalent contribution to the hydrogen bond. By considering the water trimer, the cyclic water hexamer, and the hexagonal phase of ice, we also elucidate the importance of cooperative/anticooperative effects in hydrogen-bonding formation.

  8. The unique physical properties of the hydrogen bonded in dimers liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, M.; Katranchev, B.; Rafailov, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    The dimerization of aromatic carboxylic acids, is the base of the structure formation of hydrogen bonded in dimers liquid crystals (HBDLCs), that exhibit non-conventional mesomorphism. The structural units of these LCs are amphiphilic-type molecules, which after suitable functionalization, induce supramolecular complexes, nanocomposites based on HBDLCs. The liquid crystalline character of the nanocomposites strongly dependent on intermolecular hydrogen bonds between symmetric, where the H-donors and H acceptors are contained in similar and non-symmetric HBDLCs, where the H-donors and H acceptors are contained in unlike molecules. The strength and non-covalent character of the hydrogen bonds provides both sufficient HBDLCs complex stability and bonding flexibility with a possibility to design and drive the supramolecular geometry. We investigated a series of nanocomposites produced by mixture of HBDLC (p-n-alkyloxybenzoic acid - nOBA), serving as matrices, with non-mesogenic (single walled carbon nanotubes - SWCNTs, hydroxypiridine - HOPY) and mesogenic (cholesteryl benzoate - ChB) nano-particles in various shapes and sizes. A set of new chiral ferroelectric phases were found in the nanocomposites, otherwise do not appearing in the pristine achiral HBDLCs materials. A molecular model of an unique low-temperature ferroelectric smectic phase C based on the molecular dimer ring symmetry reduction (bent dimer formation) towards to the lowest triclinic one is presented for both symmetric and nonsymmetric supramolecular liquid crystal complexes.

  9. Hydrogen bonding effects on the surface structure and photoelectrochemical properties of nanostructured SnO2 electrodes modified with porphyrin and fullerene composites.

    PubMed

    Imahori, Hiroshi; Liu, Jia-Cheng; Hotta, Hiroki; Kira, Aiko; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Matano, Yoshihiro; Li, Guifeng; Ye, Shen; Isosomppi, Marja; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Lemmetyinen, Helge

    2005-10-06

    Hydrogen bonding effects on surface structure, photophysical properties, and photoelectrochemistry have been examined in a mixed film of porphyrin and fullerene composites with and without hydrogen bonding on indium tin oxide and nanostructured SnO2 electrodes. The nanostructured SnO2 electrodes modified with the mixed films of porphyrin and fullerene composites with hydrogen bonding exhibited efficient photocurrent generation compared to the reference systems without hydrogen bonding. Atomic force microscopy, infrared reflection absorption, and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopies and time-resolved fluorescence lifetime and transient absorption spectroscopic measurements disclosed the relationship between the surface structure and photophysical and photoelectrochemical properties relating to the formation of hydrogen bonding between the porphyrins and/or the C60 moieties in the films on the electrode surface. These results show that hydrogen bonding is a highly promising methodology for the fabrication of donor and acceptor composites on nanostructured semiconducting electrodes, which exhibit high photoelectrochemical properties.

  10. Nuclear quadrupole resonance study of hydrogen bonded solid materials.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance is presented as a method for the study of solid hydrogen bonded materials. NQR study of hydrogen bonds in ferroelectric and paraelectric KH2PO4, antiferroelectric and paraelectric squaric acid, ferroelectric croconic acid and antiferroelectric and paraelectric cocrystal 5'-dimethyl-2, 2'-bipyridine - chloranilic acid (1:1) are discussed in more details. A 14N NQR study of the strong short O-HKN hydrogen bond in two polymorphic forms of cocrystal isonicotinamide-oxalic acid (2:1) is presented as well. Various correlations between the NQR parameters and between the NQR and structural parameters have been observed. These correlations may be used to determine the proton position in a hydrogen bond and some other structural parameters from the NQR data.

  11. Vibrational transitions in hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes - A local mode perturbation theory approach to transition frequencies and intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2017-04-01

    The local mode perturbation theory (LMPT) model was developed to improve the description of hydrogen bonded XH-stretching transitions, where X is typically O or N. We present a modified version of the LMPT model to extend its application from hydrated bimolecular complexes to hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes with donors such as alcohols, amines and acids. We have applied the modified model to a series of complexes of different hydrogen bond type and complex energy. We found that the differences between local mode (LM) and LMPT calculated fundamental XH-stretching transition wavenumbers and oscillator strengths were correlated with the strength of the hydrogen bond. Overall, we have found that the LMPT model in most cases predicts transition wavenumbers within 20 cm-1 of the experimental values.

  12. Intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in pyrrolylindandione derivatives and their interaction with fluoride and acetate: possible anion sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Sigalov, Mark V; Shainyan, Bagrat A; Chipanina, Nina N; Oznobikhina, Larisa P

    2013-11-07

    The series of push-pull compounds containing the pyrrole ring as a donor and the 1,3-indandione derived moieties as the acceptor unit were synthesized, and strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding in their molecules was studied. In the presence of fluoride and acetate anions their solutions undergo color changes. It was shown by NMR, UV-vis, and quantum chemical calculations including AIM analysis that all these compounds undergo solvent-assisted rupture of the intramolecular hydrogen bond followed by the formation of a strong intermolecular hydrogen bond with fluoride and acetate anions which finally abstract a proton from the pyrrole ring. The insensitivity of the studied compounds to other anions (Cl, Br, HSO4, PF6) is consequence of the instability of the corresponding hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  13. Reversible swelling-shrinking behavior of hydrogen-bonded free-standing thin film stabilized by catechol reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaxing; Su, Chao; Zhang, Xuejian; Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Jian; Yang, Shuguang

    2015-05-12

    Dopamine-modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-dopa) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVPON) was layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled to prepare thin film based on hydrogen bonding. The carboxylic group of acrylic acid and the phenolic hydroxyl group of dopamine can both act as hydrogen bond donors. The critical assembly and the critical disintegration pH values of PVPON/PAA-dopa film are enhanced compared with PVPON/PAA film. The hydrogen-bonded PVPON/PAA-dopa thin film can be cross-linked via catechol chemistry of dopamine. After cross-linking, the film can be exfoliated from the substrate in alkaline solution to get a free-standing film. Moreover, by tuning the pH value, deprotonation and protonation of PAA will make the hydrogen bond in the film break and reconstruct, which induces that the free-standing film has a reversible swelling-shrinking behavior.

  14. Catalytic Behavior Study of Bifunctional Hydrogen-Bonding Catalysts Guided by Free Energy Relationship Analyses of Steric Parameters.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Yang, Chen; Wang, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ni, Xiang; Cheng, JinPei

    2017-02-28

    Free energy relationship (FER) studies to correlate steric parameters against enantiocatalytic performance of bifunctional tertiary-amine hydrogen-bonding type catalysts, including (S, S)-cyclohexane-1, 2-diamine derived thioureas, Cinchona alkaloid derived thioureas and (S, S)-cyclohexane-1, 2-diamine derived squaramides, for Michael reactions revealed that the Michael reactions are much favored by catalysts with less bulky N-substituents. The observed FERs are independent of chiral scaffold and hydrogen-bond donors, deepening the understanding of current bifunctional hydrogen-bonding catalysts. Moreover, DFT calculations were performed to interpret the observed high reactivities of thioureas with less bulky substituents. Especially, the computations demonstrated the advantage of benzyl thiourea catalyst, in which extra CH-π interaction of hydrogen bond between catalyst and substrate should be the key point.

  15. Competitive pi interactions and hydrogen bonding within imidazolium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Richard P; Welton, Tom; Hunt, Patricia A

    2014-02-21

    In this paper we have explored the structural and energetic landscape of potential π(+)-π(+) stacked motifs, hydrogen-bonding arrangements and anion-π(+) interactions for gas-phase ion pair (IP) conformers and IP-dimers of 1,3-dimethylimidazolium chloride, [C1C1im]Cl. We classify cation-cation ring stacking as an electron deficient π(+)-π(+) interaction, and a competitive anion on-top IP motif as an anion-donor π(+)-acceptor interaction. 21 stable IP-dimers have been obtained within an energy range of 0-126 kJ mol(-1). The structures have been found to exhibit a complex interplay of structural features. We have found that low energy IP-dimers are not necessarily formed from the lowest energy IP conformers. The sampled range of IP-dimers exhibits new structural forms that cannot be recovered by examining the ion-pairs alone, moreover the IP-dimers are recovering additional key features of the local liquid structure. Including dispersion is shown to impact both the relative energy ordering and the geometry of the IPs and IP-dimers, however the impact is found to be subtle and dependent on the underlying functional.

  16. Patterned polymeric multilayered assemblies through hydrogen bonding and metal coordination.

    PubMed

    Piñón, Victor; Weck, Marcus

    2012-02-14

    Patterned polymeric multilayered assemblies were formed using a combination of metal coordination and hydrogen bonding interactions. We proved that the hydrogen bonding interaction between diamidopyridine and thymine can be employed for polymeric multilayer assemblies. We then combined this strategy along with a second supramolecular interaction, metal coordination. These interactions proved to be orthogonal to one another on the surface, making each discrete region individually responsive to external stimuli.

  17. O-H···S hydrogen bonds conform to the acid-base formalism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Surjendu; Bhattacherjee, Aditi; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2013-08-29

    Hydrogen bonding interaction between the ROH hydrogen bond donor and sulfur atom as an acceptor has not been as well characterized as the O-H···O interaction. The strength of O-H···O interactions for a given donor has been well documented to scale linearly with the proton affinity (PA) of the H-bond acceptor. In this regard, O-H···O interactions conform to the acid-base formalism. The importance of such correlation is to be able to estimate molecular property of the complex from the known thermodynamic data of its constituents. In this work, we investigate the properties of O-H···S interaction in the complexes of the H-bond donor and sulfur containing acceptors of varying proton affinity. The hydrogen bonded complexes of p-Fluorophenol (FP) with four different sulfur containing acceptors and their oxygen analogues, namely H2O/H2S, MeOH/MeSH, Me2O/Me2S and tetrahydrofuran (THF)/tetrahydrothiophene (THT) were characterized in regard to its S1-S0 excitation spectra and the IR spectra. Two-color resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (2c-R2PI), resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy, and IR-UV hole burning spectroscopic techniques were used to probe the hydrogen bonds in the aforementioned complexes. The spectroscopic data along with the ab initio calculations were used to deduce the strength of the O-H···S hydrogen bonding interactions in these system relative to that in the O-H···O interactions. It was found that, despite being dominated by the dispersion interaction, the O-H···S interactions conform to the acid-base formalism as in the case of more conventional O-H···O interactions. The dissociation energies and the red shifts in the O-H stretching frequencies correlated very well with the proton affinity of the acceptors. However, the O-H···S interaction did not follow the same correlation as that in the O-H···O H-bond. The energy decomposition analysis showed that the dissociation energies and the red shifts in the O

  18. Biological activity predictions, crystallographic comparison and hydrogen bonding analysis of cholane derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rajnikant; Dinesh; Chand, Bhavnaish

    2007-12-01

    A total of eighteen molecules of cholane derivatives (I-XVIII) (a series of steroids) have been included to predict their pharmacological effects, specific mechanisms of action, known toxicities, drug-likeness, etc, by using the statistics of multilevel neighbourhoods of atoms (MNA) descriptors for active and inactive fragments. The biological activity spectra for substances have been correlated on SAR base (structure-activity relationships data and knowledge base), which provides the different P(a) (possibility of activity) and P(i) (possibility of inactivity). Most of the probable activities have been characterized by P(a) and P(i) values, which depict that all the molecules have high value of teratogen activity. The Lipinski's thumb rule predicts that all the cholane derivatives have stronger preponderance for "cancer-like-drug" molecules and some of their related analogous have entered in the ANCI (American National Cancer Institute) database. Some selected bond distances and bond angles of interest have been taken into account and deviation of bond distances/bond angles, vis-a-vis the substitutional group and X-H...A intra/intermolecular hydrogen bonds has been discussed in detail. X-H...A intra and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the molecules have been described with the standard distance and angle cut-off criteria. D-theta and d-theta. scatter plots for intra- and intermolecular interactions are presented for better understanding of packing interactions existing among these derivatives. There exists only one C-H...O intramolecular bifurcated hydrogen bond. while high tendency of intermolecular bifurcated hydrogen bonds based on a defined O-H...O has been observed, in which O atom acts as a prototype donor as well as acceptor. The frequency of occurrence of C-H...O hydrogen bonds is predominant (i.e. 85.7%) in intramolecular interactions, whereas in intermolecular interactions, frequency of occurrence for O-H...O interactions is 62.9%. Solvent

  19. How many hydrogen-bonded α-turns are possible?

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Anette; Schramm, Peter; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg

    2011-06-01

    The formation of α-turns is a possibility to reverse the direction of peptide sequences via five amino acids. In this paper, a systematic conformational analysis was performed to find the possible isolated α-turns with a hydrogen bond between the first and fifth amino acid employing the methods of ab initio MO theory in vacuum (HF/6-31G*, B3LYP/6-311 + G*) and in solution (CPCM/HF/6-31G*). Only few α-turn structures with glycine and alanine backbones fulfill the geometry criteria for the i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond satisfactorily. The most stable representatives agree with structures found in the Protein Data Bank. There is a general tendency to form additional hydrogen bonds for smaller pseudocycles corresponding to β- and γ-turns with better hydrogen bond geometries. Sometimes, this competition weakens or even destroys the i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond leading to very stable double β-turn structures. This is also the reason why an "ideal" α-turn with three central amino acids having the perfect backbone angle values of an α-helix could not be localized. There are numerous hints for stable α-turns with a distance between the C(α)-atoms of the first and fifth amino acid smaller than 6-7 Å, but without an i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond.

  20. Strength of hydrogen bonds of water depends on local environment.

    PubMed

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz

    2012-04-14

    In-depth knowledge of water-water potential is important for devising and evaluating simple water models if they are to accurately describe water properties and reflect various solvation phenomena. Water-water potential depends upon inter-molecular distance, relative orientation of water molecules, and also local environment. When placed at a favorable distance in a favorable orientation, water molecules exhibit a particularly strong attractive interaction called hydrogen bond. Although hydrogen bond is very important for its effects on the elements of life, industrial applications, and bulk water properties, there is no scientific consensus on its true nature and origin. Using quantum-mechanical methods, hydrogen bond strength was calculated in different local environments. A simple empirical linear relationship was discovered between maximum hydrogen bond strength and the number of water molecules in the local environment. The local environment effect was shown to be considerable even on the second coordination shell. Additionally, a negative linear correlation was found between maximum hydrogen bond strength and the distance, at which it was observed. These results provide novel insights into the nature of hydrogen bonding.

  1. How are hydrogen bonds modified by metal binding?

    PubMed

    Husberg, Charlotte; Ryde, Ulf

    2013-06-01

    We have used density functional theory calculations to investigate how the hydrogen-bond strength is modified when a ligand is bound to a metal using over 60 model systems involving six metals and eight ligands frequently encountered in metalloproteins. We study how the hydrogen-bond geometry and energy vary with the nature of metal, the oxidation state, the coordination number, the ligand involved in the hydrogen bond, other first-sphere ligands, and different hydrogen-bond probe molecules. The results show that, in general, the hydrogen-bond strength is increased for neutral ligands and decreased for negatively charged ligands. The size of the effect is mainly determined by the net charge of the metal complex, and all effects are typically decreased when the model is solvated. In water solution, the hydrogen-bond strength can increase by up to 37 kJ/mol for neutral ligands, and that of negatively charged ligands can increase (for complexes with a negative net charge) or decrease (for positively charged complexes). If the net charge of the complex does not change, there is normally little difference between different metals or different types of complexes. The only exception is observed for sulphur-containing ligands (Met and Cys) and if the ligand is redox-active (e.g. high-valence Fe-O complexes).

  2. Multiple hydrogen bonds. Mass spectra of hydrogen bonded heterodimers. A comparison of ESI- and REMPI-ReTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Taubitz, Jörg; Lüning, Ulrich; Grotemeyer, Jürgen

    2004-11-07

    Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization-reflectron time of flight mass spectrometry is the analytical method of choice to observe hydrogen bonded supramolecules in the gas phase when protonation of basic centers competes with cluster formation.

  3. Luminescent gold(I) metallo-acids and their hydrogen bonded supramolecular liquid crystalline derivatives with decyloxystilbazole as hydrogen acceptor.

    PubMed

    Coco, Silverio; Cordovilla, Carlos; Domínguez, Cristina; Espinet, Pablo

    2008-12-28

    Gold complexes of 4-isocyanobenzoic acid, [AuX(CNC(6)H(4)CO(2)H)] (X = C[triple bond]C-C(6)H(4)-C(9)H(19), C(6)F(5), C(6)F(4)OC(6)H(13), C(6)F(4)C(6)F(4)Br) and [(mu-4,4'-C(6)F(4)C(6)F(4)){Au(CNC(6)H(4)CO(2)H)}(2)], have been isolated. These metallo-acids are luminescent. The single crystal X-ray diffraction study of [Au(C(6)F(5))(CNC(6)H(4)CO(2)H)](infinity) confirms a rod-like structure of the molecule, with a linear coordination around the gold atom, which extends into a supramolecular entity supported by hydrogen bond, gold-gold, and fluorophilic (F(ortho) ... F(meta)) interactions. The carboxylic acid group of the gold isocyanide complexes acts also as a hydrogen donor towards the hydrogen acceptor decyloxystilbazole, affording some hydrogen-bonded supramolecular liquid crystals.

  4. Transient hydrogen bonding in uniformly ¹³C,¹⁵N-labeled carbohydrates in water.

    PubMed

    Norris, Scott E; Landström, Jens; Weintraub, Andrej; Bull, Thomas E; Widmalm, Göran; Freedberg, Darón I

    2012-03-01

    We report NMR studies of transient hydrogen bonding in a polysaccharide (PS) dissolved in water without cosolvent at ambient temperature. The PS portion of the Escherichia coli O142 lipopolysaccharide is comprised of repeating pentasaccharide units of GalNAc (N-acetyl galactosamine), GlcNAc (N-acetyl glucosamine), and rhamnose in a 3:1:1 ratio, respectively. A 105-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on one pentasaccharide repeat unit predicts transient inter-residue hydrogen bonds from the GalNAc NH groups in the PS. To investigate these predictions experimentally, the PS was uniformly ¹³C,¹⁵N enriched and the NH, carbonyl, C2, C4, and methyl resonances of the GalNAc and GlcNAc residues assigned using through-bond triple-resonance NMR experiments. Temperature dependence of amide NH chemical shifts and one-bond NH J couplings support that NH groups on two of the GalNAc residues are donors in transient hydrogen bonds. The remaining GalNAc and GlcNAc NHs do not appear to be donors from either temperature-dependent chemical shifts or one-bond NH J couplings. These results substantiate the presence of weak or partial hydrogen bonds in carbohydrates, and that MD simulations of repeating units in PSs provide insight into overall PS structure and dynamics.

  5. Hydrogen inhalation decreases lung graft injury in brain-dead donor rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huacheng; Fu, Zhijie; Wei, Yuting; Liu, Jinfeng; Cui, Xiaoguang; Yang, Wanchao; Ding, Wengang; Pan, Peng; Li, Wenzhi

    2013-02-01

    The process of brain death induces acute lung injury in donors and aggravates ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in grafts. Hydrogen, a new anti-oxidant, attenuates IRI in several organ transplant models. We examined whether 2% inhaled hydrogen would show favorable effects on lung grafts from brain-dead donor rats. Brain-dead donor rats inhaled mixed gases with either 50% oxygen and 50% nitrogen or mixed gases with 2% hydrogen, 50% oxygen and 48% nitrogen for 2 hours. The recipients inhaled the same gas as the donors and were euthanized 2 hours after lung transplantation. Hydrogen improved PaO(2)/FIO(2) and PVO(2)/FIO(2) from the arterial and pulmonary venous blood in recipients and decreased the lung injury score in grafts from brain-dead donors. Hydrogen decreased the amount of IL-8 and TNF-α in serum, inhibited the activity of malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase, and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in the lung grafts from brain-dead donors. Furthermore, hydrogen decreased the apoptotic index of the cells and inhibited the protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and caspase-3 in lung grafts from brain-dead donors. Hydrogen can exert protective effects on lung grafts from brain-dead donors through anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. How strong are hydrogen bonds in metalla-beta-diketones?

    PubMed

    Steinborn, Dirk; Schwieger, Sebastian

    2007-01-01

    The energies of the kinetically inert, electronically saturated Lukehart-type metalla-beta-diketone [Re{(COMe)2H}(CO)4] (9 a) and of the kinetically labile, electronically unsaturated platina-beta-diketones [Pt{(COMe)2H}Cl2]- (10 a), [Pt2{(COMe)2H}2(micro-Cl)2] (11 a), and [Pt{(COMe)2H}(bpy)]+ (12 a) have been calculated by DFT at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level using effective core potentials with consideration of relativistic effects for the transition metals. Analogously, energies of the requisite open (non-hydrogen-bonded) equilibrium conformers (9 b, 10 c, 11 b, 12 b) and energies which were obtained from the hydrogen-bonded conformers by rigid rotation of the OH group around the C--O bond by 180 degrees followed by relaxation of all bond lengths and angles (9 c, 10 d, 11 c, 12 d) have been calculated. These energies were found to be higher by 14.7/27.2 (9 b/9 c), 20.7/27.2 (10 c/10 d), 19.2/25.7 (11 b/11 c), and 9.4/19.6 kcal mol(-1) (12 b/12 d) than those of the intramolecularly O--HO hydrogen-bonded metalla-beta-diketones 9 a, 10 a, 11 a, and 12 a, respectively. In acetylacetone (Hacac), the generic organic analogue of metalla-beta-diketones, the energies of the most stable non-hydrogen-bonded enol isomer (6 b) and of the conformer derived from the H-bonded form by rigid rotation of the OH group by 180 degrees followed by subsequent relaxation of all bond lengths and angles (6 k) were found to be 10.9/16.1 kcal mol(-1) (6 b/6 k) higher compared to the intramolecularly O--HO bonded isomer 6 a. Thus, the hydrogen bonds in metalla-beta- diketones must be regarded as strong and were found to be up to twice as strong as that in acetylacetone. A linear relationship was found between the hydrogen-bond energies based on the rigidly rotated structures and the OO separation in the hydrogen-bonded structures. Furthermore, these energies were also found to be correlated with the electron densities at the OH bond critical points (rhobcp) in the O--HO bonds of metalla

  7. Mapping the force-field of a hydrogen bonded assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Philip

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen-bonding underpins the structure, properties, and dynamics of a vast array of systems spanning a wide variety of scientific fields. From the striking complexity of the phase diagram of H2O and the elegance of base pair interactions in DNA, to the directionality inherent in supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces, hydrogen bonds play an essential role in directing intermolecular forces. Yet fundamental aspects of the H-bond, including the magnitude of the force and binding energy, force constant, and decay length associated with the interaction, have been vigorously debated for many decades. I will discuss how dynamic force microscopy (DFM) using a qPlus sensor can quantitatively map the tip-sample force-field for naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimide (NTCDI) molecules hydrogen-bonded in 2D assemblies. A comparison of experimental images and force spectra with their simulated counterparts from density functional theory calculations shows that image contrast due to intermolecular hydrogen bonds arises fundamentally from charge density depletion due to strong tip-sample interactions. Interpretation of DFM images of hydrogen bonds therefore necessitates detailed consideration of the coupled tip-molecule system: analyses based on intermolecular charge density in the absence of the tip fail to capture the essential physical chemistry underpinning the imaging mechanism.

  8. Carbon-Oxygen Hydrogen Bonding in Biological Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Scott; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen (CH···O) hydrogen bonding represents an unusual category of molecular interactions first documented in biological structures over 4 decades ago. Although CH···O hydrogen bonding has remained generally underappreciated in the biochemical literature, studies over the last 15 years have begun to yield direct evidence of these interactions in biological systems. In this minireview, we provide a historical context of biological CH···O hydrogen bonding and summarize some major advancements from experimental studies over the past several years that have elucidated the importance, prevalence, and functions of these interactions. In particular, we examine the impact of CH···O bonds on protein and nucleic acid structure, molecular recognition, and enzyme catalysis and conclude by exploring overarching themes and unresolved questions regarding unconventional interactions in biomolecular structure. PMID:23048026

  9. Hydrogen bond-promoted metallic state in a purely organic single-component conductor under pressure.

    PubMed

    Isono, Takayuki; Kamo, Hiromichi; Ueda, Akira; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Nakao, Akiko; Kumai, Reiji; Nakao, Hironori; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Murakami, Youichi; Mori, Hatsumi

    2013-01-01

    Purely organic materials are generally insulating. Some charge-carrier generation, however, can provide them with electrical conductivity. In multi-component organic systems, carrier generation by intermolecular charge transfer has given many molecular metals. By contrast, in purely organic single-component systems, metallic states have rarely been realized although some neutral-radical semiconductors have been reported. Here we uncover a new type of purely organic single-component molecular conductor by utilizing strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between tetrathiafulvalene-based electron-donor molecules. These conductors are composed of highly symmetric molecular units constructed by the strong intra-unit hydrogen bond. Moreover, we demonstrate that, in this system, charge carriers are produced by the partial oxidation of the donor molecules and delocalized through the formation of the symmetric intra-unit hydrogen bonds. As a result, our conductors show the highest room-temperature electrical conductivity and the metallic state under the lowest physical pressure among the purely organic single-component systems, to our knowledge.

  10. High-fidelity self-assembly pathways for hydrogen-bonding molecular semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xu; Suzuki, Mika; Gushiken, Marina; Yamauchi, Mitsuaki; Karatsu, Takashi; Kizaki, Takahiro; Tani, Yuki; Nakayama, Ken-Ichi; Suzuki, Mitsuharu; Yamada, Hiroko; Kajitani, Takashi; Fukushima, Takanori; Kikkawa, Yoshihiro; Yagai, Shiki

    2017-02-22

    The design of molecular systems with high-fidelity self-assembly pathways that include several levels of hierarchy is of primary importance for the understanding of structure-function relationships, as well as for controlling the functionality of organic materials. Reported herein is a high-fidelity self-assembly system that comprises two hydrogen-bonding molecular semiconductors with regioisomerically attached short alkyl chains. Despite the availability of both discrete cyclic and polymeric linear hydrogen-bonding motifs, the two regioisomers select one of the two motifs in homogeneous solution as well as at the 2D-confined liquid-solid interface. This selectivity arises from the high directionality of the involved hydrogen-bonding interactions, which renders rerouting to other self-assembly pathways difficult. In thin films and in the bulk, the resulting hydrogen-bonded assemblies further organize into the expected columnar and lamellar higher-order architectures via solution processing. The contrasting organized structures of these regioisomers are reflected in their notably different miscibility with soluble fullerene derivatives in the solid state. Thus, electron donor-acceptor blend films deliver a distinctly different photovoltaic performance, despite their virtually identical intrinsic optoelectronic properties. Currently, we attribute this high-fidelity control via self-assembly pathways to the molecular design of these supramolecular semiconductors, which lacks structure-determining long aliphatic chains.

  11. High-fidelity self-assembly pathways for hydrogen-bonding molecular semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xu; Suzuki, Mika; Gushiken, Marina; Yamauchi, Mitsuaki; Karatsu, Takashi; Kizaki, Takahiro; Tani, Yuki; Nakayama, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Mitsuharu; Yamada, Hiroko; Kajitani, Takashi; Fukushima, Takanori; Kikkawa, Yoshihiro; Yagai, Shiki

    2017-01-01

    The design of molecular systems with high-fidelity self-assembly pathways that include several levels of hierarchy is of primary importance for the understanding of structure-function relationships, as well as for controlling the functionality of organic materials. Reported herein is a high-fidelity self-assembly system that comprises two hydrogen-bonding molecular semiconductors with regioisomerically attached short alkyl chains. Despite the availability of both discrete cyclic and polymeric linear hydrogen-bonding motifs, the two regioisomers select one of the two motifs in homogeneous solution as well as at the 2D-confined liquid-solid interface. This selectivity arises from the high directionality of the involved hydrogen-bonding interactions, which renders rerouting to other self-assembly pathways difficult. In thin films and in the bulk, the resulting hydrogen-bonded assemblies further organize into the expected columnar and lamellar higher-order architectures via solution processing. The contrasting organized structures of these regioisomers are reflected in their notably different miscibility with soluble fullerene derivatives in the solid state. Thus, electron donor-acceptor blend films deliver a distinctly different photovoltaic performance, despite their virtually identical intrinsic optoelectronic properties. Currently, we attribute this high-fidelity control via self-assembly pathways to the molecular design of these supramolecular semiconductors, which lacks structure-determining long aliphatic chains. PMID:28225029

  12. On the potential role of the amino nitrogen atom as a hydrogen bond acceptor in macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Luisi, B; Orozco, M; Sponer, J; Luque, F J; Shakked, Z

    1998-06-26

    Crystallographic studies of duplex DNA have indicated that opposing exocyclic amino groups may form close NH⋯:N contacts. To study the nature of such interactions, we have examined the database of small molecule, high-resolution crystal structures for more accurate examples of this type of unconventional interaction. We have found cases where the amino groups in guanine and adenine bases accept hydrogen bonds from conventional donors, such as amino or hydroxyl groups. More frequently, the purine amino group was found to contact closely electropositive C-H groups. Searches of the nucleic acid structural databases also yielded several examples where the purine amino group is contacted by hydrogen bond donors in macromolecules. Ab initio calculations indicate that the hydrogen-amino contact is improved energetically when the amino group moves from the conventional geometry, where all atoms are co-planar with the base, to one in which the hydrogen atoms lie out of the plane and the nitrogen is at the apex of a pyramid, resulting in polarization of the amino group. The combined structural and theoretical data suggest that the amino group is flexible, and can accommodate close contacts, because the resulting polarization permits electropositive atoms to approach the amino group nitrogen more closely than expected for their conventional van der Waals radii. The flexibility of the amino group may permit particular DNA conformations that enforce hydrogen-amino contacts to optimize favorable stacking interactions, and it may play a role in the recognition of nucleosides. We speculate that the amino group can accept hydrogen bonds under special circumstances in macromolecules, and that this ability might play a mechanistic role in catalytic processes such as deamination or amino transfer.

  13. Hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Chun-Qi; Li, Wen-Jie; Du, Ying-Ying; Chen, Guang-Hua; Chen, Zheng; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian

    2015-09-15

    We have studied the hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids. Inter-molecular interaction is analyzed theoretically for the well-defined monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) structure. The results indicate that PC{sub 61}BM combines into C–H⋯O{sub d} bonded molecular chains, where O{sub d} denotes the doubly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. The molecular chains are linked together by C–H⋯O{sub s} bonds, where O{sub s} denotes the singly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. To reveal the consequences of hydrogen bond formation on the structural properties of PC{sub 61}BM solids (not limited to the monoclinic structure), we design and perform some experiments for annealed samples with the monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) PC{sub 61}BM as starting material. The experiments include differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption measurements. Structural phase transitions are observed below the melting point. The C–H⋯O{sub d} bonds seem persisting in the altered structures. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonds can help to understand the phase separation in polymer/PC{sub 61}BM blends and may be responsible for the existence of liquid PC{sub 61}BM.

  14. Physical meaning of the QTAIM topological parameters in hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Darío J R; Angelina, Emilio L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2014-11-01

    This work examined the local topological parameters of charge density at the hydrogen bond (H-bond) critical points of a set of substituted formamide cyclic dimers and enolic tautomers. The analysis was performed not only on the total electron density of the hydrogen bonded complexes but also on the intermediate electron density differences derived from the Morokuma energy decomposition scheme. Through the connection between these intermediate electron density differences and the corresponding differences in topological parameters, the meaning of topological parameters variation due to hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) becomes evident. Thus, for example, we show in a plausible way that the potential energy density differences at the H-bond critical point properly describe the electrostatics of H-bonding, and local kinetic energy density differences account for the localization/delocalization degree of the electrons at that point. The results also support the idea that the total electronic energy density differences at the H-bond critical point describe the strength of the interaction rather than its covalent character as is commonly considered.

  15. Discrete and polymeric self-assembled dendrimers: hydrogen bond-mediated assembly with high stability and high fidelity.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Perry S; Lawless, Laurence J; Li, Zhanting; Ma, Yuguo; Witmer, Melissa J; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2002-04-16

    Hydrogen bond-mediated self-assembly is a powerful strategy for creating nanoscale structures. However, little is known about the fidelity of assembly processes that must occur when similar and potentially competing hydrogen-bonding motifs are present. Furthermore, there is a continuing need for new modules and strategies that can amplify the relatively weak strength of a hydrogen bond to give more stable assemblies. Herein we report quantitative complexation studies on a ureidodeazapterin-based module revealing an unprecedented stability for dimers of its self-complementary acceptor-acceptor-donor-donor (AADD) array. Linking two such units together with a semirigid spacer that carries a first-, second-, or third-generation Fréchet-type dendron affords a ditopic structure programmed to self assemble. The specific structure that is formed depends both on the size of the dendron and the solvent, but all of the assemblies have exceptionally high stability. The largest discrete nanoscale assembly is a hexamer with a molecular mass of about 17.8 kDa. It is stabilized by 30 hydrogen bonds, including six AADD x DDAA contacts. The hexamer forms and is indefinitely stable in the presence of a hexamer containing six ADD x DAA hydrogen-bonding arrays.

  16. Discrete and polymeric self-assembled dendrimers: Hydrogen bond-mediated assembly with high stability and high fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Perry S.; Lawless, Laurence J.; Li, Zhanting; Ma, Yuguo; Witmer, Melissa J.; Zimmerman, Steven C.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen bond-mediated self-assembly is a powerful strategy for creating nanoscale structures. However, little is known about the fidelity of assembly processes that must occur when similar and potentially competing hydrogen-bonding motifs are present. Furthermore, there is a continuing need for new modules and strategies that can amplify the relatively weak strength of a hydrogen bond to give more stable assemblies. Herein we report quantitative complexation studies on a ureidodeazapterin-based module revealing an unprecedented stability for dimers of its self-complementary acceptoracceptor-donor-donor (AADD) array. Linking two such units together with a semirigid spacer that carries a first-, second-, or third-generation Fréchet-type dendron affords a ditopic structure programmed to self assemble. The specific structure that is formed depends both on the size of the dendron and the solvent, but all of the assemblies have exceptionally high stability. The largest discrete nanoscale assembly is a hexamer with a molecular mass of about 17.8 kDa. It is stabilized by 30 hydrogen bonds, including six AADD⋅DDAA contacts. The hexamer forms and is indefinitely stable in the presence of a hexamer containing six ADD⋅DAA hydrogen-bonding arrays. PMID:11917113

  17. How Cellulose Stretches: Synergism between Covalent and Hydrogen Bonding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose is the most familiar and most abundant strong biopolymer, but the reasons for its outstanding mechanical performance are not well understood. Each glucose unit in a cellulose chain is joined to the next by a covalent C–O–C linkage flanked by two hydrogen bonds. This geometry suggests some form of cooperativity between covalent and hydrogen bonding. Using infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that mechanical tension straightens out the zigzag conformation of the cellulose chain, with each glucose unit pivoting around a fulcrum at either end. Straightening the chain leads to a small increase in its length and is resisted by one of the flanking hydrogen bonds. This constitutes a simple form of molecular leverage with the covalent structure providing the fulcrum and gives the hydrogen bond an unexpectedly amplified effect on the tensile stiffness of the chain. The principle of molecular leverage can be directly applied to certain other carbohydrate polymers, including the animal polysaccharide chitin. Related but more complex effects are possible in some proteins and nucleic acids. The stiffening of cellulose by this mechanism is, however, in complete contrast to the way in which hydrogen bonding provides toughness combined with extensibility in protein materials like spider silk. PMID:24568640

  18. How cellulose stretches: synergism between covalent and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Altaner, Clemens M; Thomas, Lynne H; Fernandes, Anwesha N; Jarvis, Michael C

    2014-03-10

    Cellulose is the most familiar and most abundant strong biopolymer, but the reasons for its outstanding mechanical performance are not well understood. Each glucose unit in a cellulose chain is joined to the next by a covalent C-O-C linkage flanked by two hydrogen bonds. This geometry suggests some form of cooperativity between covalent and hydrogen bonding. Using infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that mechanical tension straightens out the zigzag conformation of the cellulose chain, with each glucose unit pivoting around a fulcrum at either end. Straightening the chain leads to a small increase in its length and is resisted by one of the flanking hydrogen bonds. This constitutes a simple form of molecular leverage with the covalent structure providing the fulcrum and gives the hydrogen bond an unexpectedly amplified effect on the tensile stiffness of the chain. The principle of molecular leverage can be directly applied to certain other carbohydrate polymers, including the animal polysaccharide chitin. Related but more complex effects are possible in some proteins and nucleic acids. The stiffening of cellulose by this mechanism is, however, in complete contrast to the way in which hydrogen bonding provides toughness combined with extensibility in protein materials like spider silk.

  19. Mapping the force field of a hydrogen-bonded assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, A. M.; Jarvis, S. P.; Sang, Hongqian; Lekkas, I.; Rahe, P.; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jianbo; Champness, N. R.; Kantorovich, L.; Moriarty, P.

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen bonding underpins the properties of a vast array of systems spanning a wide variety of scientific fields. From the elegance of base pair interactions in DNA to the symmetry of extended supramolecular assemblies, hydrogen bonds play an essential role in directing intermolecular forces. Yet fundamental aspects of the hydrogen bond continue to be vigorously debated. Here we use dynamic force microscopy (DFM) to quantitatively map the tip-sample force field for naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimide molecules hydrogen-bonded in two-dimensional assemblies. A comparison of experimental images and force spectra with their simulated counterparts shows that intermolecular contrast arises from repulsive tip-sample interactions whose interpretation can be aided via an examination of charge density depletion across the molecular system. Interpreting DFM images of hydrogen-bonded systems therefore necessitates detailed consideration of the coupled tip-molecule system: analyses based on intermolecular charge density in the absence of the tip fail to capture the essential physical chemistry underpinning the imaging mechanism.

  20. Non-conventional hydrogen bonds: pterins-metal anions.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rubicelia; Martínez, Ana

    2011-07-28

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the interaction of metal ions (Cu, Ag and Au) with three different pterins (pterin, isoxanthopterin and sepiapterin) to provide insights concerning the formation of conventional and non-conventional H bonds. Density functional theory calculations were performed in order to reveal the optimized structures of pterin molecules, dimers and tetramers compounds, both with and without metal anions (M). The interaction with small metal clusters (M(3)) is also considered. The formation of different systems is characterized in terms of the structural parameters and hydrogen binding energies (HBE). The HBE values for pterin-M systems presented in this study lie between 22 and 60 kcal mol(-1) and can therefore be classified as strong conventional and strong non-conventional hydrogen bonds. The HBE with small metal clusters (pterin-M(3)) are smaller than the HBE with metal atoms. Vertical electron detachment energies (VEDEs) are also reported in order to analyze the influence of the hydrogen bond on electronic properties. A direct correlation between VEDEs and HBE was found for pterin-M and pterin-M(3) complexes; i.e. as the VEDEs increase, the HBE also augment. The only exception is with Ag(3). The main conclusion derived from this study is that the strong non-conventional hydrogen bonds formed between pterins, dimers and tetramers do not affect the formation of conventional hydrogen bonds between pterins but they do influence the VEDEs. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  1. Formation of C–C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Bower, John F.; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of C–C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C–C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile–nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C–H bonds. PMID:21822399

  2. Probing the nature of hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yirong

    2006-07-01

    Energy decomposition analyses based on the block-localized wave-function (BLW-ED) method are conducted to explore the nature of the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs in terms of deformation, Heitler-London, polarization, electron-transfer and dispersion-energy terms, where the Heitler-London energy term is composed of electrostatic and Pauli-exchange interactions. A modest electron-transfer effect is found in the Watson-Crick adenine-thymine (AT), guanine-cytosine (GC) and Hoogsteen adenine-thymine (H-AT) pairs, confirming the weak covalence in the hydrogen bonds. The electrostatic attraction and polarization effects account for most of the binding energies, particularly in the GC pair. Both theoretical and experimental data show that the GC pair has a binding energy (-25.4 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2/6-31G** level) twice that of the AT (-12.4 kcal mol(-1)) and H-AT (-12.8 kcal mol(-1)) pairs, compared with three conventional N-H...O(N) hydrogen bonds in the GC pair and two in the AT or H-AT pair. Although the remarkably strong binding between the guanine and cytosine bases benefits from the opposite orientations of the dipole moments in these two bases assisted by the pi-electron delocalization from the amine groups to the carbonyl groups, model calculations demonstrate that pi-resonance has very limited influence on the covalence of the hydrogen bonds. Thus, the often adopted terminology "resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RHAB)" may be replaced with "resonance-assisted binding" which highlights the electrostatic rather than electron-transfer nature of the enhanced stabilization, as hydrogen bonds are usually regarded as weak covalent bonds.

  3. Vibrational states and optical transitions in hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannsen, P. G.

    1998-03-01

    Proton energies in hydrogen bonds are mostly calculated using a double Morse potential (the DMP model). This form, however, does not reproduce the experimentally observed correlation between the proton stretching frequency and the bond length in an extended bond-length region sufficiently well. An alternative potential is proposed in the present paper. The quantum states of this non-symmetric double-well potential are calculated numerically using the Numerov (Fox-Goodwin) algorithm. It is shown that the optical spectra of hydrogen bonds in various substances can be well approximated on the basis of the transition frequencies and intensities predicted by the present model. For weakly interacting OH impurities in 0953-8984/10/10/008/img1, the overtone spectrum and line intensities are well reproduced, whereas the line broadenings and the decrease of the fundamental stretching frequencies in intermediate and strong hydrogen bonds are traced back to the influence of the reduced height of the central barrier. The model is also extrapolated to the range of symmetric hydrogen bonds, and the calculated transition frequencies are discussed with respect to most recent infra-red experiments on ice under strong compression. A possible artificial infra-red signal from strained diamond anvils is thereby noted.

  4. Organocatalysis by Networks of Cooperative Hydrogen Bonds: Enantioselective Direct Mannich Addition to Preformed Arylideneureas.

    PubMed

    Lillo, Victor J; Mansilla, Javier; Saá, José M

    2016-03-18

    The concept of noncovalent organocatalysis by means of networks of cooperative hydrogen bonds (NCHB organocatalysis) has been explored. Arylideneureas were chosen as ideal substrates because of their powerful donor-acceptor properties. We have examined their uncatalyzed, direct Mannich reaction with acetoacetates in comparison with that catalyzed by a number of salan derivatives capable of providing a network of cooperative hydrogen bonds. Catalyst D [(R,R)-N,N'-bis(salicyl)cyclohexane-1,2-diamine] was found to drive the above direct Mannich reaction in an enantioselective manner, thereby allowing the synthesis of several Biginelli dihydropyrimidinones with high enantioselectivity. DFT calculations (B3LYP-D-PCM/6-31+G*//B3LYP/6-31+G*) revealed that the NCHB organocatalyst lowers the energy barrier of the reaction. The NCHB organocatalysts appear to function as biomimetic catalysts. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The two faces of hydrogen-bond strength on triple AAA-DDD arrays.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alfredo Henrique Duarte; Caramori, Giovanni Finoto; Coimbra, Daniel Fernando; Parreira, Renato Luis Tame; da Silva, Éder Henrique

    2013-12-02

    Systems that are connected through multiple hydrogen bonds are the cornerstone of molecular recognition processes in biology, and they are increasingly being employed in supramolecular chemistry, specifically in molecular self-assembly processes. For this reason, the effects of different substituents (NO2, CN, F, Cl, Br, OCH3 and NH2) on the electronic structure, and consequently on the magnitude of hydrogen bonds in triple AAA-DDD arrays (A=acceptor, D=donor) were evaluated in the light of topological [electron localization function (ELF) and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM)], energetic [Su-Li energy-decomposition analysis (EDA) and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO)], and geometrical analysis. The results based on local H-bond descriptors (geometries, QTAIM, ELF, and NBO) indicate that substitutions with electron-withdrawing groups on the AAA module tend to strengthen, whereas electron-donating substituents tend to weaken the covalent character of the AAA-DDD intermolecular H-bonds, and also indicate that the magnitude of the effect is dependent on the position of substitution. In contrast, Su-Li EDA results show an opposite behavior when compared to local H-bond descriptors, indicating that electron-donating substituents tend to increase the magnitude of H-bonds in AAA-DDD arrays, and thus suggesting that the use of local H-bond descriptors describes the nature of H bonds only partially, not providing enough insight about the strength of such H bonds. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Hydrogen bond radii for the hydrogen halides and van der Waals radius of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pankaj K.; Arunan, E.

    2001-03-01

    In this article, the effective size of hydrogen in the hydrogen halides forming hydrogen bonded complexes is estimated. The scheme proposed by Bhadane and Gadre [J. Chem. Phys. 107, 5625 (1997)] for estimating the size of hydrogen in HF is extended to the other hydrogen halides (HCl and HBr) and HCN. It is noted that the radius of H atom in HF, HCl, HBr, and HCN are, respectively, 0.55±0.07, 0.74±0.08, 0.80±0.11, and 0.93±0.07 Å. The radii found for HF, HCl, and HBr show a strong inverse correlation with the dipole moment of the HX. From this correlation the radius of H atom in HI is estimated to be 0.90±0.11 Å. By extrapolating to zero dipole moment, the van der Waals radius of H atom is determined to be 1.0±0.1 Å, reasonably close to the value proposed by Pauling, 1.2 Å.

  7. Effect of hydrogen bonding on the infrared absorption intensity of OH stretch vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2017-05-01

    We consider how the infrared intensity of a hydrogen-bonded OH stretch varies from weak to strong H-bonds using a theoretical model. We obtain trends for the fundamental and overtone transition intensities as a function of the donor-acceptor distance, a common measure of H-bond strength. Building upon our earlier work using a two-diabatic state model, we introduce a Mecke function-based dipole moment for the H-bond and calculate transition moments using one-dimensional vibrational eigenstates along the H-atom transfer coordinate. The fundamental intensity is found to be over 20-fold enhanced for strong H-bonds, where non-Condon effects are significant. We analyse isotope effects, including the secondary geometric isotope effect. The first overtone intensity varies non-monotonically with H-bond strength; suppression occurs for weak bonds but strong enhancements are possible for strong H-bonds. We also study how these trends are affected by Mecke parameter variations. For a few specific dimers, we compare our results with earlier works.

  8. Examining student heuristic usage in a hydrogen bonding assessment.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kathryn; Kim, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the role of representational competence in student responses to an assessment of hydrogen bonding. The assessment couples the use of a multiple-select item ("Choose all that apply") with an open-ended item to allow for an examination of students' cognitive processes as they relate to the assignment of hydrogen bonding within a structural representation. Response patterns from the multiple-select item implicate heuristic usage as a contributing factor to students' incorrect responses. The use of heuristics is further supported by the students' corresponding responses to the open-ended assessment item. Taken together, these data suggest that poor representational competence may contribute to students' previously observed inability to correctly navigate the concept of hydrogen bonding. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):411-416, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Hydrogen bond interactions between acetone and supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Tertius L; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2010-07-07

    Hydrogen bond interactions between acetone and supercritical water are investigated using a combined and sequential Monte Carlo/quantum mechanics (S-MC/QM) approach. Simulation results show a dominant presence of configurations with one hydrogen bond for different supercritical states, indicating that this specific interaction plays an important role on the solvation properties of acetone in supercritical water. Using QM MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ the calculated average interaction energy reveals that the hydrogen-bonded acetone-water complex is energetically more stable under supercritical conditions than ambient conditions and its stability is little affected by variations of temperature and/or pressure. All average results reported here are statistically converged.

  10. Insufficiently dehydrated hydrogen bonds as determinants of protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ariel; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of binding sites and the understanding of interfaces associated with protein complexation remains an open problem in molecular biophysics. This work shows that a crucial factor in predicting and rationalizing protein–protein interfaces can be inferred by assessing the extent of intramolecular desolvation of backbone hydrogen bonds in monomeric structures. Our statistical analysis of native structures shows that, in the majority of soluble proteins, most backbone hydrogen bonds are thoroughly wrapped intramolecularly by nonpolar groups except for a few ones. These latter underwrapped hydrogen bonds may be dramatically stabilized by removal of water. This fact implies that packing defects are “sticky” in a way that decisively contributes to determining the binding sites for proteins, as an examination of numerous complexes demonstrates. PMID:12518060

  11. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    PubMed Central

    Habermann, S. M.; Murphy, K. P.

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-amide hydrogen bond is about twice that of the amide-hydroxyl. Additionally, the interaction of the hydroxyl group with water is seen most readily in its contributions to entropy and heat capacity changes. Surprisingly, the hydroxyl group shows weakly hydrophobic behavior in terms of these contributions. These results can be used to understand the effects of mutations on the stability of globular proteins. PMID:8819156

  12. Dynamical Crossover in Hot Dense Water: The Hydrogen Bond Role.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Umbertoluca; Giura, Paola; Gorelli, Federico A; Santoro, Mario; Klotz, Stefan; Gillet, Philippe; Paolasini, Luigi; Koza, Michael Marek; Bove, Livia E

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the terahertz dynamics of liquid H2O as a function of pressure along the 450 K isotherm, by coupled quasielastic neutron scattering and inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. The pressure dependence of the single-molecule dynamics is anomalous in terms of both microscopic translation and rotation. In particular, the Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations are shown to be violated in hot water compressed to the GPa regime. The dynamics of the hydrogen bond network is only weakly affected by the pressure variation. The time scale of the structural relaxation driving the collective dynamics increases by a mere factor of 2 along the investigated isotherm, and the structural relaxation strength turns out to be almost pressure independent. Our results point at the persistence of the hydrogen bond network in hot dense water up to ice VII crystallization, thus questioning the long-standing perception that hydrogen bonds are broken in liquid water under the effect of compression.

  13. Shifting hydrogen bonds may produce flexible transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Bowie, James U

    2012-05-22

    The intricate functions of membrane proteins would not be possible without bends or breaks that are remarkably common in transmembrane helices. The frequent helix distortions are nevertheless surprising because backbone hydrogen bonds should be strong in an apolar membrane, potentially rigidifying helices. It is therefore mysterious how distortions can be generated by the evolutionary currency of random point mutations. Here we show that we can engineer a transition between distinct distorted helix conformations in bacteriorhodopsin with a single-point mutation. Moreover, we estimate the energetic cost of the conformational transitions to be smaller than 1 kcal/mol. We propose that the low energy of distortion is explained in part by the shifting of backbone hydrogen bonding partners. Consistent with this view, extensive backbone hydrogen bond shifts occur during helix conformational changes that accompany functional cycles. Our results explain how evolution has been able to liberally exploit transmembrane helix bending for the optimization of membrane protein structure, function, and dynamics.

  14. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-02

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  15. Hydrogen bond docking site competition in methyl esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hailiang; Tang, Shanshan; Du, Lin

    2017-06-01

    The Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonds in the 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-methyl ester complexes in the gas phase have been investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Methyl formate (MF), methyl acetate (MA), and methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) were chosen as the hydrogen bond acceptors. A dominant inter-molecular hydrogen bond was formed between the OH group of TFE and different docking sites in the methyl esters (carbonyl oxygen or ester oxygen). The competition of the two docking sites decides the structure and spectral properties of the complexes. On the basis of the observed red shifts of the OH-stretching transition with respect to the TFE monomer, the order of the hydrogen bond strength can be sorted as TFE-MA (119 cm- 1) > TFE-MF (93 cm- 1) > TFE-MTFA (44 cm- 1). Combining the experimental infrared spectra with the DFT calculations, the Gibbs free energies of formation were determined to be 1.5, 4.5 and 8.6 kJ mol- 1 for TFE-MA, TFE-MF and TFE-MTFA, respectively. The hydrogen bonding in the MTFA complex is much weaker than those of the TFE-MA and TFE-MF complexes due to the effect of the CF3 substitution on MTFA, while the replacement of an H atom with a CH3 group in methyl ester only slightly increases the hydrogen bond strength. Topological analysis and localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis was also applied to compare the interactions in the complexes.

  16. Hydrogen bond docking site competition in methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailiang; Tang, Shanshan; Du, Lin

    2017-06-15

    The OH⋯O hydrogen bonds in the 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-methyl ester complexes in the gas phase have been investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Methyl formate (MF), methyl acetate (MA), and methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) were chosen as the hydrogen bond acceptors. A dominant inter-molecular hydrogen bond was formed between the OH group of TFE and different docking sites in the methyl esters (carbonyl oxygen or ester oxygen). The competition of the two docking sites decides the structure and spectral properties of the complexes. On the basis of the observed red shifts of the OH-stretching transition with respect to the TFE monomer, the order of the hydrogen bond strength can be sorted as TFE-MA (119cm(-1))>TFE-MF (93cm(-1))>TFE-MTFA (44cm(-1)). Combining the experimental infrared spectra with the DFT calculations, the Gibbs free energies of formation were determined to be 1.5, 4.5 and 8.6kJmol(-1) for TFE-MA, TFE-MF and TFE-MTFA, respectively. The hydrogen bonding in the MTFA complex is much weaker than those of the TFE-MA and TFE-MF complexes due to the effect of the CF3 substitution on MTFA, while the replacement of an H atom with a CH3 group in methyl ester only slightly increases the hydrogen bond strength. Topological analysis and localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis was also applied to compare the interactions in the complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Light-induced hydrogen evolution from hydrogenated amorphous silicon: Hydrogen diffusion by formation of bond centered hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, H.; Arai, H.; Mizubayashi, H.; Yamanaka, M.; Sakata, I.

    2014-02-01

    The light-induced hydrogen evolution (LIHE) from amorphous (a-) Si:H by the order of at. % is observed during white light soaking (WLS) of 100-400 mW/cm2 at 350-500 K or ultra violet light soaking (UVLS) of 30-120 mW/cm2 at 305-320 K in a vacuum. The thermal desorption spectroscopy indicates that LIHE originated from bonded hydrogen takes place through the diffusion of light-induced mobile hydrogen (LIMH) with the activation energy of 0.5 eV. LIMH is assigned to bond centered hydrogen and the hydrogen diffusion process becomes prominent when LIMH can leave from a-Si:H such under light soaking in a vacuum above room temperature. For H2 in microvoids, the hydrogen evolution rate is governed by the surface barrier and its activation energy of 1.0 eV in dark decreases to 0.4 eV under WLS or UVLS.

  18. Hydrogen bonding at the water surface revealed by isotopic dilution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stiopkin, Igor V; Weeraman, Champika; Pieniazek, Piotr A; Shalhout, Fadel Y; Skinner, James L; Benderskii, Alexander V

    2011-06-08

    The air-water interface is perhaps the most common liquid interface. It covers more than 70 per cent of the Earth's surface and strongly affects atmospheric, aerosol and environmental chemistry. The air-water interface has also attracted much interest as a model system that allows rigorous tests of theory, with one fundamental question being just how thin it is. Theoretical studies have suggested a surprisingly short 'healing length' of about 3 ångströms (1 Å = 0.1 nm), with the bulk-phase properties of water recovered within the top few monolayers. However, direct experimental evidence has been elusive owing to the difficulty of depth-profiling the liquid surface on the ångström scale. Most physical, chemical and biological properties of water, such as viscosity, solvation, wetting and the hydrophobic effect, are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. This can be probed by observing the lineshape of the OH-stretch mode, the frequency shift of which is related to the hydrogen-bond strength. Here we report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the air-water interface using surface-selective heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy to focus on the 'free OD' transition found only in the topmost water layer. By using deuterated water and isotopic dilution to reveal the vibrational coupling mechanism, we find that the free OD stretch is affected only by intramolecular coupling to the stretching of the other OD group on the same molecule. The other OD stretch frequency indicates the strength of one of the first hydrogen bonds encountered at the surface; this is the donor hydrogen bond of the water molecule straddling the interface, which we find to be only slightly weaker than bulk-phase water hydrogen bonds. We infer from this observation a remarkably fast onset of bulk-phase behaviour on crossing from the air into the water phase.

  19. Anion Binding in Metal-Organic Frameworks Functionalized with Urea Hydrogen-Bonding Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2006-01-01

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups has been synthesized and structurally analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to evaluate the efficacy of anion coordination by urea within the structural constraints of the MOFs. We found that urea-based functionalities may be used for anion binding within metal-organic frameworks when the tendency for urea{hor_ellipsis}urea self-association is decreased by strengthening the intramolecular CH{hor_ellipsis}O hydrogen bonding of N-phenyl substituents to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Theoretical calculations indicate that N,N'-bis(m-pyridyl)urea (BPU) and N,N'-bis(m-cyanophenyl)urea (BCPU) should have enhanced hydrogen-bonding donor abilities toward anions and decreased tendencies to self-associate into hydrogen-bonded tapes compared to other disubstituted ureas. Accordingly, BPU and BCPU were incorporated in MOFs as linkers through coordination of various Zn, Cu, and Ag transition metal salts, including Zn(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, ZnSO{sub 4}, Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, Cu(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2}, AgNO{sub 3}, and AgSO{sub 3}CH{sub 3}. Structural analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that these linkers are versatile anion binders, capable of chelate hydrogen bonding to all of the oxoanions explored. Anion coordination by the urea functionalities was found to successfully compete with urea self-association in all cases except for that of charge-diffuse perchlorate.

  20. Hydrogen Bonds and Vibrations of Water on (110) Rutile

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nitin; Neogi, Sanghamitra; Kent, Paul R; Bandura, Andrei V.; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Sofo, Jorge O.

    2009-01-01

    We study the relation between hydrogen bonding and the vibrational frequency spectra of water on the (110) surface of rutile (α-TiO2) with three structural layers of adsorbed water. Using ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations at 280, 300 and 320K, we find strong, crystallographically-controlled adsorption sites, in general agreement with synchrotron X-ray and classical MD simulations. We demonstrate that these sites are produced by strong hydrogen bonds formed between the surface oxygen atoms and sorbed water molecules. The strength of these bonds is manifested by substantial broadening of the stretching mode vibrational band. The overall vibrational spectrum obtained from our simulations is in good agreement with inelastic neutron scattering experiments. We correlate the vibrational spectrum with different bonds at the surface in order to transform these vibrational measurements into a spectroscopy of surface interactions.

  1. Estimating the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in chitosan oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, G. P.; Lazarev, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The effect the number of chitosan monomer units CTS n ( n = 1-5), the protonation of chitosan dimers, and the interaction between CTS n ( n = 1-3) and acetate ions have on the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds is investigated by means of QTAIM analysis and solving the vibrational problem within the cluster-continuum model. It is established that the number of H-bonds in CTS n is 2 n - 1 and the total energy of H-bonds grows by ~20 kJ/mol. It is concluded that the hydrogen bonds between CTS and acetate ions play a major role in the stabilization of polyelectrolyte complexes in dilute acetic acid solutions of CTS.

  2. Interdigitated hydrogen bonds: electrophile activation for covalent capture and fluorescence turn-on detection of cyanide.

    PubMed

    Jo, Junyong; Olasz, András; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Lee, Dongwhan

    2013-03-06

    Hydrogen-bonding promoted covalent modifications are finding useful applications in small-molecule chemical synthesis and detection. We have designed a xanthene-based fluorescent probe 1, in which tightly held acylguanidine and aldehyde groups engage in multiple intramolecular hydrogen bonds within the concave side of the molecule. Such an interdigitated hydrogen bond donor-acceptor (HBD-HBA) array imposes significant energy barriers (ΔG(‡) = 10-16 kcal mol(-1)) for internal bond rotations to assist structural preorganization and effectively polarizes the electrophilic carbonyl group toward a nucleophilic attack by CN(-) in aqueous environment. This covalent modification redirects the de-excitation pathways of the cyanohydrin adduct 2 to elicit a large (>7-fold) enhancement in the fluorescence intensity at λmax = 440 nm. A remarkably faster (> 60-fold) response kinetics of 1, relative to its N-substituted (and therefore "loosely held") analogue 9, provided compelling experimental evidence for the functional role of HBD-HBA interactions in the "remote" control of chemical reactivity, the electronic and steric origins of which were investigated by DFT computational and X-ray crystallographic studies.

  3. Activation of the glmS Ribozyme Nucleophile via Overdetermined Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Bingaman, Jamie L; Gonzalez, Inanllely Y; Wang, Bo; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2017-08-22

    RNA enzymes, or ribozymes, catalyze internal phosphodiester bond cleavage using diverse catalytic strategies. These include the four classic strategies: in-line nucleophilic attack, deprotonation of the 2'-OH nucleophile, protonation of the 5'-O leaving group, and stabilization of developing charge on the nonbridging oxygen atoms of the scissile phosphate. In addition, we recently identified two additional ribozyme strategies: acidification of the 2'-OH and release of the 2'-OH from inhibitory interactions. Herein, we report inverse thio effects in the presence of glmS ribozyme variants and a 1-deoxyglucosamine 6-phosphate cofactor analogue and demonstrate that activation of the 2'-OH nucleophile is promoted by competitive hydrogen bonding among diverse ribozyme moieties for the pro-RP nonbridging oxygen. We conclude that the glmS ribozyme uses an overdetermined set of competing hydrogen bond donors in its active site to ensure potent activation and regulation by the cofactor. Nucleophile activation through competitive, overdetermined hydrogen bonding could be a general strategy for ribozyme activation and may be applicable for controlling the function of ribozymes and riboswitches in the laboratory.

  4. A statistical model of hydrogen bond networks in liquid alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillrén, Per; Bielecki, Johan; Mattsson, Johan; Börjesson, Lars; Matic, Aleksandar

    2012-03-01

    We here present a statistical model of hydrogen bond induced network structures in liquid alcohols. The model generalises the Andersson-Schulz-Flory chain model to allow also for branched structures. Two bonding probabilities are assigned to each hydroxyl group oxygen, where the first is the probability of a lone pair accepting an H-bond and the second is the probability that given this bond also the second lone pair is bonded. The average hydroxyl group cluster size, cluster size distribution, and the number of branches and leaves in the tree-like network clusters are directly determined from these probabilities. The applicability of the model is tested by comparison to cluster size distributions and bonding probabilities obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of the monoalcohols methanol, propanol, butanol, and propylene glycol monomethyl ether, the di-alcohol propylene glycol, and the tri-alcohol glycerol. We find that the tree model can reproduce the cluster size distributions and the bonding probabilities for both mono- and poly-alcohols, showing the branched nature of the OH-clusters in these liquids. Thus, this statistical model is a useful tool to better understand the structure of network forming hydrogen bonded liquids. The model can be applied to experimental data, allowing the topology of the clusters to be determined from such studies.

  5. Versatile and Resilient Hydrogen-Bonded Host Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Takuji; Ward, Michael D

    2016-12-20

    Low-density molecular host frameworks, whether equipped with persistent molecular-scale pores or virtual pores that are sustainable only when occupied by guest molecules, have emerged as a promising class of materials owing to the ability to tailor the size, geometry, and chemical character of their free space through the versatility of organic synthesis. As such, molecular frameworks are promising candidates for storage, separations of commodity and fine chemicals, heterogeneous catalysis, and optical and electronic materials. Frameworks assembled through hydrogen bonds, though generally not stable toward collapse in the absence of guests, promise significant chemical and structural diversity, with pores that can be tailored for a wide range of guest molecules. The utility of these frameworks, however, depends on the resilience of n-dimensional hydrogen-bonded motifs that serve as reliable building blocks so that the molecular constituents can be manipulated without disruption of the anticipated global solid-state architecture. Though many hydrogen-bonded frameworks have been reported, few exist that are amenable to systematic modification, thus limiting the design of functional materials. This Account reviews discoveries in our laboratory during the past decade related to a series of host frameworks based on guanidinium cations and interchangeable organosulfonate anions, in which the 3-fold symmetry and hydrogen-bonding complementarity of these ions prompt the formation of a two-dimensional (2-D) quasi-hexagonal hydrogen-bonding network that has proven to be remarkably resilient toward the introduction of a wide range of organic pendant groups attached to the sulfonate. Since an earlier report in this journal that focused primarily on organodisulfonate host frameworks with lamellar architectures, this unusually persistent network has afforded an unparalleled range of framework architectures and hundreds of new crystalline materials with predictable solid

  6. Dynamic properties of hydrogen-bonded networks in supercritical water

    PubMed

    Marti

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic properties of supercritical water at temperatures between 573 and 773 K and densities between 0.49 and 0.83 g/cm(3) have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and compared to states located on the vapor-liquid coexistence curve. A flexible simple point charge potential has been assumed for interactions in the subcritical states, whereas a reparameterization of that model has been performed to model the supercritical states. The hydrogen bonding structure and the diffusion coefficients in an ensemble of simulated states were previously analyzed and a good agreement with available experimental data was found. Dynamic properties of hydrogen bonding like the bond lifetimes and the influence of hydrogen bonds in the vibrational spectra are discussed along a range of simulation conditions. A nonlinear behavior of the hydrogen-bond lifetime as a function of temperature is observed in subcritical water whereas a linear dependence is found in supercritical water. Special attention is paid to the intermolecular vibrational spectrum (10-400 cm(-1)). It has been observed that the mode centered at 200 cm(-1), attributed to the intermolecular O-O stretching vibration in the ambient state remains active in the supercritical states.

  7. Halotriazolium axle functionalised [2]rotaxanes for anion recognition: investigating the effects of halogen-bond donor and preorganisation.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, James M; Knighton, Richard C; Cookson, James; Beer, Paul D

    2014-09-08

    The anion-templated synthesis of three novel halogen-bonding 5-halo-1,2,3-triazolium axle containing [2]rotaxanes is described, and the effects of altering the nature of the halogen-bond donor atom together with the degree of inter-component preorganisation on the anion-recognition properties of the interlocked host investigated. The ability of the bromotriazolium motif to direct the halide-anion-templated assembly of interpenetrated [2]pseudorotaxanes was studied initially; bromide was found to be the most effective template. As a consequence, bromide anion templation was used to synthesise the first bromotriazolium axle containing [2]rotaxane, the anion-binding properties of which, determined by (1) H NMR spectroscopic titration experiments, revealed enhanced bromide and iodide recognition relative to a hydrogen-bonding protic triazolium rotaxane analogue. Two halogen-bonding [2]rotaxanes with bromo- and iodotriazolium motifs integrated into shortened axles designed to increase inter-component preorganisation were also synthesised. Anion (1) H NMR spectroscopic titration experiments demonstrated that these rotaxanes were able to bind halide anions even more strongly, with the iodotriazolium axle integrated rotaxane capable of recognising halides in aqueous solvent media. Importantly, these observations suggest that a halogen-bonding interlocked host binding domain, in combination with increased inter-component preorganisation, are requisite design features for a potent anion receptor.

  8. Acid-Base Formalism Extended to Excited State for O-H···S Hydrogen Bonding Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Surjendu; Roy, Ved Prakash; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2016-09-08

    Hydrogen bond can be regarded as an interaction between a base and a proton covalently bound to another base. In this context the strength of hydrogen bond scales with the proton affinity of the acceptor base and the pKa of the donor, i.e., it follows the acid-base formalism. This has been amply demonstrated in conventional hydrogen bonds. Is this also true for the unconventional hydrogen bonds involving lesser electronegative elements such as sulfur atom? In our previous work, we had established that the strength of O-H···S hydrogen bonding (HB) interaction scales with the proton affinity (PA) of the acceptor. In this work, we have investigated the other counterpart, i.e., the H-bonding interaction between the photoacids with different pKa values with a common base such as the H2O and H2S. The 1:1 complexes of five para substituted phenols p-aminophenol, p-cresol, p-fluorophenol, p-chlorophenol, and p-cyanophenol with H2O and H2S were investigated experimentally and computationally. The investigations were also extended to the excited states. The experimental observations of the spectral shifts in the O-H stretching frequency and the S1-S0 band origins were correlated with the pKa of the donors. Ab initio calculations at the MP2 and various dispersion corrected density functional levels of theory were performed to compute the dissociation energy (D0) of the complexes. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), noncovalent interaction (NCI) method, natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, and natural decomposition analysis (NEDA) were carried out for further characterization of HB interaction. The O-H stretching frequency red shifts and the dissociation energies were found to be lower for the O-H···S hydrogen bonded systems compared to those for the O-H···O H-bound systems. Despite being dominated by the dispersion interaction the O-H···S interaction in the H2S complexes also conformed to the acid-base formalism, i.e., the D0 and the O-H red shift

  9. Calculation of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure at finite temperatures: spectral signatures of hydrogen bond breaking in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Balázs; De Angelis, Filippo; Giannozzi, Paolo; Car, Roberto

    2004-05-08

    We calculate the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure of H(2)O in the gas, hexagonal ice, and liquid phases using heuristic density-functional based methods. We present a detailed comparison of our results with experiment. The differences between the ice and water spectra can be rationalized in terms of the breaking of hydrogen bonds around the absorbing molecule. In particular the increase in the pre-edge absorption feature from ice to water is shown to be due to the breaking of a donor hydrogen bond. We also find that in water approximately 19% of hydrogen bonds are broken. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding on the geometry, atomic charges, and spectral modes of acetanilide: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binoy, J.; Prathima, N. B.; Murali Krishna, C.; Santhosh, C.; Hubert Joe, I.; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2006-08-01

    Acetanilide, a compound of pharmaceutical importance possessing pain-relieving properties due to its blocking the pulse dissipating along the nerve fiber, is subjected to vibrational spectral investigation using NIR FT Raman, FT-IR, and SERS. The geometry, Mulliken charges, and vibrational spectrum of acetanilide have been computed using the Hartree-Fock theory and density functional theory employing the 6-31G (d) basis set. To investigate the influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding, the geometry, charge distribution, and vibrational spectrum of the acetanilide dimer have been computed at the HF/6-31G (d) level. The computed geometries reveal that the acetanilide molecule is planar, while twisting of the secondary amide group with respect to the phenyl ring is found upon hydrogen bonding. The trans isomerism and “amido” form of the secondary amide, hyperconjugation of the C=O group with the adjacent C-C bond, and donor-acceptor interaction have been investigated using computed geometry. The carbonyl stretching band position is found to be influenced by the tendency of the phenyl ring to withdraw nitrogen lone pair, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, conjugation, and hyperconjugation. A decrease in the NH and C=O bond orders and increase in the C-N bond orders due to donor-acceptor interaction can be observed in the vibrational spectra. The SERS spectral analysis reveals that the flat orientation of the molecule on the adsorption plane is preferred.

  11. Pressure-induced Hydrogen Bond Symmetrization in Aluminous Phase D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, E. C.; Chidester, B.; Danielson, L. R.; Prakapenka, V.; Campbell, A.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2016-12-01

    Phase D, (Mg,Al)(Si,Al)2O6OH2, is a dense hydrous magnesium silicate which is stable at pressures and temperatures corresponding to depths up to 1200 km, potentially ushering hydrogen through the transition zone and into the lower mantle [1]. Previously, a pressure-induced hydrogen-bond symmetrization in Mg-end member phase D was established at 40 GPa on the basis of first-principles [2] and subsequent high-pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments [3]. This hydrogen-bond symmetrization was found to lead to an increase in the bulk modulus of 20%. Al-substitution stabilizes phase D at high P-T conditions, and aluminous end-member phase D (Al2SiO6H2) is likely precursor to Al-rich phase H and δ-AlOOH, which may form a solid solution and continuous hydrous reservoir with P-T stability extending to the core-mantle boundary [4]. This study combines first-principles DFT calculations using the Quantum ESPRESSO package with high-pressure XRD experiments, to evaluate the hydrogen-bond symmetrization of the aluminous end-member phase D. As with the Mg-end member, the aluminous phase undergoes hydrogen-bond symmetrization at 40 GPa, with an associated increase in the bulk modulus. Also, as with the Al-free phase, the c/a ratio was found to reduce with increased pressure up to the point of hydrogen-bond symmetrization, above which pressure there was an associated stabilization of the c/a ratio. However, in contrast to the Al-free phase, the increase in bulk modulus from the hydrogen-off-center (HOC) to hydrogen centered (HC) structures is only 5%, a significant departure from the 20% increase reported for the HOC to HC transition in the Mg-end member. The pressure at which hydrogen bond symmetrization occurred, as well as the equations of state parameters for both the HOC and HC proton arrangements, were calculated to be within 1% for both ordered and disordered aluminum substitution structures. [1] Frost and Fei (1998) J. Geophys. Res. 103, 7463-7474. [2] Tsuchiya et al

  12. Outline of a transition-state hydrogen-bond theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, Paola; Bertolasi, Valerio; Pretto, Loretta; Gilli, Gastone

    2006-06-01

    Though the H-bond is well characterized as a D-H⋯:A three-center-four-electron interaction, the formulation of a general H-bond theory has turned out to be a rather formidable problem because of the extreme variability of the bonds formed (for instance, O-H⋯O energies range from 0.1 to 31 kcal mol -1). This paper surveys our previous contributions to the problem, including: (a) the H-bond chemical leitmotifs (CLs), showing that there are only four classes of strong H-bonds and one of moderately strong ones; (b) the PA/pK a equalization principle , showing that the four CLs forming strong H-bonds are actually molecular devices apt to equalize the acid-base properties (PA or p Ka) of the H-bond donor and acceptor groups; (c) the driving variable of the H-bond strength, which remains so identified as the difference Δp Ka=p KAH(D-H)-p KBH(A-H +) or, alternatively, ΔPA=PA(D -)-PA(A); and, in particular, (d) the transition-state H-bond theory (TSHBT), which interprets the H-bond as a stationary point along the complete proton transfer pathway going from D-H⋯A to D⋯H-A via the D⋯H⋯A transition state. TSHBT is verified in connection with a series of seven 1-(X-phenylazo)-2-naphthols, a class of compounds forming a strong intramolecular resonance-assisted H-bond (RAHB), which is switched from N-H⋯O to N⋯H-O by the decreasing electron-withdrawing properties of the substituent X. The system is studied in terms of: (i) variable-temperature X-ray crystallography; (ii) DFT emulation of stationary points and full PT pathways; (iii) Marcus rate-equilibrium analysis correlated with substituent LFER Hammett parameters.

  13. Hydrogen induced electric conduction in undoped ZnO and Ga-doped ZnO thin films: Creating native donors via reduction, hydrogen donors, and reactivating extrinsic donors

    SciTech Connect

    Akazawa, Housei

    2014-09-01

    The manner in which hydrogen atoms contribute to the electric conduction of undoped ZnO and Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) films was investigated. Hydrogen atoms were permeated into these films through annealing in an atmospheric H{sub 2} ambient. Because the creation of hydrogen donors competes with the thermal annihilation of native donors at elevated temperatures, improvements to electric conduction from the initial state can be observed when insulating ZnO films are used as samples. While the resistivity of conductive ZnO films increases when annealing them in a vacuum, the degree of increase is mitigated when they are annealed in H{sub 2}. Hydrogenation of ZnO crystals was evidenced by the appearance of OH absorption signals around a wavelength of 2700 nm in the optical transmittance spectra. The lowest resistivity that was achieved by H{sub 2} annealing was limited to 1–2 × 10{sup −2} Ω cm, which is one order of magnitude higher than that by native donors (2–3 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm). Hence, all native donors are converted to hydrogen donors. In contrast, GZO films that have resistivities yet to be improved become more conductive after annealing in H{sub 2} ambient, which is in the opposite direction of GZO films that become more resistive after vacuum annealing. Hydrogen atoms incorporated into GZO crystals should assist in reactivating Ga{sup 3+} donors.

  14. An insight into the photophysical properties of amide hydrogen bonded N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl) acetamide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balijapalli, Umamahesh; Udayadasan, Sathiskumar; Panyam Muralidharan, Vivek; Sukumarapillai, Dileep Kumar; Shanmugam, Easwaramoorthi; Paduthapillai Gopal, Aravindan; S. Rathore, Ravindranath; Kulathu Iyer, Sathiyanarayanan

    2017-02-01

    Three distinct, hydrogen bond associated N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl) acetamides were synthesized by refluxing benzothiazoles with acetic acid. The nature of the assemblies was characteristic to the substituent in the benzothiazole moiety. In N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamide, water acts as a bridge for forming three hydrogen bonds, as an acceptor to amide Nsbnd H, and donors to carbonyl of amide and thiazole nitrogen assembles of three different N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamide molecules. The N-(6-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamide formed a (amide) N-H…N (thiazole) bonded R22(8) molecular dimers by two homo-intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. N-(6-methoxybenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamide formed (amide)N-H…O (acid) & (acid)O-H…N (thiazole) interactions with the acetic acid, forming a R22(8) hydrogen-bonded ring by two hetero-intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions.

  15. Femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy of hydrogen bonded structure in water and aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huaning; Li, Yang; Vdović, Silvije; Long, Saran; He, Guiying; Guo, Qianjin

    2015-12-05

    Femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fsCARS) spectroscopy, together with perturbation theory based numerical calculation, is employed to study OH stretching (υOH) of pure water and aqueous lithium chloride solutions. Vibrational OH stretching (υOH) modes of aqueous solutions are Raman-excited by a pair of ultrashort, femtosecond laser pulses, and then probed through inelastic scattering of a third, time-delayed laser field. In order to overcome limited spectral resolution of fsCARS, numerical evaluation of the CARS signal through vibrational wave packet propagation was employed in order to confirm the position of distinctive OH stretching mode that is complicated by intramolecular and intermolecular vibrational coupling. Moreover, in order to come to a microscopic description of the observed CARS spectra for aqueous solutions, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous lithium chloride solutions with varying concentrations at ambient conditions. To this end we have analyzed the equilibrium distributions of hydrogen bonds in the first solvation shells of the ions as well as in bulk water and also computed the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule. According to our experimental and theoretical results on time evolution of Raman OH stretching band of water, it can be inferred that the dissolved ions mainly influence hydrogen bond strength and structure of water molecules in the first hydration shell, the addition of lithium chloride primarily breaks the tetrahedral hydrogen bonding, promotes formation of the donor hydrogen bonding in water, and slightly increases the amount of free OH bonds.

  16. Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding of unlocked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Langkjær, Niels; Wengel, Jesper; Pasternak, Anna

    2015-11-15

    We herein describe the synthesis of two new unlocked nucleic acid building blocks containing hypoxanthine and 2,6-diaminopurine as nucleobase moieties and their incorporation into oligonucleotides. The modified oligonucleotides were used to examine the thermodynamic properties of UNA against unmodified oligonucleotides and the resulting thermodynamic data support that the hydrogen bonding face of UNA is Watson-Crick like.

  17. Semirubin. A novel dipyrrinone strapped by intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Huggins, M T; Lightner, D A

    2000-09-22

    (4Z)-9-(5-Carboxypentyl)-2,3,7,8-tetramethyl-(10H)-dipyrrin- 1-one (1, semirubin), a new dipyrrinone model for one-half of bilirubin, the yellow-orange neurotoxic pigment of jaundice, was synthesized following Friedel-Crafts acylation of 2,3,7, 8-tetramethyl-(10H)-dipyrrin-1-one (5) with the half-ester acid chloride of adipic acid. Unlike other dipyrrinone models for bilirubin, such as the xanthobilirubic acids, which engage only in intermolecular hydrogen bonding, 1 is unique in having been designed and found to engage in intramolecular hydrogen bonding, between the carboxylic acid and the dipyrrinone lactam and pyrrole. This important conformation-determining structural characteristic, shared by 1 and bilirubin, renders them less polar than their methyl esters and leaves them monomeric in nonpolar solvents, where their esters are dimeric. The corresponding 10-oxo analogue (3) of 1 serves as a model for 10-oxo-bilirubin, a presumed bilirubin metabolite in alternate pathways for bilirubin excretion. Like 1, 3 is found to engage in intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Unlike the methyl ester of 1, the ethyl ester of 3 is not intermolecularly hydrogen bonded in nonpolar solvents.

  18. Hydrogen bonding in protic ionic liquids: reminiscent of water.

    PubMed

    Fumino, Koichi; Wulf, Alexander; Ludwig, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Similarities and differences: Far-infrared spectra of protic ionic liquids could be assigned to intermolecular bending and stretching modes of hydrogen bonds. The characteristics of the low-frequency spectra resemble those of water. Both liquids form three-dimensional network structures, but only water is capable of building tetrahedral configurations. EAN: ethylammonium nitrate, PAN: propylammonium nitrate, DMAN: dimethylammonium nitrate.

  19. Crystal engineering with urea and thiourea hydrogen-bonding groups.

    PubMed

    Custelcean, Radu

    2008-01-21

    The utilization of N,N'-disubstituted ureas and thioureas as design elements in the synthesis of crystalline organic solids is reviewed. These hydrogen-bonding units are versatile yet predictable building blocks that can be rationally employed in both crystal assembly and functionalization.

  20. Hydrogen bonding in water clusters and their ionized counterparts.

    PubMed

    Neela, Y Indra; Mahadevi, A Subha; Sastry, G Narahari

    2010-12-30

    Ab initio and DFT computations were carried out on four distinct hydrogen-bonded arrangements of water clusters (H(2)O)(n), n = 2-20, represented as W1D, W2D, W2DH, and W3D. The variation in the strength of hydrogen bond as a function of the chain length is studied. In all the four cases, there is a substantial cooperative interaction, albeit in different degrees. The effect of basis set superposition error (BSSE) on the complexation energy of water clusters has been analyzed. Atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis performed to evaluate the nature of the hydrogen bonding shows a high correlation between hydrogen bond strength and the trends in complexation energy. Solvated water clusters exhibit lower complexation energies compared to corresponding gas-phase geometries on PCM (polarized continuum model) optimization. The feasibility of stripping an electron or addition of an electron increases dramatically as the cluster size increases. Although W3D caged structures are stable for neutral clusters, the helical W2DH arrangement appeared to be an optimal choice for its ionized counterparts.

  1. Microstructure and hydrogen bonding in water-acetonitrile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mountain, Raymond D

    2010-12-16

    The connection of hydrogen bonding between water and acetonitrile in determining the microheterogeneity of the liquid mixture is examined using NPT molecular dynamics simulations. Mixtures for six, rigid, three-site models for acetonitrile and one water model (SPC/E) were simulated to determine the amount of water-acetonitrile hydrogen bonding. Only one of the six acetonitrile models (TraPPE-UA) was able to reproduce both the liquid density and the experimental estimates of hydrogen bonding derived from Raman scattering of the CN stretch band or from NMR quadrupole relaxation measurements. A simple modification of the acetonitrile model parameters for the models that provided poor estimates produced hydrogen-bonding results consistent with experiments for two of the models. Of these, only one of the modified models also accurately determined the density of the mixtures. The self-diffusion coefficient of liquid acetonitrile provided a final winnowing of the modified model and the successful, unmodified model. The unmodified model is provisionally recommended for simulations of water-acetonitrile mixtures.

  2. Adhesion between silica surfaces due to hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, James; Rossetto, Hebert L.; Kendall, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    The adhesion between surfaces can be enhanced significantly by the presence of hydrogen bonding. Confined water at the nanoscale can display behaviour remarkably different to bulk water due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between two surfaces. In this work we investigate the role of confined water on the interaction between hydrophilic surfaces, specifically the effect of organic contaminants in the aqueous phase, by measuring the peak adhesive force and the work of adhesion. Atomic force microscope cantilevers presenting hemispherical silica tips were interacted with planar single crystals of silica in the presence of dimethylformamide, ethanol, and formamide; solution compositions in the range 0-100 mol% water were investigated for each molecule. Each molecule was chosen for its ability to hydrogen bond with water molecules, with increasing concentrations likely to disrupt the structure of surface-bound water layers. With the exception of aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of ethanol, all molecules decreased the ability of confined water to enhance the adhesion between the silica surfaces in excess of the predicted theoretical adhesion due to van der Waals forces. The conclusion was that adhesion depends strongly on the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network within the water layers confined between the silica surfaces.

  3. Alternation and tunable composition in hydrogen bonded supramolecular copolymers.

    PubMed

    Felder, Thorsten; de Greef, Tom F A; Nieuwenhuizen, Marko M L; Sijbesma, Rint P

    2014-03-07

    Sequence control in supramolecular copolymers is limited by the selectivity of the associating monomer end groups. Here we introduce the use of monomers with aminopyrimidinone and aminohydroxynaphthyridine quadruple hydrogen bonding end groups, which both homodimerize, but form even stronger heterodimers. These features allow the formation of supramolecular copolymers with a tunable composition and a preference for alternating sequences.

  4. Hydrogen Bonding Slows Down Surface Diffusion of Molecular Glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinshan; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Lian

    2016-08-18

    Surface-grating decay has been measured for three organic glasses with extensive hydrogen bonding: sorbitol, maltitol, and maltose. For 1000 nm wavelength gratings, the decay occurs by viscous flow in the entire range of temperature studied, covering the viscosity range 10(5)-10(11) Pa s, whereas under the same conditions, the decay mechanism transitions from viscous flow to surface diffusion for organic glasses of similar molecular sizes but with no or limited hydrogen bonding. These results indicate that extensive hydrogen bonding slows down surface diffusion in organic glasses. This effect arises because molecules can preserve hydrogen bonding even near the surface so that the loss of nearest neighbors does not translate into a proportional decrease of the kinetic barrier for diffusion. This explanation is consistent with a strong correlation between liquid fragility and the surface enhancement of diffusion, both reporting resistance of a liquid to dynamic excitation. Slow surface diffusion is expected to hinder any processes that rely on surface transport, for example, surface crystal growth and formation of stable glasses by vapor deposition.

  5. Self-ordering of metallogrid complexes via directed hydrogen-bonding.

    PubMed

    Stefankiewicz, Artur R; Rogez, Guillaume; Harrowfield, Jack; Sobolev, Alexandre N; Madalan, Augustin; Huuskonen, Juhani; Rissanen, Kari; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-12-07

    Reaction of imidazole aldehydes with dihydrazino derivatives of 2-phenylpyrimidine provides a family of bis(acylhydrazone) ligands which form [2 × 2] metallogrid complexes with transition metal ions including Fe(II), Co(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). The free ligands show H-bonding interactions, both donor and acceptor, largely involving the imidazole units, while binding of the metal ions occupies all the acceptor sites and leaves only the pyrrolic-NH site as an H-bond donor, although its deprotonation by a strong base can regenerate an acceptor. These H-bonding interactions have been studied by (1)H NMR spectroscopy in solution and in the solid state by means of several crystal structure determinations. The Fe(II) grids appear to be exclusively high-spin species over a wide temperature range in solution. In the solid state various forms of spin-crossover behaviour can be observed between 1.8 and 300 K, which has been rationalised in terms of the varied forms of hydrogen-bonding possible in the crystalline state.

  6. Testing Electrostatic Complementarity in Enzyme Catalysis: Hydrogen Bonding in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Oxyanion Hole

    PubMed Central

    Kraut, Daniel A; Sigala, Paul A; Pybus, Brandon; Liu, Corey W; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A

    2006-01-01

    A longstanding proposal in enzymology is that enzymes are electrostatically and geometrically complementary to the transition states of the reactions they catalyze and that this complementarity contributes to catalysis. Experimental evaluation of this contribution, however, has been difficult. We have systematically dissected the potential contribution to catalysis from electrostatic complementarity in ketosteroid isomerase. Phenolates, analogs of the transition state and reaction intermediate, bind and accept two hydrogen bonds in an active site oxyanion hole. The binding of substituted phenolates of constant molecular shape but increasing p K a models the charge accumulation in the oxyanion hole during the enzymatic reaction. As charge localization increases, the NMR chemical shifts of protons involved in oxyanion hole hydrogen bonds increase by 0.50–0.76 ppm/p K a unit, suggesting a bond shortening of ˜0.02 Å/p K a unit. Nevertheless, there is little change in binding affinity across a series of substituted phenolates (ΔΔG = −0.2 kcal/mol/p K a unit). The small effect of increased charge localization on affinity occurs despite the shortening of the hydrogen bonds and a large favorable change in binding enthalpy (ΔΔH = −2.0 kcal/mol/p K a unit). This shallow dependence of binding affinity suggests that electrostatic complementarity in the oxyanion hole makes at most a modest contribution to catalysis of ˜300-fold. We propose that geometrical complementarity between the oxyanion hole hydrogen-bond donors and the transition state oxyanion provides a significant catalytic contribution, and suggest that KSI, like other enzymes, achieves its catalytic prowess through a combination of modest contributions from several mechanisms rather than from a single dominant contribution. PMID:16602823

  7. Testing electrostatic complementarity in enzyme catalysis: hydrogen bonding in the ketosteroid isomerase oxyanion hole.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Daniel A; Sigala, Paul A; Pybus, Brandon; Liu, Corey W; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A; Herschlag, Daniel

    2006-04-01

    A longstanding proposal in enzymology is that enzymes are electrostatically and geometrically complementary to the transition states of the reactions they catalyze and that this complementarity contributes to catalysis. Experimental evaluation of this contribution, however, has been difficult. We have systematically dissected the potential contribution to catalysis from electrostatic complementarity in ketosteroid isomerase. Phenolates, analogs of the transition state and reaction intermediate, bind and accept two hydrogen bonds in an active site oxyanion hole. The binding of substituted phenolates of constant molecular shape but increasing pK(a) models the charge accumulation in the oxyanion hole during the enzymatic reaction. As charge localization increases, the NMR chemical shifts of protons involved in oxyanion hole hydrogen bonds increase by 0.50-0.76 ppm/pK(a) unit, suggesting a bond shortening of 0.02 A/pK(a) unit. Nevertheless, there is little change in binding affinity across a series of substituted phenolates (DeltaDeltaG = -0.2 kcal/mol/pK(a) unit). The small effect of increased charge localization on affinity occurs despite the shortening of the hydrogen bonds and a large favorable change in binding enthalpy (DeltaDeltaH = -2.0 kcal/mol/pK(a) unit). This shallow dependence of binding affinity suggests that electrostatic complementarity in the oxyanion hole makes at most a modest contribution to catalysis of 300-fold. We propose that geometrical complementarity between the oxyanion hole hydrogen-bond donors and the transition state oxyanion provides a significant catalytic contribution, and suggest that KSI, like other enzymes, achieves its catalytic prowess through a combination of modest contributions from several mechanisms rather than from a single dominant contribution.

  8. Hydrogen-bond acidity of ionic liquids: an extended scale.

    PubMed

    Kurnia, Kiki A; Lima, Filipa; Cláudio, Ana Filipa M; Coutinho, João A P; Freire, Mara G

    2015-07-15

    One of the main drawbacks comprising an appropriate selection of ionic liquids (ILs) for a target application is related to the lack of an extended and well-established polarity scale for these neoteric fluids. Albeit considerable progress has been made on identifying chemical structures and factors that influence the polarity of ILs, there still exists a high inconsistency in the experimental values reported by different authors. Furthermore, due to the extremely large number of possible ILs that can be synthesized, the experimental characterization of their polarity is a major limitation when envisaging the choice of an IL with a desired polarity. Therefore, it is of crucial relevance to develop correlation schemes and a priori predictive methods able to forecast the polarity of new (or not yet synthesized) fluids. In this context, and aiming at broadening the experimental polarity scale available for ILs, the solvatochromic Kamlet-Taft parameters of a broad range of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-([NTf2](-))-based fluids were determined. The impact of the IL cation structure on the hydrogen-bond donating ability of the fluid was comprehensively addressed. Based on the large amount of novel experimental values obtained, we then evaluated COSMO-RS, COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents, as an alternative tool to estimate the hydrogen-bond acidity of ILs. A three-parameter model based on the cation-anion interaction energies was found to adequately describe the experimental hydrogen-bond acidity or hydrogen-bond donating ability of ILs. The proposed three-parameter model is also shown to present a predictive capacity and to provide novel molecular-level insights into the chemical structure characteristics that influence the acidity of a given IL. It is shown that although the equimolar cation-anion hydrogen-bonding energies (EHB) play the major role, the electrostatic-misfit interactions (EMF) and van der Waals forces (EvdW) also contribute

  9. Hydrogen bonds in concreto and in computro: the sequel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stouten, Pieter F. W.; Van Eijck, Bouke P.; Kroon, Jan

    1991-02-01

    In the framework of our comparative research concerning hydrogen bonding in the crystalline and liquid phases we have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid methanol. Six different rigid three site models are compared. Five of them had been reported in the literature and one (OM2) we developed by a fit to the experimental molar volume, heat of vaporization and neutron weighted radial distribution function. In general the agreement with experiment is satisfactory for the different models. None of the models has an explicit hydrogen bond potential, but five of the six models show a degree of hydrogen bonding comparable to experiments on liquid methanol. The analysis of the simulation hydrogen bonds indicates that there is a distinct preference of the O⋯O axis to lie in the acceptor lone pairs plane, but hardly any for the lone pair directions. Ab initio calculations and crystal structure statistics of OH⋯O hydrogen bonds agree with this observation. The O⋯O hydrogen bond length distributions are similar for most models. The crystal structures show a sharper O⋯O distribution. Explicit introduction of harmonic motion with a quite realistic root mean square amplitude of 0.08 Å to the thermally averaged crystal distribution results in a distribution comparable to OM2 although the maximum of the former is found at shorter distance. On the basis of the analysis of the static properties of all models we conclude that our OM2, Jorgenson's OPLS and Haughney, Ferrario and McDonald's HFM1 models are good candidates for simulations of liquid methanol under isothermal, isochoric conditions. Partly flexible and completely rigid OM2 are simulated at constant pressure and with fixed volume. The flexible simulations give essentially the same (correct) results under both conditions, which is not surprising because the flexible form was fitted under both conditions. Rigid OM2 has a similar potential energy but larger pressure in the

  10. Hydrogen-bond acidity of ionic liquids: an extended scale†

    PubMed Central

    Kurnia, Kiki A.; Lima, Filipa; Cláudio, Ana Filipa M.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main drawbacks comprising an appropriate selection of ionic liquids (ILs) for a target application is related to the lack of an extended and well-established polarity scale for these neoteric fluids. Albeit considerable progress has been made on identifying chemical structures and factors that influence the polarity of ILs, there still exists a high inconsistency in the experimental values reported by different authors. Furthermore, due to the extremely large number of possible ILs that can be synthesized, the experimental characterization of their polarity is a major limitation when envisaging the choice of an IL with a desired polarity. Therefore, it is of crucial relevance to develop correlation schemes and a priori predictive methods able to forecast the polarity of new (or not yet synthesized) fluids. In this context, and aiming at broadening the experimental polarity scale available for ILs, the solvatochromic Kamlet–Taft parameters of a broad range of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-([NTf2]−)-based fluids were determined. The impact of the IL cation structure on the hydrogen-bond donating ability of the fluid was comprehensively addressed. Based on the large amount of novel experimental values obtained, we then evaluated COSMO-RS, COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents, as an alternative tool to estimate the hydrogen-bond acidity of ILs. A three-parameter model based on the cation–anion interaction energies was found to adequately describe the experimental hydrogen-bond acidity or hydrogen-bond donating ability of ILs. The proposed three-parameter model is also shown to present a predictive capacity and to provide novel molecular-level insights into the chemical structure characteristics that influence the acidity of a given IL. It is shown that although the equimolar cation–anion hydrogen-bonding energies (EHB) play the major role, the electrostatic-misfit interactions (EMF) and van der Waals forces (EvdW) also contribute

  11. a Theoretical Investigation on 10-12 Potential of Hydrogen-Hydrogen Covalent Bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneri, Sencer

    2013-05-01

    This is an analytical investigation of well-known 10-12 potential of hydrogen-hydrogen covalent bond. In this research, we will make an elaboration of the well-known 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential in case of this type of bond. Though the results are illustrated in many text books and literature, an analytical analysis for these potentials is missing almost everywhere. The power laws are valid for small radial distances, which are calculated to some extent. The internuclear separation as well as the binding energy of the hydrogen molecule are evaluated with success.

  12. An alternative near-neighbor definition of hydrogen bonding in water.

    PubMed

    Hammerich, A D; Buch, V

    2008-03-21

    A definition of hydrogen bonding in water is proposed in which an H...O pair forms a hydrogen bond if (a) an oxygen atom is the nearest nonchemically bonded neighbor of a hydrogen atom; and (b) the hydrogen is the first or the second intermolecular near-neighbor of the oxygen. Unlike the commonly employed hydrogen-bond definitions, this definition does not depend on the choice of geometric or energetic cutoffs applied to continuous distributions of properties. With the present definition, the distribution of O...H bond lengths decays smoothly to zero in a physically reasonable range. After correction for the presence of intermittent hydrogen bonds, this definition appears to provide a more stable description of hydrogen bonds and coordination shells than the more conventional cutoff-based definition. "Partial" H bonds satisfying only one of the two bonding requirements serve as transition states in the H-bond network evolution.

  13. Liquid state of a hydrogen bond network in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkin, M. I.; Klyuev, A. V.; Sinitsyn, V. V.; Ryzhkin, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    It is theoretically shown that the Coulomb interaction between violations of the Bernal-Fowler rules leads to a temperature-induced stepwise increase in their concentration by 6-7 orders of magnitude. This first-order phase transition is accompanied by commensurable decrease in the relaxation time and can be interpreted as melting of the hydrogen bond network. The new phase with the melted hydrogen lattice and survived oxygen one is unstable in the bulk of ice, and further drastic increase in the concentrations of oxygen interstitials and vacancies accomplishes the ice melting. The fraction of broken hydrogen bonds immediately after the melting is about 0.07 of their total number that implies an essential conservation of oxygen lattice in water.

  14. Association by hydrogen bonding of mononucleotides in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Raszka, M; Kaplan, N O

    1972-08-01

    Evidence for hydrogen bonding between 5'-ribonucleotides in water has been obtained from a 220-MHz proton magnetic resonance study of nitrogenous protons. The amino groups of GMP, AMP, and CMP exhibit proton resonance lines which are somewhat broadened by proton exchange with the solvent at 0 degrees ; their downfield Shifts in mixtures of mononucleotides provide the basis for the following order of base-pairing tendencies: GMP.CMP > AMP.UMP. Hydrogen bonding is also observed in other pairs of mononucleotides, notably GMP.UMP, AMP.CMP, and CMP.UMP, to a lesser extent in GMP.IMP, CMP.XMP, and possibly in CMP.IMP. In agreement with previous reports, hydrophobic interactions of mononucleotides have also been observed; base pairing occurs in addition to vertical stacking of these bases, their hydrogen bonding to water, or self-association. Only CMP shows clear evidence of self-association via hydrogen bonding in water; the evidence for GMP is less direct, and that for AMP is negative. This lack of observable self-association may occur as a result of competition from strong stacking interactions. Only CMP shows restricted rotation of the amino group at 0 degrees and neutral pH. As expected, higher temperatures increase the rate of rotation of the amino group for CMP, as well as accelerate the rate of proton exchange between water and the amino protons of mononucleotides.High-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy could prove to be a valuable tool in mapping out the specificities conferred by hydrogen bonding between biomolecules in aqueous solution.

  15. Theoretical Prediction of Hydrogen-Bond Basicity pKBHX Using Quantum Chemical Topology Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the interaction of biological molecules and their local environment. Hydrogen-bond strengths have been described in terms of basicities by several different scales. The pKBHX scale has been developed with the interests of medicinal chemists in mind. The scale uses equilibrium constants of acid···base complexes to describe basicity and is therefore linked to Gibbs free energy. Site specific data for polyfunctional bases are also available. The pKBHX scale applies to all hydrogen-bond donors (HBDs) where the HBD functional group is either OH, NH, or NH+. It has been found that pKBHX can be described in terms of a descriptor defined by quantum chemical topology, ΔE(H), which is the change in atomic energy of the hydrogen atom upon complexation. Essentially the computed energy of the HBD hydrogen atom correlates with a set of 41 HBAs for five common HBDs, water (r2 = 0.96), methanol (r2 = 0.95), 4-fluorophenol (r2 = 0.91), serine (r2 = 0.93), and methylamine (r2 = 0.97). The connection between experiment and computation was strengthened with the finding that there is no relationship between ΔE(H) and pKBHX when hydrogen fluoride was used as the HBD. Using the methanol model, pKBHX predictions were made for an external set of bases yielding r2 = 0.90. Furthermore, the basicities of polyfunctional bases correlate with ΔE(H), giving r2 = 0.93. This model is promising for the future of computation in fragment-based drug design. Not only has a model been established that links computation to experiment, but the model may also be extrapolated to predict external experimental pKBHX values. PMID:24460383

  16. Theoretical prediction of hydrogen-bond basicity pKBHX using quantum chemical topology descriptors.

    PubMed

    Green, Anthony J; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-02-24

    Hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the interaction of biological molecules and their local environment. Hydrogen-bond strengths have been described in terms of basicities by several different scales. The pKBHX scale has been developed with the interests of medicinal chemists in mind. The scale uses equilibrium constants of acid···base complexes to describe basicity and is therefore linked to Gibbs free energy. Site specific data for polyfunctional bases are also available. The pKBHX scale applies to all hydrogen-bond donors (HBDs) where the HBD functional group is either OH, NH, or NH+. It has been found that pKBHX can be described in terms of a descriptor defined by quantum chemical topology, ΔE(H), which is the change in atomic energy of the hydrogen atom upon complexation. Essentially the computed energy of the HBD hydrogen atom correlates with a set of 41 HBAs for five common HBDs, water (r2=0.96), methanol (r2=0.95), 4-fluorophenol (r2=0.91), serine (r2=0.93), and methylamine (r2=0.97). The connection between experiment and computation was strengthened with the finding that there is no relationship between ΔE(H) and pKBHX when hydrogen fluoride was used as the HBD. Using the methanol model, pKBHX predictions were made for an external set of bases yielding r2=0.90. Furthermore, the basicities of polyfunctional bases correlate with ΔE(H), giving r2=0.93. This model is promising for the future of computation in fragment-based drug design. Not only has a model been established that links computation to experiment, but the model may also be extrapolated to predict external experimental pKBHX values.

  17. Displacement of the proton in hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride by beryllium and magnesium ions

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Sean A. C.

    2009-05-14

    The displacement of the proton by a beryllium ion and by a magnesium ion from hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride, of varying hydrogen bond strengths, was investigated theoretically using ab initio methods. Stable metal-containing species were obtained from all of the hydrogen-bonded complexes regardless of the strength of the hydrogen bond. It was found that the beryllium ion was energetically very effective in displacing the proton from hydrogen bonds, whereas the magnesium ion was unable to do so. The high stability of the beryllium-containing complexes is mainly due to the strong electrostatic bonding between the beryllium and fluoride atoms. This work supports the recent finding from a multidisciplinary bioinorganic study that beryllium displaces the proton in many strong hydrogen bonds.

  18. Displacement of the proton in hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride by beryllium and magnesium ions.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Sean A C

    2009-05-14

    The displacement of the proton by a beryllium ion and by a magnesium ion from hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride, of varying hydrogen bond strengths, was investigated theoretically using ab initio methods. Stable metal-containing species were obtained from all of the hydrogen-bonded complexes regardless of the strength of the hydrogen bond. It was found that the beryllium ion was energetically very effective in displacing the proton from hydrogen bonds, whereas the magnesium ion was unable to do so. The high stability of the beryllium-containing complexes is mainly due to the strong electrostatic bonding between the beryllium and fluoride atoms. This work supports the recent finding from a multidisciplinary bioinorganic study that beryllium displaces the proton in many strong hydrogen bonds.

  19. Electrical current through individual pairs of phosphorus donor atoms and silicon dangling bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambal, K.; Rahe, P.; Payne, A.; Slinkman, J.; Williams, C. C.; Boehme, C.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear spins of phosphorus [P] donor atoms in crystalline silicon are among the most coherent qubits found in nature. For their utilization in scalable quantum computers, distinct donor electron wavefunctions must be controlled and probed through electrical coupling by application of either highly localized electric fields or spin-selective currents. Due to the strong modulation of the P-donor wavefunction by the silicon lattice, such electrical coupling requires atomic spatial accuracy. Here, the spatially controlled application of electrical current through individual pairs of phosphorus donor electron states in crystalline silicon and silicon dangling bond states at the crystalline silicon (100) surface is demonstrated using a high-resolution scanning probe microscope operated under ultra-high vacuum and at a temperature of 4.3K. The observed pairs of electron states display qualitatively reproducible current-voltage characteristics with a monotonous increase and intermediate current plateaus.

  20. Electrical current through individual pairs of phosphorus donor atoms and silicon dangling bonds

    PubMed Central

    Ambal, K.; Rahe, P.; Payne, A.; Slinkman, J.; Williams, C. C.; Boehme, C.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear spins of phosphorus [P] donor atoms in crystalline silicon are among the most coherent qubits found in nature. For their utilization in scalable quantum computers, distinct donor electron wavefunctions must be controlled and probed through electrical coupling by application of either highly localized electric fields or spin-selective currents. Due to the strong modulation of the P-donor wavefunction by the silicon lattice, such electrical coupling requires atomic spatial accuracy. Here, the spatially controlled application of electrical current through individual pairs of phosphorus donor electron states in crystalline silicon and silicon dangling bond states at the crystalline silicon (100) surface is demonstrated using a high‐resolution scanning probe microscope operated under ultra‐high vacuum and at a temperature of 4.3K. The observed pairs of electron states display qualitatively reproducible current-voltage characteristics with a monotonous increase and intermediate current plateaus. PMID:26758087

  1. Theoretical Study of Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions: The Effect of Hydrogen Bond Bending Motion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Hao; Song, Kai; Xu, Yang; Shi, Qiang

    2015-06-25

    We investigate theoretically the effect of hydrogen bond bending motion on the proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction, using a model system where an intramolecular hydrogen-bonded phenol group is the proton donor. It is shown that, in a two-dimensional (2D) model of the PCET reaction, the bending and stretching vibrational motions are separated, and due to the hydrogen bond configuration and anharmonicity of the potential energy surface, the bending vibration can play a role in the PCET reaction. The results are also compared with two different sets of one-dimensional models (1D-linear and 1D-curved). Due to contributions of the bending motion, the rate constants in the 2D model are larger than those in the 1D-linear model, although the differences between the total rate constants and KIEs for 2D and 1D models are not major. Results from the 1D-curved model lie between the 2D- and 1D-linear models, indicating that it can include some effect of bending motion in reducing the potential energies along the reaction path.

  2. Inner reorganization limiting electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding: intra- vs. intermolecular effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Eduardo; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-05-07

    In this work, experimental evidence of the influence of the electron transfer kinetics during electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding between anion radicals of metronidazole and ornidazole, derivatives of 5-nitro-imidazole, and 1,3-diethylurea as the hydrogen bond donor, is presented. Analysis of the variations of voltammetric EpIcvs. log KB[DH], where KB is the binding constant, allowed us to determine the values of the binding constant and also the electron transfer rate k, confirmed by experiments obtained at different scan rates. Electronic structure calculations at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level for metronidazole, including the solvent effect by the Cramer/Truhlar model, suggested that the minimum energy conformer is stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In this structure, the inner reorganization energy, λi,j, contributes significantly (0.5 eV) to the total reorganization energy of electron transfer, thus leading to a diminishment of the experimental k.

  3. Hydrogen-bonding motifs and thermotropic polymorphism in redetermined halide salts of hexamethylenediamine.

    PubMed

    van Blerk, Charmaine; Kruger, Gert J

    2008-10-01

    The redetermined crystal structures of hexane-1,6-diammonium dichloride, C(6)H(18)N(2)(2+) x 2 Cl(-), (I), hexane-1,6-diammonium dibromide, C(6)H(18)N(2)(2+) x 2 Br(-), (II), and hexane-1,6-diammonium diiodide, C(6)H(18)N(2)(2+) x 2 I(-), (III), are described, focusing on their hydrogen-bonding motifs. The chloride and bromide salts are isomorphous, with both demonstrating a small deviation from planarity [173.89 (10) and 173.0 (2) degrees, respectively] in the central C-C-C-C torsion angle of the hydrocarbon backbone. The chloride and bromide salts also show marked similarities in their hydrogen-bonding interactions, with subtle differences evident in the hydrogen-bond lengths reported. Bifurcated interactions are exhibited between the N-donor atoms and the halide acceptors in the chloride and bromide salts. The iodide salt is very different in molecular structure, packing and intermolecular interactions. The hydrocarbon chain of the iodide straddles an inversion centre and the ammonium groups on the diammonium cation of the iodide salt are offset from the planar hydrocarbon backbone by a torsion angle of 69.6 (4) degrees. All three salts exhibit thermotropic polymorphism, as is evident from differential scanning calorimetry analysis and variable-temperature powder X-ray diffraction studies.

  4. Strengthening of N-H...Co hydrogen bonds upon increasing the basicity of the hydrogen bond acceptor (Co)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, D.; Ladipo, F.T.; Braddock-Wilking, J.; Brammer, L.

    1996-03-05

    Low temperature crystal structures of (DABCO)H{sup +}Co(CO){sub 4}{sup -} (1) and (DABCO)H{sup +}Co(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup -} (2) (DABCO = 1,4-diazabicyclooctane) indicate that both salts exhibit N-H...Co hydrogen bonding. IR and NMR data indicate that these hydrogen bonded species persist in nonpolar solvents such as toluene, but exist as solvent separated ions in more polar solvents. Replacement of the axial CO ligand by PPh{sub 3} leads to a shortening of the N...Co separation in the solid state from 3.437(3) to 3.294(6) A. This change is accompanied by an increase in the angle between the equatorial carbonyl ligands. Thus, the crystallographic results suggest a strengthening of the N-H...Co hydrogen bond upon increasing the basicity of the metal center, the first observation of this type in the solid state. This assertion is supported by variable-temperature {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR data in toluene-d{sub 8} solution which, discussed in the light of ab initio calculations, indicate that the barrier to a fluxional process involving cleavage of the N-H...Co hydrogen bond is greater in 2 than in 1. The crystal structures of 1 and 2 have been determined by X-ray diffraction at 135(5) and 123(5) K, respectively. 19 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Combined DFT and NBO study on the electronic basis of Si...N-beta-donor bond.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bing; Huang, YuanHe; Wang, Guo; Wang, Yang

    2010-03-01

    Two groups of isoelectronic molecules with different SiXN (X=C, N, O ) units are analyzed by a combined DFT and NBO study to investigate the electronic basis of Si...N-beta-donor bond. The influence of various energy components on the formation of Si...N-beta-donor bond is explored. The importance of the electron delocalization from the lone pair of nitrogen atom into the acceptor-orbitals connected with Si atom is elicited by our calculations. The electron delocalization from the lone pair of nitrogen atom into the antibonding orbital of Si-X bond is quite different among the isoelectronic molecules with various types of SiXN units.

  6. On hydrogen bonding in 1,6-anhydro-beta-D-glucopyranose (levoglucosan): X-ray and neutron diffraction and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Smrcok, Lubomír; Sládkovicová, Mariana; Langer, Vratislav; Wilson, Chick C; Koós, Miroslav

    2006-10-01

    The geometry of hydrogen bonds in 1,6-anhydro-beta-D-glucopyranose (levoglucosan) is accurately determined by refinement of time-of-flight neutron single-crystal diffraction data. Molecules of levoglucosan are held together by a hydrogen-bond array formed by a combination of strong O-H...O and supporting weaker C-H...O bonds. These are fully and accurately detailed by the neutron diffraction study. The strong hydrogen bonds link molecules in finite chains, with hydroxyl O atoms acting as both donors and acceptors of hydroxyl H atoms. A comparison of molecular and solid-state DFT calculations predicts red shifts of O-H and associated blue shifts of C-H stretching frequencies due to the formation of hydrogen bonds in this system.

  7. Investigation of contrasting hydrogen bonding pattern of 3-(phenylamino)-cyclohexen-1-one with solvents in the ground and excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Ramprasad; Kar, Susmita

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we report the contrasting pattern of hydrogen bonding between solvents and 3-(phenylamino)-cyclohexen-1-one (PACO), an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule in the ground and excited states. The uniqueness of this molecule has been revealed through linear free energy relationship based Kamlet-Taft analysis which indicates that the polarizability (π∗) and the hydrogen bond acceptor abilities (β) of the solvent are mainly responsible for the observed absorption spectra of the probe while polarizability (π∗) and the hydrogen bond donor abilities (α) of the solvents mainly determine its emitting profile. This investigation helps us to decipher the ground and excited state behavior of the hydrogen bonding sites present in PACO. These findings are also expected to be useful in understanding the nature of other molecules containing multiple H-bonding sites.

  8. Topological analysis of aromatic halogen/hydrogen bonds by electron charge density and electrostatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Darío J R; de las Vallejos, Margarita M; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the intermolecular distribution of the electronic charge density in the aromatic hydrogen/halogen bonds is studied within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) analysis. The study is carried out in nine complexes formed between benzene and simple lineal molecules, where hydrogen, fluorine and chlorine atoms act as bridge atoms. All the results are obtained at MP2 level theory using cc-pVTZ basis set. Attention is focused on topological features observed at the intermolecular region such as bond, ring and cage critical points of the electron density, as well as the bond path, the gradient of the density maps, molecular graphs and interatomic surfaces. The strength of the interaction increases in the following order: F[Symbol: see text]pi < Cl[Symbol: see text]pi < H[Symbol: see text]pi. Our results show that the fluorine atom has the capability to interact with the pi-cloud to form an aromatic halogen bond, as long as the donor group is highly electron withdrawing. The Laplacian topology allows us to state that the halogen atoms can act as nucleophiles as well as electrophiles, showing clearly their dual character.

  9. Energetics of Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in a Hydrophobic Protein Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lan; Baergen, Alyson; Michelsen, Klaus; Kitova, Elena N.; Schnier, Paul D.; Klassen, John S.

    2014-05-01

    This work explores the energetics of intermolecular H-bonds inside a hydrophobic protein cavity. Kinetic measurements were performed on the gaseous deprotonated ions (at the -7 charge state) of complexes of bovine β-lactoglobulin (Lg) and three monohydroxylated analogs of palmitic acid (PA): 3-hydroxypalmitic acid (3-OHPA), 7-hydroxypalmitic acid (7-OHPA), and 16-hydroxypalmitic acid (16-OHPA). From the increase in the activation energy for the dissociation of the (Lg + X-OHPA)7- ions, compared with that of the (Lg + PA)7- ion, it is concluded that the -OH groups of the X-OHPA ligands participate in strong (5 - 11 kcal mol-1) intermolecular H-bonds in the hydrophobic cavity of Lg. The results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that the -OH groups of 3-OHPA and 16-OHPA act as H-bond donors and interact with backbone carbonyl oxygens, whereas the -OH group of 7-OHPA acts as both H-bond donor and acceptor with nearby side chains. The capacity for intermolecular H-bonds within the Lg cavity, as suggested by the gas-phase measurements, does not necessarily lead to enhanced binding in aqueous solution. The association constant (Ka) measured for 7-OHPA [(2.3 ± 0.2) × 105 M-1] is similar to the value for the PA [(3.8 ± 0.1) × 105 M-1]; Ka for 3-OHPA [(1.1 ± 0.3) × 106 M-1] is approximately three-times larger, whereas Ka for 16-OHPA [(2.3 ± 0.2) × 104 M-1] is an order of magnitude smaller. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the energetic penalty to desolvating the ligand -OH groups, which is necessary for complex formation, is similar in magnitude to the energetic contribution of the intermolecular H-bonds.

  10. Multiple hydrogen-bonded complexes based on 2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Lee, Hui Hui; Blakey, Idriss; Dargaville, Bronwin; Chirila, Traian V; Whittaker, Andrew K; Smith, Sean C

    2011-09-29

    In the present work, the electronic structures and properties of a series of 2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone(UPy)-based monomers and dimers in various environments (vacuum, chloroform, and water) are studied by density functional theoretical methods. Most dimers prefer to form a DDAA-AADD (D, H-bond donor; A, H-bond acceptor) array in both vacuum and solvents. Topological analysis proved that intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds coexist in the dimers. Frequency and NBO calculations show that all the hydrogen bonds exhibit an obvious red shift in their stretching vibrational frequencies. Larger substituents at position 6 of the pyrimidinone ring with stronger electron-donating ability favor the total binding energy and free energy of dimerization. Calculations on the solvent effect show that dimerization is discouraged by the stronger polarity of the solvent. Further computations show that Dimer-1 may be formed in chloroform, but water molecules may interact with the donor or acceptor sites and hence disrupt the hydrogen bonds of Dimer-1.

  11. Symmetry and diffusivity of the interstitial hydrogen shallow-donor center in In2O3

    DOE PAGES

    Weiser, Philip; Qin, Ying; Yin, Weikai; ...

    2016-11-16

    Uniaxial stress experiments performed for the 3306 cm-1 vibrational line assigned to the interstitial-hydrogen, shallow-donor center in In2O3 reveal its symmetry and transition- moment direction. The defect alignment that can be produced by a [001] stress applied at 165 K is due to a process that is also a hydrogen- diffusion jump, providing a microscopic determination of the diffusion constant for H in In2O3 and its mechanism. Lastly, our experimental results strongly complement theoretical predictions for the structure and diffusion of the interstitial hydrogen donor center in In2O3.

  12. Boron as an Electron-Pair Donor for B⋅⋅⋅Cl Halogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Del Bene, Janet E

    2016-10-05

    MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculations were performed to investigate boron as an electron-pair donor in halogen-bonded complexes (CO)2 (HB):ClX and (N2 )2 (HB):ClX, for X=F, Cl, OH, NC, CN, CCH, CH3 , and H. Equilibrium halogen-bonded complexes with boron as the electron-pair donor are found on all of the potential surfaces, except for (CO)2 (HB):ClCH3 and (N2 )2 (HB):ClF. The majority of these complexes are stabilized by traditional halogen bonds, except for (CO)2 (HB):ClF, (CO)2 (HB):ClCl, (N2 )2 (HB):ClCl, and (N2 )2 (HB):ClOH, which are stabilized by chlorine-shared halogen bonds. These complexes have increased binding energies and shorter B-Cl distances. Charge transfer stabilizes all complexes and occurs from the B lone pair to the σ* Cl-A orbital of ClX, in which A is the atom of X directly bonded to Cl. A second reduced charge-transfer interaction occurs in (CO)2 (HB):ClX complexes from the Cl lone pair to the π* C≡O orbitals. Equation-of-motion coupled cluster singles and doubles (EOM-CCSD) spin-spin coupling constants, (1x) J(B-Cl), across the halogen bonds are also indicative of the changing nature of this bond. (1x) J(B-Cl) values for both series of complexes are positive at long distances, increase as the distance decreases, and then decrease as the halogen bonds change from traditional to chlorine-shared bonds, and begin to approach the values for the covalent bonds in the corresponding ions [(CO)2 (HB)-Cl](+) and [(N2 )2 (HB)-Cl](+) . Changes in (11) B chemical shieldings upon complexation correlate with changes in the charges on B.

  13. A Study about Regioisomeric Hydroquinones with Multiple Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cifuentes, Maximiliano; Cardona, Wilson; Saitz, Claudio; Weiss-López, Boris; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2017-04-07

    A theoretical exploration about hydrogen bonding in a series of synthetic regioisomeric antitumor tricyclic hydroquinones is presented. The stabilization energy for the intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB) formation in four structurally different situations were evaluated: (a) IHB between the proton of a phenolic hydroxyl group and an ortho-carbonyl group (forming a six-membered ring); (b) between the oxygen atom of a phenolic hydroxyl group and the proton of an hydroxyalkyl group (seven membered ring); (c) between the proton of a phenolic hydroxyl group with the oxygen atom of the hydroxyl group of a hydroxyalkyl moiety (seven-membered ring); and (d) between the proton of a phenolic hydroxyl group and an oxygen atom directly bonded to the aromatic ring in ortho position (five-membered ring). A conformational analysis for the rotation around the hydroxyalkyl substituent is also performed. It is observed that there is a correspondence between the conformational energies and the IHB. The strongest intramolecular hydrogen bonds are those involving a phenolic proton and a carbonyl oxygen atom, forming a six-membered ring, and the weakest are those involving a phenolic proton with the oxygen atom of the chromenone, forming five-membered rings. Additionally, the synthesis and structural assignment of two pairs of regioisomeric hydroquinones, by 2D-NMR experiments, are reported. These results can be useful in the design of biologically-active molecules.

  14. Competition of hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds in complexes of hypohalous acids with nitrogenated bases.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Blanco, Fernando; Solimannejad, Mohammad; Elguero, Jose

    2008-10-30

    A theoretical study of the complexes formed by hypohalous acids (HOX, X = F, Cl, Br, I, and At) with three nitrogenated bases (NH 3, N 2, and NCH) has been carried out by means of ab initio methods, up to MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ computational method. In general, two minima complexes are found, one with an OH...N hydrogen bond and the other one with a X...N halogen bond. While the first one is more stable for the smallest halogen derivatives, the two complexes present similar stabilities for the iodine case and the halogen-bonded structure is the most stable one for the hypoastatous acid complexes.

  15. Chloroform as a hydrogen atom donor in Barton reductive decarboxylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Ho, Junming; Zheng, Jingjing; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Truhlar, Donald G; Ko, Eun Jung; Savage, G Paul; Williams, Craig M; Coote, Michelle L; Tsanaktsidis, John

    2013-07-05

    The utility of chloroform as both a solvent and a hydrogen atom donor in Barton reductive decarboxylation of a range of carboxylic acids was recently demonstrated (Ko, E. J. et al. Org. Lett. 2011, 13, 1944). In the present work, a combination of electronic structure calculations, direct dynamics calculations, and experimental studies was carried out to investigate how chloroform acts as a hydrogen atom donor in Barton reductive decarboxylations and to determine the scope of this process. The results from this study show that hydrogen atom transfer from chloroform occurs directly under kinetic control and is aided by a combination of polar effects and quantum mechanical tunneling. Chloroform acts as an effective hydrogen atom donor for primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl radicals, although significant chlorination was also observed with unstrained tertiary carboxylic acids.

  16. Alternative strategy for adjusting the association specificity of hydrogen-bonded duplexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Penghui; Chu, Hongzhu; Li, Xianghui; Feng, Wen; Deng, Pengchi; Yuan, Lihua; Gong, Bing

    2011-01-07

    A strategy for creating new association specificity of hydrogen-bonded duplexes by varying the spacings between neighboring hydrogen bonds is described. Incorporation of naphthalene-based residues has provided oligoamide strands that pair into duplexes sharing the same H-bonding sequences (e.g., DDAA) but differing in the spacings between their intermolecular hydrogen bonds, leading to homo- or heteroduplexes. The ability to manipulate association-specificity as demonstrated by this work may be extended to other multiple hydrogen bonded systems, thereby further enhancing the diversity of multiple hydrogen-bonded association units for constructing supramolecular structures.

  17. Control of redox reactivity of flavin and pterin coenzymes by metal ion coordination and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kojima, Takahiko

    2008-03-01

    The electron-transfer activities of flavin and pterin coenzymes can be fine-tuned by coordination of metal ions, protonation and hydrogen bonding. Formation of hydrogen bonds with a hydrogen-bond receptor in metal-flavin complexes is made possible depending on the type of coordination bond that can leave the hydrogen-bonding sites. The electron-transfer catalytic functions of flavin and pterin coenzymes are described by showing a number of examples of both thermal and photochemical redox reactions, which proceed by controlling the electron-transfer reactivity of coenzymes with metal ion binding, protonation and hydrogen bonding.

  18. Molecular and ionic hydrogen bond formation in fluorous solvents.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Kristi L; Weber, Stephen G

    2009-01-08

    There are only a few studies of noncovalent association in fluorous solvents and even fewer that are quantitative. A full understanding, particularly of stoichiometry and binding strength of noncovalent interactions in fluorous solvents could be very useful in improved molecular-receptor-based extractions, advancements in sensor technologies, crystal engineering, and supramolecular chemistry. This work investigates hydrogen bonding between heterocyclic bases and a perfluoropolyether with a terminal carboxylic acid group (Krytox 157FSH (1)), chiefly in FC-72 (a mixture of perfluorohexanes). In particular, we were interested in whether or not proton transfer occurs, and if so, under what conditions in H-bonded complexes. Continuous variations experiments show that in FC-72 weaker bases (pyrazine, pyrimidine, and quinazoline) form 1:1 complexes with 1, whereas stronger bases (quinoline, pyridine, and isoquinoline) form 1:3 complexes. Ultraviolet and infrared spectral signatures reveal that the 1:1 complexes are molecular (B.HA) whereas the 1:3 complexes are ionic (BH+.A-HAHA). Infrared spectra of 1:3 ionic complexes are discussed in detail. Literature and experimental data on complexes between N-heterocyclic bases and carboxylic acids in a range of solvents are compiled to compare solvent effects on proton transfer. Polar solvents support ionic hydrogen bonds at a 1:1 mol ratio. In nonpolar organic solvents, ionic hydrogen bonds are only observed in complexes with 1:2 (base/acid) stoichiometries. In fluorous solvents, a larger excess of acid, 1:3, is necessary to facilitate proton transfer in hydrogen bonds between carboxylic acids and the bases studied.

  19. The exploration of hydrogen bonding properties of 2,6- and 3,5-diethynylpyridine by IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Danijela; Kovačević, Goran; Vazdar, Mario

    2015-02-05

    Hydrogen bonding properties of 2,6- and 3,5-diethynylpyridine were analyzed by exploring of their interactions with trimethylphosphate, as hydrogen bond acceptor, or phenol, as hydrogen bond donor, in tetrachloroethene C2Cl4. The employment of IR spectroscopy enabled unravelling of their interaction pattern as well as the determination of their association constants (Kc) and standard reaction enthalpies (ΔrH(⦵)). The association of diethynylpyridines with trimethylphosphate in stoichiometry 1:1 is established through CH⋯O hydrogen bond, accompanied by the secondary interaction between CC moiety and CH3 group of trimethylphosphate. In the complexes with phenol, along with the expected OH⋯N interaction, CC⋯HO interaction is revealed. In contrast to 2,6-diethynylpyridine where the spatial arrangement of hydrogen bond accepting groups enables the simultaneous involvement of phenol OH group in both OH⋯N and OH⋯CC hydrogen bond, in the complex between phenol and 3,5-diethynylpyridine this is not possible. It is postulated that cooperativity effects, arisen from the certain type of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds, contribute the stability gain of the latter. Associations of diethynylpyridines with trimethylphosphate are characterized as weak (Kc≈0.8-0.9mol(-1)dm(3); -ΔrH(⦵)≈5-8kJmol(-1)), while their complexes with phenol as medium strong (Kc≈5mol(-1)dm(3); -ΔrH(⦵)≈15-35kJmol(-1)). Experimental findings on the studied complexes are supported with the calculations conducted at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in the gas phase. Two conformers of diethynylpyridine⋯trimethylphosphate dimers are formed via CH⋯O interaction, whereas dimers between phenol and diethynylpyridines are established through OH⋯N interaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The exploration of hydrogen bonding properties of 2,6- and 3,5-diethynylpyridine by IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojta, Danijela; Kovačević, Goran; Vazdar, Mario

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen bonding properties of 2,6- and 3,5-diethynylpyridine were analyzed by exploring of their interactions with trimethylphosphate, as hydrogen bond acceptor, or phenol, as hydrogen bond donor, in tetrachloroethene C2Cl4. The employment of IR spectroscopy enabled unravelling of their interaction pattern as well as the determination of their association constants (Kc) and standard reaction enthalpies (ΔrH⦵). The association of diethynylpyridines with trimethylphosphate in stoichiometry 1:1 is established through tbnd Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, accompanied by the secondary interaction between Ctbnd C moiety and CH3 group of trimethylphosphate. In the complexes with phenol, along with the expected OH⋯N interaction, Ctbnd C⋯HO interaction is revealed. In contrast to 2,6-diethynylpyridine where the spatial arrangement of hydrogen bond accepting groups enables the simultaneous involvement of phenol OH group in both OH⋯N and OH⋯Ctbnd C hydrogen bond, in the complex between phenol and 3,5-diethynylpyridine this is not possible. It is postulated that cooperativity effects, arisen from the certain type of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds, contribute the stability gain of the latter. Associations of diethynylpyridines with trimethylphosphate are characterized as weak (Kc ≈ 0.8-0.9 mol-1 dm3; -ΔrH⦵ ≈ 5-8 kJ mol-1), while their complexes with phenol as medium strong (Kc ≈ 5 mol-1 dm3; -ΔrH⦵ ≈ 15-35 kJ mol-1). Experimental findings on the studied complexes are supported with the calculations conducted at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in the gas phase. Two conformers of diethynylpyridine⋯trimethylphosphate dimers are formed via tbnd Csbnd H⋯O interaction, whereas dimers between phenol and diethynylpyridines are established through OH⋯N interaction.

  1. The influence of potassium cation on a strong OHO hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Majerz, Irena

    2011-03-07

    The influence of the potassium cation on the OHO hydrogen bond in potassium chloromaleate was investigated. Theoretical methods commonly used for investigating hydrogen bonds, such as the analysis of electron density at the hydrogen bond critical points, and the calculation of the shape of the potential energy curves and potential energy surfaces, show that the strong OHO hydrogen bond can be modified by the potassium cation located around the chloromaleate anion.

  2. Car-Parrinello simulation of hydrogen bond dynamics in sodium hydrogen bissulfate.

    PubMed

    Pirc, Gordana; Stare, Jernej; Mavri, Janez

    2010-06-14

    We studied proton dynamics of a short hydrogen bond of the crystalline sodium hydrogen bissulfate, a hydrogen-bonded ferroelectric system. Our approach was based on the established Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) methodology, followed by an a posteriori quantization of the OH stretching motion. The latter approach is based on snapshot structures taken from CPMD trajectory, calculation of proton potentials, and solving of the vibrational Schrodinger equation for each of the snapshot potentials. The so obtained contour of the OH stretching band has the center of gravity at about 1540 cm(-1) and a half width of about 700 cm(-1), which is in qualitative agreement with the experimental infrared spectrum. The corresponding values for the deuterated form are 1092 and 600 cm(-1), respectively. The hydrogen probability densities obtained by solving the vibrational Schrodinger equation allow for the evaluation of potential of mean force along the proton transfer coordinate. We demonstrate that for the present system the free energy profile is of the single-well type and features a broad and shallow minimum near the center of the hydrogen bond, allowing for frequent and barrierless proton (or deuteron) jumps. All the calculated time-averaged geometric parameters were in reasonable agreement with the experimental neutron diffraction data. As the present methodology for quantization of proton motion is applicable to a variety of hydrogen-bonded systems, it is promising for potential use in computational enzymology.

  3. Car-Parrinello simulation of hydrogen bond dynamics in sodium hydrogen bissulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirc, Gordana; Stare, Jernej; Mavri, Janez

    2010-06-01

    We studied proton dynamics of a short hydrogen bond of the crystalline sodium hydrogen bissulfate, a hydrogen-bonded ferroelectric system. Our approach was based on the established Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) methodology, followed by an a posteriori quantization of the OH stretching motion. The latter approach is based on snapshot structures taken from CPMD trajectory, calculation of proton potentials, and solving of the vibrational Schrödinger equation for each of the snapshot potentials. The so obtained contour of the OH stretching band has the center of gravity at about 1540 cm-1 and a half width of about 700 cm-1, which is in qualitative agreement with the experimental infrared spectrum. The corresponding values for the deuterated form are 1092 and 600 cm-1, respectively. The hydrogen probability densities obtained by solving the vibrational Schrödinger equation allow for the evaluation of potential of mean force along the proton transfer coordinate. We demonstrate that for the present system the free energy profile is of the single-well type and features a broad and shallow minimum near the center of the hydrogen bond, allowing for frequent and barrierless proton (or deuteron) jumps. All the calculated time-averaged geometric parameters were in reasonable agreement with the experimental neutron diffraction data. As the present methodology for quantization of proton motion is applicable to a variety of hydrogen-bonded systems, it is promising for potential use in computational enzymology.

  4. Exploring the Relationships Between Anharmonicity and OH Bond Lengths in Hydrogen Bonded Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Anne B.; Xantheas, Sotiris

    2016-06-01

    In this talk we explore the effects of anharmonicity on the zero-point averaged OH bond lengths in hydrogen bonded complexes. Clusters with as many as six HF molecules or water molecules are explored as well as protonated water clusters and complexes of water clusters with F^-, Cl^-, Br^- and OH^-. It is shown that there is a universal correlation between the vibrationally averaged OH or HF bond length and the anharmonc OH or HF stretch frequency. This relationship provides an extension to previously investigated correlations between the equilibrium bond lengths and harmonic frequencies and allows one to anticipate OH or HF bond lengths based on measured frequencies. In addition, differences between the R_z and R_0 structures are discussed within the context of these weakly bound complexes.

  5. Predictive binding geometry of ligands to DNA minor groove: isohelicity and hydrogen-bonding pattern.

    PubMed

    Stockert, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of drugs and dyes with nucleic acids, particularly when binding to DNA minor groove occurs, has increasing importance in biomedical sciences. This is due to the resulting biological activity and to the possibility of recognizing AT and GC base pairs. In such cases, DNA binding can be predicted if appropriate helical and hydrogen-bonding parameters are deduced from DNA models, and a simplified geometrical rule in the form of a stencil is then applied on computer-drawn molecules of interest. Relevant structure parameter values for minor groove binders are the length (4.6 < L < 5.4 Å) and angle (152 < σ < 156.5°) between three consecutive units, measured at the level of hydrogen donor or acceptor groups. Application of the stencil shows that predictive methods can aid in the design of new compounds, by checking the possible binding of isohelical sequence-specific ligands along the DNA minor groove.

  6. Spectroscopic Evidences for Strong Hydrogen Bonds with Selenomethionine in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mundlapati, V Rao; Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Ghosh, Sanat; Purame, Umesh Kumar; Pandey, Shubhant; Acharya, Rudresh; Pal, Nitish; Tiwari, Prince; Biswal, Himansu S

    2017-02-16

    Careful protein structure analysis unravels many unknown and unappreciated noncovalent interactions that control protein structure; one such unrecognized interaction in protein is selenium centered hydrogen bonds (SeCHBs). We report, for the first time, SeCHBs involving the amide proton and selenium of selenomethionine (Mse), i.e., amide-N-H···Se H-bonds discerned in proteins. Using mass selective and conformer specific high resolution vibrational spectroscopy, gold standard quantum chemical calculations at CCSD(T), and in-depth protein structure analysis, we establish that amide-N-H···Se and amide-N-H···Te H-bonds are as strong as conventional amide-NH···O and amide-NH···O═C H-bonds despite smaller electronegativity of selenium and tellurium than oxygen. It is in fact, electronegativity, atomic charge, and polarizability of the H-bond acceptor atoms are at play in deciding the strength of H-bonds. The amide-N-H···Se and amide-N-H···Te H-bonds presented here are not only new additions to the ever expanding world of noncovalent interactions, but also are of central importance to design new force-fields for better biomolecular structure simulations.

  7. Quantum Chemical Modeling of Hydrogen Bonding in Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) is an important and very general phenomenon. H-bonding is part of the basis of life in DNA, key in controlling the properties of water and ice, and critical to modern applications such as crystal engineering, catalysis applications, pharmaceutical and agrochemical development. H-bonding also plays a significant role for many ionic liquids (IL), determining the secondary structuring and affecting key physical parameters. ILs exhibit a particularly diverse and wide range of traditional as well as non-standard forms of H-bonding, in particular the doubly ionic H-bond is important. Understanding the fundamental nature of the H-bonds that form within ILs is critical, and one way of accessing this information, that cannot be recovered by any other computational method, is through quantum chemical electronic structure calculations. However, an appropriate method and basis set must be employed, and a robust procedure for determining key structures is essential. Modern generalised solvation models have recently been extended to ILs, bringing both advantages and disadvantages. QC can provide a range of information on geometry, IR and Raman spectra, NMR spectra and at a more fundamental level through analysis of the electronic structure.

  8. Local modes in a DNA polymer with hydrogen bond defect.

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, V K; Van Zandt, L L

    1994-01-01

    Vibrations of a homopolymer DNA with localized hydrogen bond defects have been examined using the recently developed decaying mode theory for long-chain polymers with local structural defects. For a poly(dA)-poly(dT) homopolymer having perturbed hydrogen bonds in one base pair, a localized mode at 63.2 cm-1 has been found. This mode has a very nearly pure H-bond stretch or "breathing" character, although the backbones do not separate. This agrees in frequency with a similar result found by other authors using a different approach. We search the full microwave frequency range for other local modes for several models of weakened H bonds. Besides the local mode with breathing characteristics, local modes with other characteristic motions were found, but only for asymmetrically perturbed bonds. We find in general that local modes are not very robust, requiring quite specific, narrow ranges in parameter space. They are also not abundant, there being only three in our most prolific model. PMID:7696483

  9. Hydrogen-hydrogen bonds in highly branched alkanes and in alkane complexes: A DFT, ab initio, QTAIM, and ELF study.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Norberto K V; Firme, Caio L

    2014-03-06

    The hydrogen-hydrogen (H-H) bond or hydrogen-hydrogen bonding is formed by the interaction between a pair of identical or similar hydrogen atoms that are close to electrical neutrality and it yields a stabilizing contribution to the overall molecular energy. This work provides new, important information regarding hydrogen-hydrogen bonds. We report that stability of alkane complexes and boiling point of alkanes are directly related to H-H bond, which means that intermolecular interactions between alkane chains are directional H-H bond, not nondirectional induced dipole-induced dipole. Moreover, we show the existence of intramolecular H-H bonds in highly branched alkanes playing a secondary role in their increased stabilities in comparison with linear or less branched isomers. These results were accomplished by different approaches: density functional theory (DFT), ab initio, quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), and electron localization function (ELF).

  10. Discrimination of hydrogen-bonded complexes with axial chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2002-10-01

    The chiral self-discrimination of twelve molecules showing axial chirality has been studied. They included peroxides, hydrazines, carboxylic acids, amides, and allenes. The homo and heterochiral dimers of the selected compounds, that present two hydrogen bonds, have been studied by means of density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31+G**) and ab initio (MP2/6-31+G** and MP2/6-311++G**) methods. The energetic differences found for the complexes of each compound have been rationalized based on their electron density maps and the natural bond orbital analysis. In some cases, intermolecular oxygen-oxygen interactions have been found and interpreted as additional stabilizing contacts.

  11. A revised structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II from a neutron fiber diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, P.; Nishiyama, Y.; Chanzy, H.

    1999-11-03

    The crystal and molecular structure and hydrogen bonding system in cellulose II have been revised using new neutron diffraction data extending to 1.2 {angstrom} resolution collected from two highly crystalline fiber samples of mercerized flax. Mercerization was achieved in NaOH/H{sub 2}O for one sample and in NaOD/D{sub 2}O for the other, corresponding to the labile hydroxymethyl moieties being hydrogenated and deuterated, respectively. Fourier difference maps were calculated in which neutron difference amplitudes were combined with phases calculated from two revised X-ray models of cellulose II. The revised phasing models were determined by refinement against the X-ray data set of Kolpak and Blackwell, using the LALS methodology. Both models have two antiparallel chains organized in a P2{sub 1} space group and unit cell parameters: a = 8.01 {angstrom}, b = 9.04 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, and {gamma} = 117.1{degree}. One has equivalent backbone conformations for both chains but different conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties: gt for the origin chain and tg for the center chain. The second model based on the recent crystal structures of cellotetraose, has different conformations for the two chains but nearly equivalent conformations for the hydroxymethyl moieties. On the basis of the X-ray data alone, the models could not be differentiated. From the neutron Fourier difference maps, possible labile hydrogen atom positions were identified for each model and refined using LALS. The second model is significantly different from previous proposals based on the crystal structures of cellotetraose, MD simulations of cellulose II, and any potential hydrogen-bonding network in the structure of cellulose II determined in earlier X-ray fiber diffraction studies. The exact localization of the labile hydrogen atoms involved in this bonding, together with their donor and acceptor characteristics, is presented and discussed. This study provides, for the first time

  12. Analysis of Proton NMR in Hydrogen Bonds in Terms of Lone-Pair and Bond Orbital Contributions.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Kiplangat; Aucar, Gustavo A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-12-07

    NMR spectroscopic parameters of the proton involved in hydrogen bonding are studied theoretically. The set of molecules includes systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds, internal hydrogen bonds but no resonance stabilization, the acetic acid dimer (AAD), a DNA base pair, and the hydrogen succinate anion (HSA). Ethanol and guanine represent reference molecules without hydrogen bonding. The calculations are based on zero-point vibrationally averaged molecular structures in order to include anharmonicity effects in the NMR parameters. An analysis of the calculated NMR shielding and J-coupling is performed in terms of "chemist's orbitals", that is, localized molecular orbitals (LMOs) representing lone-pairs, atomic cores, and bonds. The LMO analysis associates some of the strong de-shielding of the protons in resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds with delocalization involving the π-backbone. Resonance is also shown to be an important factor causing de-shielding of the OH protons for AAD and HSA, but not for the DNA base pair. Nitromalonamide (NMA) and HSA have particularly strong hydrogen bonds exhibiting signs of covalency in the associated J-couplings. The analysis results show how NMR spectroscopic parameters that are characteristic for hydrogen bonded protons are influenced by the geometry and degree of covalency of the hydrogen bond as well as intra- and intermolecular resonance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hydrogen-bonding interactions between a nitrile-based functional ionic liquid and DMSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yu; Deng, Geng; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2016-11-01

    Task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) have been introduced by incorporating additional functional groups in the cation or anion to impart specific properties or reactivates. In this work, the hydrogen-bonding interactions between a nitrile-functional TSIL 1-propylnitrile-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([PCNMIM][BF4]) and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) were investigated in detail by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), combined with hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and density functional theory calculations (DFT). It was found that, first, introducing a nitrile group into the alkyl chain does not change the main interaction site in the cation. It is still the C2 hydrogen. So the v(C2-H) is more sensitive to the environmental change and can be used as an indicator of the environments change of IL. Second, the wavenumber shift changes of v(C2-H) have two turning points (xDMSO ≈ 0.6 and 0.9), dividing the dilution process into three stages. Combined with the calculation results, the dilution process is identified as: From larger ion clusters to smaller ion clusters (xDMSO < 0.6), then to ion pairs (0.6 0.9). Introducing a nitrile group into the alkyl chain does not influence the dilution process of IL dissolving in DMSO. Third, the Ctbnd N in [PCNMIM][BF4] can work as an electron donor in forming hydrogen-bonds with the methyl group of [PCNMIM]+ and DMSO, but its strength is weaker than that formed by the imidazolium ring C-Hs. The dual roles of the cation to work as both electron acceptor and donor expand the wide applications of this nitrile-functional ionic liquid.

  14. Hydrogen bonding in selected vanadates: a Raman and infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Erickson, Kristy L; Weier, Matt L

    2004-08-01

    Water plays an important role in the stability of minerals containing the deca and hexavanadates ions. A selection of minerals including pascoite, huemulite, barnesite, hewettite, metahewettite, hummerite has been analysed. Infrared spectroscopy combined with Raman spectroscopy has enabled the spectra of the water HOH stretching bands to be determined. The use of the Libowitsky type function allows for the estimation of hydrogen bond distances to be determined. The strength of the hydrogen bonds can be assessed by these hydrogen bond distances. An arbitrary value of 2.74A was used to separate the hydrogen bonds into two categories such that bond distances less than this value are considered as strong hydrogen bonds whereas hydrogen bond distances greater than this value are considered relatively weaker. Importantly infrared spectroscopy enables the estimation of hydrogen bond distances using an empirical function.

  15. Supramolecular Archimedean cages assembled with 72 hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuzhou; Hu, Chunhua; Comotti, Angiolina; Ward, Michael D

    2011-07-22

    Self-assembly of multiple components into well-defined and predictable structures remains one of the foremost challenges in chemistry. Here, we report on the rational design of a supramolecular cage assembled from 20 ions of three distinct species through 72 hydrogen bonds. The cage is constructed from two kinds of hexagonal molecular tiles, a tris(guanidinium)nitrate cluster and a hexa(4-sulfonatophenyl)benzene, joined at their edges through complementary and metrically matched N-H···O-S hydrogen bonds to form a truncated octahedron, one of the Archimedean polyhedra. The truncated octahedron, with an interior volume of 2200 cubic angstroms, serves as the composite building unit of a body-centered cubic zeolite-like framework, which exhibits an ability to encapsulate a wide range of differently charged species, including organic molecules, transition metal complexes, and "ship-in-a-bottle" nanoclusters not observed otherwise.

  16. Supramolecular Archimedean Cages Assembled with 72 Hydrogen Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuzhou; Hu, Chunhua; Comotti, Angiolina; Ward, Michael D.

    2011-12-09

    Self-assembly of multiple components into well-defined and predictable structures remains one of the foremost challenges in chemistry. Here, we report on the rational design of a supramolecular cage assembled from 20 ions of three distinct species through 72 hydrogen bonds. The cage is constructed from two kinds of hexagonal molecular tiles, a tris(guanidinium)nitrate cluster and a hexa(4-sulfonatophenyl)benzene, joined at their edges through complementary and metrically matched N-H {hor_ellipsis} O-S hydrogen bonds to form a truncated octahedron, one of the Archimedean polyhedra. The truncated octahedron, with an interior volume of 2200 cubic angstroms, serves as the composite building unit of a body-centered cubic zeolite-like framework, which exhibits an ability to encapsulate a wide range of differently charged species, including organic molecules, transition metal complexes, and 'ship-in-a-bottle' nanoclusters not observed otherwise.

  17. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Paper Strength Properties.

    PubMed

    Przybysz, Piotr; Dubowik, Marcin; Kucner, Marta Anna; Przybysz, Kazimierz; Przybysz Buzała, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds between fibres on static and dynamic strength properties of paper. A commercial bleached pinewood kraft pulp was soaked in water, refined in a PFI, and used to form paper webs in different solvents, such as water, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol, to determine the effect of their dipole moment on static and dynamic strength properties of resulting paper sheets. Paper which was formed in water, being the solvent of the highest dipole moment among the tested ones, showed the highest breaking length and tear resistance. When paper webs were formed in n-butanol, which was the least polar among the solvents, these parameters were reduced by around 75%. These results provide evidence of the importance of water in paper web formation and strong impact of hydrogen bonds between fibres on strength properties of paper.

  18. A hydrogen-bonded 'trimer' of two symmetric dipyridones.

    PubMed

    Maverick, E F; Wash, P L; Lightner, D A

    2001-03-01

    The isomers 3,3'-(1,2-ethynediyl)bis(2-pyridone), (I), and 6,6'-(1,2-ethynediyl)bis(2-pyridone), (II), were designed to form a hydrogen-bonded pair through alignment of their complementary cyclic lactam moieties. Instead, an equimolar mixture of (I) and (II) dissolved in methanol produced crystals of 3,3'-(1,2-ethynediyl)bis(2-pyridone)-6,6'-(1,2-ethynediyl)bis(2-pyridone)-methanol (1/2/2), 0.5C(12)H(8)N(2)O(2) x C(12)H(8)N(2)O(2) x CH(4)O, in which one molecule of (I), situated at a center of symmetry, is hydrogen bonded to two molecules of (II) and to two molecules of methanol.

  19. Anharmonic dynamics of intramolecular hydrogen bonds driven by DNA breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, B. S.; Stanev, V. G.; Bishop, A. R.; Rasmussen, K. Ø.

    2012-12-01

    We study the effects of the anharmonic strand-separation dynamics of double-stranded DNA on the infrared spectra of the intramolecular base-pairing hydrogen bonds. Using the extended Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model for the DNA breathing dynamics coupled with the Lippincott-Schroeder potential for N-H⋯N and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding, we identify a high-frequency (˜96 THz) feature in the infrared spectra. We show that this sharp peak arises as a result of the anharmonic base-pair breathing dynamics of DNA. In addition, we study the effects of friction on the infrared spectra. For higher temperatures (˜300 K), where the anharmonicity of DNA dynamics is pronounced, the high-frequency peak is always present irrespective of the friction strength.

  20. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Paper Strength Properties

    PubMed Central

    Przybysz, Piotr; Dubowik, Marcin; Kucner, Marta Anna; Przybysz, Kazimierz; Przybysz Buzała, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds between fibres on static and dynamic strength properties of paper. A commercial bleached pinewood kraft pulp was soaked in water, refined in a PFI, and used to form paper webs in different solvents, such as water, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol, to determine the effect of their dipole moment on static and dynamic strength properties of resulting paper sheets. Paper which was formed in water, being the solvent of the highest dipole moment among the tested ones, showed the highest breaking length and tear resistance. When paper webs were formed in n-butanol, which was the least polar among the solvents, these parameters were reduced by around 75%. These results provide evidence of the importance of water in paper web formation and strong impact of hydrogen bonds between fibres on strength properties of paper. PMID:27228172

  1. Nuclear quantum effects and hydrogen bond fluctuations in water.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Cuny, Jérôme; Parrinello, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2013-09-24

    The hydrogen bond (HB) is central to our understanding of the properties of water. However, despite intense theoretical and experimental study, it continues to hold some surprises. Here, we show from an analysis of ab initio simulations that take proper account of nuclear quantum effects that the hydrogen-bonded protons in liquid water experience significant excursions in the direction of the acceptor oxygen atoms. This generates a small but nonnegligible fraction of transient autoprotolysis events that are not seen in simulations with classical nuclei. These events are associated with major rearrangements of the electronic density, as revealed by an analysis of the computed Wannier centers and (1)H chemical shifts. We also show that the quantum fluctuations exhibit significant correlations across neighboring HBs, consistent with an ephemeral shuttling of protons along water wires. We end by suggesting possible implications for our understanding of how perturbations (solvated ions, interfaces, and confinement) might affect the HB network in water.

  2. Probing the hydrogen bonding structure in the Rieske protein.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Youssef; Trivella, Aurélien; Gross, Julien; Hellwig, Petra

    2010-10-25

    The use of the far-infrared spectral range presents a novel approach for analysis of the hydrogen bonding in proteins. Here it is presented for the analysis of Fe--S vibrations (500-200 cm(-1)) and of the intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding signature (300-50 cm(-1)) in the Rieske protein from Thermus thermophilus as a function of temperature and pH. Three pH values were adequately chosen in order to study all the possible protonation states of the coordinating histidines. The Fe--S vibrations showed pH-dependent shifts in the FIR spectra in line with the change of protonation state of the histidines coordinating the [2Fe--2S] cluster. Measurements of the low-frequency signals between 300 and 30 K demonstrated the presence of a distinct overall hydrogen bonding network and a more rigid structure for a pH higher than 10. To further support the analysis, the redox-dependent shifts of the secondary structure were investigated by means of an electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectroscopic approach in the mid infrared. The results confirmed a clear pH dependency and an influence of the immediate environment of the cluster on the secondary structure. The results support the hypothesis that structure-mediated changes in the environment of iron--sulfur centers play a critical role in regulating enzymatic catalysis. The data point towards the role of the overall internal hydrogen bonding organization for the geometry and the electronic properties of the cluster.

  3. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  4. Deconfinement of electric charges in hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bo-Jie; Chern, Chyh-Hong

    2017-08-01

    In addition to the gauge charges, a new charge degree of freedom is identified in the deconfined phase in the lattice Ising gauge theory. While applying to the hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics, the new charge is essentially the electric charge, leading to the divergent dielectric susceptibility. The new degree of freedom paves an experimentally accessible way to identify the deconfined phase in the lattice Ising gauge theory.

  5. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  6. Protonic transport through solitons in hydrogen-bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, L.; Jayanthi, S.; Muniyappan, A.; Gopi, D.

    2011-09-01

    We offer an alternative route for investigating soliton solutions in hydrogen-bonded (HB) chains. We invoke the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method coupled with symbolic computation to solve the governing equation of motion for proton dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of proton transfer in HB chains through bell-shaped soliton excitations, which trigger the bio-energy transport in most biological systems. This solitonic mechanism of proton transfer could play functional roles in muscular contraction, enzymatic activity and oxidative phosphorylation.

  7. Electrostatics determine vibrational frequency shifts in hydrogen bonded complexes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Arghya; Mondal, Sohidul Islam; Sen, Saumik; Ghosh, Debashree; Patwari, G Naresh

    2014-12-14

    The red-shifts in the acetylenic C-H stretching vibration of C-H∙∙∙X (X = O, N) hydrogen-bonded complexes increase with an increase in the basicity of the Lewis base. Analysis of various components of stabilization energy suggests that the observed red-shifts are correlated with the electrostatic component of the stabilization energy, while the dispersion modulates the stabilization energy.

  8. NMR studies of solid pentachlorophenol-4-methylpyridine complexes exhibiting strong OHN hydrogen bonds: geometric H/D isotope effects and hydrogen bond coupling cause isotopic polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ip, Brenda C K; Shenderovich, Ilya G; Tolstoy, Peter M; Frydel, Jaroslaw; Denisov, Gleb S; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    We have studied the hydrogen bond interactions of (15)N labeled 4-methylpyridine (4-MP) with pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the solid state and in polar solution using various NMR techniques. Previous spectroscopic, X-ray, and neutron crystallographic studies showed that the triclinic 1:1 complex (4-MPPCP) exhibits the strongest known intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond in the solid state. By contrast, deuteration of the hydrogen bond gives rise to the formation of a monoclinic structure exhibiting a weaker hydrogen bond. By performing NMR experiments at different deuterium fractions and taking advantage of dipolar (1)H-(15)N recoupling under combined fast MAS and (1)H decoupling, we provide an explanation of the origin of the isotopic polymorphism of 4-MPPCP and improve previous chemical shift correlations for OHN hydrogen bonds. Because of anharmonic ground state vibrations, an ODN hydrogen bond in the triclinic form exhibits a shorter oxygen-hydron and a longer oxygen-nitrogen distance as compared to surrounding OHN hydrogen bonds, which also implies a reduction of the local dipole moment. The dipole-dipole interaction between adjacent coupled OHN hydrogen bonds which determines the structure of triclinic 4-MPPCP is then reduced by deuteration, and other interactions become dominant, leading to the monoclinic form. Finally, the observation of stronger OHN hydrogen bonds by (1)H NMR in polar solution as compared to the solid state is discussed.

  9. Quantum mechanics models of the methanol dimer: OH⋯O hydrogen bonds of β-d-glucose moieties from crystallographic data.

    PubMed

    Cintrón, Michael Santiago; Johnson, Glenn P; French, Alfred D

    2017-03-19

    The interaction of two methanol molecules, simplified models of carbohydrates and cellulose, was examined using a variety of quantum mechanics (QM) levels of theory. Energy plots for hydrogen bonding distance (H⋯O) and angle (OH⋯O) were constructed. All but two experimental structures were located in stabilized areas on the vacuum phase energy plots. Each of the 399 models was analyzed with Bader's atoms-in-molecules (AIM) theory, which showed a widespread ability by the dimer models to form OH⋯O hydrogen bonds that have bond paths and Bond Critical Points. Continuum solvation calculations suggest that a portion of the energy-stabilized structures could occur in the presence of water. A survey of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for all donor-acceptor interactions in β-D-glucose moieties examined the similarities and differences among the hydroxyl groups and acetal oxygen atoms that participate in hydrogen bonds. Comparable behavior was observed for the O2H, O3H, O4H, and O6H hydroxyls, acting either as acceptors or donors. Ring O atoms showed distinct hydrogen bonding behavior that favored mid-length hydrogen bonds.

  10. Strong Ionic Hydrogen Bonding Causes a Spectral Isotope Effect in Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Hara, Miwa; Stalcup, T. Page; Xie, Aihua; Hoff, Wouter D.

    2013-01-01

    Standard hydrogen bonds are of great importance for protein structure and function. Ionic hydrogen bonds often are significantly stronger than standard hydrogen bonds and exhibit unique properties, but their role in proteins is not well understood. We report that hydrogen/deuterium exchange causes a redshift in the visible absorbance spectrum of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). We expand the range of interpretable isotope effects by assigning this spectral isotope effect (SIE) to a functionally important hydrogen bond at the active site of PYP. The inverted sign and extent of this SIE is explained by the ionic nature and strength of this hydrogen bond. These results show the relevance of ionic hydrogen bonding for protein active sites, and reveal that the inverted SIE is a novel, to our knowledge, tool to probe ionic hydrogen bonds. Our results support a classification of hydrogen bonds that distinguishes the properties of ionic hydrogen bonds from those of both standard and low barrier hydrogen bonds, and show how this classification helps resolve a recent debate regarding active site hydrogen bonding in PYP. PMID:24314088

  11. Electronic origin of the dependence of hydrogen bond strengths on nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor hydrogen bonds in polyhedral water clusters (H 2 O) n , n = 8, 20 and 24

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Suehiro; Akase, Dai; Aida, Misako; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2016-01-01

    The relative stability and the characteristics of the hydrogen bond networks in the cubic cages of (H2O)8, dodecahedral cages of (H2O)20,and tetrakaidodecahedral cages of (H2O)24 are studied. The charge-transfer and dispersion interaction terms of every pair of the hydrogen bonds are evaluated by using the perturbation theory based on the locally-projected molecular orbital (LPMO PT). Every water molecule and every hydrogen-bonded pair in polyhedral clusters are classified by the types of the adjacent molecules and hydrogen bonds. The relative binding energies among the polyhedral clusters are grouped by these classifications. The necessary condition for the stable conformers and the rules of the ordering of the relative stability among the isomers are derived from the analysis. The O–O distances and the pair-wise charge-transfer terms are dependent not only on the types of the hydrogen donor and acceptor waters but also on the types of the adjacent waters. This dependence is analyzed with Mulliken’s charge-transfer theory. The work is partially supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Science Research of JSPS (SI, DA, MA). SSX was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy.

  12. Quinacridone on Ag(111): Hydrogen Bonding versus Chirality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Quinacridone (QA) has recently gained attention as an organic semiconductor with unexpectedly high performance in organic devices. The strong intermolecular connection via hydrogen bonds is expected to promote good structural order. When deposited on a substrate, another relevant factor comes into play, namely the 2D-chirality of the quinacridone molecules adsorbed on a surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of monolayer quinacridone on Ag(111) deposited at room temperature reveal the formation of quasi-one-dimensional rows of parallel quinacridone molecules. These rows are segmented into short stacks of a few molecules in which adjacent, flat-lying molecules of a single handedness are linked via hydrogen bonds. After annealing to a temperature of T = 550–570 K, which is close to the sublimation temperature of bulk quinacridone, the structure changes into a stacking of heterochiral quinacridone dimers with a markedly different intermolecular arrangement. Electron diffraction (LEED) and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) data corroborate the STM findings. These results illustrate how the effects of hydrogen bonding and chirality can compete and give rise to very different (meta)stable structures of quinacridone on surfaces. PMID:24883168

  13. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-01

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R22(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8 kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31 + G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4 kcal/mol.

  14. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-05

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R2(2)(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6-31++G*, B3LYP/6-31++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4kcal/mol.

  15. A Study of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Levoglucosan Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Quiquempoix, Lucas; Bogdan, Elena; Wells, Neil J; Le Questel, Jean-Yves; Graton, Jérôme; Linclau, Bruno

    2017-03-24

    Organofluorine is a weak hydrogen-bond (HB) acceptor. Bernet et al. have demonstrated its capability to perturb OH···O intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IMHBs), using conformationally rigid carbohydrate scaffolds including levoglucosan derivatives. These investigations are supplemented here by experimental and theoretical studies involving six new levoglucosan derivatives, and complement the findings of Bernet et al. However, it is shown that conformational analysis is instrumental in interpreting the experimental data, due to the occurrence of non-intramolecular hydrogen-bonded populations which, although minor, cannot be neglected and appears surprisingly significant. The DFT conformational analysis, together with the computation of NMR parameters (coupling constants and chemical shifts) and wavefunction analyses (AIM, NBO), provides a full picture. Thus, for all compounds, the most stabilized structures show the OH groups in a conformation allowing IMHB with O5 and O6, when possible. Furthermore, the combined approach points out the occurrence of various IMHBs and the effect of the chemical modulations on their features. Thus, two-center or three-center IMHB interactions are observed in these compounds, depending on the presence or absence of additional HB acceptors, such as methoxy or fluorine.

  16. The hydrogen-bond collective dynamics in liquid methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissima, Stefano; de Panfilis, Simone; Bafile, Ubaldo; Cunsolo, Alessandro; González, Miguel Angel; Guarini, Eleonora; Formisano, Ferdinando

    2016-12-01

    The relatively simple molecular structure of hydrogen-bonded (HB) systems is often belied by their exceptionally complex thermodynamic and microscopic behaviour. For this reason, after a thorough experimental, computational and theoretical scrutiny, the dynamics of molecules in HB systems still eludes a comprehensive understanding. Aiming at shedding some insight into this topic, we jointly used neutron Brillouin scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to probe the dynamics of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded alcohol, liquid methanol. The comparison with the most thoroughly investigated HB system, liquid water, pinpoints common behaviours of their THz microscopic dynamics, thereby providing additional information on the role of HB dynamics in these two systems. This study demonstrates that the dynamic behaviour of methanol is much richer than what so far known, and prompts us to establish striking analogies with the features of liquid and supercooled water. In particular, based on the strong differences between the structural properties of the two systems, our results suggest that the assignment of some dynamical properties to the tetrahedral character of water structure should be questioned. We finally highlight the similarities between the characteristic decay times of the time correlation function, as obtained from our data and the mean lifetime of hydrogen bond known in literature.

  17. The hydrogen-bond collective dynamics in liquid methanol

    DOE PAGES

    Bellissima, Stefano; Cunsolo, Alessandro; DePanfilis, Simone; ...

    2016-12-20

    The relatively simple molecular structure of hydrogen-bonded (HB) systems is often belied by their exceptionally complex thermodynamic and microscopic behaviour. For this reason, after a thorough experimental, computational and theoretical scrutiny, the dynamics of molecules in HB systems still eludes a comprehensive understanding. Aiming at shedding some insight into this topic, we jointly used neutron Brillouin scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to probe the dynamics of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded alcohol, liquid methanol. The comparison with the most thoroughly investigated HB system, liquid water, pinpoints common behaviours of their THz microscopic dynamics, thereby providing additional information on the role of HBmore » dynamics in these two systems. This study demonstrates that the dynamic behaviour of methanol is much richer than what so far known, and prompts us to establish striking analogies with the features of liquid and supercooled water. In particular, based on the strong differences between the structural properties of the two systems, our results suggest that the assignment of some dynamical properties to the tetrahedral character of water structure should be questioned. We finally highlight the similarities between the characteristic decay times of the time correlation function, as obtained from our data and the mean lifetime of hydrogen bond known in literature.« less

  18. The hydrogen-bond collective dynamics in liquid methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Bellissima, Stefano; Cunsolo, Alessandro; DePanfilis, Simone; Bafile, Ubaldo; Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Guarini, Eleonora; Formisano, Ferdinando

    2016-12-20

    The relatively simple molecular structure of hydrogen-bonded (HB) systems is often belied by their exceptionally complex thermodynamic and microscopic behaviour. For this reason, after a thorough experimental, computational and theoretical scrutiny, the dynamics of molecules in HB systems still eludes a comprehensive understanding. Aiming at shedding some insight into this topic, we jointly used neutron Brillouin scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to probe the dynamics of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded alcohol, liquid methanol. The comparison with the most thoroughly investigated HB system, liquid water, pinpoints common behaviours of their THz microscopic dynamics, thereby providing additional information on the role of HB dynamics in these two systems. This study demonstrates that the dynamic behaviour of methanol is much richer than what so far known, and prompts us to establish striking analogies with the features of liquid and supercooled water. In particular, based on the strong differences between the structural properties of the two systems, our results suggest that the assignment of some dynamical properties to the tetrahedral character of water structure should be questioned. We finally highlight the similarities between the characteristic decay times of the time correlation function, as obtained from our data and the mean lifetime of hydrogen bond known in literature.

  19. The hydrogen-bond collective dynamics in liquid methanol

    PubMed Central

    Bellissima, Stefano; De Panfilis, Simone; Bafile, Ubaldo; Cunsolo, Alessandro; González, Miguel Angel; Guarini, Eleonora; Formisano, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    The relatively simple molecular structure of hydrogen-bonded (HB) systems is often belied by their exceptionally complex thermodynamic and microscopic behaviour. For this reason, after a thorough experimental, computational and theoretical scrutiny, the dynamics of molecules in HB systems still eludes a comprehensive understanding. Aiming at shedding some insight into this topic, we jointly used neutron Brillouin scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to probe the dynamics of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded alcohol, liquid methanol. The comparison with the most thoroughly investigated HB system, liquid water, pinpoints common behaviours of their THz microscopic dynamics, thereby providing additional information on the role of HB dynamics in these two systems. This study demonstrates that the dynamic behaviour of methanol is much richer than what so far known, and prompts us to establish striking analogies with the features of liquid and supercooled water. In particular, based on the strong differences between the structural properties of the two systems, our results suggest that the assignment of some dynamical properties to the tetrahedral character of water structure should be questioned. We finally highlight the similarities between the characteristic decay times of the time correlation function, as obtained from our data and the mean lifetime of hydrogen bond known in literature. PMID:27996056

  20. Hydrogen-bonded diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) pigments as organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Coskun, Halime; Blood-Forsythe, Martin A.; Monkowius, Uwe; Leonat, Lucia; Grzybowski, Marek; Gryko, Daniel; White, Matthew Schuette; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Diketopyrrolopyrroles (DPPs) have recently gained attention as building-blocks for organic semiconducting polymers and small molecules, however the semiconducting properties of their hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) pigment forms have not been explored. Herein we report on the performance of three archetypical H-bonded DPP pigments, which show ambipolar carrier mobilities in the range 0.01–0.06 cm2/V s in organic field-effect transistors. Their semiconducting properties are correlated with crystal structure, where an H-bonded crystal lattice supports close and relatively cofacial π–π stacking. To better understand transport in these systems, density functional theory calculations were carried out, indicating theoretical maximum ambipolar mobility values of ∼0.3 cm2/V s. Based on these experimental and theoretical results, H-bonded DPPs represent a viable alternative to more established DPP-containing polymers and small molecules where H-bonding is blocked by N-alkylation. PMID:25642158

  1. Thioamides: versatile bonds to induce directional and cooperative hydrogen bonding in supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Mes, Tristan; Cantekin, Seda; Balkenende, Dirk W R; Frissen, Martijn M M; Gillissen, Martijn A J; De Waal, Bas F M; Voets, Ilja K; Meijer, E W; Palmans, Anja R A

    2013-06-24

    The amide bond is a versatile functional group and its directional hydrogen-bonding capabilities are widely applied in, for example, supramolecular chemistry. The potential of the thioamide bond, in contrast, is virtually unexplored as a structuring moiety in hydrogen-bonding-based self-assembling systems. We report herein the synthesis and characterisation of a new self-assembling motif comprising thioamides to induce directional hydrogen bonding. N,N',N''-Trialkylbenzene-1,3,5-tris(carbothioamide)s (thioBTAs) with either achiral or chiral side-chains have been readily obtained by treating their amide-based precursors with P2S5. The thioBTAs showed thermotropic liquid crystalline behaviour and a columnar mesophase was assigned. IR spectroscopy revealed that strong, three-fold, intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions stabilise the columnar structures. In apolar alkane solutions, thioBTAs self-assemble into one-dimensional, helical supramolecular polymers stabilised by three-fold hydrogen bonding. Concentration- and temperature-dependent self-assembly studies performed by using a combination of UV and CD spectroscopy demonstrated a cooperative supramolecular polymerisation mechanism and a strong amplification of supramolecular chirality. The high dipole moment of the thioamide bond in combination with the anisotropic shape of the resulting cylindrical aggregate gives rise to sufficiently strong depolarised light scattering to enable depolarised dynamic light scattering (DDLS) experiments in dilute alkane solution. The rotational and translational diffusion coefficients, D(trans) and D(rot), were obtained from the DDLS measurements, and the average length, L, and diameter, d, of the thioBTA aggregates were derived (L = 490 nm and d = 3.6 nm). These measured values are in good agreement with the value L(w) = 755 nm obtained from fitting the temperature-dependent CD data by using a recently developed equilibrium model. This experimental verification

  2. Hydrogen bond breaking in aqueous solutions near the critical point

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2001-01-01

    The nature of water-anion bonding is examined using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy on a 1mZnBr2/6m NaBr aqueous solution, to near critical conditions. Analyses show that upon heating the solution from 25??C to 500??C, a 63% reduction of waters occurs in the solvation shell of ZnBr42-, which is the predominant complex at all pressure-temperature conditions investigated. A similar reduction in the hydration shell of waters in the Br- aqua ion was found. Our results indicate that the water-anion and water-water bond breaking mechanisms occurring at high temperatures are essentially the same. This is consistent with the hydration waters being weakly hydrogen bonded to halide anions in electrolyte solutions. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Optimization of hydrogen bonds for combined DNA/collagen complex.

    PubMed

    Pidaparti, Ramana M; Svintradze, David V; Shan, Yingfeng; Yokota, Hiroki

    2009-01-21

    Many natural and biological systems including collagen and DNA polymers are formed by a process of molecular self-assembly. In this paper, we developed two novel structural models and built heterogeneous DNA/collagen complexes through a preferable arrangement of multiple hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) between DNA and collagen molecules. The simulation results based on three sets of criteria indicate that one of the models with five collagen molecules, which are positioned around each strand of DNA molecules emerged to form a suitable polymer complex with the maximum number of H-bonds. Our predictions quantitatively validated and agreed with the molecular structure reported by Mrevlishvili and Svintradze [2005. Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 36, 324-326].

  4. Neutral redox-active hydrogen- and halogen-bonding [2]rotaxanes for the electrochemical sensing of chloride.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-12-14

    The first examples of redox-active ferrocene-functionalised neutral [2]rotaxanes have been synthesised via chloride anion templation. (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations reveal that these [2]rotaxane host systems recognize chloride selectively over other halides and oxoanions in highly-competitive aqueous media. By replacing the hydrogen bonding prototriazole units of the rotaxane axle component with iodotriazole halogen bond-donor groups, the degree of chloride selectivity of the [2]rotaxanes is modulated. Electrochemical voltammetric experiments demonstrate that the rotaxanes can sense chloride via cathodic perturbations of the respective rotaxanes' ferrocene-ferrocenium redox-couple upon anion addition.

  5. Weak hydrogen bonding yields rigid, tough, and elastic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Hu, Xiaobo; Vatankhah-Varnosfaderani, Mohammad; Zhou, Jing; Li, Qiaoxi; Dobrynin, Andrey

    Unlike living tissues, synthetic hydrogels are inherently soft and brittle, particularly when built of hydrogen bonds. It remains challenging to design hydrogels that combine high rigidity, strength at break, extensibility, high elasticity. Through free-radical copolymerization of N , N -dimethylacrylamide and methacrylic acid, we have designed a network system based on tunable composition of covalent bonds (permanent cross-links) and hydrogen bonds (sacrificial and recoverable crosslinks) with the following rationale: 1) Maintain a high total number of cross-links to ensure high modulus; 2) Introduce a high fraction of H-bonding to ensure high energy dissipation; and 3) Incorporate a small fraction of permanent cross-links to ensure shape control. By tuning the chemical composition and microstructure we have obtained materials with superb mechanical properties. The hydrogels contain 70 wt% water (similar to living cartilage, skin, and ligaments), while display modulus of 28 MPa, strength of 2 MPa, fracture energy of 9300 J .m-2, extensibility of 800%, excellent fatigue-resistance, and great elasticity allowing for complete and fast strain recovery. The results agreed with theoretical predictions for modulus relaxation of dual networks with dynamic and permanent crosslinks. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation (DMR 1122483, DMR 1407645, and DMR 1436201).

  6. Hydrogen donors in ZnO and TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, Eduard V.

    2016-02-01

    The results of combined IR absorption and photoconductivity studies on hydrogen donors in ZnO and TiO2 are presented. It is shown that hydrogen donors in ZnO and rutile TiO2 can be detected as Fano resonances in the photoconductivity spectra at the frequencies corresponding to the vibrational modes of these defects. In the case of anatase TiO2 IR absorption lines at 3412 and 3417 cm-1 are assigned to the stretching local vibrational modes of a donor in the neutral and the positive charge states, respectively. Interstitial hydrogen is suggested as a tentative model for the defect giving rise to these vibrational modes.

  7. Communication: Towards the binding energy and vibrational red shift of the simplest organic hydrogen bond: Harmonic constraints for methanol dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, Matthias; Suhm, Martin A.; Mata, Ricardo A.

    2014-09-14

    The discrepancy between experimental and harmonically predicted shifts of the OH stretching fundamental of methanol upon hydrogen bonding to a second methanol unit is too large to be blamed mostly on diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicity corrections. It is shown that a decisive contribution comes from post-MP2 electron correlation effects, which appear not to be captured by any of the popular density functionals. We also identify that the major deficiency is in the description of the donor OH bond. Together with estimates for the electronic and harmonically zero-point corrected dimer binding energies, this work provides essential constraints for a quantitative description of this simple hydrogen bond. The spectroscopic dissociation energy is predicted to be larger than 18 kJ/mol and the harmonic OH-stretching fundamental shifts by about −121 cm{sup −1} upon dimerization, somewhat more than in the anharmonic experiment (−111 cm{sup −1})

  8. Communication: Towards the binding energy and vibrational red shift of the simplest organic hydrogen bond: harmonic constraints for methanol dimer.

    PubMed

    Heger, Matthias; Suhm, Martin A; Mata, Ricardo A

    2014-09-14

    The discrepancy between experimental and harmonically predicted shifts of the OH stretching fundamental of methanol upon hydrogen bonding to a second methanol unit is too large to be blamed mostly on diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicity corrections. It is shown that a decisive contribution comes from post-MP2 electron correlation effects, which appear not to be captured by any of the popular density functionals. We also identify that the major deficiency is in the description of the donor OH bond. Together with estimates for the electronic and harmonically zero-point corrected dimer binding energies, this work provides essential constraints for a quantitative description of this simple hydrogen bond. The spectroscopic dissociation energy is predicted to be larger than 18 kJ/mol and the harmonic OH-stretching fundamental shifts by about -121 cm(-1) upon dimerization, somewhat more than in the anharmonic experiment (-111 cm(-1)).

  9. Green's function calculation of through-bond electronic coupling in donor bridge acceptor model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santana, O. L.; da Gama, A. A. S.

    1999-12-01

    The Green's function formalism is applied for the calculation of the effective through-bond donor-acceptor coupling in model molecular systems. The calculation is performed at a Hartree-Fock (self-consistent) level, by using semiempirical AM1 and CNDO/S, and ab initio STO-3G methods. The results are compared with that obtained from the splitting of the appropriate levels, by using the Koopmans' theorem, within each one of the selected quantum chemical methods.

  10. Interaction-induced localisation of protons in hydrogen bonds at superfluid helium temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walewski, Łukasz; Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2013-09-01

    It is common wisdom to expect that protons are more delocalised than much heavier nuclei due to quantum effects, for instance, in hydrogen bonds D-H⋆ ṡ ṡ ṡ A, where the shared proton H⋆ is suspended in between the donor and acceptor heavy sites. Here, we demonstrate that this simple quasi-classical perspective fails at sufficiently low temperatures as a result of intramolecular covalent bonding accompanied by the non-covalent intermolecular interactions which induce strong localisation in the deep quantum regime. Using the water dimer as well as H2O ṡ ṡ ṡ HCl as generic models, path integral simulations at temperatures characteristic to superfluid helium conditions (about 1 K) reveal that the shared proton in such hydrogen bonds gets extremely confined to a spatial region that is comparable to - or even smaller than - that of the heavy atoms. This counter-intuitive so-called interaction-induced localisation phenomenon is also effective for the heavier nuclei, although to a much lesser extent. It is the elevated temperature (about 100 K) that restores the familiar quasi-classical picture, in which atomic spread follows the usual mass dependence of de Broglie wavelength.

  11. Bifurcated hydrogen bonds stabilize fibrils of poly(L-glutamic) acid.

    PubMed

    Fulara, Aleksandra; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2010-06-24

    Model fibrillating homopolypeptides have been providing many insightful analogies to the clinically important phenomena of protein misfolding and amyloidogenesis. Here we show that the beta(2) structural variant of poly(l-glutamic) acid forms fibrils with an amyloid-like morphology, ability to enhance fluorescence of thioflavin T, and seeding properties. The beta(2) fibrils are formed upon heating of aqueous solutions of alpha-helical poly(l-glutamic) acid, which leads to a significant increase of pD (pH) of unbuffered samples and a concomitant precipitation of fibrils with unusual infrared traits: amide I' band being dramatically red-shifted to 1596 cm(-1), and the -COOD stretching band split into two peaks around 1730 and 1719 cm(-1). We are proposing that formation of three-center hydrogen bonds involving bifurcated peptide carbonyl acceptors (>C=O) and main chains' NH, as well as side chains' -COOH proton donors is likely to underlie the observed infrared characteristics of beta(2) fibrils. Such bonds provide additional conformational constraints in a tightly packed environment around glutamate side chains resulting in the decreased overall acidity of the polypeptide. The presence of bifurcated hydrogen bonds in amyloid fibrils may be an overlooked factor in fibrils' robustness, thermodynamic stability and the ability to propagate their own growth.

  12. An ab initio investigation of some hydrogen-bonded complexes of methanethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricknell, Bradley C.; Ford, Thomas A.

    2010-07-01

    The hydrogen-bonded complexes formed between methanethiol, as proton donor, and trimethyl amine, dimethyl ether, methyl fluoride, trimethyl phosphine, dimethyl sulphide and methyl chloride, as proton acceptors, have been studied by means of ab initio calculations at the second order level of Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and using the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The hydrogen bond energies were found to correlate with the gas phase basicities of the proton acceptors. The increases of the SH bond lengths, the shifts of the wavenumbers of the SH stretching modes and the increases of their infrared intensities were also found to be dependent on the interaction energies. The results for the CH 3SH·S(CH 3) 2 complex are anomalous, and this is attributed to deficiencies with the basis set used for sulphur. The data for the CH 3SH complex closely mirror the behaviour of the corresponding complexes of CH 3OH and (CH 3) 2NH, with the perturbations of the various properties varying consistently in the order CH 3OH > (CH 3) 2NH > CH 3SH.

  13. Monitoring selected hydrogen bonds in crystal hydrates of amino acid salts: combining variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction and polarized Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Boris A; Kolesov, Boris A; Boldyreva, Elena V

    2011-07-28

    Predicting behaviour of hydrogen bonds with varying temperature, in particular-correlating donor-acceptor distances in the O-H···O hydrogen bonds with the frequencies of O-H stretching vibrations is important for understanding dynamics of biomolecules and phase transitions in crystals. A commonly used correlation suggested earlier in the literature is based on statistical analysis of different compounds [A. Novak, Structure and Bonding, 1974, 18, 177; K. Nakamoto, M. Margoshes, R. E. Rundle, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1955, 77, 6480]. The present study is a rare example when correlations between geometry and energy parameters have been found for selected individual hydrogen bonds in the same crystalline compound at multiple temperatures. The properties of several types of O-H···O hydrogen bonds in bis(DL-serinium) oxalate dihydrate and DL-alaninium semi-oxalate monohydrate have been studied by a combination of variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction and polarized Raman spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrogen bonds geometry could be compared with the changes of the corresponding spectral modes. The correlation suggested by Novak is roughly followed, better for medium and weak, than for short hydrogen bonds. Fine details of spectral changes differ for individual bonds. The way how H-bonds are affected by cooling depends on their environment in the crystal structure. Short O-H···O hydrogen bonds in bis(DL-serinium) oxalate dihydrate expand or remain almost unchanged on cooling, whereas in DL-alaninium semi-oxalate monohydrate all strong H-bonds are compressed under these conditions. The distortion of individual hydrogen bonds on temperature variations is correlated with the anisotropy of lattice strain.

  14. Hydrogen bond stabilities in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin from amide-resolved hydrogen-exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, C E; Handcock, L J

    1996-04-01

    Amide-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange-rate constants were measured for backbone amides of alamethicin reconstituted in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles by an exchange-trapping method combined with high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In vesicles containing alamethicin at molar ratios between 1:20 and 1:100 relative to lipid, the exchange-rate constants increased with increasing volume of the D20 buffer in which the vesicles were suspended, indicating that exchange under these conditions is dominated by partitioning of the peptide into the aqueous phase. This was supported by observation of a linear relationship between the exchange-rate constants for amides in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin and those for amides in alamethicin dissolved directly into D2O buffer. Significant protection of amides from exchange with D2O buffer in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin is interpreted in terms of stabilization by helical hydrogen bonding. Under conditions in which amide exchange occurred by partitioning of the peptide into solution, only lower limits for hydrogen-bond stabilities in the membrane were determined; all the potentially hydrogen-bonded amides of alamethicin are at least 1000-fold exchange protected in the membrane-bound state. When partitioning of alamethicin into the aqueous phase was suppressed by hydration of reconstituted vesicles in a limiting volume of water [D2O:dioleoylphosphatidylcholine:alamethicin; 220:1:0.05; (M:M:M)], the exchange-protection factors exhibited helical periodicity with highly exchange-protected, and less well-protected, amides on the nonpolar and polar helix faces, respectively. The exchange data indicate that, under the conditions studied, alamethicin adopts a stable helical structure in DOPC bilayers in which all the potentially hydrogen-bonded amides are stabilized by helical hydrogen bonds. The protection factors define the orientation of the peptide helix with respect to an aqueous phase, which is

  15. Electron transfer across multiple hydrogen bonds: the case of ureapyrimidinedione-substituted vinyl ruthenium and osmium complexes.

    PubMed

    Pichlmaier, Markus; Winter, Rainer F; Zabel, Manfred; Zális, Stanislav

    2009-04-08

    Ruthenium and osmium complexes 2a,b and 3a,b featuring the N-4,6-dioxo-5,5-dibutyl- or the N-4,6-dioxo-5,5-di-(2-propenyl)-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-yl-N'(4-ethenylphenyl)-urea ligand dimerize by a self-complementary quadruply hydrogen-bonding donor/donor/acceptor/acceptor (DDAA) motif. We provide evidence that the dimeric structures are maintained in nonpolar solvents and in 0.1 M NBu(4)PF(6)/CH(2)Cl(2) supporting electrolyte solution. All complexes are reversibly oxidized in two consecutive two-electron oxidations (DeltaE(1/2) approximately = 500 mV) without any discernible potential splitting for the oxidation of the individual hydrogen-bridged redox active moieties. IR and UV/vis/NIR spectroelectrochemistry show a one-step conversion of the neutral to the dication without any discernible features of an intermediate monooxidized radical cation. Oxidation-induced IR changes of the NH and CO groups that are involved in hydrogen bonding are restricted to the styryl-bonded urea NH function. IR band assignments are aided by quantum chemical calculations. Our experimental findings clearly show that, at least in the present systems, the ureapyrimidinedione (Upy) DDAA hydrogen-bonding motif does not support electron transfer. The apparent reason is that neither of the hydrogen-bonding functionalities contributes to the occupied frontier levels. This results in nearly degenerate pairs of MOs representing the in-phase and out-of-phase combinations of the individual monomeric building blocks.

  16. A novel tubular hydrogen-bond pattern in a new diazaphosphole oxide: a combination of X-ray crystallography and theoretical study of hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Sabbaghi, Fahimeh; Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Farhadipour, Abolghasem; Ghorbanian, Nazila; Andreev, Pavel V

    2017-07-01

    In the structure of 2-(4-chloroanilino)-1,3,2λ(4)-diazaphosphol-2-one, C12H11ClN3OP, each molecule is connected with four neighbouring molecules through (N-H)2...O hydrogen bonds. These hydrogen bonds form a tubular arrangement along the [001] direction built from R(3)3(12) and R4(3)(14) hydrogen-bond ring motifs, combined with a C(4) chain motif. The hole constructed in the tubular architecture includes a 12-atom arrangement (three P, three N, three O and three H atoms) belonging to three adjacent molecules hydrogen bonded to each other. One of the N-H groups of the diazaphosphole ring, not co-operating in classical hydrogen bonding, takes part in an N-H...π interaction. This interaction occurs within the tubular array and does not change the dimension of the hydrogen-bond pattern. The energies of the N-H...O and N-H...π hydrogen bonds were studied by NBO (natural bond orbital) analysis, using the experimental hydrogen-bonded cluster of molecules as the input file for the chemical calculations. In the (1)H NMR experiment, the nitrogen-bound proton of the diazaphosphole ring has a high value of 17.2 Hz for the (2)JH-P coupling constant.

  17. Toward the development of the potential with angular distortion for halogen bond: a comparison of potential energy surfaces between halogen bond and hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Gao, Jun; Bi, Fuzhen; Song, Bo; Liu, Chengbu

    2014-10-02

    As noncovalent intermolecular interactions, hydrogen bond (HB) and halogen bond (XB) are attracting increasing attention. In this work, the potential energy surfaces (PESs) of hydrogen and halogen bonds are compared. Twelve halogen-bonded and three hydrogen-bonded models are scanned for analysis using the MP2 level of theory. This work indicates that potential energy surfaces of both HB and XB have angular distortion. The potential well of XB is narrower than that of HB. With the elongation of the bond length, the potential energy surfaces get flatter. The best fitting functions for angular distortion and the flattening character of angular terms are also combined into a modified Buckingham potential. The testing results show that the essential features of the PES, including angular distortion and flattening character, have been reproduced. These results provide a better understanding of halogen and hydrogen bonds and the optimization of halogen bond force fields.

  18. Quantum mechanics models of the methanol dimer: O-H…O hydrogen bonds of ß-D-glucose moieties from crystallographic data.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, a survey of the Cambridge Crystal Structure Database for all donor-acceptor interactions in ß-D-glucose moieties was performed to examine the similarities and differences among the different hydroxyl groups and ether oxygen atoms that participate in hydrogen bonds. Comparable behavior...

  19. Phosphorus as a simultaneous electron-pair acceptor in intermolecular P···N pnicogen bonds and electron-pair donor to Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, Janet E; Alkorta, Ibon; Sánchez-Sanz, Goar; Elguero, José

    2013-04-11

    Ab initio MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculations have been performed to investigate the structures and energies of binary complexes LA:PH2F and LA:PH3 and of ternary complexes LA:H2FP:NFH2 and LA:H3P:NH3 in which the pnicogen-bonded P atom also acts as an electron-pair donor to a Lewis acid (LA), for LA = BH3, NCH, ClH, FH, FCl, and HLi. Hydrogen bonds, halogen bonds, and dative covalent bonds are found at P in some cases, depending on the nature of the Lewis acid. HLi forms a lithium bond with P only in the binary complex HLi:PH3. The binding energies of ternary complexes exhibit a classical synergistic effect, although the computed cooperativity may be overestimated due to neglect of the interaction of the Lewis acid with NH2F or NH3 in some cases. The hydrogen-bonding Lewis acids appear to have little effect on the strength of the P···N bond, while the remaining Lewis acids strengthen the pnicogen bond. (31)P absolute chemical shieldings increase in LA:H2FP:NFH2 complexes relative to the corresponding LA:PH2F complexes as the positive charge on P decreases, while chemical shieldings decrease in LA:H3P:NH3 relative to the corresponding LA:PH3 complexes as the positive charge increases. Absolute values of (1p)J(P-N) spin-spin coupling constants in complexes LA:H2FP:NFH2 decrease as the P-N distance decreases. It appears that this behavior is associated with the presence of a second intermolecular interaction, whether electron-donation by P or hydrogen bond formation at P-F.

  20. The Contrasting Character of Early and Late Transition Metal Fluorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dan A; Beweries, Torsten; Blasius, Clemens; Jasim, Naseralla; Nazir, Ruqia; Nazir, Sadia; Robertson, Craig C; Whitwood, Adrian C; Hunter, Christopher A; Brammer, Lee; Perutz, Robin N

    2015-09-16

    The association constants and enthalpies for the binding of hydrogen bond donors to group 10 transition metal complexes featuring a single fluoride ligand (trans-[Ni(F)(2-C5NF4)(PR3)2], R = Et 1a, Cy 1b, trans-[Pd(F)(4-C5NF4)(PCy3)2] 2, trans-[Pt(F){2-C5NF2H(CF3)}(PCy3)2] 3 and of group 4 difluorides (Cp2MF2, M = Ti 4a, Zr 5a, Hf 6a; Cp*2MF2, M = Ti 4b, Zr 5b, Hf 6b) are reported. These measurements allow placement of these fluoride ligands on the scales of organic H-bond acceptor strength. The H-bond acceptor capability β (Hunter scale) for the group 10 metal fluorides is far greater (1a 12.1, 1b 9.7, 2 11.6, 3 11.0) than that for group 4 metal fluorides (4a 5.8, 5a 4.7, 6a 4.7, 4b 6.9, 5b 5.6, 6b 5.4), demonstrating that the group 10 fluorides are comparable to the strongest organic H-bond acceptors, such as Me3NO, whereas group 4 fluorides fall in the same range as N-bases aniline through pyridine. Additionally, the measurement of the binding enthalpy of 4-fluorophenol to 1a in carbon tetrachloride (-23.5 ± 0.3 kJ mol(-1)) interlocks our study with Laurence's scale of H-bond basicity of organic molecules. The much greater polarity of group 10 metal fluorides than that of the group 4 metal fluorides is consistent with the importance of pπ-dπ bonding in the latter. The polarity of the group 10 metal fluorides indicates their potential as building blocks for hydrogen-bonded assemblies. The synthesis of trans-[Ni(F){2-C5NF3(NH2)}(PEt3)2], which exhibits an extended chain structure assembled by hydrogen bonds between the amine and metal-fluoride groups, confirms this hypothesis.

  1. Are non-linear C-H⋯O contacts hydrogen bonds or Van der Waals interactions?. Establishing the limits between hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoa, Juan J.; Lafuente, Pilar; Mota, Fernando

    1998-07-01

    The hydrogen bond nature of angular C-H⋯O contacts is examined to determine when these contacts are better classified as hydrogen bonds or as Van der Waals bonds. To classify the bond we propose to look at the nature of the intermolecular bond critical point present in the electron density of the complex containing the bond. The physics behind this approach is explained using a qualitative orbital overlap model aimed at describing the main changes in the electronic density of the complex produced by the C-H⋯O bending.

  2. An experimental and theoretical study of a hydrogen-bonded complex: O-phenylenediamine with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Khaled; Rezvani, Ali Reza; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa; Shahraki, Mehdi; Shokrollahi, Ardeshir; Moghimi, Abolghasem; Tamandani, Halimeh Kord; Gavahi, Sara

    2015-11-01

    The hydrogen-bonded complex, [(OPDH)+(dipicH)-.H2O], between o-phenylenediamine (OPD) and 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (dipicH2) has been characterized in water by the 1H, 13C NMR and IR spectroscopies. The crystal structure showed that the edge to face C-H⋯π and C-O⋯π stacking interactions between the dipicH2 and OPD rings play an extra significant role in the formation of the hydrogen-bonded complex and supported the H-bonding interactions. The proton transfer also investigated theoretically in gas phase and thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH‡, ΔG‡, ΔS‡ were calculated for this process. Moreover, intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interaction has been recognized by calculating the electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇2ρ(r) at the bond critical point (BCP) using Atoms-In-Molecule (AIM) method and also the interaction between electron acceptor (σ*) of OH with the lone pair of the nitrogen atom as an electron donor using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. In addition, the protonation constants of dipicH2 and OPD and the equilibrium constants for the dipic-OPD (1:1) proton transfer system were obtained by the potentiometric pH titration method using the Hyperquad 2008 program. The stoichiometry of the proton transfer species in the solution confirmed the solid state result.

  3. Fundamental Kinetics of Supercritical Coal Liquefaction: Effect of Catalysts and Hydrogen-Donor Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Ben J; Madras, Girodhar; Smith, J M; Kodera, Yoichi

    1997-04-16

    This is the quarterly report on our recent progress toward the overall objective to understand the supercritical fluid extraction of hydrocarbons from coal. Our strategy is to simulate coal as a high molecular-weight polymeric material by studying the degradation of polymers under various conditions. The hypothesis we are testing is that degradation of such macromolecules is applicable to the decomposition (depolymerization) of the coal network. Polymer degradation and coal liquefaction are influenced strongly by the solvent in the reaction. This motivated our investigation of the effect of hydrogen donor solvents on polymer degradation. In particular, we obtained new experimental data to show how a hydrogen donor, 6-hydroxy tetralin, influences the degradation rate of polystyrene. We also developed a detailed radical mechanism for hydrogen donation based on the Rice-Herzfeld chain reaction concept with the elementary steps of initiation, depropagation, hydrogen abstraction, and termination. Expressions for the degradation rate parameters were obtained by applying continuous distribution kinetics to the MWD of the reacting polymer. The theory explains the different influences of the hydrogen donor solvent on the degradation rate coefficients for different polymers. Though developed for the degradation of polymers, the mechanism and the theory are potentially applicable for chain scission and addition reactions among distributions of paraffins, olefins, and radicals of all chain lengths. The concepts can, in principle, be extended to examine the effect of hydrogen donors on coal liquefaction and on the complex mixture of liquefaction compounds. Based on this work, a research paper titled "Effect of Hydrogen Donors on Polymer Degradation", has been submitted for publication. Our research paper entitled, "Molecular weight effect on the dynamics of polystyrene degradation", has been accepted for publication by the journal, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research.

  4. Hydrogen-Bonding Polarizable Intermolecular Potential Model for Water.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Moultos, Othonas A; Economou, Ioannis G; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2016-12-08

    A polarizable intermolecular potential model with short-range directional hydrogen-bonding interactions was developed for water. The model has a rigid geometry, with bond lengths and angles set to experimental gas-phase values. Dispersion interactions are represented by the Buckingham potential assigned to the oxygen atom, whereas electrostatic interactions are modeled by Gaussian charges. Polarization is handled by a Drude oscillator site, using a negative Gaussian charge attached to the oxygen atom by a harmonic spring. An explicit hydrogen-bonding term is included in the model to account for the effects of charge transfer. The model parameters were optimized to density, configurational energy, pair correlation function, and the dielectric constant of water under ambient conditions, as well as the minimum gas-phase dimer energy. Molecular dynamics and Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the new model with respect to the thermodynamic and transport properties over a wide range of temperature and pressure conditions. Good agreement between model predictions and experimental data was found for most of the properties studied. The new model yields better performance relative to the majority of existing models and outperforms the BK3 model, which is one of the best polarizable models, for vapor-liquid equilibrium properties, whereas the new model is not better than the BK3 model for representation of other properties. The model can be efficiently simulated with the thermalized Drude oscillator algorithm, resulting in computational costs only 3 times higher than those of the nonpolarizable TIP4P/2005 model, whereas having significantly improved properties. Because it involves only a single Drude oscillator site, the new model is significantly faster than polarizable models with multiple sites. With the explicit inclusion of hydrogen-bond interactions, the model may provide a better description of the phase behavior of aqueous mixtures.

  5. New Insights into Hydrogen Bonding and Stacking Interactions in Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this quantum chemical study, we explore hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) and stacking interactions in different crystalline cellulose allomorphs, namely cellulose I and cellulose IIII. We consider a model system representing a cellulose crystalline core, made from six cellobiose units arranged in three layers with two chains per layer. We calculate the contributions of intrasheet and intersheet interactions to the structure and stability in both cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores. Reference structures for this study were generated from molecular dynamics simulations of water-solvated cellulose I and IIII fibrils. A systematic analysis of various conformations describing different mutual orientations of cellobiose units is performed using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) with the M06-2X with 6-31+G (d, p) basis sets. We dissect the nature of the forces that stabilize the cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores and quantify the relative strength of H-bonding and stacking interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that individual H-bonding interactions are stronger in cellulose I than in cellulose IIII. We also observe a significant contribution from cooperative stacking interactions to the stabilization of cellulose I . In addition, the theory of atoms-in-molecules (AIM) has been employed to characterize and quantify these intermolecular interactions. AIM analyses highlight the role of nonconventional CH O H-bonding in the cellulose assemblies. Finally, we calculate molecular electrostatic potential maps for the cellulose allomorphs that capture the differences in chemical reactivity of the systems considered in our study.

  6. Asymmetric hydrogen bonds in a centrosymmetric environment. III. Quantum mechanical calculations of the potential-energy surfaces for the very short hydrogen bonds in potassium hydrogen dichloromaleate.

    PubMed

    Majerz, I; Olovsson, I

    2007-10-01

    In the crystal structure of potassium hydrogen dichloromaleate there are two short hydrogen bonds of 2.44 A. The 'heavy-atom' structure is centrosymmetric (space group P1) with centers of symmetry in the middle of the O-O bonds, suggesting centered hydrogen bonds. However, earlier unconventional types of refinements of the extensive neutron data taken at 30, 90, 135, 170 and 295 K demonstrated that the H atoms are actually non-centered in the hydrogen bonds, although the environment is centrosymmetric. Traditionally it has been assumed that the hydrogen distribution adopts the same symmetry as the environment. Reviewing these unusual results it was considered of great interest to verify that the non-centered locations of the H atoms are reasonable from an energy point of view. Quantum mechanical calculations have now been carried out for the potential-energy surfaces (PES) for both the centered and non-centered locations of the H atoms. In all cases the non-centered positions are closer to the energy minima in the PES than the centered positions, and this result confirms that the structure is best described with non-centered H atoms. There is virtually perfect agreement between the quantum-mechanically derived reaction coordinates (QMRC) and the bond-order reaction coordinates (BORC) derived using Pauling's bond-order concept together with the principle of conservation of bond order. [Part I: Olovsson et al. (2001). Acta Cryst. B57, 311-316; Part II: Olovsson et al. (2002). Acta Cryst. B58, 627-631.].

  7. Nitrate removal in aquaria systems: use of electrochemically generated hydrogen gas as electron donor for denitrification.

    PubMed

    Grommen, R; Verstraete, W

    2003-01-01

    Nitrate, the end product of the nitrification process, tends to accumulate in aquaria systems. Removal of nitrate in these systems by means of biological denitrification requires the addition of an external electron donor. In this study, the possibilities for using hydrogen gas in aquaria systems as a harmless alternative to other electron donors such as sulphur or reduced organic carbon was investigated. To circumvent safety issues regarding the storage of large volumes of hydrogen gas, in situ generation of hydrogen gas by means of a separate electrochemical cell was chosen. A plug flow reactor filled with polyester cotton wool as carrier material for denitrifying bacteria received hydrogen gas in the headspace. Removal rates of 15 +/- 6 mg N per day were achieved with a hydraulic residence time of 3.3 hours. During the start-up phase nitrite peaks up to 3 mg N per liter were measured in the effluent of the reactor.

  8. Influence of hydrogen-bonding configurations on the physical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredotti, C.; Fizzotti, F.; Boero, M.; Pastorino, P.; Polesello, P.; Vittone, E.

    1994-12-01

    We analyzed the physical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) samples grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, by means of infrared spectroscopy, mass-density, and optical measurements. We applied the usual infrared spectroscopic techniques to evaluate the amount of incorporated hydrogen and to investigate the influence of the Si-H bonding configurations on the optical and electronic properties of a-Si:H obtained by this widely used deposition process, and with parameters so chosen as to obtain films having state of the art characteristics. We carried out an exhaustive study of the different infrared absorption peaks, generally ascribed to different bonding configurations of H in Si, with a view to distinguishing the different contributions of SiH, SiH2 (SiH2)n to the spectral response of the material and to relating them to deposition temperature. The correlation of this infrared spectral analysis with mass-density measurements has evidenced that, for hydrogen content below 10 at. %, isolated SiH and SiH2 bonds occur, whereas, with higher hydrogen concentrations, the formation of (SiH2)n chains gives rise to empty cavities where hydrogen is preferentially incorporated. In addition, optical measurements show that samples deposited at temperatures below 170 °C exhibit energy gaps and defect densities, which are quite different to those expected if only the effects of SiH groups are considered.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrogen-Bonded Clusters of Protonated Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Makoto; Kasahara, Yasutoshi; Ishikawa, Haruki

    2015-06-01

    Histidine(His), one of the essential amino acids, is involved in active sites in many enzyme proteins, and known to play fundamental roles in human body. Thus, to gain detailed information about intermolecular interactions of His as well as its structure is very important. In the present study, we have recorded IR spectra of hydrogen-bonded clusters of protonated His (HisH^+) in the gas phase to discuss the relation between the molecular structure and intermolecular interaction of HisH^+. Clusters of HisH^+-(MeOH)_n (n = 1, 2) were generated by an electrospray ionization of the MeOH solution of L-His hydrochloride monohydrate. IR photodissociation spectra of HisH^+-(MeOH)1,2 were recorded. By comparing with the results of the DFT calculations, we determined the structures of these clusters. In the case of n = 1 cluster, MeOH is bonded to the imidazole ring as a proton acceptor. The most of vibrational bands observed were well explained by this isomer. However, a free NH stretch band of the imidazole ring was also observed in the spectrum. This indicates an existence of an isomer in which MeOH is bounded to the carboxyl group of HisH^+. Furthermore, it is found that a protonated position of His is influenced by a hydrogen bonding position of MeOH. In the case of n = 2 cluster, one MeOH molecule is bonded to the amino group, while the other MeOH molecule is separately bonded to the carboxyl group in the most stable isomer. However, there is a possibility that other conformers also exist in our experimental condition. The details of the experimental and theoretical results will be presented in the paper.

  10. Anion Coordination in Metal-Organic Frameworks Functionalized with Urea Hydrogen-Bonding Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2005-12-15

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups have been designed, synthesized, and structurally analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction to evaluate the efficacy of anion binding within the structural constraints of the MOFs. We found that urea-based functionalities may be used for anion binding within metal-organic frameworks when the tendency for urea???urea self-association is decreased by strengthening the intramolelcular CH???O hydrogen bonding of N-phenyl substituents to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Theoretical calculations indicate that N,N?-bis(m-pyridyl)urea (BPU) and N,N?-bis(m-cyanophenyl)urea (BCPU) should have enhanced hydrogen-bonding donor abilities toward anions and decreased tendencies to self-associate into hydrogen-bonded chains compared to other disubstituted ureas. Accordingly, BPU and BCPU were incorporated in MOFs as linkers through coordination of various Zn, Cu, and Ag transition metal salts, including Zn(ClO4)2, ZnSO4, Cu(NO3)2, Cu(CF3SO3)2, AgNO3 and AgSO3CH3. Structural analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that these linkers are versatile anion binders, capable of chelate hydrogen bonding to all of the oxoanions explored. Anion binding by the urea functionalities was found to successfully compete with urea self-association in all cases except for that of charge-diffuse perchlorate. This research was sponsored by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (managed by UT-Battelle, LLC), and performed at Oak Ridge National laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (managed by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830). This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences laboratory

  11. Using Unnatural Amino Acids to Probe the Energetics of Oxyanion Hole Hydrogen Bonds in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are ubiquitous in enzyme active sites, providing binding interactions and stabilizing charge rearrangements on substrate groups over the course of a reaction. But understanding the origin and magnitude of their catalytic contributions relative to hydrogen bonds made in aqueous solution remains difficult, in part because of complexities encountered in energetic interpretation of traditional site-directed mutagenesis experiments. It has been proposed for ketosteroid isomerase and other enzymes that active site hydrogen bonding groups provide energetic stabilization via “short, strong” or “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds that are formed due to matching of their pKa or proton affinity to that of the transition state. It has also been proposed that the ketosteroid isomerase and other enzyme active sites provide electrostatic environments that result in larger energetic responses (i.e., greater “sensitivity”) to ground-state to transition-state charge rearrangement, relative to aqueous solution, thereby providing catalysis relative to the corresponding reaction in water. To test these models, we substituted tyrosine with fluorotyrosines (F-Tyr’s) in the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) oxyanion hole to systematically vary the proton affinity of an active site hydrogen bond donor while minimizing steric or structural effects. We found that a 40-fold increase in intrinsic F-Tyr acidity caused no significant change in activity for reactions with three different substrates. F-Tyr substitution did not change the solvent or primary kinetic isotope effect for proton abstraction, consistent with no change in mechanism arising from these substitutions. The observed shallow dependence of activity on the pKa of the substituted Tyr residues suggests that the KSI oxyanion hole does not provide catalysis by forming an energetically exceptional pKa-matched hydrogen bond. In addition, the shallow dependence provides no indication of an active site electrostatic

  12. The role of charge transfer in the hydrogen bond cooperative effect of cis-N-methylformamide oligomers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongwei; Qu, Wenwen; Chen, Guangju; Liu, Ruozhuang

    2005-07-21

    Two accumulating molecular systems have been designed to investigate the cooperative effect of hydrogen bonding in theory. The first system included a series of linear oligomers of cis-N-methylformamide (c-NMF) molecules. Substantial cooperative effect has been confirmed in the electronic structures and energies of the hydrogen bonds in them as shown by the results obtained using the B3LYP method at the level of cc-pVTZ basis sets. Such a cooperative effect gradually increases with the growth of the c-NMF oligomer. The second system included a series of modified c-NMF trimers whose central c-NMF molecules contained insertion fragments of varying structural and electrical compositions. On the basis of an examination of the structures and charge populations of the c-NMF oligomers in these two systems, a mechanism of the cooperative effect of hydrogen bonding in these systems based on charge flow in the c-NMF molecules is proposed. The results from the second system of c-NMF trimers were particularly instrumental in formulating this mechanism, because the charge flows between the C=O and N-H groups in the modified c-NMF molecule of these trimers were dampened by the various molecular insertions. A clear correlation between the degree of charge flow dampening from each inserted fragment and the magnitude of the cooperative effect of hydrogen bonding was observed. On the basis of an analysis of the electronic structural characteristics of the molecular fragments, we conclude that the charge flow between the hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups in the c-NMF molecule is the most important factor inducing the cooperative effect of hydrogen bonding.

  13. A new quadruple hydrogen-bonding module with a DDAA array: formation of a stable homodimer without competition from undesired hydrogen-bonded dimers.

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Yosuke; Shirai, Naohiro; Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Odashima, Kazunori

    2009-10-01

    A new DDAA hydrogen-bonding module (UImp-2), based on a ureidoimidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine structure, forms a highly stable homodimer (K(dim) > 1.1 x 10(5) M(-1) in CDCl(3)) without competition from undesired hydrogen-bonded dimers.

  14. Unveiling subsurface hydrogen-bond structure of hexagonal water ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuki, Yuji; Sugimoto, Toshiki; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro; Watanabe, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu

    2017-09-01

    The phase-resolved sum-frequency-generation (SFG) spectrum for the basal face of hexagonal ice is reported and is interpreted by molecular dynamics simulations combined with ab initio quantum calculations. Here, we demonstrate that the line shape of the SFG spectra of isotope-diluted OH chromophores is a sensitive indicator of structural rumpling uniquely emerging at the subsurface of hexagonal ice. In the outermost subsurface between the first (B1) and second (B2) bilayer, the hydrogen bond of OB 1-H ⋯OB 2 is weaker than that of OB 1⋯H -OB 2 . This implies that subsurface O-O distance is laterally altered, depending on the direction of O-H bond along the surface normal: H-up or H-down, which is in stark contrast to bulk hydrogen bonds. This new finding uncovers how water molecules undercoordinated at the topmost surface influence on the subsurface structural rumpling associated with orientational frustration inherent in water ice.

  15. Unusual cooperativity effects between halogen bond and donor-acceptor interactions: The role of orbital interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mousavian, Parisasadat

    2017-06-01

    Cooperative effects between halogen and donor-acceptor interactions are studied in C5H5B⋯NCX⋯NCY complexes, where X = F, Cl, Br, I and Y = H, CN, OH, Li. The B⋯N binding distances are found to be longer than those in C5H5B⋯NCX dimers, which means that the formation of the X⋯N interaction weakens the B⋯N bonds. This abnormal cooperativity effect is further investigated by means of molecular electrostatic potential, electron density and natural bond orbital analyses. It is found that the back-bonding π → π∗ orbital interaction between C5H5B and NCX moieties is responsible for the unusual cooperativity of B⋯N and X⋯N interactions.

  16. Aromatic and aliphatic CH hydrogen bonds fight for chloride while competing alongside ion pairing within triazolophanes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yuran; Ramabhadran, Raghunath O; Uduehi, Esther O; Karty, Jonathan A; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Flood, Amar H

    2011-01-03

    Triazolophanes are used as the venue to compete an aliphatic propylene CH hydrogen-bond donor against an aromatic phenylene one. Longer aliphatic C-H...Cl(-) hydrogen bonds were calculated from the location of the chloride within the propylene-based triazolophane. The gas-phase energetics of chloride binding (ΔG(bind) , ΔH(bind) , ΔS(bind) ) and the configurational entropy (ΔS(config) ) were computed by taking all low-energy conformations into account. Comparison between the phenylene- and propylene-based triazolophanes shows the computed gas-phase free energy of binding decreased from ΔG(bind) =-194 to -182 kJ mol(-1) , respectively, with a modest enthalpy-entropy compensation. These differences were investigated experimentally. An (1) H NMR spectroscopy study on the structure of the propylene triazolophane's 1:1 chloride complex is consistent with a weaker propylene CH hydrogen bond. To quantify the affinity differences between the two triazolophanes in dichloromethane, it was critical to obtain an accurate binding model. Four equilibria were identified. In addition to 1:1 complexation and 2:1 sandwich formation, ion pairing of the tetrabutylammonium chloride salt (TBA(+) ⋅Cl(-) ) and cation pairing of TBA(+) with the 1:1 triazolophane-chloride complex were observed and quantified. Each complex was independently verified by ESI-MS or diffusion NMR spectroscopy. With ion pairing deconvoluted from the chloride-receptor binding, equilibrium constants were determined by using (1) H NMR (500 μM) and UV/Vis (50 μM) spectroscopy titrations. The stabilities of the 1:1 complexes for the phenylene and propylene triazolophanes did not differ within experimental error, ΔG=(-38±2) and (-39±1) kJ mol(-1) , respectively, as verified by an NMR spectroscopy competition experiment. Thus, the aliphatic CH donor only revealed its weaker character when competing with aromatic CH donors within the propylene-based triazolophane.

  17. Quantifying weak hydrogen bonding in uracil and 4-cyano-4'-ethynylbiphenyl: a combined computational and experimental investigation of NMR chemical shifts in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Uldry, Anne-Christine; Griffin, John M; Yates, Jonathan R; Pérez-Torralba, Marta; María, M Dolores Santa; Webber, Amy L; Beaumont, Maximus L L; Samoson, Ago; Claramunt, Rosa María; Pickard, Chris J; Brown, Steven P

    2008-01-23

    but opposite sign for the donor 13C and acceptor 15N nuclei. In uracil and 4-cyano-4'-ethynylbiphenyl, the CH hydrogen-bonding donors are sp2 and sp hybridized, respectively; a comparison of the calculated changes in 1H chemical shift with those for the sp3 hybridized CH donors in maltose (Yates et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 10216) reveals no marked dependence on hybridization for weak hydrogen-bonding strength.

  18. Can QTAIM topological parameters be a measure of hydrogen bonding strength?

    PubMed

    Mo, Yirong

    2012-05-31

    The block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is the simplest variant of ab initio valence bond (VB) theory, together with the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) approach, have been used to probe the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions in a series of representative systems of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHBs). RAHB is characteristic of the cooperativity between the π-electron delocalization and hydrogen bonding interactions and is identified in many biological systems. While the deactivation of the π resonance in these RAHB systems by the use of the BLW method is expected to considerably weaken the hydrogen bonding strength, little change on the topological properties of electron densities at hydrogen bond critical points (HBCPs) is observed. This raises a question of whether the QTAIM topological parameters can be an effective measure of hydrogen bond strength.

  19. Effects of hydrogen bonds on solid state TATB, RDX, and DATB under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Hai-Quan; Cheng, Xin-Lu

    2014-04-01

    To probe the behavior of hydrogen bonds in solid energetic materials, we conduct ReaxFF and SCC-DFTB molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline TATB, RDX, and DATB. By comparing the intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonding rates, we find that the crystal structures are stabilized by inter-molecular hydrogen bond networks. Under high-pressure, the inter- and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds in solid TATB and DATB are nearly equivalent. The hydrogen bonds in solid TATB and DATB are much shorter than in solid RDX, which suggests strong hydrogen bond interactions existing in these energetic materials. Stretching of the C-H bond is observed in solid RDX, which may lead to further decomposition and even detonation.

  20. A new polymorph of triphenylmethylamine: the effect of hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Victor N; Borisova, Irina V; Zemlyansky, Nikolai N; Antipin, M Yu

    2009-02-01

    Crystallization of the hexane reaction mixture after treatment of LiGe(OCH(2)CH(2)NMe(2))(3) with Ph(3)CN(3) gives rise to a new triclinic (space group P\\overline{1}) polymorph of triphenylmethylamine, C(19)H(17)N, (I), containing dimers formed by N-H...N hydrogen bonds, whereas the structure of the known orthorhombic (space group P2(1)2(1)2(1)) polymorph of this compound, (II), consists of isolated molecules. While the dimers in (I) lie across crystallographic inversion centres, the molecules are not truly related by them. The centrosymmetric structure is due to the statistical disordering of the amino H atoms participating in the N-H...N hydrogen-bonding interactions, and thus the inversion centre is superpositional. The conformations and geometric parameters of the molecules in (I) and (II) are very similar. It was found that the polarity of the solvent does not affect the capability of triphenylmethylamine to crystallize in the different polymorphic modifications. The orthorhombic polymorph, (II), is more thermodynamically stable under normal conditions than the triclinic polymorph, (I). The experimental data indicate the absence of a phase transition in the temperature interval 120-293 K. The densities of (I) (1.235 Mg m(-3)) and (II) (1.231 Mg m(-3)) at 120 K are practically equal. It would seem that either the kinetic factors or the effects of the other products of the reaction facilitating the hydrogen-bonded dimerization of triphenylmethylamine molecules are the determining factor for the isolation of the triclinic polymorph (I) of triphenylmethylamine.

  1. Dynamics and mechanism of structural diffusion in linear hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwattana, Sermsiri; Phonyiem, Mayuree; Vchirawongkwin, Viwat; Prueksaaroon, Supakit; Sagarik, Kritsana

    2012-01-15

    Dynamics and mechanism of proton transfer in a protonated hydrogen bond (H-bond) chain were studied, using the CH(3)OH(2)(+)(CH(3)OH)(n) complexes, n = 1-4, as model systems. The present investigations used B3LYP/TZVP calculations and Born-Oppenheimer MD (BOMD) simulations at 350 K to obtain characteristic H-bond structures, energetic and IR spectra of the transferring protons in the gas phase and continuum liquid. The static and dynamic results were compared with the H(3)O(+)(H(2)O)(n) and CH(3)OH(2)(+)(H(2)O)(n) complexes, n = 1-4. It was found that the H-bond chains with n = 1 and 3 represent the most active intermediate states and the CH(3)OH(2)(+)(CH(3)OH)(n) complexes possess the lowest threshold frequency of proton transfer. The IR spectra obtained from BOMD simulations revealed that the thermal energy fluctuation and dynamics help promote proton transfer in the shared-proton structure with n = 3 by lowering the vibrational energy for the interconversion between the oscillatory shuttling and structural diffusion motions, leading to a higher population of the structural diffusion motion than in the shared-proton structure with n = 1. Additional explanation on the previously proposed mechanisms was introduced, with the emphases on the energetic of the transferring proton, the fluctuation of the number of the CH(3)OH molecules in the H-bond chain, and the quasi-dynamic equilibriums between the shared-proton structure (n = 3) and the close-contact structures (n ≥ 4). The latter prohibits proton transfer reaction in the H-bond chain from being concerted, since the rate of the structural diffusion depends upon the lifetime of the shared-proton intermediate state. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Bonding changes in hot fluid hydrogen at megabar pressures

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Natarajan; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Somayazulu, Maddury; Hemley, Russell J.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells has been employed to probe the bonding state and phase diagram of dense hydrogen up to 140 GPa and 1,500 K. The measurements were made possible as a result of the development of new techniques for containing and probing the hot, dense fluid, which is of fundamental importance in physics, planetary science, and astrophysics. A pronounced discontinuous softening of the molecular vibron was found at elevated temperatures along with a large broadening and decrease in intensity of the roton bands. These phenomena indicate the existence of a state of the fluid having significantly modified intramolecular bonding. The results are consistent with the existence of a pressure-induced transformation in the fluid related to the presence of a temperature maximum in the melting line as a function of pressure. PMID:21447715

  3. Synthesis and characterization of hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Pan, Yong; Cao, Shuya; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-05-01

    Hexafluoroisopropanol phenyl group functionalized materials have great potential in the application of gas-sensitive materials for nerve agent detection, due to the formation of strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between the group and the analytes. In this paper, take full advantage of ultra-large specific surface area and plenty of carbon-carbon double bonds and hexafluoroisopropanol phenyl functionalized graphene was synthesized through in situ diazonium reaction between -C=C- and p-hexafluoroisopropanol aniline. The identity of the as-synthesis material was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The synthesis method is simply which retained the excellent physical properties of original graphene. In addition, the novel material can be assigned as an potential candidate for gas sensitive materials towards organophosphorus nerve agent detection.

  4. NMR parameters and geometries of OHN and ODN hydrogen bonds of pyridine-acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Shenderovich, Ilya G; Smirnov, Sergei N; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S

    2004-10-11

    In this paper, equations are proposed which relate various NMR parameters of OHN hydrogen-bonded pyridine-acid complexes to their bond valences which are in turn correlated with their hydrogen-bond geometries. As the valence bond model is strictly valid only for weak hydrogen bonds appropriate empirical correction factors are proposed which take into account anharmonic zero-point energy vibrations. The correction factors are different for OHN and ODN hydrogen bonds and depend on whether a double or a single well potential is realized in the strong hydrogen-bond regime. One correction factor was determined from the known experimental structure of a very strong OHN hydrogen bond between pentachlorophenol and 4-methylpyridine, determined by the neutron diffraction method. The remaining correction factors which allow one also to describe H/D isotope effects on the NMR parameters and geometries of OHN hydrogen bond were determined by analysing the NMR parameters of the series of protonated and deuterated pyridine- and collidine-acid complexes. The method may be used in the future to establish hydrogen-bond geometries in biologically relevant functional OHN hydrogen bonds.

  5. Hydrogen-Bonding-Supported Self-Healing Antifogging Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojie; He, Junhui

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the repair of DNA through efficient reformation of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds), herein we report a facile one-step approach to construction of self-healing antifogging thin films on the basis of partly cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol)(PVA) and poly(acrylic acid)(PAA). By designing the molar ratio of hydroxyl groups to carboxyl groups, the cross-linked polymer thin films maintain abundant free hydroxyl groups to present excellent antifogging property, which is derived from the hydrophilicity and hygroscopicity of the thin films. The thin films showed smart intrinsic self-healing characteristics towards wounds caused by external forces, which is attributed to sufficient free hydroxyl groups at the scratched interfaces to reform H-bonds across the interfaces and a sufficient chain mobility that is indispensable for chain diffusion across the interfaces and hydroxyl groups association to form H-bonds. No synthetic surfaces reported so far possess all the unique characteristics of the polymer thin films: intrinsic self-healing, long-term antifogging, excellent mechanical property, high transmittance and large-scale feasibility. PMID:25784188

  6. Quantum effects in a simple ring with hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Kariev, Alisher M; Green, Michael E

    2015-05-14

    Complexes containing multiple arginines are common in proteins. The arginines are typically salt-bridged or hydrogen-bonded, so that their charges do not repel. Here we present a quantum calculation of a ring in which the components of a salt bridge composed of a guanidinium, the arginine side chain, and a carboxylic acid are separated by water molecules. When one water molecule is displaced from the ring, atomic charges of the other water molecule, as well as other properties, are significantly affected. The exchange and correlation energy differences between optimized and displaced rings are larger than thermal energy at room temperature, and larger than the sum of other energy differences. This suggests that calculations on proteins and other systems where such a ring may occur must take quantum effects into account; charges on certain atoms shift as substituents are added to the system: another water molecule, an -OH, or -CN bonded to either moiety. Also, charge shifts accompany proton shifts from the acid to guanidinium to ionize the salt bridge. The consequences of moving one water out of the ring give evidence for electron delocalization. Bond order and atomic charges are determined using natural bond orbital calculations. The geometry of the complex changes with ionization as well as the -OH and -CN additions but not in a simple manner. These results help in understanding the role of groups of arginines in salt-bridged clusters in proteins.

  7. Enzymatic Functionalization of Carbon-Hydrogen Bonds1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jared C.; Coelho, Pedro S.

    2010-01-01

    The development of new catalytic methods to functionalize carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds continues to progress at a rapid pace due to the significant economic and environmental benefits of these transformations over traditional synthetic methods. In nature, enzymes catalyze regio- and stereoselective C-H bond functionalization using transformations ranging from hydroxylation to hydroalkylation under ambient reaction conditions. The efficiency of these enzymes relative to analogous chemical processes has led to their increased use as biocatalysts in preparative and industrial applications. Furthermore, unlike small molecule catalysts, enzymes can be systematically optimized via directed evolution for a particular application and can be expressed in vivo to augment the biosynthetic capability of living organisms. While a variety of technical challenges must still be overcome for practical application of many enzymes for C-H bond functionalization, continued research on natural enzymes and on novel artificial metalloenzymes will lead to improved synthetic processes for efficient synthesis of complex molecules. In this critical review, we discuss the most prevalent mechanistic strategies used by enzymes to functionalize non-acidic C-H bonds, the application and evolution of these enzymes for chemical synthesis, and a number of potential biosynthetic capabilities uniquely enabled by these powerful catalysts. PMID:21079862

  8. Hydrogen-Bonding-Supported Self-Healing Antifogging Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojie; He, Junhui

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by the repair of DNA through efficient reformation of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds), herein we report a facile one-step approach to construction of self-healing antifogging thin films on the basis of partly cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol)(PVA) and poly(acrylic acid)(PAA). By designing the molar ratio of hydroxyl groups to carboxyl groups, the cross-linked polymer thin films maintain abundant free hydroxyl groups to present excellent antifogging property, which is derived from the hydrophilicity and hygroscopicity of the thin films. The thin films showed smart intrinsic self-healing characteristics towards wounds caused by external forces, which is attributed to sufficient free hydroxyl groups at the scratched interfaces to reform H-bonds across the interfaces and a sufficient chain mobility that is indispensable for chain diffusion across the interfaces and hydroxyl groups association to form H-bonds. No synthetic surfaces reported so far possess all the unique characteristics of the polymer thin films: intrinsic self-healing, long-term antifogging, excellent mechanical property, high transmittance and large-scale feasibility.

  9. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO){sub 3}(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) (CO = carbonyl; PR{sub 3} = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H{sub 2} exchanges easily with D{sub 2}. This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H{sub 2} bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H{sub 2})(R{sub 2}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PR{sub 2}){sub 2} were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig.

  10. Hydrogen-bond-driven controlled molecular marriage in covalent cages.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Koushik; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2014-02-03

    A supramolecular approach that uses hydrogen-bonding interaction as a driving force to accomplish exceptional self-sorting in the formation of imine-based covalent organic cages is discussed. Utilizing the dynamic covalent chemistry approach from three geometrically similar dialdehydes (A, B, and D) and the flexible triamine tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (X), three new [3+2] self-assembled nanoscopic organic cages have been synthesized and fully characterized by various techniques. When a complex mixture of the dialdehydes and triamine X was subjected to reaction, it was found that only dialdehyde B (which has OH groups for H-bonding) reacted to form the corresponding cage B3X2 selectively. Surprisingly, the same reaction in the absence of aldehyde B yielded a mixture of products. Theoretical and experimental investigations are in complete agreement that the presence of the hydroxyl moiety adjacent to the aldehyde functionality in B is responsible for the selective formation of cage B3X2 from a complex reaction mixture. This spectacular selection was further analyzed by transforming a nonpreferred (non-hydroxy) cage into a preferred (hydroxy) cage B3X2 by treating the former with aldehyde B. The role of the H-bond in partner selection in a mixture of two dialdehydes and two amines has also been established. Moreover, an example of unconventional imine bond metathesis in organic cage-to-cage transformation is reported. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hydrogen-bonding-supported self-healing antifogging thin films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojie; He, Junhui

    2015-03-18

    Inspired by the repair of DNA through efficient reformation of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds), herein we report a facile one-step approach to construction of self-healing antifogging thin films on the basis of partly cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol)(PVA) and poly(acrylic acid)(PAA). By designing the molar ratio of hydroxyl groups to carboxyl groups, the cross-linked polymer thin films maintain abundant free hydroxyl groups to present excellent antifogging property, which is derived from the hydrophilicity and hygroscopicity of the thin films. The thin films showed smart intrinsic self-healing characteristics towards wounds caused by external forces, which is attributed to sufficient free hydroxyl groups at the scratched interfaces to reform H-bonds across the interfaces and a sufficient chain mobility that is indispensable for chain diffusion across the interfaces and hydroxyl groups association to form H-bonds. No synthetic surfaces reported so far possess all the unique characteristics of the polymer thin films: intrinsic self-healing, long-term antifogging, excellent mechanical property, high transmittance and large-scale feasibility.

  12. Neutron crystallography for the study of hydrogen bonds in macromolecules

    DOE PAGES

    Oksanen, Esko; Chen, Julian C.; Fisher, Zoe

    2017-04-07

    The hydrogen bond (H bond) is one of the most important interactions that form the foundation of secondary and tertiary protein structure. Beyond holding protein structures together, H bonds are also intimately involved in solvent coordination, ligand binding, and enzyme catalysis. The H bond by definition involves the light atom, H, and it is very difficult to study directly, especially with X-ray crystallographic techniques, due to the poor scattering power of H atoms. Neutron protein crystallography provides a powerful, complementary tool that can give unambiguous information to structural biologists on solvent organization and coordination, the electrostatics of ligand binding, themore » protonation states of amino acid side chains and catalytic water species. The method is complementary to X-ray crystallography and the dynamic data obtainable with NMR spectroscopy. Also, as it gives explicit H atom positions, it can be very valuable to computational chemistry where exact knowledge of protonation and solvent orientation can make a large difference in modeling. Finally, this article gives general information about neutron crystallography and shows specific examples of how the method has contributed to structural biology, structure-based drug design; and the understanding of fundamental questions of reaction mechanisms.« less

  13. Neutron Crystallography for the Study of Hydrogen Bonds in Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Oksanen, Esko; Chen, Julian C-H; Fisher, Suzanne Zoë

    2017-04-07

    Abstract: The hydrogen bond (H bond) is one of the most important interactions that form the foundation of secondary and tertiary protein structure. Beyond holding protein structures together, H bonds are also intimately involved in solvent coordination, ligand binding, and enzyme catalysis. The H bond by definition involves the light atom, H, and it is very difficult to study directly, especially with X-ray crystallographic techniques, due to the poor scattering power of H atoms. Neutron protein crystallography provides a powerful, complementary tool that can give unambiguous information to structural biologists on solvent organization and coordination, the electrostatics of ligand binding, the protonation states of amino acid side chains and catalytic water species. The method is complementary to X-ray crystallography and the dynamic data obtainable with NMR spectroscopy. Also, as it gives explicit H atom positions, it can be very valuable to computational chemistry where exact knowledge of protonation and solvent orientation can make a large difference in modeling. This article gives general information about neutron crystallography and shows specific examples of how the method has contributed to structural biology, structure-based drug design; and the understanding of fundamental questions of reaction mechanisms.

  14. Role of the Distal Hydrogen-Bonding Network in Regulating Oxygen Affinity in the Truncated Hemoglobin III from Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Mañez, Pau Arroyo; Lu, Changyuan; Boechi, Leonardo; Martí, Marcelo A.; Shepherd, Mark; Wilson, Jayne Louise; Poole, Robert K.; Luque, F. Javier; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Estrin, Darío A.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen affinity in heme-containing proteins is determined by a number of factors, such as the nature and conformation of the distal residues that stabilize the heme bound-oxygen via hydrogen-bonding interactions. The truncated hemoglobin III from Campylobacter jejuni (Ctb) contains three potential hydrogen-bond donors in the distal site: TyrB10, TrpG8, and HisE7. Previous studies suggested that Ctb exhibits an extremely slow oxygen dissociation rate due to an interlaced hydrogen-bonding network involving the three distal residues. Here we have studied the structural and kinetic properties of the G8WF mutant of Ctb and employed state-of-the-art computer simulation methods to investigate the properties of the O2 adduct of the G8WF mutant, with respect to those of the wild-type protein and the previously studied E7HL and/or B10YF mutants. Our data indicate that the unique oxygen binding properties of Ctb are determined by the interplay of hydrogen-bonding interactions between the heme-bound ligand and the surrounding TyrB10, TrpG8, and HisE7 residues. PMID:21476539

  15. The study of hydrogen bonding and π⋯π interactions in phenol⋯ethynylbenzene complex by IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Danijela; Vazdar, Mario

    2014-11-11

    Weak hydrogen bonds between phenol and ethynylbenzene in tetrachloroethene were explored by using FTIR spectroscopy. Association constants (Kc) were determined by high dilution method at two temperatures, 20°C and 26°C, and they are, respectively, 0.54±0.09 mol(-1) dm3 and 0.36±0.08 mol(-1) dm3. The position of ethynylbenzene stretching band, when in hydrogen bonding complex with phenol (CC⋯), is proposed to be governed by the interplay of OH⋯π (CC moiety or phenyl ring of ethynylbenzene) and π⋯π (phenyl ring of phenol⋯CC moiety or phenyl ring of ethynylbenzene) interactions. This conclusion is supported by the findings on the complex between ethanol and ethynylbenzene; in the latter, CC⋯ stretching band is shifted to the higher wavenumbers, as expected when ethynylbenzene interacts with hydrogen bond donor. Geometries and energies of the presumed complexes, as well as their vibrational spectra, are predicted by using ab initio calculations. The spectroscopic and thermodynamic data obtained here offer the missing pieces in the present picture of migration of H-atom of phenol OH group between competing hydrogen bond accepting centers on ethynylbenzene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Nature of Activated Non-classical Hydrogen Bonds: A Case Study on Acetylcholinesterase-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Berg, Lotta; Mishra, Brijesh Kumar; Andersson, C David; Ekström, Fredrik; Linusson, Anna

    2016-02-18

    Molecular recognition events in biological systems are driven by non-covalent interactions between interacting species. Here, we have studied hydrogen bonds of the CH⋅⋅⋅Y type involving electron-deficient CH donors using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) calculations applied to acetylcholinesterase-ligand complexes. The strengths of CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions activated by a proximal cation were considerably strong; comparable to or greater than those of classical hydrogen bonds. Significant differences in the energetic components compared to classical hydrogen bonds and non-activated CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions were observed. Comparison between DFT and molecular mechanics calculations showed that common force fields could not reproduce the interaction energy values of the studied hydrogen bonds. The presented results highlight the importance of considering CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions when analysing protein-ligand complexes, call for a review of current force fields, and opens up possibilities for the development of improved design tools for drug discovery.

  17. Change in hydrogen bonding structures of a hydrogel with dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naohara, Ryo; Narita, Kentaro; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of structural changes in polymer network and water during dehydration, X-ray diffraction of poly-N,N-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA) hydrogels was measured. The variation process in the individual structures of water and PDMAA were analyzed by decomposition of the diffraction patterns to separate the respective contributions. The results show that the short-range structures of PDMAA expand during dehydration, whereas the network structure as a whole shrinks. The average length of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules increases with the process. The present results provide a direct evidence of the structural changes of water and polymer in the hydrogel during dehydration.

  18. Anharmonicity and hydrogen bonding in electrooptic sucrose crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, M. M.; Giermańska, J.

    1990-03-01

    The polarized absorption spectra of the sucrose crystal in the 5300 - 7300 cm -1 region have been measured. The assignments of all the eight OH stretching overtones are proposed and their mechanical anharmonicities are estimated. The discrepancies from the oriented gas model (OGM) in the observed relative band intensities, especially of the -CH vibrations, are assumed to be connected with vibronic couplings enhanced by the helical arrangement of molecules joined by hydrogen bondings. It seems that this kind of interactions might be important for the second harmonic generation (SHG) by the sucrose crystal.

  19. Hydrogen-bonded clusters of ferrocenecarboxylic acid on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Quardokus, Rebecca C; Wasio, Natalie A; Christie, John A; Henderson, Kenneth W; Forrest, Ryan P; Lent, Craig S; Corcelli, Steven A; Kandel, S Alex

    2014-09-14

    Self-assembled monolayers of ferrocenecarboxylic acid (FcCOOH) contain two fundamental units, both stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonding: dimers and cyclic five-membered catemers. At surface coverages below a full monolayer, however, there is a significantly more varied structure that includes double-row clusters containing two to twelve FcCOOH molecules. Statistical analysis shows a distribution of cluster sizes that is sharply peaked compared to a binomial distribution. This rules out simple nucleation-and-growth mechanisms of cluster formation, and strongly suggests that clusters are formed in solution and collapse into rows when deposited on the Au(111) surface.

  20. Fragility and cooperativity concepts in hydrogen-bonded organic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpouve, N.; Vuillequez, A.; Saiter, A.; Youssef, B.; Saiter, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular dynamics at the glass transition of three lactose/oil glassy systems have been investigated according to the cooperativity and fragility approaches. From Donth's approach, the cooperativity length is estimated by modulated temperature calorimetric measurements. Results reveal that modification of the disaccharide by oil leads to increase the disorder degree in the lactose, the size of the cooperative domains and the fragility index. These particular hydrogen-bonded organic glasses follow the general tendency observed on organic and inorganic polymers: the higher the cooperativity length, the higher the value of the fragility index at Tg.

  1. Modelling OH⋯O hydrogen bonds in carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, G. A.

    1990-09-01

    Hydrogen-bonding is particularly significant in the molecular modelling of the molecules of glycobiology because of the large number of OH⋯O functional groups for each carbohydrate monomer in these oligo- and macromolecules. This requires appropriate parameterization of the electrostatic interactions, which is considered to be the least well-developed component of molecular mechanics and dynamics formulations. Oligo- and polysaccharides are more difficult to model, in this respect, than oligo- and polypeptides and nucleotides because of the orientational freedom of the hydroxyl groups. The extension of present methods to carbohydrates is discussed.

  2. Summation solute hydrogen bonding acidity values for hydroxyl substituted flavones determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Whaley, William L; Okoso-amaa, Ekua M; Womack, Cody L; Vladimirova, Anna; Rogers, Laura B; Risher, Margaret J; Abraham, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    The flavonoids are a structurally diverse class of natural products that exhibit a broad spectrum of biochemical activities. The flavones are one of the most studied flavonoid subclasses due to their presence in dietary plants and their potential to protect human cells from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several flavone compounds also mediate beneficial actions by direct binding to protein receptors and regulatory enzymes. There is current interest in using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) to guide drug development based on flavone lead structures. This approach is most informative when it involves the use of accurate physical descriptors. The Abraham summation solute hydrogen bonding acidity (A) is a descriptor in the general solvation equation. It defines the tendency of a molecule to act as a hydrogen bond donor, or acid, when surrounded by solvent molecules that are hydrogen bonding acceptors, or bases. As a linear free energy relationship, it is useful for predicting the absorption and uptake of drug molecules. A previously published method, involving nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to evaluate A for the monohydroxyflavones (MHFs). Values of A ranged from 0.02, for 5-hydroxyflavone, to 0.69 for 4'-hydroxyflavone. The ability to examine separate NMR signals for individual hydroxyl groups allowed the investigation of intramolecular interactions between functional groups. The value of A for the position 7 hydroxyl group of 7-hydroxyflavone was 0.67. The addition of a position 5 hydroxyl group (in 5,7-dihydroxyflavone) increased the value of A for the position 7 hydroxyl group to 0.76. Values of A for MHFs were also calculated by the program ACD-Absolve and these agreed well with values measured by NMR. These results should facilitate more accurate estimation of the values of A for structurally complex flavones with pharmacological activities.

  3. Thermodynamics and Photodynamics of a Monoprotonated Porphyrin Directly Stabilized by Hydrogen Bonding with Polar Protic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wataru; Kotani, Hiroaki; Ishizuka, Tomoya; Ohkubo, Kei; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kojima, Takahiko

    2017-04-03

    Addition of 1 equiv of TFA to an acetone solution containing dodecaphenylporphyrin (H2 DPP) in the presence of 10 % MeOH (v/v) resulted in selective formation of a monoprotonated form (H3 DPP(+) ), in sharp contrast to protonation of H2 DPP directly affording a diprotonated form (H4 DPP(2+) ) in acetone in the absence of MeOH. The crucial role of MeOH for selective H3 DPP(+) formation was interpreted as hydrogen-bonding stabilization of H3 DPP(+) , since a MeOH molecule was found to form hydrogen bonds with an NH proton of H3 DPP(+) in the crystal. The selectivity of H3 DPP(+) formation was evaluated by the formation yield of H3 DPP(+) , which increased when elevating the portion of MeOH (0-10 %) in acetone with saturation behavior, suggesting that H3 DPP(+) is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with MeOH even in solution, together with the thermodynamic parameters determined from a van't Hoff plot based on the spectroscopic titration. Femto- and nanosecond laser flash photolysis allowed us to elucidate the photodynamics of H3 DPP(+) in intermolecular photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from ferrocene derivatives as one-electron donors to the triplet excited state of H3 DPP(+) as an electron acceptor. The second-order rate constants of the ET reactions were evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of ET. The reorganization energy of ET was determined to be 1.87 eV, which is slightly larger than that of H4 DPP(2+) in acetonitrile (1.69 eV), due to larger structural change upon ET than that of H4 DPP(2+) . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The Role of Aromaticity, Hybridization, Electrostatics, and Covalency in Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonds of Adenine–Thymine (AT) Base Pairs and Their Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Guillaumes, L; Simon, S; Fonseca Guerra, C

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds play a crucial role in many biochemical processes and in supramolecular chemistry. In this study, we show quantum chemically that neither aromaticity nor other forms of π assistance are responsible for the enhanced stability of the hydrogen bonds in adenine–thymine (AT) DNA base pairs. This follows from extensive bonding analyses of AT and smaller analogs thereof, based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT). Removing the aromatic rings of either A or T has no effect on the Watson–Crick bond strength. Only when the smaller mimics become saturated, that is, when the hydrogen-bond acceptor and donor groups go from sp2 to sp3, does the stability of the resulting model complexes suddenly drop. Bonding analyses based on quantitative Kohn–Sham molecular orbital theory and corresponding energy decomposition analyses (EDA) show that the stronger hydrogen bonds in the unsaturated model complexes and in AT stem from stronger electrostatic interactions as well as enhanced donor–acceptor interactions in the σ-electron system, with the covalency being responsible for shortening the hydrogen bonds in these dimers. PMID:26246994

  5. Copper(ii)-directed synthesis of neutral heteroditopic [2]rotaxane ion-pair host systems incorporating hydrogen and halogen bonding anion binding cavities.

    PubMed

    Brown, Asha; Mennie, Katrina M; Mason, Owen; White, Nicholas G; Beer, Paul D

    2017-09-27

    Neutral heteroditopic [2]rotaxane ion-pair host systems were synthesised via a Cu(ii) directed passive metal template strategy. Each rotaxane contains discrete, axle-separated interlocked binding sites for a guest anion and a transition metal countercation. The anion binding sites are composed of convergent X-H (X = C, N) hydrogen bond donor groups, or mixed X-H and C-I hydrogen and halogen bond donor groups, whereas an equivalent three-dimensional array of amine, pyridine and carbonyl oxygen donor groups comprise the transition metal binding site. (1)H NMR titrations experiments in CDCl3/CD3OD or CDCl3/CD3OD/D2O solvent mixtures reveal that the heteroditopic [2]rotaxane host systems are capable of cooperative anion recognition in the presence of a co-bound Zn(ii) cation.

  6. Ludwig-Soret effect of aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol oligomers, crown ethers, and glycerol: Temperature, molecular weight, and hydrogen bond effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kousaku; Shinyashiki, Naoki; Yagihara, Shin; Wiegand, Simone; Kita, Rio

    2015-09-01

    The thermal diffusion, also called the Ludwig-Soret effect, of aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol oligomers, crown ethers, and glycerol is investigated as a function of temperature by thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering. The Soret coefficient, ST, and the thermal diffusion coefficient, DT, show a linear temperature dependence for all studied compounds in the investigated temperature range. The magnitudes and the slopes of ST and DT vary with the chemical structure of the solute molecules. All studied molecules contain ether and/or hydroxyl groups, which can act as acceptor or donor to form hydrogen bonds, respectively. By introducing the number of donor and acceptor sites of each solute molecule, we can express their hydrogen bond capability. ST and DT can be described by an empirical equation depending on the difference of donor minus acceptor sites and the molecular weight of the solute molecule.

  7. Halogen Bonding VS Hydrogen Bonding in CHF_2I Complexes with NH_3 and N(CH_3)_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medcraft, Chris; Geboes, Yannick; Legon, Anthony; Walker, Nick

    2016-06-01

    Ammonia and trimethylamine (TMA) were used to probe preference of hydrogen over halogen bonding in molecular complexes containing CHF_2I via chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The halogen bonded complex of TMA is ≈ 2 kJ/mol more energetically favourable (extrapolation to CCSD(T)/CBS level) than the hydrogen bonded complex. The reverse is true for the ammonia complex where the hydrogen bonded complex is ≈ 3kJ/mol more favourable. Although the spectra of both complexes were perturbed by large amplitude motions around the intermolecular bond effective fits of the lower rotational energy levels appear to confirm that TMA prefers to bind to the iodine whilst ammonia prefers the hydrogen.

  8. On the influence of electrical anharmonicity on infrared bandshape of hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekik, Najeh; Wójcik, Marek J.

    2010-04-01

    The influence of electrical anharmonicity on the infrared shape of the υS(X-H→…Y) stretching vibrations is investigated. For this aim, we extend a previous approach [Rekik et al., Chem. Phys. 352 (2008) 65-76] by accounting for variable dipole moment. The approach is involving anharmonic coupling between the high frequency stretching vibration, X-H→…Y (double well potential) and low-frequency donor-acceptor stretching mode X←-H…Y→ (Morse potential), Fermi resonances between states involving the X-H→…Y stretching and overtones or combinations of some internal modes, as well as the electrical anharmonicity of dipole moment operator of the fast mode. Direct relaxation mechanism is incorporated through a time decaying exponential according to Rösch and Ratner theory. The approach has been constructed in the framework of the linear response theory for which spectral density is obtained by Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. It follows from numerical results that electrical anharmonicity has a very substantial effect on the intensity of the hydrogen-bonded stretching vibration and provide explanation of the most important intensity changes that occur upon hydrogen bond formation.

  9. Simple guanidinium salts revisited: room-temperature ferroelectricity in hydrogen-bonded supramolecular structures.

    PubMed

    Szafrański, Marek

    2011-07-14

    Dielectric, calorimetric, and X-ray diffraction methods have been employed to characterize the crystals of guanidinium tetrafluoroborate and guanidinium perchlorate, both built of two-dimensional honeycomb hydrogen-bonded sheets. The room-temperature ferroelectricity of these isosymmetric complexes (space group R3m) has been evidenced by the polarization switching in an external electric field and pyroelectric effect. The analysis of structural data as a function of temperature showed that the high values of spontaneous polarization of about 8.5 μC cm(-2) originate mainly from the ionic displacements, while the exceptional thermally induced increase of polarization is related with the apparent weakening of the N-H···F/N-H···O hydrogen bonds at elevated temperatures. An excellent correlation between the donor-acceptor distance and the relative displacement of the ions in the crystal lattice along the polar direction has been found. The huge entropy change at the two-closely spaced high-temperature phase transitions in guanidinium perchlorate, together with the large crystal polarization, suggest a large electrocaloric effect, the property strongly desired for solid-state cooling applications.

  10. Tetrahedral oxyanions-assisted supramolecular assemblies of pyridine-based tectons into hydrogen-bonding networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xue-Hua; Wang, Shi; Li, Yong-Hua; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The systematic research has been done into structural variations of supramolecular architectures by the self assembly of two pyridine-based potential anion receptors, 1-(4-pyridyl)piperazine (L1) and 4-pyrrolidinopyridine (L2), and different inorganic acids (HCl, HBr, HI, HNO3, HClO4, HIO4, H2SO4 and H3PO4). The formation of four fascinating salts, i.e. (H2L12+)·(H2PO4-)2 (1), (H2L12+)·(ClO4-)2 (2), (HL2+)·(ClO4-) (3) and (HL2+)·(IO4-) (4), indicates that N-heterocyclic L1 and L2 are prone to cocrystallize with tetrahedral oxyanions and anionic topologies play a crucial role in the crystallization process. Structural analyses reveal that various intermolecular ring motifs have been generated by robust hydrogen-bonding interactions in compounds 1-4. In particular, interesting substructures were observed in H2PO4- from salts 1 due to its polytopic potential hydrogen-bonding donor and acceptor oxygen atoms, including ring motifs, 1D ribbons and 2D supramolecular framework. Much to our surprise, crystal 4 proves to be a member of few supramolecular salts crystallizing with IO4- anion according to the Cambridge Structure Database (CSD).

  11. Hydrogen-bonded layered structures in two bis(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)-substituted cyclic diol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Foces-Foces, C; López-Rodríguez, M

    2008-12-01

    2,6-Bis(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)-9-oxabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane-3,7-diol, C(20)H(42)O(5)Si(2), (I), and 4,8-bis(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)-2,6-dioxatricyclo[3.3.1(3,7)]decane-1,3-diol, C(20)H(40)O(6)Si(2), (II), form layered structures that differ in the way the molecules are connected within each layer. The endocyclic O atom common to both structures plays an active role in the hydrogen-bonding network, whereas the second oxygen bridge in (II) does not participate in any interaction. This work reports the first structural analysis of two bis(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)-substituted cyclic diol derivatives and provides insight into the influence of small changes in the molecular structure on the supramolecular aggregation. The unbalanced hydrogen-bond acceptor/donor ratio, greater in (II) than in (I), does not result in the inclusion of water molecules in the structure.

  12. Therapeutic application of hydrogen sulfide donors: the potential and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Hu, Qingxun; Zhu, Yizhun

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a colorless gas smelling of rotten egg, has long been considered a toxic gas and environment hazard. However, evidences show that H2S plays a great role in many physiological and pathological activities, and it exhibits different effects when applied at various doses. In this review, we summarize the chemistry and biomedical applications of H2S-releasing compounds, including inorganic salts, phosphorodithioate derivatives, derivatives of Allium sativum extracts, derivatives of thioaminoacids, and derivatives of antiinflammatory drugs.

  13. The FORMAMIDE_2-H_2O Complex: Structure and Hydrogen Bond Cooperative Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Susana; Pinacho, Pablo; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The adduct formamide_2-H_20 has been detected in a supersonic expansion and its rotational spectra in the 5-13 GHz frequency region characterized by narrow-band molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (MB-FTMW). The spectrum shows the hyperfine structure due to the presence of two 14N-nuclei. This hyperfine structure has been analyzed and the determined quadrupole coupling constants together with the rotational constants have been a key for the identification of the adduct structure on the light of ab initio computations. The rotational parameters are consistent with the formation of a three body cycle thanks to the double proton acceptor/proton donor character of both formamide and water. The low value of the planar moment of inertia Pcc indicates that the heavy atom skeleton of the cluster is essentially planar. A detailed analysis of the results reveals the subtle effects of hydrogen bond cooperative effects in this system.

  14. Characterization of the monovalent ion position and hydrogen-bond network in guanine quartets by DFT calculations of NMR parameters.

    PubMed

    van Mourik, Tanja; Dingley, Andrew J

    2005-10-07

    Conformational stability of G-quartets found in telomeric DNA quadruplex structures requires the coordination of monovalent ions. Here, an extensive Hartree-Fock and density functional theory analysis of the energetically favored position of Li+, Na+, and K+ ions is presented. The calculations show that at quartet-quartet distances observed in DNA quadruplex structures (3.3 A), the Li+ and Na+ ions favor positions of 0.55 and 0.95 A outside the plane of the G-quartet, respectively. The larger K+ ion prefers a central position between successive G-quartets. The energy barrier separating the minima in the quartet-ion-quartet model are much smaller for the Li+ and Na+ ions compared with the K+ ion; this suggests that K+ ions will not move as freely through the central channel of the DNA quadruplex. Spin-spin coupling constants and isotropic chemical shifts in G-quartets extracted from crystal structures of K+- and Na+-coordinated DNA quadruplexes were calculated with B3LYP/6-311G(d). The results show that the sizes of the trans-hydrogen-bond couplings are influenced primarily by the hydrogen bond geometry and only slightly by the presence of the ion. The calculations show that the R(N2N7) distance of the N2-H2...N7 hydrogen bond is characterized by strong correlations to both the chemical shifts of the donor group atoms and the (h2)J(N2N7) couplings. In contrast, weaker correlations between the (h3)J(N1C6') couplings and single geometric factors related to the N1-H1...O6=C6 hydrogen bond are observed. As such, deriving geometric information on the hydrogen bond through the use of trans-hydrogen-bond couplings and chemical shifts is more complex for the N1-H1...O6=C6 hydrogen bond than for the N2-H2...N7 moiety. The computed trans-hydrogen-bond couplings are shown to correlate with the experimentally determined couplings. However, the experimental values do not show such strong geometric dependencies.

  15. Hydrogen-bond landscapes, geometry and energetics of squaric acid and its mono- and dianions: a Cambridge Structural Database, IsoStar and computational study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Wood, Peter A; Bardwell, David A

    2013-10-01

    As part of a programme of work to extend central-group coverage in the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre's (CCDC) IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions, we have studied the hydrogen-bonding abilities of squaric acid (H2SQ) and its mono- and dianions (HSQ(-) and SQ(2-)) using the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) along with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations for a range of